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Sample records for imperfect hexagonal lattice

  1. Hexagonal structure of baby Skyrmion lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, Itay; Karliner, Marek

    2008-03-01

    We study the zero-temperature crystalline structure of baby Skyrmions by applying a full-field numerical minimization algorithm to baby Skyrmions placed inside different parallelogramic unit cells and imposing periodic boundary conditions. We find that within this setup, the minimal energy is obtained for the hexagonal lattice, and that in the resulting configuration the Skyrmion splits into quarter Skyrmions. In particular, we find that the energy in the hexagonal case is lower than the one obtained on the well-studied rectangular lattice, in which splitting into half Skyrmions is observed.

  2. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Koukouloyannis, V.; Kourakis, I.

    2009-08-15

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  3. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  4. Multilayer DNA origami packed on hexagonal and hybrid lattices.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels V; Gothelf, Kurt V; Shih, William M

    2012-01-25

    "Scaffolded DNA origami" has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry. Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal-lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close-packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22187940

  5. Lattice-Polarity-Driven Epitaxy of Hexagonal Semiconductor Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Yuan, Ying; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xinqiang; Zheng, Xiantong; Rong, Xin; Wang, Tao; Sheng, Bowen; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Yongqiang; Bian, Lifeng; Yang, Xuelin; Xu, Fujun; Qin, Zhixin; Li, Xinzheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is demonstrated on InN NWs. In-polarity InN NWs form typical hexagonal structure with pyramidal growth front, whereas N-polarity InN NWs slowly turn to the shape of hexagonal pyramid and then convert to an inverted pyramid growth, forming diagonal pyramids with flat surfaces and finally coalescence with each other. This contrary growth behavior driven by lattice-polarity is most likely due to the relatively lower growth rate of the (0001̅) plane, which results from the fact that the diffusion barriers of In and N adatoms on the (0001) plane (0.18 and 1.0 eV, respectively) are about 2-fold larger in magnitude than those on the (0001̅) plane (0.07 and 0.52 eV), as calculated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). The formation of diagonal pyramids for the N-polarity hexagonal NWs affords a novel way to locate quantum dot in the kink position, suggesting a new recipe for the fabrication of dot-based devices. PMID:26694227

  6. Beyond the simple hexagonal Abrikosov vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, D.; Ettouhami, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    In layered superconductors as high-Tc materials but also organic superconductors, chalcogenides and superlattices, the simple concept of an distorted hexagonal lattice of straight vortices becomes unsufficient. Due to anisotropy and short coherence lengths, quite new vortex structures may arise. Some of them, as staircase vortices, simply add a modulation in the direction of vortex lines. This phenomenon is reviewed, together with the resulting lock-in transition, especially when the effects of the layered structure are weak. More exotic structures like a decomposed vortex lattice can also occur in specific situations: they involve two perpendicular sublattices, one parallel and one normal to the layers. We propose that extended defects as twin boundaries or irradiation tracks can trigger such a structure even in moderately anisotropic compounds as Y:123.

  7. Proposal for generating synthetic magnetic fields in hexagonal optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Binbin; Endres, Manuel; Pekker, David

    2015-05-01

    We propose a new approach to generating synthetic magnetic fields in ultra cold atom systems that does not rely on either Raman transitions nor periodic drive. Instead, we consider a hexagonal optical lattice produced by the intersection of three laser beams at 120 degree angles, where the intensity of one or more of the beams is spatially non-uniform. The resulting optical lattice remains hexagonal, but has spatially varying hopping matrix elements. For atoms near the Dirac points, these spatial variations appear as a gauge field, similar to the fictitious gauge field that is induced for for electrons in strained graphene. We suggest that a robust way to generate a gauge field that corresponds to a uniform flux is to aligning three gaussian beams to intersect in an equilateral triangle. Using realistic experimental parameters, we show how the proposed setup can be used to observe cyclotron motion of an atom cloud - the conventional Hall effect and distinct Landau levels - the integer quantum Hall effect.

  8. Discrete solitons and vortices in anisotropic hexagonal and honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoq, Q. E.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Bishop, A. R.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, we consider the self-focusing discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation on hexagonal and honeycomb lattice geometries. Our emphasis is on the study of the effects of anisotropy, motivated by the tunability afforded in recent optical and atomic physics experiments. We find that multi-soliton and discrete vortex states undergo destabilizing bifurcations as the relevant anisotropy control parameter is varied. We quantify these bifurcations by means of explicit analytical calculations of the solutions, as well as of their spectral linearization eigenvalues. Finally, we corroborate the relevant stability picture through direct numerical computations. In the latter, we observe the prototypical manifestation of these instabilities to be the spontaneous rearrangement of the solution, for larger values of the coupling, into localized waveforms typically centered over fewer sites than the original unstable structure. For weak coupling, the instability appears to result in a robust breathing of the relevant waveforms.

  9. Discrete solitons and vortices in anisotropic hexagonal and honeycomb lattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoq, Q. E.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Bishop, A. R.

    2016-01-14

    We consider the self-focusing discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation on hexagonal and honeycomb lattice geometries. Our emphasis is on the study of the effects of anisotropy, motivated by the tunability afforded in recent optical and atomic physics experiments. We find that multi-soliton and discrete vortex states undergo destabilizing bifurcations as the relevant anisotropy control parameter is varied. Furthermore, we quantify these bifurcations by means of explicit analytical calculations of the solutions, as well as of their spectral linearization eigenvalues. Finally, we corroborate the relevant stability picture through direct numerical computations. In the latter, we observe the prototypical manifestation of these instabilitiesmore » to be the spontaneous rearrangement of the solution, for larger values of the coupling, into localized waveforms typically centered over fewer sites than the original unstable structure. In weak coupling, the instability appears to result in a robust breathing of the relevant waveforms.« less

  10. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on lattice imperfections in pyrolytic boron nitride.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Cooley, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Pyrolitic boron nitride was exposed to 310 equivalent sun hours of ultraviolet radiation in a space environment simulator with the objective to evaluate its applicability as a pigment for a thermal control coating and to identify radiation damage using X-ray diffraction techniques. Lattice parameter comparisons show a definite increase in lattice imperfections in the crystal structure resulting from the ultraviolet irradiation. This sensitivity to radiation damage makes pyrolitic boron nitride unsuitable as a pigment for thermal control coating.

  11. Analysis of photonic logic gates based on single hexagonal-lattice photonic crystal ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Junzhen; Qiang, Zexuan; Xu, Xiaofu; Chen, Xiyao

    2011-01-01

    We devised a new configuration of optical logic gates based on a single hexagonal-lattice photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR) composed of two-dimensional (2D) cylindrical silicon rods in air. The modal behavior of the proposed logic gates was comprehensively analyzed with a topology optimization technique based on the principle of beam interference and perturbation theory. It was then numerically verified by using a 2D finite-difference time-domain technique. The predictions have a very good agreement with the numerical results. This new single PCRR can really function as NOT and NOR gates. And the logic ``0'' and ``1'' of the hexagonal ring can be defined as less than 8% and greater than 86%, respectively, much better than earlier reported square-lattice results.

  12. Self-Assembly of Cubes into 2D Hexagonal and Honeycomb Lattices by Hexapolar Capillary Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soligno, Giuseppe; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-06-01

    Particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface induce capillary deformations that determine their orientations and generate mutual capillary interactions which drive them to assemble into 2D ordered structures. We numerically calculate, by energy minimization, the capillary deformations induced by adsorbed cubes for various Young's contact angles. First, we show that capillarity is crucial not only for quantitative, but also for qualitative predictions of equilibrium configurations of a single cube. For a Young's contact angle close to 90°, we show that a single-adsorbed cube generates a hexapolar interface deformation with three rises and three depressions. Thanks to the threefold symmetry of this hexapole, strongly directional capillary interactions drive the cubes to self-assemble into hexagonal or graphenelike honeycomb lattices. By a simple free-energy model, we predict a density-temperature phase diagram in which both the honeycomb and hexagonal lattice phases are present as stable states.

  13. Self-Assembly of Cubes into 2D Hexagonal and Honeycomb Lattices by Hexapolar Capillary Interactions.

    PubMed

    Soligno, Giuseppe; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-06-24

    Particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface induce capillary deformations that determine their orientations and generate mutual capillary interactions which drive them to assemble into 2D ordered structures. We numerically calculate, by energy minimization, the capillary deformations induced by adsorbed cubes for various Young's contact angles. First, we show that capillarity is crucial not only for quantitative, but also for qualitative predictions of equilibrium configurations of a single cube. For a Young's contact angle close to 90°, we show that a single-adsorbed cube generates a hexapolar interface deformation with three rises and three depressions. Thanks to the threefold symmetry of this hexapole, strongly directional capillary interactions drive the cubes to self-assemble into hexagonal or graphenelike honeycomb lattices. By a simple free-energy model, we predict a density-temperature phase diagram in which both the honeycomb and hexagonal lattice phases are present as stable states. PMID:27391753

  14. Effect of large deformation pre-loads on the wave properties of hexagonal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Raj Kumar; Rimoli, Julian; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    We study linear wave propagation in nonlinear hexagonal lattices capable of undergoing large deformations, under different levels of pre-load. The lattices are composed of a set of masses connected by linear axial and angular springs, with the nonlinearity arising solely from geometric effects. By applying different levels of pre-load, the small amplitude linear wave propagation response can be varied from isotropic to highly directional. Analytical expressions for the stiffness of a unit cell in the deformed configuration are derived and they are used to analyze the dispersion surfaces and group velocity variation with pre-load. Numerical simulations on finite lattices demonstrate the validity of our unit cell predictions and illustrate the wave steering potential of our lattice.

  15. Dust Lattice Waves in Two-Dimensional Hexagonal Dust Crystals with an External Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Farokhi, B.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2008-09-07

    The influence of a constant magnetic field on the propagation of dust-lattice (DL) modes in a two-dimensional hexagonal strongly coupled plasma crystal formed by paramagnetic particles is considered. The expression for the wave dispersion relation clearly shows that high-frequency and low-frequency branches exist as a result of the coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes due to the Lorentz force acting on the dust particles.

  16. Single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    An, B.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.; Yoshimura, M.; Egashira, M.; Korai, Y.; Mochida, I.

    2001-06-04

    The electronic structure of a single pentagon in a hexagonal carbon lattice has been revealed on an atomic scale by scanning tunneling microscopy. The pentagon is located at the apex of the conical protuberance of the graphitic particle. The enhanced charge density localized at each carbon atom in the pentagon is identified, and the ringlike pattern of the ({radical}3{times}{radical}3)R30{degree} superstructure of graphite is clearly observed around the pentagon. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Symmetry analysis of translational symmetry broken density waves: Application to hexagonal lattices in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venderbos, J. W. F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we introduce a symmetry classification for electronic density waves which break translational symmetry due to commensurate wave-vector modulations. The symmetry classification builds on the concept of extended point groups: symmetry groups which contain, in addition to the lattice point group, translations that do not map the enlarged unit cell of the density wave to itself, and become "nonsymmorphic"-like elements. Multidimensional representations of the extended point group are associated with degenerate wave vectors. Electronic properties such as (nodal) band degeneracies and topological character can be straightforwardly addressed, and often follow directly. To further flesh out the idea of symmetry, the classification is constructed so as to manifestly distinguish time-reversal invariant charge (i.e., site and bond) order, and time-reversal breaking flux order. For the purpose of this work, we particularize to spin-rotation invariant density waves. As a first example of the application of the classification we consider the density waves of a simple single- and two-orbital square lattice model. The main objective, however, is to apply the classification to two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal lattices, specifically the triangular and the honeycomb lattices. The multicomponent density waves corresponding to the commensurate M -point ordering vectors are worked out in detail. To show that our results generally apply to 2 D hexagonal lattices, we develop a general low-energy SU(3 ) theory of (spinless) saddle-point electrons.

  18. Elastic properties of static charge-stabilized colloidal crystal with two-dimensional hexagonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Y. V.; Batanova, A. A.; Gladkova, E. V.; Dyshlovenko, P. E.; Nagatkin, A. N.; Nizametdinov, A. F.

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional charge-stabilized colloidal crystal with a hexagonal crystal lattice and constant electric potential on the particles is studied numerically. The properties of the crystal are described by the theory based on the Poisson-Boltzmann non-linear differential equation. The force constants and the equilibrium pressure in the crystals are calculated for a broad range of the lattice parameters. The numerical procedures of the force constant and pressure determination is briefly described. Elastic constants of the first and second order are also calculated on the base of the force constants to obtain information about the many-body effective interactions in the system. It was shown that the Cauchy relation between the elastic constants breaks down in the whole range of the lattice parameter especially at higher densities. This can be interpreted as an effect of the many-body effective interaction between the particles in the crystal.

  19. Nematic Liquid Crystal on a Two Dimensional Hexagonal Lattice and its Application

    PubMed Central

    Arslan Shehzad, Muhammad; Hoang Tien, Dung; Waqas Iqbal, M; Eom, Jonghwa; Park, J. H.; Hwang, Chanyong; Seo, Yongho

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the alignment of liquid crystal adsorbed onto graphene and hexagonal boron nitride by using a polarized optical microscope. From the experimental data, it was found that there were 6 different alignment orientations of the liquid crystal molecules on a single crystal substrate. This result has never been reported and is quite different from other previous results. As the hexagonal lattice has a threefold rotational symmetry, three different alignment orientations were expected, but our result seems counter-intuitive. We explain this result considering the bending of the tail of the liquid crystal molecules. Using this anchoring effect with six accurate discrete angles, a novel non-volatile display can be developed with micron-scale pixel size, due to the molecular level accuracy of the alignment. PMID:26290037

  20. Nematic Liquid Crystal on a Two Dimensional Hexagonal Lattice and its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan Shehzad, Muhammad; Hoang Tien, Dung; Waqas Iqbal, M.; Eom, Jonghwa; Park, J. H.; Hwang, Chanyong; Seo, Yongho

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the alignment of liquid crystal adsorbed onto graphene and hexagonal boron nitride by using a polarized optical microscope. From the experimental data, it was found that there were 6 different alignment orientations of the liquid crystal molecules on a single crystal substrate. This result has never been reported and is quite different from other previous results. As the hexagonal lattice has a threefold rotational symmetry, three different alignment orientations were expected, but our result seems counter-intuitive. We explain this result considering the bending of the tail of the liquid crystal molecules. Using this anchoring effect with six accurate discrete angles, a novel non-volatile display can be developed with micron-scale pixel size, due to the molecular level accuracy of the alignment.

  1. Devil's staircase in a quantum dimer model on the hexagonal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Thomas; Misguich, Grégoire; Schlittler, Thiago M.; Vidal, Julien; Mosseri, Rémy

    Quantum dimer models appear in different contexts when describing dynamics in constrained low-energy manifolds, such as for frustrated Ising models in weak transverse fields. In this talk, I address a particularly interesting case, where a quantum dimer model on the hexagonal lattice, in addition to the standard Rokhsar-Kivelson Hamiltonian, includes a competing potential term, counting dimer-free hexagons. It has a rich zero-temperature phase diagram that comprises a cascade of rapidly changing flux quantum numbers (tilt in the height language). This cascade is partially of fractal nature and the model provides, in particular, a microscopic realization of the ``devil's staircase'' scenario [E. Fradkin et al. Phys. Rev. B 69, 224415 (2004)]. We have studied the system by means of quantum Monte-Carlo simulations and the results can be explained using perturbation theory, RG, and variational arguments.References: arXiv:1507.04643, arXiv:1501.02242.

  2. Phase Diagram of an Extended Quantum Dimer Model on the Hexagonal Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlittler, Thiago; Barthel, Thomas; Misguich, Grégoire; Vidal, Julien; Mosseri, Rémy

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a quantum dimer model on the hexagonal lattice that, in addition to the standard three-dimer kinetic and potential terms, includes a competing potential part counting dimer-free hexagons. The zero-temperature phase diagram is studied by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations, supplemented by variational arguments. It reveals some new crystalline phases and a cascade of transitions with rapidly changing flux (tilt in the height language). We analyze perturbatively the vicinity of the Rokhsar-Kivelson point, showing that this model has the microscopic ingredients needed for the "devil's staircase" scenario [Eduardo Fradkin et al. Phys. Rev. B 69, 224415 (2004)], and is therefore expected to produce fractal variations of the ground-state flux.

  3. Nematic Liquid Crystal on a Two Dimensional Hexagonal Lattice and its Application.

    PubMed

    Arslan Shehzad, Muhammad; Hoang Tien, Dung; Waqas Iqbal, M; Eom, Jonghwa; Park, J H; Hwang, Chanyong; Seo, Yongho

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the alignment of liquid crystal adsorbed onto graphene and hexagonal boron nitride by using a polarized optical microscope. From the experimental data, it was found that there were 6 different alignment orientations of the liquid crystal molecules on a single crystal substrate. This result has never been reported and is quite different from other previous results. As the hexagonal lattice has a threefold rotational symmetry, three different alignment orientations were expected, but our result seems counter-intuitive. We explain this result considering the bending of the tail of the liquid crystal molecules. Using this anchoring effect with six accurate discrete angles, a novel non-volatile display can be developed with micron-scale pixel size, due to the molecular level accuracy of the alignment. PMID:26290037

  4. Multi-component quantum gases in spin-dependent hexagonal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltan-Panahi, P.; Struck, J.; Hauke, P.; Bick, A.; Plenkers, W.; Meineke, G.; Becker, C.; Windpassinger, P.; Lewenstein, M.; Sengstock, K.

    2011-05-01

    In solid-state materials, the static and dynamic properties as well as the magnetic and electronic characteristics are crucially influenced by the crystal symmetry. Hexagonal structures play a particularly important role and lead to novel physics, such as that of carbon nanotubes or graphene. Here we report on the realization of ultracold atoms in a spin-dependent optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. We show how the combined effects of the lattice and interactions between atoms lead to a forced antiferromagnetic Néel order when two spin-components localize at different lattice sites. We also demonstrate that the coexistence of two components--one Mott-insulating and the other one superfluid--leads to an interaction-induced modulation of the superfluid density, which is observed spectroscopically. Our studies reveal the vast impact of the interaction-induced modulation on the superfluid-to-Mott-insulator transition. The observations are consistent with theoretical predictions using Gutzwiller mean-field theory.

  5. Magnetic structure and resonance properties of a hexagonal lattice of antidots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, A. I.; Krivoruchko, V. N.

    2012-02-01

    Static and resonance properties of ferromagnetic films with a hexagonal lattice of antidots (pores in the film) were studied. The description of the system is based on micromagnetic modeling and analytical solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. The dependences of ferromagnetic resonance spectra on the in-plane direction of applied magnetic field and on the lattice parameters were investigated. The nature of the dependences of a dynamic system response on the frequency at fixed magnetic fields and on the field at fixed frequency when the field changes were explored. They cause the static magnetic order to change. It was found that the specific peculiarities of the system dynamics remain unchanged for both of these experimental conditions. Namely, for low damping the resonance spectra contain three quasi-homogeneous modes which are due to the resonance of different regions (domains) of the antidot lattice cell. It is shown that the angular field dependences of each mode are characterized by a twofold symmetry, and the related easy axes are mutually rotated by 60 °. As a result, a hexagonal symmetry of the system's static and dynamic magnetic characteristics is realized. The existence in the resonance spectrum of several quasi-homogeneous modes related to different regions of the unit cell could be fundamental for the function of the working elements of magnonics devices.

  6. Hexagonal RMnO3: a model system for two-dimensional triangular lattice antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Sim, Hasung; Oh, Joosung; Jeong, Jaehong; Le, Manh Duc; Park, Je Geun

    2016-02-01

    The hexagonal RMnO3(h-RMnO3) are multiferroic materials, which exhibit the coexistence of a magnetic order and ferroelectricity. Their distinction is in their geometry that both results in an unusual mechanism to break inversion symmetry and also produces a two-dimensional triangular lattice of Mn spins, which is subject to geometrical magnetic frustration due to the antiferromagnetic interactions between nearest-neighbor Mn ions. This unique combination makes the h-RMnO3 a model system to test ideas of spin-lattice coupling, particularly when both the improper ferroelectricity and the Mn trimerization that appears to determine the symmetry of the magnetic structure arise from the same structure distortion. In this review we demonstrate how the use of both neutron and X-ray diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering techniques have been essential to paint this comprehensive and coherent picture of h-RMnO3. PMID:26830792

  7. Conical wave propagation and diffraction in two-dimensional hexagonally packed granular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, C.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear mechanisms for conical wave propagation in two-dimensional lattices are explored in the realm of phononic crystals. As a prototypical example, a statically compressed granular lattice of spherical particles arranged in a hexagonal packing configuration is analyzed. Upon identifying the dispersion relation of the underlying linear problem, the resulting diffraction properties are considered. Analysis both via a heuristic argument for the linear propagation of a wave packet and via asymptotic analysis leading to the derivation of a Dirac system suggests the occurrence of conical diffraction. This analysis is valid for strong precompression, i.e., near the linear regime. For weak precompression, conical wave propagation is still possible, but the resulting expanding circular wave front is of a nonoscillatory nature, resulting from the complex interplay among the discreteness, nonlinearity, and geometry of the packing. The transition between these two types of propagation is explored.

  8. Conical wave propagation and diffraction in two-dimensional hexagonally packed granular lattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chong, C.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-25

    We explore linear and nonlinear mechanisms for conical wave propagation in two-dimensional lattices in the realm of phononic crystals. As a prototypical example, a statically compressed granular lattice of spherical particles arranged in a hexagonal packing configuration is analyzed. Upon identifying the dispersion relation of the underlying linear problem, the resulting diffraction properties are considered. Analysis both via a heuristic argument for the linear propagation of a wave packet and via asymptotic analysis leading to the derivation of a Dirac system suggests the occurrence of conical diffraction. This analysis is valid for strong precompression, i.e., near the linear regime. Formore » weak precompression, conical wave propagation is still possible, but the resulting expanding circular wave front is of a nonoscillatory nature, resulting from the complex interplay among the discreteness, nonlinearity, and geometry of the packing. Lastly, the transition between these two types of propagation is explored.« less

  9. Competing magnetic orderings and tunable topological states in two-dimensional hexagonal organometallic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Li, Chaokai; Feng, Ji; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of topological states is of significant fundamental and practical importance in contemporary condensed matter physics, for which the extension to two-dimensional (2D) organometallic systems is particularly attractive. Using first-principles calculations, we show that a 2D hexagonal triphenyl-lead lattice composed of only main group elements is susceptible to a magnetic instability, characterized by a considerably more stable antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulating state rather than the topologically nontrivial quantum spin Hall state proposed recently. Even though this AFM phase is topologically trivial, it possesses an intricate emergent degree of freedom, defined by the product of spin and valley indices, leading to Berry curvature-induced spin and valley currents under electron or hole doping. Furthermore, such a trivial band insulator can be tuned into a topologically nontrivial matter by the application of an out-of-plane electric field, which destroys the AFM order, favoring instead ferrimagnetic spin ordering and a quantum anomalous Hall state with a nonzero topological invariant. These findings further enrich our understanding of 2D hexagonal organometallic lattices for potential applications in spintronics and valleytronics.

  10. What are the possible moiré patterns of graphene on hexagonally packed surfaces? Universal solution for hexagonal coincidence lattices, derived by a geometric construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Patrick; Günther, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    We present a systematic investigation of two coinciding lattices and their spatial beating frequencies that lead to the formation of moiré patterns. A mathematical model was developed and applied for the case of a hexagonally arranged adsorbate on a hexagonal support lattice. In particular, it describes the moiré patterns observed for graphene grown on a hexagonally arranged transition metal surface, a system that serves as one of the promising synthesis routes for the formation of this highly wanted material. The presented model uses a geometric construction that derives analytic expressions for first and higher order beating frequencies occurring for arbitrarily oriented graphene on the underlying substrate lattice. By solving the corresponding equations, we predict the size and orientation of the resulting moiré pattern. Adding the constraints for commensurability delivers further solvable analytic equations that predict whether or not first or higher order commensurable phases occur. We explicitly treat the case for first, second and third order commensurable phases. The universality of our approach is tested by comparing our data with moiré patterns that are experimentally observed for graphene on Ir(111) and on Pt(111). Our analysis can be applied for graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), or other sp2-networks grown on any hexagonally packed support surface predicting the size, orientation and properties of the resulting moiré patterns. In particular, we can determine which commensurate phases are expected for these systems. The derived information can be used to critically discuss the moiré phases reported in the literature.

  11. Size dependence of bandgaps in a two-dimensional plasmonic crystal with a hexagonal lattice.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hikaru; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    The optical properties of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are investigated at the Г point in a two-dimensional plasmonic crystal with a hexagonal lattice (Hex-PlC). The cathodoluminescence (CL) technique combined with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) are used to produce spectral images of the SPP standing waves at the Г point and identify the four types of band-edge modes predicted by group theory. The systematic measurement of the band-edge energies employed here is used to determine the characteristic dependence of each band-edge mode on the structure parameters, which provides some criteria for the design of plasmonic devices with Hex-PlCs. PMID:25836118

  12. Chiral phonons at high-symmetry points in monolayer hexagonal lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifa; Niu, Qian

    2015-09-11

    In monolayer hexagonal lattices, the intravalley and intervalley scattering of electrons can involve chiral phonons at Brillouin-zone center and corners, respectively. At these high-symmetry points, there is a threefold rotational symmetry endowing phonon eigenmodes with a quantized pseudoangular momentum, which includes orbital and spin parts. Conservation of pseudoangular momentum yields selection rules for intravalley and intervalley scattering of electrons by phonons. Concrete predictions of helicity-resolved optical phenomena are made on monolayer molybdenum disulfide. The chiral phonons at Brillouin-zone corners excited by polarized photons can be detected by a valley phonon Hall effect. The chiral phonons, together with phonon circular polarization, phonon pseudoangular momentum, selection rules, and valley phonon Hall effect will extend the basis for valley-based electronics and phononics applications in the future. PMID:26406841

  13. Chiral Phonons at High-Symmetry Points in Monolayer Hexagonal Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifa; Niu, Qian

    2015-09-01

    In monolayer hexagonal lattices, the intravalley and intervalley scattering of electrons can involve chiral phonons at Brillouin-zone center and corners, respectively. At these high-symmetry points, there is a threefold rotational symmetry endowing phonon eigenmodes with a quantized pseudoangular momentum, which includes orbital and spin parts. Conservation of pseudoangular momentum yields selection rules for intravalley and intervalley scattering of electrons by phonons. Concrete predictions of helicity-resolved optical phenomena are made on monolayer molybdenum disulfide. The chiral phonons at Brillouin-zone corners excited by polarized photons can be detected by a valley phonon Hall effect. The chiral phonons, together with phonon circular polarization, phonon pseudoangular momentum, selection rules, and valley phonon Hall effect will extend the basis for valley-based electronics and phononics applications in the future.

  14. Validation of KENO-VI: A comparison with hexagonal lattice light-water-reactor critical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenwalter, J.J.

    1998-06-01

    The KENO-VI Monte Carlo code, released with Version 4.3 of the SCALE Code System, provides the capability to model more complex geometries than previously allowed by KENO-V.a. One significant improvement is the simplistic specification of hexprism unit cells and hexagonal arrays, an arduous task to complete in KENO-V.a. This report documents the validation of KENO-VI against 30 critical experiments consisting of low enriched uranium, light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods in hexagonal lattices with no poisons. The reference, enrichment, pitch, cladding, and core identification of the experiments are given. The results indicate that KENO-VI accurately calculates these critical experiments, with a bias of {minus}0.51% for the 238 group cross section library and {minus}0.24% for the 44 group cross section library. If these biases are properly taken into account, the KENO-VI code can be used with confidence for the design and safety analysis of storage and transportation systems of similar LWR type fuels.

  15. Interatomic correlations moments of atoms in the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice by using Morse and Lenard-Jones potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Clóves G.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we investigate the interatomic correlation moments in two-dimensional model of a weakly anharmonic crystal (i.e., not very high temperatures) with hexagonal lattice, using the Correlative Method of Unsymmetrized Self-Consistent Field (CUSF). The numerical results are obtained (and compared) by using the Morse and Lenard-Jones potentials.

  16. Two-dimensional XXZ -Ising model on a square-hexagon lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, J. S.; Rojas, Onofre; de Souza, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    We study a two-dimensional XXZ -Ising model on a square-hexagon (denoted for simplicity by 4-6) lattice with spin 1/2. The phase diagram at zero temperature is discussed, where five states are found, two types of ferrimagnetic states, two types of antiferromagnetic states, and one ferromagnetic state. To solve this model, we have mapped onto the eight-vertex model with union Jack interaction term, and it was verified that the model cannot be completely mapped onto eight-vertex model. However, by imposing an exact solution condition, we have found the region where the XXZ -Ising model on 4-6 lattice is exactly soluble with one free parameter, particularly for the case of symmetric eight-vertex model condition. In this manner we have explored the properties of the system and have analyzed the interacting competition parameters which preserve the region where there is an exact solution. Unfortunately the present model does not satisfy the free fermion condition of the eight-vertex model, unless for a trivial solution. Even so, we are able to discuss the critical point region, beyond the region of exact resolvability.

  17. Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides with a hexagonal lattice: Room-temperature quantum spin Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yandong; Kou, Liangzhi; Li, Xiao; Dai, Ying; Heine, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    So far, several transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC)-based two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) have been discovered, all of them based on a tetragonal lattice. However, in 2D crystals, the hexagonal rather than the tetragonal symmetry is the most common motif. Here, based on first principles calculations, we propose a class of stable 2D TMDCs of composition MX2(M =Mo ,W ;X =S ,Se ,Te ) with a hexagonal lattice. They are all in the same stability range as other 2D TMDC allotropes that have been demonstrated experimentally, and they are identified to be practical 2D TIs with large band gaps ranging from 41 to 198 meV, making them suitable for applications at room temperature. Besides, in contrast to tetragonal 2D TMDCs, their hexagonal lattice will greatly facilitate the integration of theses novel TI state van der Waals crystals with other hexagonal or honeycomb materials and thus provide a route for 2D material-based devices for wider nanoelectronic and spintronic applications. The nontrivial band gaps of both WS e2 and WT e2 2D crystals are 198 meV, which are larger than that in any previously reported TMDC-based TIs. These large band gaps entirely stem from the strong spin orbit coupling strength within the d orbitals of Mo/W atoms near the Fermi level. Our findings broaden the scientific and technological impact of both 2D TIs and TMDCs.

  18. Study on hexagonal super-lattice pattern with surface discharges in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying; Dong, Lifang Niu, Xuejiao; Gao, Yenan; Zhang, Chao

    2015-10-15

    The hexagonal super-lattice pattern with surface discharges (SDs) in dielectric barrier discharge is investigated by intensified charge-coupled device. The pattern is composed of the bright spot and the dim spot which is located at the centroid of surrounding other three bright spots. The phase diagram of the pattern as a function of the gas pressure and the argon concentration is given. The instantaneous images indicate that the bright spot emerging at the front of the current pulse is formed by the volume discharge (VD), and dim spot occurring at the tail of the current pulse is formed by the SD. The above result shows that the SD is induced by the VD. The simulation of the electric fields of wall charges accumulated by VDs confirms that the dim spot is formed by the confluences of the SDs of surrounding other three bright spots. By using optical emission spectrum method, both the molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the SD are larger than that of the VD.

  19. Hofstadter butterfly and quantum transport in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride from multiscale lattice simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, Nicolas; Martinez-Gordillo, Rafael; MacDonald, Allan; Jung, Jeil

    Clear signatures of the Hofstadter butterfly have been experimentally observed in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (G/BN), thanks to an appropriate balance between the length scale and the quality of the moiré superlattices. During this talk, I will present a methodology to map the continuum moiré pattern of incommensurable G/BN crystals obtained from ab initio calculations onto supercell lattice tight-binding Hamiltonians. Using efficient Lanczos recursion techniques for simulating large scale systems containing millions of atoms, the density of states and the dc conductivity are obtained as a function of energy or carrier density and magnetic field. The calculated Hofstadter butterflies and Landau fan diagrams show that the site potential variations, the mass, and substantial virtual strain contributions that appear even in the absence of real strains in the band Hamiltonian sensitively affect the electron-hole asymmetry, the gaps at the secondary Dirac points, as well as the tertiary features that appear at high-carrier densities.

  20. Study on hexagonal super-lattice pattern with surface discharges in dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Dong, Lifang; Niu, Xuejiao; Gao, Yenan; Zhang, Chao

    2015-10-01

    The hexagonal super-lattice pattern with surface discharges (SDs) in dielectric barrier discharge is investigated by intensified charge-coupled device. The pattern is composed of the bright spot and the dim spot which is located at the centroid of surrounding other three bright spots. The phase diagram of the pattern as a function of the gas pressure and the argon concentration is given. The instantaneous images indicate that the bright spot emerging at the front of the current pulse is formed by the volume discharge (VD), and dim spot occurring at the tail of the current pulse is formed by the SD. The above result shows that the SD is induced by the VD. The simulation of the electric fields of wall charges accumulated by VDs confirms that the dim spot is formed by the confluences of the SDs of surrounding other three bright spots. By using optical emission spectrum method, both the molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the SD are larger than that of the VD.

  1. CO/sub 2/ laser processing of diffusion induced lattice imperfections in silicon: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.B.; Geist, G.A.; Young, R.T.; Christie, W.H.; Greulich, F.A.

    1987-10-01

    The high-temperature diffusion of phosphorus into crystalline silicon causes the formation of electrically inactive phosphorus-rich precipitates near the surface. These precipitates decrease the carrier lifetime and mobility in the diffused layer, and thus lead to less than optimal diode characteristics of electrical junctions formed by diffusion of phosphorus into a p-type substrate. We show that the free-carrier absorption of a CO/sub 2/ laser pulse can be used to completely dissolve the precipitates and remove dislocations in the diffused layer. Furthermore, we find that there are distinct advantages in depositing the pulse energy by way of free-carrier transitions, since the energy can be preferentially deposited in either confined doped layers or diffusion wells that are surrounded by lightly doped material. Our transmission electron microscopy results show that the annealing of the extended lattice defects is caused by melting of the near-surface region and subsequent liquid-phase epitaxial regrowth. Van der Pauw measurements are used to study the carrier concentration, mobility, and sheet resistivity of the samples before and after laser irradiation. The results of the electrical measurements show that there is a large increase in the carrier concentrations and a corresponding drop in the sheet resistivities of the laser irradiated samples. Using a Fourier transform

  2. Combined first-order reversal curve and x-ray microscopy investigation of magnetization reversal mechanisms in hexagonal antidot lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Joachim; Weigand, Markus; Stahl, Claudia; Träger, Nick; Kopp, Michael; Schütz, Gisela; Goering, Eberhard J.; Haering, Felix; Ziemann, Paul; Wiedwald, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    The magnetization reversal in nanoscaled antidot lattices is widely investigated to understand the tunability of the magnetic anisotropy and the coercive field through nanostructuring of thin films. By investigating highly ordered focused ion beam milled antidot lattices with a combination of first-order reversal curves and magnetic x-ray microscopy, we fully elucidate the magnetization reversal along the distinct orientations of a hexagonal antidot lattice. This combination proves especially powerful as all partial steps of this complex magnetization reversal can be identified and subsequently imaged. Through this approach we discovered several additional steps that were neglected in previous studies. Furthermore, by imaging the microscopic magnetization state during each reversal step, we were able to link the coercive and interaction fields determined by the first-order reversal curve method to true microscopic magnetization configurations and determine their origin.

  3. Imperfect Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Katherine

    This unit provides visual activities to engage students in learning the imperfect tense in Spanish. Upon completion of the unit, students will be able to do the following: identify imperfect tense conjugation in children's books; conjugate verbs in the imperfect tense; list uses of the imperfect tense; discriminate between the imperfect tense and…

  4. An exact solution for the steady state phase distribution in an array of oscillators coupled on a hexagonal lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    When electronic oscillators are coupled to nearest neighbors to form an array on a hexagonal lattice, the planar phase distributions desired for excitation of a phased array antenna are not steady state solutions of the governing non-linear equations describing the system. Thus the steady state phase distribution deviates from planar. It is shown to be possible to obtain an exact solution for the steady state phase distribution and thus determine the deviation from the desired planar distribution as a function of beam steering angle.

  5. Discrete Sommerfeld diffraction problems on hexagonal lattice with a zigzag semi-infinite crack and rigid constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Basant Lal

    2015-12-01

    Diffraction problems, associated with waves scattered by a semi-infinite crack and rigid constraint, in a hexagonal (honeycomb) lattice model, with nearest neighbor interactions, are solved exactly using the method of Wiener and Hopf. Asymptotic expressions for the scattered waves in far field are provided for both problems, by application of the method of stationary phase to corresponding diffraction integrals. Additionally, for the crack diffraction problem, bond lengths on the semi-infinite row complementing the crack, as well as the crack opening displacement, are provided in closed form except for the presence of concomitant Fourier coefficients of the Wiener-Hopf kernel. For the rigid constraint diffraction problem, the solution on the semi-infinite row complementing the constrained lattice sites, as well as that adjacent to the constrained row, are provided in similar closed form. The amplitude, as well as phase, of waves in far field is compared, through graphical plots, with that of a numerical solution on finite grid. Also, the analytical solution for few sites near the tip of each defect is compared with numerical solution. Both discrete Sommerfeld diffraction problems and their solutions are also relevant to numerical solution of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation using a 4-point hexagonal grid, besides having applications inherent to the scattering of waves on a honeycomb structure.

  6. Lattice dynamics, electronic structure, and optical properties of LiBeSb: A hexagonal ABC-type hyperferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jian-Qing; Zhu, Jian-Hui; Xu, Jie-Wang

    2016-07-01

    The recently discovered hexagonal ABC-type hyperferroelectrics, in which the polarization persists in the presence of the depolarization filed, exhibit a variety of intriguing and potentially useful properties [Garrity et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 127601 (2014)]. For the existing prototype of LiBeSb, we present detailed first-principles calculations concerning the lattice dynamics, electronic structure, and optical properties. An unstable longitudinal optic mode in the high-symmetry structure and a large polarization of 0.5 C/m2 in the polar phase are reported, including the remarkable dependence of Born effective charges on structural distortion. Using the HSE06 hybrid functional, we predict that LiBeSb has a small band-gap of 1.5 eV and shows dominant asymmetric covalent bonding character. Importantly, we find that there are remarkable absorptions in the whole visible spectrum. These features, combined with the enhanced carrier mobility, make LiBeSb as well as the whole family of hexagonal ABC-type hyperferroelectrics as promising candidates for ferroelectric photovoltaic materials with large bulk photovoltaic effect in the visible spectrum.

  7. Ordering of Sphere Forming SISO Tetrablock Terpolymers on a Simple Hexagonal Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingwen; Sides, Scott; Bates, Frank S.

    2012-03-15

    Hexagonally ordered spherical and cylindrical morphologies (P{sub 6}/mmm and P{sub 6}/mm space group symmetries) have been identified in bulk poly(styrene-b-isoprene-b-styrene-b-ethylene oxide) (SISO) tetrablock terpolymers. These materials were synthesized by adding up to 32% by volume O blocks to a parent hydroxy-terminated SIS triblock copolymer containing 40% S by volume, and the resulting morphologies were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical spectroscopy. Disordered, spherical and cylindrical phases were documented with increasing O content, where both ordered states exhibit hexagonal symmetry. Theoretical calculations based on a numerical self-consistent field theory for polymers provide crucial insights into the molecular configurations associated with these morphologies. These results offer a new approach to independently control domain shape and packing in block copolymer melts through manipulation of the magnitude and sequencing of the binary segment-segment interactions ({chi}{sub SI} {<=} {chi}{sub SO} << {chi}{sub IO}), which dictate core segregation and the effective interdomain interactions.

  8. STEAM LINE BREAK AND STATION BLACKOUT TRANSIENTS FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANT HEXAGONAL TIGHT LATTICE BWR.

    SciTech Connect

    ROHATGI,U.S.; JO,J.; CHUNG,B.D.; TAKAHASHI,H.

    2002-06-09

    Safety analyses of a proliferation resistant, economically competitive, high conversion, boiling water reactor (HCBWR) fueled with fissile plutonium and fertile thorium oxide fuel elements, and with passive safety systems are presented here. The HCBWR developed here is characterized by a very tight lattice with a relatively small water volume fraction in the core which therefore operates with a fast reactor neutron spectrum, and a considerably improved neutron economy compared to the current generation of Light Water Reactors. The tight lattice core has a very narrow flow channels with a hydraulic diameter less than half of the regular BWR core and, thus, presents a special challenge to core cooling, because of reduced water inventory and high friction in the core. The primary safety concern when reducing the moderator to fuel ratio and when using a tightly packed lattice arrangement is to maintain adequate cooling of the core during both normal operation and accident scenarios. In the preliminary HCBWR design, the core has been placed in a vessel with a large chimney section, and the vessel is connected with Isolation Condenser System (ICs). The vessel is placed in containment with Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in a configuration similar to General Electric's Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). The safety systems are similar to SBWR; ICs and PCCS are scaled with power. An internal recirculation pump was placed in the downcomer to augment the buoyancy head provided by the chimney, since the buoyancy provided by the chimney alone could not generate sufficient recirculation in the vessel as the tight lattice configuration resulted in much larger friction in the core than the SBWR. The constitutive relationships for RELAP5 were assessed for narrow channels, and as a result the heat transfer package was modified. The modified RELAP5 was used to simulate and analyze two of the most limiting events for a tight

  9. Phase stability and magnetic behavior of hexagonal phase of N2-O2 system with kagome lattice under high pressure and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akahama, Y.; Ishihara, D.; Yamashita, H.; Fujihisa, H.; Hirao, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The pressure-temperature (P -T ) phase diagram of N2-O2 mixture with a composition of N2-48 mol % O2 has been investigated using x-ray diffraction and the phase stability of a hexagonal phase (space group: P 6 /mmm), with the kagome lattice examined under high-pressure and low-temperature conditions. While the phase appears as a low-temperature phase of the cubic phase (P m 3 n ) with the structure of γ -O2 or δ -N2 and is stable in a wide range of pressures and temperatures, it transforms to lower symmetry monoclinic or orthorhombic phases at lower temperature, accompanied with a distortion of the kagome lattice. Based on Rietveld refinements, the monoclinic and orthorhombic phases are found to be in the P 21/a and Cmmm space groups, respectively. In magnetization measurements, a magnetic transition is observed with a relatively large drop of magnetization, corresponding to the cubic-to-hexagonal phase transition. This suggests that the hexagonal phase has a certain magnetic ordered state that arises from the molecular magnetic moment of O2.

  10. Graphene as a hexagonal 2-lattice: Evaluation of the in-plane material constants for the linear theory. A multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfyris, D.; Koukaras, E. N.; Pugno, N.; Galiotis, C.

    2015-08-01

    Continuum modeling of free-standing graphene monolayer, viewed as a two dimensional 2-lattice, requires specification of the components of the shift vector that acts as an auxiliary variable. If only in-plane motions are considered, the energy depends on an in-plane strain measure and the shift vector. The assumption of geometrical and material linearity leads to quadratic energy terms with respect to the shift vector, the strain tensor, and their combinations. Graphene's hexagonal symmetry reduces the number of independent moduli then to four. We evaluate these four material parameters using molecular calculations and the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order potential and compare them with standard linear elastic constitutive modeling. The results of our calculations show that the predicted values are in reasonable agreement with those obtained solely from our molecular calculations as well as those from the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to measure mechanical properties when graphene is modeled as a hexagonal 2-lattice. This work targets at the continuum scale when the insight measurements come from finer scales using atomistic simulations.

  11. Graphene as a hexagonal 2-lattice: Evaluation of the in-plane material constants for the linear theory. A multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sfyris, D. E-mail: dsfyris@sfyris.net; Koukaras, E. N.; Pugno, N.; Galiotis, C.

    2015-08-21

    Continuum modeling of free-standing graphene monolayer, viewed as a two dimensional 2-lattice, requires specification of the components of the shift vector that acts as an auxiliary variable. If only in-plane motions are considered, the energy depends on an in-plane strain measure and the shift vector. The assumption of geometrical and material linearity leads to quadratic energy terms with respect to the shift vector, the strain tensor, and their combinations. Graphene's hexagonal symmetry reduces the number of independent moduli then to four. We evaluate these four material parameters using molecular calculations and the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order potential and compare them with standard linear elastic constitutive modeling. The results of our calculations show that the predicted values are in reasonable agreement with those obtained solely from our molecular calculations as well as those from the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to measure mechanical properties when graphene is modeled as a hexagonal 2-lattice. This work targets at the continuum scale when the insight measurements come from finer scales using atomistic simulations.

  12. [Study on Hexagonal Super-Lattice Pattern with Light Spot and Dim Spot in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Dong, Li-fang; Niu, Xue-jiao; Zhang, Chao

    2016-02-01

    The hexagonal super-lattice pattern composed of the light spot and the dim spot is firstly observed and investigated in the discharge of gas mixture of air and argon by using the dielectric barrier discharge device with double water electrodes. It is found that the dim spot is located at the center of its surrounding three light spots by observing the discharge image. Obviously, the brightness of the light spot and the dim spot are different, which indicates that the plasma states of the light spot and the dim spot may be different. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the light spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the light spot and the dim spot are calculated. Based on the relative intensity ratio of the line at 391.4 nm and the N₂ line at 394.1 nm, the average electron energies of the light spot and the dim spot are investigated. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the light spot and the dim spot. The experiment shows that the molecule vibration temperature, average electron energy and the electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the light spot in the same argon content. The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the light spot and dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 70% to 95%, while average electron energies of the light spot and dim spot decrease gradually. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the decisive effect on the formation of the dim spot. The experiment above plays an important role in studying the formation mechanism of the hexagonal super-lattice pattern with light spot and

  13. Defects in bilayer silica and graphene: common trends in diverse hexagonal two-dimensional systems

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Torbjörn; Kurasch, Simon; Lehtinen, Ossi; Kotakoski, Jani; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Srivastava, Anchal; Skakalova, Viera; Smet, Jurgen H.; Kaiser, Ute; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    2013-01-01

    By combining first-principles and classical force field calculations with aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments, we study the morphology and energetics of point and extended defects in hexagonal bilayer silica and make comparison to graphene, another two-dimensional (2D) system with hexagonal symmetry. We show that the motifs of isolated point defects in these 2D structures with otherwise very different properties are similar, and include Stone-Wales-type defects formed by structural unit rotations, flower defects and reconstructed double vacancies. The morphology and energetics of extended defects, such as grain boundaries have much in common as well. As both sp2-hybridised carbon and bilayer silica can also form amorphous structures, our results indicate that the morphology of imperfect 2D honeycomb lattices is largely governed by the underlying symmetry of the lattice. PMID:24336488

  14. Evolution of lattice dynamics in ferroelectric hexagonal REInO3 (RE = Ho, Dy, Tb, Gd, Eu, Sm) perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Barnita; Chatterjee, Swastika; Gop, Sumana; Roy, Anushree; Grover, Vinita; Shukla, Rakesh; Tyagi, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    Rare-earth indates emerge as one of the efficient geometric ferroelectric materials, in which the spontaneous polarization can be tuned by varying their crystal structure along the 4f rare-earth series. We report a systematic study of structural changes in hexagonal REInO3 perovskite (RE = Ho3+, Dy3+, Tb3+, Gd3+, Eu3+, Sm3+) and YInO3 of P63 cm space group by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman scattering measurements. The crystal structure of these materials could be investigated by the Rietveld refinement of their XRD patterns. We have calculated density of states of phonons using density functional theory and examined the atomic displacements corresponding to observed Raman modes. The evolution of lattice dynamics of REInO3 has been probed by correlating various Raman modes with the structural distortion of the unit cell and the characteristics of the rare-earth ions. We report the appearance of the coupled mode in the phonon spectra. We have estimated spontaneous polarization from the structural distortion in this system and shown that it can be modulated by varying RE3+ ions in REInO3. We also report the appearance of a ferroelectric soft Raman mode, a unique characteristic of these materials.

  15. Irregularities in Imperfective Derivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Maurice I.

    1977-01-01

    This article discusses presentation of Russian conjugation via the one-stem system advocated by Lipson and Townsend, and attempts a more unified and complete presentation of irregularities in imperfect derivation. Two major irregularities are occurrence of an unexpected suffix and unpredictable alternation in the root of the derived imperfective.…

  16. Imperfection Insensitive Thin Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xin

    The buckling of axially compressed cylindrical shells and externally pressurized spherical shells is extremely sensitive to even very small geometric imperfections. In practice this issue is addressed by either using overly conservative knockdown factors, while keeping perfect axial or spherical symmetry, or adding closely and equally spaced stiffeners on shell surface. The influence of imperfection-sensitivity is mitigated, but the shells designed from these approaches are either too heavy or very expensive and are still sensitive to imperfections. Despite their drawbacks, these approaches have been used for more than half a century. This thesis proposes a novel method to design imperfection-insensitive cylindrical shells subject to axial compression. Instead of following the classical paths, focused on axially symmetric or high-order rotationally symmetric cross-sections, the method in this thesis adopts optimal symmetry-breaking wavy cross-sections (wavy shells). The avoidance of imperfection sensitivity is achieved by searching with an evolutionary algorithm for smooth cross-sectional shapes that maximize the minimum among the buckling loads of geometrically perfect and imperfect wavy shells. It is found that the shells designed through this approach can achieve higher critical stresses and knockdown factors than any previously known monocoque cylindrical shells. It is also found that these shells have superior mass efficiency to almost all previously reported stiffened shells. Experimental studies on a design of composite wavy shell obtained through the proposed method are presented in this thesis. A method of making composite wavy shells and a photogrametry technique of measuring full-field geometric imperfections have been developed. Numerical predictions based on the measured geometric imperfections match remarkably well with the experiments. Experimental results confirm that the wavy shells are not sensitive to imperfections and can carry axial compression

  17. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  18. Imperfect Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  19. Hexagons of the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhauser, Beth; Porter, Dave

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the international interdependence Hexagon Project for Haiti which invites students, ages five through eighteen, to create an image within a hexagonal template and respond to big questions surrounding a global culture of interdependence. The hexagon is a visual metaphor for interdependence, with its potential to infinitely…

  20. Equivalent Imperfections In Arched Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallemule, Marian

    2015-09-01

    There are currently three design methods to verify the in-plane buckling of an arched structure: substitute member method, the method of equivalent imperfection with recommendations for arched bridges, and the equivalent unique global and local initial imperfection method (EUGLI), which uses the critical elastic buckling mode as an imperfection. The latter method is included in the EN 1993-1-1 cl. 5.3.2 (11) since 2002; however, to this day it is neither utilized in the design practice nor is it incorporated in ordinary structural analysis software. The main purpose of this article is to show the application of the proposed methods in a step-by-step manner to the numerical example considered and to compare these design methods for various arched structures. Verification of the in-plane buckling of an arch is explained in detail.

  1. Insertion of lattice strains into ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel by mechanical stress: A comparison of perfect versus imperfect structures as a cathode for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Naito, Makio

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-doped lithium manganese oxide, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, has received much attention as a cathode active material in high-energy lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). This active material has two different spinel structures depending on the ordering state of the Ni and Mn ions. The ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel has an inferior cathode performance than the disordered phase because of its poor electronic conductivity. However, the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel possesses the potential advantage of avoiding dissolution of the Mn ion, which is an issue for the disordered spinel. The improvement of cathode performance is important for future applications. Here, we report a unique approach to improve the cathode performance of the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel. The mechanical treatment using an attrition-type mill successfully inserted lattice strains into the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel structure without a phase transformation to the disordered phase. The insertion of lattice strains by mechanical stresses provided an increased discharge capacity and a decreased charge transfer resistance. This limited crystal structure modification improved the cathode performance. The present work has the potential for application of the mechanically treated ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel as a cathode for high-energy LIBs.

  2. Competing structures in two dimensions: Square-to-hexagonal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gränz, Barbara; Korshunov, Sergey E.; Geshkenbein, Vadim B.; Blatter, Gianni

    2016-08-01

    We study a system of particles in two dimensions interacting via a dipolar long-range potential D /r3 and subject to a square-lattice substrate potential V (r ) with amplitude V and lattice constant b . The isotropic interaction favors a hexagonal arrangement of the particles with lattice constant a , which competes against the square symmetry of the underlying substrate lattice. We determine the minimal-energy states at fixed external pressure p generating the commensurate density n =1 /b2=(4/3 ) 1 /2/a2 in the absence of thermal and quantum fluctuations, using both analytical techniques based on the harmonic and continuum elastic approximations as well as numerical relaxation of particle configurations. At large substrate amplitude V >0.2 eD, with eD=D /b3 the dipolar energy scale, the particles reside in the substrate minima and hence arrange in a square lattice. Upon decreasing V , the square lattice turns unstable with respect to a zone-boundary shear mode and deforms into a period-doubled zigzag lattice. Analytic and numerical results show that this period-doubled phase in turn becomes unstable at V ≈0.074 eD towards a nonuniform phase developing an array of domain walls or solitons; as the density of solitons increases, the particle arrangement approaches that of a rhombic (or isosceles triangular) lattice. At a yet smaller substrate value estimated as V ≈0.046 eD, a further solitonic transition establishes a second nonuniform phase which smoothly approaches the hexagonal (or equilateral triangular) lattice phase with vanishing amplitude V . At small but finite amplitude V , the hexagonal phase is distorted and hexatically locked at an angle of φ ≈3 .8∘ with respect to the substrate lattice. The square-to-hexagonal transformation in this two-dimensional commensurate-incommensurate system thus involves a complex pathway with various nontrivial lattice- and modulated phases.

  3. Hexagon solar power panel

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Irwin

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy panel comprises a support upon which silicon cells are arrayed. The cells are wafer thin and of two geometrical types, both of the same area and electrical rating, namely hexagon cells and hourglass cells. The hourglass cells are composites of half hexagons. A near perfect nesting relationship of the cells achieves a high density packing whereby optimum energy production per panel area is achieved.

  4. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals.

    PubMed

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C H; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S; Robinson, Joseph S; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N

    2016-02-11

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed--and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins--they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing. PMID

  5. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals

    PubMed Central

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Lourdu Xavier, Paulraj; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are predominantly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation is access to high-quality crystals, to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields sufficiently high-resolution information that the crystal structure can be solved. The observation that crystals with shrunken unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks1,2 hints that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity but rather by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern, equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid single molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and hence with an increased information content3. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed—and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins4 —they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5 Å limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to directly phase5 the pattern. With the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 Å as a constraint, we then obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at 3.5 Å resolution. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome long-supposed resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, with a method that puts great value in commonly encountered imperfect crystals and opens up the possibility for model-free phasing6,7. PMID:26863980

  6. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed—and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins—they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing.

  7. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition. PMID:26550724

  8. Critical Surface of the Hexagonal Polygon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmett, Geoffrey R.; Li, Zhongyang

    2016-05-01

    The hexagonal polygon model arises in a natural way via a transformation of the 1-2 model on the hexagonal lattice, and it is related to the high temperature expansion of the Ising model. There are three types of edge, and three corresponding parameters α ,β ,γ >0. By studying the long-range order of a certain two-edge correlation function, it is shown that the parameter space (0,∞)^3 may be divided into subcritical and supercritical regions, separated by critical surfaces satisfying an explicitly known formula. This result complements earlier work on the Ising model and the 1-2 model. The proof uses the Pfaffian representation of Fisher, Kasteleyn, and Temperley for the counts of dimers on planar graphs.

  9. Seismic response of LMFBR tanks with imperfections

    SciTech Connect

    Gvildys, J.; Ma, D.C.; Chang, Y.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with seismic responses of imperfect circular tanks. Physical imperfection due to manufacturing tolerances and numerical imperfection due to finite element spatial discretization are described. Numerical imperfections produced by 4-node and 9-node Lagrangian shell elements are examined. A convergence study is performed in which the number of the shell elements required to capture the dominant ''out-of-roundness'' modes under seismic excitations is determined. The response of a shell with a cos4theta imperfection due to manufacturing tolerances is compared with that of a perfect circular shell to demonstrate the effects of imperfection on the axial stresses of the shell under seismic conditions. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Imperfect Cloning Operations in Algebraic Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    No-cloning theorem says that there is no unitary operation that makes perfect clones of non-orthogonal quantum states. The objective of the present paper is to examine whether an imperfect cloning operation exists or not in a C*-algebraic framework. We define a universal -imperfect cloning operation which tolerates a finite loss of fidelity in the cloned state, and show that an individual system's algebra of observables is abelian if and only if there is a universal -imperfect cloning operation in the case where the loss of fidelity is less than . Therefore in this case no universal -imperfect cloning operation is possible in algebraic quantum theory.

  11. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  12. Buckling of conical shell with local imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Dexter, C. B.

    1974-01-01

    Small geometric imperfections in thin-walled shell structures can cause large reductions in buckling strength. Most imperfections found in structures are neither axisymmetric nor have the shape of buckling modes but rather occur locally. This report presents the results of a study of the effect of local imperfections on the critical buckling load of a specific axially compressed thin-walled conical shell. The buckling calculations were performed by using a two-dimensional shell analysis program referred to as the STAGS (Structural Analysis of General Shells) computer code, which has no axisymmetry restrictions. Results show that the buckling load found from a bifurcation buckling analysis is highly dependent on the circumferential arc length of the imperfection type studied. As the circumferential arc length of the imperfection is increased, a reduction of up to 50 percent of the critical load of the perfect shell can occur. The buckling load of the cone with an axisymmetric imperfections is nearly equal to the buckling load of imperfections which extended 60 deg or more around the circumference, but would give a highly conservative estimate of the buckling load of a shell with an imperfection of a more local nature.

  13. A Developmental Perspective on the Imperfective Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanina, Nina; Phillips, Colin

    2007-01-01

    Imperfective or progressive verb morphology makes it possible to use the name of a whole event to refer to an activity that is clearly not a complete instance of that event, leading to what is known as the Imperfective Paradox. For example, a sentence like "John was building a house" does not entail that a house ever got built. The Imperfective…

  14. Methodological imperfection and formalizations in scientific activity

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlichny, G.

    1987-03-01

    Any mathematical formalization of scientific activity allows for imperfections in the methodology that is formalized. These can be of three types, dirty, rotten, and dammed. Restricting mathematical attention to those methods that cannot be construed to be imperfect drastically reduces the class of objects that must be analyzed, and related all other objects to these more regular ones. Examples are drawn from empirical logic.

  15. Turing patterns beyond hexagons and stripes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lingfa; Dolnik, Milos; Zhabotinsky, Anatol M; Epstein, Irving R

    2006-09-01

    The best known Turing patterns are composed of stripes or simple hexagonal arrangements of spots. Until recently, Turing patterns with other geometries have been observed only rarely. Here we present experimental studies and mathematical modeling of the formation and stability of hexagonal and square Turing superlattice patterns in a photosensitive reaction-diffusion system. The superlattices develop from initial conditions created by illuminating the system through a mask consisting of a simple hexagonal or square lattice with a wavelength close to a multiple of the intrinsic Turing pattern's wavelength. We show that interaction of the photochemical periodic forcing with the Turing instability generates multiple spatial harmonics of the forcing patterns. The harmonics situated within the Turing instability band survive after the illumination is switched off and form superlattices. The square superlattices are the first examples of time-independent square Turing patterns. We also demonstrate that in a system where the Turing band is slightly below criticality, spatially uniform internal or external oscillations can create oscillating square patterns. PMID:17014248

  16. Hexagonal uniformly redundant arrays for coded-aperture imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, M. H.; Prince, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Uniformly redundant arrays are used in coded-aperture imaging, a technique for forming images without mirrors or lenses. The URAs constructed on hexagonal lattices, are outlined. Details are presented for the construction of a special class of URAs, the skew-Hadamard URAs, which have the following properties: (1) nearly half open and half closed (2) antisymmetric upon rotation by 180 deg except for the central cell and its repetitions. Some of the skew-Hadamard URAs constructed on a hexagonal lattice have additional symmetries. These special URAs that have a hexagonal unit pattern, and are antisymmetric upon rotation by 60 deg, called hexagonal uniformly redundant arrays (HURAs). The HURAs are particularly suited to gamma-ray imaging in high background situations. In a high background situation the best sensitivity is obtained with a half open and half closed mask. The hexagonal symmetry of an HURA is more appropriate for a round position-sensitive detector or a closed-packed array of detectors than a rectangular symmetry.

  17. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, R.D.M.

    1982-11-02

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively [+-]60[degree] away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency. 3 figs.

  18. Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xuemei; Balke, Nina; Chi, Miaofang; Gai, Zheng; Keavney, David; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shen, Jian; Snijders, Paul C; Wang, Wenbin; Ward, Thomas Z; Xu, Xiaoshan; Yi, Jieyu; Zhu, Leyi; Christen, Hans M; Zhao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We observed the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism at room temperature in the hexagonal phase of LuFeO3 stabilized by epitaxial thin film growth. While the ferroelectricity in hexagonal LuFeO3 can be understood as arising from its polar structure, the observation of weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is remarkable considering the frustrated triangular spin structure. An explanation of the room temperature weak ferromagnetism is proposed in terms of a subtle lattice distortion revealed by the structural characterization. The combination of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in epitaxial films at room temperature offers great potential for the application of this novel multiferroic material in next generation devices.

  19. Constrained Clustering With Imperfect Oracles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiatian; Loy, Chen Change; Gong, Shaogang

    2016-06-01

    While clustering is usually an unsupervised operation, there are circumstances where we have access to prior belief that pairs of samples should (or should not) be assigned with the same cluster. Constrained clustering aims to exploit this prior belief as constraint (or weak supervision) to influence the cluster formation so as to obtain a data structure more closely resembling human perception. Two important issues remain open: 1) how to exploit sparse constraints effectively and 2) how to handle ill-conditioned/noisy constraints generated by imperfect oracles. In this paper, we present a novel pairwise similarity measure framework to address the above issues. Specifically, in contrast to existing constrained clustering approaches that blindly rely on all features for constraint propagation, our approach searches for neighborhoods driven by discriminative feature selection for more effective constraint diffusion. Crucially, we formulate a novel approach to handling the noisy constraint problem, which has been unrealistically ignored in the constrained clustering literature. Extensive comparative results show that our method is superior to the state-of-the-art constrained clustering approaches and can generally benefit existing pairwise similarity-based data clustering algorithms, such as spectral clustering and affinity propagation. PMID:25622327

  20. Thermal conductivity of ultra-thin chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. T.; Bresnehan, M. S.; Robinson, J. A.; Haque, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of freestanding 10 nm and 20 nm thick chemical vapor deposited hexagonal boron nitride films was measured using both steady state and transient techniques. The measured value for both thicknesses, about 100 ± 10 W m-1 K-1, is lower than the bulk basal plane value (390 W m-1 K-1) due to the imperfections in the specimen microstructure. Impressively, this value is still 100 times higher than conventional dielectrics. Considering scalability and ease of integration, hexagonal boron nitride grown over large area is an excellent candidate for thermal management in two dimensional materials-based nanoelectronics.

  1. Teaching Imperfect Competition at the Principles Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, William V.; Highfill, Jannett K.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that, although most economics textbooks' explanations of imperfect competition may involve three to five models, the concept can be taught using a single, simple model. Uses several business/economic examples as illustrations. (DB)

  2. Understanding Your Vision: The "Imperfect Eye"

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Understanding Your Vision: The "Imperfect Eye" Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table ... are different and so are the types of vision that we have. Understanding how some of us ...

  3. Methodological Imperfection and Formalizations of Scientific Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichny, George

    1987-03-01

    Any mathematical formalization of scientific activity allows for imperfections in the methodology that is formalized. These can be of three types, “dirty,” “rotten,” and “dammed.” Restricting mathematical attention to those methods that cannot be construed to be imperfect drastically reduces the class of objects that must be analyzed, and relates all other objects to these more regular ones. Examples are drawn from empirical logic.

  4. On the perfect hexagonal packing of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.

    2006-04-01

    In most cases the hexagonal packing of fibrous structures or rods extremizes the energy of interaction between strands. If the strands are not straight, then it is still possible to form a perfect hexatic bundle. Conditions under which the perfect hexagonal packing of curved tubular structures may exist are formulated. Particular attention is given to closed or cycled arrangements of the rods like in the DNA toroids and spools. The closure or return constraints of the bundle result in an allowable group of automorphisms of the cross-sectional hexagonal lattice. The structure of this group is explored. Examples of open helical-like and closed toroidal-like bundles are presented. An expression for the elastic energy of a perfectly packed bundle of thin elastic rods is derived. The energy accounts for both the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the rods. It is shown that equilibria of the bundle correspond to solutions of a variational problem formulated for the curve representing the axis of the bundle. The functional involves a function of the squared curvature under the constraints on the total torsion and the length. The Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained in terms of curvature and torsion and due to the existence of the first integrals the problem is reduced to the quadrature. The three-dimensional shape of the bundle may be readily reconstructed by integration of the Ilyukhin-type equations in special cylindrical coordinates. The results are of universal nature and are applicable to various fibrous structures, in particular, to intramolecular liquid crystals formed by DNA condensed in toroids or packed inside the viral capsids. International Workshop on Biopolymers: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Mechanics of DNA, RNA and Proteins, 30.05.2005-3.06.2005, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy.

  5. Structural properties of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, N.; Rajan, V.; Gottlieb, J.; Catherine, Y.; Adams, J. B.

    2006-04-01

    The electronic and structural properties of hexagonal boron nitride (BN) were studied using density functional theory calculations. Three different approximations for the exchange—correlation energy (the local density and two forms of the generalized gradient)—were used to calculate properties such as the bulk modulus, cohesive energy and lattice constants to determine their relative predictive abilities for this system. In general, calculations using the local density approximation produced properties slightly closer to experimental values than calculations with either generalized gradient approximations. Different stackings, or arrangements of one basal plane with respect to another, were examined to determine the equilibrium stacking(s) and it was found that the different stackings have similar cohesive energies and bulk moduli. Energy versus volume curves were calculated for each stacking using two different methods to determine their relative efficacy. Bulk moduli values obtained assuming no pressure dependence were closer to experimental values than those obtained from three common equations of state. Comparisons between the cohesive energies of hexagonal BN and cubic BN show that the cubic phase is more stable. The pressure/volume dependence of the band structure was studied for several different stackings and all showed similar behaviour, specifically a 3-4.5 eV band gap that was nearly independent of pressure in the -500 to +500 kb regime. These calculated results of the pressure/volume dependence of the band structure are the first reports for this system.

  6. Epitaxial Growth of Cubic Crystalline Semiconductor Alloys on Basal Plane of Trigonal or Hexagonal Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Hetero-epitaxial semiconductor materials comprising cubic crystalline semiconductor alloys grown on the basal plane of trigonal and hexagonal substrates, in which misfit dislocations are reduced by approximate lattice matching of the cubic crystal structure to underlying trigonal or hexagonal substrate structure, enabling the development of alloyed semiconductor layers of greater thickness, resulting in a new class of semiconductor materials and corresponding devices, including improved hetero-bipolar and high-electron mobility transistors, and high-mobility thermoelectric devices.

  7. A Unified Understanding of the Thickness-Dependent Bandgap Transition in Hexagonal Two-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joongoo; Zhang, Lijun; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-02-18

    Many important layered semiconductors, such as hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), are derived from a hexagonal lattice. A single layer of such hexagonal semiconductors generally has a direct bandgap at the high-symmetry point K, whereas it becomes an indirect, optically inactive semiconductor as the number of layers increases to two or more. Here, taking hBN and MoS2 as examples, we reveal the microscopic origin of the direct-to-indirect bandgap transition of hexagonal layered materials. Our symmetry analysis and first-principles calculations show that the bandgap transition arises from the lack of the interlayer orbital couplings for the band-edge states at K, which are inherently weak because of the crystal symmetries of hexagonal layered materials. Therefore, it is necessary to judiciously break the underlying crystal symmetries to design more optically active, multilayered semiconductors from hBN or TMDs. PMID:26800573

  8. An Explanation for Saturn's Hexagon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    For over three decades, weve been gathering observations of the mysterious hexagonal cloud pattern encircling Saturns north pole. Now, researchers believe they have a model that can better explain its formation.Fascinating GeometrySaturns northern Hexagon is a cloud band circling Saturns north pole at 78 N, first observed by the Voyager flybys in 198081. This remarkable pattern has now persisted for more than a Saturn year (29.5 Earth years).Eight frames demonstrating the motion within Saturns Hexagon. Click to watch the animation! The view is from a reference frame rotating with Saturn. [NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/Hampton University]Observations by Voyager and, more recently, Cassini have helped to identify many key characteristics of this bizarre structure. Two interesting things weve learned are:The Hexagon is associated with an eastward zonal jet moving at more than 200 mph.The cause of the Hexagon is believed to be a jet stream, similar to the ones that we experience on Earth. The path of the jet itself appears to follow the hexagons outline.The Hexagon rotates at roughly the same rate as Saturns overall rotation.While we observe individual storms and cloud patterns moving at different speeds within the Hexagon, the vertices of the Hexagon move at almost exactly the same rotational speed as that of Saturn itself.Attempts to model the formation of the Hexagon with a jet stream have yet to fully reproduce all of the observed features and behavior. But now, a team led by Ral Morales-Juberas of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology believes they have created a model that better matches what we see.Simulating a Meandering JetThe team ran a series of simulations of an eastward, Gaussian-profile jet around Saturns pole. They introduced small perturbations to the jet and demonstrated that, as a result of the perturbations, the jet can meander into a hexagonal shape. With the initial conditions of the teams model, the meandering jet is able to settle into a

  9. Thermal stability of hexagonal OsB2

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; Cullen, David A; Payzant, E Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of novel hexagonal ReB2-type OsB2 ceramic powder was performed by high energy ball milling of elemental Os and B powders. Two different sources of B powder have been used for this mechanochemical synthesis. One B powder consisted of a mixture of amorphous and crystalline phases and a mixture of 10B and 11B isotopes with a fine particle size, while another B powder was a purely crystalline (rhombohedral) material consisting of enriched 11B isotope with coarse particle size. The same Os powder was used for the synthesis in both cases. It was established that, in the first case, the hexagonal OsB2 phase was the main product of synthesis with a small quantity of Os2B3 phase present after synthesis as an intermediate product. In the second case, where coarse crystalline 11B powder was used as a raw material, only Os2B3 boride was synthesized mechanochemically. The thermal stability of hexagonal OsB2 powder was studied by heating under argon up to 876 C and cooling in vacuo down to 225 C. During the heating, the sacrificial reaction 2OsB2+3O2 2Os+2B2O3 took place due to presence of O2/water vapor molecules in the heating chamber, resulting in the oxidation of B atoms and formation of B2O3 and precipitation of Os metal out of the OsB2 lattice. As a result of such phase changes during heating, the lattice parameters of hexagonal OsB2 changed significantly. The shrinkage of the a lattice parameter was recorded in 276 426 C temperature range upon heating, which was attributed to the removal of B atoms from the OsB2 lattice due to oxidation followed by the precipitation of Os atoms and formation of Os metal. While significant structural changes occurred upon heating due to presence of O2, the hexagonal OsB2 ceramic demonstrated good phase stability upon cooling in vacuo with linear shrinkage of the lattice parameters and no phase changes detected during cooling.

  10. Structural analysis of Li-intercalated hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Sumiyoshi, A.; Hyodo, H.; Kimura, K.

    2012-03-15

    A structural investigation of Li-intercalated hexagonal boron nitride (Li-h-BNIC) was performed by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The host BN framework of Li-h-BNIC was expanded by Li-intercalation. The intralayer B-N bond length was increased by 2.48(1)% and the interlayer distance was expanded by 12.86(1)%. No superlattice structure of intercalated Li was observed. - Graphical abstract: XRD pattern fitting of the sample and schematic view of host h-BN lattice. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Li-intercalated h-BN was investigated by synchrotron radiation powder XRD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lattice parameter of host h-BN lattice was increased by intercalation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase ratio of B-N bond length was considerably larger than those of Li GICs.

  11. Valley Hall Effect in Two-Dimensional Hexagonal Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Michihisa; Shimazaki, Yuya; Borzenets, Ivan V.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-12-01

    Valley is a quantum number defined for energetically degenerate but nonequivalent structures in energy bands of a crystalline material. Recent discoveries of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials have shed light on the potential use of this degree of freedom for information carriers because the valley can now be potentially manipulated in integrated 2D architectures. The valleys separated by a long distance in a momentum space are robust against external disturbance and the flow of the valley, the valley current, is nondissipative because it carries no net electronic current. Among the various 2D valley materials, graphene has by far the highest crystal quality, leading to an extremely long valley relaxation length in the bulk. In this review, we first describe the theoretical background of the valley Hall effect, which converts an electric field into a valley current. We then describe the first observation of the valley Hall effect in monolayer MoS2. Finally, we describe experiments on the generation and detection of the pure valley current in monolayer and bilayer graphene, achieved recently using the valley Hall effect and inverse valley Hall effect. While we show unambiguous evidence of a pure valley current flowing in graphene, we emphasize that the field of "valleytronics" is still in its infancy and that further theoretical and experimental investigations are necessary.

  12. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2009-09-15

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  13. Imperfect chimera states for coupled pendula.

    PubMed

    Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Kuzma, Patrycja; Wojewoda, Jerzy; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Maistrenko, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of chimera states in the systems of coupled, identical oscillators has attracted a great deal of recent theoretical and experimental interest. In such a state, different groups of oscillators can exhibit coexisting synchronous and incoherent behaviors despite homogeneous coupling. Here, considering the coupled pendula, we find another pattern, the so-called imperfect chimera state, which is characterized by a certain number of oscillators which escape from the synchronized chimera's cluster or behave differently than most of uncorrelated pendula. The escaped elements oscillate with different average frequencies (Poincare rotation number). We show that imperfect chimera can be realized in simple experiments with mechanical oscillators, namely Huygens clock. The mathematical model of our experiment shows that the observed chimera states are controlled by elementary dynamical equations derived from Newton's laws that are ubiquitous in many physical and engineering systems. PMID:25223296

  14. Impact of imperfect information on network attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchionna, Andrew; Caloca, Jesus; Squires, Shane; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Ott, Edward; Girvan, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    This paper explores the effectiveness of network attack when the attacker has imperfect information about the network. For Erdős-Rényi networks, we observe that dynamical importance and betweenness centrality-based attacks are surprisingly robust to the presence of a moderate amount of imperfect information and are more effective compared with simpler degree-based attacks even at moderate levels of network information error. In contrast, for scale-free networks the effectiveness of attack is much less degraded by a moderate level of information error. Furthermore, in the Erdős-Rényi case the effectiveness of network attack is much more degraded by missing links as compared with the same number of false links.

  15. Impact of imperfect information on network attack.

    PubMed

    Melchionna, Andrew; Caloca, Jesus; Squires, Shane; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Girvan, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    This paper explores the effectiveness of network attack when the attacker has imperfect information about the network. For Erdős-Rényi networks, we observe that dynamical importance and betweenness centrality-based attacks are surprisingly robust to the presence of a moderate amount of imperfect information and are more effective compared with simpler degree-based attacks even at moderate levels of network information error. In contrast, for scale-free networks the effectiveness of attack is much less degraded by a moderate level of information error. Furthermore, in the Erdős-Rényi case the effectiveness of network attack is much more degraded by missing links as compared with the same number of false links. PMID:25871157

  16. Quantum metrology with imperfect states and detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Animesh; Zhang Lijian; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Smith, Brian J.; Walmsley, Ian A.; Dorner, Uwe

    2011-06-15

    Quantum enhancements of precision in metrology can be compromised by system imperfections. These may be mitigated by appropriate optimization of the input state to render it robust, at the expense of making the state difficult to prepare. In this paper, we identify the major sources of imperfection of an optical sensor: input state preparation inefficiency, sensor losses, and detector inefficiency. The second of these has received much attention; we show that it is the least damaging to surpassing the standard quantum limit in a optical interferometric sensor. Further, we show that photonic states that can be prepared in the laboratory using feasible resources allow a measurement strategy using photon-number-resolving detectors that not only attain the Heisenberg limit for phase estimation in the absence of losses, but also deliver close to the maximum possible precision in realistic scenarios including losses and inefficiencies. In particular, we give bounds for the tradeoff between the three sources of imperfection that will allow true quantum-enhanced optical metrology

  17. Microstructural and crystallographic imperfections of MgB{sub 2} superconducting wire and their correlation with the critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Alzayed, Nasser S.; Oh, Sangjun; Choi, Seyong; Maeda, Minoru; Hata, Satoshi; Shimada, Yusuke; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Kim, Jung Ho

    2014-01-15

    A comprehensive study of the effects of structural imperfections in MgB{sub 2} superconducting wire has been conducted. As the sintering temperature becomes lower, the structural imperfections of the MgB{sub 2} material are increased, as reflected by detailed X-ray refinement and the normal state resistivity. The crystalline imperfections, caused by lattice disorder, directly affect the impurity scattering between the π and σ bands of MgB{sub 2}, resulting in a larger upper critical field. In addition, low sintering temperature keeps the grain size small, which leads to a strong enhancement of pinning, and thereby, enhanced critical current density. Owing to both the impurity scattering and the grain boundary pinning, the critical current density, irreversibility field, and upper critical field are enhanced. Residual voids or porosities obviously remain in the MgB{sub 2}, however, even at low sintering temperature, and thus block current transport paths.

  18. Shell Buckling Design Criteria Based on Manufacturing Imperfection Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis-based approach .for developing shell-buckling design criteria for laminated-composite cylindrical shells that accurately accounts for the effects of initial geometric imperfections is presented. With this approach, measured initial geometric imperfection data from six graphite-epoxy shells are used to determine a manufacturing-process-specific imperfection signature for these shells. This imperfection signature is then used as input into nonlinear finite-element analyses. The imperfection signature represents a "first-approximation" mean imperfection shape that is suitable for developing preliminary-design data. Comparisons of test data and analytical results obtained by using several different imperfection shapes are presented for selected shells. Overall, the results indicate that the analysis-based approach presented for developing reliable preliminary-design criteria has the potential to provide improved, less conservative buckling-load estimates, and to reduce the weight and cost of developing buckling-resistant shell structures.

  19. Status of the ATF2 Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Tomas, R.; Bambade, P.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Seryi, A.; White, G.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The current status for the ATF2 Nominal and Ultra-low {beta}* lattices are presented in this paper. New lattice designs have been obtained in order to minimise the impact of the last interpretation of multipole measurements that have been included into the model. However, the new ATF2 Ultra-low design is not able to recover the expected vertical beam size at the IP with the current magnet distribution. Therefore, different quadrupole sorting have been studied. A significant gain is evident for the ATF2 Ultra-low lattice when sorting the magnets according to the skew-sextupolar components. The ATF2 Nominal lattice is also expected to benefit from the new sorting. Tuning results of the new ATF2 Ultra-low lattice under realistic imperfections are also reported.

  20. Thermal stability of hexagonal OsB{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; Cullen, David A.; Andrew Payzant, E.

    2014-11-15

    The synthesis of novel hexagonal ReB{sub 2}-type OsB{sub 2} ceramic powder was performed by high energy ball milling of elemental Os and B powders. Two different sources of B powder have been used for this mechanochemical synthesis. One B powder consisted of a mixture of amorphous and crystalline phases and a mixture of {sup 10}B and {sup 11}B isotopes with a fine particle size, while another B powder was a purely crystalline (rhombohedral) material consisting of enriched {sup 11}B isotope with coarse particle size. The same Os powder was used for the synthesis in both cases. It was established that, in the first case, the hexagonal OsB{sub 2} phase was the main product of synthesis with a small quantity of Os{sub 2}B{sub 3} phase present after synthesis as an intermediate product. In the second case, where coarse crystalline {sup 11}B powder was used as a raw material, only Os{sub 2}B{sub 3} boride was synthesized mechanochemically. The thermal stability of hexagonal OsB{sub 2} powder was studied by heating under argon up to 876 °C and cooling in vacuo down to −225 °C. During the heating, the sacrificial reaction 2OsB{sub 2}+3O{sub 2}→2Os+2B{sub 2}O{sub 3} took place due to presence of O{sub 2}/water vapor molecules in the heating chamber, resulting in the oxidation of B atoms and formation of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and precipitation of Os metal out of the OsB{sub 2} lattice. As a result of such phase changes during heating, the lattice parameters of hexagonal OsB{sub 2} changed significantly. The shrinkage of the a lattice parameter was recorded in 276–426 °C temperature range upon heating, which was attributed to the removal of B atoms from the OsB{sub 2} lattice due to oxidation followed by the precipitation of Os atoms and formation of Os metal. While significant structural changes occurred upon heating due to presence of O{sub 2}, the hexagonal OsB{sub 2} ceramic demonstrated good phase stability upon cooling in vacuo with linear shrinkage of the lattice

  1. Hexagonal diamonds in meteorites: implications.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, R E; Strong, H M; Bundy, F P

    1967-02-24

    A new polymorph of carbon, hexagonal diamond, has been discovered in the Canyon Diablo and Goalpara meteorites. This phase had been synthesized recently under specific high-pressure conditions in the laboratory. Our results: provide strong evidence that diamonds found in these meteorites were produced by intense shock pressures acting on crystalline graphite inclusions present within the meteorite before impact, rather than by disintegration of larger, statically grown diamonds, as some theories propose. PMID:17830485

  2. Phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilovol, V.; Martínez-García, R.

    2015-11-01

    The phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite (SrFe12O19) to magnetite (Fe3O4) as main phase and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) as secondary phase is reported here. SrFe12O19 powder was obtained by a heat treatment at 250 °C under controlled oxygen flow. It was observed that the phase transformation occurred when the SrFe12O19 ferrite was heated up to 625 °C in confinement conditions. This transformation took place by a combination of three factors: the presence of stresses in the crystal lattice of SrFe12O19 due to a low synthesis temperature, the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ during the heating up to 625 °C, and the similarity of the coordination spheres of the iron atoms present in the S-block of SrFe12O19 and Fe3O4. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the existence of strain and crystal deformation in SrFe12O19 and the absence of them in the material after the phase transformation. Dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Fe57 Mössbauer spectroscopy provided evidences of the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ in the SrFe12O19 crystal.

  3. A hexagonal orthogonal-oriented pyramid as a model of image representation in visual cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells represent the visual image with a spatial code, in which each cell conveys information about a small region in the image. In contrast, cells of the primary visual cortex use a hybrid space-frequency code in which each cell conveys information about a region that is local in space, spatial frequency, and orientation. A mathematical model for this transformation is described. The hexagonal orthogonal-oriented quadrature pyramid (HOP) transform, which operates on a hexagonal input lattice, uses basis functions that are orthogonal, self-similar, and localized in space, spatial frequency, orientation, and phase. The basis functions, which are generated from seven basic types through a recursive process, form an image code of the pyramid type. The seven basis functions, six bandpass and one low-pass, occupy a point and a hexagon of six nearest neighbors on a hexagonal lattice. The six bandpass basis functions consist of three with even symmetry, and three with odd symmetry. At the lowest level, the inputs are image samples. At each higher level, the input lattice is provided by the low-pass coefficients computed at the previous level. At each level, the output is subsampled in such a way as to yield a new hexagonal lattice with a spacing square root of 7 larger than the previous level, so that the number of coefficients is reduced by a factor of seven at each level. In the biological model, the input lattice is the retinal ganglion cell array. The resulting scheme provides a compact, efficient code of the image and generates receptive fields that resemble those of the primary visual cortex.

  4. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiraj, Lipika Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O.; Karimi, Nader; Sailor, Anna; Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P.

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  5. Method for correcting imperfections on a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Weed, John W.

    1999-09-07

    A process for producing near perfect optical surfaces. A previously polished optical surface is measured to determine its deviations from the desired perfect surface. A multi-aperture mask is designed based on this measurement and fabricated such that deposition through the mask will correct the deviations in the surface to an acceptable level. Various mask geometries can be used: variable individual aperture sizes using a fixed grid for the apertures or fixed aperture sizes using a variable aperture spacing. The imperfections are filled in using a vacuum deposition process with a very thin thickness of material such as silicon monoxide to produce an amorphous surface that bonds well to a glass substrate.

  6. Imperfect relativistic mirrors in the quantum regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.; Serbeto, A.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2014-05-15

    The collective backscattering of intense laser radiation by energetic electron beams is considered in the relativistic quantum regime. Exact solutions for the radiation field are obtained, for arbitrary electron pulse shapes and laser intensities. The electron beams act as imperfect nonlinear mirrors on the incident laser radiation. This collective backscattering process can lead to the development of new sources of ultra-short pulse radiation in the gamma-ray domain. Numerical examples show that, for plausible experimental conditions, intense pulses of gamma-rays, due to the double Doppler shift of the harmonics of the incident laser radiation, can be produced using the available technology, with durations less than 1 as.

  7. Learning receptor positions from imperfectly known motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is described for learning image interpolation functions for sensor arrays whose sensor positions are somewhat disordered. The learning is based on failures of translation invariance, so it does not require knowledge of the images being presented to the visual system. Previously reported implementations of the method assumed the visual system to have precise knowledge of the translations. It is demonstrated that translation estimates computed from the imperfectly interpolated images can have enough accuracy to allow the learning process to converge to a correct interpolation.

  8. Imperfection, practice and humility in clinical ethics.

    PubMed

    Garchar, Kim

    2012-10-01

    In this essay, I provide a description of the discipline of ethics using the philosophies of Aristotle and the American pragmatist John Dewey. Specifically, I argue that ethics is an active undertaking that is ambiguous and pluralistic. I then normatively prescribe the way in which clinical ethicists ought to approach their work in medicine. Rather than endeavouring to become, or behaving as if they are, experts, clinical ethicists must be humble. They must practise ethics. That is, they must admit ethics is the study and pursuit of the good life but that this study and pursuit occurs imperfectly in the face of problematic situations. PMID:22995007

  9. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor.

    PubMed

    Kabiraj, Lipika; Saurabh, Aditya; Karimi, Nader; Sailor, Anna; Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P; Paschereit, Christian O

    2015-02-01

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration. PMID:25725637

  10. Madelung energy of Yukawa lattices.

    PubMed

    Pereira, P C N; Apolinario, S W S

    2012-10-01

    We propose a method to obtain an approximate closed form expression for the Madelung energy (ME) of Yukawa lattices. Such a method is applied for lattices of different topologies and dimensions. The obtained Madelung energies have a satisfactory accuracy for all ranges of the screening parameter κ of the Yukawa potential, and it becomes exact in the asymptotic limits κ→0 and κ→+∞. For instance, for the triangular lattice, the maximum relative error of the ME given by the method is about 0.0047. Also, satisfactory results are obtained for the one-component plasma limit. The Madelung constants of the two-dimensional hexagonal BN and square NaCl and the three-dimensional cubic NaCl crystals are estimated with a relative error of 0.004, 0.006, and 0.03, respectively. Finally, different ways to improve the method are presented and discussed. PMID:23214705

  11. Modeling Being "Lost": Imperfect Situation Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Being "lost" is an exemplar of imperfect Situation Awareness/Situation Understanding (SA/SU) -- information/knowledge that is uncertain, incomplete, and/or just wrong. Being "lost" may be a geo-spatial condition - not knowing/being wrong about where to go or how to get there. More broadly, being "lost" can serve as a metaphor for uncertainty and/or inaccuracy - not knowing/being wrong about how one fits into a larger world view, what one wants to do, or how to do it. This paper discusses using agent based modeling (ABM) to explore imperfect SA/SU, simulating geo-spatially "lost" intelligent agents trying to navigate in a virtual world. Each agent has a unique "mental map" -- its idiosyncratic view of its geo-spatial environment. Its decisions are based on this idiosyncratic view, but behavior outcomes are based on ground truth. Consequently, the rate and degree to which an agent's expectations diverge from ground truth provide measures of that agent's SA/SU.

  12. Imperfect twinning: a clinical and ethical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Denardin, Daniela; Telles, Jorge Alberto B.; Betat, Rosilene da Silveira; Fell, Paulo Renato K.; da Cunha, André Campos; Targa, Luciano Vieira; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the history, epidemiology, etiology, gestational aspects, diagnosis and prognosis of imperfect twinning. DATA SOURCES Scientific articles were searched in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, using the descriptors "conjoined twins", "multiple pregnancy", "ultrasound", "magnetic resonance imaging" and "prognosis". The research was not delimited to a specific period of time and was supplemented with bibliographic data from books. DATA SYNTHESIS: The description of conjoined twins is legendary. The estimated frequency is 1/45,000-200,000 births. These twins are monozygotic, monochorionic and usually monoamniotic. They can be classified by the most prominent fusion site, by the symmetry between the conjoined twins or by the sharing structure. The diagnosis can be performed in the prenatal period or after birth by different techniques, such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography. These tests are of paramount importance for understanding the anatomy of both fetuses/children, as well as for prognosis and surgical plan determination. CONCLUSIONS Although imperfect twinning is a rare condition, the prenatal diagnosis is very important in order to evaluate the fusion site and its complexity. Hence, the evaluation of these children should be multidisciplinary, involving mainly obstetricians, pediatricians and pediatric surgeons. However, some decisions may constitute real ethical dilemmas, in which different points should be discussed and analyzed with the health team and the family. PMID:24142323

  13. Statistical analysis of imperfection effect on cylindrical buckling response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M. S.; Purbolaksono, J.; Muhammad, N.; Andriyana, A.; Liew, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is widely reported that no efficient guidelines for modelling imperfections in composite structures are available. In response, this work evaluates the imperfection factors of axially compressed Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) cylinder with different ply angles through finite element (FE) analysis. The sensitivity of imperfection factors were analysed using design of experiment: factorial design approach. From the analysis it identified three critical factors that sensitively reacted towards buckling load. Furthermore empirical equation is proposed according to each type of cylinder. Eventually, critical buckling loads estimated by empirical equation showed good agreements with FE analysis. The design of experiment methodology is useful in identifying parameters that lead to structures imperfection tolerance.

  14. Relations and interactions between twinning and grain boundaries in hexagonal close-packed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Christopher Duncan

    Improving the formability and crashworthiness of wrought magnesium alloys are the two biggest challenges in current magnesium technology. Magnesium is the best material candidate for enabling required improvements in fuel economy of combustion engines and increases in ranges of electric vehicles. In hexagonal closed-packed (HCP) structures, effects of grain size/morphology and crystallographic texture are particularly important. Prior research has established a general understanding of the dependences of strength and strain anisotropy on grain morphology and texture. Unfortunately, deformation, recrystallization, and grain growth strategies that control the microstructures and textures of cubic metals and alloys have not generally worked for HCPs. For example, in Magnesium, the deformation texture induced by primary forming operations (rolling, extrusion, etc.) is not randomized by recrystallization and may strengthen during grain growth. A strong texture reduces formability during secondary forming (stamping, bending, hemming etc.) Thus, the inability to randomize texture has impeded the implementation of magnesium alloys in engineering applications. When rare earth solutes are added to magnesium alloys, distinct new textures are derived. However, `rare earth texture' derivation remains insufficiently explained. Currently, it is hypothesized that unknown mechanisms of alloy processing are at work, arising from the effects of grain boundary intrinsic defect structures on microstructural evolution. This dissertation is a comprehensive attempt to identify formal methodologies of analyzing the behavior of grain boundaries in magnesium. We focus particularly on twin boundaries and asymmetric tilt grain boundaries using molecular dynamics. We begin by exploring twin nucleation in magnesium single crystals, elucidating effects of heterogeneities on twin nucleation and their relationships with concurrent slip. These efforts highlighted the necessity of imperfections to

  15. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  16. Lattice-gas automata for the Navier-Stokes equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, U.; Hasslacher, B.; Pomeau, Y.

    1986-04-01

    It is shown that a class of deterministic lattice gases with discrete Boolean elements simulates the Navier-Stokes equations, and can be used to design simple, massively parallel computing machines. A hexagonal lattice gas (HLG) model consisting of a triangular lattice with hexagonal symmetry is developed, and is shown to lead to the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The three-dimensional formulation is obtained by a splitting method in which the nonlinear term in the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation is recasts as the sum of two terms, each containing spurious elements and each realizable on a different lattice. Freed slip and rigid boundary conditions are easily implemented. It is noted that lattice-gas models must be run at moderate Mach numbers to remain incompressible, and to avoid spurious high-order nonlinear terms. The model gives a concrete hydrodynamical example of how cellular automata can be used to simulate classical nonlinear fields.

  17. Imperfect mirror copies of the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, Jeffrey M.; de Gouvêa, André; Hernández, Daniel; Kelly, Kevin J.

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by the standard model of particle physics, we discuss a mechanism for constructing chiral, anomaly-free gauge theories. The gauge symmetries and particle content of such theories are identified using subgroups and complex representations of simple anomaly-free Lie groups, such as S O (10 ) or E6. We explore, using mostly S O (10 ) and the 16 representation, several of these "imperfect copies" of the standard model, including U (1 )N theories, S U (5 )⊗U (1 ) theories, S U (4 )⊗U (1 )2 theories with 4-plets and 6-plets, and chiral S U (3 )⊗S U (2 )⊗U (1 ) . A few general properties of such theories are discussed, as is how they might shed light on nonzero neutrino masses, the dark matter puzzle, and other phenomenologically relevant questions.

  18. Method for correcting imperfections on a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Weed, J.W.

    1999-09-07

    A process for producing near perfect optical surfaces is disclosed. A previously polished optical surface is measured to determine its deviations from the desired perfect surface. A multi-aperture mask is designed based on this measurement and fabricated such that deposition through the mask will correct the deviations in the surface to an acceptable level. Various mask geometries can be used: variable individual aperture sizes using a fixed grid for the apertures or fixed aperture sizes using a variable aperture spacing. The imperfections are filled in using a vacuum deposition process with a very thin thickness of material such as silicon monoxide to produce an amorphous surface that bonds well to a glass substrate.

  19. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  20. The Laplacian-Energy-Like Invariants of Three Types of Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Zheng-Qing; Liu, Jia-Bao; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly studies the Laplacian-energy-like invariants of the modified hexagonal lattice, modified Union Jack lattice, and honeycomb lattice. By utilizing the tensor product of matrices and the diagonalization of block circulant matrices, we derive closed-form formulas expressing the Laplacian-energy-like invariants of these lattices. In addition, we obtain explicit asymptotic values of these invariants with software-aided computations of some integrals. PMID:27190675

  1. Electrodeposited Silver Nanoparticles Patterned Hexagonally for SERS

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Geun Hoi; Lee, Sue Yeone; Suh, Jung Sang

    2010-08-06

    We have fabricated hexagonally patterned silver nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by electrodepositing silver on the surface of an aluminum plate prepared by completely removing the oxide from anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. Even after completely removing the oxide, well-ordered hexagonal patterns, similar to the shape of graphene, remained on the surface of the aluminum plate. The borders of the hexagonal pattern protruded up to form sorts of nano-mountains at both the sides and apexes of the hexagon, with the apexes protruding even more significantly than the sides. The aluminum plate prepared by completely removing the oxide has been used in the preparation of SERS substrates by sputter-coating of gold or silver on it. Instead of sputter-coating, here we have electro-deposited silver on the aluminum plate. When silver was electro-deposited on the plate, silver nanoparticles were made along the hexagonal margins.

  2. Lattice Cubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parris, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Given a segment that joins two lattice points in R[superscript 3], when is it possible to form a lattice cube that uses this segment as one of its twelve edges? A necessary and sufficient condition is that the length of the segment be an integer. This paper presents an algorithm for finding such a cube when the prime factors of the length are…

  3. Use of Imperfect Calibration for Seismic Location

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Schultz, C A

    2000-07-12

    Efforts to more effectively monitor nuclear explosions include the calibration of travel times along specific paths. Benchmark events are used to improve travel-time prediction by (1) improving models, (2) determining travel times empirically, or (3) using a hybrid approach. Even velocity models that are determined using geophysical analogy (i.e. models determined without the direct use of calibration data) require validation with calibration events. Ideally, the locations and origin times of calibration events would be perfectly known. However, the existing set of perfectly known events is spatially limited and many of these events occurred prior to the installation of current monitoring stations, thus limiting their usefulness. There are, however, large numbers of well (but not perfectly) located events that are spatially distributed, and many of these events may be used for calibration. Identifying the utility and limitations of the spatially distributed set of imperfect calibration data is of paramount importance to the calibration effort. In order to develop guidelines for calibration utility, we examine the uncertainty and correlation of location parameters under several network configurations that are commonly used to produce calibration-grade locations. We then map these calibration uncertainties through location procedures with network configurations that are likely in monitoring situations. By examining the ramifications of depth and origin-time uncertainty, we expand on previous studies that focus strictly on epicenter accuracy. Particular attention is given to examples where calibration events are determined with teleseismic or local networks and monitoring is accomplished with a regional network.

  4. Modeling the angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations of Fermi surfaces with hexagonal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Joseph C. A.; Coldea, Amalia I.

    2016-06-01

    By solving the Boltzmann transport equation we investigate theoretically the general form of oscillations in the resistivity caused by varying the direction of an applied magnetic field for the case of quasi-two-dimensional systems on hexagonal lattices. The presence of the angular magnetoresistance oscillations can be used to map out the topology of the Fermi surface and we study how this effect varies as a function of the degree of interplane warping as well as a function of the degree of isotropic scattering. We find that the angular-dependent effect due to in-plane rotation follows the symmetry imposed by the lattice whereas for interplane rotation the degree of warping dictates the dominant features observed in simulations. Our calculations make predictions for specific angle-dependent magnetotransport signatures in magnetic fields expected for quasi-two-dimensional hexagonal compounds similar to PdCoO2 and PtCoO2.

  5. Influence of imperfections on effective properties of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Grenestedt, J.L.

    1998-12-31

    The mechanical properties of cellular solids, or solid foams, is affected by imperfections such as wavy distortions of cell walls, variations in cell wall thickness, non-uniform cell shape, etc. The present paper is focused mainly on elastic stiffnesses of closed cell cellular solids. A perfect model is first discussed and shown to predict the behavior of PVC foams well. However, this model over-estimates the stiffnesses of aluminum foams. The relatively poor properties of the aluminum foam are believed to be caused by imperfections in the cells. The main body of the paper focuses on modeling different kinds of imperfections, and analyzing their impact on foam properties.

  6. Ballistic Transport in Graphene Antidot Lattices.

    PubMed

    Sandner, Andreas; Preis, Tobias; Schell, Christian; Giudici, Paula; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Weiss, Dieter; Eroms, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    The bulk carrier mobility in graphene was shown to be enhanced in graphene-boron nitride heterostructures. However, nanopatterning graphene can add extra damage and drastically degrade the intrinsic properties by edge disorder. Here we show that graphene embedded into a heterostructure with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) on both sides is protected during a nanopatterning step. In this way, we can prepare graphene-based antidot lattices where the high mobility is preserved. We report magnetotransport experiments in those antidot lattices with lattice periods down to 50 nm. We observe pronounced commensurability features stemming from ballistic orbits around one or several antidots. Due to the short lattice period in our samples, we can also explore the boundary between the classical and the quantum transport regime, as the Fermi wavelength of the electrons approaches the smallest length scale of the artificial potential. PMID:26598218

  7. Increasing skyrmion lattice stability: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruchkov, Alex; White, Jonathan; Ronnow, Henrik; Zivkovic, Ivica

    Magnetic skyrmions are vortices of spins, considered to be topologically protected against perturbations, and envisaged as very possible next-generation information carriers due to their nanoscale size. In chiral ferromagnets they form a two-dimensional hexagonal array - the skyrmion lattice. A key challenge is that bulk skyrmions have been restricted so far to a tiny region in the temperature-field phase diagram. In this work we address theoretically the stability of the skyrmion lattice. We demonstrate that tuning anisotropy can lead to dramatic (20 times) enhancement of the skyrmion phase volume, which has been recently revealed in our experiment.

  8. Lattice Gas Model with Nonlocal Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shankar P.

    We analyze the nature of the hydrodynamic modes in a Lattice Gas Automata (LGA) model defined on a hexagonal lattice and having nonlocal interactions of attractive and repulsive type simultaneously. The model is similar in spirit to the liquid gas model of Appert and Zaleski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1 (1990)]. The phase diagram for the model is computed using the kinetic pressure. The dynamics is studied with a mean field type approach in the Boltzmann approximation ignoring effects of correlated collisions. We compute the transport coefficients and the speed of sound propagation. The presence of attractive interactions show increase in the transport coefficients at intermediate densities.

  9. Gluing hexagons at three loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Benjamin; Goncalves, Vasco; Komatsu, Shota; Vieira, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    We perform extensive three-loop tests of the hexagon bootstrap approach for structure constants in planar N = 4 SYM theory. We focus on correlators involving two BPS operators and one non-BPS operator in the so-called SL (2) sector. At three loops, such correlators receive wrapping corrections from mirror excitations flowing in either the adjacent or the opposing channel. Amusingly, we find that the first type of correction coincides exactly with the leading wrapping correction for the spectrum (divided by the one-loop anomalous dimension). We develop an efficient method for computing the second type of correction for operators with any spin. The results are in perfect agreement with the recently obtained three-loop perturbative data by Chicherin, Drummond, Heslop, Sokatchev [2] and by Eden [3]. We also derive the integrand for general multi-particle wrapping corrections, which turns out to take a remarkably simple form. As an application we estimate the loop order at which various new physical effects are expected to kick-in.

  10. Fermionic pentagons and NMHV hexagon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the near-collinear limit of the null polygonal hexagon super Wilson loop in the planar N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. We focus on its Grassmann components which are dual to next-to-maximal helicity-violating (NMHV) scattering amplitudes. The kinematics in question is studied within a framework of the operator product expansion that encodes propagation of excitations on the background of the color flux tube stretched between the sides of Wilson loop contour. While their dispersion relation is known to all orders in 't Hooft coupling from previous studies, we find their form factor couplings to the Wilson loop. This is done making use of a particular tessellation of the loop where pentagon transitions play a fundamental role. Being interested in NMHV amplitudes, the corresponding building blocks carry a nontrivial charge under the SU(4) R-symmetry group. Restricting the current consideration to twist-two accuracy, we analyze two-particle contributions with a fermion as one of the constituents in the pair. We demonstrate that these nonsinglet pentagons obey bootstrap equations that possess consistent solutions for any value of the coupling constant. To confirm the correctness of these predictions, we calculate their contribution to the super Wilson loop demonstrating agreement with recent results to four-loop order in 't Hooft coupling.

  11. Ultracold quantum gases in triangular optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, C.; Soltan-Panahi, P.; Kronjäger, J.; Dörscher, S.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2010-06-01

    Over recent years, exciting developments in the field of ultracold atoms confined in optical lattices have led to numerous theoretical proposals devoted to the quantum simulation of problems e.g. known from condensed matter physics. Many of those ideas demand experimental environments with non-cubic lattice geometries. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a versatile three-beam lattice allowing for the generation of triangular as well as hexagonal optical lattices. As an important step, the superfluid-Mott insulator (SF-MI) quantum phase transition has been observed and investigated in detail in this lattice geometry for the first time. In addition to this, we study the physics of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in the presence of the triangular optical lattice potential, especially spin changing dynamics across the SF-MI transition. Our results suggest that, below the SF-MI phase transition, a well-established mean-field model describes the observed data when renormalizing the spin-dependent interaction. Interestingly, this opens up new perspectives for a lattice-driven tuning of a spin dynamics resonance occurring through the interplay of the quadratic Zeeman effect and spin-dependent interaction. Finally, we discuss further lattice configurations that can be realized with our setup.

  12. Triplet Pairing in Electron Systems with Hexagonal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Akihiro; Hu, Xiao

    2004-03-01

    Inspired by the recently discovered superconductor Na_xCoO_2otyH_2O[1], we discuss how a novel triplet pairing state can occur from fermi surface effects/electron correlations in 2d electron systems with hexagonal symmetry[2]. This would serve as a complementary approach to studies based on the RVB picture, which basically concentrate on singlet pairing correlations. Spin and charge transports arising from the nontrivial topology (Chern numbers etc.) in k-space are investigated, and compared with the case of the square lattice. [1] K. Takada et al, Nature vol. 422, 53 (2003). [2] A. Tanaka and X. Hu, Phys. Rev. Lett., in press (cond-mat/0304409).

  13. Columnar epitaxy of hexagonal and orthorhombic silicides on Si(111)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Nieh, C. W.; Xiao, Q. F.; Hashimoto, Shin

    1990-01-01

    Columnar grains of PtSi and CrSi2 surrounded by high-quality epitaxial silicon are obtained by ultrahigh vacuum codeposition of Si and metal in an approximately 10:1 ratio on Si(111) substrates heated to 610-840 C. This result is similar to that found previously for CoSi2 (a nearly-lattice-matched cubic-fluorite crystal) on Si(111), in spite of the respective orthorhombic and hexagonal structures of PtSi and CrSi2. The PtSi grains are epitaxial and have one of three variants of the relation defined by PtSi(010)/Si(111), with PtSi 001 line/Si 110 line type.

  14. Activated chemoreceptor arrays remain intact and hexagonally packed

    PubMed Central

    Briegel, Ariane; Beeby, Morgan; Thanbichler, Martin; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bacterial chemoreceptors cluster into exquisitively sensitive, tunable, highly ordered, polar arrays. While these arrays serve as paradigms of cell signalling in general, it remains unclear what conformational changes transduce signals from the periplasmic tips, where attractants and repellents bind, to the cytoplasmic signalling domains. Conflicting reports support and contest the hypothesis that activation causes large changes in the packing arrangement of the arrays, up to and including their complete disassembly. Using electron cryotomography, here we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, chemoreceptor arrays in cells grown in different media and immediately after exposure to the attractant galactose all exhibit the same 12 nm hexagonal packing arrangement, array size and other structural parameters. ΔcheB and ΔcheR mutants mimicking attractant- or repellent-bound states prior to adaptation also show the same lattice structure. We conclude that signal transduction and amplification must be accomplished through only small, nanoscale conformational changes. PMID:21992450

  15. Predicting Sizes of Hexagonal and Gyroid Metal Nanostructures from Liquid Crystal Templating.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Kaleem A; Rowlands, Daniel A; Elliott, Joanne M; Squires, Adam M

    2015-11-24

    We describe a method to predict and control the lattice parameters of hexagonal and gyroid mesoporous materials formed by liquid crystal templating. In the first part, we describe a geometric model with which the lattice parameters of different liquid crystal mesophases can be predicted as a function of their water/surfactant/oil volume fractions, based on certain geometric parameters relating to the constituent surfactant molecules. We demonstrate the application of this model to the lamellar (Lα), hexagonal (H1), and gyroid bicontinuous cubic (V1) mesophases formed by the binary Brij-56 (C16EO10)/water system and the ternary Brij-56/hexadecane/water system. In this way, we demonstrate predictable and independent control over the size of the cylinders (with hexadecane) and their spacing (with water). In the second part, we produce mesoporous platinum using as templates hexagonal and gyroid phases with different compositions and show that in each case the symmetry and lattice parameter of the metal nanostructure faithfully replicate those of the liquid crystal template, which is itself in agreement with the model. This demonstrates a rational control over the geometry, size, and spacing of pores in a mesoporous metal. PMID:26493862

  16. Quantification of the Forgiveness of Drugs to Imperfect Adherence.

    PubMed

    Assawasuwannakit, P; Braund, R; Duffull, S B

    2015-03-01

    The circumstance of how sensitive therapeutic success is under imperfect adherence is driven by the property known as forgiveness. To date, no studies have considered variability in the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic process in conjunction with imperfect adherence patterns in order to develop a comparative criterion to determine the forgiveness of a drug. In this study, we have proposed a criterion to quantify forgiveness; illustrated the criterion for a theoretical example and evaluated the forgiveness of a motivating example, namely warfarin. A forgiveness criterion, relative forgiveness, is defined as the number of times more likely that a target is successfully attained under perfect adherence compared to imperfect adherence; or when comparing two drugs under a standard setting of imperfect adherence. The relative forgiveness criterion may have important implications for both drug development and clinical practice since the choice of drug can account for the likely influence of its forgiveness. PMID:26225235

  17. Bayesian imperfect information analysis for clinical recurrent data

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In medical research, clinical practice must often be undertaken with imperfect information from limited resources. This study applied Bayesian imperfect information-value analysis to realistic situations to produce likelihood functions and posterior distributions, to a clinical decision-making problem for recurrent events. In this study, three kinds of failure models are considered, and our methods illustrated with an analysis of imperfect information from a trial of immunotherapy in the treatment of chronic granulomatous disease. In addition, we present evidence toward a better understanding of the differing behaviors along with concomitant variables. Based on the results of simulations, the imperfect information value of the concomitant variables was evaluated and different realistic situations were compared to see which could yield more accurate results for medical decision-making. PMID:25565853

  18. Buckling Imperfection Sensitivity of Axially Compressed Orthotropic Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Structural stability is a major consideration in the design of lightweight shell structures. However, the theoretical predictions of geometrically perfect structures often considerably over predict the buckling loads of inherently imperfect real structures. It is reasonably well understood how the shell geometry affects the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed cylindrical shells; however, the effects of shell anisotropy on the imperfection sensitivity is less well understood. In the present paper, the development of an analytical model for assessing the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed orthotropic cylinders is discussed. Results from the analytical model for four shell designs are compared with those from a general-purpose finite-element code, and good qualitative agreement is found. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed, and potential design implications of this line of research are discussed.

  19. Elastic interaction of point defects in cubic and hexagonal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.; Telyatnik, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    The elastic interaction of two point defects in cubic and hexagonal structures has been considered. On the basis of the exact expression for the tensor Green's function of the elastic field obtained by the Lifschitz-Rozentsveig for a hexagonal medium, an exact formula for the interaction energy of two point defects has been obtained. The solution is represented as a function of the angle of their relative position on the example of semiconductors such as III-nitrides and α-SiC. For the cubic medium, the solution is found on the basis of the Lifschitz-Rozentsveig Green's tensors corrected by Ostapchuk, in the weak-anisotropy approximation. It is proven that the calculation of the interaction energy by the original Lifschitz-Rozentsveig Green's tensor leads to the opposite sign of the energy. On the example of the silicon crystal, the approximate solution is compared with the numerical solution, which is represented as an approximation by a series of spherical harmonics. The range of applicability of the continual approach is estimated by the quantum mechanical calculation of the lattice Green's function.

  20. Precision Astronomy with Imperfect Deep Depletion CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Christopher; LSST Sensor Team; PanSTARRS Team

    2014-01-01

    While thick CCDs do provide definite advantages in terms of increased quantum efficiency at wavelengths 700 nm<λ < 1.1 microns and reduced fringing from atmospheric emission lines, these devices also exhibit undesirable features that pose a challenge to precision determination of the positions, fluxes, and shapes of astronomical objects, and for the precision extraction of features in astronomical spectra. For example, the assumptions of a perfectly rectilinear pixel grid and of an intensity-independent point spread function become increasingly invalid as we push to higher precision measurements. Many of the effects seen in these devices arise from lateral electrical fields within the detector, that produce charge transport anomalies that have been previously misinterpreted as quantum efficiency variations. Performing simplistic flat-fielding therefore introduces systematic errors in the image processing pipeline. One measurement challenge we face is devising a combination of calibration methods and algorithms that can distinguish genuine quantum efficiency variations from charge transport effects. These device imperfections also confront spectroscopic applications, such as line centroid determination for precision radial velocity studies. Given the scientific benefits of improving both the precision and accuracy of astronomical measurements, we need to identify, characterize, and overcome these various detector artifacts. In retrospect, many of the detector features first identified in thick CCDs also afflict measurements made with more traditional CCD detectors, albeit often at a reduced level since the photocharge is subject to the perturbing influence of lateral electric fields for a shorter time interval. I provide a qualitative overview of the physical effects we think are responsible for the observed device properties, and provide some perspective for the work that lies ahead.

  1. Novel high pressure hexagonal OsB{sub 2} by mechanochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Graule, Moritz; Orlovskaya, Nina; Andrew Payzant, E.; Cullen, David A.; Blair, Richard G.

    2014-07-01

    Hexagonal OsB{sub 2}, a theoretically predicted high-pressure phase, has been synthesized for the first time by a mechanochemical method, i.e., high energy ball milling. X-ray diffraction indicated that formation of hexagonal OsB{sub 2} begins after 2.5 h of milling, and the reaction reaches equilibrium after 18 h of milling. Rietveld refinement of the powder data indicated that hexagonal OsB{sub 2} crystallizes in the P63/mmc space group (No. 194) with lattice parameters of a=2.916 Å and c=7.376 Å. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the appearance of the hexagonal OsB{sub 2} phase after high energy ball milling. in situ X-ray diffraction experiments showed that the phase is stable from −225 °C to 1050 °C. The hexagonal OsB{sub 2} powder was annealed at 1050 °C for 6 days in vacuo to improve crystallinity and remove strain induced during the mechanochemical synthesis. The structure partially converted to the orthorhombic phase (20 wt%) after fast current assisted sintering of hexagonal OsB{sub 2} at 1500 °C for 5 min. Mechanochemical approaches to the synthesis of hard boride materials allow new phases to be produced that cannot be prepared using conventional methods. - Graphical abstract: High resolution transmission electron micrograph of hexagonal OsB{sub 2} nanocrystallite with corresponding fast Fourier transform and simulated diffraction pattern. - Highlights: • Hexagonal OsB{sub 2} has been synthesized for the first time by mechanochemical method. • Hexagonal OsB{sub 2} crystallizes in P63/mmc space group (No. 194), a=2.916 Å and c=7.376 Å. • The hexagonal structure was confirmed by a transmission electron microscope. • No phase transformation was observed after being annealed at 1050 °C for 6 days. • 20 wt% of h-OsB{sub 2} was transformed to o-OsB{sub 2} after being sintered at 1500 °C for 5 min.

  2. Dislocation stability in three-phase nanocomposites with imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying-Xin; Liu, You-Wen; Fang, Qi-Hong

    2014-10-01

    Interface imperfection can significantly affect the mechanical properties and failure mechanisms as well as the strength and toughness of nanocomposites. The elastic behavior of a screw dislocation in nanoscale coating with imperfect interface is studied in the three-phase composite cylinder model. The interface between inner nanoinhomogeneity and intermediate coating is assumed as perfectly bonded. The bonding between intermediate coating and outer matrix is considered to be imperfect with the assumption that interface imperfection is uniform, and a linear spring model is adopted to describe the weakness of imperfect interface. The explicit expression for image force acting on dislocation is obtained by means of a complex variable method. The analytic results indicate that inner interface effect and outer interface imperfection, simultaneously taken into account, would influence greatly image force, equilibrium position and stability of dislocation, and various critical parameters that would change dislocation stability. The weaker interface is a very strong trap for glide dislocation and, thus, a more effective barrier for slip transmission.

  3. Method and apparatus for evaluating multilayer objects for imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Abedin, Nurul (Inventor); Sun, Kuen J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A multilayer object having multiple layers arranged in a stacking direction is evaluated for imperfections such as voids, delaminations and microcracks. First, an acoustic wave is transmitted into the object in the stacking direction via an appropriate transducer/waveguide combination. The wave propagates through the multilayer object and is received by another transducer/waveguide combination preferably located on the same surface as the transmitting combination. The received acoustic wave is correlated with the presence or absence of imperfections by, e.g., generating pulse echo signals indicative of the received acoustic wave, wherein the successive signals form distinct groups over time. The respective peak amplitudes of each group are sampled and curve fit to an exponential curve, wherein a substantial fit of approximately 80-90% indicates an absence of imperfections and a significant deviation indicates the presence of imperfections. Alternatively, the time interval between distinct groups can be measured, wherein equal intervals indicate the absence of imperfections and unequal intervals indicate the presence of imperfections.

  4. Method and Apparatus for Evaluating Multilayer Objects for Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Abedin, Nurul (Inventor); Sun, Kuen J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A multilayer object having multiple layers arranged in a stacking direction is evaluated for imperfections such as voids, delaminations and microcracks. First. an acoustic wave is transmitted into the object in the stacking direction via an appropriate transducer/waveguide combination. The wave propagates through the multilayer object and is received by another transducer/waveguide combination preferably located on the same surface as the transmitting combination. The received acoustic wave is correlated with the presence or absence of imperfections by, e.g., generating pulse echo signals indicative of the received acoustic wave. wherein the successive signals form distinct groups over time. The respective peak amplitudes of each group are sampled and curve fit to an exponential curve. wherein a substantial fit of approximately 80-90% indicates an absence of imperfections and a significant deviation indicates the presence of imperfections. Alternatively, the time interval between distinct groups can be measured. wherein equal intervals indicate the absence of imperfections and unequal intervals indicate the presence of imperfections.

  5. Duality analysis on random planar lattices.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state. PMID:23214752

  6. Duality analysis on random planar lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of hexagonal magnesium hydroxide nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Chunhong; Guo, Ming; Sun, Lingna; Hu, Changwen

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of PEG-20,000. Results show that PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of this kind of nanostructure. The SAED patterns taken from the different positions on a single hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflake yielded different crystalline structures. The structure of the nanoflakes are polycrystalline and the probable formation mechanism of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes is discussed. - Highlights: • Hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were synthesized via hydrothermal method. • PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of hexagonal nanostructure. • Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes show different crystalline structures at different positions. • The probable formation mechanism of hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes was reported. - Abstract: Hexagonal magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanoflakes were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of the surfactant polyethylene glycol 20,000 (PEG-20,000). Results show that PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of this kind of nanostructure. The composition, morphologies and structure of the Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The SAED patterns taken from the different positions on a single hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflake show different crystalline structures. The structure of the nanoflakes are polycrystalline and the probable formation mechanism of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes is discussed. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis were performed to investigate the porous structure and surface area of the as-obtained nanoflakes.

  8. Effect of binding of lanthanide ions on the bacteriorhodopsin hexagonal structure: An x-ray study

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, J.A.; El-Sayed, M.A.; Capel, M.

    1996-07-18

    The effect of the binding of trivalent lanthanide metal cations (Eu{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}, and Dy{sup 3+}) on the hexagonal structure of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is investigated at different pH using x-Ray diffraction to examine films made by slow evaporation of the corresponding regenerated bR. It is observed that the lanthanide-regenerated bR (at a ratio of 2:1 metal ion to bR) does not form a 2D structure isomorphous to that of native bR or Ca{sup 2+}-regenerated samples at low sample pH. The native bR hexagonal structure is recovered by titration of the sample with sodium hydroxide. The pH at which the hexagonal structure is recovered depends on the charge density of the lanthanide ion used for the regeneration. The higher the charge density of the ion, the higher pH at which an isomorphous lattice is formed. A model is proposed in which at normal or low pH a complex bidentate and monodentate type binding (which disrupts the lattice hexagonal structure) exists between a lanthanide ion, the O{sup -} of PO{sub 2}{sup -} groups, and/or the amino acid residues. At high pH, complexation with OH{sup -} takes place, which converts this binding to a simple monodentate type complex that leads to the recovery of the lattice structure. An equation is derived for the pH at which this conversion takes place. 48 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Imperfection Insensitivity Analyses of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Farrokh, Babak; Stanford, Bret K.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Two advanced composite tow-steered shells, one with tow overlaps and another without overlaps, were previously designed, fabricated and tested in end compression, both without cutouts, and with small and large cutouts. In each case, good agreement was observed between experimental buckling loads and supporting linear bifurcation buckling analyses. However, previous buckling tests and analyses have shown historically poor correlation, perhaps due to the presence of geometric imperfections that serve as failure initiators. For the tow-steered shells, their circumferential variation in axial stiffness may have suppressed this sensitivity to imperfections, leading to the agreement noted between tests and analyses. To investigate this further, a numerical investigation was performed in this study using geometric imperfections measured from both shells. Finite element models of both shells were analyzed first without, and then, with measured imperfections that were then, superposed in different orientations around the shell longitudinal axis. Small variations in both the axial prebuckling stiffness and global buckling load were observed for the range of imperfections studied here, which suggests that the tow steering, and resulting circumferentially varying axial stiffness, may result in the test-analysis correlation observed for these shells.

  10. Bio-chemical sensor based on imperfected plastic optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babchenko, Anatoly; Chernyak, Valeri; Maryles, Jonathan

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we report results for an intrinsic evanescent field sensor based on not-regular plastic optical fiber with polymer film containing Malachite Green MG +([PhC(C 6H 4NMe II) 3] +) as an absorption reagent, which coats the fiber's imperfected area. A theoretical model was developed which shows that changes of light in such structure result from the attenuation of light in the strait and bent imperfected fiber. In this model, the imperfected area with malachite green polymer film is replaced by a uniform layer with a complex refractive index. The changes in color and absorption characteristics of the polymer film depend on the acidic and basic environmental properties in the sensing area. Additional increase of the evanescent field interaction can be achieved by decrease the bending radius of the fiber with the coated imperfection area at the middle of the bent fiber. An imperfected plastic optical fiber with Malachite Green coating has been presented for the detection of ammonia vapor. The initial results show that depending on the sensing application demands, it is possible to design a high sensitive sensor with a relatively long response time, while when the demands require fast response times the sensor with less sensitivity can be used. In addition, the sensors' sensitivity can be calibrated in real-time by changing the bending radius.

  11. Blue-noise halftoning for hexagonal grids.

    PubMed

    Lau, Daniel L; Ulichney, Robert

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we closely scrutinize the spatial and spectral properties of aperiodic halftoning schemes on rectangular and hexagonal sampling grids. Traditionally, hexagonal sampling grids have been shunned due to their inability to preserve the high-frequency components of blue-noise dither patterns at gray-levels near one-half, but as will be shown, only through the introduction of diagonal correlations between dots can even rectangular sampling grids preserve these frequencies. And by allowing the sampling grid to constrain the placement of dots, a particular algorithm may introduce visual artifacts just as disturbing as excess energy below the principal frequency. If, instead, the algorithm maintains radial symmetry by introducing a minimum degree of clustering, then that algorithm can maintain its grid defiance illusion fundamental to the spirit of the blue-noise model. As such, this paper shows that hexagonal grids are preferrable because they can support gray-levels near one-half with less required clustering of minority pixels and a higher principal frequency. Along with a thorough Fourier analysis of blue-noise dither patterns on both rectangular and hexagonal sampling grids, this paper also demonstrates the construction of a blue-noise dither array for hexagonal grids. PMID:16671307

  12. Expansion of the hexagonal phase-forming region of Lu1-xScxFeO3 by containerless processing.

    PubMed

    Masuno, Atsunobu; Ishimoto, Atsushi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kawaji, Hitoshi; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Hexagonal Lu1-xScxFeO3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) was directly solidified from an undercooled melt by containerless processing with an aerodynamic levitation furnace. The hexagonal phase-forming region was considerably extended compared to that of the conventional solid-state reaction (x ∼ 0.5). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the crystal structure of the hexagonal phase was isomorphous to hexagonal ferroelectric RMnO3 (R = a rare earth ion) with a polar space group of P63cm. As x increased, the a-axis lattice constant decreased linearly, strengthening the antiferromagnetic interaction between the Fe(3+) ions on the a-b plane. Accordingly, the weak ferromagnetic transition temperature increased from 150 K for x = 0 to 175 K for x = 0.7. These transition temperatures were much higher than those of hexagonal Lu1-xScxMnO3. The results indicate that hexagonal Lu1-xScxFeO3 is a suitable alternative magnetic dielectric for use at higher temperatures. PMID:26376708

  13. Lattice Strain Defects in a Ceria Nanolayer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An ultrathin two-dimensional CeO2 (ceria) phase on a Cu(110) surface has been fabricated and fully characterized by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The atomic lattice structure of the ceria/Cu(110) system is revealed as a hexagonal CeO2(111)-type monolayer separated from the Cu(110) surface by a partly disordered Cu–O intercalated buffer layer. The epitaxial coupling of the two-dimensional ceria overlayer to the Cu(110)-O surface leads to a nanoscopic stripe pattern, which creates defect regions of quasi-periodic lattice distortions. The symmetry and lattice mismatch at the interface is clarified to be responsible for the topographic stripe geometry and the related anisotropic strain defect regions at the ceria surface. This ceria monolayer is in a fully oxidized and thermodynamically stable state. PMID:26988695

  14. Arbitrary lattice symmetries via block copolymer nanomeshes

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers is a powerful motif for spontaneously forming well-defined nanostructures over macroscopic areas. Yet, the inherent energy minimization criteria of self-assembly give rise to a limited library of structures; diblock copolymers naturally form spheres on a cubic lattice, hexagonally packed cylinders and alternating lamellae. Here, we demonstrate multicomponent nanomeshes with any desired lattice symmetry. We exploit photothermal annealing to rapidly order and align block copolymer phases over macroscopic areas, combined with conversion of the self-assembled organic phase into inorganic replicas. Repeated photothermal processing independently aligns successive layers, providing full control of the size, symmetry and composition of the nanoscale unit cell. We construct a variety of symmetries, most of which are not natively formed by block copolymers, including squares, rhombuses, rectangles and triangles. In fact, we demonstrate all possible two-dimensional Bravais lattices. Finally, we elucidate the influence of nanostructure on the electrical and optical properties of nanomeshes. PMID:26100566

  15. Marginalized Particle Filter for Blind Signal Detection with Analog Imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yuki; Hayashi, Kazunori; Sakai, Hideaki; Bocquet, Wladimir

    Recently, the marginalized particle filter (MPF) has been applied to blind symbol detection problems over selective fading channels. The MPF can ease the computational burden of the standard particle filter (PF) while offering better estimates compared with the standard PF. In this paper, we investigate the application of the blind MPF detector to more realistic situations where the systems suffer from analog imperfections which are non-linear signal distortion due to the inaccurate analog circuits in wireless devices. By reformulating the system model using the widely linear representation and employing the auxiliary variable resampling (AVR) technique for estimation of the imperfections, the blind MPF detector is successfully modified to cope with the analog imperfections. The effectiveness of the proposed MPF detector is demonstrated via computer simulations.

  16. Multiwave diffraction, phase problem, and extinction in imperfect crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrienko, V. E.

    2009-11-15

    The extinction effects of multiwave diffraction in imperfect crystals have been investigated. It is shown that the presence of extinction in the direct diffraction channel may lead to errors in determining the relative phases of structural amplitudes by the multiwave diffraction method (i.e., by interference with indirect excitation). The reason is that the dependence of the reflection intensity on the structural amplitude in imperfect crystals is generally nonquadratic (as in the kinematic theory), nonlinear (as in the dynamic theory), and is not even somewhat intermediate. These effects open up new possibilities for using multiwave diffraction for the direct study of the extinction and, therefore, quantitatively characterize the imperfection of crystal structures with known values and phases of structural amplitudes.

  17. Remote preparation of W states from imperfect bipartite sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, M. G. M.; Cunha, Márcio M.; Parisio, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Several proposals to produce tripartite W-type entanglement are probabilistic even if no imperfections are considered in the processes. We provide a deterministic way to remotely create W states out of an EPR source. The proposal is made viable through measurements (which can be demolitive) in an appropriate three-qubit basis. The protocol becomes probabilistic only when source flaws are considered. It turns out that, even in this situation, it is robust against imperfections in two senses: (i) It is possible, after postselection, to create a pure ensemble of W states out of an EPR source containing a systematic error; (ii) If no postselection is done, the resulting mixed state has a fidelity, with respect to a pure |Wrangle , which is higher than that of the imperfect source in comparison with an ideal EPR source. This simultaneously amounts to entanglement concentration and lifting.

  18. Static Isotropic Space-Times with Radially Imperfect Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopka, Tomasz

    When one is solving the equations of general relativity in a symmetric sector, it is natural to consider the same symmetry for the geometry and stress-energy. This implies that for static and isotropic space-times, the most general natural stress-energy tensor is a sum of a perfect fluid and a radially imperfect fluid component. In the special situations where the perfect fluid component vanishes or is a space-time constant, the solutions to Einstein's equations can be thought of as modified Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter spaces. Exact solutions of this type are derived and it is shown that whereas deviations from the unmodified solutions can be made small, among the manifestations of the imperfect fluid component is a shift in angular momentum scaling for orbiting test bodies at large radius. Based on this effect, the question of whether the imperfect fluid component can feasibly describe dark matter phenomenology is addressed.

  19. Micellar hexagonal phases in lyotropic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, L. Q.; Gulik, A.; Itri, R.; Mariani, P.

    1992-09-01

    The hexagonal cell parameter a of the system sodium dodecyl lauryl sulfate and water as a function of volume concentration cv in phase Hα shows the functional behavior expected for micelles of finite length: a~c-1/3v. The interpretation of x-ray data based on finite micelles leads to an alternative description of the hexagonal phase Hα: spherocylindrical micelles of constant radius with length that may grow along the range of the Hα phase. Results are compared with recent statistical-mechanical calculations for the isotropic I-Hα transition. The absence of diffraction in the direction perpendicular to the hexagonal plane is ascribed to polydispersity of micellar length, which also is a necessary condition for the occurrence of direct I-Hα transitions.

  20. Thermally induced microstrain broadening in hexagonal zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Andrew C; Valdez, James A; Roberts, Joyce A; Leineweber, Andreas; Mittemeijer, E J; Kreher, W

    2008-01-01

    Neutron powder-diffraction experiments on polycrystalline hexagonal zinc show considerable temperature-dependent line broadening. Whereas as-received zinc at 300 K exhibits narrow reflections, during cooling to a minimum temperature of 10K considerable line-broadening appears, which largely disappears again during reheating. The line broadening may be ascribed to microstrains induced by thermal microstresses due to the anisotropy of the thermal expansion (shrinkage) of hexagonal zinc. Differences between the thermal microstrains and theoretical predictions considering elastic deformation of the grains can be explained by plastic deformation and surface effects.

  1. Intervalley scattering in hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassabois, G.; Valvin, P.; Gil, B.

    2016-01-01

    We report photoluminescence experiments bringing the evidence for intervalley scattering in bulk hexagonal boron nitride. From a quantitative analysis of the defect-related emission band, we demonstrate that transverse optical phonons at the K point of the Brillouin zone assist inter-K valley scattering, which becomes observable because stacking faults in bulk hexagonal boron nitride provide a density of final electronic states. Time-resolved experiments highlight the different recombination dynamics of the phonon replicas implying either virtual excitonic states or real electronic states in the structural defects.

  2. Formation of hexagonal and cubic ice during low-temperature growth

    PubMed Central

    Thürmer, Konrad; Nie, Shu

    2013-01-01

    From our daily life we are familiar with hexagonal ice, but at very low temperature ice can exist in a different structure––that of cubic ice. Seeking to unravel the enigmatic relationship between these two low-pressure phases, we examined their formation on a Pt(111) substrate at low temperatures with scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy. After completion of the one-molecule-thick wetting layer, 3D clusters of hexagonal ice grow via layer nucleation. The coalescence of these clusters creates a rich scenario of domain-boundary and screw-dislocation formation. We discovered that during subsequent growth, domain boundaries are replaced by growth spirals around screw dislocations, and that the nature of these spirals determines whether ice adopts the cubic or the hexagonal structure. Initially, most of these spirals are single, i.e., they host a screw dislocation with a Burgers vector connecting neighboring molecular planes, and produce cubic ice. Films thicker than ∼20 nm, however, are dominated by double spirals. Their abundance is surprising because they require a Burgers vector spanning two molecular-layer spacings, distorting the crystal lattice to a larger extent. We propose that these double spirals grow at the expense of the initially more common single spirals for an energetic reason: they produce hexagonal ice. PMID:23818592

  3. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Liu, Yushen; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  4. Hexagonal and Pentagonal Fractal Multiband Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Philip W.; Wahid, Parveen

    2005-01-01

    Multiband dipole antennas based on hexagonal and pentagonal fractals have been analyzed by computational simulations and functionally demonstrated in experiments on prototypes. These antennas are capable of multiband or wide-band operation because they are subdivided into progressively smaller substructures that resonate at progressively higher frequencies by virtue of their smaller dimensions. The novelty of the present antennas lies in their specific hexagonal and pentagonal fractal configurations and the resonant frequencies associated with them. These antennas are potentially applicable to a variety of multiband and wide-band commercial wireless-communication products operating at different frequencies, including personal digital assistants, cellular telephones, pagers, satellite radios, Global Positioning System receivers, and products that combine two or more of the aforementioned functions. Perhaps the best-known prior multiband antenna based on fractal geometry is the Sierpinski triangle antenna (also known as the Sierpinski gasket), shown in the top part of the figure. In this antenna, the scale length at each iteration of the fractal is half the scale length of the preceding iteration, yielding successive resonant frequencies related by a ratio of about 2. The middle and bottom parts of the figure depict the first three iterations of the hexagonal and pentagonal fractals along with typical dipole-antenna configuration based on the second iteration. Successive resonant frequencies of the hexagonal fractal antenna have been found to be related by a ratio of about 3, and those of the pentagonal fractal antenna by a ratio of about 2.59.

  5. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal “artificial atoms” behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures.

  6. Topological Properties of Electrons in Honeycomb Lattice with Detuned Hopping Energy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Long-Hua; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Honeycomb lattice can support electronic states exhibiting Dirac energy dispersion, with graphene as the icon. We propose to derive nontrivial topology by grouping six neighboring sites of honeycomb lattice into hexagons and enhancing the inter-hexagon hopping energies over the intra-hexagon ones. We reveal that this manipulation opens a gap in the energy dispersion and drives the system into a topological state. The nontrivial topology is characterized by the index associated with a pseudo time-reversal symmetry emerging from the C6 symmetry of the hopping texture, where the angular momentum of orbitals accommodated on the hexagonal “artificial atoms” behaves as the pseudospin. The size of topological gap is proportional to the hopping-energy difference, which can be larger than typical spin-orbit couplings by orders of magnitude and potentially renders topological electronic transports available at high temperatures. PMID:27076196

  7. Defect properties of cobalt-doped hexagonal barium titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhammer, H. T.; Böttcher, R.; Müller, T.; Walther, T.; Ebbinghaus, S. G.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) powder spectra (9 and 34 GHz) and the magnetic susceptibility of BaTiO3 + 0.04 BaO + x/2 Co2O3 (0.001 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.02) ceramics were studied to investigate the incorporation of Co ions in the BaTiO3 lattice and their valence states as well as the development of the hexagonal phase (6H modification) in dependence on doping level x and sintering temperature Ts. At Ts = 1400 °C the 6H modification begins to occur at a nominal Co concentration x of about 0.001 and for x > 0.005 the samples are completely hexagonal at room temperature. Two different EPR spectra were observed in the 6H modification of BaTiO3, which were both assigned to paramagnetic Co2+ ions located at the two crystallographically non-equivalent Ti sites in 6H-BaTiO3. The EPR g tensor values as well as the molar paramagnetic susceptibility, measured in the temperature range 5 K-300 K at a magnetic field of 9 T, were analyzed in the framework of the ligand field theory using the program CONCORD. The combination of EPR and magnetic measurements reveals that in air-sintered 6H BaTiO3, the incorporated Co occurs as a mixture of paramagnetic Co2+ and diamagnetic Co3+ ions, whereas in samples annealed in reducing atmosphere the majority of Co is in the divalent state. The occurrence of Co4+ can be excluded for all investigated samples. The sample color caused by Co2+ and Co3+ ions is beige/light yellow and dark grey/black, respectively. The majority of the Co2+ ions substitutes Ti in the exclusively corner-sharing oxygen octahedra possessing nearly cubic symmetry. The corresponding ligand field parameter B04(3) amounts to about -28 000 cm-1 (Wybourne notation, 10Dq ≈ 20 000 cm-1). In the reduced samples nearly 5% of the detected Co2+ ions occupy the Ti site in the face-sharing oxygen octahedra, which are significantly trigonally distorted. The negative sign of the obtained ligand field parameter B02 ≈ -7300 cm-1

  8. Vibration and guiding of moving media with edge weave imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartik, V.; Wickert, J. A.

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the steady-state-forced vibration of a moving medium that is guided by a partial elastic foundation, and where geometric imperfections on the medium's edge act as an excitation source. Such a system is of technical interest in the areas of web handling and magnetic tape transport where externally pressurized air bearing guides are sometimes used to control lateral position. The axially moving strip is modeled here as a string that is guided by elastic foundation segments, and that is subjected to traveling wave excitation as the edge's imperfection interacts with the foundation. The equation of motion for this "moving medium and moving load" system incorporates a skew-symmetric Coriolis acceleration component that arises from convection. The governing equation is cast in state-space form, with one symmetric and one skew-symmetric operator, as is characteristic of gyroscopic systems. Through modal analysis, the forced response of the system is obtained to the complex harmonic excitation associated with the interaction between the edge's weave pattern and the guides. Parameter studies are presented in the transport speed, foundation stiffness, guide placement, guide width, and imperfection wavelength. Of potential technological application, for a given wavelength of the edge's imperfection, it is possible to reduce the medium's vibration at a certain location by judiciously selecting the locations and spans of the foundation segments.

  9. Modelling occurrence and abundance of species when detection is imperfect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Nichols, J.D.; Kery, M.

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between species abundance and occupancy are of considerable interest in metapopulation biology and in macroecology. Such relationships may be described concisely using probability models that characterize variation in abundance of a species. However, estimation of the parameters of these models in most ecological problems is impaired by imperfect detection. When organisms are detected imperfectly, observed counts are biased estimates of true abundance, and this induces bias in stated occupancy or occurrence probability. In this paper we consider a class of models that enable estimation of abundance/occupancy relationships from counts of organisms that result from surveys in which detection is imperfect. Under such models, parameter estimation and inference are based on conventional likelihood methods. We provide an application of these models to geographically extensive breeding bird survey data in which alternative models of abundance are considered that include factors that influence variation in abundance and detectability. Using these models, we produce estimates of abundance and occupancy maps that honor important sources of spatial variation in avian abundance and provide clearly interpretable characterizations of abundance and occupancy adjusted for imperfect detection.

  10. Information Imperfections: The Achilles' Heel of Entitlement Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Gary

    1978-01-01

    Discusses some crucial questions about voucher systems in education and examines the major weakness of the voucher and entitlement proposals, i.e., information imperfections that limit the ability of individuals, especially low-income and less educated people, to choose intelligently among competing alternatives. (BR)

  11. Lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann computational physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.

    1993-05-01

    Recent developments of the lattice gas automata method and its extension to the lattice Boltzmann method have provided new computational schemes for solving a variety of partial differential equations and modeling different physics systems. The lattice gas method, regarded as the simplest microscopic and kinetic approach which generates meaningful macroscopic dynamics, is fully parallel and can be easily programmed on parallel machines. In this talk, the author will review basic principles of the lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann method, its mathematical foundation and its numerical implementation. A detailed comparison of the lattice Boltzmann method with the lattice gas technique and other traditional numerical schemes, including the finite-difference scheme and the pseudo-spectral method, for solving the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic fluid flows, will be discussed. Recent achievements of the lattice gas and the the lattice Boltzmann method and their applications in surface phenomena, spinodal decomposition and pattern formation in chemical reaction-diffusion systems will be presented.

  12. Reconfigurable lattice mesh designs for programmable photonic processors.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Daniel; Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José; Soref, Richard A

    2016-05-30

    We propose and analyse two novel mesh design geometries for the implementation of tunable optical cores in programmable photonic processors. These geometries are the hexagonal and the triangular lattice. They are compared here to a previously proposed square mesh topology in terms of a series of figures of merit that account for metrics that are relevant to on-chip integration of the mesh. We find that that the hexagonal mesh is the most suitable option of the three considered for the implementation of the reconfigurable optical core in the programmable processor. PMID:27410130

  13. Helimagnons in the skyrmion lattice of MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoschek, M.; Jonietz, F.; Link, P.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2010-01-01

    In MnSi the application of a small magnetic field destabilizes the helimagnetic order in a narrow temperature interval just below the helimagnetic ordering temperature and stabilizes the formation of a hexagonal lattice of skyrmions, i.e., a lattice composed of a type of magnetic vortex lines. We have studied the skyrmion lattice in MnSi using a cold triple-axis spectrometer. Our data suggests that the skyrmion lattice represents a three-dimensional spin structure. The collective spin excitations of the skyrmion lattice are strongly reminiscent of the rich spectrum of helimagnon bands, recently shown to be a universal property of the helimagnetic state of MnSi in zero magnetic field.

  14. Area of Lattice Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A lattice is a (rectangular) grid of points, usually pictured as occurring at the intersections of two orthogonal sets of parallel, equally spaced lines. Polygons that have lattice points as vertices are called lattice polygons. It is clear that lattice polygons come in various shapes and sizes. A very small lattice triangle may cover just 3…

  15. Magnetic charges and magnetoelectricity in hexagonal rare-earth manganites and ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Meng; Vanderbilt, David

    2015-07-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) materials are of fundamental interest and show broad potential for technological applications. The common dominant contribution to the ME response is the lattice-mediated one, which is proportional to both the Born electric charge Ze and its analog, the dynamical magnetic charge Zm. Our previous study has shown that exchange striction acting on noncollinear spins induces much larger magnetic charges than those that depend on spin-orbit coupling. The hexagonal manganites R MnO3 and ferrites R FeO3 (R =Sc, Y, In, Ho-Lu) exhibit strong couplings between electric, magnetic, and structural degrees of freedom. The transition-metal ions in the basal plane antiferromagnetically coupled through super-exchange so as to form a 120∘ noncollinear spin arrangement. In this paper, we present a theoretical study of the magnetic charges, and of the spin-lattice and spin-electronic ME constants, in these hexagonal manganites and ferrites. We clarify the conditions under which exchange striction leads to enhanced Zm values and anomalously large in-plane spin-lattice ME effects.

  16. Two-dimensional hexagonal smectic structure formed by topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganov, P. V.; Shuravin, N. S.; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional hexagonal smectic structure formed by point topological defects and intersecting defect walls was discovered. This unique structure was predicted theoretically about 30 years ago but not observed. For a long time the hexagonal structure was a challenge for experimentalists. A different type of self-organization in smectic films was found and used to form the hexagonal structure. Methods applied for building the hexagonal phase can be used for the formation of complicated liquid-crystal structures.

  17. Complex magnetism of Ho-Dy-Y-Gd-Tb hexagonal high-entropy alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lužnik, J.; Koželj, P.; Vrtnik, S.; Jelen, A.; Jagličić, Z.; Meden, A.; Feuerbacher, M.; Dolinšek, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth based equimolar Ho-Dy-Y-Gd-Tb hexagonal high-entropy alloy (HEA) is a prototype of an ideal HEA, stabilized by the entropy of mixing at any temperature with random mixing of elements on the hexagonal close-packed lattice. In order to determine intrinsic properties of an ideal HEA characterized by the enormous chemical (substitutional) disorder on a weakly distorted simple lattice, we have performed measurements of its magnetic and electrical response and the specific heat. The results show that the Ho-Dy-Y-Gd-Tb hexagonal HEA exhibits a rich and complex magnetic field-temperature (H ,T ) phase diagram, as a result of competition among the periodic potential arising from the electronic band structure that favors periodic magnetic ordering, the disorder-induced local random potential that favors spin glass-type spin freezing in random directions, the Zeeman interaction with the external field that favors spin alignment along the field direction, and the thermal agitation that opposes any spin ordering. Three characteristic temperature regions were identified in the (H ,T ) phase diagram between room temperature and 2 K. Within the upper temperature region I (roughly between 300 and 75 K), thermal fluctuations average out the effect of local random pinning potential and the spin system behaves as a pure system of compositionally averaged spins, undergoing a thermodynamic phase transition to a long-range ordered helical antiferromagnetic state at the Néel temperature TN=180 K that is a compositional average of the Néel temperatures of pure Tb, Dy, and Ho metals. Region II (between 75 and 20 K) is an intermediate region where the long-range periodic spin order "melts" and the random ordering of spins in the local random potential starts to prevail. Within the low-temperature region III (below 20 K), the spins gradually freeze in a spin glass configuration. The spin glass phase appears to be specific to the rare earths containing hexagonal HEAs, sharing

  18. Lysozyme entrapped within reverse hexagonal mesophases: physical properties and structural behavior.

    PubMed

    Mishraki, Tehila; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2010-01-01

    A model protein (lysozyme) was incorporated into monoolein-based reverse hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase and its structure effects were characterized by small angle X-ray scattering, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, and rheological measurements. Modifications in molecular organization of the H(II) mesophases as well as the conformational stability of lysozyme (LSZ) as a function of pH and denaturating agent (urea) were clarified. Up to 3 wt.% LSZ can be solubilized into the H(II). The vibration FTIR analysis revealed that LSZ interacted with OH groups of glycerol monooleate (GMO) in the outer interface region, resulting in strong hydrogen bonding between the surfactant and its environment. Simultaneously, the decrease in the hydrogen-bonded carbonyl population of GMO was monitored, indicating dehydration of the monoolein carbonyls. These molecular interactions yielded a minor decrease in the lattice parameter of the systems, as detected by small angle X-ray scattering. Furthermore, LSZ was crystallized within the medium of the hexagonal structures in a single crystal form. The alpha-helix conformation of lysozyme was stabilized at high pH conditions, demonstrating greater helical structure content, compared to D(2)O solution. Moreover, the hexagonal phase decreased the unfavorable alpha-->beta transition in lysozyme, thereby increasing the stability of the protein under chemical denaturation. The rheological behavior of the hexagonal structures varied with the incorporation of LSZ, reflected in stronger elastic properties and pronounced solid-like response of the systems. The hydrogen bonding enhancement in the interface region of the structures was most likely responsible for these phenomena. The results of this study provided valuable information on the use of hexagonal systems as a carrier for incorporation and stabilization of proteins for various applications. PMID:19748240

  19. Stability analysis of lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, J.D.; Chen, Shiyi

    1996-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation describes the evolution of the velocity distribution function on a lattice in a manner that macroscopic fluid dynamical behavior is recovered. Although the equation is a derivative of lattice gas automata, it may be interpreted as a Lagrangian finite-difference method for the numerical simulation of the discrete-velocity Boltzmann equation that makes use of a BGK collision operator. As a result, it is not surprising that numericaI instability of lattice Boltzmann methods have been frequently encountered by researchers. We present an analysis of the stability of perturbations of the particle populations linearized about equilibrium values corresponding to a constant-density uniform mean flow. The linear stability depends on the following parameters: the distribution of the mass at a site between the different discrete speeds, the BGK relaxation time, the mean velocity, and the wave-number of the perturbations. This parameter space is too large to compute the complete stability characteristics. We report some stability results for a subset of the parameter space for a 7-velocity hexagonal lattice, a 9-velocity square lattice, and a 15-velocity cubic lattice. Results common to all three lattices are (1) the BGK relaxation time {tau} must be greater than 1/2 corresponding to positive shear viscosity, (2) there exists a maximum stable mean velocity for fixed values of theother parameters, and (3) as {tau} is increased from 1/2 the maximum stable velocity increases monotonically until some fixed velocity is reached which does not change for larger {tau}.

  20. A Discourse Analysis of the Periphrastic Imperfect in the Greek New Testament Writings of Luke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carl E.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by Bloomfield's belief that linguistic variation is not without motivation, this paper seeks to determine the distinction between the morphological imperfect and periphrastic imperfect of Koine Greek within the New Testament writings of Luke. This study suggests that: (1) The periphrastic imperfect occurs only within narrative…

  1. Nodal equivalence theory for hexagonal geometry, thermal reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.; Downar, T. )

    1992-01-01

    An important aspect of advanced nodal methods is the determination of equivalent few-group parameters for the relatively large homogenized regions used in the nodal flux solution. The theoretical foundation for light water reactor (LWR) assembly homogenization methods has been clearly established, and during the last several years, its successes have secured its position in the stable of dependable LWR analysis methods. Groupwise discontinuity factors that correct for assembly homogenization errors are routinely generated along with the group constants during lattice physics analysis. During the last several years, there has been interest in applying equivalence theory to other reactor types and other geometries. A notable effort has been the work at Argonne National Laboratory to incorporate nodal equivalence theory (NET) for hexagonal lattices into the nodal diffusion option of the DIF3D code. This work was originally intended to improve the neutronics methods used for the analysis of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), and Ref. 4 discusses the success of that application. More recently, however, attempts were made to apply NET to advanced, thermal reactor designs such as the modular high-temperature gas reactor (MHTGR) and the new production heavy water reactor (NPR/HWR). The same methods that were successful for EBR-II have encountered problems for these reactors. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the sharp global flux gradients in these cores requires large discontinuity factors (greater than 4 or 5) to reproduce the reference solution. This disrupts the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node-wise flux moments and partial currents. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made over the last few years, including bounding the discontinuity factors and providing improved initial guesses for the flux solution, but nothing has been satisfactory.

  2. Time-resolved photoluminescence study of excitons in hexagonal GaN layers grown on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, S.; Liu, Z. X.; Kuhl, J.; Ringling, J.; Grahn, H. T.; Khan, M. A.; Sun, C. J.; Ambacher, O.; Stutzmann, M.

    1998-03-01

    We performed time-resolved and continuous wave photoluminescence on two samples of hexagonal GaN, one with free exciton emission and the other without. For the sample with free exciton emission, very different decay dynamics are observed between the front and backside emission. We find that the strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the sapphire substrate and the GaN film has a large influence on the population decay of the sample with free exciton emission and a minor influence on the decay properties of the sample dominated by bound exciton emission. A polariton picture is used to describe the observed behavior.

  3. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, J.; Eaves, L.; Novoselov, K. S.; Mishchenko, A.; Geim, A. K.; Fromhold, T. M.; Greenaway, M. T.

    2015-09-01

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable.

  4. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, J.; Fromhold, T. M.; Greenaway, M. T.; Eaves, L.; Novoselov, K. S.; Mishchenko, A.; Geim, A. K.

    2015-09-07

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable.

  5. On vortex shedding from a hexagonal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi, Hatef A.; Andersson, Helge I.

    2011-10-01

    The unsteady wake behind a hexagonal cylinder in cross-flow is investigated numerically. The time-dependent three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved for three different Reynolds numbers Re and for two different cylinder orientations. The topology of the vortex shedding depends on the orientation and the Strouhal frequency is generally higher in the wake of a face-oriented cylinder than behind a corner-oriented cylinder. For both orientations a higher Strouhal number St is observed when Re is increased from 100 to 500 whereas St is unaffected by a further increase up to Re=1000. The distinct variation of St with the orientation of the hexagonal cylinder relative to the oncoming flow is opposite of earlier findings for square cylinder wakes which exhibited a higher St with corner orientation than with face orientation.

  6. Multilayer hexagonal silicon forming in slit nanopore

    PubMed Central

    He, Yezeng; Li, Hui; Sui, Yanwei; Qi, Jiqiu; Wang, Yanqing; Chen, Zheng; Dong, Jichen; Li, Xiongying

    2015-01-01

    The solidification of two-dimensional liquid silicon confined to a slit nanopore has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The results clearly show that the system undergoes an obvious transition from liquid to multilayer hexagonal film with the decrease of temperature, accompanied by dramatic change in potential energy, atomic volume, coordination number and lateral radial distribution function. During the cooling process, some hexagonal islands randomly appear in the liquid first, then grow up to grain nuclei, and finally connect together to form a complete polycrystalline film. Moreover, it is found that the quenching rate and slit size are of vital importance to the freezing structure of silicon film. The results also indicate that the slit nanopore induces the layering of liquid silicon, which further induces the slit size dependent solidification behavior of silicon film with different electrical properties. PMID:26435518

  7. Multilayer hexagonal silicon forming in slit nanopore.

    PubMed

    He, Yezeng; Li, Hui; Sui, Yanwei; Qi, Jiqiu; Wang, Yanqing; Chen, Zheng; Dong, Jichen; Li, Xiongying

    2015-01-01

    The solidification of two-dimensional liquid silicon confined to a slit nanopore has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The results clearly show that the system undergoes an obvious transition from liquid to multilayer hexagonal film with the decrease of temperature, accompanied by dramatic change in potential energy, atomic volume, coordination number and lateral radial distribution function. During the cooling process, some hexagonal islands randomly appear in the liquid first, then grow up to grain nuclei, and finally connect together to form a complete polycrystalline film. Moreover, it is found that the quenching rate and slit size are of vital importance to the freezing structure of silicon film. The results also indicate that the slit nanopore induces the layering of liquid silicon, which further induces the slit size dependent solidification behavior of silicon film with different electrical properties. PMID:26435518

  8. Control of normal chirality at hexagonal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Haraldsen, Jason T; Fishman, Randy Scott

    2010-01-01

    We study the net chirality created by the Dzyaloshinkii-Moriya interaction (DMI) at the boundary between hexagonal layers of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. It is shown that another mechanism besides elastic torsion is required to understand the change in chirality observed in Dy/Y multilayers during field-cooling. The paper shows that due to the overlap between magnetic and non-magnetic atoms, interfacial steps may produce a DMI normal to the interface in magnetic heterostructures.

  9. Saturn's North Polar Hexagon Numerical Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Juberias, R.; Sayanagi, K. M.; Dowling, T. E.

    2008-12-01

    In 1980, Voyager images revealed the presence of a circumpolar wave at 78 degrees planetographic latitude in the northern hemisphere of Saturn. It was notable for having a dominant planetary wavenumber-six zonal mode, and for being stationary with respect to Saturn's Kilometric Radiation rotation rate measured by Voyager. The center of this hexagonal feature was coincident with the center of a sharp eastward jet with a peak speed of 100 ms-1 and it had a meridional width of about 4 degrees. This hexagonal feature was confirmed in 1991 through ground-based observations, and it was observed again in 2006 with the Cassini VIMS instrument. The latest observations highlight the longevity of the hexagon and suggest that it extends at least several bars deep into the atmosphere. We use the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Code (EPIC) to perform high-resolution numerical simulations of this unique feature. We show that a wavenumber six instability mode arises naturally from initially barotropic jets when seeded with weak random turbulence. We also discuss the properties of the wave activity on the background vertical stability, zonal wind, planetary rotation rate and adjacent vortices. Computational resources were provided by the New Mexico Computing Applications Center and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the Comparative Planetology Laboratory at the University of Louisville.

  10. Hexagonal boron nitride film substrate for fabrication of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Tosa, M.; Kasahara, A.; Yosihara, K.

    2001-01-01

    The fabrication of material with an atomic scale manipulation requires the suitable advanced substrate for epitaxial growth without the effect by the substrate lattice structure. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) can be the advanced substrate for atomic manipulation due to van der Waals' gap with little attractive force along to c axis. We have successfully synthesized h-BN layer on the co-deposited Cu/BN film by surface segregation phenomena using helicon wave plasma enhanced radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering system. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the h-BN composite segregated on the surface of Cu/BN film covered over 95% of the film annealed at 900 K for 30 min. Atomic forces microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) analysis showed that attractive force on the film surface is uniformly distributed to an extent of 2nN and that the h-BN surface can be a good electric insulator like sintered h-BN plate.

  11. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  12. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity. PMID:26686661

  13. Effects of mask imperfections on InP etching profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, D.T.C.; Yan, M.F.; Wynn, J.D.; Wilt, D.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the quality of etch masks has a significant effect on the InP etching profiles. In particular, the authors have shown that mask imperfections can cause defective etching profiles, such as vertical sidewalls and extra mask undercutting in InP. The authors also discovered that the geometry of these defective profiles is determined by the orientation of the substrate relative to the direction of the mask imperfections. Along a {l angle}110{r angle} line mask defect, the downward etching process changes the {l angle}110{r angle} v-grooves to vertical sidewalls without extra undercutting. For v-grooves aligned along the {l angle}110{r angle} direction, defects on the mask give a significant extra undercutting without changing the etching profile.

  14. Noncontacting thermoelectric detection of material imperfections in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Peter B. Nagy; Adnan H. Nayfeh; Waseem I. Faidi; Hector Carreon; Balachander Lakshminaraya; Feng Yu; Bassam Abu-Nabah

    2005-06-17

    This project was aimed at developing a new noncontacting thermoelectric method for nondestructive detection of material imperfections in metals. The method is based on magnetic sensing of local thermoelectric currents around imperfections when a temperature gradient is established throughout a conducting specimen by external heating and cooling. The surrounding intact material serves as the reference electrode therefore the detection sensitivity could be very high if a sufficiently sensitive magnetometer is used in the measurements. This self-referencing, noncontacting, nondestructive inspection technique offers the following distinct advantages over conventional methods: high sensitivity to subtle variations in material properties, unique insensitivity to the size, shape, and other geometrical features of the specimen, noncontacting nature with a substantial stand-off distance, and the ability to probe relatively deep into the material. The potential applications of this method cover a very wide range from detection metallic inclusions and segregations, inhomogeneities, and tight cracks to characterization of hardening, embrittlement, fatigue, texture, and residual stresses.

  15. Distribution of radiative crystal imperfections through a silicon ingot

    SciTech Connect

    Flø, A. Burud, I.; Kvaal, K.; Olsen, E.; Søndenå, R.

    2013-11-15

    Crystal imperfections limit the efficiency of multicrystalline silicon solar cells. Recombination through traps is more prominent in areas with high density of crystal imperfections. A method to visualize the distribution of radiative emission from Shockley Read Hall recombination in silicon is demonstrated. We use hyperspectral photoluminescence, a fast non-destructive method, to image radiatively active recombination processes on a set of 50 wafers through a silicon block. The defect related emission lines D1 and D2 may be detected together or alone. The D3 and D4 seem to be correlated if we assume that an emission at the similar energy as D3 (VID3) is caused by a separate mechanism. The content of interstitial iron (Fe{sub i}) correlates with D4. This method yields a spectral map of the inter band gap transitions, which opens up for a new way to characterize mechanisms related to loss of efficiency for solar cells processed from the block.

  16. Parametric Multi-Level Tiling of Imperfectly Nested Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Albert; Baskaran, Muthu M.; Bastoul, Cedric; Cohen, Albert; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Norris, Boyana; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-05-18

    Tiling is a critical loop transformation for generating high-performance code on modern architectures. Efficient generation of multilevel tiled code is essential to exploit several levels of parallelism and/or to maximize data reuse in deep memory hierarchies. Tiled loops with parameterized tile sizes (not compile time constants) facilitate runtime feedback and dynamic optimizations used in iterative compilation and automatic tuning. The existing parametric multilevel tiling approach has focused on transformation for perfectly nested loops, where all assignment statements are contained inside the innermost loop of a loop nest. Previous solutions to tiling for imperfect loop nests are limited to the case where tile sizes are fixed. In this paper, we present an approach to parameterized multilevel tiling for imperfectly nested loops. Our tiling algorithm generates loops that iterate over full rectangular tiles that are amenable for potential compiler optimizations such as register tiling. Experimental results using a number of computational benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our tiling approach.

  17. Stability, vibration and passive damping of partially restrained imperfect columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Z.; Voland, R. T.; Bush, H. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of slender tubular columns for possible use in space structures is conducted in the presence of partial rotational end restraints. Explicit formulas are derived for computing the buckling load and the lowest natural frequency of perfectly straight uniform elastic members with rotational end restraints possessing linear moment-rotation characteristics. An exact solution in the form of a transcendental equation, and a numerical solution using second-order finite-differences are also presented. The presence of an initial imperfection is also incorporated into the numerical procedure. Vibration tests are conducted on an imperfect tubular steel member in the absence of an axial load. A damping concept consisting of a string-mass assembly is explored. Three passive damping configurations involving combinations of three lead shots were investigated. The three lead shot configurations provided considerably greater damping than the single lead shot.

  18. Coarse grain modeling of imperfect networks and gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliozberg, Yelena; Chantawansri, Tanya; Sirk, Timothy; Andzelm, Jan; Mrozek, Randy; Lenhart, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    There is a strong interest in chemically and physically cross-linked entangled polymer networks and gels due to their tailorability in respect to both mechanical and structural properties. Even so, these properties are sensitive to imperfections in the polymer networks, such as dangling ends and loops. Computational modeling is a viable tool to understand the effects of these imperfections on properties in a controlled environment, in which specific defects can be systematically created and varied. In this study, we have employed generic bead-spring models of flexible chains to study a chemically and physically cross-linked network. Our results will show the importance defects, such as dangling ends and loops, on the mechanical and structural properties of these networks. We will also discuss the effects of these defects on the time-dependent elastic modulus. The simulation results qualitatively agree with experimental results and the other theoretical predictions.

  19. Imperfect Geometric Control and Overdamping for The Damped Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burq, Nicolas; Christianson, Hans

    2015-05-01

    We consider the damped wave equation on a manifold with imperfect geometric control. We show the sub-exponential energy decay estimate in (Christianson, J Funct Anal 258(3):1060-1065, 2010) is optimal in the case of one hyperbolic periodic geodesic. We show if the equation is overdamped, then the energy decays exponentially. Finally we show if the equation is overdamped but geometric control fails for one hyperbolic periodic geodesic, then nevertheless the energy decays exponentially.

  20. Buckling of structures with uncertain imperfections - Personal perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac

    1998-01-01

    The previous review on stochastic buckling of structures was written by Amazigo in 1976. This review summarizes some of the developments which took place in recent two decades. A brief overview is given of the effect on uncertainty in the initial geometric imperfections, elastic moduli, applied forces, and thickness variation. For the benefit of the thinking reader, the review has a critical nature. It should be noted that this manuscript has yet to be completed.

  1. Transitional Flows in Imperfect Millimeter-Scale Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissandrello, Charles; Li, Le; Ekinci, Kamil L.; Yakhot, Victor

    2015-11-01

    The majority of workers studying transition to turbulence in pipes have been interested in the flow response to perturbations in otherwise perfect pipes. Conversely, the ``fuzzy'' problem involving inlet disturbances, pipe imperfections, and pipe roughness has not attracted as much attention. Here, we investigate both experimentally and theoretically the transition to turbulence in imperfect millimeter-scale channels. For probing the flows, we use microcantilever sensors embedded in the channel walls. We perform experiments in two nominally identical channels. We quantify growing perturbations near the channel wall by their spectra and statistical properties, including probability densities and low- and high-order moments. The different sets of imperfections in the two channels result in two random flows in which the high-order moments of the near-wall fluctuations differ by orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, however, the lowest-order statistics in both cases appear to be qualitatively similar and can be described by a proposed noisy Landau equation for a slow mode. The noise, regardless of its origin, regularizes the Landau singularity of the relaxation time and makes transitions driven by different noise sources appear similar.

  2. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging.

    PubMed

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles. PMID:27078384

  3. NMR-based diffusion lattice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Müller, Lars; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g., about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles that these experiments can be used to determine the shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open well-connected systems. In this theoretical work, it is shown that the full structure information of connected periodic systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called "SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time intervals" (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion encoding gradient pulses with different amplitudes. Two two-dimensional solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a rectangular lattice of isosceles triangles.

  4. Triangular lattice of carbon nanotube arrays for negative index of refraction and subwavelength lensing effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Wang, X.; Rybczynski, J.; Wang, D.Z.; Kempa, K.; Ren, Z.F.

    2005-04-11

    Self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres has been utilized in a two-step masking technique to prepare triangular lattices of catalytic nanodots at low cost. Subsequent triangular lattices of aligned carbon nanotubes on a silicon substrate are achieved by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Nickel is used both in the nanodots and in the secondary mask. The triangular lattices of carbon nanotube arrays as two-dimensional photonic crystals show higher geometrical symmetry than the hexagonal lattices previously reported, enabling broader applications including negative index of refraction and subwavelength lensing effect.

  5. Lattice and off-lattice side chain models of protein folding: Linear time structure prediction better than 86% of optimal

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.; Istrail, S.

    1996-08-09

    This paper considers the protein structure prediction problem for lattice and off-lattice protein folding models that explicitly represent side chains. Lattice models of proteins have proven extremely useful tools for reasoning about protein folding in unrestricted continuous space through analogy. This paper provides the first illustration of how rigorous algorithmic analyses of lattice models can lead to rigorous algorithmic analyses of off-lattice models. The authors consider two side chain models: a lattice model that generalizes the HP model (Dill 85) to explicitly represent side chains on the cubic lattice, and a new off-lattice model, the HP Tangent Spheres Side Chain model (HP-TSSC), that generalizes this model further by representing the backbone and side chains of proteins with tangent spheres. They describe algorithms for both of these models with mathematically guaranteed error bounds. In particular, the authors describe a linear time performance guaranteed approximation algorithm for the HP side chain model that constructs conformations whose energy is better than 865 of optimal in a face centered cubic lattice, and they demonstrate how this provides a 70% performance guarantee for the HP-TSSC model. This is the first algorithm in the literature for off-lattice protein structure prediction that has a rigorous performance guarantee. The analysis of the HP-TSSC model builds off of the work of Dancik and Hannenhalli who have developed a 16/30 approximation algorithm for the HP model on the hexagonal close packed lattice. Further, the analysis provides a mathematical methodology for transferring performance guarantees on lattices to off-lattice models. These results partially answer the open question of Karplus et al. concerning the complexity of protein folding models that include side chains.

  6. Thermodynamic properties of the magnetized Coulomb crystal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhberov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    It is thought that Coulomb crystals of ions with hexagonal close-packed lattice may form in the crust of strongly-magnetized neutron stars (magnetars). In this work we are trying to verify this prediction assuming that the direction of the magnetic field corresponds to the minimum of the zero-point energy. We also continue a detailed study of vibration modes and thermodynamic properties of magnetized Coulomb crystals in a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields. It is demonstrated that the total Helmholtz free energy of the body-centered cubic Coulomb crystal is always lower than that of the Coulomb crystal with hexagonal close-packed or face-centered cubic lattice, which casts doubt on the hypothesis above.

  7. Hydrothermal hexagonal SrFe12O19 ferrite powders: Phase composition, microstructure and acid washing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ailin; Hu, Xuzhao; Li, Diankai; Chen, Lu; Jin, Chuangui; Zuo, Conghua; Su, Shubing

    2014-03-01

    A series of hexagonal m-type SrFe12O19 ferrite powders were hydrothermally synthesized, and their phase composition, microstructure and magnetic properties before/after acid washing were studied. In the synthesis of these specimens, the atomic ratio of Fe/Sr ( R F/S ) in starting materials was set to 4, 5 and 12, respectively. When R F/S = 12, the specimen has morphology of round flat cakes, not typical hexagonal plate-like structure. The results of SEM images and XRD patterns indicate that the specimen with R F/S = 12 was mostly composed of Fe2O3. When R F/S = 4 or 5, the hexagonal plate-like SrFe12O19 ferrite powders were successfully synthesized with only a small quantity of Fe2O3 and SrCO3 impurities. It is also found that acid washing can eliminate the impurities in as-synthesized specimens effectively, and also change their topography, which enhances the saturation magnetization. However, the coercivity changed irregularly after acid washing, which is ascribed to the combination of the changed morphology, introduced stress and lattice defects.

  8. 2D metamaterials with hexagonal structure: spatial resonances and near field imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhuromskyy, O; Shamonina, E; Solymar, L

    2005-11-14

    The current and field distribution in a 2D metamaterial consisting of resonant elements in a hexagonal arrangement are found assuming magnetic interaction between the elements. The dispersion equation of magnetoinductive (MI) waves is derived with the aid of the direct and reciprocal lattice familiar from solid state theory. A continuous model for the current variation in the elements is introduced leading to the familiar wave equation in the form of a second order differential equation. The current distributions are shown to exhibit a series of spatial resonances for rectangular, circular and hexagonal boundaries. The axial and radial components of the resulting magnetic field are compared with previously obtained experimental results on a Swiss Roll metamaterial with hexagonal boundaries. Experimental and theoretical results are also compared for the near field image of an object in the shape of the letter M followed by a more general discussion of imaging. It is concluded that a theoretical formulation based on the propagation of MI waves can correctly describe the experimental results. PMID:19503131

  9. Theory of thermal transport in multilayer hexagonal boron nitride and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for the lattice thermal conductivity κL of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (MLBN), which is based on an exact numerical solution of the phonon Boltzmann equation. Coupling between layers in MLBN and nanotube curvature in BNNTs each break a phonon scattering selection rule found in single-layer hexagonal boron nitride (SLBN), which reduces κL in these systems. We show that out-of-plane flexural phonons in MLBN and out-of-tube phonons in BNNTs provide large contributions to κL, qualitatively similar to multilayer graphene (MLG) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). However, we find that the κL's in BNNTs and MLBN are considerably smaller compared to similar SWCNTs and MLG structures because of stronger anharmonic phonon scattering in the former. A large and strongly temperature-dependent isotope effect is found reflecting the interplay between anharmonic and isotope scattering phonons. Finally, we also demonstrate convergence of BNNTs into SLBN for large-diameter nanotubes and MLBN to bulk hexagonal boron nitride within a few layers.

  10. Recursive, in-place algorithm for the hexagonal orthogonal oriented quadrature image pyramid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1989-01-01

    Pyramid image transforms have proven useful in image coding and pattern recognition. The hexagonal orthogonal oriented quadrature image pyramid (HOP), transforms an image into a set of orthogonal, oriented, odd and even bandpass subimages. It operates on a hexagonal input lattice and employs seven kernels, each of which occupies a neighborhood consisting of a point and a hexagon of six nearest neighbors. The kernels consist of one lowpass and six bandpass kernels that are orthogonal, self-similar, and localized in space, spatial frequency, orientation, and phase. The kernels are first applied to the image samples to create the first level of the pyramid, then to the lowpass coefficients to create the next level. The resulting pyramid is a compact, efficient image code. Here, a recursive, in-place algorithm for computation of the HOP transform is described. The transform may be regarded as a depth-first traversal of a tree structure. It is shown that the algorithm requires a number of operations that is on the order of the number of pixels.

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of Ca-substituted barium W-type hexagonal hexaferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Liu, Xiansong; Feng, Shuangjiu; Zhang, Zhanjun; Yu, Jiangying; Niu, Xiaofei; Lv, Farui; Huang, Xing

    2015-04-01

    A series of W-type hexagonal ferrites with the composition Ba1-xCaxCo2Fe16O27 (x=0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5) were synthesized using a sol-gel method. The effects of doping on structural and magnetic properties are studied by X-ray diffraction, thermal analyzer, scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analyzer, respectively. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the samples belong to the W-type hexagonal ferrite. The lattice constants a and c decreases as Ca contents increases. The grains exhibit well defined hexagonal shape. The saturation magnetization and the intrinsic coercive force increases with the increase of the Ca substitution amount. The real part of complex permittivity (ε‧) and imaginary part (ε″) increase with more addition of Ca2+ amount. The imaginary part of complex permittivity (μ‧) increases and the real part (μ‧‧) goes down after Ca2+ is doped. Furthermore, the Ca2+ ions doped in the ferrite improved microwave absorbency.

  12. Wargaming in Both Rectilinear and Hexagonal Spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Alex

    2012-01-01

    There are two main approaches to managing wargame entity interactions (movement, line of sight, area of effect, etc) freespace and gridded In the freespace approach, the units exist as entities in a continuous volume of (usually) Cartesian 3D space. They move in any direction (based on interaction with "terrain" that occupies the same space) and interact with each other based on references and displacements from their position in that space. In the gridded approach, space is broken up into (usually regular) shaped pieces. Units are considered to occupy the entire volume of one of these pieces, movement, line of sight, and other interactions are based on the relationships among the spaces rather than the absolute positions of the units themselves. Both approaches have advantages and drawbacks. The general issue that this discussion has addressed is that there is no "perfect" approach to implementing a wargaming battlespace. Each of them (and this extends to others not discussed) has different sets of advantages and disadvantages. Nothing will change that basic nature of the various approaches, nor would it be desirable to do so. Along with the advantages, the challenges define the feel of the game and focus the thinking of the players on certain aspects and away from others. The proposed approach to combining square and hexagonal approaches, which we will call the rhombus interface, leverages rhombuses constructed from equilateral triangles into which the hexagon can be decomposed to bridge the gap between the approaches, maintain relative consistency between the two as much as possible, and provide most of the feel of the hexagonal approach.

  13. Solubilization of nutraceuticals into reverse hexagonal mesophases.

    PubMed

    Amar-Yuli, Idit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2008-08-21

    The solubilization of four bioactive molecules with different polarities, in three reverse hexagonal (HII) systems has been investigated. The three HII systems were a typical reverse hexagonal composed of glycerol monooleate (GMO)/tricaprylin/water and two fluid hexagonal systems containing either 2.75 wt % Transcutol or ethanol as a fourth component. The phase behavior of the liquid crystalline phases in the presence of ascorbic acid, ascorbyl palmitate, D-alpha-tocopherol and D-alpha-tocopherol acetate were determined by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and optical microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques were utilized to follow modifications in the thermal behavior and in the vibrations of different functional groups upon solubilizing the bioactive molecules. The nature of each guest molecule (in both geometry and polarity) together with the different HII structures (typical and fluids) determined the corresponding phase behavior, swelling or structural transformations and its location in the HII structures. Ascorbic acid was found to act as a chaotropic guest molecule, localized in the water-rich core and at the interface. The AP was also a chaotropic guest molecule with its head located in the vicinity of the GMO headgroup while its tail embedded close to the surfactant tail. D-alpha-tocopherol and D-alpha-tocopherol acetate were incorporated between the GMO tails; however, the D-alpha-tocopherol was located closer to the interface. Once Transcutol or ethanol was present and upon guest molecule incorporation, partial migration was detected. PMID:18665631

  14. Quasiparticles near domain walls in hexagonal superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumya; Samokhin, Kirill

    We calculate the energy spectrum of quasiparticles trapped by a domain wall separating different time reversal symmetry-breaking ground states in a hexagonal superconductor, such as UPt3. The bound state energy is found to be strongly dependent on the gap symmetry, the domain wall orientation, the quasiparticle's direction of semiclassical propagation, and the phase difference between the domains. We calculate the corresponding density of states and show how one can use its prominent features, in particular, the zero-energy singularity, to distinguish between different pairing symmetries. Discovery Grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  15. Quasiparticles near domain walls in hexagonal superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.; Samokhin, K. V.

    2016-02-01

    We calculate the energy spectrum of quasiparticles trapped by a domain wall separating different time-reversal symmetry-breaking ground states in a hexagonal superconductor, such as UPt3. The bound-state energy is found to be strongly dependent on the gap symmetry, the domain-wall orientation, the quasiparticle's direction of semiclassical propagation, and the phase difference between the domains. We calculate the corresponding density of states and show how one can use its prominent features, in particular, the zero-energy singularity, to distinguish between different pairing symmetries.

  16. Diamagnetic response in zigzag hexagonal silicene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ning; Chen, Qiao; Tian, Hongyu; Ding, Jianwen; Liu, Junfeng

    2016-09-01

    Hexagonal silicene rings with unusually large diamagnetic moments have been found in a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties. In the presence of effective spin-orbit coupling, the magnetic-field-driven spin-up electrons flow anticlockwise exhibiting colossal diamagnetic moments, while the spin-down electrons flow clockwise exhibiting colossal paramagnetic moments along the rings. The large diamagnetic moment is thus the result of competition of spin-up and spin-down electrons, which can be modulated by spin-orbit coupling strength and exchange field.

  17. Diagonal form factors and hexagon form factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunfeng; Petrovskii, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    We study the heavy-heavy-light (HHL) three-point functions in the planar {N} = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory using the recently proposed hexagon bootstrap program [1]. We prove the conjecture of Bajnok, Janik and Wereszczynski [2] on the polynomial L-dependence of HHL structure constant up to the leading finite-size corrections, where L is the length of the heavy operators. The proof is presented for a specific set-up but the method can be applied to more general situations.

  18. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  19. Hexagonal OsB2 reduction upon heating in H2 containing environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; Payzant, E. Andrew

    2014-10-23

    The stability of hexagonal ReB2 type OsB2 powder upon heating under reforming gas was investigated. Pure Os metal particles were detected by powder X-ray diffraction starting at 375⁰ C and complete transformation of OsB2 to metallic Os was observed at 725⁰ C. The mechanisms of precipitation of metallic Os is proposed and changes in the lattice parameters of OsB2 upon heating are analysed in terms of the presence of oxygen or water vapour in the heating chamber. Previous studies suggested that Os atoms possess (0) valence, while B atoms possess both (+3) and ( 3) valences in the alternating boron/osmiummore » sheet structure of hexagonal (P63/mmc, No. 194) OsB2; if controllable method for Os removal from the lattice could be found, the opportunity would arise to form two-dimensional (2D) layers consisting of pure B atoms.« less

  20. Gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: Hexagonal template placement and its efficiency in detecting physical signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cokelaer, T.

    2007-11-01

    Matched filtering is used to search for gravitational waves emitted by inspiralling compact binaries in data from the ground-based interferometers. One of the key aspects of the detection process is the design of a template bank that covers the astrophysically pertinent parameter space. In an earlier paper, we described a template bank that is based on a square lattice. Although robust, we showed that the square placement is overefficient, with the implication that it is computationally more demanding than required. In this paper, we present a template bank based on an hexagonal lattice, which size is reduced by 40% with respect to the proposed square placement. We describe the practical aspects of the hexagonal template bank implementation, its size, and computational cost. We have also performed exhaustive simulations to characterize its efficiency and safeness. We show that the bank is adequate to search for a wide variety of binary systems (primordial black holes, neutron stars, and stellar-mass black holes) and in data from both current detectors (initial LIGO, Virgo and GEO600) as well as future detectors (advanced LIGO and EGO). Remarkably, although our template bank placement uses a metric arising from a particular template family, namely, stationary phase approximation, we show that it can be used successfully with other template families (e.g., Padé resummation and effective one-body approximation). This quality of being effective for different template families makes the proposed bank suitable for a search that would use several of them in parallel (e.g., in a binary black hole search). The hexagonal template bank described in this paper is currently used to search for nonspinning inspiralling compact binaries in data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

  1. Gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: Hexagonal template placement and its efficiency in detecting physical signals

    SciTech Connect

    Cokelaer, T.

    2007-11-15

    Matched filtering is used to search for gravitational waves emitted by inspiralling compact binaries in data from the ground-based interferometers. One of the key aspects of the detection process is the design of a template bank that covers the astrophysically pertinent parameter space. In an earlier paper, we described a template bank that is based on a square lattice. Although robust, we showed that the square placement is overefficient, with the implication that it is computationally more demanding than required. In this paper, we present a template bank based on an hexagonal lattice, which size is reduced by 40% with respect to the proposed square placement. We describe the practical aspects of the hexagonal template bank implementation, its size, and computational cost. We have also performed exhaustive simulations to characterize its efficiency and safeness. We show that the bank is adequate to search for a wide variety of binary systems (primordial black holes, neutron stars, and stellar-mass black holes) and in data from both current detectors (initial LIGO, Virgo and GEO600) as well as future detectors (advanced LIGO and EGO). Remarkably, although our template bank placement uses a metric arising from a particular template family, namely, stationary phase approximation, we show that it can be used successfully with other template families (e.g., Pade resummation and effective one-body approximation). This quality of being effective for different template families makes the proposed bank suitable for a search that would use several of them in parallel (e.g., in a binary black hole search). The hexagonal template bank described in this paper is currently used to search for nonspinning inspiralling compact binaries in data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)

  2. Imperfect pseudo-merohedral twinning in crystals of fungal fatty acid synthase

    PubMed Central

    Jenni, Simon; Ban, Nenad

    2009-01-01

    The recent high-resolution structures of fungal fatty acid synthase (FAS) have provided new insights into the principles of fatty acid biosynthesis by large multifunctional enzymes. The crystallographic phase problem for the 2.6 MDa fungal FAS was initially solved to 5 Å resolution using two crystal forms from Thermomyces lanuginosus. Monoclinic crystals in space group P21 were obtained from orthorhombic crystals in space group P212121 by dehydration. Here, it is shown how this space-group transition induced imperfect pseudo-merohedral twinning in the monoclinic crystal, giving rise to a Moiré pattern-like interference of the two twin-related reciprocal lattices. The strategy for processing the twinned diffraction images and obtaining a quantitative analysis is presented. The twinning is also related to the packing of the molecules in the two crystal forms, which was derived from self-rotation function analysis and molecular-replacement solutions using a low-resolution electron microscopy map as a search model. PMID:19171964

  3. Optical properties of Tb3+ doped KLaF4 in cubic and hexagonal symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Shahzad; Das, Subrata; Nagarajan, R.; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2013-12-01

    Tb3+ doped cubic and hexagonally ordered KLaF4 nano-sized crystals have been synthesized by solution based method with the simultaneous evaluation of their optical and magnetic properties. While higher amounts of Tb3+ (10%) can be doped in cubic KLaF4 lattice, only 3% of Tb3+ can be doped in hexagonal KLaF4 by this method. Cubic KLaF4:Tb3+ samples show a very strong green emission centered at 545 nm (5D4 → 7F5) on excitation with 337 nm laser, the intensity increases monotonically with Tb3+ content. The relative intensity of the excited state 5D3 violet emission is weaker than that of 5D4 emissions even at the low Tb3+ amounts. It is proposed that the 5D3 → 5D4 cross-relaxation may be responsible for the decrease in the 5D3 decay rate with increasing Tb3+ concentrations. The average emission decay lifetime of the green emission (545 nm; 5D4 → 7F5) of Tb3+ doped cubic KLaF4 samples are in the order of 1-3 ms. The absence of the characteristic emissions from 5D3 level in hexagonal KLaF4:Tb3+ phosphor suggests the pronounced non-radiative cross relaxation between the 5D3 to 5D4 energy levels. Further, these cubic KLaF4:Tb3+ samples show intense green upconversion emission when co-doped with moderate concentrations of sensitizer Yb3+ ions. Both cubic and hexagonal KLaF4:Tb3+ samples show paramagnetic behavior at room temperature with χg value ranging from 1.627 × 10-6 to 1.356 × 10-5 emu/g.

  4. Domain wall kinetics of lithium niobate single crystals near the hexagonal corner

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ju Won; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Yu, Nan Ei E-mail: jhro@pnu.edu; Kitamura, Kenji; Ro, Jung Hoon E-mail: jhro@pnu.edu

    2015-03-09

    A mesospheric approach based on a simple microscopic 2D Ising model in a hexagonal lattice plane is proposed to explain macroscopic “asymmetric in-out domain wall motion” observation in the (0001) plane of MgO-doped stoichiometric lithium niobate. Under application of an electric field that was higher than the conventional coercive field (E{sub c}) to the ferroelectric crystal, a natural hexagonal domain was obtained with walls that were parallel to the Y-axis of the crystal. When a fraction of the coercive field of around 0.1E{sub c} is applied in the reverse direction, this hexagonal domain is shrunk (moved inward) from the corner site into a shape with a corner angle of around 150° and 15° wall slopes to the Y-axis. A flipped electric field of 0.15E{sub c} is then applied to recover the natural hexagonal shape, and the 150° corner shape changes into a flat wall with 30° slope (moved outward). The differences in corner domain shapes between inward and outward domain motion were analyzed theoretically in terms of corner and wall site energies, which are described using the domain corner angle and wall slope with respect to the crystal Y-axis, respectively. In the inward domain wall motion case, the energy levels of the evolving 150° domain corner and 15° slope walls are most competitive, and could co-exist. In the outward case, the energy levels of corners with angles >180° are highly stable when compared with the possible domain walls; only a flat wall with 30° slope to the Y-axis is possible during outward motion.

  5. Lattice Location Determination of Ge in SiC by ALCHEMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kups, T.; Voelskow, M.; Skorupa, W.; Soueidan, M.; Ferro, G.; Pezoldt, J.

    The incorporation of Ge into cubic and hexagonal silicon carbide is compared for three different doping methods: ion-implantation, molecular beam epitaxy and liquid phase epitaxy. The lattice location of Ge was determined by the transmission electron microscopy based method ALCHEMI (atomic location by channelling enhanced microanalysis). Depending on the method used for incorporation, Ge is able to occupy different silicon carbide lattice locations.

  6. A Computationally Efficient Modeling Approach for Predicting Mechanical Behavior of Cellular Lattice Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Kadkhodaei, M.

    2015-01-01

    As the fabrication and characterization of cellular lattice structures are time consuming and expensive, development of simple models is vital. In this paper, a new approach is presented to model the mechanical stress-strain curve of cellular lattices with low computational efforts. To do so, first, a single strut of the lattice is modeled with its imperfections and defects. The stress-strain of a specimen fabricated with the same processing parameters as those used for the lattice is used as the base material. Then, this strut is simulated in simple tension, and its stress-strain curve is obtained. After that, a unit cell of the lattice is simulated without any imperfections, and the material parameters of the single strut are attributed to the bulk material. Using this method, the stress-strain behavior of the lattice is obtained and shown to be in a good agreement with the experimental result. Accordingly, this paper presents a computationally efficient method for modeling the mechanical properties of cellular lattices with a reasonable accuracy using the material parameters of simple tension tests. The effects of the single strut's length and its micropores on its mechanical properties are also assessed.

  7. Nylon flocked swab severely reduces Hexagon Obti sensibility.

    PubMed

    Frippiat, Christophe; De Roy, Gilbert; Fontaine, Louis-Marie; Dognaux, Sophie; Noel, Fabrice; Heudt, Laeticia; Lepot, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    Hexagon Obti immunological blood test and flocked swab are widely used in forensic laboratories. Nevertheless, up to now, no compatibility tests have been published between sampling with the ethylene oxide treated flocked swab and the Hexagon Obti blood detection strip. In this study, we investigated this compatibility. Our work shows that sampling with ethylene oxide treated flocked swab reduces by a factor of at least 100 the detection threshold of blood using the Hexagon Obti immunological test. PMID:25575014

  8. Raman spectra and structural properties of hexagonal Yb1-xDyxMnO3 (x = 0, 0.05 and 0.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattibabu, Bhumireddi; Bhatnagar, Anil K.; Das, D.

    2016-05-01

    Single phase Yb1-xDyxMnO3 (x= 0, 0.05 and 0.1) samples are prepared by a solid state reaction method. X-ray powder diffraction shows that all samples crystallize in the hexagonal phase with P63cm space group. The structural analysis shows there is increase in lattice parameter c and cell volume of the hexagonal unit cell with Dy substitution and the average bond length between Mn-O increases. Raman spectra show that the phonon peaks of Yb1-xDyxMnO3 slightly shift to lower frequencies with doping.

  9. Solution of an associating lattice-gas model with density anomaly on a Husimi lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago J.; Stilck, Jürgen F.; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a model of a lattice gas with orientational degrees of freedom which resemble the formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecules. In this model, which is the simplified version of the Henriques-Barbosa model, no distinction is made between donors and acceptors in the bonding arms. We solve the model in the grand-canonical ensemble on a Husimi lattice built with hexagonal plaquettes with a central site. The ground state of the model, which was originally defined on the triangular lattice, is exactly reproduced by the solution on this Husimi lattice. In the phase diagram, one gas and two liquid [high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL)] phases are present. All phase transitions (GAS-LDL, GAS-HDL, and LDL-HDL) are discontinuous, and the three phases coexist at a triple point. A line of temperatures of maximum density in the isobars is found in the metastable GAS phase, as well as another line of temperatures of minimum density appears in the LDL phase, part of it in the stable region and another in the metastable region of this phase. These findings are at variance with simulational results for the same model on the triangular lattice, which suggested a phase diagram with two critical points. However, our results show very good quantitative agreement with the simulations, both for the coexistence loci and the densities of particles and of hydrogen bonds. We discuss the comparison of the simulations with our results.

  10. Reliability with imperfect diagnostics. [flight-maintenance sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    A reliability estimation method for systems that continually accumulate faults because of imperfect diagnostics is developed and an application for redundant digital avionics is presented. The present method assumes that if a fault does not appear in a short period of time, it will remain hidden until a majority of components are faulty and the system fails. A certain proportion of a component's faults are detected in a short period of time, and a description of their detection is included in the reliability model. A Markov model of failure during flight for a nonreconfigurable five-plex is presented for a sequence of one-hour flights followed by maintenance.

  11. Security Issues of Quantum Cryptographic Systems with Imperfect Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenkov, Viacheslav

    The laws of quantum physics can be used to secure communications between two distant parties in a scheme called quantum key distribution (QKD), even against a technologically unlimited eavesdropper. While the theoretical security of QKD has been proved rigorously, current implementations of QKD are generally insecure. In particular, mathematical models of devices, such as detectors, do not accurately describe their reallife behaviour. Such seemingly insignificant discrepancies can compromise the security of the entire scheme, especially as novel detector technologies are being developed with little regard for potential vulnerabilities. In this thesis, we study how detector imperfections can impact the security of QKD and how to overcome such technological limitations. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  12. Effect of imperfect Faraday mirrors on the security of a Faraday-Michelson quantum cryptography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Long; Gao, Ming; Ma, Zhi

    2013-11-01

    The one-way Faraday-Michelson system is a very useful practical quantum cryptography system where Faraday mirrors (FMs) play an important role. In this paper we analyze the security of this system against imperfect FMs. We consider the security loophole caused by imperfect FMs in Alice’s and Bob’s security zones. Then we implement a passive FM attack in this system. By changing the values of the imperfection parameters of Alice’s FMs, we calculate the quantum bit error rate between Alice and Bob induced by Eve and the probability that Eve obtains outcomes successfully. It is shown that the imperfection of one of Alice’s two FMs makes the system sensitive to an attack. Finally we give a modified key rate as a function of the FM imperfections. The security analysis indicates that both Alice’s and Bob’s imperfect FMs can compromise the secure key.

  13. Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride as a tunable hyperbolic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, S.; Ma, Q.; Liu, M. K.; Andersen, T.; Fei, Z.; Goldflam, M. D.; Wagner, M.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Thiemens, M.; Keilmann, F.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Zhu, S.-E.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-08-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a natural hyperbolic material, in which the dielectric constants are the same in the basal plane (ɛt ≡ ɛx = ɛy) but have opposite signs (ɛtɛz < 0) in the normal plane (ɛz). Owing to this property, finite-thickness slabs of h-BN act as multimode waveguides for the propagation of hyperbolic phonon polaritons—collective modes that originate from the coupling between photons and electric dipoles in phonons. However, control of these hyperbolic phonon polaritons modes has remained challenging, mostly because their electrodynamic properties are dictated by the crystal lattice of h-BN. Here we show, by direct nano-infrared imaging, that these hyperbolic polaritons can be effectively modulated in a van der Waals heterostructure composed of monolayer graphene on h-BN. Tunability originates from the hybridization of surface plasmon polaritons in graphene with hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN, so that the eigenmodes of the graphene/h-BN heterostructure are hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons. The hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons in graphene/h-BN suffer little from ohmic losses, making their propagation length 1.5-2.0 times greater than that of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN. The hyperbolic plasmon-phonon polaritons possess the combined virtues of surface plasmon polaritons in graphene and hyperbolic phonon polaritons in h-BN. Therefore, graphene/h-BN can be classified as an electromagnetic metamaterial as the resulting properties of these devices are not present in its constituent elements alone.

  14. Probing topological relations between high-density and low-density regions of 2MASS with hexagon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yongfeng; Xiao, Weike

    2014-02-01

    We introduced a new two-dimensional (2D) hexagon technique for probing the topological structure of the universe in which we mapped regions of the sky with high and low galaxy densities onto a 2D lattice of hexagonal unit cells. We defined filled cells as corresponding to high-density regions and empty cells as corresponding to low-density regions. The numbers of filled cells and empty cells were kept the same by controlling the size of the cells. By analyzing the six sides of each hexagon, we could obtain and compare the statistical topological properties of high-density and low-density regions of the universe in order to have a better understanding of the evolution of the universe. We applied this hexagonal method to Two Micron All Sky Survey data and discovered significant topological differences between the high-density and low-density regions. Both regions had significant (>5σ) topological shifts from both the binomial distribution and the random distribution.

  15. B{sub 27}{sup −}: Appearance of the smallest planar boron cluster containing a hexagonal vacancy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Li; Piazza, Zachary A.; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Pal, Rhitankar; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-05-28

    Photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations have been carried out to probe the structures and chemical bonding of the B{sub 27}{sup −} cluster. Comparison between the experimental spectrum and the theoretical results reveals a two-dimensional (2D) global minimum with a triangular lattice containing a tetragonal defect (I) and two low-lying 2D isomers (II and III), each with a hexagonal vacancy. All three 2D isomers have 16 peripheral boron atoms and 11 inner boron atoms. Isomer I is shown to be mainly responsible for the observed photoelectron spectrum with isomers II and III as minor contributors. Chemical bonding analyses of these three isomers show that they all feature 16 localized peripheral B–B σ-bonds. Additionally, isomer I possesses 16 delocalized σ bonds and nine delocalized π bonds, while isomers II and III each contain 17 delocalized σ bonds and eight delocalized π bonds. It is found that the hexagonal vacancy is associated generally with an increase of delocalized σ bonds at the expense of delocalized π bonds in 2D boron clusters. The hexagonal vacancy, characteristic of borophenes, is found to be a general structural feature for mid-sized boron clusters. The current study shows that B{sub 27}{sup −} is the first boron cluster, where a hexagonal vacancy appears among the low-lying isomers accessible experimentally.

  16. One-dimensional flows of an imperfect diatomic gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    With the assumptions that Berthelot's equation of state accounts for molecular size and intermolecular force effects, and that changes in the vibrational heat capacities are given by a Planck term, expressions are developed for analyzing one-dimensional flows of a diatomic gas. The special cases of flow through normal and oblique shocks in free air at sea level are investigated. It is found that up to a Mach number 10 pressure ratio across a normal shock differs by less than 6 percent from its ideal gas value; whereas at Mach numbers above 4 the temperature rise is considerable below and hence the density rise is well above that predicted assuming ideal gas behavior. It is further shown that only the caloric imperfection in air has an appreciable effect on the pressures developed in the shock process considered. The effects of gaseous imperfections on oblique shock-flows are studied from the standpoint of their influence on the life and pressure drag of a flat plate operating at Mach numbers of 10 and 20. The influence is found to be small. (author)

  17. Population level impact of an imperfect prophylactic HSV-2 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Alsallaq, Ramzi A.; Schiffer, Joshua T.; Longini, Ira M.; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The continuation of developing HSV-2 prophylactic vaccines requires parallel mathematical modeling to quantify the impact on the population of these vaccines. Methods Using mathematical modeling we derived three summary measures for the population impact of imperfect HSV-2 vaccines as a function of their efficacies in reducing susceptibility (VES), genital shedding (VEP), and infectivity during shedding (VEI). In addition, we studied the population level impact of vaccine intervention using representative vaccine efficacies. Results A vaccine with limited efficacy of reducing shedding frequency (VEP =10%) and infectivity (VEI =0%) would need to reduce susceptibility by 75% (VES =75%) to substantially reduce the sustainability of HSV-2 infection in a population. No reduction in susceptibility would be required to reach this target in a vaccine that decreased shedding by 75% (VES =0%, VEP =75%, VEI =0%). Mass vaccination using a vaccine with imperfect efficacies (VES =30%, VEP =75%, and VEI =0%) in Kisumu, Kenya in 2010 would decrease prevalence and incidence in 2020 by 7% and 30% respectively. For lower prevalence settings, vaccination is predicted to have a lower impact on prevalence. Conclusion A vaccine with substantially high efficacy of reducing HSV-2 shedding frequency would have a desirable impact at the population level. The vaccine’s short-term impact in a high prevalence setting in Africa would be a substantial decrease in incidence, whereas its immediate impact on prevalence would be small and would increase slowly over time. PMID:20351622

  18. Efficient Logistic Regression Designs Under an Imperfect Population Identifier

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Paul S.; Liu, Aiyi; Nansel, Tonja

    2013-01-01

    Summary Motivated by actual study designs, this article considers efficient logistic regression designs where the population is identified with a binary test that is subject to diagnostic error. We consider the case where the imperfect test is obtained on all participants, while the gold standard test is measured on a small chosen subsample. Under maximum-likelihood estimation, we evaluate the optimal design in terms of sample selection as well as verification. We show that there may be substantial efficiency gains by choosing a small percentage of individuals who test negative on the imperfect test for inclusion in the sample (e.g., verifying 90% test-positive cases). We also show that a two-stage design may be a good practical alternative to a fixed design in some situations. Under optimal and nearly optimal designs, we compare maximum-likelihood and semi-parametric efficient estimators under correct and misspecified models with simulations. The methodology is illustrated with an analysis from a diabetes behavioral intervention trial. PMID:24261471

  19. Postdeposition annealing induced transition from hexagonal Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} to cubic PrO{sub 2} films on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Weisemoeller, T.; Bertram, F.; Gevers, S.; Greuling, A.; Deiter, C.; Tobergte, H.; Neumann, M.; Wollschlaeger, J.; Giussani, A.; Schroeder, T.

    2009-06-15

    Films of hexagonal praseodymium sesquioxide (h-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were deposited on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy and thereafter annealed in 1 atm oxygen at different temperatures, ranging from 100 to 700 deg. C. The films of the samples annealed at 300 deg. C or more were transformed to PrO{sub 2} with B-oriented Fm3m structure, while films annealed at lower temperatures kept the hexagonal structure. The films are composed of PrO{sub 2} and PrO{sub 2-d}elta species, which coexist laterally and are tetragonally distorted due to the interaction at the interface between oxide film and Si substrate. Compared to PrO{sub 2}, PrO{sub 2-d}elta has the same cubic structure but with oxygen vacancies. The oxygen vacancies are partly ordered and increase the vertical lattice constant of the film, whereas the lateral lattice constant is almost identical for both species and on all samples. The latter lattice constant matches the lattice constant of the originally crystallized hexagonal praseodymium sesquioxide. That means that no long range reordering of the praseodymium atoms takes place during the phase transformation.

  20. Robust light transport in non-Hermitian photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano; Gatti, Davide; Della Valle, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Combating the effects of disorder on light transport in micro- and nano-integrated photonic devices is of major importance from both fundamental and applied viewpoints. In ordinary waveguides, imperfections and disorder cause unwanted back-reflections, which hinder large-scale optical integration. Topological photonic structures, a new class of optical systems inspired by quantum Hall effect and topological insulators, can realize robust transport via topologically-protected unidirectional edge modes. Such waveguides are realized by the introduction of synthetic gauge fields for photons in a two-dimensional structure, which break time reversal symmetry and enable one-way guiding at the edge of the medium. Here we suggest a different route toward robust transport of light in lower-dimensional (1D) photonic lattices, in which time reversal symmetry is broken because of the non-Hermitian nature of transport. While a forward propagating mode in the lattice is amplified, the corresponding backward propagating mode is damped, thus resulting in an asymmetric transport insensitive to disorder or imperfections in the structure. Non-Hermitian asymmetric transport can occur in tight-binding lattices with an imaginary gauge field via a non-Hermitian delocalization transition, and in periodically-driven superlattices. The possibility to observe non-Hermitian delocalization is suggested using an engineered coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure. PMID:26314932

  1. Robust light transport in non-Hermitian photonic lattices

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Stefano; Gatti, Davide; Valle, Giuseppe Della

    2015-01-01

    Combating the effects of disorder on light transport in micro- and nano-integrated photonic devices is of major importance from both fundamental and applied viewpoints. In ordinary waveguides, imperfections and disorder cause unwanted back-reflections, which hinder large-scale optical integration. Topological photonic structures, a new class of optical systems inspired by quantum Hall effect and topological insulators, can realize robust transport via topologically-protected unidirectional edge modes. Such waveguides are realized by the introduction of synthetic gauge fields for photons in a two-dimensional structure, which break time reversal symmetry and enable one-way guiding at the edge of the medium. Here we suggest a different route toward robust transport of light in lower-dimensional (1D) photonic lattices, in which time reversal symmetry is broken because of the non-Hermitian nature of transport. While a forward propagating mode in the lattice is amplified, the corresponding backward propagating mode is damped, thus resulting in an asymmetric transport insensitive to disorder or imperfections in the structure. Non-Hermitian asymmetric transport can occur in tight-binding lattices with an imaginary gauge field via a non-Hermitian delocalization transition, and in periodically-driven superlattices. The possibility to observe non-Hermitian delocalization is suggested using an engineered coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure. PMID:26314932

  2. Observation of a Field-Driven Structural Phase Transition in the Flux Line Lattice in ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    SciTech Connect

    Eskildsen, M.; Andersen, N.; Mortensen, K.; Bolle, C.; Lieber, C.; Oxx, S.; Sridhar, S.; Canfield, P.

    1997-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and magnetic decoration both demonstrate a topological transition in the flux line lattice (FLL) in ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. The high-field square lattice slowly transforms into a hexagonal lattice via an area preserving [100] rhombohedral distortion below roughly 500Oe. The square FLL is aligned with the [110] direction of the tetragonal crystal, while the two domains of the hexagonal FLL are aligned with [100] and [010]. The differences in pinning for the two FLL topologies are reflected in the rf kinetic inductance. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  4. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K.; Aluru, Narayana R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  5. The hexagon hypothesis: Six disruptive scenarios.

    PubMed

    Burtles, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to bring a simple but effective and comprehensive approach to the development, delivery and monitoring of business continuity solutions. To ensure that the arguments and principles apply across the board, the paper sticks to basic underlying concepts rather than sophisticated interpretations. First, the paper explores what exactly people are defending themselves against. Secondly, the paper looks at how defences should be set up. Disruptive events tend to unfold in phases, each of which invites a particular style of protection, ranging from risk management through to business continuity to insurance cover. Their impact upon any business operation will fall into one of six basic scenarios. The hexagon hypothesis suggests that everyone should be prepared to deal with each of these six disruptive scenarios and it provides them with a useful benchmark for business continuity. PMID:26420396

  6. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing. PMID:26501751

  7. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Tran, Toantrong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; MTEE Collaboration

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. The emitters emit at the red and the near infrared spectral range and exhibit narrowband ultra bright emission (~full width at half maximum of below 10 nm with more than three million counts/s). Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  8. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  9. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K; Aluru, Narayana R

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems. PMID:27131542

  10. Elasto-static micropolar behavior of a chiral auxetic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadoni, A.; Ruzzene, M.

    2012-01-01

    Auxetic materials expand when stretched, and shrink when compressed. This is the result of a negative Poisson's ratio ν. Isotropic configurations with ν≈-1 have been designed and are expected to provide increased shear stiffness G. This assumes that Young's modulus and ν can be engineered independently. In this article, a micropolar-continuum model is employed to describe the behavior of a representative auxetic structural network, the chiral lattice, in an attempt to remove the indeterminacy in its constitutive law resulting from ν=-1. While this indeterminacy is successfully removed, it is found that the shear modulus is an independent parameter and, for certain configurations, it is equal to that of the triangular lattice. This is remarkable as the chiral lattice is subject to bending deformation of its internal members, and thus is more compliant than the triangular lattice which is stretch dominated. The derived micropolar model also indicates that this unique lattice has the highest characteristic length scale lc of all known lattice topologies, as well as a negative first Lamé constant without violating bounds required for thermodynamic stability. We also find that hexagonal arrangements of deformable rings have a coupling number N=1. This is the first lattice reported in the literature for which couple-stress or Mindlin theory is necessary rather than being adopted a priori.