Science.gov

Sample records for imperial valley california

  1. Liquefaction sites, Imperial Valley, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youd, T.L.; Bennett, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Sands that did and did not liquefy at two sites during the 1979 Imperial Valley, Calif., earthquake (ML = 6.6) are identified and their properties evaluated. SPT tests were used to evaluate liquefaction susceptibility. Loose fine sands in an abandoned channel liquefied and produced sand boils, ground fissures, and a lateral spread at the Heber Road sites. Evidence of liquefaction was not observed over moderately dense over-bank sand east of the channel nor over dense point-bar sand to the west. -from ASCE Publications Information

  2. Surface Deformation in Imperial Valley, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eneva, M.; Adams, D.; Falorni, G.; Morgan, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Imperial Valley in southern California is subjected to significant tectonic deformation resulting from the relative movement of the North American and Pacific plates. It is characterized by large earthquakes, frequent swarm activity, and aseismic events. High heat flow makes possible the operation of geothermal fields, some of which cause man-made surface displacements superimposed on the tectonic deformation. We apply radar interferometry (InSAR) to analyze Envisat ASAR data for the period 2003-2010. The SqueeSAR technique is used to obtain deformation time series and annual rates at numerous locations of permanent and distributed scatterers (PS and DS). SqueeSAR works very well in agricultural areas, where conventional differential InSAR (DinSAR) fails. We observe differential movements marking the Superstition Hills, San Andreas, and Imperial faults. The Imperial fault traverses agricultural fields, where DInSAR does not work and thus our SqueeSAR observations are the first for this fault (Fig. 1). We also observe steps in the deformation time series around the Superstition Hills fault from an October 2006 aseismic event and the April 2010 M7.2 earthquake south of the U.S.-Mexico border. Significant annual deformation rates are detected in the current geothermal fields. For example, subsidence of up to -50 mm/year is seen at the Salton Sea field (Fig. 2), and both subsidence and uplift are seen at Heber. We also determine the deformation baseline at prospective geothermal fields, thus making it possible in the future to distinguish between man-made and tectonic causes of surface deformation. Fig. 1. Line-of-sight (LOS) deformation indicates differential displacement on both sides of Imperial Fault. Movements away from the satellite are shown in yellow to red, and towards the satellite in blue. Larger deformation is associated with two geothermal fields, Heber (to the south-west) and East Mesa (to the east). Fig. 2. Subsidence in the Salton Sea geothermal

  3. Imperial Valley and Salton Sea, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Southern California's Salton Sea is a prominent visual for astronauts. This large lake supports the rich agricultural fields of the Imperial, Coachella and Mexicali Valleys in the California and Mexico desert. The Salton Sea formed by accident in 1905 when an irrigation canal ruptured, allowing the Colorado River to flood the Salton Basin. Today the Sea performs an important function as the sink for agricultural runoff; water levels are maintained by the runoff from the surrounding agricultural valleys. The Salton Sea salinity is high-nearly 1/4 saltier than ocean water-but it remains an important stopover point for migratory water birds, including several endangered species. The region also experiences several environmental problems. The recent increased demands for the limited Colorado River water threatens the amount of water allowed to flow into the Salton Sea. Increased salinity and decreased water levels could trigger several regional environmental crises. The agricultural flow into the Sea includes nutrients and agricultural by-products, increasing the productivity and likelihood of algae blooms. This image shows either a bloom, or suspended sediment (usually highly organic) in the water that has been stirred up by winds. Additional information: The Salton Sea A Brief Description of Its Current Conditions, and Potential Remediation Projects and Land Use Across the U.S.-Mexico Border Astronaut photograph STS111-E-5224 was taken by the STS-111 Space Shuttle crew that recently returned from the International Space Station. The image was taken June 12, 2002 using a digital camera. The image was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  4. A seismic refraction survey of the Imperial Valley Region, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G. S.; Mooney, W. D.; Healy, J. H.; McMechan, G. A.; Lutter, W. J.

    1984-02-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive seismic refraction survey in the Imperial Valley region of California in 1979. The Imperial Valley is located in the Salton Trough, an active rift between the Pacific and North American plates. Forty shots fired at seven shot points were recorded by 100 portable seismic instruments at typical spacing of 0.5-1 km. More than 1300 recording locations were occupied, and more than 3000 usable seismograms were obtained. We analyzed five profiles using a standard ray-tracing program, constructed a contour map of reduced travel times from our most widely recorded shot point, and modeled an existing gravity profile across the Salton Trough. Results are itemized: (1) All models have in common a sedimentary layer (Vp = 1.8-5.0 km/s), a "transition zone" (Vp = 5.0-5.65 km/s), a basement (Vp = 5.65 km/s in the Imperial Valley, 5.9 km/s on the bordering mesas), and subbasement (Vp = 7.2 km/s). (2) The sedimentary layer ranges in thickness along the axis of the Salton Trough from 3.7 km (Salton Sea) to 4.8 km (U.S.-Mexican border). On the bordering mesas it is quite variable in thickness. (3) The "transition" zone is about 1 km thick in most places. In the Imperial Valley there are no marked velocity discontinuities in this zone between the sedimentary layer and basement. On the bordering mesas, however, there is a discontinuity at the top of this zone. (4) There are apparently two types of basement. On the bordering mesas, basement is crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks. In the Imperial Valley, basement is mostly lower-greenshist-facies sedimentary rocks, based primarily on the smooth transition in character from sediment to basement arrivals, the low value of basement velocity, and the fact that deep (4 km) wells in the valley penetrate only the upper part of the known Cenozoic stratigraphic column for the Salton Trough. (5) The subbasement, or intermediate crustal layer, ranges in depth along the axis of the Salton Trough

  5. Measuring ground movement in geothermal areas of Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    Significant ground movement may accompany the extraction of large quantities of fluids from the subsurface. In Imperial Valley, California, one of the potential hazards of geothermal development is the threat of both subsidence and horizontal movement of the land surface. Regional and local survey nets are being monitored to detect and measure possible ground movement caused by future geothermal developments. Precise measurement of surface and subsurface changes will be required to differentiate man-induced changes from natural processes in this tectonically active region.

  6. Overview of Reclamation's geothermal program in Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulcher, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation is presently involved in a unique Geothermal Resource Development Program in Imperial Valley, California. The main purpose of the investigations is to determine the feasibility of providing a source of fresh water through desalting geothermal fluids stored in the aquifers underlying the valley. Significant progress in this research and development stage to date includes extensive geophysical investigations and the drilling of five geothermal wells on the Mesa anomaly. Four of the wells are for production and monitoring the anomaly, and one will be used for reinjection of waste brines from the desalting units. Two desalting units, a multistage flash unit and a vertical tube evaporator unit, have been erected at the East Mesa test site. The units have been operated on shakedown and continuous runs and have produced substantial quantities of high-quality water.

  7. Seismic and geodetic studies of the Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.D.

    1981-05-01

    The Imperial Valley exhibits perhaps the most active current tectonism in the United States; patterns of gravitational and thermal anomalies, along with geodetic measurements, strike-slip faulting, and recent volcanism suggest that the continental crust may still be spreading (Elders et al., 1972). In recent years, the United States Geological Survey and Caltech have added new seismic stations into a dense network in the Imperial Valley to study in detail the relationship between geothermal areas and earthquakes, and to understand the tectonic processes taking place there. The purposes of this study are to: (1) examine crustal structure using recently available data on P-wave arrival times of local earthquakes; (2) examine the leveling data for evidence of tectonic subsidence or uplift; and (3) study correlations between seismicity, seismic velocity, geodetic motion, geothermal activity, and local geology to provide a more consistent picture of the tectonics of the Imperial Valley.

  8. Salton Sea and Imperial Valley, California as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Salton Sea and Imperial Valley area of southern California, including a portion of northern Baja California, Mexico, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 17th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 125 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 27 hours.

  9. Crustal Structure in the Imperial Valley Region of California From Active-Source Seismic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G. S.; Mooney, W. D.

    2008-12-01

    New crust is being generated by rifting in the Salton Trough. As the rift opens, mafic intrusive rocks fill it from below as young sedimentary rocks fill it from above. Rifting and intrusion produce high heat flow and temperatures that metamorphose the sedimentary rocks to shallow depths, forming a metasedimentary basement in the central part of the Trough, or Imperial Valley, thus consolidating the new crust. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive seismic-refraction survey in the Imperial Valley region of California in 1979, and recorded additional data in 1992. Profile data were modeled using a combination of forward and inverse modeling techniques. First arrivals on profiles and arrays from all shots were combined in an inversion for a basement-depth model. Finally an an existing gravity profile across the Salton Trough was modeled. Results are as follows: (1) No first-order velocity discontinuity is observed between sedimentary and "basement" rocks in the Imperial Valley; whereas such a discontinuity is observed on West Mesa, west of the Imperial Valley. In the Imperial Valley, basement velocity is 5.65 km/s, and basement is as much as 6 km deep. On West Mesa, basement velocity is 5.9 km/s and is at most 2 km deep. In the Imperial Valley, basement shoals beneath known geothermal areas, and the deepest wells (approx. 4 km) have penetrated only the upper part of the known Cenozoic stratigraphic column in the Salton Trough. Based on these results, we interpret basement in the Imperial Valley to be sedimentary rocks metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies and basement on West Mesa to be crystalline rocks. (2) The Imperial fault offsets basement in a normal sense by as much as 1 km down to the northeast, and there is an irregular basement scarp as high as 3.5 km between West Mesa and the Imperial Valley, which we interpret as a rift suture between old crystalline and young metasedimentary basement. (3) "Subbasement" (Vp 6.9 km/s) is seen at depths as

  10. GPS measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California: 1986-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 +/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 +/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  11. Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California - 1986-1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-06-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 =/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 =/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  12. Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California - 1986-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 =/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 =/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  13. Geodetic constraints on frictional properties and earthquake hazard in the Imperial Valley, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Eric O.; Fialko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    We analyze a suite of geodetic observations across the Imperial Fault in southern California that span all parts of the earthquake cycle. Coseismic and postseismic surface slips due to the 1979 M 6.6 Imperial Valley earthquake were recorded with trilateration and alignment surveys by Harsh (1982) and Crook et al. (1982), and interseismic deformation is measured using a combination of multiple interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)-viewing geometries and continuous and survey-mode GPS. In particular, we combine more than 100 survey-mode GPS velocities with InSAR data from Envisat descending tracks 84 and 356 and ascending tracks 77 and 306 (149 total acquisitions), processed using a persistent scatterers method. The result is a dense map of interseismic velocities across the Imperial Fault and surrounding areas that allows us to evaluate the rate of interseismic loading and along-strike variations in surface creep. We compare available geodetic data to models of the earthquake cycle with rate- and state-dependent friction and find that a complete record of the earthquake cycle is required to constrain key fault properties including the rate-dependence parameter (a - b) as a function of depth, the extent of shallow creep, and the recurrence interval of large events. We find that the data are inconsistent with a high (>30 mm/yr) slip rate on the Imperial Fault and investigate the possibility that an extension of the San Jacinto-Superstition Hills Fault system through the town of El Centro may accommodate a significant portion of the slip previously attributed to the Imperial Fault. Models including this additional fault are in better agreement with the available observations, suggesting that the long-term slip rate of the Imperial Fault is lower than previously suggested and that there may be a significant unmapped hazard in the western Imperial Valley.

  14. Shallow velocity structure in the Imperial Valley region of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Stock, J. M.; Hole, J. A.; Fuis, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Imperial Valley, located south of the Salton Sea of Southern California, contains a pull-apart basin formed by the on-going oblique extension between the southernmost San Andreas fault and the northern Imperial fault. In this very seismically active area, the earthquakes tend to occur in the form of seismic swarms (e.g. events in August 2012), often related to the geothermal systems in the valley. Previous active seismic studies (e.g. Fuis et al. 1979, Parsons and McCarthy 1996) have revealed major crustal structures including the shallow basin structures in the valley and surroundings, based primarily on 2D models. A better 3D structure model is still awaiting construction to provide improved information on the location of earthquakes, faults, fault-zone properties, and the evolution of the basin. The 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) deployed a seismic array at 2-km grid spacing in the central northern part of the valley (Line 11), and three longer seismic lines across the valley with active sources (Lines 1, 2, and 3). Here we will present the shallow (to 8-km depth) 3D structure in this region obtained by modeling the traveltimes of the first arrivals in these recordings and from earlier experiments. We have processed arrivals from all shots at all receivers, from the SSIP dataset, in the region south of the Salton Sea. Relevant data from the 1979 Imperial Valley experiment has also been used. The 3D structure of the valley was inverted from the surface to 8-km depth using the technique of Hole (1992). On average, the velocity increases rapidly from ~2 km/s at the surface to 5.6 km/s at 5 km depth, a velocity range corresponding to the unmetamorphosed sediments (Fuis et al. 1984). Below 5-km depth, velocity increases slowly to 6.3 km/s at 8-km depth, a velocity range corresponding to the metasedimentary rocks, or 'basement' (Fuis et al. 1984). In depth slices, geothermal areas are characterized by high velocity zones. Specifically, we observe a

  15. Earthquakes, active faults, and geothermal areas in the imperial valley, california.

    PubMed

    Hill, D P; Mowinckel, P; Peake, L G

    1975-06-27

    A dense seismograph network in the Imperial Valley recorded a series of earthquake swarms along the Imperial and Brawley faults and a diffuse pattern of earthquakes along the San Jacinto fault. Two known geothermal areas are closely associated with these earthquake swarms. This seismicity pattern demonstrates that seismic slip is occurring along both the Imperial-Brawley and San Jacinto fault systems. PMID:17772600

  16. Earthquakes, active faults, and geothermal areas in the Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, D.P.; Mowinckel, P.; Peake, L.G.

    1975-01-01

    A dense seismograph network in the Imperial Valley recorded a series of earthquake swarms along the Imperial and Brawley faults and a diffuse pattern of earthquakes along the San Jacinto fault. Two known geothermal areas are closely associated with these earthquake swarms. This seismicity pattern demonstrates that seismic slip is occurring along both the Imperial-Brawley and San Jacinto fault systems.

  17. Local variations of seismic velocity in the Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.D.; Lee, W.B.

    1981-12-01

    The authors inverted local earthquake arrival times to estimate spatial variations of seismic velocity. Their model consisted of near-surface station corrections and local perturbations to a standard crustal velocity model. The authors found a zone of relatively high-velocity trending southeast from the Salton Sea. This zone corresponds to the region of thickest sediments. The authors compared results with those of teleseismic studies by Savino et al (1977). The agreement was excellent, suggesting that the teleseismic delays are caused primarily by crustal velocity variations. Residual delays between the teleseismic observations and predicted crustal delays imply crustal thinning of 3 or 4 km along the axis of the valley. Known geothermal resource areas at Salton Sea (or Obsidian Buttes), Brawley, and East Mesa, lie on the axis of a zone of thin crust, and they may be intimately related to the Brawley fault. Neither local earthquake nor teleseismic arrival times can discriminate between these hypotheses, but the issue might be resolved by combining both types of data. Known geothermal resource areas at Heber, Dunes, and Glamis, lie away from the projected trace of the Brawley fault. These areas are nearly aseismic, and overlie crust with apparent seismic velocities only mildly higher than the regional average. These apparent velocity anomalies could be related to crustal thinning, but because of the very mild Bouguer gravity anomalies in these areas, it seems more likely that the velocity anomalies occur entirely within the crust. 7 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Bioindicators from Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) Sampled from the Imperial Valley in Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Draugelis-Dale, Rassa O.

    2006-01-01

    The Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge (SSNWR) is located 64 km north of the Mexican border at the southern end of the Salton Sea in California's Imperial Valley. Freshwater ponds and managed habitats at the SSNWR, Calipatria, Calif. are supplied with Colorado River water that carries compounds from upstream sources. Components include municipal and industrial discharges, agricultural drainage, and sewage plant inputs. Aquatic animals in these ecosystems are continuously exposed to multiple constituents, several of which have been demonstrated to be associated with hormonal disturbances. We investigated possible endocrine impacts to fish in the Imperial Valley, Calif., by addressing the null hypothesis that aquatic species in impacted sites did not exhibit evidence of endocrine disruption as compared with those from nonimpacted sites. The results presented are intended to provide managers with science-based information and interpretations about the condition of the animals in their ecosystems for the minimization of potential adverse effects to trust fish and wildlife resources and for the maximization of available water resources.

  19. Interpretation of shallow crustal structure of the Imperial Valley, California, from seismic reflection profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Severson, L.K.

    1987-05-01

    Eight seismic reflection profiles (285 km total length) from the Imperial Valley, California, were provided to CALCRUST for reprocessing and interpretation. Two profiles were located along the western margin of the valley, five profiles were situated along the eastern margin and one traversed the deepest portion of the basin. These data reveal that the central basin contains a wedge of highly faulted sediments that thins to the east. Most of the faulting is strike-slip but there is evidence for block rotations on the scale of 5 to 10 kilometers within the Brawley Seismic Zone. These lines provide insight into the nature of the east and west edges of the Imperial Valley. The basement at the northwestern margin of the valley, to the north of the Superstition Hills, has been normal-faulted and blocks of basement material have ''calved'' into the trough. A blanket of sediments has been deposited on this margin. To the south of the Superstition Hills and Superstition Mountain, the top of the basement is a detachment surface that dips gently into the basin. This margin is also covered by a thick sequence sediments. The basement of the eastern margin consists of metamorphic rocks of the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountain Thrust system underlain by the Orocopia Schist. These rocks dip to the southeast and extend westward to the Sand Hills Fault but do not appear to cross it. Thus, the Sand Hills Fault is interpreted to be the southern extension of the San Andreas Fault. North of the Sand Hills Fault the East Highline Canal seismicity lineament is associated with a strike-slip fault and is probably linked to the Sand Hills Fault. Six geothermal areas crossed by these lines, in agreement with previous studies of geothermal reservoirs, are associated with ''faded'' zones, Bouguer gravity and heat flow maxima, and with higher seismic velocities than surrounding terranes.

  20. Well log interpretation of certain geothermal fields in the Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ershaghi, I.; Abdassah, D.

    1984-03-01

    This study reviews the wireline log responses of some geothermal fields in the Imperial Valley, California. The fields under study include the Heber, the East Mesa, the Brawley, and the Westmoreland. The well logs used in the study did not include all the wireline surveys obtained by the operators. The selected well logs obtained under special arrangements with the operators were chosen to maintain the anonymity of specific well locations but are only representative of each area. Analysis of the well logs indicates that on an individual field basis, the well logs are excellent for correlation purposes. The presence of extremely saline fluids in some fields precludes the monitoring of Q/sub v/ (cation exchange capacity per unit volume) profile for detection of hydrothermally altered zones. The producing sections in all the fields are characterized by low porosity and high resistivity.

  1. Reclaiming agricultural drainage water with nanofiltration membranes: Imperial Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Schroeder, R.A.; Setmire, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted pilot-scale field experiments using nanofiltration membranes to lower the salinity and remove Se, As and other toxic contaminants from saline agricultural wastewater in the Imperial Valley, California, USA. Farmlands in the desert climate (rainfall - 7.4 cm/a) of Imperial Valley cover -200,000 ha that are irrigated with water (-1.7 km3 annually) imported from the Colorado River. The salinity (-850 mg/L) and concentration of Se (-2.5 ??g/L) in the Colorado River water are high and evapotranpiration further concentrates salts in irrigation drainage water, reaching salinities of 3,000-15,000 mg/L TDS and a median Se value of -30 ??g/L. Experiments were conducted with two commercially available nanofiltration membranes, using drainage water of varying composition, and with or without the addition of organic precipitation inhibitors. Results show that these membranes selectively remove more than 95% of Se, SO4, Mo, U and DOC, and -30% of As from this wastewater. Low percentages of Cl, NO3 and HCO3, with enough cations to maintain electrical neutrality also were removed. The product water treated by these membranes comprised more than 90% of the wastewater tested. Results indicate that the treated product water from the Alamo River likely will have less than 0.2 ??g/L Se, salinity of 300-500 mg/L TDS and other chemical concentrations that meet the water quality criteria for irrigation and potable use. Because acceptability is a major issue for providing treated wastewater to urban centers, it may be prudent to use the reclaimed water for irrigation and creation of lower salinity wetlands near the Salton Sea; an equivalent volume of Colorado River water can then be diverted for the use of increasing populations of San Diego and other urban centers in southern California. Nanofiltration membranes yield greater reclaimed-water output and require lower pressure and less pretreatment, and therefore are generally more cost effective than traditional reverse

  2. Age constraints for the present fault configuration in the Imperial Valley, California: Evidence for northwestward propagation of the Gulf of California rift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Releveling and other geophysical data for the Imperial Valley of southern California suggest the northern section of the Imperial-Brawley fault system, which includes the Mesquite Basin and Brawley Seismic Zone, is much younger than the 4 to 5 million year age of the valley itself. A minimum age of 3000 years is calculated for the northern segment of the Imperial fault from correlations between surface topography and geodetically observed seismic/interseismic vertical movements. Calculations of a maximum age of 80,000 years is based upon displacements in the crystalline basement along the Imperial fault, inferred from seismic refraction surveys. This young age supports recent interpretations of heat flow measurements, which also suggest that the current patterns of seismicity and faults in the Imperial Valley are not long lived. The current fault geometry and basement morphology suggest northwestward growth of the Imperial fault and migration of the Brawley Seismic Zone. It is suggested that this migration is a manifestation of the propagation of the Gulf of California rift system into the North American continent.

  3. Age constraints for the present fault configuration in the Imperial Valley, California - Evidence for northwestward propagation of the Gulf of California rift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Releveling and other geophysical data for the Imperial Valley of southern California suggest the northern section of the Imperial-Brawley fault system, which includes the Mesquite Basin and Brawley Seismic Zone, is much younger than the 4 to 5 million year age of the valley itself. A minimum age of 3000 years is calculated for the northern segment of the Imperial fault from correlations between surface topography and geodetically observed seismic/interseismic vertical movements. Calculations of a maximum age of 80,000 years is based upon displacements in the crystalline basement along the Imperial fault, inferred from seismic refraction surveys. This young age supports recent interpretations of heat flow measurements, which also suggest that the current patterns of seismicity and faults in the Imperial Valley are not long lived. The current fault geometry and basement morphology suggest northwestward growth of the Imperial fault and migration of the Brawley Seismic Zone. It is suggested that this migration is a manifestation of the propagation of the Gulf of California rift system into the North American continent.

  4. Heat flow and geothermal potential of the East Mesa KGRA, Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanberg, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The East Mesa KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) is located in the southeast part of the Imperial Valley, California, and is roughly 150 kilometers square in areal extent. A new heat flow technique which utilizes temperature gradient measurements across best clays is presented and shown to be as accurate as conventional methods for the present study area. Utilizing the best clay gradient technique, over 70 heat flow determinations have been completed within and around the East Mesa KGRA. Background heat flow values range from 1.4 to 2.4 hfu (1 hfu = .000001 cal. per square centimeter-second) and are typical of those throughout the Basin and Range province. Heat flow values for the northwest lobe of the KGRA (Mesa anomaly) are as high as 7.9 hfu, with the highest values located near gravity and seismic noise maxima and electrical resistivity minima. An excellent correlation exists between heat flow contours and faults defined by remote sensing and microearthquake monitoring.

  5. Engineering aspects of geothermal development with emphasis on the Imperial Valley of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, M.

    1978-01-01

    This review was prepared in support of a geothermal planning activity of the County of Imperial. Engineering features of potential geothermal development are outlined. Acreage requirements for drilling and powerplants are estimated, as are the costs for wells, fluid transmission pipes, and generating stations. Rough scaling relationships are developed for cost factors as a function of reservoir temperature. Estimates are made for cooling water requirements, and possible sources of cooling water are discussed. Availability and suitability of agricultural wastewater for cooling are emphasized. The utility of geothermal resources for fresh water production in the Imperial Valley is considered.

  6. Assessment of geothermal development in the Imperial Valley of California. Volume 1. Environment, health, and socioeconomics

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, D.

    1980-07-01

    Utilization of the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources to support energy production could be hindered if environmental impacts prove to be unacceptable or if geothermal operations are incompatible with agriculture. To address these concerns, an integrated environmental and socioeconomic assessment of energy production in the valley was prepared. The most important impacts examined in the assessment involved air quality changes resulting from emissions of hydrogen sulfide, and increases in the salinity of the Salton Sea resulting from the use of agricultural waste waters for power plant cooling. The socioeconomics consequences of future geothermal development will generally be beneficial. (MHR)

  7. Timing and slip for prehistoric earthquakes on the Superstition Mountain Fault, Imperial Valley, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, Larry D.; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    1996-03-01

    Trenches excavated across the Superstition Mountain fault in the Imperial Valley, California, have exposed evidence for four prehistorical earthquakes preserved in displaced lacustrine stratigraphy associated with ancient Lake Cahuilla. The presence of shoreline peat accumulations along with abundant detrital charcoal allows for high-precision age determination of some stratigraphic units, thereby providing constraints on the timing of three of the paleoearthquakes. These three events occurred within a 480- to 820-year interval during the past 1200 years. The most recent earthquake (event 1) occurred during a fluvial phase of deposition between A.D. 1440-1637, immediately prior to the inundation of the Cahuilla basin at about A.D. 1480 and 1660. A channel margin was offset 2.2 +0.4/-0.15 m in this rupture, suggesting an earthquake with a magnitude ≥7. The penultimate event (event 2) also occurred during fluvial deposition after A.D. 1280 but before another lakestand at A.D. 1440-1640. Lateral slip could not be resolved for event 2. However, based on juxtaposition of dissimilar units and the amount of deformation produced by this event, it is presumed that this was also a large earthquake. The timing of event 3 is constrained to have occurred between about A.D. 820 and 1280. This event is represented by several fractures and small displacements that rupture up to a distinct stratigraphic level or event horizon. Slip was not resolved for this event. Finally, the timing of event 4 is very poorly constrained to between A.D. 964 and 4670 B.C. Undoubtedly, many events may have occurred during this period. Notably, the past three earthquakes occurred within a period of less than 820 years, and it has been over 350 years since the last earthquake.

  8. Assessment of geothermal development in the Imperial Valley of California. Volume 2. Environmental control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.; Hill, J.

    1980-07-01

    Environmental control technologies are essential elements to be included in the overall design of Imperial Valley geothermal power systems. Environmental controls applicable to abatement of hydrogen sulfide emissions, cooling tower drift, noise, liquid and solid wastes, and induced subsidence and seismicity are assessed here. For optimum abatement of H{sub 2}S under a variety of plant operating conditions, removal of H{sub 2}S upstream of the steam turbine is recommended. The environmental impact of cooling tower drift will be closely tied to the quality of cooling water supplies. Conventional noise abatement procedures can be applied and no special research and development are needed. Injection technology constitutes the primary and most essential environmental control and liquid waste disposal technology for Imperial Velley geothermal operations. Subsurface injection of fluids is the primary control for managing induced subsidence. Careful maintenance of injection pressure is expected to control induced seismicity. (MHR)

  9. Comparison of multispectral remote-sensing techniques for monitoring subsurface drain conditions. [Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goettelman, R. C.; Grass, L. B.; Millard, J. P.; Nixon, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    The following multispectral remote-sensing techniques were compared to determine the most suitable method for routinely monitoring agricultural subsurface drain conditions: airborne scanning, covering the visible through thermal-infrared (IR) portions of the spectrum; color-IR photography; and natural-color photography. Color-IR photography was determined to be the best approach, from the standpoint of both cost and information content. Aerial monitoring of drain conditions for early warning of tile malfunction appears practical. With careful selection of season and rain-induced soil-moisture conditions, extensive regional surveys are possible. Certain locations, such as the Imperial Valley, Calif., are precluded from regional monitoring because of year-round crop rotations and soil stratification conditions. Here, farms with similar crops could time local coverage for bare-field and saturated-soil conditions.

  10. Interseismic Strain Accumulation in the Imperial Valley and Implications for Triggering of Large Earthquakes in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, B. W.; Bock, Y.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2009-12-01

    From February, 2008 to March, 2009, we performed three rapid-static Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of 115 geodetic monuments stretching from the United States-Mexico border into the Coachella Valley using the method of instantaneous positioning. The monuments are located in key areas near the Imperial, Superstition Hills, San Jacinto, San Andreas and Brawley Faults with nominal baselines generally less than 10 km. We perform a bicubic spline interpolation on the crustal motion vectors from the campaign measurements and 1005 continuous GPS monuments in western North America and solve for the velocity gradient tensor to look at the maximum shear strain, dilatation and rotation rates in the Imperial Valley. We then compare our computed strain field to that computed using the Southern California Earthquake Center Crustal Motion Map 3.0, which extends through 2003 and includes 840 measurements. We show that there is an interseismic strain transient that corresponds to an increase in the maximum shear strain rate of 0.7 μstrain/yr near Obsidian Buttes since 2003 along a fault referred to as the Obsidian Buttes Fault (OBF). A strong subsidence signal of 27 mm/yr and a left-lateral increase of 10 mm/yr are centered along the OBF. Changes in the dilatation and rotation rates confirm the increase in left-lateral motion, as well as infer a strong increase in spreading rate in the southern Salton Sea. The increase in spreading rate has caused an accelerated slip rate along the southern San Andreas near Durmid Hill as evidenced by continuous GPS, which has the potential for earthquake triggering.

  11. Evaluation of remote sensing in control of pink bollworm in cotton. [Imperial Valley, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, L. N. (Principal Investigator); Coleman, V. B.; Johnson, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This investigation is to evaluate the use of a satellite in monitoring the cotton production regulation program of the State of California as an aid in controlling pink bollworm infestation in the southern deserts of California. Color combined images of ERTS-1 multispectral images simulating color infrared are being used for crop identification. The status of each field (crop, bare, harvested, wet, plowed) is mapped from the imagery and is then compared to ground survey information taken at the time of ERTS-1 overflights. A computer analysis has been performed to compare field and satellite data to a crop calendar. Correlation to date has been 97% for field condition. Actual crop identification varies; cotton identification is only 63% due to lack of full season coverage.

  12. Seismic calibration shots conducted in 2009 in the Imperial Valley, southern California, for the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Janice; Goldman, Mark; Fuis, Gary; Rymer, Michael; Sickler, Robert; Miller, Summer; Butcher, Lesley; Ricketts, Jason; Criley, Coyn; Stock, Joann; Hole, John; Chavez, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of the southern section of the San Andreas Fault, from the Coachella Valley to the Mojave Desert, is believed to be the greatest natural hazard facing California in the near future. With an estimated magnitude between 7.2 and 8.1, such an event would result in violent shaking, loss of life, and disruption of lifelines (freeways, aqueducts, power, petroleum, and communication lines) that would bring much of southern California to a standstill. As part of the Nation's efforts to prevent a catastrophe of this magnitude, a number of projects are underway to increase our knowledge of Earth processes in the area and to mitigate the effects of such an event. One such project is the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), which is a collaborative venture between the United States Geological Survey (USGS), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). This project will generate and record seismic waves that travel through the crust and upper mantle of the Salton Trough. With these data, we will construct seismic images of the subsurface, both reflection and tomographic images. These images will contribute to the earthquake-hazard assessment in southern California by helping to constrain fault locations, sedimentary basin thickness and geometry, and sedimentary seismic velocity distributions. Data acquisition is currently scheduled for winter and spring of 2011. The design and goals of SSIP resemble those of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE) of the 1990's. LARSE focused on examining the San Andreas Fault system and associated thrust-fault systems of the Transverse Ranges. LARSE was successful in constraining the geometry of the San Andreas Fault at depth and in relating this geometry to mid-crustal, flower-structure-like decollements in the Transverse Ranges that splay upward into the network of hazardous thrust faults that caused the 1971 M 6.7 San Fernando and 1987 M 5

  13. First report of an ipomovirus infecting cucurbits in the Imperial Valley of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the fall of 2014, pumpkin plants grown at the University of California Desert Research Extension Center (DREC) in Holtville, CA showed severe stunting, leaf yellowing, crumpling, and epinasty. These plants were also infested with high populations of B. tabaci. RT-PCR and PCR tests performed on le...

  14. Assessment of the impact on crops of effluent gases from geothermal energy development in the Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The potential impact of regionally dispersed sources of geothermal gaseous effluents on crops in the Imperial Valley was assessed. A detailed model of the photosynthesis and growth of sugar beets fumigated by H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ and generalized from the model calculations to other crops was used. Model calculations were made with estimates of time series of expected ground-level concentrations of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ calculated by the air quality assessment element of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project (IVEP) at 22 locations around the valley. The model calculations also used time series data of meteorological variables such as air temperature, solar radiation, and relative humidity, which were measured by the air quality baseline element in the field of the Imperial Valley. Results indicate that, in the absence of interactions with other ambient pollutant gases, all location would experience an increase (from slight to significant) in total growth of sugar beets. Seven locations will experience an increase of at least 10%. The emissions rate at which negative effects cancel out the benefits of H/sub 2/S fertilization was calculated; in the worst case, emission rates are expected to be no more than 1/13 of this crossover rate. The expected emission rate will be less than that necessary for negative effects on the most sensitive species (such as alfalfa) by a factor of 4. Similar results for other crops are summarized in the report. If CO/sub 2/ emissions are increased proportionately, the dominance of deleterious effects is not expected to occur, even under maximum development as set forth in IVEP scenario projections. 8 figures, 6 tables.

  15. Assessment of the impact on crops of effluent gases from geothermal energy development in the Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, J.R.

    1981-05-22

    We have assessed the potential impact of regionally dispersed sources of geothermal gaseous effluents on crops in the Imperial Valley. We used a detailed model of the photosynthesis and growth of sugar beets fumigated by H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ and generalized from the model calculations to other crops. Model calculations were made with estimates of time series of expected ground-level concentrations of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ calculated by the Air Quality Assessment element of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project (IVEP) at 22 locations around the valley. Results indicate that in the absence of interactions with other ambient pollutant gases, all locations would experience an increase (from slight to significant) in total growth of sugar beets. Seven locations will experience an increase of at least 10%. We calculated the emissions rate at which negative effects cancel out the benefits of H/sub 2/S fertilization; in the worst case, emission rates are expected to be no more than 1/13 this crossover rate. The expected emission rate will be less than that necessary for negative effects on the most sensitive species (such as alfalfa) by a factor of 4. Similar results for other crops are summarized in the report. If CO/sub 2/ emissions are increased proportionately, the dominance of deleterious effects is not expected to occur even under maximum development as set forth in IVEP scenario projections. 23 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  16. Anomalous record of October 15, 1979, Imperial Valley, California, earthquake from Coachella Canal Engine House No. 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bycroft, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    A recording obtained at the Coachella Canal Engine House No. 4 of the October 15, 1979, Imperial Valley earthquake shows a dominant 2 Hz frequency. This feature is very unusual and an attempt has been made to determine if the recording is real or spurious. As the pumping station is a small heavily constructed bunker type of structure located on material of low shear wave velocity it was considered likely that soil-structure interaction might be responsible for the 2 Hz component. However, both an experimental and theoretical investigation fail to establish this. This report describes the theoretical investigation. The experimental investigation is described in a separate open-file report.

  17. Imperial Contradictions: Is the Valley a Watershed, Region, or Cyborg?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, Alan P.

    2005-01-01

    Is California's Imperial Valley a watershed? If so, at what level and by what topographic logic? Is it a region? If so, at what level and by what geographic logic? Are its boundaries natural, political, or multivalent on different scales? In short, this essay looks at the special (re)production of environmental conditions within a cyborg world.…

  18. Use of long-term tritium records from the Colorado River to determine timescales for hydrologic processes associated with irrigation in the Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, R.L.; Schoeder, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium records were used to study hydrologic processes associated with irrigation and drainage in the Imperial Valley, a 2000-km2 agricultural area in the southeastern California desert. Tritium was analyzed in surface water, ground water, soil-pore water and drain water, and the results were compared to the historical record of tritium in the Colorado River. The Colorado River record was reconstructed using a simple reservoir model and precipitation data in the Colorado River Basin for the period prior to 1965, and from continuous measurements in the river for 1965-1988. This historical record is especially useful in the arid Imperial Valley because recent agricultural development has been entirely dependent on irrigation water diverted from the Colorado River and local recharge is negligible. Results indicate that it takes about 5 a for irrigation drainage to move through the soil to a depth of 2-3 m. Drainwaters have a wide range in tritium concentrations because of varying degrees of influence from ground-water intrusion, and from rapid percolation of irrigation through preferred pathways. The net result is that drainwater from about 40 fields had a range in tritium concentration similar to that of the Colorado River over the last 9 a (1980-1988), a period during which tritium concentration was declining about 15% annually in the river. ?? 1994.

  19. 77 FR 2496 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District and Imperial Valley Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD) and Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

  20. Frequency distribution of mineral elements in samples of alfalfa and sugar beet leaves obtained from a common field in Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Kinnear, J.

    1982-07-01

    Baseline measurements were made of mineral composition of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.) from one field each in the Imperial Valley of California. The fields are in a geothermal area being developed for energy production, and the purpose of the investigation was to ascertain variablility within a relatively large number of samples from a common area, so that subsequent samplings could be made to satisfactorily detect whether there were changes resulting from the geothermal activity. Means, standard deviations, frequency distribution, correlations, cluster trees, and other statistics were examined for over 20 elements at each site.Most elements were normally distributed, but there was three- to fourfold range in the concentration for each.

  1. Earthquake History of the Northern Imperial Fault, Imperial Valley, California, since the last Lake Cahuilla Highstand, circa A.D. 1680

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzner, A. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Verdugo, D. M.

    2003-12-01

    The Imperial fault (IF) is the only fault in southern California to have ruptured in two major earthquakes in the 20th century. In 1940, it ruptured end-to-end (both north and south of the international border) in an M 6.9 earthquake, and in 1979, the northern segment of the fault (north of the border) ruptured again in an M 6.4 event. Slip in 1940 was highest (5-6 m) along the central portion of the fault and lowest (<1 m) along the northern portion, with a high slip gradient between these two segments just north of the border. The 1979 earthquake involved surface rupture along only the northern 30 km of the fault, with dextral offsets being <1 m and being nearly identical to 1940 offsets along the northern 20 km of the rupture. The similarities and differences of the two events led Sieh (1996) to propose a "slip-patch model" for the Imperial fault, whereby the fault ruptures with frequent moderate earthquakes along its northern end, like in 1979, and with less frequent larger events like 1940 along its entire length. According to the model, the central patch, which experienced high slip in 1940 and did not rupture in 1979, would rupture with relatively infrequent events (roughly every 260 years) with typically 5-6 m of slip per event; meanwhile, the northern patch, which corresponds to the 1979 rupture, would rupture more frequently (roughly every 40 years) with up to 1 m of slip per event. This model is consistent with the slip distribution observed in 1940 and in 1979. Paleoseismic investigations along the central patch also support this model, as the penultimate event there occurred shortly after the last Lake Cahuilla (LC) highstand at around A.D. 1680 (Thomas and Rockwell, 1996). Prior to the present investigation, however, there were no data on events prior to 1940 on the northern patch, which could serve to either support or refute the slip-patch model. We have opened a trench across the IF south of Harris Road, adjacent to Mesquite Basin, where the fault

  2. Efficacy of CC traps and seasonal activity of adult Bemisia argentifolii (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) in Imperial and Palo Verde Valleys, California.

    PubMed

    Chu, C C; Henneberry, T J; Natwick, E T; Ritter, D; Birdsall, S L

    2001-02-01

    Adult whitefly Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring trap (CC trap) catches were compared with suction type trap catches. CC trap catches were significantly correlated to the suction trap catches. Higher numbers of B. argentifolii adults were caught in CC traps oriented toward an untreated, B. argentifolii-infested, cotton field as compared with traps oriented toward Bermuda grass fields, farm roads, or fallow areas. CC trap catches at five heights above ground (from 0 to 120 cm) were significantly related to each other in choice and no-choice studies. CC trap catches were low in the Imperial and Palo Verde Valleys from late October to early June each of 1996, 1997, and 1998. Trap catches increased with increasing seasonal air temperatures and host availability. Trap catches were adversely affected by wind and rain. Abrupt trap catch increases of 40- to 50-fold for 1-2 d in late June to early July followed by abrupt decreases in adult catches suggest migrating activity of adults from other nearby crop sources. PMID:11233132

  3. A system of regional agricultural land use mapping tested against small scale Apollo 9 color infrared photography of the Imperial Valley (California)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Claude W.; Browden, Leonard W.; Pease, Robert W.

    1969-01-01

    Interpretation results of the small scale ClR photography of the Imperial Valley (California) taken on March 12, 1969 by the Apollo 9 earth orbiting satellite have shown that world wide agricultural land use mapping can be accomplished from satellite ClR imagery if sufficient a priori information is available for the region being mapped. Correlation of results with actual data is encouraging although the accuracy of identification of specific crops from the single image is poor. The poor results can be partly attributed to only one image taken during mid-season when the three major crops were reflecting approximately the same and their ClR image appears to indicate the same crop type. However, some incapacity can be attributed to lack of understanding of the subtle variations of visual and infrared color reflectance of vegetation and surrounding environment. Analysis of integrated color variations of the vegetation and background environment recorded on ClR imagery is discussed. Problems associated with the color variations may be overcome by development of a semi-automatic processing system which considers individual field units or cells. Design criteria for semi-automatic processing system are outlined.

  4. Imperial Valley College 2+2+2 Project Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez, Ralph

    This handbook of the Imperial Valley College (IVC) 2+2+2 Project provides an overview of the development of an articulated education program for business and law enforcement careers, involving six local high schools and San Diego State University, Imperial Valley Campus. Following a brief introduction to the 2+2+2 project in section I, section II…

  5. A Galerkin, finite-element analysis of steady-state flow and heat transport in the shallow hydrothermal system in the East Mesa area, Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    A steady-state simulation model was applied to the shallow hydrothermal system in the East Mesa area of Imperial Valley, Calif. The steady-state equations of flow and heat transport were solved by use of a Galerkin, finite-element method. A solution was obtained by iterating between the temperature and pressure equations, using updated densities and viscosities. Temperature and pressure were obtained for each node, and corresponding head values were calculated. The simulated temperature and pressure patterns correlated well with the observed patterns. Additional data, mainly from test drilling, would be required for construction of a similar model of the deep hydrothermal system.

  6. Pesticides in Water and Suspended Sediment of the Alamo and New Rivers, Imperial Valley/Salton Sea Basin, California, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, James L.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    Water and suspended-sediment samples were collected at eight sites on the Alamo and New Rivers in the Imperial Valley/Salton Sea Basin of California and analyzed for both current-use and organochlorine pesticides by the U.S. Geological Survey. Samples were collected in the fall of 2006 and spring of 2007, corresponding to the seasons of greatest pesticide use in the basin. Large-volume water samples (up to 650 liters) were collected at each site and processed using a flow-through centrifuge to isolate suspended sediments. One-liter water samples were collected from the effluent of the centrifuge for the analysis of dissolved pesticides. Additional samples were collected for analysis of dissolved organic carbon and for suspended-sediment concentrations. Water samples were analyzed for a suite of 61 current-use and organochlorine pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A total of 25 pesticides were detected in the water samples, with seven pesticides detected in more than half of the samples. Dissolved concentrations of pesticides observed in this study ranged from below their respective method detection limits to 8,940 nanograms per liter (EPTC). The most frequently detected compounds in the water samples were chlorpyrifos, DCPA, EPTC, and trifluralin, which were observed in more than 75 percent of the samples. The maximum concentrations of most pesticides were detected in samples from the Alamo River. Maximum dissolved concentrations of carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion exceeded aquatic life benchmarks established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for these pesticides. Suspended sediments were analyzed for 87 current-use and organochlorine pesticides using microwave-assisted extraction, gel permeation chromatography for sulfur removal, and either carbon/alumina stacked solid-phase extraction cartridges or deactivated Florisil for removal of matrix interferences. Twenty current-use pesticides were detected in the suspended

  7. Aquaculture in the Imperial Valley -- A geothermal success story

    SciTech Connect

    Rafferty, K.

    1999-03-01

    The Salton Sea and Imperial Valley area of southern California has long been recognized as a hot spot of geothermal development. In the geothermal industry, this area has for some time been synonymous with electric power generation projects. Starting with the first plant in East Mesa in 1979, geothermal power has increased over the years to the present 400+ MW of installed capacity in the three primary areas of Salton Sea, Heber and East Mesa. Although most in the industry are aware of the millions of kilowatt-hours annually produced in this desert oasis of development, they remain surprisingly uninformed about the Valley`s other geothermal industry -- aquaculture. At present, there are approximately 15 fish farming (or aquaculture) operations clustered, for the most part, around the Salton Sea. All of these farms use geothermal fluids to control the temperature of the fish culture facilities so as to produce larger fish in a shorter period of time and to permit winter production which would otherwise not be possible. In aggregate, these farms produce on the order of 10,000,000 lbs of fish per year most of which is sold into the California market. Principle species are catfish, striped bass and tilapia. For the past several years, tilapia has been the fastest growing part of the aquaculture industry. In 1996, the total US consumption of tilapia was 62,000 lbs. Of this, only 16,000,000 lbs (26%) was domestically produced and the balance imported. The primary market for the fish on the West Coast is among the Asian-American populations in the major cities. Fish are shipped and sold liver at the retail level.

  8. San Diego Gas and Electric Company Imperial Valley geothermal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichs, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    San Diego Gas and Electric and its wholly owned subsidiary New Albion Resources Co. have been affiliated with Magma Power Company, Magma Energy Inc. and Chevron Oil Company for the last 2-1/2 years in carrying out geothermal research and development in the private lands of the Imperial Valley. The steps undertaken in the program are reviewed and the sequence that must be considered by companies considering geothermal research and development is emphasized. Activities at the south end of the Salton Sea and in the Heber area of Imperial Valley are leading toward development of demonstration facilities within the near future. The current status of the project is reported.

  9. California: San Joaquin Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley   ... is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected ... as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, ...

  10. Imperial Valley's proposal to develop a guide for geothermal development within its county

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    A plan to develop the geothermal resources of the Imperial Valley of California is presented. The plan consists of development policies and includes text and graphics setting forth the objectives, principles, standards, and proposals. The plan allows developers to know the goals of the surrounding community and provides a method for decision making to be used by county representatives. A summary impact statement for the geothermal development aspects is provided.

  11. Pliocene Invertebrates From the Travertine Point Outcrop of the Imperial Formation, Imperial County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Charles L.

    2008-01-01

    Forty-four invertebrate taxa, including one coral, 40 mollusks (30 bivalves and 10 gastropods), and three echinoids are recognized from a thin marine interval of the Imperial Formation near Travertine Point, Imperial County, California. The Travertine Point outcrop lies about midway between exposures of the Imperial Formation around Palm Springs, Riverside County, and exposures centered at Coyote Mountain in Imperial and San Diego Counties. Based on faunal comparisons, the Travertine Point outcrop corresponds to the Imperial and San Diego outcrops. The Travertine Point fauna is inferred to have lived in subtropical to tropical waters at littoral to inner sublittorial (<50 m) water depths. Coral and molluscan species from the Travertine Point outcrop indicate a Pliocene age. Two extant bivalve mollusks present have not previously been reported as fossils Anadara reinharti and forms questionably referred to Dosinia semiobliterata.

  12. Trap catches of the sweetpotato whitefly (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) in the Imperial Valley, Caiifornia, from 1996 to 2002

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An outbreak of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), biotype B occurred in the Imperial Valley, California in 1991. The insects destroyed melon crops and seriously damaged other vegetables, ornamentals and row crops. As a result of the need for sampling technology, we developed a w...

  13. Modeling Events in the Lower Imperial Valley Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X.; Wei, S.; Zhan, Z.; Fielding, E. J.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    The Imperial Valley below the US-Mexican border has few seismic stations but many significant earthquakes. Many of these events, such as the recent El Mayor-Cucapah event, have complex mechanisms involving a mixture of strike-slip and normal slip patterns with now over 30 aftershocks with magnitude over 4.5. Unfortunately, many earthquake records from the Southern Imperial Valley display a great deal of complexity, ie., strong Rayleigh wave multipathing and extended codas. In short, regional recordings in the US are too complex to easily separate source properties from complex propagation. Fortunately, the Dec 30 foreshock (Mw=5.9) has excellent recordings teleseismically and regionally, and moreover is observed with InSAR. We use this simple strike-slip event to calibrate paths. In particular, we are finding record segments involving Pnl (including depth phases) and some surface waves (mostly Love waves) that appear well behaved, ie., can be approximated by synthetics from 1D local models and events modeled with the Cut-and-Paste (CAP) routine. Simple events can then be identified along with path calibration. Modeling the more complicated paths can be started with known mechanisms. We will report on both the aftershocks and historic events.

  14. Further Resolution of Past Earthquake Surface Ruptures at the Carrizo Wash Site, Superstition Mountain Strand of the San Jacinto Fault, Imperial Valley, Southern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo, D.; Ragona, D. E.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from new trench exposures in Carrizo Wash along the northernmost part of the Superstition Mountain strand (SMF) of the San Jacinto Fault, southern California. Prior paleoseismic work by Ragona (2003) recovered evidence for 7 earthquake events, 3 of which occurred in the past 1000 years. The most recent event produced only 15 cm of slip and is only recognized along the Coyote Creek Fault (CCF). The other two recognized events cumulatively produced nearly 6 m of slip. However, an erosional unconformity in the initial excavations removed evidence for at least one event, based on problematic correlations to nearby sites resulting from mismatches in both the number of recognized lake units as well as the relative stratigraphic position of events with respect to the lakes. The new trenches, south of the effects of the erosional channel, contain evidence for an additional event and an additional delta-lake sequence not present in the original exposures. The new event likely correlates to the penultimate event at the Northern Shoreline site (Gurrola and Rockwell, 1996). Thus, the observed 6 m of slip was mostly accommodated by three events, suggesting about 2 m of slip per event for large SMF ruptures. Our new observations also agree well with data from four other nearby trench sites along the CCF and SMF, and suggest that 1) the SMF has ruptured in only three large events in the past 1100 years, 2) at least two of these events are likely recognized along the CCF, indicating that the step-over between SMF and CCF is soft in large events, 3) most CCF ruptures do not propagate onto the SMF, indicating that the step-over is hard for small displacements, such as 1968-type events (30-50 cm of slip). These observations support the concept of segmentation but indicate that a perceived segment boundary may be transparent if slip exceeds a threshold value.

  15. Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of Death Valley, California, centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan and Furnace Creek Ranch at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. The dark fork-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. The bright dots near the center of the image are corner refectors that have been set-up to calibrate the radar as the Shuttle passes overhead with the SIR-C/X-SAR system. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43883.

  16. Location of odor sources and the affected population in Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, J.L.

    1981-08-01

    This report is divided into four sections. The first two sections contain general background information on Imperial County. The third section is a general discussion of odor sources in Imperial County, and the fourth maps the specific odor sources, the expected areas of perception, and the affected populations. this mapping is done for the Imperial Valley and each of the four Imperial County KGRA's (Known Geothermal Resource Areas) where odor from the development of the geothermal energy may affect population.

  17. Steady state, near-source models of the Parkfield, Imperial Valley, and Mexicali Valley Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, A. J.; Luco, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the gross characteristics of the rupture processes for the 1966 Parkfield, 1979 Imperial Valley, and 1980 Mexicali Valley earthquakes are determined by waveform inversion of near-source data employing a steady state dislocation model in a layered half-space. The forward model involves a piecewise-linear rupture front moving with a constant horizontal rupture velocity on a fault of infinite length and finite width. The inferred shapes for the rupture front and for the distribution of slip as a function of depth are consistent with previous results obtained by use of more general models. The results obtained show that a strong velocity pulse observed in the nearsource region can be modeled as the passage of the rupture front phase and that the supershear propagation of the rupture front in the sedimentary layers of the medium provides a mechanism for the generation of the observed large amplitudes.

  18. Geodetic observations of fault creep in the Imperial Valley: hidden faults, earthquake hazard and implications for frictional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, E. O.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present new observations of the pattern of fault creep and interseismic deformation in the Imperial Valley, California using a combination of multiple InSAR viewing geometries and survey-mode GPS. We combine more than 100 survey-mode GPS velocities (Crowell et al., 2013) with Envisat InSAR observations from descending tracks 84 and 356 and ascending tracks 77 and 306 (149 total acquisitions), processed using the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) package (Hooper et al., 2007). The result is a dense map of surface velocities across the Imperial fault and surrounding areas. The data suggest that a previously little-known extension of the Superstition Hills fault through the town of El Centro may accommodate a significant portion of the slip previously attributed to the Imperial Fault. We investigate a suite of possible models for the transfer of this slip to the Imperial and Cerro Prieto faults to the south, yielding a range of plausible hazard scenarios. Finally, we compare the geodetic data to models of earthquake cycles with rate- and state-dependent friction to assess the implications for creep depth, moment accumulation rate, and recurrence interval of large events on these faults.

  19. California: Diamond Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... District began filling the reservoir with water from the Colorado River and Northern California. Water appears darker than the ... center is being built to protect these finds. The lower MISR image, from May 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view ...

  20. 78 FR 18581 - Imperial Valley Solar 1, LLC: Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Imperial Valley Solar 1, LLC: Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding, of Imperial Valley Solar 1, LLC's application for market-based rate... filings in the above-referenced proceeding(s) are accessible in the Commission's eLibrary system...

  1. 77 FR 13591 - Imperial Valley Solar Company (IVSC) 1, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Imperial Valley Solar Company (IVSC) 1, LLC; Supplemental Notice That... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Imperial Valley Solar Company (IVSC) 1, LLC's...Library system by clicking on the appropriate link in the above list. They are also available for...

  2. Imperialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2002-01-01

    This publication discusses issues related to imperialism. It examines the 1857 uprising against the British in India; examines how Hawaii became a U.S. territory at the turn of the 20th century; and reviews oil and U.S. energy policy, particularly the debate over drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, an issue relevant to September 11,…

  3. Structure of the active rift zone and margins of the northern Imperial Valley from Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, A.; Han, L.; Delph, J. R.; White-Gaynor, A. L.; Petit, R.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    First-arrival refraction data were used to create a seismic velocity model of the upper crust across the actively rifting northern Imperial Valley and its margins. The densely sampled seismic refraction data were acquired by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) , which is investigating rift processes in the northern-most rift segment of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. A 95-km long seismic line was acquired across the northern Imperial Valley, through the Salton Sea geothermal field, parallel to the five Salton Butte volcanoes and perpendicular to the Brawley Seismic Zone and major strike-slip faults. Nineteen explosive shots were recorded with 100 m seismometer spacing across the valley and with 300-500 m spacing into the adjacent ranges. First-arrival travel times were picked from shot gathers along this line and a seismic velocity model was produced using tomographic inversion. Sedimentary basement and seismic basement in the valley are interpreted to be sediment metamorphosed by the very high heat flow. The velocity model shows that this basement to the west of the Brawley Seismic Zone is at ~4-km depth. The basement shallows to ~2-km depth in the active geothermal field and Salton Buttes volcanic field which locally coincide with the Brawley Seismic Zone. At the eastern edge of the geothermal field, the basement drops off again to ~3.5-km depth. The eastern edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the along-strike extension of the Sand Hills Fault, an inactive strike-slip fault. The seismic velocities to the east of the fault correspond to metamorphic rock of the Chocolate Mountains, different from the metamorphosed basement in the valley. The western edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the active Superstition Hills Fault. To the west of the valley, >4-km deep valley basement extends to the active Superstition Hills Fault. Basement then shallows

  4. Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

  5. California's restless giant: the Long Valley Caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Bailey, Roy A.; Hendley, James W., II; Stauffer, Peter H.; Marcaida, Mae

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have monitored geologic unrest in the Long Valley, California, area since 1980. In that year, following a swarm of strong earthquakes, they discovered that the central part of the Long Valley Caldera had begun actively rising. Unrest in the area persists today. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to provide the public and civil authorities with current information on the volcanic hazard at Long Valley and is prepared to give timely warnings of any impending eruption.

  6. Integrated Modeling of Water Policy Futures in the Imperial-Mexicali Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjelland, M. K.; Forster, C. B.; Grant, W. E.; Collins, K.

    2004-12-01

    Divided by an international border, the Imperial-Mexicali Valleys (IMVs) are linked by shared history, natural resources, culture and economy. This region is experiencing changes driven by policy makers both within and outside the IMVs. The largest external decision, the Colorado River Quantification Settlement Agreement (QSA) of 2003, opens the door to a laboratory for studying the consequences of a massive transfer of agricultural water to municipal users. Two irrigation districts, two urban water agencies and the State of California have agreed to a 75 year of more than 30 million acre-feet of Colorado River water from agricultural to urban use. Although Imperial Valley farmers will be compensated for water conservation and land fallowing, the economic, environmental and social consequences are unclear. Farmers who fallow will likely cause a greater impact on local businesses and government than those choosing on-field water conservation. Reduced agricultural water use causes reduced flow of irrigation runoff, at higher salinity than before, to the Salton Sea that, in turn, impacts the population dynamics of Ichthyan and Avian species at the Salton Sea. Municipal wastewater discharged into the New River by Mexicali, Mexico is also an important source of inflow to the Salton Sea that will be reduce by plans to reclaim the wastewater for various uses, including cooling water for two new power plants in the Mexicali. A restoration program is funded to produce a Sea with much reduced surface area. But this approach may, in turn, lead to increases in windblown dust from the dry lakebed that will contribute to an air basin already designated as a federal nonattainment area for particulate emissions. Additional water will be conserved by lining the All American and Coachella canals. But, eliminating seepage from the All American canal reduces groundwater recharge to aquifers used by Mexican farmers. A complex interplay of water-related issues must be accounted for if

  7. 75 FR 8008 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ...EPA is proposing a limited approval and limited disapproval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern coarse particulate matter (PM10) emissions from sources of fugitive dust such as construction sites, unpaved roads, and disturbed soils in open and agricultural......

  8. 76 FR 26615 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    .... SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District... various air pollution sources. We are approving local rules that regulate these emission sources under the... February 9, 2011 (76 FR 7142), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the California SIP....

  9. Liquefaction and other ground failures in Imperial County, California, from the April 4, 2010, El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrink, Timothy P.; Pridmore, Cynthia L.; Tinsley, John C., III; Sickler, Robert R.; Brandenberg, Scott J.; Stewart, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    The Colorado River Delta region of southern Imperial Valley, California, and Mexicali Valley, Baja California, is a tectonically dynamic area characterized by numerous active faults and frequent large seismic events. Significant earthquakes that have been accompanied by surface fault rupture and/or soil liquefaction occurred in this region in 1892 (M7.1), 1915 (M6.3; M7.1), 1930 (M5.7), 1940 (M6.9), 1950 (M5.4), 1957 (M5.2), 1968 (6.5), 1979 (6.4), 1980 (M6.1), 1981 (M5.8), and 1987 (M6.2; M6.8). Following this trend, the M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010, ruptured approximately 120 kilometers along several known faults in Baja California. Liquefaction caused by the M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake was widespread throughout the southern Imperial Valley but concentrated in the southwest corner of the valley, southwest of the city centers of Calexico and El Centro where ground motions were highest. Although there are few strong motion recordings in the very western part of the area, the recordings that do exist indicate that ground motions were on the order of 0.3 to 0.6g where the majority of liquefaction occurrences were found. More distant liquefaction occurrences, at Fites Road southwest of Brawley and along Rosita Canal northwest of Holtville were triggered where ground motions were about 0.2 g. Damage to roads was associated mainly with liquefaction of sandy river deposits beneath bridge approach fills, and in some cases liquefaction within the fills. Liquefaction damage to canal and drain levees was not always accompanied by vented sand, but the nature of the damage leads the authors to infer that liquefaction was involved in the majority of observed cases. Liquefaction-related damage to several public facilities - Calexico Waste Water Treatment Plant, Fig Lagoon levee system, and Sunbeam Lake Dam in particular - appears to be extensive. The cost to repair these facilities to prevent future liquefaction damage will likely be prohibitive. As

  10. 78 FR 37845 - Meeting of the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA) Subgroup of the California Desert...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... California Desert District Advisory Council SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given, in accordance with Public Laws 92-463 and 94-579, that the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Subgroup of the California Desert... filed in advance of the meeting for the California Desert District Advisory Council ISDRA Subgroup,...

  11. Provenance of alluvial fan deposits to constrain the mid-term offsets along a strike-slip active fault: the Elsinore fault in the Coyote Mountains, Imperial Valley, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, Eulalia; Stepancikova, Petra; Rockwell, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The lateral variation in rates along a fault and its constancy along time is a matter of discussion. To give light to this discussion, short, mid and long term offset distribution along a fault is needed. Many studies analyze the short-term offset distribution along a strike-slip fault that can be obtained by the analysis of offset features imprinted in the morphology of the near-fault area. We present an example on how to obtain the mid- to long-term offset values based on the composition of alluvial fans that are offset by the fault. The study area is on the southern tip of the Elsinore fault, which controls the mountain front of the Coyote Mountains (California). The Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault is part of the San Andreas fault (SAF) system, extending 250 km from the Los Angeles Basin southeastward into the Gulf of California, in Mexico. The slip-rate on the southern Elsinore fault is believed to be moderate based on recent InSAR observations, although a recent study near Fossil Canyon (southern Coyote Mountains) suggests a rate in the range of 1-2 mm/yr. For this study we processed the airborne LiDAR dataset (EarthScope Southern & Eastern California, SoCal) to map short to mid-term alluvial offsets. We reprocessed the point clouds to produce DEMs with 0.5m and 0.25m grids and we varied the insolation angles to illuminate the various fault strands and the offset features. We identified numerous offset features, such as rills, channel bars, channel walls, alluvial fans, beheaded channels and small erosional basins that varied in displacement from 1 to 350 m. For the mid- to long-term offsets of the alluvial fans we benefited from the diverse petrological composition of their sources. Moreover, we recognized that older alluvium, which is offset by greater amounts, is in some cases buried beneath younger alluvial fan deposits and separated by buried soils. To determine the source canyon of various alluvial elements, we quantified the clast assemblage of each source

  12. Environmental assessmental, geothermal energy, Heber geothermal binary-cycle demonstration project: Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The proposed design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale (45 MWe net) binary-cycle geothermal demonstration power plant are described using the liquid-dominated geothermal resource at Heber, Imperial County, California. The following are included in the environmental assessment: a description of the affected environment, potential environmental consequences of the proposed action, mitigation measures and monitoring plans, possible future developmental activities at the Heber anomaly, and regulations and permit requirements. (MHR)

  13. Mineral resources of the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-360), Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.S.U.; Yeend, W.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; Gese, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-360), California Desert Conservation Area, Imperial County, California. The potential for undiscovered base and precious metals, and sand and gravel within the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area is low. The study area has a moderate potential for geothermal energy. One small sand-free area between the Coachella Canal and the west edge of the dune field would probably be the only feasible exploration site for geothermal energy. The study area has a moderate to high potential for the occurrence of undiscovered gas/condensate within the underlying rocks. 21 refs.

  14. Source characterization of major emission sources in the imperial and Mexicali Valleys along the US/Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Watson, J G; Chow, J C

    2001-08-10

    Chemical profiles for particle emissions are needed for source apportionment studies using the chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model. Source measurements of geological sources, motor vehicle exhaust, vegetative burning (e.g. asparagus, field burning, charbroil cooking), and industrial sources (e.g. oil-fueled glass plant, manure-fueled power plants) were acquired as part of the Imperial/Mexicali Valley Cross Border PM10 Transport Study in 1992. Six different source sampling techniques (i.e. hot- and diluted-exhaust sampling, ground-based source sampling, particle sweeping/grab sampling, vacuum sampling, and laboratory resuspension sampling) were applied to acquire filter samples of PM 2.5 and PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 and 10 microm, respectively). Filter samples were analyzed for mass by gravimetry, elements (Na to U) by X-ray fluorescence, anions (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(=)) by ion chromatography, ammonium (NH4(+)) by automated colorimetry, soluble sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and organic and elemental carbon (OC, EC) by thermal/optical reflectance. Concentration data were acquired for a total of approximately 50 chemical species. Elevated abundances of crustal components (Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe) from geological material, carbon (OC, EC) and trace elements (Br, Pb) from vehicle exhausts, carbon (OC, EC) and ions (K(+), Cl(-)) from vegetative burning, ions (SO4(=), NH4(+), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-)) and elements (Cl, Se) from a manure-fueled power plants, and sulfur and trace elements (Na(+), Pb, Se, Ni, V) from an oil-fueled glass plant were found in the resulting source profiles. Abundances of crustal species (e.g. Al, Si, Ca) in the Imperial/Mexicali Valley geological profiles are more than twice those found in central and southern California. Abundances of lead in motor vehicle exhausts indicate different vehicle fleets in border cities. Emission profiles from field burning and charbroil cooking

  15. Response of El Centro Steam Plant equipment during the October 15, 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T. A.; Murray, R. C.; Young, J. A.; Campbell, R. D.; Martore, J. A.; Levin, H. A.; Reiter, L.

    1980-09-01

    For the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performed a dynamic seismic analysis of Unit 4 of the El Centro Steam Plant in El Centro, Calif. Built in 1968, Unit 4 is an oil- or gas-fired, steam-driven turbine-generator that was designed to resist a static lateral force equivalent to 20% of the dead and live load. The unit's structural and mechanical systems sustained only minor damage during the October 15, 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake that produced an estimated 0.5 g peak horizontal ground acceleration (0.66 g vertical) at the site. LLNL's seismic analysis was done to analytically estimate the equipment response, which, when compared to actual observation, will indicate the levels of actual equipment capacity. 15 refs., 51 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Recent geothermal developments in the Imperial Valley: Brawley, Salton Sea, Heber

    SciTech Connect

    Papay, L.T.

    1983-01-01

    Imperial Valley programs in geothermal energy are reviewed. The Brawley plant has had a relatively high availability on line since its startup in 1980. The startup at Salton Sea plant was surprisingly smooth. Using these research projects, all of the technical parameters for commercial development of geothermal energy will be known in a year or two. Native brine handling processes, casing materials and configurations, and turbine modifications are being studied. The PUC's decision on the Heber plant was a temporary setback. PUC ruled that projects will not be approved unless they yield competitive busbar costs. The Avoided Cost concept has become the benchmark at PUC. But Avoided Cost does not account for the higher initial design costs and unknown parameters of startup as opposed to mature plant costs. Avoided Cost is seen as the only obstacle to commercial developement in all areas.

  17. Recent landscape change in California's Central Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulard, C. E.; Wilson, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    Long term monitoring of land use and land cover in California's intensively farmed Central Valley reveals several key physical and socioeconomic factors driving landscape change. As part of the USGS Land Cover Trends Project, we analyzed modern land-use/land-cover change for the California Central Valley ecoregion between 2000 and 2010, monitoring annual change between 2005 and 2010, while creating two new change intervals (2000-2005 and 2005-2010) to update the existing 27-year, interval-based analysis. Between 2000 and 2010, agricultural lands fluctuated due to changes in water allocations and emerging drought conditions, or were lost permanently to development (240 square km). Land-use pressure from agriculture and development also led to a decline in grasslands and shrublands across the region (280 square km). Overall, 400 square km of new developed lands were added in the first decade of the 21st century. From 2007 to 2010, development only expanded by 50 square km, coinciding with defaults in the banking system, the onset of historic foreclosure crisis in California and the global economic downturn. Our annual LULC change estimates capture landscape-level change in response to regional policy changes, climate, and fluctuations (e.g., growth or decline) in the national and global economy. The resulting change data provide insights into the drivers of landscape change in the California Central Valley and the combination of two consistent mapping efforts represents the first continuous, 37-year endeavor of its kind.

  18. Age and paleoenvironment of the imperial formation near San Gorgonio Pass, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, K.; Poore, R.Z.; Matti, J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfossiliferous marine sediments of the Imperial Formation exposed in the Whitewater and Cabazon areas, near San Gorgonio Pass, southern California, are late Miocene in age and were deposited at intertidal to outer neritic depths, and possibly upper bathyal depths. A late Miocene age of 7.4 to >6.04 Ma is based on the ranges of age-diagnostic benthic foraminifers (Cassidulina delicata and Uvigerina peregrina), planktic foraminifers (Globigerinoides obliquus, G. extremus, and Globigerina nepenthes; zones N17-N19), and calcareous nannoplankton (Discoaster brouweri, D. aff. D. surculus, Reticulofenestra pseudoumbilicata, Sphenolithus abies, and S. neoabies; zones CN9a-CN11) coupled with published K/Ar dates from the underlying Coachella Formation (10.1 ?? 1.2 Ma; Peterson, 1975) and overlying Painted Hill Formation (6.04 ?? 0.18 and 5.94 ?? 0.18 Ma; J. L. Morton in Matti and others, 1985 and Matti and Morton, 1993). Paleoecologic considerations (sea-level fluctuations and paleotemperature) restrict the age of the Imperial Formation to 6.5 through 6.3 Ma. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages indicate that the Imperial Formation in the Whitewater and Cabazon sections accumulated at inner neritic to outer neritic (0-152 m) and possibly upper bathyal (152-244 m) depths. Shallowing to inner neritic depths occurred as the upper part of the section was deposited. This sea-level fluctuation corresponds to a global highstand at 6.3 Ma (Haq and others, 1987). Planktic foraminifers suggest an increase in surface-water temperatures upsection. A similar increase in paleotemperatures is interpreted for the North Pacific from 6.5 to 6.3 Ma (warm interval W10 of Barron and Keller, 1983). Environmental contrasts between the Whitewater and Cabazon sections of the Imperial Formation provide evidence for right-lateral displacements on the Banning fault, a late Miocene strand of the San Andreas fault system. The Cabazon section lies south of the Banning fault, and has been displaced west

  19. Groundwater quality in the Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Antelope Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Antelope study area is approximately 1,600 square miles (4,144 square kilometers) and includes the Antelope Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Antelope Valley has an arid climate and is part of the Mojave Desert. Average annual rainfall is about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff from the surrounding mountains draining towards dry lakebeds in the lower parts of the valley. Land use in the study area is approximately 68 percent (%) natural (mostly shrubland and grassland), 24% agricultural, and 8% urban. The primary crops are pasture and hay. The largest urban areas are the cities of Palmdale and Lancaster (2010 populations of 152,000 and 156,000, respectively). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. The primary aquifers in Antelope Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in Antelope Valley are completed to depths between 360 and 700 feet (110 to 213 meters), consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of 180 to 350 feet (55 to 107 meters), and are screened or perforated below the solid casing. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the surrounding mountains, and by direct infiltration of irrigation and sewer and septic

  20. Water Transfers, Air Quality, Ecosystems and Population Growth at the US-Mexico Border: An Integrated Model of the Mexicali and Imperial Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, C. B.; Gonzalez, T.; Peach, J.; Kjelland, M.; Collins, K.; Grant, W. E.

    2006-12-01

    Borderland communities in the Imperial-Mexicali Valleys (IMVs) of California (U.S.A.) and Mexicali (Mexico) are experiencing socioeconomic and environmental changes driven by policy makers and environmental conditions both within and outside the IMVs. The Colorado River Quantification Settlement Agreement (QSA) of 2003 will transfer 30 million acre-feet of Colorado River water from Imperial Valley (IV) agricultural users to Southern California urban users over a 75-year period. Because the water level of the Salton Sea is supported by agricultural runoff, reduced water flows to the sea raise concerns that: 1) air quality will be degraded as dust is generated by the drying Sea-bed, and 2) declining fish populations due to increasing salinity will no longer support birds migrating along a key avian flyway. Rapid population growth in the Mexican border-city of Mexicali, combined with new power plants and plans for water reuse, raises concerns that: 1) the quantity and quality of water supplied to the Salton Sea will decline, and 2) increased vehicle use and electrical power generation will lead to declining air quality in the binational air basin. Each concern may be affected by climate change. As environmental factors change, so too may the agricultural economy of the Imperial Valley that, in turn, depends on the availability of both water and manual labor. The economy of Mexicali is dominated by the maquiladora (manufacturing) industry that depends upon the availability of power, labor and water. A system dynamics model, with annual time step, simulates this complex binational system. The model was developed by an academic team with input from local experts/decision-makers from both Mexico and the US. We are preparing to engage community stakeholders and decision-makers in exploring the model. Insights gained from model results yield better understanding of the consequences of alternative future scenarios that include: QSA water transfers and land fallowing plans

  1. Slip on faults in the Imperial Valley Triggered by the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Major earthquake as revealed by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Sandwell, D. T.; Fialko, Y.; Bilham, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    Radar interferometry (InSAR) reveals surface slip on multiple faults in the Imperial Valley triggered by the 2010 Baja M7.2 earthquake. Co-seismic offsets occurred on the San Andreas, Superstition Hills, Imperial, Elmore Ranch, Wienert, Coyote Creek, Elsinore, Yuha Wells, and several minor faults near the town of Ocotillo at the northern end of the mainshock rupture. We documented right-lateral slip (< 40 mm) on northwest trending faults and left-lateral slip (< 40 mm) on southwest trending faults. Slip occurred on 15-km- and 20-km-long segments of the San Andreas Fault in the Mecca Hills (≤ 50 mm) and Durmid Hill (≤ 10 mm) respectively, and 23 km of the Superstition Hills Fault (≤ 37 mm). Field measurements of slip on the Superstition Hills Fault agree with InSAR and creepmeter measurements to within a few millimeters. Dislocation models of the InSAR data on the Superstition Hills Fault confirm that creep in this sequence, as in previous slip events, is confined to shallow depths (< 3 km). Map of Southern California and Northern Baja California. Black solid lines are major faults. Yellow solid lines are faults with observed offsets. Dashed black lines are National and State borders. White star is the epicenter of the 2010 April 4th El Major earthquake. Red dots are aftershocks within one month after the main rupture with magnitude greater than 5, blue 4-5, and green 3-4. Earthquake data are from the Southern California Earthquake Center. Fault names are abbreviated as follows: ERF, Elmore Ranch fault; SHF, Superstition Hills fault; SMF, Superstition Mountains fault; WF, Wienert fault; YWF, Yuha Wells Fault.

  2. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project: Tomographic characterization of a sediment-filled rift valley and adjacent ranges, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, K.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Carrick, E.; Tikoff, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Trough in Southern California represents the northernmost rift of the Gulf of California extensional system. Relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates is accommodated by continental rifting in step-over zones between the San Andreas, Imperial, and Cerro Prieto transform faults. Rapid sedimentation from the Colorado River has isolated the trough from the southern portion of the Gulf of California, progressively filling the subsiding rift basin. Based on data from previous seismic surveys, the pre-existing continent has ruptured completely, and a new ~22 km thick crust has been created entirely by sedimentation overlying rift-related magmatism. The MARGINS, EarthScope, and USGS-funded Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was designed to investigate the nature of this new crust, the ongoing process of continental rifting, and associated earthquake hazards. SSIP, acquired in March 2011, comprises 7 lines of onshore seismic refraction / wide-angle reflection data, 2 lines of refraction / reflection data in the Salton Sea, and a line of broadband stations. This presentation focuses on the refraction / wide-angle reflection line across the Imperial Valley, extending ~220 km across California from Otay Mesa, near Tijuana, to the Colorado River. The data from this line includes seventeen 100-160 kg explosive shots and receivers at 100 m spacing across the Imperial Valley to constrain the structure of the Salton Trough rift basin, including the Imperial Fault. Eight larger shots (600-920 kg) at 20-35 km spacing and receivers at 200-500 m spacing extend the line across the Peninsular Ranges and the Chocolate Mountains. These data will contrast the structure of the rift to that of the surrounding crust and provide constraints on whole-crust and uppermost mantle structure. Preliminary work has included tomographic inversion of first-arrival travel times across the Valley, emphasizing a minimum-structure approach to create a velocity model of the

  3. Death Valley California as seen from STS-59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This oblique handheld Hasselblad 70mm photo shows Death Valley, near California's border with Nevada. The valley -- the central feature of Death Valley National Monument -- extends north to south for some 140 miles (225 kilometers). Hemmed in to the east by the Amargosa Range and to the west by the Panamints, its width varies from 5 to 15 miles (8 to 24 kilometers).

  4. Space Radar Image of Saline Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Saline Valley, about 30 km (19 miles) east of the town of Independence, California created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this one are helpful to scientists because they clarify the relationships of the different types of surfaces detected by the radar and the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. The view is looking southwest across Saline Valley. The high peaks in the background are the Inyo Mountains, which rise more than 3,000 meters (10,000 feet) above the valley floor. The dark blue patch near the center of the image is an area of sand dunes. The brighter patches to the left of the dunes are the dry, salty lake beds of Saline Valley. The brown and orange areas are deposits of boulders, gravel and sand known as alluvial fans. The image was constructed by overlaying a color composite radar image on top of a digital elevation map. The radar image was taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-bandSynthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on board the space shuttleEndeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was producedusing radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The elevation data were derived from a 1,500-km-long (930-mile) digital topographic map processed at JPL. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vetically received; and blue is the ratio of C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received to L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. This image is centered near 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint

  5. Space Radar Image of Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image shows Death Valley, California, centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan and Furnace Creek Ranch at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. The dark fork-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. This SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is an area of extensive field investigations and has been visited by both Space Radar Lab astronaut crews. Elevations in the valley range from 70 meters (230 feet) below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level. Scientists are using SIR-C/X-SAR data from Death Valley to help answer a number of different questions about Earth's geology. One question concerns how alluvial fans are formed and change through time under the influence of climatic changes and earthquakes. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. They are visible in the image as circular, fan-shaped bright areas extending into the darker valley floor from the mountains. Information about the alluvial fans helps scientists study Earth's ancient climate. Scientists know the fans are built up through climatic and tectonic processes and they will use the SIR-C/X-SAR data to understand the nature and rates of weathering processes on the fans, soil formation and the transport of sand and dust by the wind. SIR-C/X-SAR's sensitivity to centimeter-scale (inch-scale) roughness provides detailed maps of surface texture. Such information can be used to study the occurrence and movement of dust storms and sand dunes. The goal of these studies is to gain a better understanding of the record of past climatic changes and the effects of those changes on a sensitive environment. This may lead to a better ability to predict future response of the land to different potential global climate-change scenarios. Death Valley is

  6. 76 FR 67369 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Pollution Control District and Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental... Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) and Imperial County Air Pollution Control.... Proposed Action On June 3, 2011 (FR 32113), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the...

  7. ANALYSIS OF LOTIC MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using multivariate and cluster analyses, we examined the relaitonships between chemical and physical characteristics and macroinvertebrate assemblages at sites sampled by R-EMAP in California's Central Valley. By contrasting results where community structure was summarized as met...

  8. space Radar Image of Long Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    An area near Long Valley, California, was mapped by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavor on April 13, 1994, during the first flight of the radar instrument, and on October 4, 1994, during the second flight of the radar instrument. The orbital configurations of the two data sets were ideal for interferometric combination -- that is overlaying the data from one image onto a second image of the same area to create an elevation map and obtain estimates of topography. Once the topography is known, any radar-induced distortions can be removed and the radar data can be geometrically projected directly onto a standard map grid for use in a geographical information system. The 50 kilometer by 50 kilometer (31 miles by 31 miles) map shown here is entirely derived from SIR-C L-band radar (horizontally transmitted and received) results. The color shown in this image is produced from the interferometrically determined elevations, while the brightness is determined by the radar backscatter. The map is in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Elevation contour lines are shown every 50 meters (164 feet). Crowley Lake is the dark feature near the south edge of the map. The Adobe Valley in the north and the Long Valley in the south are separated by the Glass Mountain Ridge, which runs through the center of the image. The height accuracy of the interferometrically derived digital elevation model is estimated to be 20 meters (66 feet) in this image. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global

  9. Water supply issues of the San Joaquin Valley in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The San Joaquin Valley of California is undoubtedly one of the most productive agricultural regions of the United States, and of the world. The valley was a Miocene epicontinental sea bounded by the Sierra Nevada igneous arc in the east and the Coast Range accretionary terrane in the west. It is now...

  10. Arc-rift transition volcanism in the Volcanic Hills, Jacumba and Coyote Mountains, San Diego and Imperial Counties, california

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Gregory Zane

    Neogene volcanism associated with the subduction of the Farallon-Pacific spreading center and the transition from a subduction zone to a rift zone has been studied extensively in Baja, California, Mexico. One of the main goals of these studies was to find a geochemical correlation with slab windows that may have formed during that complicated transition. While workers have been able to find distinct geochemical signatures in samples from Baja California, none have shown statistically significant correlation with samples from southern California that are thought to be related to the same arc-rift transition events. All of the basaltic samples from this study of southern California rocks have prominent Nb depletions typical of island-arc subduction-related volcanism, in contrast to the chemistry of Baja California volcanics that have trace element patterns typical of synrift related volcanism. The work done by previous investigators has been additionally complicated due to each investigator's choice of important ratios or patterns, which bears little, if any, correlation with work done by others working in the same area. For example, Martin-Barajas et al. (1995) use K/Rb ratios in their study of the Puertocitos Volcanic Province, while Castillo (2008) argues that Sr/Y vs. Y is a better indicator of petrogenetic processes. Little petrologic work has been done on Neogene volcanic rocks in the Imperial Valley and eastern San Diego County region of Southern California. This thesis combines new research with that of previous workers and attempts to establish a better understanding of the processes involved with the transition volcanism. Prior work documents significant differences in the geochemistry between some of these areas, especially those in close proximity to each other (e.g. the Volcanic Hills and Coyote Mountains). These differences were thought to be largely the result different magmatic sources. The potential of finding two differing magma types in close

  11. 3D View of Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 3-D perspective view looking north over Death Valley, California, was produced by draping ASTER nighttime thermal infrared data over topographic data from the US Geological Survey. The ASTER data were acquired April 7, 2000 with the multi-spectral thermal infrared channels, and cover an area of 60 by 80 km (37 by 50 miles). Bands 13, 12, and 10 are displayed in red, green and blue respectively. The data have been computer enhanced to exaggerate the color variations that highlight differences in types of surface materials. Salt deposits on the floor of Death Valley appear in shades of yellow, green, purple, and pink, indicating presence of carbonate, sulfate, and chloride minerals. The Panamint Mtns. to the west, and the Black Mtns. to the east, are made up of sedimentary limestones, sandstones, shales, and metamorphic rocks. The bright red areas are dominated by the mineral quartz, such as is found in sandstones; green areas are limestones. In the lower center part of the image is Badwater, the lowest point in North America.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER

  12. Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

  13. Public health assessment for Stoker Company, Imperial, Imperial County, California, Region 9. Cerclis No. CAD066635442. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    Stoker Company is a pesticide dealer and crop dusting loading facility located in the County of Imperial, approximately 25 miles from the Mexican border. The 26-acre site is barren with no vegetation. Operations at the facility, beginning in 1966, have caused the surface soil over much of the site to be contaminated with pesticides. Some of the contaminated surface soil has blown off-site and impacted nearby surface soil and surface water. This preliminary public health assessment evaluated the potential for adverse health effects to occur in five populations identified as being impacted by contaminants. The impacted populations include: (1) on-site workers; (2) the family formerly living on the neighboring D K property; (3) the D K Duck Hunting Club members; (4) individuals using untreated surface water for drinking and/or other domestic purposes; and (5) individuals living or working near crop dusting operations. Based on this assessment, Stoker Company is considered to pose a public health hazard because long-term exposure to site-related contaminants may cause adverse health effects.

  14. Perspective with Landsat Overlay: Antelope Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Antelope Valley is bounded by two of the most active faults in California: the Garlock fault, which fronts the distant mountains in this view, and the San Andreas fault, part of which is seen bounding the mountains in the left foreground. In this view, Antelope Valley is in the foreground, the Tehachapi Mountains form the left skyline, and ranges within the southernmost Sierra Nevada form the right skyline. Antelope Valley is directly north of Los Angeles and is the westernmost part of the Mojave Desert. It is a closed basin. Stream flow here ends at Rosamond and Rogers dry lakes, which appear bright white. Dry lakes like these are common where tectonic activity raises and lowers parts of the Earth's crust, and thus the topographic surface, faster than stream flow can fill depressions with water, and then overflow and cut escape channels to other basins and eventually to the sea. The Sierra Nevada, the Tehachapi, and other mountains generally to the west create a rain shadow desert here. Thus, the area definitely has the active tectonics and low rainfall combination that leads to closed basin topography.

    This perspective view was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Shading of the SRTM elevation model was added to enhance topographic appearance. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30 meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three

  15. 75 FR 27975 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan; Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ...: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD... previous version of Rule 420 (see 68 FR 8839). CARB has made no subsequent submittals of the rule. C. What..., Imperial County was reclassified as a serious PM nonattainment area (see 69 FR 48792 and 40 CFR part...

  16. Deformation near the Coyote Creek fault, Imperial County, California: Tectonic or groundwater-related?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellors, Robert J.; Boisvert, Alex

    2003-02-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements show a consistent, 40-km2 wedge-shaped area of deformation partially bounded by a branch of the Coyote Creek fault (a southern extension of the San Jacinto fault) in Imperial County, California, west of the Salton Sea. The deformation is centered at 33.1 N latitude, 116.0 W longitude. 18 ERS-1 and ERS-2 (descending) interferograms falling within 1992 to 2000 are analyzed. An average line-of-sight range change over the area of 6 ± 3 mm per year away from the satellite is observed with peak values up to 12 ± 3 mm per year. The southwestern edge of the deformation is partially bounded by a fault segment that ruptured in the 1968 Mw 6.5 Borrego Mountain earthquake and which also showed triggered slip after the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquakes. The southeastern edge of the deformation also coincides with a mapped fault. The deformation is centered on a farming area that has pumped approximately 5.8 × 10-6 m3 per year of groundwater from 5 wells on the property and which shows declining water levels of 1.4 m per year. The area of highest change appears to be centered on location of the wells and away from the faults. The aquifer is at a depth of roughly 100 to 200 m and consists of sands with interbedded clays. It appears that the most likely explanation is subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal in a fault-bounded aquifer rather than tectonic slip.

  17. Surface displacement on the Imperial and Superstition Hills faults triggered by the Westmorland, California, earthquake of 26 April 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, R.V.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Rymer, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Parts of the Imperial and the Superstition Hills faults moved right-laterally at the ground surface at the time of or shortly following the ML 5.6 Westmorland earthquake of 26 April 1981. The displacements occurred prior to any significant aftershocks on either fault and thus are classed as sympathetic. Although the main shock was located in an exceptionally seismogenic part of Imperial Valley, about 20 km distant from either fault, no clear evidence of surface faulting has yet been found in the epicentral area. Horizontal displacement on the Imperial and Superstition Hills faults, southeast and southwest of the epicenter, respectively, reached maxima of 8 mm and 14 mm, and the discontinuous surface ruptures formed along approximately equal lengths of northern segments of the two structures (16.8 km and 15.7 km, respectively). The maximum vertical component of slip on the Imperial fault, 6 ram, was observed 3.4 km north of the point of largest horizontal slip. Vertical movement on the Superstition Hills fault was less than 1 mm. No new displacement was found along the traces of the Brawley fault zone, the San Andreas fault, or the part of the Coyote Creek fault that slipped during the 1968 Borrego Mountain earthquake. A careful search in the epicentral area of the main shock failed to locate any definite evidence of surface faulting. Concentrations of late aftershocks north and northeast of Calipatria near the southeastward projection of the San Andreas fault occurred mostly after our field check; this area was not investigated.

  18. Magma energy exploratory well Long Valley caldera, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bender-Lamb, S.

    1991-04-01

    Intensive study of Long Valley over the past 15 years indicates evidence for magma at depths accessible to drilling. The Department of Energy's Magma Energy Extraction Program is currently drilling a 20,000 foot exploratory well into the Long Valley caldera. The purpose of this program is to determine the feasibility of producing electrical power from magma. If the magma energy experiment is successful, the Long Valley caldera could hypothetically supply the electrical power needs of California for 100 years at present power consumption rates. The paper describes calderas, the potential of geothermal energy, Long Valley geology, the Long Valley magma energy exploratory well, the four phases of the exploratory well drilling program, and Phase 1 results.

  19. Precipitation depth-duration characteristics, Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, James C.; Nasseri, Iraj

    1995-01-01

    To document the changes in runoff characteristics of basins subject to urbanization, streamflow and precipitation data were collected at eight small basins in Antelope Valley, California, for the period 1990-93. The data collected at U.S. Geological Survey stations were supplemented by data collected at 35 long-term precipitation stations. These data will be used to calibrate and verify rainfall-runoff models for the eight basins and for estimating basin runoff characteristics throughout Antelope Valley. Annual precipitation in Antelope Valley varies from more than 50 cm in the mountains to less than 10 cm on the valley floor. Most precipitation in the valley occurs during the winter months, December through March, but cyclonic storms in the fall and convectional storms in the summer sometimes occur.

  20. California's Central Valley Groundwater Study: A Powerful New Tool to Assess Water Resources in California's Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faunt, Claudia C.; Hanson, Randall T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Rogers, Laurel

    2009-01-01

    Competition for water resources is growing throughout California, particularly in the Central Valley. Since 1980, the Central Valley's population has nearly doubled to 3.8 million people. It is expected to increase to 6 million by 2020. Statewide population growth, anticipated reductions in Colorado River water deliveries, drought, and the ecological crisis in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have created an intense demand for water. Tools and information can be used to help manage the Central Valley aquifer system, an important State and national resource.

  1. Apricot variety development in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial apricot production began in California's mild coastal valleys during the early part of the 20th century. Varieties such as 'Blenheim,' 'Derby,' 'Hemskirke,' 'Moorpark,''Newcastle,''Steward,''Tilton' and 'Wiggins' were all cultivated commercially throughout the growing regions for fresh m...

  2. Likelihood of volcanic eruption at Long Valley, California, is reduced

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, D.

    1984-01-01

    A relatively low level of earthquake activity as well as reduced rates of ground deformation over the past year have led U.S Geological Survey scientists to conclude that the likelihood of imminent volcanic activity at Long Valley, California, is reduced from that of mid-1982 through 1983.

  3. Status of groundwater pollution in the San Gabriel Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    Contamination of groundwater in the San Gabriel Valley of California has been identified as a potential health hazard from industrial sources. Sampling has revealed the presence of trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CTC); therefore, water purveyors are using a variety of means to alleviate the contamination and the use of contaminated water.

  4. Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

    2006-08-15

    With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this

  5. Aeromagnetic survey map of Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    Three aeromagnetic surveys were flown to improve understanding of the geology and structure in the Sacramento Valley. The resulting data serve as a basis for geophysical interpretations, and support geological mapping, water and mineral resource investigations, and other topical studies. Local spatial variations in the Earth's magnetic field (evident as anomalies on aeromagnetic maps) reflect the distribution of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite, in the underlying rocks. In many cases the volume content of magnetic minerals can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in the amount of magnetic minerals commonly mark lithologic or structural boundaries. Bodies of serpentinite and other mafic and ultramafic rocks tend to produce the most intense positive magnetic anomalies (for example, in the northwest part of the map). These rock types are the inferred sources, concealed beneath weakly magnetic, valley-fill deposits, of the most prominent magnetic features in the map area, the magnetic highs that extend along the valley axis. Cenozoic volcanic rocks are also an important source of magnetic anomalies and coincide with short-wavelength anomalies that can be either positive (strong central positive anomaly flanked by lower-amplitude negative anomalies) or negative (strong central negative anomaly flanked by lower-amplitude positive anomalies), reflecting the contribution of remanent magnetization. Rocks with more felsic compositions or even some sedimentary units also can cause measurable magnetic anomalies. For example, the long, linear, narrow north-trending anomalies (with amplitudes of <50 nanoteslas [nT]) along the western margin of the valley coincide with exposures of the Mesozoic Great Valley sequence. Note that isolated, short-wavelength anomalies, such as those in the city of Sacramento and along some of the major roads, are caused by manmade features.

  6. Sutter Buttes-the lone volcano in California's Great Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hausback, Brain P.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Clynne, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The volcanic spires of the Sutter Buttes tower 2,000 feet above the farms and fields of California's Great Valley, just 50 miles north-northwest of Sacramento and 11 miles northwest of Yuba City. The only volcano within the valley, the Buttes consist of a central core of volcanic domes surrounded by a large apron of fragmental volcanic debris. Eruptions at the Sutter Buttes occurred in early Pleistocene time, 1.6 to 1.4 million years ago. The Sutter Buttes are not part of the Cascade Range of volcanoes to the north, but instead are related to the volcanoes in the Coast Ranges to the west in the vicinity of Clear Lake, Napa Valley, and Sonoma Valley.

  7. The Obsidian Creep Project: Seismic Imaging in the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    In March 2010, we acquired medium- and high-resolution P- and S-wave seismic reflection and refraction data across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) and across part of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), Imperial Valley, California. Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities associated with the BSZ and SSGF. We acquired multiple seismic data sets along a north-south profile and a high-resolution P-wave profile along an east-west profile. The north-south profile included: 1) a 6.4-km-long P-wave (main) profile that was recorded on 320 Texan seismographs spaced at 20-m intervals, 2) a 1.2-km-long cabled, high-resolution profile along the northern end of the main profile, and 3) an approximately 1.2-km-long S-wave profile along the cabled profile. P-wave sources along the main profile were generated by 0.15- to 0.45-kg buried explosions spaced every 40 m, and P-wave sources along the cabled profile were generated by Betsy-Seisgun ‘shots’ spaced every 10 m. S-waves sources were generated by hammer impacts on the ends of an aluminum block. The east-west profile consisted of a 3.4-km-long high-resolution P-wave seismic profile with shots (Betsy-Seisgun) and geophones spaced every 10 m. Preliminary interpretation of shot gathers from blasts in the north-south profile suggests that the BSZ and SSGF are structurally complex, with abundant faults extending to or near the ground surface. Also, we observe relatively high-velocity material, apparent velocities of about 4.0 km/s in one direction and about 2.8 km/s in another relative to about 1.6 km/s for shallower material, that shallows beneath the SSGF. This may be due to high temperatures and resultant metamorphism of buried materials in the SSGF. From preliminary interpretation of shot gathers along the east-west profile we interpret a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on projection of the Kalin fault, from about 40 m to

  8. Arc-rift transition volcanism in the Volcanic Hills, Jacumba and Coyote Mountains, San Diego and Imperial Counties, california

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Gregory Zane

    Neogene volcanism associated with the subduction of the Farallon-Pacific spreading center and the transition from a subduction zone to a rift zone has been studied extensively in Baja, California, Mexico. One of the main goals of these studies was to find a geochemical correlation with slab windows that may have formed during that complicated transition. While workers have been able to find distinct geochemical signatures in samples from Baja California, none have shown statistically significant correlation with samples from southern California that are thought to be related to the same arc-rift transition events. All of the basaltic samples from this study of southern California rocks have prominent Nb depletions typical of island-arc subduction-related volcanism, in contrast to the chemistry of Baja California volcanics that have trace element patterns typical of synrift related volcanism. The work done by previous investigators has been additionally complicated due to each investigator's choice of important ratios or patterns, which bears little, if any, correlation with work done by others working in the same area. For example, Martin-Barajas et al. (1995) use K/Rb ratios in their study of the Puertocitos Volcanic Province, while Castillo (2008) argues that Sr/Y vs. Y is a better indicator of petrogenetic processes. Little petrologic work has been done on Neogene volcanic rocks in the Imperial Valley and eastern San Diego County region of Southern California. This thesis combines new research with that of previous workers and attempts to establish a better understanding of the processes involved with the transition volcanism. Prior work documents significant differences in the geochemistry between some of these areas, especially those in close proximity to each other (e.g. the Volcanic Hills and Coyote Mountains). These differences were thought to be largely the result different magmatic sources. The potential of finding two differing magma types in close

  9. Beginnings of geothermal impact on county population and leadership, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pick, J.B.; Butler, E.W.

    1980-09-01

    A major geothermal energy development scenario is about to begin in Imperial County. Initial energy-socioeconomic interactions in the areas of population and county leadership structure are discussed. These include immigration of energy company workers, a sewage plant dispute, conflict over union affiliation of geothermal laborers, and a transmission corridor routing dispute.

  10. 75 FR 39365 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... minimis level. Id. at 42011. \\19\\ 75 FR 8008, 8010, and proposal TSD, pp. 5-7. Open areas: --Windblown... Order Reviews I. Summary of Proposed Action On February 23, 2010 (75 FR 8008), EPA proposed a limited... section E.6 for recreational use of public lands in Imperial County. \\6\\ 75 FR 8008, 8010-8011 and...

  11. 78 FR 896 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD... IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On April 27, 2012 (77 FR 25109), EPA... and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); does not impose an...

  12. 78 FR 23677 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD... III. EPA Action IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On January 7, 2013 (78 FR... not acting on Rule 802 at this time. \\2\\ See, e.g., 75 FR 8010 (February 23, 2010). Comment...

  13. 76 FR 39303 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Pollution Control District, Kern County Air Pollution Control District, and Ventura County Air Pollution... taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District (KCAPCD), and Ventura County Air Pollution...

  14. 76 FR 7142 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ...: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD... versions of these rules? We approved an earlier version of Rule 201 into the SIP on January 3, 2007 (72 FR... permit exemptions. Rule 103 was approved into the SIP on May 31, 1972 (37 FR 10842). The...

  15. 77 FR 25109 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990,'' 59 FR 41998 (August 16, 1994). 5. ``PM-10...: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD...-2008 monitoring period (74 FR 63309). This determination suspended some of the planning...

  16. 76 FR 39357 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Pollution Control District, Kern County Air Pollution Control District, and Ventura County Air Pollution... proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District (KCAPCD), and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District...

  17. 78 FR 922 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... for the Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990,'' 57 FR 13498 (April 16... Preamble for the Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990,'' 59 FR 41998 (August...: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District...

  18. Mineral deficiencies in tule elk, Owens Valley, California.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Heather E; Bleich, Vernon C; Krausman, Paul R

    2007-01-01

    Male tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) are susceptible to high rates of antler breakage in Owens Valley, California. We hypothesized that a mineral deficiency in the diet predisposed male elk to antler breakage. We analyzed elk antler, liver, and forage samples to identify mineral imbalances. We compared the mineral content of livers and antlers from elk in Owens Valley to samples taken from tule elk at Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, a population experiencing normal rates (<5%) of antler breakage. Antler and liver samples were collected from 1989 to 1993, and in 2002, and were tested for calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), and zinc (Zn). Mineral levels from antler and liver samples were compared to reference values established for elk and deer. We also compared the mineral content of elk forage in Owens Valley, collected in 2002-03, to dietary reference values established for cattle. In antlers, Ca, Fe, and Mg levels were higher in Owens Valley elk than in Grizzly Island elk, although all mineral levels were lower than reference values established for deer antlers. In liver samples, Cu levels from elk in Owens Valley were lower than those from Grizzly Island and lower than minimum reference values; liver Ca and Mo levels were higher in elk from Owens Valley than in those from Grizzly Island. Compared to reference values, elk forage in Owens Valley had high levels of Ca and Mo, and low levels of Cu, P, and Zn. Mineral analyses from antlers, livers, and forage suggest that tule elk in the Owens Valley are Cu and/or P deficient. High levels of Mo and Ca may exacerbate Cu and P deficiencies, respectively. Bone fragility is a symptom of both deficiencies, and an imbalance in Cu, P, or a combination of both, may predispose male tule elk in the Owens Valley to antler breakage. PMID:17347394

  19. Climate controls on valley fever incidence in Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, Charles S.; Talamantes, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Coccidiodomycosis (valley fever) is a systemic infection caused by inhalation of airborne spores from Coccidioides immitis, a soil-dwelling fungus found in the southwestern United States, parts of Mexico, and Central and South America. Dust storms help disperse C. immitis so risk factors for valley fever include conditions favorable for fungal growth (moist, warm soil) and for aeolian soil erosion (dry soil and strong winds). Here, we analyze and inter-compare the seasonal and inter-annual behavior of valley fever incidence and climate risk factors for the period 1980-2002 in Kern County, California, the US county with highest reported incidence. We find weak but statistically significant links between disease incidence and antecedent climate conditions. Precipitation anomalies 8 and 20 months antecedent explain only up to 4% of monthly variability in subsequent valley fever incidence during the 23 year period tested. This is consistent with previous studies suggesting that C. immitis tolerates hot, dry periods better than competing soil organisms and, as a result, thrives during wet periods following droughts. Furthermore, the relatively small correlation with climate suggests that the causes of valley fever in Kern County could be largely anthropogenic. Seasonal climate predictors of valley fever in Kern County are similar to, but much weaker than, those in Arizona, where previous studies find precipitation explains up to 75% of incidence. Causes for this discrepancy are not yet understood. Higher resolution temporal and spatial monitoring of soil conditions could improve our understanding of climatic antecedents of severe epidemics.

  20. Preliminary subsidence investigation of Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lofgren, B.E.; Ireland, R.L.

    1973-01-01

    Although a number of agencies have made leveling surveys in Sacramento Valley and a valleywide network of first- and second-order control exists, few areas have sufficient control for determining whether land subsidence has occurred and if so, how much, within the time span of vertical control. Available data suggest that 0.2 to 0.9 foot (0.06 to 0.3 m) of subsidence probably has occurred from 1935-42 to 1964 in an extensive agricultural area of heavy ground-water pumping between Zamora and Davis, and that as much as 2 feet (0.6 m) of subsidence has occurred in at least two areas of pumping overdraft--east of Zamora, and west of Arbuckle. A comparison of maps showing long-term water-level decline and average annual ground-water pumpage indicates several other areas of probable subsidence. In six general areas--northwest of Sacramento; northeast of Sacramento; southeast of Yuba City; 10 miles (16 km) north of Willows; 20 miles (32 km) north of Willows; and especially in the Arbuckle area,ground-water declines have quite probably produced significant subsidence. In two areas of most intensive pumping, no long-term water-level declines have occurred, and no subsidence is indicated. If problems of land subsidence are of concern in Sacramento Valley, and if estimates of historic subsidence or subsidence potential are needed, serious consideration should be given to a field program of basic-data collection. Second-order leveling along a few carefully selected lines of existing control, and the installation and operation of two or three compaction recorders in areas of continuing water-level decline, would provide helpful data for estimating .past and future subsidence.

  1. 27 CFR 9.219 - Antelope Valley of the California High Desert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... California High Desert. 9.219 Section 9.219 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... Viticultural Areas § 9.219 Antelope Valley of the California High Desert. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Antelope Valley of the California High Desert”. For purposes...

  2. 27 CFR 9.219 - Antelope Valley of the California High Desert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... California High Desert. 9.219 Section 9.219 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... Viticultural Areas § 9.219 Antelope Valley of the California High Desert. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Antelope Valley of the California High Desert”. For purposes...

  3. 27 CFR 9.219 - Antelope Valley of the California High Desert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... California High Desert. 9.219 Section 9.219 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... Viticultural Areas § 9.219 Antelope Valley of the California High Desert. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Antelope Valley of the California High Desert”. For purposes...

  4. Microscopic Identification of Prokaryotes in Modern and Ancient Halite, Saline Valley and Death Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.

    2009-06-01

    Primary fluid inclusions in halite crystallized in Saline Valley, California, in 1980, 2004-2005, and 2007, contain rod- and coccoid-shaped microparticles the same size and morphology as archaea and bacteria living in modern brines. Primary fluid inclusions from a well-dated (0-100,000 years), 90 m long salt core from Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California, also contain microparticles, here interpreted as halophilic and halotolerant prokaryotes. Prokaryotes are distinguished from crystals on the basis of morphology, optical properties (birefringence), and uniformity of size. Electron micrographs of microparticles from filtered modern brine (Saline Valley), dissolved modern halite crystals (Saline Valley), and dissolved ancient halite crystals (Death Valley) support in situ microscopic observations that prokaryotes are present in fluid inclusions in ancient halite. In the Death Valley salt core, prokaryotes in fluid inclusions occur almost exclusively in halite precipitated in perennial saline lakes 10,000 to 35,000 years ago. This suggests that trapping and preservation of prokaryotes in fluid inclusions is influenced by the surface environment in which the halite originally precipitated. In all cases, prokaryotes in fluid inclusions in halite from the Death Valley salt core are miniaturized (<1 μm diameter cocci, <2.5 μm long, very rare rod shapes), which supports interpretations that the prokaryotes are indigenous to the halite and starvation survival may be the normal response of some prokaryotes to entrapment in fluid inclusions for millennia. These results reinforce the view that fluid inclusions in halite and possibly other evaporites are important repositories of microbial life and should be carefully examined in the search for ancient microorganisms on Earth, Mars, and elsewhere in the Solar System.

  5. Observations of coastal sediment dynamics of the Tijuana Estuary Fine Sediment Fate and Transport Demonstration Project, Imperial Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Lam, Angela; Ferreiera, Joanne; Miller, Ian M.; Rippy, Meg; Svejkovsky, Jan; Mustain, Neomi

    2012-01-01

    Coastal restoration and management must address the presence, use, and transportation of fine sediment, yet little information exists on the patterns and/or processes of fine-sediment transport and deposition for these systems. To fill this information gap, a number of State of California, Federal, and private industry partners developed the Tijuana Estuary Fine Sediment Fate and Transport Demonstration Project ("Demonstration Project") with the purpose of monitoring the transport, fate, and impacts of fine sediment from beach-sediment nourishments in 2008 and 2009 near the Tijuana River estuary, Imperial Beach, California. The primary purpose of the Demonstration Project was to collect and provide information about the directions, rates, and processes of fine-sediment transport along and across a California beach and nearshore setting. To achieve these goals, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored water, beach, and seafloor properties during the 2008–2009 Demonstration Project. The project utilized sediment with ~40 percent fine sediment by mass so that the dispersal and transport of fine sediment would be easily recognizable. The purpose of this report is to present and disseminate the data collected during the physical monitoring of the Demonstration Project. These data are available online at the links noted in the "Additional Digital Information" section. Synthesis of these data and results will be provided in subsequent publications.

  6. 78 FR 21581 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality... the Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD), Monterey Bay Unified Air...

  7. 77 FR 26475 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality... the Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD), Eastern Kern Air Pollution...

  8. 76 FR 41745 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) Rule 4682, Polystyrene, Polyethylene,...

  9. Secret World of the Forbidden City: Splendors from Imperial China, 1644-1911 and Change and Continuity: Chinese Americans in California. Exhibition Information and Curriculum Guide for Teachers Grades 2-11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    The materials in this curriculum guide were designed to prepare teachers and students in grades 2-11 for the "Secret World of the Forbidden City: Splendors from China's Imperial Palace 1644-1911" exhibition at the Oakland Museum of California Education Department, to inform teachers and students about Imperial China, and to illuminate the…

  10. Land use and water use in the Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templin, W.E.; Phillips, S.P.; Cherry, D.E.; DeBortoli, M.L.; Haltom, T.C.; McPherson, K.R.; Mrozek, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Urban land use and water use in the Antelope Valley, California, have increased greatly since the devel- opment of the valley began in the late 1800's. Ground water always has been a major source of supply in this area because of limited local surface-water resources. Ground-water pumpage reportedly increased from about 29,000 acre-feet in 1919 to about 400,000 acre-feet in the 1950's. Declines in ground-water levels and increased costs of electrical power in the 1970's resulted in a reduction in the quantity of ground-water pumped annually for irrigation uses. Ground-water pumpage was further reduced in the 1970's following the completion of the California Aqueduct, which conveys water from northern California. Total annual reported ground-water pumpage decreased to a low of about 53,200 acre-feet in 1983 and increased again to about 91,700 acre-feet in 1991. Rapid urban development and the 1987-92 drought renewed concern about a possible return to extensive ground-water- storage depletion and increased land subsidence. Water-demand forecasts in 1980 for the Antelope Valley indicated that total annual demand by the year 2020 was expected to be about 250,000 acre- feet per year, with agricultural uses to be about 65 percent of this total demand. In 1990, total demand. In 1993, preliminary forecasts for total demand for 2010 ranged from about 127,000 to 329,000 acre-feet with urban water uses accounting for all but a few percent of the total anticipated demand. This history of forecasts indicates that expectations change with time. Factors that affect water demand change and different forecasting methods are used. Water-conservation options may be adopted to employ best-management practices that would further influence future water demands in the Antelope Valley.

  11. Landslide oil field, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, B.P.; March, K.A.; Caballero, J.S.; Stolle, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    The Landslide field, located at the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 by a partnership headed by Channel Exploration Company, on a farm out from Tenneco Oil Company. Initial production from the Tenneco San Emidio 63X-30 was 2064 BOPD, making landslide one of the largest onshore discoveries in California during the past decade. Current production is 7100 BOPD from a sandstone reservoir at 12,500 ft. Fifteen wells have been drilled in the field, six of which are water injectors. Production from the Landslide field occurs from a series of upper Miocene Stevens turbidite sandstones that lie obliquely across an east-plunging structural nose. These turbidite sandstones were deposited as channel-fill sequences within a narrowly bounded levied channel complex. Both the Landslide field and the larger Yowlumne field, located 3 mi to the northwest, comprise a single channel-fan depositional system that developed in the restricted deep-water portion of the San Joaquin basin. Information from the open-hole logs, three-dimensional surveys, vertical seismic profiles, repeat formation tester data, cores, and pressure buildup tests allowed continuous drilling from the initial discovery to the final waterflood injector, without a single dry hole. In addition, the successful application of three-dimensional seismic data in the Landslide development program has helped correctly image channel-fan anomalies in the southern Maricopa basin, where data quality and severe velocity problems have hampered previous efforts. New exploration targets are currently being evaluated on the acreage surrounding the Landslide discovery and should lead to an interesting new round of drilling activity in the Maricopa basin.

  12. Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration features images of southern California and southwestern Nevada acquired on January 3, 2001 (Terra orbit 5569), and includes data from three of MISR's nine cameras. The San Joaquin Valley, which comprises the southern extent of California's Central Valley, covers much of the viewed area. Also visible are several of the Channel Islands near the bottom, and Mono and Walker Lakes, which stand out as darker patches near the top center, especially in the vertical and backward oblique images. Near the lower right of each image is the Los Angeles Basin, with the distinctive chevron shape of the Mojave Desert to its north.

    The Central Valley is a well-irrigated and richly productive agricultural area situated between the Coast Range and the snow-capped Sierra Nevadas. During the winter, the region is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected sunlight, dramatic differences in the MISR images are apparent as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, the pervasive haze that fills most of the valley is only slightly visible in the vertical view. At the oblique angles, the haze is highly distinguishable against the land surface background, particularly in the forward-viewing direction. Just above image center, the forward view also reveals bluish-tinged plumes near Lava Butte in Sequoia National Forest, where the National Interagency Coordination Center reported an active forest fire.

    The changing surface visibility in the multi-angle data allows us to derive the amount of atmospheric haze. In the lower right quadrant is a map of haze amount determined from automated processing of the MISR imagery. Low amounts of haze are shown in blue, and a variation in hue through shades of green, yellow, and red indicates progressively larger amounts of airborne particulates. Due to the

  13. Mapping Evapotranspiration over Agricultural Land in the California Central Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, F. S.; Huntington, J. L.; Guzman, A.; Johnson, L.; Morton, C.; Nemani, R. R.; Post, K. M.; Rosevelt, C.; Shupe, J. W.; Spellenberg, R.; Vitale, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in satellite mapping of evapotranspiration (ET) have made it possible to largely automate the process of mapping ET over large areas at the field-scale. This development coincides with recent drought events across the western U.S. which have intensified interest in mapping of ET and consumptive use to address a range of water management challenges, including resolving disputes over water rights, improving irrigation management, and developing sustainable management plans for groundwater resources. We present a case study for California that leverages two automated ET mapping capabilities to estimate ET at the field scale over agricultural areas in the California Central Valley. We utilized the NASA Earth Exchange and applied a python-based implementation of the METRIC surface energy balance model and the Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) system, which uses a surface reflectance-based approach, to map ET over agricultural areas in the Central Valley. We present estimates from 2014 from both approaches and results from a comparison of the estimates. Though theoretically and computationally quite different from each other, initial results from both approaches show good agreement overall on seasonal ET totals for 2014. We also present results from comparisons against ET measurements collected on commercial farms in the Central Valley and discuss implications for accuracy of the two different approaches. The objective of this analysis is to provide data that can inform planning for the development of sustainable groundwater management plans, and assist water managers and growers in evaluating irrigation demand during drought events.

  14. Impact of Air Pollution on California Central Valley Fog Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the 20th century, trends in California Central Valley fog frequency have changed dramatically without explanation. While episodes of dense radiation fog, known regionally as Tule Fog, increased steadily from 1930-1970, analysis from both ground and remote sensing measurements confirm a 46-50% reduction in fog days in the last 30 years (Baldocchi and Waller, 2014, Herkes et al., 2014). The dominant hypotheses suggest that the recent decline in radiation fog can be explained by the rising temperatures associated with climate change or urban heat island effect. This assertion fails to explain the significant increase in Central Valley fog midcentury. Here we instead assert that changes in air pollution, rather than climate, better support this upward then downward temporal trend. Automobile use greatly increased emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx) midcentury, followed by a large decrease in vehicle emissions due to statewide regulation from 1980 to present. In the Central Valley, NOx from automobile emissions contributes to the formation ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), the dominant hygroscopic aerosol in the valley's wintertime boundary layer that can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) necessary for fog droplet formation. Thus, changes in air pollution not only affect the number of CCN, but may also impact the density and persistence of fog episodes. Using NOAA meteorological records throughout the twentieth century, we will show the correlation between fog frequency, air pollution, and climatic drivers. We conclude that fog trends are closely correlated with changes in air pollution, rather than solely climate change.

  15. Rock-fall potential in the Yosemite Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Morrissey, M.M.; Iovine, Giulio; Godt, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    We used two methods of estimating rock-fall potential in the Yosemite Valley, California based on (1) physical evidence of previous rock-fall travel, in which the potential extends to the base of the talus, and (2) theoretical potential energy considerations, in which the potential can extend beyond the base of the talus, herein referred to as the rock-fall shadow. Rock falls in the valley commonly range in size from individual boulders of less than 1 m3 to moderate-sized falls with volumes of about 100,000 m3. Larger rock falls exceeding 100,000 m3, referred to as rock avalanches, are considered to be much less likely to occur based on the relatively few prehistoric rock-fall avalanche deposits in the Yosemite Valley. Because the valley has steep walls and is relatively narrow, there are no areas that are absolutely safe from large rock avalanches. The map shows areas of rock-fall potential, but does not predict when or how frequently a rock fall will occur. Consequently, neither the hazard in terms of probability of a rock fall at any specific location, nor the risk to people or facilities to such events can be assessed from this map.

  16. Faulting history of the Long Valley caldera, eastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.G. . School of Natural Science)

    1993-03-01

    The faulting history that produced the Sierra Nevada Range can be seen, in part, on the eastern contact of the Sierra Nevada Block with the Owens Valley Block. By surveying a series of remnant lake shore lines in the Long Valley Caldera of eastern California, the deformation and faulting history of the area can be inferred. These beaches are ideal for studying the faulting history of the area as their location is so near the contact of the two plates. The caldera sits on the Owens Valley Block just east of the major fault which separates it from the Sierra Nevada Block. It encompasses a ten mile by twenty mile area, which was filled with a lake after its creation some 730,000 years ago. Over time, the lake slowly lowered due to erosion of its sill, successive upward tilting of the Sierra Nevada Block, and consequent downward tilting of the Owens Valley Block. These changes in the attitude of the caldera floor and the beaches of the lake left the successive, non-parallel shore lines that have now been surveyed, mapped, and dated relative to each other. Together with the regional structures and history of the area, the remnant deformed shore lines can be used to develop a picture of the faulting history of the area and its relation to the rising of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

  17. Ground Watering of the Death Valley Region, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    USGS

    2006-10-12

    Water is a precious commodity, especially in the arid southwest region of the US, where there is a limited supply of both surface water and ground water. Ground water has a variety of uses (such as agricultural, commercial, and domestic) in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) of southern Nevada and eastern California. The DVRFS, an area of about 100,000 square kilometers, contains very complex geology and hydrology. Using a computer model to represent this complex system the US Geological Survey (USGS) simulated ground-water flow in the Death Valley region for use with US Department of Energy (DOE) projects in southern Nevada. The model was created to help address contaminant cleanup activities associated with the underground nuclear testing conducted from 1951 to 1992 at the Nevada Test Site and to support the licensing process for the Nation's proposed geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  18. Geological literature on the San Joaquin Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maher, J.C.; Trollman, W.M.; Denman, J.M.

    1973-01-01

    The following list of references includes most of the geological literature on the San Joaquin Valley and vicinity in central California (see figure 1) published prior to January 1, 1973. The San Joaquin Valley comprises all or parts of 11 counties -- Alameda, Calaveras, Contra Costa, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tulare (figure 2). As a matter of convenient geographical classification the boundaries of the report area have been drawn along county lines, and to include San Benito and Santa Clara Counties on the west and Mariposa and Tuolumne Counties on the east. Therefore, this list of geological literature includes some publications on the Diablo and Temblor Ranges on the west, the Tehachapi Mountains and Mojave Desert on the south, and the Sierra Nevada Foothills and Mountains on the east.

  19. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: San Joaquin Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    San Joaquin, the name given to the southern portion of California's vast Central Valley, has been called the world's richest agricultural valley. In this perspective view generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and an enhanced Landsat image, we are looking toward the southwest over a checkerboard pattern of agricultural fields. Mt. Pinos, a popular location for stargazing at 2,692 meters (8,831 feet) looms above the valley floor and is visible on the left side of the image. The productive southern San Joaquin is in reality a desert, averaging less than 12.7 cm (5 inches) of rain per year. Through canals and irrigation, the region nurtures some two hundred crops including grapes, figs, apricots, oranges, and more than 4,047 square-km (1,000,000 acres) of cotton. The California Aqueduct, transporting water from the Sacramento River Delta through the San Joaquin, runs along the base of the low-lying Wheeler Ridge on the left side of the image. The valley is not all agriculture though. Kern County, near the valley's southern end, is the United States' number one oil producing county, and actually produces more crude oil than Oklahoma. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors, from Landsat data, approximate natural color.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200 feet)long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U

  20. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  1. 77 FR 74355 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley; Attainment Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley... Quality Standards in the San Joaquin Valley. This technical amendment corrects the CFR to properly codify the California Air Resources Board's commitment to update the air quality modeling in the San...

  2. Contaminated fish consumption in California's Central Valley Delta.

    PubMed

    Shilling, Fraser; White, Aubrey; Lippert, Lucas; Lubell, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Extensive mercury contamination and angler selection of the most contaminated fish species coincide in California's Central Valley. This has led to a policy conundrum: how to balance the economic and cultural impact of advising subsistence anglers to eat less fish with the economic cost of reducing the mercury concentrations in fish? State agencies with regulatory and other jurisdictional authority lack sufficient data and have no consistent approach to this problem. The present study focused on a critical and contentious region in California's Central Valley (the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers Delta) where mercury concentrations in fish and subsistence fishing rates are both high. Anglers and community members were surveyed for their fish preferences, rates of consumption, the ways that they receive health information, and basic demographic information. The rates of fish consumption for certain ethnicities were higher than the rates used by state agencies for planning pollution remediation. A broad range of ethnic groups were involved in catching and eating fish. The majority of anglers reported catching fish in order to feed to their families, including children and women of child-bearing age. There were varied preferences for receiving health information and no correlation between knowledge of fish contamination and rates of consumption. Calculated rates of mercury intake by subsistence anglers were well above the EPA reference dose. The findings here support a comprehensive policy strategy of involvement of the diverse communities in decision-making about education and clean-up and an official recognition of subsistence fishers in the region. PMID:20176346

  3. Evapotranspiration of applied water, Central Valley, California, 1957-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Alex K.

    1982-01-01

    In the Central Valley, Calif., where 57% of the 20,000 square miles of land is irrigated, ground-water recharge from agricultural lands is an important input to digital simulation models of ground-water flow. Several methods of calculating recharge were explored for the Central Valley Aquifer Project and a simplified water budget was designed where net recharge (recharge minus pumpage) equals net surface water diverted minus evapotranspiration of applied water (ETAW). This equation eliminates the need to determine pumpage from the water-table aquifer, assuming that the time lag for infiltration is not longer than the time intervals of interest for modeling. This study evaluates only the evapotranspiration of applied water. Future reports will describe the other components of the water budget. ETAW was calculated by summing the products of ETAW coefficients and respective crop areas for each 7 1/2-minute quadrangle area in the valley, for each of three land-use surveys between 1957 and 1978. In 1975 total ETAW was 15.2 million acre-feet, a 43% increase since 1959. The largest increases were in the south, especially Kern County, which had a sixfold increase, which was caused by the import of surface water in the California Aqueduct. (USGS)

  4. Statistical modeling of valley fever data in Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamantes, Jorge; Behseta, Sam; Zender, Charles S.

    2007-03-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is a fungal infection found in the southwestern US, northern Mexico, and some places in Central and South America. The fungus that causes it ( Coccidioides immitis) is normally soil-dwelling but, if disturbed, becomes air-borne and infects the host when its spores are inhaled. It is thus natural to surmise that weather conditions that foster the growth and dispersal of the fungus must have an effect on the number of cases in the endemic areas. We present here an attempt at the modeling of valley fever incidence in Kern County, California, by the implementation of a generalized auto regressive moving average (GARMA) model. We show that the number of valley fever cases can be predicted mainly by considering only the previous history of incidence rates in the county. The inclusion of weather-related time sequences improves the model only to a relatively minor extent. This suggests that fluctuations of incidence rates (about a seasonally varying background value) are related to biological and/or anthropogenic reasons, and not so much to weather anomalies.

  5. Statistical modeling of valley fever data in Kern County, California.

    PubMed

    Talamantes, Jorge; Behseta, Sam; Zender, Charles S

    2007-03-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is a fungal infection found in the southwestern US, northern Mexico, and some places in Central and South America. The fungus that causes it (Coccidioides immitis) is normally soil-dwelling but, if disturbed, becomes air-borne and infects the host when its spores are inhaled. It is thus natural to surmise that weather conditions that foster the growth and dispersal of the fungus must have an effect on the number of cases in the endemic areas. We present here an attempt at the modeling of valley fever incidence in Kern County, California, by the implementation of a generalized auto regressive moving average (GARMA) model. We show that the number of valley fever cases can be predicted mainly by considering only the previous history of incidence rates in the county. The inclusion of weather-related time sequences improves the model only to a relatively minor extent. This suggests that fluctuations of incidence rates (about a seasonally varying background value) are related to biological and/or anthropogenic reasons, and not so much to weather anomalies. PMID:17120065

  6. 78 FR 75332 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; California Central Valley Angler Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ...; California Central Valley Angler Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA... (Sacramento River winter Chinook, Central Valley spring Chinook, Central Valley steelhead). The survey is... restoration. II. Method of Collection A random sample of recreational anglers who fish on Central...

  7. 77 FR 70707 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley and South Coast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley and... Ambient Air Quality Standards in the San Joaquin Valley and the South Coast Air Basin. These technical...) in the San Joaquin Valley and South Coast (Los Angeles) Air Basin and included provisions of...

  8. Yuma District Resource Management Plan, Yuma, La Paz, and Mohave Counties, Arizona and San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial Counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Implementation of a resource management plan is proposed for 1.2 million acres within the 2.7-million-acre Yuma District, located in Yuma, La Paz, and Mohave counties, Arizona and San Bernardino, Riverside, and Imperial counties, California. Under the preferred alternative, wildlife habitat would be a priority consideration on approximately 247,740 acre, and nine special management areas would be designated. A portion of the Cactus Plain and the Chemehuevi/Needles wilderness study areas would be recommended for wilderness designation. Two areas totaling 31,360 acres would be designated as special management areas, and another six areas totaling 155,705 acres would be managed to protect their natural values. Livestock grazing would be authorized at 3998 animal unit months on four allotments. Approximately 55,490 acres of federal lands would be available for disposal and 31,220 acres would be acquired. Nine utility corridors and nine communication sites would be designated. Existing recreational facilities would be maintained, with additional facilities provided when warranted. Along Parker Strip, only floodproofed day-use facilities would be allowed within the 100-year flood plain. Off-road vehicle (ORV) use designations would be made on 640 acres and ORV use in the remainder of the district would be limited to existing roads and trails. Continuous occupancy of mobile home sites would be restricted to one five-month period in a single year. Permanent residential use would be phased out.

  9. Victor Valley College Agreement between the Victor Valley Community College District and the Victor Valley College California Teachers Association Chapter 1170. July 1989 - June 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victor Valley Community Coll. District, Victorville, CA.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the Victor Valley College Board of Trustees and the Victor Valley College California Teachers Association/National Education Association is presented. This contract, covering the period from July 1989 through June 1992, deals with the following topics: bargaining agent recognition; district and…

  10. Late Holocene vegetation changes in Greenwater Valley, Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, K.L.; Webb, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Small-scale late Holocene vegetation changes were determined from a series of 13 modern and fossil packrat middens collected from a site in the Greenwater Valley, northern Mojave Desert, California. Although the site is above the modern lower limit of Coleogyne ramosissima (black-brush), macrofossils of this shrub are only present in samples younger than 270 yr B.P. In order to measure changes more subtle than presence vs absence, macrofossil concentrations were quantified, and principal components and factor analyses were used to distinguish midden plant assemblages. Both the presence/absence data and the statistical analyses suggest a downward shift of 50 to 100 m for Coleogyne (blackbrush) communities between 1435 and 1795 A.D. ?? 1985.

  11. Faulting caused by groundwater level declines, San Joaquin Valley, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 230mm of aseismic vertical offset of the land surface across the Pond-Poso Creek fault in the San Joaquin Valley, California, probably is related to groundwater withdrawal for crop irrigation. The scarp is approximately 3.4km long and occurs in an area where the land subsided more than 1.5m from 1926 to 1970. Modern faulting postdates the beginning of water level declines and associated subsidence. Movement detected by precise leveling surveys from February 1977 to March 1979 was seasonal, occurring during periods of water level decline. The modern movement probably is caused by localized differential compaction induced by differential water level declines across the preexisting fault. -Author

  12. Late Cenozoic sedimentation in Pilot Knob Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittase, W. M.; Walker, J. D.; Kirby, E.; Andrew, J.; Wan, E.

    2012-12-01

    In Pilot Knob Valley (PKV), active inversion of a Pliocene-mid Pleistocene basin presents the opportunity to understand the spatial and temporal development of an enigmatic basin astride a major transform boundary in California. Here, a ~1000-m-thick package of exposed Late Cenozoic strata has been uplifted and tilted to the northeast. Based on new age and provenance data, we adopt the name Pilot Knob formation (PKfm) to describe much of these exposed rocks north of the Garlock fault (GF) and east of Christmas Canyon gate. Post-Miocene development of PKV is strongly influenced by the sinistral GF, the newly identified Marine Gate fault (MGF) and dextral Eastern California shear zone. The PKfm consists of three lithofacies members, from base to top: (1) rocks derived from Eagle Crags to the south; (2) Randsburg Wash lacustrine rocks; and (3) an upper member derived from the Slate Range. Tephrochronologic data from four PKfm ash samples brackets deposition of lacustrine Randsburg Wash Member rocks between 3.7-3.1 Ma and lacustrine rocks of the Slate Range Member between 1.2-0.6 Ma. A fifth tephrochronologic sample from lacustrine-distal alluvial sediments south of the GF near Christmas Canyon brackets deposition of a possible PKfm facies at ~3.1 Ma. A 3-stage tectonic model for northern PKV explains changing provenance patterns. Prior to ~3.1 Ma, the western PKV paleo-low lay north of the current GF adjacent to the southern Slate Range and connected to Searles Valley. The MGF cuts adjacent to the southern face of the Slate Range and southern Searles Valley with up to 7.5 km of sinistral oblique-normal slip between ~5-2.5 Ma. Eagle Crags fanglomerate deposition may continue after 3.7 Ma west of the Randsburg Wash-Searles Valley spillway, but these rocks have been eroded away. By ~3.7 Ma, northward progradation of Eagle Crags fanglomerate waned and lacustrine sediments were deposited north of the GF and east of the Randsburg Wash-Searles Valley spillway. At ~3.1 Ma

  13. Biostratigraphy of marine Pliocene-Pleistocene deposits, Simi Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, L.T.; Squires, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    Richly fossiliferous, marine deltaic deposits exposed in the northern Simi Valley, southern California, are important biostratigraphically because they straddle the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary. These deposits consist of fine to coarse-grained sandstone with interbedded conglomerate. The best exposure is in Gilibrand Quarry, where 250 m are exposed in a continuous section with four main fossiliferous zones rich in mollusks. Most of these mollusks are complete and display growth series that represent a life assemblage with minimal postmortem transport. An erosional surface is present between the second and third fossiliferous beds in the quarry. Beds below the erosional surface contain mollusks indicative of Pliocene age. These mollusks are the pectinid Patinopecten healeyi and the epitoniid gastropod Opalia varicostata. Beds above the erosional surface contain a calcareous nannofossil assemblage that suggests a Pleistocene age. These species are Coccolithus pelagicus, Helicosphaera carteri, and Dictyococcites productus. (An absence of discoaster species and Emiliana huxleyi would place this assemblage in the early or medial Pleistocene.) The name lower Saugus Formation is assigned to all of these marine Pliocene-Pleistocene deposits because W.S. W. Kew in 124 originally named and mapped these strata as Saugus Formation. Confusion will be avoided by discontinuing usage of the names Fernando Formation, Pico Formation, and Sunshine Ranch Member of the Saugus Formation in this area for these strata. The lower Saugus Formation in the Simi Valley is faunally similar and time-correlate with the San Diego Formation in San Diego County.

  14. Sustainability of irrigated agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    PubMed Central

    Schoups, Gerrit; Hopmans, Jan W.; Young, Chuck A.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Tanji, Ken K.; Panday, Sorab

    2005-01-01

    The sustainability of irrigated agriculture in many arid and semiarid areas of the world is at risk because of a combination of several interrelated factors, including lack of fresh water, lack of drainage, the presence of high water tables, and salinization of soil and groundwater resources. Nowhere in the United States are these issues more apparent than in the San Joaquin Valley of California. A solid understanding of salinization processes at regional spatial and decadal time scales is required to evaluate the sustainability of irrigated agriculture. A hydro-salinity model was developed to integrate subsurface hydrology with reactive salt transport for a 1,400-km2 study area in the San Joaquin Valley. The model was used to reconstruct historical changes in salt storage by irrigated agriculture over the past 60 years. We show that patterns in soil and groundwater salinity were caused by spatial variations in soil hydrology, the change from local groundwater to snowmelt water as the main irrigation water supply, and by occasional droughts. Gypsum dissolution was a critical component of the regional salt balance. Although results show that the total salt input and output were about equal for the past 20 years, the model also predicts salinization of the deeper aquifers, thereby questioning the sustainability of irrigated agriculture. PMID:16230610

  15. Slip on faults in the Imperial Valley triggered by the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake revealed by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Meng; Sandwell, David; Fialko, Yuri; Bilham, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Radar interferometry (InSAR), field measurements and creepmeters reveal surface slip on multiple faults in the Imperial Valley triggered by the main shock of the 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Mw 7.2 earthquake. Co-seismic offsets occurred on the San Andreas, Superstition Hills, Imperial, Elmore Ranch, Wienert, Coyote Creek, Elsinore, Yuha, and several minor faults near the town of Ocotillo at the northern end of the mainshock rupture. We documented right-lateral slip (<40 mm) on northwest-striking faults and left-lateral slip (<40 mm) on southwest-striking faults. Slip occurred on 15-km- and 20-km-long segments of the San Andreas Fault in the Mecca Hills (≤50 mm) and Durmid Hill (≤10 mm) respectively, and on 25 km of the Superstition Hills Fault (≤37 mm). Field measurements of slip on the Superstition Hills Fault agree with InSAR and creepmeter measurements to within a few millimeters. Dislocation models of the InSAR data from the Superstition Hills Fault confirm that creep in this sequence, as in previous slip events, is confined to shallow depths (<3 km).

  16. Geothermal fluids to irrigate energy crops on Imperial East Mesa Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, F.E.; Thomas, T.R.; Singh, K.

    1981-10-01

    Geothermal fluid at 2200 parts per million(ppM) total dissolved solids from the East Mesa, California was compared to 1400 ppM ground water from a 100 m well as irrigation sources for Beta vulgaris (L.) USH-11 sugar beet and Tamarix aphylla (L.) athel, a biomass and windbreak tree. In 1980 there was no significant difference between the yields from the two waters. In 1981, there was no significant difference between biomass production from the waters on the athel. The geothermal water produced a larger yield of sucrose than the ground water. The data suggest that raising sugar beets with either water is feasible on the East Mesa.

  17. Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial Valley, California as a site for continental scientific drilling. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1983-03-01

    The Salton Trough, where seafloor spreading systems of the East Pacific Rise transition into the San Andreas transform fault system, is the site of such continental rifting and basin formation today. The largest thermal anomaly in the trough, the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), is of interest to both thermal regimes and mineral resources investigators. At this site, temperatures >350/sup 0/C and metal-rich brines with 250,000 mg/L TDS have been encountered at <2 km depth. Republic Geothermal Inc. will drill a new well to 3.7 km in the SSGF early in 1983; we propose add-on experiments in it. If funded, we will obtain selective water and core samples and a large-diameter casing installed to 3.7 km will permit later deepening. In Phase 2, the well would be continuously cored to 5.5 km and be available for scientific studies until July 1985. The deepened well would encounter hydrothermal regimes of temperature and pressure never before sampled.

  18. Geophysical, geochemical, and geological investigations of the Dunes geothermal system, Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elders, W. A.; Combs, J.; Coplen, T. B.; Kolesar, P.; Bird, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    The Dunes anomaly is a water-dominated geothermal system in the alluvium of the Salton Trough, lacking any surface expression. It was discovered by shallow-temperature gradient measurements. A 612-meter-deep test well encountered several temperature-gradient reversals, with a maximum of 105 C at 114 meters. The program involves surface geophysics, including electrical, gravity, and seismic methods, down-hole geophysics and petrophysics of core samples, isotopic and chemical studies of water samples, and petrological and geochemical studies of the cores and cuttings. The aim is (1) to determine the source and temperature history of the brines, (2) to understand the interaction between the brines and rocks, and (3) to determine the areal extent, nature, origin, and history of the geothermal system. These studies are designed to provide better definition of exploration targets for hidden geothermal anomalies and to contribute to improved techniques of exploration and resource assessment.

  19. 78 FR 16827 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; State of California; Imperial Valley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... crestline of the Chocolate Mountains. If EPA receives adverse comments, EPA will withdraw the direct final rule, and it will not take effect. EPA will address all public comments in a subsequent final...

  20. Heber Ethanol Fuel Facility, Imperial Valley, California. Quarterly report No. 2, March 1981-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The purposed project is a commercial-scale ethanol-fuel facility with a capacity of twenty million gallons per year of fuel-grade ethanol. In addition, 70,000 tons per year of distillers dried grains will be produced. The following tasks and issues are addressed: process engineering - process descriptions, plant layout, and design; economics and finance - overview of capital and operating costs; environmental analysis - preliminary project description; and permit processing and legal issues. (MHR)

  1. Preliminary results of geothermal desalting operations at the East Mesa test site Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suemoto, S. H.; Mathias, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation has erected at its Geothermal Resource Development site two experimental test vehicles for the purpose of desalting hot fluids of geothermal origin. Both plants have as a feed source geothermal well Mesa 6-1 drilled to a total depth of 8,030 feet and having a bottom hole temperature of 400 F. Formation fluid collected at the surface contained 24,800 mg/1 total dissolved solids. The dissolved solids consist mainly of sodium chloride. A multistage distillation (3-stage) plant has been operated intermittently for one year with no operational problems. Functioning at steady-state conditions with a liquid feed rate of 70 g/m and a temperature of 221 F, the final brine blowdown temperature was 169 F. Product water was produced at a rate of about 2 g/m; average total dissolved solids content of the product was 170 mg/1. A product quality of 27.5 mg/1 at a pH of 9.5 was produced from the first stage.

  2. 78 FR 16792 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; State of California; Imperial Valley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ..., Arizona. On October 31, 1990 (55 FR 45799), EPA clarified the descriptions of several Group I and II areas... nonattainment area by operation of law effective November 15, 1990. On March 15, 1991 (56 FR 11101), EPA...'' PM 10 nonattainment area. On November 6, 1991 (56 FR 56694), EPA codified the PM 10...

  3. Chemistry and geothermometry of brine produced from the Salton Sea Scientific drill hole, Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.M.; Fournier, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    The December 29-30, 1985, flow test of the State 2-14 well, also known as the Salton Sea Scientific drill hole, produced fluid from a depth of 1865-1877 m at a reservoir temperature of 305????5??C. Samples were collected at five different flashing pressures. The brines are Na-Ca-K-Cl-type waters with very high metal and low SO4 and HCO3 contents. Compositions of the flashed brines were normalized relative to the 25??C densities of the solutions, and an ionic charge balance was achieved by adjusting the Na concentration. Calculated Na/K geothermometer temperatures, using equations suggested by different investigators, range from 326?? to 364??C. The Mg/K2 method gives a temperature of about 350??C, Mg/Li2 about 282??, and Na/Li 395??-418??C. -from Authors

  4. Color Image of Death Valley, California from SIR-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This radar image shows the area of Death Valley, California and the different surface types in the area. Radar is sensitive to surface roughness with rough areas showing up brighter than smooth areas, which appear dark. This is seen in the contrast between the bright mountains that surround the dark, smooth basins and valleys of Death Valley. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan (green crescent feature) at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. Several other alluvial fans (semicircular features) can be seen along the mountain fronts in this image. The dark wrench-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. Elevations in the valley range from 70 meters (230 feet) below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level. Scientists are using these radar data to help answer a number of different questions about Earth's geology including how alluvial fans form and change through time in response to climatic changes and earthquakes. The image is centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. Colors in the image represent different radar channels as follows: red =L-band horizontally polarized transmitted, horizontally polarized received (LHH); green =L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received (LHV) and blue = CHV.

    SIR-C/X-SAR is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground

  5. ANALYSIS OF MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN RELATION TO ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENTS AMONG LOTIC HABITATS OF CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We analyzed relationships between environmental characteristics and macroinvertebrate assemblages in lotic habitats of California's Central Valley with community metric and multivariate statistical approaches. Using canonical ordination analyses, we contrasted results when asse...

  6. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABLES AND BENTHIC DIATOM ASSEMBLAGES IN CALIFORNIA CENTRAL VALLEY STREAMS (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams and rivers in the California Central Valley Ecoregion have been substantially modified by human activities. This study examines distributional patterns of benthic diatom assemblages in relation to environmental characteristics in streams and rivers of this region. Benthic...

  7. Nitrate Contamination of Deep Aquifers in the Salinas Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Holtz, M.; Roberts, S. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Visser, A.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Belitz, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Salinas Valley, known as 'the salad bowl of the world', has been an agricultural center for more than 100 years. Irrigated row crops such as lettuce and strawberries dominate both land use and water use. Groundwater is the exclusive supply for both irrigation and drinking water. Some irrigation wells and most public water supply wells in the Salinas Valley are constructed to draw water from deep portions of the aquifer system, where contamination by nitrate is less likely than in the shallow portions of the aquifer system. However, a number of wells with top perforations greater than 75 m deep, screened below confining or semi-confining units, have nitrate concentrations greater than the Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) of 45 mg/L as NO3-. This study uses nitrate concentrations from several hundred irrigation, drinking water, and monitoring wells (Monterey County Water Resources Agency, 1997), along with tritium-helium groundwater ages acquired at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through the State of California Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program (reported in Kulongoski et al., 2007 and in Moran et al., in press), to identify nitrate 'hot spots' in the deep aquifer and to examine possible modes of nitrate transport to the deep aquifer. In addition, observed apparent groundwater ages are compared with the results of transport simulations that use particle tracking and a stochastic-geostatistical framework to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity to determine the distribution of travel times from the water table to each well (Fogg et al., 1999). The combined evidence from nitrate, tritium, tritiogenic 3He, and radiogenic 4He concentrations, reveals complex recharge and flow to the capture zone of the deep drinking water wells. Widespread groundwater pumping for irrigation accelerates vertical groundwater flow such that high nitrate groundwater reaches some deep drinking water wells. Deeper portions of the wells often draw in water that recharged

  8. Climate Impacts on Irrigated Agriculture in California's Central Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, J.; Young, C. A.; Mehta, V. K.; Davitt, A. W. D.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Ruane, A. C.; Rosenzweig, C.

    2015-12-01

    Irrigated farms account for 80%-90% of consumptive water use in the United States and $118.5 billion of US agricultural production. Despite the vast water use and high yields of irrigated croplands, agriculture is typically the lowest value sector in a water resources system, and thus the first to face reductions when water becomes scarce. A major challenge for hydrologic and agricultural communities is assessing the effects of climate change on the sustainability of regional water resources and irrigated agriculture. To explore the interface of water and agriculture in California's Central Valley, the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) crop model was coupled to the Water Evaluation and Planning System (WEAP) water resources model, deployed over the service area of Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, and forced using both historical and future climate scenarios. This coupling brings water supply constraints to DSSAT and sophisticated agricultural water use, management, and diagnostics to WEAP. Thirty year historical (1980-2009) simulations of WEAP-DSSAT for corn, wheat, and rice were run using a spatially interpolated observational dataset, and contrasted with future simulations using climate scenarios developed by adjusting the spatially interpolated observational dataset with North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program differences between future (2050-2069) and historical (1980-1999) regional climate model simulations of precipitation and temperature. Generally, within the Central Valley temperatures warm by approximately 2°C, precipitation remains constant, and crop water use efficiency increases. On average corn yields decrease, wheat yields increase, and rice yields remain unchanged. Potential adaptations, as well as implications for groundwater pumping, irrigation extent and method, and land use change including fallowing and switching crops, are examined.

  9. PM10 source apportionment in California's San Joaquin valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Solomon, Paul A.; Magliano, Karen L.; Ziman, Steven D.; Willard Richards, L.

    A PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter equal to or less than 10 μm) aerosol study was carried out at six sites in California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV) from 14 June 1988 to 9 June 1989, as part of the 1988-1989 Valley Air Quality Study (VAQS). Concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameters equal to or less than 2.5 μm) mass, organic and elemental carbon, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium and elements were determined in 24-h aerosol samples collected at three urban (Stockton, Fresno, Bakersfield) and three non-urban (Crows Landing, Fellows, Kern Wildlife Refuge) locations during this period. The sources which contributed to ambient concentrations of PM10 were determined by applying the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model using the source profiles determined specifically for that study area. The VAQS data indicates the federal 24-h PM10 standard of 150 μg m -3 was exceeded at four out of the six sites and for reasons which differ by season and by spatial region of influence. The annual average source contributions to the PM10 at Bakersfield, the site with the highest annual average, were 54% from primary geological material, 15% from secondary ammonium nitrate, 10% from primary motor vehicle exhaust, 8% from primary construction; the remaining 4% was unexplained. The results of the source apportionment at all sites show that geological contributions (fugitive dust from tilling, roadways and construction) are largest in summer and fall months, while secondary ammonium nitrate contributions (deriving from direct emissions of ammonia and oxides of nitrogen from agricultural activities and engine exhaust) are largest during winter months.

  10. Estimating soil matric potential in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.; Miller, R.F.; Welch, M.R.; Groeneveld, D.P.; Branson, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Much of the floor of the Owens Valley, California, is covered with alkaline scrub and alkaline meadow plant communities, whose existence is dependent partly on precipitation and partly on water infiltrated into the rooting zone from the shallow water table. The extent to which these plant communities are capable of adapting to and surviving fluctuations in the water table depends on physiological adaptations of the plants and on the water content, matric potential characteristics of the soils. Two methods were used to estimate soil matric potential in test sites in Owens Valley. The first was the filter-paper method, which uses water content of filter papers equilibrated to water content of soil samples taken with a hand auger. The other method of estimating soil matric potential was a modeling approach based on data from this and previous investigations. These data indicate that the base 10 logarithm of soil matric potential is a linear function of gravimetric soil water content for a particular soil. Estimates of soil water characteristic curves were made at two sites by averaging the gravimetric soil water content and soil matric potential values from multiple samples at 0.1 m depths derived by using the hand auger and filter paper method and entering these values in the soil water model. The characteristic curves then were used to estimate soil matric potential from estimates of volumetric soil water content derived from neutron-probe readings. Evaluation of the modeling technique at two study sites indicated that estimates of soil matric potential within 0.5 pF units of the soil matric potential value derived by using the filter paper method could be obtained 90 to 95% of the time in soils where water content was less than field capacity. The greatest errors occurred at depths where there was a distinct transition between soils of different textures. (Lantz-PTT)

  11. 76 FR 30002 - Establishment of the Antelope Valley of the California High Desert Viticultural Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Antelope Valley of the California High Desert viticultural area in the Federal Register (75 FR 53877) on... western tip of the valley, is a sedimentary bed dating to the Miocene epoch (about 23 to 5 million years... granitic rock on alluvial fans and terraces. Generally, they vary in drainage, slope, elevation,...

  12. 77 FR 12491 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD) and San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern negative declarations for volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of sulfur source categories for the AVAQMD and......

  13. 76 FR 298 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation......... 12/17/92 08/24/07 On September 17, 2007, the submittal for San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution... December 13, 1994 (59 FR 64132), EPA approved into the SIP a previous version of Rule 4402, SJVUAPCD...

  14. 78 FR 53038 - Interim Final Determination to Stay and Defer Sanctions; California; San Joaquin Valley

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 69896), we published a partial approval and partial disapproval of the San Joaquin Valley... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Interim Final Determination to Stay and Defer Sanctions; California; San Joaquin... imposition of highway sanctions based on a proposed approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley...

  15. 77 FR 65305 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley Unified Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley... (SIP) revision for the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (District) portion of... detailed discussion of District Rule 2410, please refer to our proposed approval. See 77 FR 32493 (June...

  16. Model for deformation in Long Valley, California, 1980-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, J.B.; Whitcomb, J.H.

    1984-10-10

    Geodetic data collected in Long Valley, California, from 1975 through 1981 define a pattern of uplift and strain which is evidently associated with a sequence of earthquakes occuring in May 1980 and subsequent swarm activity continuing until the present. We have constructed a model to explain the deformation observed since May 1980 in terms of inflation of two subsurface magma chambers, faulting in the south most region of the caldera, and slip in the Hilton Creek fault. The most significant new feature of the model is the shallow magma chamber at 5 km depth, located a few hundred meters to the east of the Casa Diablo hot spring area. Inflation of this chamber cause stresses which show consistency with various aspects of the seismicity in the south moat of the calcers. Calculations of stress across vertical planes over the magma chambers can be used together with failure criteria to estimate the inflation volume at which the rock layers intervening between the chamber and the surface will fail by extensional fracture.

  17. To Develop an Administrative Manual for the Cooperative Education Program at Los Angeles Valley College [California].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomen, Lynn D.

    This document is Part I of the Handbook on Cooperative Education at Los Angeles Valley College (California). It was designed to standardize the procedures and policies that have proven appropriate for this college. For comparative purposes, the author studied the administration of cooperative education programs at four other California community…

  18. Food and Environment. A Teachers' Resource Guide to California Valley Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railton, Esther, Comp.

    Presented is a compilation of teaching resources prepared by teachers enrolled in a graduate-level environmental education course at California State University, Hayward. The emphasis of these materials is upon agriculture and related environmental practices in California's San Joaquin Valley. Following a description of course logistics are six…

  19. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California - 3D view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Long Valley, California by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. This view was constructed by overlaying a color composite SIR-C image on a digital elevation map. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process by which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle and, which then, are compared to obtain elevation information. The data were acquired on April 13, 1994 and on October 3, 1994, during the first and second flights of the SIR-C/X-SAR radar instrument. The color composite radar image was produced by assigning red to the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) polarization; green to the C-band (vertically transmitted and received) polarization; and blue to the ratio of the two data sets. Blue areas in the image are smooth and yellow areas are rock outcrops with varying amounts of snow and vegetation. The view is looking north along the northeastern edge of the Long Valley caldera, a volcanic collapse feature created 750,000 years ago and the site of continued subsurface activity. Crowley Lake is off the image to the left. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  20. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective view of Long Valley, California was created from data taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. This image was constructed by overlaying a color composite SIR-C radar image on a digital elevation map. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process by which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The interferometry data were acquired on April 13,1994 and on October 3, 1994, during the first and second flights of the SIR-C/X-SAR instrument. The color composite radar image was taken in October and was produced by assigning red to the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) polarization; green to the C-band (vertically transmitted and received) polarization; and blue to the ratio of the two data sets. Blue areas in the image are smooth and yellow areas are rock outcrops with varying amounts of snow and vegetation. The view is looking north along the northeastern edge of the Long Valley caldera, a volcanic collapse feature created 750,000 years ago and the site of continued subsurface activity. Crowley Lake is the large dark feature in the foreground. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are

  1. Estimating soil matric potential in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.; Miller, Reuben F.; Welch, Michael R.; Groeneveld, David P.; Branson, Farrel A.

    1989-01-01

    Much of the floor of Owens Valley, California, is covered with alkaline scrub and alkaline meadow plant communities, whose existence is dependent partly on precipitation and partly on water infiltrated into the rooting zone from the shallow water table. The extent to which these plant communities are capable of adapting to and surviving fluctuations in the water table depends on physiological adaptations of the plants and on the water content, matric potential characteristics of the soils. Two methods were used to estimate soil matric potential in test sites in Owens Valley. The first, the filter-paper method, uses water content of filter papers equilibrated to water content of soil samples taken with a hand auger. The previously published calibration relations used to estimate soil matric potential from the water content of the filter papers were modified on the basis of current laboratory data. The other method of estimating soil matric potential was a modeling approach based on data from this and previous investigations. These data indicate that the base-10 logarithm of soil matric potential is a linear function of gravimetric soil water content for a particular soil. The slope and intercepts of this function vary with the texture and saturation capacity of the soil. Estimates of soil water characteristic curves were made at two sites by averaging the gravimetric soil water content and soil matric potential values from multiple samples at 0.1-m depth intervals derived by using the hand auger and filter-paper method and entering these values in the soil water model. The characteristic curves then were used to estimate soil matric potential from estimates of volumetric soil water content derived from neutron-probe readings. Evaluation of the modeling technique at two study sites indicated that estimates of soil matric potential within 0.5 pF units of the soil matric potential value derived by using the filter-paper method could be obtained 90 to 95 percent of the

  2. Gravity survey and depth to bedrock in Carson Valley, Nevada-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurer, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    Gravity data were obtained from 460 stations in Carson Valley, Nevada and California. The data have been interpreted to obtain a map of approximate depth to bedrock for use in a ground-water model of the valley. This map delineates the shape of the alluvium-filled basin and shows that the maximum depth to bedrock exceeds 5,000 feet, on the west side of the valley. A north-south trending offset in the bedrock surface shows that the Carson-Valley/Pine-Nut-Mountain block has not been tilted to the west as a simple unit, but is comprised of several smaller blocks. (USGS)

  3. The hydrothermal system of Long Valley Caldera, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Lewis, Robert Edward; Olmsted, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    Long Valley caldera, an elliptical depression covering 450 km 2 on the eastern front of the Sierra Nevada in east-central California, contains a hot-water convection system with numerous hot springs and measured and estimated aquifer temperatures at depths of 180?C to 280?C. In this study we have synthesized the results of previous geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic investigations of the Long Valley area to develop a generalized conceptual and mathematical model which describes the gross features of heat and fluid flow in the hydrothermal system. Cenozoic volcanism in the Long Valley region began about 3.2 m.y. (million years) ago and has continued intermittently until the present time. The major event that resulted in the formation of the Long Valley caldera took place about 0.7 m.y. ago with the eruption of 600 km 3 or more of Bishop Tuff of Pleistocene age, a rhyolitic ash flow, and subsequent collapse of the roof of the magma chamber along one or more steeply inclined ring fractures. Subsequent intracaldera volcanism and uplift of the west-central part of the caldera floor formed a subcircular resurgent dome about 10 km in diameter surrounded by a moat containing rhyolitic, rhyodacitic, and basaltic rocks ranging in age from 0.5 to 0.05 m.y. On the basis of gravity and seismic studies, we estimate an aver- age thickness of fill of 2.4 km above the precaldera granitic and metamorphic basement rocks. A continuous layer of densely welded Bishop Tuff overlies the basement rocks, with an average thickness of 1.4 km; the fill above the welded Bishop Tuff consists of intercalated volcanic flows and tuffs and fluvial and lacustrine deposits. Assuming the average grain density of the fill is between 2.45 and 2.65 g/cm 3 , we calculate the average bulk porosity of the total fill as from 0.11 to 0.21. Comparison of published values of porosity of the welded Bishop Tuff exposed southeast of the caldera with calculated values indicates average bulk porosity

  4. Particulate carbon measurements in California's San Joaquin Valley.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Chen, L-W Antony; Magliano, Karen L

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol carbon sampling methods and biases were evaluated during the California Regional PM10/PM2.5 Air Quality Study (CRPAQS) and Fresno Supersite programs. PM2.5 sampling was conducted using Desert Research Institute (DRI) sequential filter samplers (SFS) from December 1999 through February 2001 at two urban sites (Fresno and Bakersfield), one regional transport site (Angiola), and two boundary sites (Bethel Island and Sierra Nevada Foothills) during CRPAQS in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Additional filter-based sampling was done in Fresno as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Supersites program. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations were higher during winter (December-February) than summer (June-August) and this trend was most pronounced at Fresno and Bakersfield. OC and EC displayed similar diurnal trends during winter and summer at Fresno and during winter at Angiola. The diurnal pattern at Angiola reflected the transport of secondary pollutants to the site. Collocated measurements of OC and EC on undenuded quartz-fiber filters were made at Fresno with the DRI SFS and the Andersen FRM and RAAS samplers. All average differences in OC between samplers were less than their respective measurement uncertainties. Positive and negative OC biases were evaluated at Fresno using the Andersen RAAS sampler with carbon-denuded and undenuded channels with Teflon-membrane and quartz-fiber filter pairs. Differences between the denuded particle OC and that obtained by subtracting the quartz-behind-Teflon or quartz-behind-quartz OC from the undenuded quartz-fiber front filter were less than twice their measurement uncertainties in most cases. Particulate OC in the denuded channel agreed most closely with the difference between undenuded front and backup quartz-fiber OC. PMID:15990153

  5. Identifying Key Vulnerabilities in Current Management of California Central Valley for the California Water Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, E.; Groves, D.; Joyce, B. A.; Juricich, R.

    2012-12-01

    The California Department of Water Resources (DWR), for its 2013 Update of the California Water Plan (CWP), is building new analytic capabilities for developing and evaluating regional and state-wide water management strategies. These strategies are intended to address growing and diverse water needs coupled with uncertain future hydrologic conditions and available supplies. Recognizing the significant uncertainty about future water management conditions, DWR is utilizing new robust decision methods to identify robust and adaptive water management strategies. This talk will describe a recently completed application of Robust Decision Making (RDM) for long-term water planning as part of the 2013 CWP Update. This analysis utilizes a new hydrologic / water management model of the Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and Tulare hydrologic regions, running the model under hundreds of potential futures. These futures consider potential variation in demographic growth, land-use patterns, drought length and timing, and other climate factors from projections generated by downscaled global circulation models. Cluster-finding "scenario discovery" algorithms, applied to the resulting database of simulation model results, identify the key characteristics of future conditions where current management fails to meet a wide range of policy objectives. These "vulnerabilities" provide the foundation for developing more robust and adaptive response packages and the considering tradeoffs between such response packages. This analysis will provide guidance for considering response packages to meet the challenges posed by future conditions in the California Central Valley and provides a widely applicable new approach for making water management plans more cognizant and responsive to a wide range of uncertainties.

  6. Spatio-temporal evolution of aseismic ground deformation in the Mexicali Valley (Baja California, Mexico) from 1993 to 2010, using differential SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychikhina, O.; Glowacka, E.

    2015-11-01

    Ground deformation in Mexicali Valley, Baja California, Mexico, the southern part of the Mexicali-Imperial valley, is influenced by active tectonics and human activity, mainly that of geothermal fluid extraction in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. Significant ground deformation, mainly subsidence (~ 18 cm yr-1), and related ground fissures cause severe damage to local infrastructure. The technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) has been demonstrated to be a very effective remote sensing tool for accurately measuring the spatial and temporal evolution of ground displacements over broad areas. In present study ERS-1/2 SAR and ENVISAT ASAR images acquired between 1993 and 2010 were used to perform a historical analysis of aseismic ground deformation in Mexicali Valley, in an attempt to evaluate its spatio-temporal evolution and improve the understanding of its dynamic. For this purpose, the conventional 2-pass DInSAR was used to generate interferograms which were used in stacking procedure to produce maps of annual aseismic ground deformation rates for different periods. Differential interferograms that included strong co-seismic deformation signals were not included in the stacking and analysis. The changes in the ground deformation pattern and rate were identified. The main changes occur between 2000 and 2005 and include increasing deformation rate in the recharge zone and decreasing deformation rate in the western part of the CPGF production zone. We suggested that these changes are mainly caused by production development in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  7. 3-D Velocity Model of the Coachella Valley, Southern California Based on Explosive Shots from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, P.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Hole, J. A.; Goldman, M.; Scheirer, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    of the largest earthquakes in the 2012 Brawley swarm, Imperial Valley, California: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 40, no. 5, p. 847-852.

  8. Final Report: Baseline Selenium Monitoring of Agricultural Drains Operated by the Imperial Irrigation District in the Salton Sea Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; May, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes comprehensive findings from a 4-year-long field investigation to document baseline environmental conditions in 29 agricultural drains and ponds operated by the Imperial Irrigation District along the southern border of the Salton Sea. Routine water-quality collections and fish community assessments were conducted on as many as 16 sampling dates at roughly quarterly intervals from July 2005 to April 2009. The water-quality measurements included total suspended solids and total (particulate plus dissolved) selenium. With one exception, fish were surveyed with baited minnow traps at quarterly intervals during the same time period. However, in July 2007, fish surveys were not conducted because we lacked permission from the California Department of Fish and Game for incidental take of desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), an endangered species. During April and October 2006-08, water samples also were collected from seven intensively monitored drains (which were selected from the 29 total drains) for measurement of particulate and dissolved selenium, including inorganic and organic fractions. In addition, sediment, aquatic food chain matrices [particulate organic detritus, filamentous algae, net plankton, and midge (chironomid) larvae], and two fish species (western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis; and sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna) were sampled from the seven drains for measurement of total selenium concentrations. The mosquitofish and mollies were intended to serve as surrogates for pupfish, which we were not permitted to sacrifice for selenium determinations. Water quality (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and turbidity) values were typical of surface waters in a hot, arid climate. A few drains exhibited brackish, near-anoxic conditions, especially during summer and fall when water temperatures occasionally exceeded 30 degrees Celsius. Total selenium concentrations in water were directly correlated with salinity and

  9. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California -Interferometry/Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These four images of the Long Valley region of east-central California illustrate the steps required to produced three dimensional data and topographics maps from radar interferometry. All data displayed in these images were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour during its two flights in April and October, 1994. The image in the upper left shows L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) SIR-C radar image data for an area 34 by 59 kilometers (21 by 37 miles). North is toward the upper right; the radar illumination is from the top of the image. The bright areas are hilly regions that contain exposed bedrock and pine forest. The darker gray areas are the relatively smooth, sparsely vegetated valley floors. The dark irregular patch near the lower left is Lake Crowley. The curving ridge that runs across the center of the image from top to bottom is the northeast rim of the Long Valley Caldera, a remnant crater from a massive volcanic eruption that occurred about 750,000 years ago. The image in the upper right is an interferogram of the same area, made by combining SIR-C L-band data from the April and October flights. The colors in this image represent the difference in the phase of the radar echoes obtained on the two flights. Variations in the phase difference are caused by elevation differences. Formation of continuous bands of phase differences, known as interferometric 'fringes', is only possible if the two observations were acquired from nearly the same position in space. For these April and October data takes, the shuttle tracks were less than 100 meters (328 feet) apart. The image in the lower left shows a topographic map derived from the interferometric data. The colors represent increments of elevation, as do the thin black contour lines, which are spaced at 50-meter (164-foot) elevation intervals. Heavy contour lines show 250-meter intervals (820-foot). Total relief in

  10. 75 FR 44278 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Imperial Valley Solar...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ...: Stirling Energy Systems (SES) filed right- of-way (ROW) application CACA-47740 for the SES Solar Two... mirror facets. These mirrors concentrate solar energy onto the solar receiver of the PCU. The project... into a MOU with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to conduct a joint environmental review of...

  11. Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-09-23

    Rare earth element measurements for thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California. Samples were collected in acid washed HDPE bottles and acidified with concentrated trace element clean (Fisher Scientific) nitric acid. Samples were pre-concentratated by a factor of approximately 10 using chelating resin with and IDA functional group and measured on magnetic sector ICP-MS. Samples include Seyferth Hot Springs, Surprise Valley Resort Mineral Well, Leonard's Hot Spring, and Lake City Mud Volcano Boiling Spring.

  12. Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

  13. Irrigation in California's Central Valley Strengthens the Southwestern U. S. Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural irrigation in the Central Valley of California has always depended on surface water reservoirs and groundwater pumping. This anthropogenic redistribution of water modifies the land hydrological cycle significantly, especially by increasing evapotranspiration. In this study we establish the importance of California's Central Valley irrigation in the local and regional hydrological cycles, including its role in land surface-atmosphere interactions. We use the global, NCAR Community Atmosphere Model, with realistic estimates of irrigation applied to the NCAR Community Land Model. Consistent with previous studies, we find that irrigation modifies the surface radiation budget by generally increasing latent heat, decreasing sensible heat and decreasing land surface temperature. Although atmospheric water vapor increases due to enhanced evapotranspiration, during the summer, the Central Valley underlies the descending branch of the large-scale circulation, which inhibits the occurrence of convection. Consequently, Central Valley irrigation has negligible effects on local precipitation. However, precipitation in the downwind region of California, i.e., in the southwestern U. S., increases, enhancing the North American Monsoon, while forming a regional, anthropogenic recycling loop in the hydrologic cycle which returns water to California. This study has implications for the importance of human-driven impacts on the hydrological cycle and local and regional climate, and for water resources management in California and the Western United States.

  14. Diurnal Evolution of Three-Dimensional Wind and Temperature Structure in California's Central Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Shiyuan; Whiteman, Charles D.; Bian, Xindi

    2004-11-01

    The diurnal evolution of the three-dimensional summer season mean wind and temperature structure in California’s Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys (collectively called the Central Valley) are investigated using data from 22 radar wind profiler/Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (RASS) operated as part of the Central California Ozone Study in 2000. The profiler network revealed, for the first time, that the persistent summer season flow pattern documented by surface observations extends 800-1000 m above the surface. At most locations, up-valley winds persist both day and night except at the upper ends of the valleys and close to the valley sidewalls where diurnal wind reversals occur. Wind speeds exhibit pronounced diurnal oscillations, with amplitudes decreasing with height. A low-level wind maximum occurs in the lowest 300 m, with a sharp decrease in speed above the maximum. Especially well-defined nocturnal low-level jets occur at sites in the southern San Joaquin Valley, where maximum speeds of 10 m s-1 or more occur 1-2 h before midnight at heights near 300 m. The afternoon mixed layer, generally deeper than 1000 m, increases in depth with up-valley distance in both valleys. At night, temperature inversions develop in the lowest several hundred meters with near-isothermal layers above. Mean temperatures in the lowest 500 m of the valleys are always warmer than at the same altitude over the coast, and temperature increases from the lower to upper valleys. The diurnal oscillation of the coast-valley and along-valley temperature and pressure difference reach a maximum in late afternoon and a minimum in early morning. These oscillations are in phase with the diurnal variation of westerly onshore flows. The along-valley wind maxima, however, occur 1-2 h before midnight while the pressure gradient maxima are usually found just before sunset.

  15. Quantitative rock-fall hazard and risk assessment for Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, Greg M.; Luco, Nicolas; Collins, Brian D.; Harp, Edwin L.; Reichenbach, Paola; Frankel, Kurt L.

    2014-01-01

    Rock falls are common in Yosemite Valley, California, posing substantial hazard and risk to the approximately four million annual visitors to Yosemite National Park. Rock falls in Yosemite Valley over the past few decades have damaged structures and caused injuries within developed regions located on or adjacent to talus slopes highlighting the need for additional investigations into rock-fall hazard and risk. This assessment builds upon previous investigations of rock-fall hazard and risk in Yosemite Valley and focuses on hazard and risk to structures posed by relatively frequent fragmental-type rock falls as large as approximately 100,000 (cubic meters) in volume.

  16. Water-level changes (1975-1998) in the Antelope Valley ground-water basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, Carl S.; Phillips, Steven P.

    1998-01-01

    Antelope Valley is in the western part of the Mojave Desert in southern California, about 50 mi northeast of Los Angeles. Between 1975 and 1998, water levels in the valley have changed in response to a shift in ground-water use from agricultural to urban, declining in some areas and rising in others. A study to document these changes was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Antelope Valley Water Group. This report presents the water-level data and the changes that occurred during this study period.

  17. Late Cenozoic tectonism of the Sacramento Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, D.S.; Helley, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Structure contours drawn on top of the Cretaceous rocks in the Sacramento Valley define a large number of diversely oriented folds and faults that are expressed in topographic, hydrologic, and geologic features at the land surface. Although many of the structures in the valley have a protracted history of movement, some dating back to the late Mesozoic, a remarkable number of these structures show late Cenozoic deformation that can be accurately determined from folding and faulting of widespread, dated Pliocene and Pleistocene volcanic units. These time-stratigraphic units are used to define structural domains of essentially contemporaneous late Cenozoic deformation that was characterized by east-west compressive stress. The oldest structural domain is located in the southeastern part of the valley, where east-side-up reverse movement on the Willows fault ceased prior to deposition of continentally derived sediments of late Miocene and early Pliocene age. In the middle Pliocene to early Pleistocene, east-west compressive deformation progressed northward through the valley so that the youngest late Cenozoic deformation is recorded in east-northeast-trending folds and faults in the Battle Creek domain, at the northern-most part of the valley. The northward progression of east-west compressive deformation appears to be related to the northward eclipse of eastward subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate before the northwestward migration of the Mendocino triple junction along the continental margin west of the valley.

  18. HCMM: Soil moisture in relation to geologic structure and lithology, northern California. [Sacramento Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Empirical observations on the ground and examination of aerial color IR photographs indicate that in grassland terrain, the vegetation overlying sandstone tends to become less vigorous sooner in the late spring season than does the area overlain by an adjacent shale unit. The reverse relationship obtains in the fall. These relationships are thought to be a reflection of the relative porosity of each of the units and hence of their ability to retain or lose soil moisture. A comparison of the optically enlarged day and nite IR imagery of the Late Mesozoic interbedded sandstone and shale units along the western margin of the Sacramento Valley, California, taken at seasonally critical times of the year (late spring/early summer and late fall/early winter) reveals subtle seasonal variations of graytone which tend to support the empirical observations after consideration of Sun angle and azimuth, and the internal consistency of the data on each set of satellite imagery.

  19. Development of Biological and Cultural Control of Olive Fruit Fly in the Central Valley of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eastern side of the Central Valley of California where olives are grown for canning was surveyed for olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), infestations. The pest was found for the first time in unusually high numbers in Merced. The a parasitic wasp, Psyttalia humilis (Silvestri), was import...

  20. Communication/Culture Study for Victor Valley College, Victorville, California, November 1991-April 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Patricia F.

    In November 1991, a study was conducted to assess the corporate culture and state of communication at Victor Valley College (VVC), in Victorville, California. The study was designed to determine the extent to which "trust" or "distrust" existed at VVC, and whether the lack of communication on campus was real or perceived. Study methodology…

  1. 76 FR 56132 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ...EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from polyester resin operations. We are approving a local rule that regulates these emission sources under the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (CAA or the......

  2. Epidemiology of almond leaf scorch disease in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond leaf scorch (ALS) disease has been present in California for more than 60 years. This disease is caused by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, which causes several other important plant diseases, including Pierce’s disease of grapes. The epidemiology of ALS in the San Joaquin Valley of Califo...

  3. Growing more with less in the Westlands Water District in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disposal of saline drainage water is a problem for irrigated agricultural throughout the world. In California the Westlands Water District in the San Joaquin Valley had its drainage service eliminated because of selenium contamination in the Kesterson Reservoir. A five-year study developed alternati...

  4. Pesticide Risk Communication, Risk Perception, and Self-Protective Behaviors among Farmworkers in California's Salinas Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Leckie, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural pesticide use is the highest of any industry, yet there is little research evaluating farmworkers' understandings of the health risks chemical exposure poses. This study examines pesticide education, risk perception, and self-protective behaviors among farmworkers in California's Salinas Valley. Fifty current and former farmworkers…

  5. 75 FR 39581 - Yosemite Valley Plan; Yosemite National Park; Mariposa, Madera, and Tuolumne Counties, California...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Yosemite Valley Plan; Yosemite National Park; Mariposa, Madera, and Tuolumne Counties, California; Notice of Revised Record of Decision SUMMARY: On December 29, 2000, the National Park...

  6. 77 FR 58078 - Withdrawal of Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley; 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... San Joaquin Valley (SJV) extreme ozone nonattainment area. 75 FR 10420. The California Air Resources... the 1-hour ozone NAAQS effective May 17, 2004. 69 FR 20550 (April 16, 2004).\\1\\ The SIP revisions that...-hour ozone standard in the SJV area. See 75 FR 10420, 10421 (March 8, 2010). \\1\\ EPA established a...

  7. 77 FR 12651 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley; Attainment Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... standards (NAAQS) in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). See 76 FR 57846. California developed this SIP to provide... implementation rule.\\1\\ \\1\\ See 40 CFR part 51, subpart X and 69 FR 23951 (April 30, 2004) and 70 FR 71612... and reductions by the District and CARB.\\4\\ 76 FR 57846, 57867. \\3\\ See letter, James...

  8. Epidemiology of xylellae diseases in the San Joaquin Valley of California: the role of alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pierce’s disease of grape and almond leaf scorch disease are both caused by various stains of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa. The pathogen is vectored by xylem feeding insects. Within the San Joaquin Valley of California, the green sharpshooter (Draeculacephala Minerva) is one of the mos...

  9. Isotopic evidence for climatic influence on alluvial-fan development in Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.I.; DeNiro, M.J.; Ajie, H.O.

    1987-02-01

    At least three semiarid to arid cycles are recorded by ..delta../sup 13/C values of organic matter in layers of rock varnishes on surfaces of Hanaupah Canyon and Johnson Canyon alluvial fans, Death Valley, California. These isotopic paleoenvironmental signals are interpreted as indicating major periods of fan aggradation during relatively more humid periods and fan entrenchment during subsequent lengthy arid periods.

  10. 76 FR 16696 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... November 5, 2010 (75 FR 68294), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California SIP....

  11. 76 FR 69135 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... 16, 2011 (76 FR 35167), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California SIP....

  12. 76 FR 68103 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Action On June 30, 2011 (76 FR 38340), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California...

  13. 76 FR 53640 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Action On June 24, 2011 (76 FR 37044), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California...

  14. 75 FR 60623 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation.... Proposed Action On 12/09/09 (74 FR 65042), EPA proposed a limited approval and limited disapproval of...

  15. 75 FR 2796 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District portion... On June 16, 2009 (74 FR 28467), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the California SIP... topcoats; and that Ventura County Air Pollution Control District's (VCAPCD) rule has more stringent...

  16. 76 FR 47076 - Revision to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of a revision to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... Action On June 8, 2011 (76 FR 33181), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California...

  17. 77 FR 745 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) Correction In rule document 2011-33660 appearing on...

  18. 77 FR 214 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control... Action On July 11, 2011 (76 FR 132), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the California...

  19. 75 FR 1716 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation... Reviews I. Proposed Action On August 19, 2009 (74 FR 41826), EPA proposed a limited approval and...

  20. 77 FR 64427 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... June 13, 2012 (77 FR 35329), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the California SIP....

  1. 78 FR 6740 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley United Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley United Air Pollution Control... FR 66429), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California SIP. Local agency Rule...

  2. 75 FR 24408 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control... FR 3680), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the California SIP. Rule Rule title...

  3. Data from geothermal gradient wells near Oasis, lower Coachella Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robison, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    This report includes drillers ' logs, temperature logs, and water quality analyses from geothermal tests made at 11 sites near Oasis, lower Coachella Valley, California. A map shows the locations of the wells and also included is the location-numbering system for wells. (USGS)

  4. To Develop a Curriculum Manual for the Cooperative Education Program at Los Angeles Valley College [California].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomen, Lynn D.

    This document is Part II of the Handbook on Cooperative Education at Los Angeles Valley College (California). It was designed to enable instructor/coordinators to conduct classes more effectively and efficiently. Outlines are provided of the new and revised curriculum offerings that have been suggested by students, the Cooperative Education…

  5. Comparison of inversion models using AIRSAR data for Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.

    1993-01-01

    Polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data were collected for the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) over Death Valley, California, USA, in September 1989. AIRSAR is a four-look, quid-polarizaiton, three frequency instrument. It collects measurements at C-band (5.66 cm), L-band (23.98 cm), and P-band (68.13 cm), and has a GIFOV of 10 meters and a swath width of 12 kilometers. Because the radar measures at three wavelengths, different scales of surface roughness are measured. Also, dielectric constants can be calculated from the data. The scene used in this study is in Death Valley, California and is located over Trail Canyon alluvial fan, the valley floor, and Artists Drive alluvial fan. The fans are very different in mineralogic makeup, size, and surface roughness. Trail Canyon fan is located on the west side of the valley at the base of the Panamint Range and is a large fan with older areas of desert pavement and younger active channels. The source for the material on southern part of the fan is mostly quartzites and there is an area of carbonate source on the northern part of the fan. Artists Drive fan is located at the base of the Black Mountains on the east side of the valley and is a smaller, young fan with its source mostly from volcanic rocks. The valley floor contains playa and salt deposits that range from smooth to Devil's Golf course type salt pinnacles.

  6. Geophysical Investigations of Structures within Southern Fish Lake Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, K.; Ferguson, J. F.; Oldow, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The 80km Fish Lake Valley Fault Zone makes up the northern portion of the Furnace Creek - Death Valley Fault Zone, a 250km right lateral oblique strike slip system that accounts for up to 25% of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American Plates. The Cucomongo Canyon Restraining bend lies to the south of Fish Lake Valley, and causes localized uplift. The developmental history of the Cucomongo Canyon restraining bend and the resultant uplift, deformation, and displacement is the focus of an integrated study by the Miles Geoscience Center at the University of Texas at Dallas. This specific part of the study focuses on the southernmost section of Fish Lake Valley, where Paleozoic sedimentary rocks are juxtaposed with Cenozoic sediments on multiple faulted boundaries. Structural constraints are not very well known as the faults are locally obscured by Quaternary alluvial deposits of various ages. Analysis of high resolution topography, produced from LiDAR scanning performed by the Miles team, and imagery shows subtle geomorphic expressions related to faulting. A near surface geophysical survey utilizing high resolution seismic refraction and microGal gravity measurements was done to explore the subsurface beneath the alluvium. Forward models were created to identify faults and ascertain vertical offsets and orientations. The geophysical models indicate a zone of extensional deformation north of the restraining bend

  7. Urban hydrology in the desert, Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, James C.; Nasseri, Iraj; Elliott, Ann L.

    1990-01-01

    A study of urban hydrology in Antelope Valley includes data collection, analysis of rainfall and runoff frequencies, and comparison of results from various rainfall-runoff models. This paper discusses only parts of the project that include data collection and frequency analyses.

  8. Hydrology of modern and late Holocene lakes, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.N.

    1996-07-01

    Above-normal precipitation and surface-water runoff, which have been generally related to the cyclic recurrence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, have produced modern ephemeral lakes in the closed-basin Death Valley watershed. This study evaluates the regional hydroclimatic relations between precipitation, runoff, and lake transgressions in the Death Valley watershed. Recorded precipitation, runoff, and spring discharge data for the region are used in conjunction with a closed-basin, lake-water-budget equation to assess the relative contributions of water from these sources to modern lakes in Death Valley and to identify the requisite hydroclimatic changes for a late Holocene perennial lake in the valley. As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program, an evaluation of the Quaternary regional paleoflood hydrology of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was planned. The objectives of the evaluation were (1) to identify the locations and investigate the hydraulic characteristics of paleofloods and compare these with the locations and characteristics of modern floods, and (2) to evaluate the character and severity of past floods and debris flows to ascertain the potential future hazards to the potential repository during the pre-closure period (US Department of Energy, 1988). This study addresses the first of these objectives, and the second in part, by assessing and comparing the sizes, locations, and recurrence rates of modern, recorded (1962--83) floods and late Holocene paleofloods for the 8,533-mi{sup 2}, closed-basin, Death Valley watershed with its contributing drainage basins in the Yucca Mountain site area.

  9. Short-term reproductive diapause by Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Coachella Valley of California.

    PubMed

    Reisen, W K; Smith, P T; Lothrop, H D

    1995-09-01

    Culex tarsalis Coquillett from the Coachella Valley in southeastern California enter a short-term reproductive diapause that is terminated by changes in photoperiod at or shortly after the winter solstice. Reproductively active and unfed resting females exhibited respective increases and decreases in parity rates during December that were characteristic of diapause induction, although reproductively active females, larvae, and males were collected during every month throughout winter. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that females from Coachella Valley enter and maintain a facultative reproductive diapause similar to females from the more northern San Joaquin Valley when exposed to simulated winter conditions. In environmental chambers, diapause termination was not related to temperature accrual because females terminated diapause at approximately the same time regardless of temperature regimens. A field experiment showed that female cohorts emerging in the Coachella Valley from late October through December entered a reproductive diapause that was terminated synchronously by changing photoperiod in late December. PMID:7473621

  10. DEFORMATION NEAR THE EPICENTER OF THE 1984 ROUND VALLEY, CALIFORNIA, EARTHQUAKE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, W.K.; Savage, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    A trilateration network extending from near Mammoth Lakes to Bishop, California, was resurveyed following the November 23, 1984, Round Valley earthquake (M//L equals 5. 8). The network had previously been surveyed in 1982. Deformation apparently associated with the Round Valley earthquake was detected as well as deformation due to the expansion of a magma chamber 8 km beneath the resurgent dome in the Long Valley caldera and right-lateral slip on the uppermost 2 km of the 1983 rupture surface in the south moat of the caldera. The deformation associated with Round Valley earthquake suggests left-lateral slip on the north-northeasterly striking vertical plane defined by the aftershock hypocenters. (Edted author abstract) Refs.

  11. Ground-water conditions and potential for artificial recharge in Lucerne Valley, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Donald H.

    1979-01-01

    The water level in two areas of Lucerne Valley in California has declined more than 100 feet since 1917, including 60 feet from 1954 to 1976. These declines are the result of pumping for the irrigation of alfalfa. The lowering of water levels has caused many shallow domestic wells to go dry. Well yields in the valley generally are between 10 and 1,000 gallons per minute. About 240 ,000 acre-feet of ground water was withdrawn between 1950 and 1976. About 1,750,000 acre-feet remains in storage. Water of poor quality underlies the valley around Lucerne Lake. There was no definable movement of this water from 1954 to 1976, but the possibility exists for future movement toward centers of pumping. Lucerne Valley may be hydrologically suitable for artificial-recharge operations. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. Digital-model evaluation of the ground-water resources in Ocotillo-Coyote Wells Basin, Imperial County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skrivan, James A.

    1977-01-01

    A flow model using finite-element techniques has been constructed for an alluvial aquifer in the Ocotillo-Coyote Wells Basin, Imperial County, Calif. Natural recharge is about 2,600 acre-feet per year, and estimated ground water in storage is 640 ,000 acre-feet. Pumpage totaled 880 acre-feet in 1975. The computed decline from steady-state conditions in 1925 to December 1975 was 15 feet in Ocotillo. The projected decline from 1976 to 1995 with annual pumpage of 1,000 acre-feet is 6 feet and with annual pumpage of 2,000 acre-feet is 17 feet in Ocotillo. In the latter projection, continued pumping after 1995 may cause saline water to flow toward the potable ground water in and around Ocotillo. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Tectonic tilting of the northern Owens Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pinter, N.; Keller, E.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Tectonic rotation is characteristic of active deformation in many of the structural basins of the Basin and Range. The Owens Valley (OV) is the most western basin of the province. The structure, stratigraphy, and geomorphology of the northern OV suggest that there has been active eastward tilting of the valley throughout at least the late Quaternary. A series of analytical techniques are developed here which quantify the age, rate, and character of deformation. The geomorphic clock'' of the northern OV was reset 738,000 years ago by the unroofing of Long Valley Caldera, just to the north, and the emplacement of the Bishop Tuff ignimbrite sheet. Since that time, cooling joints in the tuff and channels cut into the surface of the sheet have been reoriented, and fluvial terraces and alluvial fans have been tilted. Each of these analyses have the same solution--a net down-to-the-east rotation of the valley block at a mean rate of 0.8--1.0[degree]/Ma. Other indicators of tilt support this solution: fluvial and lacustrine strata at the type-locality of the Glass Mountain ashes dip approximately 1[degree] to the east; and gravity measurements of basement geometry demonstrate a dip of 11.0--13.7[degree] eastward. Extrapolating a uniform rate of tilt, the dip of the basement suggest that sedimentation in the OV began in the late Miocene. The character of deformation across the study area is consistent with motion on the Coyote warp anticlinal trend, near the base of the Sierra Nevada. The author propose that the Coyote warp has acted as a tectonic hinge, accommodating westward rotation of the Sierra Nevada and eastward rotation of the northern OV.

  14. Sedimentary facies of alluvial fan deposits, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, G.V. )

    1992-01-01

    Fans in Death Valley include both diamicts and bedded gravels. Seven facies may be recognized. The diamicts include: (1) matrix-rich, coarse wackestones; (2) thin, matrix-rich, fine wackestones, that may show grading; (3) matrix-poor, coarse packstones, transitional to wackestones. The bedded facies include: (4) weakly bedded, poorly sorted packstones or grainstones, that show patchy imbrication, and cut-and-fill structures; (5) packed, imbricated cobble lenses, generally interbedded in facies 4; (6) distinctly bedded gravels, that are better bedded, finer and better sorted, and show better imbrication than facies 4, but still do not show clear separation of sand and gravel beds; (7) backfill cross-bedded gravels. Sand beds are not seen in fan deposits. Sand is present in eolian deposits, as plane-laminated, back-eddy deposits in Death Valley Wash, and as laminated or rippled sand in the Amargosa River. The most remarkable features of the fan deposits are the very weak segregation of sand and gravel, and the complete absence of any lower flow-regime structures produced by ripples or dunes. During floods, the slope of fan and even large wash surfaces is steep enough to produce upper flow regimes. There are also very few trends in facies abundance down fans: most fans in Death Valley itself are not strongly dominated by debris flow deposits (diamicts). The facies characteristics of a given fan vary little from proximal to distal regions, but may differ strongly from the facies seen in adjacent fans. Ancient deposits that show clear segregation of gravel from cross-bedded sand beds, or strong proximal to distal facies transitions, must have been deposited in environments quite different from Death Valley.

  15. Rockfall failure mechanisms in Yosemite Valley, California (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasci, Battista; Guerin, Antoine; Carrea, Dario; Stock, Greg M.; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Collins, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Rockfall hazard is especially high in Yosemite Valley, with tens of rockfalls inventoried every year. A rockfall on 5 October 2013 from Ahwiyah Point consisted of a volume of 740 cubic meters and occurred within the perimeter of a larger event on 28 March 2009 that released 25'400 cubic meters of rock (Zimmer et al., 2012). In both events (2009 and 2013), the initial rockfall volumes dislodged a second one approximately equivalent in size by impacting the cliff below the source area during the fall. Rock fragments of up to several cubic meters were deposited on the talus slope, damaging a heavily used and recently reconstructed hiking path. We performed extensive mapping of structural features for several cliffs of Yosemite Valley to improve the assessment of the most susceptible rockfall areas. In particular we mapped and characterized the main brittle structures, the exfoliation joints and the failure mechanisms of the past rockfalls. Several failure mechanisms exist in Yosemite including the propagation of brittle structures that may lead to tensile, planar sliding, wedge sliding or toppling failures. Frequently, topographically-parallel exfoliation joints and topographically-oblique discontinuities coexist, resulting in complex failures. We also developed a methodology to examine how the distribution of joints within the cliff faces of Yosemite Valley affects overall stability with respect to the identified failure mechanisms. For these analyses, we used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to collect high resolution point clouds of the vertical and overhanging rock faces throughout the Valley. This provided the necessary 3D data to identify the main joint sets, perform spacing and trace length measurements, and calculate volumes of previous and potential rockfalls. We integrated this information with stability calculations to identify the likely failure mechanisms for each area of cliff and to obtain the number of potential failures per square meter of cliff face

  16. Hydro-economic analysis of groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; MacEwan, Duncan; Howitt, Richard E.; Koruakos, George; Dogrul, Emin C.; Brush, Charles F.; Kadir, Tariq N.; Harter, Thomas; Melton, Forrest; Lund, Jay R.

    2015-09-01

    As in many places, groundwater in California (USA) is the major alternative water source for agriculture during drought, so groundwater's availability will drive some inevitable changes in the state's water management. Currently, agricultural, environmental, and urban uses compete for groundwater, resulting in substantial overdraft in dry years with lowering of water tables, which in turn increases pumping costs and reduces groundwater pumping capacity. In this study, SWAP (an economic model of agricultural production and water use in California) and C2VISim (the California Department of Water Resources groundwater model for California's Central Valley) are connected. This paper examines the economic costs of pumping replacement groundwater during drought and the potential loss of pumping capacity as groundwater levels drop. A scenario of three additional drought years continuing from 2014 show lower water tables in California's Central Valley and loss of pumping capacity. Places without access to groundwater and with uncertain surface-water deliveries during drought are the most economically vulnerable in terms of crop revenues, employment and household income. This is particularly true for Tulare Lake Basin, which relies heavily on water imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Remote-sensing estimates of idle agricultural land between 2012 and 2014 confirm this finding. Results also point to the potential of a portfolio approach for agriculture, in which crop mixing and conservation practices have substantial roles.

  17. Origin of Hot Creek Canyon, Long Valley caldera, California

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, N.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Hot Creek has eroded a canyon some thirty meters deep across the Hot Creek rhyolite flows located in the southeastern moat of Long Valley Caldera. Maloney (1987) showed that the canyon formed by headward erosion resulting from spring sapping along hydrothermally altered fractures in the rhyolite, and the capture of Mammoth Creek. This analysis ignored the continuing uplift of the central resurgent dome. Reid (1992) concluded that the downward erosion of the canyon must have kept pace with the uplift. Long Valley Lake occupied the caldera until 100,000 to 50,000 years before present. The elevation of the shoreline, determined by trigonometric leveling, is 2,166 m where the creek enters the canyon and 2,148 m on the downstream side of the rhyolite. The slope of the strand line is about equal to the stream gradient. The hill was lower and the stream gradient less at the time of stream capture. Rotational uplift increased the stream gradient which increased the rate of downward erosion and formed the V-shaped canyon

  18. Historical Channel Changes in Cache Creek, Capay Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, S. A.; Kamman, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    Historical channel changes were assessed for the 21-mile segment of Cache Creek through Capay Valley in order to evaluate temporal changes in stream channel morphology. The Capay Valley segment of Cache Creek is primarily a low-gradient channel with a gravel/cobble substrate. Hydrologic conditions have been affected by dam operations that store runoff during the wet season and deliver water during the dry season for downstream irrigation uses. Widespread distribution of invasive plant species has altered the condition of the riparian corridor. The assessment evaluated a hypothesis that historical changes in hydrology and vegetation cover have triggered changes in geomorphic conditions. Historic channel alignments were digitized to assess planform channel adjustments. Results illustrate a dynamic system with frequent channel movements throughout the historic period. Evaluation of longitudinal channel adjustments revealed a relatively stable bed surface elevation since the 1930’s. Comparisons of cross-sectional channel geometry for topographic profiles surveyed in 1984 were compared to equivalent features in a LiDAR survey from 2008. The comparisons show a relatively consistent channel geometry that has maintained a similar form despite rather large planform adjustments with areas of bank retreat in excess of 500 feet. Results suggest that the study reach has maintained a relatively stable morphology through a series of dynamic planform adjustments during the historic period.

  19. Variation of P-Wave Velocity before the Bear Valley, California, Earthquake of 24 February 1972.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R; Wesson, R L; Ellsworth, W L

    1974-06-21

    Residuals for P-wave traveltimes at a seismnograph station near Bear Valley, California, for small, precisely located local earthquakes at distances of 20 to 70 kilometers show a sharp increase of nearly 0.3 second about 2 months before a magnitude 5.0 earthquake that occurred within a few kilometers of the station. This indicates that velocity changes observed elsewhere premonitory to earthquakes, possibly related to dilatancy, occur along the central section of the San Andreas fault system. PMID:17784227

  20. The mechanism of intrusion of the Inyo Dike, Long Valley Caldera, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reches, Zeev; Fink, Jonathan

    1988-01-01

    The dike geometry of the 11-km-long Inyo Dike at the margins of the Long Valley calderas in eastern California is explained here in terms of the interaction between tectonic stresses and local variations in host rock rheology. Relationships between tectonic and magmatic stresses are evaluated, and the magnitude of magmatic pressure at the depth necessary to get the dike to the surface is estimated. The application of the model to other volcanoes is also discussed.

  1. Uranium-series dating of pedogenic carbonates from the Livermore Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.

    1981-01-07

    A uranium-series dating technique has been applied to pedogenic carbonates from the Livermore Valley in California. The results from geomorphologically distinct Quaternary alluvial units are internally consistent and for one alluvial unit are corroborated by a concordant /sup 14/C age for an associated wood fragment. In appropriate situations, age dates for pedogenic carbonates derived using this technique may provide a time stratigraphy for alluvial units and hence provide some limits (minimum age) for last fault movement.

  2. Relating seismic swarms and deformation in Long Valley Caldera, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery-Brown, E. K.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Hill, D. P.; Shelly, D. R.; Langbein, J. O.; Lisowski, M.; Llenos, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake swarm activity in the South Moat Seismic Zone (SMSZ) in Long Valley caldera began increasing following the onset of slow inflation of the resurgent dome in 2011. From 1980 through 1999 the caldera produced recurring earthquake swarms in the SMSZ accompanied by an 80-cm uplift of the resurgent dome. Since 2000, the caldera has been quieter than from 1980 to 1999, but it experienced a gradual 7-cm uplift episode in 2002-2003 and currently the caldera has been gradually uplifting since 2011 at less than half of the peak uplift velocity observed in the late 1990's. Two of the recent swarms in October/November of 2012 and March 2013 have been accompanied by small deformation transients during which caldera uplift paused for about a week despite otherwise steady inflation. To better understand this recent activity, we cross correlate seismic velocity waveforms from individual events recorded by the Long Valley seismic network to identify similar clusters (families) of earthquakes and analyze their temporal recurrence. Then, we use representative waveforms from each family as templates to search the continuous waveforms from the deep borehole seismometers in the Long Valley Exploratory Well (MDH1) for repeating, yet smaller, earthquakes. MDH1 consists of two three-component instruments, located 2592 m and 2263 m below ground level, that provide 6 channels with very low background noise relative to surface seismometers. The cross correlations identify about 25 times more earthquakes with most magnitudes ranging from -1 to +0.5, determined from an empirical relationship between catalog magnitude and observed amplitude on MDH1. We apply an ETAS model to the augmented catalog to detect subtle changes in background earthquake rates that might suggest a change in stressing rate. For comparison with the change in seismicity rates, a geodetically determined stress change is estimated from a simple model of the continuous GPS data. We model the uplift from 2011 to

  3. Water quality and supply issues of irrigated agricultural regions – lessons from the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The San Joaquin Valley of California covers 4 million hectares of farmland and produces $25 billion of agricultural products annually, but its average annual rainfall ranges from only 130 mm in the south to 330 mm in the north and nearly all occur in the winter. On the east side of the valley, irrig...

  4. Global positioning system surveying to monitor land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikehara, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    A subsidence research program began in 1985 to document the extent and magnitude of land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, an area of about 15 600 km2m, using Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying. In addition to periodic conventional spirit levelling, an examination was made of the changes in GPS-derived ellipsoidal height differences (summary differences) between pairs of adjacent bench marks in central Sacramento Valley from 1986 to 1989. The average rates of land subsidence in the southern Sacramento Valley for the past several decades were determined by comparing GPS-derived orthometric heights with historic published elevations. A maximum average rate of 0.053 m year-1 (0.90 m in 17 years) of subsidence has been measured. -Author

  5. Optimal pumping strategies for managing shallow, poorquality groundwater, western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.; Wagner, B.; Belitz, K.

    1995-01-01

    Continued agricultural productivity in the western San Joaquin Valley, California, is threatened by the presence of shallow, poor-quality groundwater that can cause soil salinization. We evaluate the management alternative of using groundwater pumping to control the altitude of the water table and provide irrigation water requirements. A transient, three-dimensional, groundwater flow model was linked with nonlinear optimization to simulate management alternatives for the groundwater flow system. Optimal pumping strategies have been determined that substantially reduce the area subject to a shallow water table and bare-soil evaporation (that is, areas with a water table within 2.1 m of land surface) and the rate of drainflow to on-farm drainage systems. Optimal pumping strategies are constrained by the existing distribution of wells between the semiconfined and confined zones of the aquifer, by the distribution of sediment types (and associated hydraulic conductivities) in the western valley, and by the historical distribution of pumping throughout the western valley.

  6. Winter fog is decreasing in the fruit growing region of the Central Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Waller, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The Central Valley of California is home to a variety of fruit and nut trees. These trees account for 95% of the U.S. production, but they need a sufficient amount of winter chill to achieve rest and quiescence for the next season's buds and flowers. In prior work, we reported that the accumulation of winter chill is declining in the Central Valley. We hypothesize that a reduction in winter fog is cooccurring and is contributing to the reduction in winter chill. We examined a 33 year record of satellite remote sensing to develop a fog climatology for the Central Valley. We find that the number of winter fog events, integrated spatially, decreased 46%, on average, over 32 winters, with much year to year variability. Less fog means warmer air and an increase in the energy balance on buds, which amplifies their warming, reducing their chill accumulation more.

  7. Chemical and isotopic prediction of aquifer temperatures in the geothermal system at Long Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Sorey, M.L.; Mariner, R.H.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    Temperatures of aquifers feeding thermal springs and wells in Long Valley, California, estimated using silica and Na-K-Ca geothermometers and warm spring mixing models, range from 160/dg to about 220??C. This information was used to construct a diagram showing enthalpy-chloride relations for the various thermal waters in the Long Valley region. The enthalpy-chloride information suggests that a 282 ?? 10??C aquifer with water containing about 375 mg chloride per kilogram of water is present somewhere deep in the system. That deep water would be related to ??? 220??C Casa Diablo water by mixing with cold water, and to Hot Creek water by first boiling with steam loss and then mixing with cold water. Oxygen and deuterium isotopic data are consistent with that interpretation. An aquifer at 282??C with 375 mg/kg chloride implies a convective heat flow in Long Valley of 6.6 ?? 107 cal/s. ?? 1979.

  8. Cotton yield losses and ambient ozone concentrations in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Kats, G.; Reagan, C.; Hake, S.

    1993-01-01

    Based on controlled experiments and simulation modeling, ozone air pollution has been estimated to cause significant yield losses to cotton. The study reported here was conducted to verify losses for Acala cotton (Gossypium hirsutum SJ2) along a gradient of ambient ozone (O3) concentrations across the San Joaquin Valley in California. Cotton was grown in nonfiltered (NF) and charcoal-filtered (CF) open-top chambers at four sites during the 1988-1989 summer growing seasons. Cotton yields were reduced in NF compared to CF air in general proportion to O3 concentrations across all sites and years. Greatest cotton yield losses were at Dinuba on the east side of the San Joaquin Valley and lowest were on the west side of the valley. Ozone injury symptoms on cotton were most noticeable in areas with greatest yield losses.

  9. Monitoring land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, using GPS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, J.C.; Ikehara, M.E.; Williams, Gary E.

    1990-01-01

    Land subsidence measurement is usually based on a comparison of bench-mark elevations surveyed at different times. These bench marks, established for mapping or the national vertical control network, are not necessarily suitable for measuring land subsidence. Also, many bench marks have been destroyed or are unstable. Conventional releveling of the study area would be costly and would require several years to complete. Differences of as much as 3.9 ft between recent leveling and published bench-mark elevations have been documented at seven locations in the Sacramento Valley. Estimates of land subsidence less than about 0.3 ft are questionable because elevation data are based on leveling and adjustment procedures that occured over many years. A new vertical control network based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) provides highly accurate vertical control data at relatively low costs, and the survey points can be placed where needed to obtain adequate areal coverage of the area affected by land subsidence.

  10. Mathematical ground-water model of Indian Wells Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bloyd, R.M., Jr.; Robson, S.G.

    1971-01-01

    A mathematical model of the Indian Wells Valley ground-water basin was developed and verified. The alternating-direction implicit method was used to compute the mathematical solution. It was assumed that there are only two aquifers in the valley, one being deep and the other shallow. Where the shallow aquifer occurs, the underlying deep aquifer is confined or artesian. Flow between the aquifers under steady-state conditions is assumed to be in one direction, from deep to shallow. The transmissivity of the deep aquifer ranges from about 250,000 to 22,000 gallons per day per foot and from about 25,000 to 5,000 gallons per day per foot for the shallow aquifer. The storage coefficient for the deep aquifer ranges from 1 x 10 -4 to 0.20. Steady-state recharge and discharge in each aquifer was estimated to be 9,850 acre-feet per year. Ground-water pumping, sewage-effluent recharge, and capture of ground-water discharge occurred under non-steady-state conditions. Most of the ground-water pumpage is near Ridgecrest and Inyokern and in the area between the two towns. By 1968 pumpage in the deep aquifer had caused a reversal in the ground-water gradient south of China Lake and small water-level declines over most of the aquifer. The model for the deep aquifer was verified under steady-state and non-steady-state conditions. The shallow aquifer was verified under steady-state conditions only. The verified model was then used to generate 1983 water-level conditions in the deep aquifer.