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Sample records for implanted detection structures

  1. Detection of degradation in polyester implants by analysing mode shapes of structure vibration.

    PubMed

    Samami, Hassan; Pan, Jingzhe

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on using vibration analysis to detect degradation in degrading polyesters. A numerical model of a degrading plate sample is considered. The plate is assumed to degrade following the typical behaviour of amorphous copolymers of polylactide and polyglycolide. Due to the well-known autocatalytic effect in the degradation of these polyesters, the inner core of the plate degrades faster than outer surface region, forming layers of materials with varying Young׳s modulus. Firstly the change in molecular weight and corresponding change in Young׳s modulus at different times are calculated using the mathematical models developed in our previous work. Secondly the first four mode shapes of transverse vibration of the plate are calculated using the finite element method. Finally the curvature of the mode shapes are calculated and related to the spatial distribution of the polymer degradation. It is shown that the curvature of the mode shapes can be used to detect the onset and distribution of polymer degradation. The level of measurement accuracy required in an experiment is presented to guide practical applications of the method. At the end of this paper a demonstration case of coronary stent is presented showing how the method can be used to detect degradation in an implant of sophisticated structure. PMID:27235780

  2. Detection of Acoustic Temporal Fine Structure by Cochlear Implant Listeners: Behavioral Results and Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Imennov, Nikita S.; Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R.; Jameyson, Elyse; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2013-01-01

    A test of within-channel detection of acoustic temporal fine structure (aTFS) cues is presented. Eight cochlear implant listeners (CI) were asked to discriminate between two Schroeder-phase (SP) complexes using a two-alternative, forced-choice task. Because differences between the acoustic stimuli are primarily constrained to their aTFS, successful discrimination reflects a combination of the subjects’ perception of and the strategy’s ability to deliver aTFS cues. Subjects were mapped with single-channel Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS) and Simultaneous Analog Stimulation (SAS) strategies. To compare within- and across- channel delivery of aTFS cues, a 16-channel clinical HiRes strategy was also fitted. Throughout testing, SAS consistently outperformed the CIS strategy (p ≤ 0.002). For SP stimuli with F0 =50 Hz, the highest discrimination scores were achieved with the HiRes encoding, followed by scores with the SAS and the CIS strategies, respectively. At 200 Hz, single-channel SAS performed better than HiRes (p = 0.022), demonstrating that under a more challenging testing condition, discrimination performance with a single-channel analog encoding can exceed that of a 16-channel pulsatile strategy. To better understand the intermediate steps of discrimination, a biophysical model was used to examine the neural discharges evoked by the SP stimuli. Discrimination estimates calculated from simulated neural responses successfully tracked the behavioral performance trends of single-channel CI listeners. PMID:23333260

  3. Injury to the coronary arteries and related structures by implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Pang, Benjamin J; Barold, S Serge; Mond, Harry G

    2015-04-01

    Damage to the coronary arteries and related structures from pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead implantation is a rarely reported complication that can lead to myocardial infarction and pericardial tamponade that may occur acutely or even years later. We summarize the reported cases of injury to coronary arteries and related structures and review the causes of troponin elevation in the setting of cardiac implantable electronic device implantation. PMID:25564549

  4. In Vivo Ultrasonic Detection of Polyurea Crosslinked Silica Aerogel Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Firouzeh; Sebelik, Merry E.; Meacham, Ryan; Boughter, John D.; Challis, Mitchell J.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogels are highly porous, lightweight, and mechanically strong materials with great potential for in vivo applications. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated the biocompatibility of this type of aerogel. The highly porous nature of aerogels allows for exceptional thermal, electric, and acoustic insulating capabilities that can be taken advantage of for non-invasive external imaging techniques. Sound-based detection of implants is a low cost, non-invasive, portable, and rapid technique that is routinely used and readily available in major clinics and hospitals. Methodology In this study the first in vivo ultrasound response of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants was investigated by means of a GE Medical Systems LogiQe diagnostic ultrasound machine with a linear array probe. Aerogel samples were inserted subcutaneously and sub-muscularly in a) fresh animal model and b) cadaveric human model for analysis. For comparison, samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were also imaged under similar conditions as the aerogel samples. Conclusion/significance Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel (X-Si aerogel) implants were easily identified when inserted in either of the regions in both fresh animal model and cadaveric model. The implant dimensions inferred from the images matched the actual size of the implants and no apparent damage was sustained by the X-Si aerogel implants as a result of the ultrasonic imaging process. The aerogel implants demonstrated hyperechoic behavior and significant posterior shadowing. Results obtained were compared with images acquired from the PDMS implants inserted at the same location. PMID:23799093

  5. Surface topographical and structural analysis of Ag+-implanted polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Shafaq; Rafique, M. Shahid; Saleemi, Farhat; Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu; Sagheer, Riffat; Bashir, Shazia; Zia, Rehana; Siraj, Khurram; Iqbal, Saman

    2016-08-01

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were implanted with 400-keV Ag+ ions at different ion fluences ranging from 1 × 1014 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 using a 400-kV NEC ion implanter. The surface topographical features of the implanted PMMA were investigated by a confocal microscope. Modifications in the structural properties of the implanted specimens were analyzed in comparison with pristine PMMA by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. UV-Visible spectroscopy was applied to determine the effects of ion implantation on optical transmittance of the implanted PMMA. The confocal microscopic images revealed the formation of hillock-like microstructures along the ion track on the implanted PMMA surface. The increase in ion fluence led to more nucleation of hillocks. The XRD pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of pristine and implanted PMMA, while the Raman studies justified the transformation of Ag+-implanted PMMA into amorphous carbon at the ion fluence of ⩾5 × 1014 ions/cm2. Moreover, the decrease in optical transmittance of PMMA is associated with the formation of hillocks and ion-induced structural modifications after implantation.

  6. Spectrotemporal Modulation Detection and Speech Perception by Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jong Ho; Moon, Il Joon; Jin, Sunhwa; Park, Heesung; Woo, Jihwan; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chung, Won-Ho; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Spectrotemporal modulation (STM) detection performance was examined for cochlear implant (CI) users. The test involved discriminating between an unmodulated steady noise and a modulated stimulus. The modulated stimulus presents frequency modulation patterns that change in frequency over time. In order to examine STM detection performance for different modulation conditions, two different temporal modulation rates (5 and 10 Hz) and three different spectral modulation densities (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 cycles/octave) were employed, producing a total 6 different STM stimulus conditions. In order to explore how electric hearing constrains STM sensitivity for CI users differently from acoustic hearing, normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners were also tested on the same tasks. STM detection performance was best in NH subjects, followed by HI subjects. On average, CI subjects showed poorest performance, but some CI subjects showed high levels of STM detection performance that was comparable to acoustic hearing. Significant correlations were found between STM detection performance and speech identification performance in quiet and in noise. In order to understand the relative contribution of spectral and temporal modulation cues to speech perception abilities for CI users, spectral and temporal modulation detection was performed separately and related to STM detection and speech perception performance. The results suggest that that slow spectral modulation rather than slow temporal modulation may be important for determining speech perception capabilities for CI users. Lastly, test–retest reliability for STM detection was good with no learning. The present study demonstrates that STM detection may be a useful tool to evaluate the ability of CI sound processing strategies to deliver clinically pertinent acoustic modulation information. PMID:26485715

  7. MIS diode structure in As/+/ implanted CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchby, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Structure made by As implantation of carefully prepared high-conductivity CdS surfaces followed by Pt deposition and 450 C anneal display rectifying, although substantially different, I-V characteristics in the dark and during illumination with subband-gap light. Structures prepared in the same way on an unimplanted portion of the substrate have similar I-V characteristics, except that the forward turnover voltage for an illuminated unimplanted diode is much smaller than that for an implanted diode. It is suggested that the charge conduction in both structures is dominated by hole and/or electron tunneling through a metal-semiconductor potential barrier. The tunneling processes appear to be quite sensitive to subband-gap illumination, which causes the dramatic decreases of turnover voltages and apparent series resistances. The difference in turnover voltage appears to be caused by interface states between the Pt electrode and the implanted layer, which suggests a MIS model.

  8. Label-free detection of antigens using implantable SERS nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honggang; Baum, Caitlin E.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2005-11-01

    Monitoring the presence, production and transport of proteins inside individual living cells can provide vital information about cellular signaling pathways and the overall biological response of an organism. For example, cellular response to external stimuli, such as biological warfare (BW) agents, can be monitored by measuring interleukin-II (IL-2) expression inside T-cells as well as other chemical species associated with T-cell activation. By monitoring such species, pre-symptomatic detection of exposure to BW agents can be achieved, leading to significantly increased post-exposure survival rates. To accomplish such monitoring, we have developed and optimized implantable nanosphere-based nanosensors for the intracellular analysis of specific proteins in a label-free fashion. These sensors consist of 300-520 nm diameter silica spheres that have been coated with silver and antibodies to allow for trace protein detection via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). They have been optimized for SERS response by evaluating the size of the nanospheres best suited to 632.8 nm laser excitation, as well as the various nanosensor fabrication steps (i.e., silver deposition process, antibody binding, etc.). During usage, the presence of the specific protein of interest is monitored by either directly measuring SERS signals associated with the protein and/or changes in the SERS spectrum of the antibodies resulting from conformational changes after antigen binding. In this work, human insulin was used as a model compound for initial studies into the sensitivity of these optimized nanosensors.

  9. Sensing and detection in Medtronic implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mark L; Swerdlow, Charles D

    2016-09-01

    Ensuring sensing and detection of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) was a prerequisite for the clinical trials that established the survival benefit of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). However, for decades, a high incidence of unnecessary shocks limited patients' and physicians' acceptance of ICD therapy. Oversensing, misclassification of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) as VT, and self-terminating VT accounted for the vast majority of unnecessary shocks. Medtronic ICDs utilize sensitive baseline settings with minimal blanking periods to ensure accurate sensing of VF, VT, and SVT electrograms. Programmable algorithms reject oversensing caused by far-field R waves, T waves, and non-physiologic signals caused by lead failure. A robust hierarchy of SVT-VT discriminators minimize misclassification of SVT as VT. These features, combined with evidence-based programming, have reduced the 1‑year inappropriate shock rate to 1.5 % for dual-/triple-chamber ICDs and to 2.5 % for single-chamber ICDs. PMID:27624809

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of Co + implanted n-GaN dilute magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husnain, G.; Tao, Fa; Yao, Shu-De

    2010-05-01

    The n-type GaN epilayer was grown on sapphire prepared by metal organic chemical vapour deposition and subsequently Co + ions implanted. The properties of Co + ions implanted GaN epilayer were investigated by structural and magnetic measurements. The results of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channeling illustrate that an excellent crystalline quality ( χmin=1.3%) of as-grown GaN. After the implantation of 150 keV Co + ions with dose 3×10 16 cm -2 into GaN and subsequently annealed at 700, 800 and 900 °C, no secondary phase or metal related-peaks were detected by typical XRD. In addition high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was performed to study structural related properties. The magnetization curves were obtained by SQUID and AGM measurements, a well-defined hysteresis loop was observed even at 300 K. The temperature dependence of magnetization was taken in FC and ZFC conditions showed the highest Curie temperature ( TC) ∼370 K recorded for Co + implanted GaN.

  11. [Tachycardia detection in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators by Sorin/LivaNova : Algorithms, pearls and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Ocklenburg, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    For physicians involved in the treatment of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) the knowledge of tachycardia detection algorithms is of paramount importance. This knowledge is essential for adequate device selection during de-novo implantation, ICD replacement, and for troubleshooting during follow-up. This review describes tachycardia detection algorithms incorporated in ICDs by Sorin/LivaNova and analyses their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:27605232

  12. Using channel-specific statistical models to detect reverberation in cochlear implant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Jill M; Collins, Leslie M; Throckmorton, Chandra S

    2013-08-01

    Reverberation is especially detrimental for cochlear implant listeners; thus, mitigating its effects has the potential to provide significant improvements to cochlear implant communication. Efforts to model and correct for reverberation in acoustic listening scenarios can be quite complex, requiring estimation of the room transfer function and localization of the source and receiver. However, due to the limited resolution associated with cochlear implant stimulation, simpler processing for reverberation detection and mitigation may be possible for cochlear implants. This study models speech stimuli in a cochlear implant on a per-channel basis both in quiet and in reverberation, and assesses the efficacy of these models for detecting the presence of reverberation. This study was able to successfully detect reverberation in cochlear implant pulse trains, and the results appear to be robust to varying room conditions and cochlear implant stimulation parameters. Reverberant signals were detected 100% of the time for a long reverberation time of 1.2 s and 86% of the time for a shorter reverberation time of 0.5 s. PMID:23927111

  13. Use of cone-beam computed tomography in early detection of implant failure.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Juan F; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    Preimplant planning with complex imaging techniques has long been a recommended practice for assessing the quality and quantity of alveolar bone before dental implant placement. When maxillofacial imaging is necessary, static film or digital images lack the depth and dimension offered by computed tomography. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers the dentist not only a radiographic volumetric view of alveolar bone but also a 3-dimensional reconstruction. This article reviews the use of CBCT for assessing implant placement and early detection of failure, and compares the performance of CBCT with that of other imaging modalities in the early detection of implant failure. PMID:25434558

  14. Structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R. Kremer, F.; Mirzaei, S.; Medling, S. A.; Ridgway, M. C.; Sprouster, D. J.; Decoster, S.; Glover, C. J.; Russo, S. P.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the effects of dopant concentration on the structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge. For In concentrations of ≤ 0.2 at. %, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements demonstrate that all In atoms occupy a substitutional lattice site while metallic In precipitates are apparent in transmission electron micrographs for In concentrations ≥0.6 at. %. Evidence of the formation of In-vacancy complexes deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements is complimented by density functional theory simulations. Hall effect measurements of the conductivity, carrier density, and carrier mobility are then correlated with the substitutional In fraction.

  15. Structure and micro-mechanical properties of helium-implanted layer on Ti by plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinxin; Li, Jinlong; Sun, Mingren

    2008-08-01

    The present paper concentrates on structure and micro-mechanical properties of the helium-implanted layer on titanium treated by plasma-based ion implantation with a pulsed voltage of -30 kV and doses of 3, 6, 9 and 12 × 10 17 ions/cm 2, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are employed to characterize the structure of the implanted layer. The hardnesses at different depths of the layer were measured by nano-indentation. We found that helium ion implantation into titanium leads to the formation of bubbles with a diameter from a few to more than 10 nm and the bubble size increases with the increase of dose. The primary existing form of Ti is amorphous in the implanted layer. Helium implantation also enhances the ingress of O, C and N and stimulates the formations of TiO 2, Ti 2O 3, TiO, TiC and TiN in the near surface layer. And the amount of the ingressed oxygen is obviously higher than those of nitrogen and carbon due to its higher activity. At the near surface layer, the hardnesses of all implanted samples increases remarkably comparing with untreated one and the maximum hardness has an increase by a factor of up to 3.7. For the samples implanted with higher doses of 6, 9 and 12 × 10 17 He/cm 2, the local displacement bursts are clearly found in the load-displacement curves. For the samples implanted with a lower dose of 3 × 10 17 He/cm 2, there is no obvious displacement burst found. Furthermore, the burst width increases with the increase of the dose.

  16. Detection of deeply implanted impedance-switching devices using ultrasound doppler.

    PubMed

    Mari, Jean Martial; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean Yves

    2013-06-01

    Communication with and transmission of energy to remote devices, such as deeply-implanted physiological recorders, using ultrasound presents several technical problems. In particular, device detection and piezoelectric sensor targeting remains difficult. Both tasks require differentiating the device from the surrounding fully passive tissues. Like radiofrequency identification devices, ultrasonic transponders have the capacity to rapidly change the impedance of their piezoelectric elements, which modulates their backscattering coefficient and allows the device to "flash" periodically at a very low energy cost, and, in particular situations, to communicate with an external device. A method for localizing the device by interpreting this flashing as movement is presented here. An ultrasound Doppler scan sequence is implemented using a programmable scanner, and radio-frequency data are collected and processed. The data are then analyzed for different excitation lengths and flashing frequencies to determine the optimum detection parameters. Measurements show that 1) detection can be achieved and is maximal when the excitation length reaches that of the Doppler processing window, and 2) when the flashing frequency is in a specific range. A study of the incidence angle also showed that 3) the sensor of the device can be detected over a given angular window. The conclusion is that by using ultrasound color Doppler sequences, impedance-switching piezoelectric devices can be detected under the conditions provided in the present study, and can be distinguished from fully passive structures. PMID:25004471

  17. Application of collision detection to assess implant insertion in elbow replacement surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutunea-Fatan, O. Remus; Bernick, Joshua H.; Lalone, Emily; King, Graham J. W.; Johnson, James A.

    2010-02-01

    An important aspect of implant replacement of the human joint is the fit achieved between the implant and bone canal. As the implant is inserted within the medullary canal, its position and orientation is subjected to a variety of constraints introduced either by the external forces and moments applied by the surgeon or by the interaction of the implant with the cortical wall of the medullary canal. This study evaluated the implant-bone interaction of a humeral stem in elbow replacement surgery as an example, but the principles can also be applied to other joints. After converting CT scan data of the humerus to the parametric NURBS-based representation, a collision detection procedure based on existing Computer-Aided Engineering techniques was employed to control the instantaneous kinematics and dynamics of the insertion of a humeral implant in an attempt to determine its final posture within the canal. By measuring the misalignment between the native flexion-extension (FE) axis of the distal humerus and the prosthesis, a prediction was made regarding the fit between the canal and the implant. This technique was shown to be effective in predicting the final misalignment of the implant axis with respect to the native FE axis of the distal humerus using a cadaver specimen for in-vitro validation.

  18. Assessing the hierarchical structure of titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Matteson, Jesse L; Greenspan, David C; Tighe, Timothy B; Gilfoy, Nathan; Stapleton, Joshua J

    2016-08-01

    The physical texture of implant surfaces are known to be one important factor in creating a stable bone-implant interface. Simple roughness parameters (for e.g., Sa or Sz) are not entirely adequate when characterizing surfaces possessing hierarchical structure (macro, micro, and nano scales). The aim of this study was to develop an analytical approach to quantify hierarchical surface structure of implant surfaces possessing nearly identical simple roughness. Titanium alloys with macro/micro texture (MM) and macro/micro/nano texture (MMN) were chosen as model surfaces to be evaluated. There was no statistical difference (p > 0.05) in either Sa (13.56 vs. 13.43 µm) or Sz (91.74 vs. 92.39 µm) for the MM and MMN surfaces, respectively. However, when advanced filtering algorithms were applied to these datasets, a statistical difference in roughness was found between MM (Sa = 0.54 µm) and MMN (Sa = 1.06 µm; p < 0.05). Additionally, a method was developed to specifically quantify the density of surface features appearing similar in geometry to natural osteoclastic pits. This analysis revealed a significantly greater numbers of these features (i.e., valleys) on the MMN surface as compared to the MM surface. Finally, atomic force microscopy showed a rougher nano-texture on the MMN surface compared with the MM surface (p < 0.05). The results support recent published studies that show a combination of appropriate micron and nano surface results in a more robust cellular response and increased osteoblast differentiation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1083-1090, 2016. PMID:26034005

  19. Influence of the chemical nature of implanted ions on the structure of a silicon layer damaged by implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbachev, K. D. Voronova, M. I.; Bublik, V. T.; Mordkovich, V. N. Pazhin, D. M.; Zinenko, V. I.; Agafonov, Yu. A.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of the implantation of silicon single crystals by fluorine, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon ions on the distribution of strain and the static Debye-Waller factor in the crystal lattice over the implanted-layer depth has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. The density depth distribution in the surface layer of native oxide has been measured by X-ray reflectometry. Room-temperature implantation conditions have ensured the equality of the suggested ranges of ions of different masses and the energies transferred by them to the target. It is convincingly shown that the change in the structural parameters of the radiation-damaged silicon layer and the native oxide layer depend on the chemical activity of the implanted ions.

  20. Detection and manipulation of sychronization processes during depth electrode implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiek, Michael; Zimmermann, Egon; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Sturm, Volker; Tass, Peter

    2002-03-01

    Population of phase oscillators can effectively be desynchronized with composite stimulation techniques using stochastic phase resetting principles [1]. This approach is used to design the first model-based demand controlled deep brain stimulation techniques for the therapy of neurological diseases like Parkinson's disease. We report on first tests of these novel techniques performed in patients during electrode implantation. [1] P.A. Tass: Europhys.Lett. 53(2001) 15-21; 55(2001) 171-177; Biol. Cybern. 85(2001) 343-354

  1. How are arrhythmias detected by implanted cardiac devices managed in Europe? Results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derick; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Proclemer, Alessandro; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Estner, Heidi; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-09-01

    The management of arrhythmias detected by implantable cardiac devices can be challenging. There are no formal international guidelines to inform decision-making. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the management of various clinical scenarios among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. There were 49 responses to the questionnaire. The survey responses were mainly (81%) from medium-high volume device implanting centres, performing more than 200 total device implants per year. Clinical scenarios were described focusing on four key areas: the implantation of pacemakers for bradyarrhythmia detected on an implantable loop recorder (ILR), the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmia detected by an ILR or pacemaker, the management of atrial fibrillation in patients with pacemakers and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices and the management of ventricular tachycardia in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. PMID:26443791

  2. A detection system for charged-particle decay studies with a continuous-implantation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. J.; Xu, X. X.; Lin, C. J.; Wang, J. S.; Fang, D. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, Y. T.; Li, J.; Yang, L.; Ma, N. R.; Wang, K.; Zang, H. L.; Wang, H. W.; Li, C.; Shi, C. Z.; Nie, M. W.; Li, X. F.; Li, H.; Ma, J. B.; Ma, P.; Jin, S. L.; Huang, M. R.; Bai, Z.; Wang, J. G.; Yang, F.; Jia, H. M.; Zhang, H. Q.; Liu, Z. H.; Bao, P. F.; Wang, D. X.; Yang, Y. Y.; Zhou, Y. J.; Ma, W. H.; Chen, J.

    2015-12-01

    A new detection system with high detection efficiency and low detection threshold has been developed for charged-particle decay studies, including β-delayed proton, α decay or direct proton emission from proton-rich nuclei. The performance was evaluated by using the β-delayed proton emitter 24Si produced by projectile fragmentation at the First Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou. Under a continuous-beam mode, the isotopes of interest were implanted into two double-sided silicon strip detectors, where the subsequent decays were measured and correlated to the preceding implantations by using position and time information. The system allows us to measure protons with energies down to about 200 keV without obvious β background in the proton spectrum. Further application of the detection system can be extended to the measurements of β-delayed proton decay and the direct proton emission of more exotic proton-rich nuclei.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Inverted and Unprocessed Digitized Periapical Radiographs for Detection of Peri-Implant Defects

    PubMed Central

    Pourhashemi, Seyed Jalal; Kiani, Mohammad Taghi; Emami, Raheleh; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of inverted and unprocessed digitized periapical radiographs for detection of peri-implant defects. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 osteotomy sites were prepared in three groups of control, study group 1 with 0.425 mm defects and study group 2 with 0.725 mm defects using the SIC and Astra Tech drill systems with 4.25mm and 4.85mm diameters. Small and large defects were randomly created in the coronal 8mm of 20 implant sites; implants (3.4mm diameter, 14.5mm length) were then placed. Thirty periapical (PA) radiographs were obtained using Digora imaging system (Soredex Corporation, Helsinki, Finland), size 2 photostimulable storage phosphor (PSP) plate sensors (40.0mm×30.0mm) and Scanora software. Unprocessed images were inverted using Scanora software by applying image inversion and a total of 60 images were obtained and randomly evaluated by four oral and maxillofacial radiologists. Data were analyzed using the t-test. Results: Significant differences were observed in absolute and complete sensitivity and specificity of the two imaging modalities for detection of small and large defects (P<0.05). Unprocessed digital images had a higher mean in terms of absolute sensitivity for detection of small defects, complete sensitivity for detection of large peri-implant defects and definite rule out of defects compared with inverted images. Conclusion: Unprocessed digital images have a higher diagnostic value for detection of small and large peri-implant defects and also for definite rule out of defects compared with inverted images. PMID:27123016

  4. Investigation of the silicone structure in breast implants using ¹H NMR.

    PubMed

    Formes, Andreas; Diehl, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Against the background of the scandal about low-grade silicone breast implants of the French manufacturer Poly Implant Prothese (PIP), several types of implants were examined using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The intention was to classify an implant according to its silicone structure. Therefore, the certificated raw material of the American silicone producer Nusil Technology was analyzed and used as a reference. The list of tested implants consists of implants by PFM medical, PIP, Silimed, Rofil, Eurosilicone, Mentor, Perouse Plastie, Polytech, Nagor, CUI, and McGhan. In the (1)H NMR spectrum the signal of the vinyl group, which is used to cross link silicone rubbers, is visible. It is possible to differentiate between silicones which have a vinyl terminated end group and silicones whose vinyl group is located within the chain of the polymer. The two different types of the vinyl group are one mean to classify the implants. Other categories besides the type of vinyl include the relative amount of the remaining vinyl in the implant and the chemical structure of the material used for the production of the envelope. With these characteristics the examined implants could be grouped into four types. PMID:24342752

  5. Development of Linear Mode Detection for Top-down Ion Implantation of Low Energy Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of donor spin qubits for quantum computing applications requires deterministic control over the number of implanted donors and the spatial accuracy to within which these can be placed. We present an ion implantation and detection technique that allows us to deterministically implant a single Sb ion (donor) with a resulting volumetric distribution of <10 nm. This donor distribution is accomplished by implanting 30keV Sb into Si which yields a longitudinal straggle of <10 nm and combined with a <50 nm spot size using the Sandia NanoImplanter (nI). The ion beam induced charge signal is collected using a MOS detector that is integrated with a Si quantum dot for transport measurments. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Measurements of deformations in osseous structures and implants by digital speckle interferometry (DSPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Rosario; González-Peña, Rolando; Cibrián, Rosa; Buendía, Mateo; Mínguez, Fe; Laguía, Manuel; Molina, Teresa; Marti, Luis; Esteve, José; Caballero, José; Micó, Vicente; Sanjuan, Elena

    2006-09-01

    Knowledge of how osseous structures and implants behave under deforming stress is an interesting point when evaluating the response of an implanted prosthesis. The failure of an implant is not always due to the great stress a structure may be subjected to at a particular moment, but rather to the effects of deterioration associated with lesser stress but which is continuously applied. Therefore it is helpful to know how bones and implants respond to this lesser stress. Digital speckle interferometry (DSPI) is suitable for this type of determination, as it is a highly sensitive, non-invasive optical technique. In this study we present the results we obtained when determining the elasticity of a sample of a macerated human radius, a titanium implant and a titanium screw used to treat the fractures of this bone. The correlation ratios we obtained in determining Young's modulus were in the order of r=0.994. Models were made of these structures using the finite elements method (FEM) with the aid of the ANSYS 10.0 program, applying Young's modulus values determined by DSPI. With a view to monitoring the accuracy of the FEM models of the bone and the implant elements we designed a flexion experiment to obtain the DSPI values in and out of plane. The high degree of concordance between the results of both methods makes it possible to continue studying osseous samples with a fixed implant, and also other implants made of different alloys.

  7. Structure analysis of bimetallic Co-Au nanoparticles formed by sequential ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-jian; Wang, Yu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Song, Shu-peng; chen, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Xiong, Zu-zhao; Ji, Ling-ling; Dai, Hou-mei; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Wang, Ru-wu; Zheng, Li-rong

    2016-08-01

    Co-Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by sequential ion implantation of Co and Au into silica glass at room temperature. The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. We have used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to study the local structural information of bimetallic nanoparticles. With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Hence, three oscillations, respectively, Co-O, Co-Co and Co-Au coordination are determined.

  8. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojkumar, P. A.; Chirayath, V. A.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A. K.; Raj, Baldev

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  9. 3D imaging of biofilms on implants by detection of scattered light with a scanning laser optical tomograph

    PubMed Central

    Heidrich, Marko; Kühnel, Mark P.; Kellner, Manuela; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Lange, Tineke; Winkel, Andreas; Stiesch, Meike; Meyer, Heiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms – communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces – are a constant threat for long-term success in modern implantology. The application of laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has increased the knowledge about microscopic properties of biofilms, whereas a 3D imaging technique for the large scale visualization of bacterial growth and migration on curved and non-transparent surfaces is not realized so far. Towards this goal, we built a scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) setup detecting scattered laser light to image biofilm on dental implant surfaces. SLOT enables the visualization of living biofilms in 3D by detecting the wavelength-dependent absorption of non-fluorescent stains like e.g. reduced triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) accumulated within metabolically active bacterial cells. Thus, the presented system allows the large scale investigation of vital biofilm structure and in vitro development on cylindrical and non-transparent objects without the need for fluorescent vital staining. We suggest SLOT to be a valuable tool for the structural and volumetric investigation of biofilm formation on implants with sizes up to several millimeters. PMID:22076261

  10. In Situ Transformation of Chitosan Films into Microtubular Structures on the Surface of Nanoengineered Titanium Implants.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Karan; Johnson, Lucas; Karunagaran, Ramesh; Findlay, David; Losic, Dusan

    2016-04-11

    There is considerable interest in combining bioactive polymers such as chitosan with titanium bone implants to promote bone healing and address therapeutic needs. However, the fate of these biodegradable polymers especially on titanium implants is not fully explored. Here we report in situ formation of chitosan microtube (CMT) structures from chitosan films on the implant surface with titania nanotubes (TNTs) layer, based on phosphate buffer-induced transformation and precipitation process. We have comprehensively analyzed this phenomenon and the factors that influence CMT formation, including substrate topography, immersion solution and its pH, effect of coating thickness, and time of immersion. Significance of reported in situ formation of chitosan microtubes on the TNTs surface is possibly to tailor properties of implants with favorable micro and nano morphology using a self-ordering process after the implant's insertion. PMID:26999291

  11. Luminescence and structural properties of defects in ion implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, T.; Soares, M. J.; Neves, A. J.; Carmo, M. C.; Peres, M.; Cruz, A.; Alves, E.; Wahl, U.; Rita, E.; Munoz-Sanjose, V.; Zuniga-Perez, J.

    2006-03-01

    ZnO substrates and films were intentionally implanted with rare earth and transition metal ions. The influence of the implantation and subsequent air thermal annealing treatments on the structural and optical properties of ZnO samples were studied by using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and low temperature photoluminescence techniques. Intraionic Tm-related emission was observed for bulk and ZnO films. Similarly, Eu and Tb-doped ZnO films follow the same trend observed in bulk samples. No intraionic related emission was observed for Eu-doped samples even being the ion in Zn sites and for the Tb-doped samples ion segregation was observed for thermal annealing temperatures above 800 °C. For the Mn-doped ZnO bulk samples the lattice recovery follows the same trend to that one observed for the Fe-doped samples, starting near 800 °C being fully recovered at 1050 °C. Although Fe3+ was observed no intraionic Mn-related emission was detected under the used conditions.

  12. The local structure and ferromagnetism in Fe-implanted SrTiO₃ single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lobacheva, O. Chavarha, M.; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.; Goncharova, L. V.

    2014-07-07

    We report a connection between the local structure of low-level Fe impurities and vacancies as the cause of ferromagnetic behavior observed in strontium titanate single crystals (STO), which were implanted with Fe and Si ions at different doses then annealed in oxygen. The effects of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing of STO were studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. XANES spectra for Fe and Ti K- and L-edge reveal the changes in the local environment of Fe and Ti following the implantation and annealing steps. The annealing in oxygen atmosphere partially healed implantation damages and changed the oxidation state of the implanted iron from metallic Fe⁰ to Fe²⁺/Fe³⁺ oxide. The STO single crystals were weak ferromagnets prior to implantation. The maximum saturation moment was obtained after our highest implantation dose of 2×10¹⁶ Fe atom/cm², which could be correlated with the metallic Fe⁰ phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies. After recrystallization annealing, the ferromagnetic response disappears. Iron oxide phases with Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺ corresponding to this regime were identified and confirmed by calculations using Real Space Multiple Scattering program (FEFF9).

  13. A study of the structural and magnetic properties of ZnO implanted by Gd ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Mikulics, M.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2014-08-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of ZnO (0 0 0 1) single crystals implanted with 200 keV Gd ions up to a fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 and subsequently annealed at 800 °C in various atmospheres were studied. The chemical composition and concentration depth profiles of ion-implanted layers were characterised by Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry (RBS) and compared to SRIM simulations. The as-implanted Gd depth profiles were found to be broader than those simulated by SRIM, but the projected range coincided well with that simulated. After annealing at 800 °C, the depth profiles became narrower. The structural changes in the layers modified by ion implantation and subsequent annealing were characterised by RBS channelling. The annealing led to partial recrystallisation and a decrease in the number of Gd atoms situated in substitutional positions. Raman spectroscopy showed that the point defects in Zn and O vacancies had been created by implantation and that these defects are most effectively cured after annealing in oxygen atmosphere. AFM analysis was used to determine the surface-morphology changes after the implantation and annealing procedures. The as-implanted samples exhibited ferromagnetism persisting up to room temperature. The annealing procedure led to paramagnetic behaviour, probably caused by the formation of gadolinium clusters.

  14. The local structure and ferromagnetism in Fe-implanted SrTiO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobacheva, O.; Chavarha, M.; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.; Goncharova, L. V.

    2014-07-01

    We report a connection between the local structure of low-level Fe impurities and vacancies as the cause of ferromagnetic behavior observed in strontium titanate single crystals (STO), which were implanted with Fe and Si ions at different doses then annealed in oxygen. The effects of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing of STO were studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. XANES spectra for Fe and Ti K- and L-edge reveal the changes in the local environment of Fe and Ti following the implantation and annealing steps. The annealing in oxygen atmosphere partially healed implantation damages and changed the oxidation state of the implanted iron from metallic Fe0 to Fe2+/Fe3+ oxide. The STO single crystals were weak ferromagnets prior to implantation. The maximum saturation moment was obtained after our highest implantation dose of 2 × 1016 Fe atom/cm2, which could be correlated with the metallic Fe0 phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies. After recrystallization annealing, the ferromagnetic response disappears. Iron oxide phases with Fe2+ and Fe3+ corresponding to this regime were identified and confirmed by calculations using Real Space Multiple Scattering program (FEFF9).

  15. The relationship between dental implant stability and trabecular bone structure using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between primary implant stability as measured by impact response frequency and the structural parameters of trabecular bone using cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT), excluding the effect of cortical bone thickness. Methods We measured the impact response of a dental implant placed into swine bone specimens composed of only trabecular bone without the cortical bone layer using an inductive sensor. The peak frequency of the impact response spectrum was determined as an implant stability criterion (SPF). The 3D microstructural parameters were calculated from CT images of the bone specimens obtained using both micro-CT and CBCT. Results SPF had significant positive correlations with trabecular bone structural parameters (BV/TV, BV, BS, BSD, Tb.Th, Tb.N, FD, and BS/BV) (P<0.01) while SPF demonstrated significant negative correlations with other microstructural parameters (Tb.Sp, Tb.Pf, and SMI) using micro-CT and CBCT (P<0.01). Conclusions There was an increase in implant stability prediction by combining BV/TV and SMI in the stepwise forward regression analysis. Bone with high volume density and low surface density shows high implant stability. Well-connected thick bone with small marrow spaces also shows high implant stability. The combination of bone density and architectural parameters measured using CBCT can predict the implant stability more accurately than the density alone in clinical diagnoses. PMID:27127692

  16. Structural investigations in helium implanted cubic zirconia using grazing incidence XRD and EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Degueldre, C.; Bertsch, J.; Döbeli, M.

    2010-06-01

    The crystal structure and local atom arrangements surrounding Zr atoms were determined for a helium implanted cubic stabilized zirconia (CSZ) using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, respectively, measured at glancing angles. The implanted specimen was prepared at a helium fluence of 2 × 10 16 cm -2 using He + beams at two energies (2.54 and 2.74 MeV) passing through a 8.0 μm Al absorber foil. XRD results identified the formation of a new rhombohedral phase in the helium embedded layer, attributed to internal stress as a result of expansion of the CSZ-lattice. Zr K-edge EXAFS data suggested loss of crystallinity in the implanted lattice and disorder of the Zr atoms environment. EXAFS Fourier transforms analysis showed that the average first-shell radius of the Zr sbnd O pair in the implanted sample was slightly larger than that of the CSZ standard. Common general disorder features were explained by rhombohedral type short-range ordered clusters. The average structural parameters estimated from the EXAFS data of unimplanted and implanted CSZ are compared and discussed. Potential of EXAFS as a local probe of atomic-scale structural modifications induced by helium implantation in CSZ is demonstrated.

  17. Formation of SIMOX-SOI structure by high-temperature oxygen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Yasushi; Kamikawa, Tomohiro; Nakata, Jyoji

    2015-12-01

    We have performed oxygen ion implantation in silicon at very high substrate-temperatures (⩽1000 °C) for the purpose of forming silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure. We have expected that the high-temperature implantation can effectively avoids ion-beam-induced damages in the SOI layer and simultaneously stabilizes the buried oxide (BOX) and SOI-Si layer. Such a high-temperature implantation makes it possible to reduce the post-implantation annealing temperature. In the present study, oxygen ions with 180 keV are incident on Si(0 0 1) substrates at various temperatures from room temperature (RT) up to 1000 °C. The ion-fluencies are in order of 1017-1018 ions/cm2. Samples have been analyzed by atomic force microscope, Rutherford backscattering, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. It is found in the AFM analysis that the surface roughness of the samples implanted at 500 °C or below are significantly small with mean roughness of less than 1 nm, and gradually increased for the 800 °C-implanted sample. On the other hand, a lot of dents are observed for the 1000 °C-implanted sample. RBS analysis has revealed that stoichiometric SOI-Si and BOX-SiO2 layers are formed by oxygen implantation at the substrate temperatures of RT, 500, and 800 °C. However, SiO2-BOX layer has been desorbed during the implantation. Raman spectra shows that the ion-beam-induced damages are fairly suppressed by such a high-temperatures implantation.

  18. Structural and magnetic impact of Cr+-implantation into GaN thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husnain, G.; Shu-De, Yao; Ahmad, Ishaq; Rafique, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    Thin films of GaN with thickness of 2 μm were synthesized on sapphire. Cr+ ions were implanted into GaN with150 keV energy at a fluence of 3 × 1015 cm-2. The annealing of the samples was carried out for a short time using rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Structural properties of the implanted samples were undertaken by XRD and Rutherford backscattering. The annealed samples demonstrated lattice recovery and damages caused by implantation. The structural properties were also studied by High-resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD). Magnetic measurements of the samples were performed by Alternating Gradient Magnetometer (AGM) at room temperature and by SQUID in the range of 5-380 K. The SQUID results showed ferromagnetic behavior at T = 5 K and above 380 K for Cr+-implanted GaN.

  19. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Er implanted ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, P. P.; Kennedy, J.; Ruck, B. J.; Leveneur, J.

    2015-09-01

    We report the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Er implanted and annealed ZnO thin films. The effect of annealing in oxygen-deficient and oxygen-rich conditions was investigated. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results revealed that the Er atoms are located at the implantation depth of around 13 nm, and annealing conditions had no adverse effect on the Er concentration in the layer. Raman spectroscopy results showed peak related to E2(high) mode of ZnO indicating enhanced crystalline quality of the Er implanted and annealed ZnO films. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy results demonstrated pre-edge features in O K-edge which are attributed to the structural defects in the films. Room temperature magnetic ordering was observed in Er implanted and annealed films, and is mainly assigned to the intrinsic defects in ZnO.

  20. The structural and optical properties of metal ion-implanted GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Veselý, M.; Böttger, R.

    2016-03-01

    The practical development of novel optoelectronic materials with appropriate optical properties is strongly connected to the structural properties of the prepared doped structures. We present GaN layers oriented along the (0 0 0 1) crystallographic direction that have been grown by low-pressure metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates implanted with 200 keV Co+, Fe+ and Ni+ ions. The structural properties of the ion-implanted layers have been characterised by RBS-channelling and Raman spectroscopy to obtain a comprehensive insight into the structural modification of implanted GaN layers and to study the subsequent influence of annealing on crystalline-matrix recovery. Photoluminescence was measured to control the desired optical properties. The post-implantation annealing induced the structural recovery of the modified GaN layer depending on the introduced disorder level, e.g. depending on the ion implantation fluence, which was followed by structural characterisation and by the study of the surface morphology by AFM.

  1. Oxygen Implant Isolation of n-GaN Field-Effect Transistor Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, G.; Cao, X.A.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S.J.; Han, J.; Baca, A.G.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-07-20

    Multiple-energy (30-325 keV) O{sup +} implantation into GaN field-effect transistor structures (n {approximately} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}, 3000 {angstrom} thick) can produce as-implanted sheet resistances of 4 x 10{sup 12} {Omega}/{open_square}, provided care is taken to ensure compensation of the region up to the projected range of the lowest energy implant. The sheet resistance remains above 10{sup 7} {Omega}/{open_square} to annealing temperatures of {approximately} 650 C and displays an activation energy of 0.29 eV. No diffusion of the implanted oxygen was observed for anneals up to 800 C.

  2. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-12-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 10(14) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2). The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I-the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); II-the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 10(17) to 8 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); III-the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 10(17) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2)). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The

  3. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 1014 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2. The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I—the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 1017 D/cm2); II—the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 1017 to 8 × 1017 D/cm2); III—the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 1017 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The resulting structure shows stability against the action of

  4. Detecting the onset of urinary bladder contractions using an implantable pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Melgaard, J; Rijkhoff, N J M

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates whether signals obtained from an implantable pressure sensor placed in the urinary bladder wall could be used to detect the onset of bladder contractions. The sensor assembly was custom made using a small piezoresistive sensor die. The die was mounted on ceramic substrate (8 mm × 8 mm) and encapsulated in silicone by a two-part moulding process. The final sensor was lens shaped with a diameter of 13.6 mm and height of 2.0 mm. Experiments were performed in six pigs that had one or more sensors placed in the bladder wall. An external reference sensor was used to simultaneously monitor intravesical pressure via a transurethral catheter. Bladder contractions were evoked by unilateral electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve. Onset latency was computed using both signals. In addition, the correlation between wall pressure and intravesical pressure was calculated. On average, the onset latency was - 307 ms using the wall sensors compared to the intravesical pressure, i.e., the detection occurred earlier using the wall sensors than the intravesical sensor. In 91 of 114 recordings the correlation coefficient was above 0.90. In conclusion, the implantable sensor performs similar to the reference sensor when used to detect the onset of bladder contractions. PMID:21997323

  5. Applications of Fault Detection in Vibrating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eure, Kenneth W.; Hogge, Edward; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Russell, Andrew; Hill, Boyd L.

    2012-01-01

    Structural fault detection and identification remains an area of active research. Solutions to fault detection and identification may be based on subtle changes in the time series history of vibration signals originating from various sensor locations throughout the structure. The purpose of this paper is to document the application of vibration based fault detection methods applied to several structures. Overall, this paper demonstrates the utility of vibration based methods for fault detection in a controlled laboratory setting and limitations of applying the same methods to a similar structure during flight on an experimental subscale aircraft.

  6. Influence of Si ion implantation on structure and morphology of g-C3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varalakshmi, B.; Sreenivasulu, K. V.; Asokan, K.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of Si ion implantation on structural and morphological features of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was investigated. g-C3N4 was prepared by using a simple atmospheric thermal decomposition process. The g-C3N4 pellets were irradiated with a Si ion beam of energy 200 keV with different fluencies. Structural, morphological and elemental, and phase analysis of the implanted samples in comparison with the pristine samples was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques, respectively. The observations revealed that Si ion implantation results in a negligible change in the crystallite size and alteration of the network-like to the sheet-like morphology of g-C3N4 and Si ions in the g-C3N4 network.

  7. Implantable self-reset CMOS image sensor and its application to hemodynamic response detection in living mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takehara, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A self-reset pixel of 15 × 15 µm2 with high signal-to-noise ratio (effective peak SNR ≃64 dB) for an implantable image sensor has been developed for intrinsic signal detection arising from hemodynamic responses in a living mouse brain. For detecting local conversion between oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) in brain tissues, an implantable imaging device was fabricated with our newly designed self-reset image sensor and orange light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ = 605 nm). We demonstrated imaging of hemodynamic responses in the sensory cortical area accompanied by forelimb stimulation of a living mouse. The implantable imaging device for intrinsic signal detection is expected to be a powerful tool to measure brain activities in living animals used in behavioral analysis.

  8. Tachycardia detection in modern implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Thomas; Dahlke, Daniel; Chebbo, Amin; Neumann, Ilka

    2016-09-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) have to reliably sense, detect, and treat malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Inappropriate treatment of non life-threatening tachyarrhythmias should be avoided. This article outlines the functionality of ICDs developed and manufactured by BIOTRONIK. Proper sensing is achieved by an automatic sensitivity control which can be individually tailored to solve special under- and oversensing situations. The programming of detection zones for ventricular fibrillation (VF), ventricular tachycardia (VT), and zones to monitor other tachyarrhythmias is outlined. Dedicated single-chamber detection algorithms based on average heart rate, cycle length variability, sudden rate onset, and changes in QRS morphology as used in ICDs by BIOTRONIK are described in detail. Preconditions and confirmation algorithms for therapy deliveries as antitachycardia pacing (ATP) and high energy shocks are explained. Finally, a detailed description of the dual-chamber detection algorithm SMART is given. It comprises additional detection criteria as stability of atrial intervals, 1:1 conduction, atrial-ventricular (AV) multiplicity, AV trend, and AV regularity to differentiate between ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27576695

  9. Transtelephonic monitoring and transmission of stored arrhythmia detection and therapy data from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Fetter, J G; Stanton, M S; Benditt, D G; Trusty, J; Collins, J

    1995-08-01

    A new transtelephonic monitoring device designed for use with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) was evaluated. It is capable of interrogating ICDs and transmitting the following data via telephone: programmed parameters (e.g., ventricular tachycardia [VT] and ventricular fibrillation [VF] detection, therapies), number of VT and VF episodes, identification of successful therapies, the 20 cycle lengths preceding the last episode detected, the 10 cycle lengths after the last delivered therapy, battery voltage, and real-time transmission of the patient's rhythm. Eighteen patients (mean age 64 +/- 17 years; 15 males) were implanted with an ICD and epicardial lead system. The patients who did not live near the primary hospital were provided with this transmitter and instructed to transmit monthly and whenever presyncope, syncope, or a shock were experienced. Five hundred ten episodes of spontaneous arrhythmia (495 VT, 15 VF) were detected in 14 of 18 patients in a 24-month period and the success of each therapy (antitachycardia pacing, cardioversion 0.4-34 J, defibrillation 34 J) was analyzed. The number of therapies delivered and their success (%) in terminating the arrhythmia were: 380 ramp/86%, 116 burst/84%, 119 cardioversion/57%, and 15 defibrillations/100%. Sixty-three (42%) of the 152 transmissions indicated an arrhythmia. Twenty-five (16%) of the 152 were transmitted because of symptoms. Sixteen (9.7%) of 165 VT episodes could not be terminated by the full set of programmed VT therapies. Analysis of the pre- and post-episode intervals along with the patient's transmitted rhythm indicated that sinus tachycardia or atrial fibrillation were likely responsible for these episodes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7479174

  10. Detection of Structural Abnormalities Using Neural Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.; Maccalla, A.; Daggumati, V.; Gulati, S.; Toomarian, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a feed-forward neural net approach for detection of abnormal system behavior based upon sensor data analyses. A new dynamical invariant representing structural parameters of the system is introduced in such a way that any structural abnormalities in the system behavior are detected from the corresponding changes to the invariant.

  11. Detection of underground structures and tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Moses, R.W.; Kelly, R.E.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H.; Cogbill, A.H.; Stolarczyk, L.G.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There is a continuing need in the United States defense and drug interdiction for effective over, convert, and standoff means of detecting underground tunnels, structures, and objects. This project sought to begin an assessment of electromagnetic and gravitational gradient detection approaches to the detection of underground structures and tunnels.

  12. Synergistic effects of surface chemistry and topologic structure from modified microarc oxidation coatings on Ti implants for improving osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Wei, Daqing; Cao, Jianyun; Feng, Wei; Cheng, Su; Du, Qing; Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2015-04-29

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) coating containing Ca, P, Si, and Na elements on a titanium (Ti) implant has been steam-hydrothermally treated and further mediated by post-heat treatment to overcome the compromised bone-implant integration. The bone regeneration, bone-implant contact, and biomechanical push-out force of the modified Ti implants are discussed thoroughly in this work. The best in vivo performances for the steam-hydrothermally treated one is attributed to the synergistic effects of surface chemistry and topologic structure. Through post-heat treatment, we can decouple the effects of surface chemistry and the nanoscale topologic structure easily. Attributed to the excellent in vivo performance of the surface-modified Ti implant, the steam-hydrothermal treatment could be a promising strategy to improve the osseointegration of the MAO coating covered Ti implant. PMID:25860058

  13. [Structural changes of toothbrush bristles by brushing in patients with dental implants].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, N G; Sirak, S V; Sirak, A G

    2014-01-01

    Lack of proper oral hygiene practices can lead to treatment failure in patients with implant-retained restorations. Structural changes of toothbrush bristles were studied using scanning electron microscopy and correlated with cleaning efficiency which was assessed at baseline and after 3 months of use of various toothbrushes types in 146 patients with implant-retained restorations. Oral hygiene was valued according to several indices (Approximal Plaque-Index (API), the Turesky index (PI), a modified superstructure plaque index Silness-Loe (PLIsk). Ultrasound toothbrush provided the best and the most efficient cleaning outcome in patients with implant-retained restorations. Scanning electron microscopy proved ultrasonic toothbrush bristles to be more resistant to abrasion during the three-month use. PMID:24781121

  14. Compositional and Structural Study of Gd Implanted ZnO Films

    SciTech Connect

    Murmu, Peter P.; Kennedy, John V.; Markwitz, Andreas; Ruck, Ben J.

    2009-07-23

    We report a compositional and structural study of ZnO films implanted with 30 keV Gd ions. The depth profile of the implanted ions, measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, matches predictions of DYNAMIC-TRIM calculations. However, after annealing at temperatures above 550 deg. C the Gd ions are observed to migrate towards the bulk, and at the same time atomic force microscope images of the film surfaces show significant roughening. Raman spectroscopy shows that the annealed films have a reduced number of crystalline defects. The overall results are useful for developing an implantation-annealing regime to produce well characterized samples to investigate magnetism in the ZnO:Gd system.

  15. Probability of detection of internal voids in structural ceramics using microfocus radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, G. Y.; Roth, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of microfocus x-radiography for detecting subsurface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. The microfocus system was operated in the projection mode using low X-ray photon energies (20 keV) and a 10 micro m focal spot. The statistics were developed for implanted subsurface voids in green and sintered silicon carbide and silicon nitride test specimens. These statistics were compared with previously-obtained statistics for implanted surface voids in similar specimens. Problems associated with void implantation are discussed. Statistical results are given as probability-of-detection curves at a 95 percent confidence level for voids ranging in size from 20 to 528 micro m in diameter.

  16. Contrast-enhanced X-ray microtomography of the bone structure adjacent to oral implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, L.; Casseler, F.; Dreossi, D.; Mancini, L.; Tromba, G.; Zanini, F.

    2005-08-01

    One of the most important aims about cortical and cancellous bone research is to understand the factors that determine their mechanical properties, how these properties are maintained, and how bone reacts to changes in its environment, such as the introduction of a titanium implant. Trabecular morphometry has been traditionally assessed in two dimensions, where the structural parameters are either inspected visually or measured from sections, and the third dimension is added on the basis of stereology. Particularly, limiting is the destructive nature of this extremely time consuming procedure, preventing the specimens from being used for other measurements. The most common technique used to overcome some of the limitations of two-dimensional analysis is stereo- or scanning microscopy to assess three-dimensional structural indices qualitatively. Synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography is a particular kind of X-ray computerized axial tomography with higher resolution and the possibility to choose among a very wide range of X-ray energies. Beam energies ranging between 30 and 40 keV will provide a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio and contrast for bone, except for the parts falling in the shadow of the Ti implant. Higher beam energies would provide correctly exposed images, with lower -to noise ratio for the bone trabecular structure. We will show how the use of alternative materials, such as aluminum, while not altering the evaluation of the mechanical impact of an implant, allows a satisfactory non-destructive, three-dimensional analysis of the bone-implant interface.

  17. Infrared Structural Biology: Detect Functionally Important Structural Motions of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Aihua

    Proteins are dynamic. Lack of dynamic structures of proteins hampers our understanding of protein functions. Infrared structural biology (IRSB) is an emerging technology. There are several advantages of IRSB for mechanistic studies of proteins: (1) its excellent dynamic range (detecting structural motions from picoseconds to >= seconds); (2) its high structural sensitivity (detect tiny but functionally important structural motions such as proton transfer and changes in hydrogen bonding interaction); (3) its ability to detect different structural motions simultaneously. Successful development of infrared structural biology demands not only new experimental techniques (from infrared technologies to chemical synthesis and cell biology), but also new data processing (how to translate infrared signals into quantitative structural information of proteins). These topics will be discussed as well as examples of how to use IRSB to study structure-function relationship of proteins. This work was supported by NSF DBI1338097 and OCAST HR10-078.

  18. Novel composite fiber structures to provide drug/protein delivery for medical implants and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital

    2007-01-01

    A novel class of bioresorbable composite (core/shell) fiber structures loaded with bioactive agents was developed and studied. These unique polymeric structures are designed to combine good mechanical properties with a desired controlled release profile, in order to serve as scaffolds for tissue regeneration applications and as basic elements of medical implants. These core/shell fiber structures were formed by "coating" core polymer fibers with drug/protein-containing poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) porous structures. The shell preparation ("coating") was performed by the freeze-drying of water-in-oil emulsions. Both water soluble and water insoluble agents can be incorporated in these structures and their activity is preserved, since the fiber fabrication requires neither high temperatures nor harsh solvents in the vicinity of the bioactive agents. Examples for release profiles of protein (horseradish peroxidase) and drug (paclitaxel) are presented. We have demonstrated that appropriate selection of the emulsion's parameters can yield a variety of new core/shell fiber structures with desirable drug/protein release behavior. This will lead to the engineering of new implants and scaffolds, and will advance the field of tissue regeneration and medical implants. PMID:16956799

  19. Real-time detection of implant-associated neutrophil responses using a formyl peptide receptor-targeting NIR nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Weng, Hong; Tang, Ewin N; Nair, Ashwin; Davé, Digant P; Tang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in implant-mediated inflammation and infection. Unfortunately, current methods which monitor neutrophil activity, including enzyme measurements and histological evaluation, require many animals and cannot be used to accurately depict the dynamic cellular responses. To understand the neutrophil interactions around implant-mediated inflammation and infection it is critical to develop methods which can monitor in vivo cellular activity in real time. In this study, formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-targeting near-infrared nanoprobes were fabricated. This was accomplished by conjugating near-infrared dye with specific peptides having a high affinity to the FPRs present on activated neutrophils. The ability of FPR-targeting nanoprobes to detect and quantify activated neutrophils was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. As expected, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated on activated neutrophils in vitro. Following transplantation, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated at the biomaterial implantation site. Equally important, a strong relationship was observed between the extent of fluorescence intensity in vivo and the number of recruited neutrophils at the implantation site. Furthermore, FPR-targeting nanoprobes may be used to detect and quantify the number of neutrophils responding to a catheter-associated infection. The results show that FPR-targeting nanoprobes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of neutrophil responses to biomaterial implants in vivo. PMID:22619542

  20. Direct observation of enhanced emission sites in nitrogen implanted hybrid structured ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Kalpataru; Sundaravel, B.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Chen, Huang-Chin; Lin, I.-Nan

    2013-02-07

    A hybrid-structured ultrananocrystalline diamond (h-UNCD) film, synthesized on Si-substrates by a two-step microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MPECVD) process, contains duplex structure with large diamond aggregates evenly dispersed in a matrix of ultra-small grains ({approx}5 nm). The two-step plasma synthesized h-UNCD films exhibit superior electron field emission (EFE) properties than the one-step MPECVD deposited UNCD films. Nitrogen-ion implantation/post-annealing processes further improve the EFE properties of these films. Current imaging tunnelling spectroscopy in scanning tunnelling spectroscopy mode directly shows increased density of emission sites in N implanted/post-annealed h-UNCD films than as-prepared one. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show increased sp{sup 2} phase content and C-N bonding fraction in N ion implanted/post-annealed films. Transmission electron microscopic analysis reveals that the N implantation/post-annealing processes induce the formation of defects in the diamond grains, which decreases the band gap and increases the density of states within the band gap of diamond. Moreover, the formation of nanographitic phase surrounding the small diamond grains enhanced the conductivity at the diamond grain boundaries. Both of the phenomena enhance the EFE properties.

  1. The Structure of Sapphire Implanted with Carbon at Room Temperature and 1000° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E.; Marques, C.; Safran, G.; McHargue, Carl J.

    2009-03-01

    Carbon was implanted into sapphire at various temperatures as part of a study of the different defect structures produced by a series of light ions. Implantations were made with 150 keV ions to fluences of 1×1016 and 1×1017ions/cm2 at room temperature (RT) and 1000° C. The defect structures were characterized using Rutherford backscattering-channeling (RBS-C) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The RBS-C spectra indicated low residual disorder for RT implantation at 1×1016 C+/cm2. The de-channeling approached the random value at 1×1017 C+/cm2 and the TEM examination revealed a buried amorphous layer containing embedded sapphire nanocrystals. Damaged layers containing planar defects generally aligned parallel to the surface surrounded this layer. The RBS-C spectra for the sample implanted at 1000° C with 1×1017C+/cm2 suggested a highly damaged but crystalline surface that was confirmed by TEM micrographs.

  2. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Román, R.; Maffiotte, C.; González-Casablanca, J.; Perez, R.; Hole, D.

    2009-05-01

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al2O3), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2 was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 °C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al2O3 substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  3. Optimal controller design for structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun

    2005-03-01

    The virtual passive control technique has recently been applied to structural damage detection, where the virtual passive controller only uses the existing control devices, and no additional physical elements are attached to the tested structure. One important task is to design passive controllers that can enhance the sensitivity of the identified parameters, such as natural frequencies, to structural damage. This paper presents a novel study of an optimal controller design for structural damage detection. We apply not only passive controllers but also low-order and fixed-structure controllers, such as PID controllers. In the optimal control design, the performance of structural damage detection is based on the application of a neural network technique, which uses the pattern of the correlation between the natural frequency changes of the tested system and the damaged system.

  4. Temporal Fine Structure and Applications to Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Complex broadband sounds are decomposed by the auditory filters into a series of relatively narrowband signals, each of which conveys information about the sound by time-varying features. The slow changes in the overall amplitude constitute envelope, while the more rapid events, such as zero crossings, constitute temporal fine structure (TFS).…

  5. Usefulness of Sonication of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices to Enhance Microbial Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Avish; Patel, Robin; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Baddour, Larry M.; Lynch, David T.; Lahr, Brian D.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Friedman, Paul A.; Hayes, David L.; Sohail, M. Rizwan

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection rate is rising disproportionately to the rate of device implantation. Identification of microorganisms that cause CIED infections is not always achieved using present laboratory techniques. We conducted a prospective study to determine whether device vortexing-sonication followed by culture of the resulting sonicate fluid would enhance microbial detection compared with traditional swab or pocket tissue cultures. Forty-two subjects with noninfected and 35 with infected CIEDs were prospectively enrolled over 12 months. One swab each from the device pocket and device surface, pocket tissue, and the CIED were collected from each patient. Swabs and tissues were cultured using routine methods. The CIED was processed in Ringer’s solution using vortexing-sonication and the resultant fluid semiquantitatively cultured. Tissue and swab growth was considered significant when colonies grew on ≥2 quadrants of the culture plate and device was considered significant when ≥20 colonies were isolated from 10 ml of sonicate fluid. In noninfected group, 5% of sonicate fluids yielded significant bacterial growth, compared with 5% of tissue cultures (p = 1.00) and 2% of both pocket and device swab cultures (p = 0.317 each). In infected group, significant bacterial growth was observed in 54% of sonicate fluids, significantly greater than the sensitivities of pocket swab (20%, p = 0.001), device swab (9%, p <0.001), or tissue (9%, p <0.001) culture. In conclusion, vortexing-sonication of CIEDs with semiquantitative culture of the resultant sonicate fluid results in a significant increase in the sensitivity of culture results, compared with swab or tissue cultures. PMID:25779615

  6. EXAFS study of the structural properties of In and In + C implanted Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, R.; Kremer, F.; Sprouster, D. J.; Mirzaei, S.; Decoster, S.; Glover, C. J.; Medling, S. A.; Russo, S. P.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2016-05-01

    The structural configurations of In implanted Ge have been studied via x-ray absorption spectroscopy with and without the codoping of C. In the case of In singly implanted Ge, while the In atoms occupy an substitutional site in Ge (InGe4) at low In concentration (≤ 2 at. %), they precipitate into a metallic phase (In metal) and form complexes composed of one vacancy and three Ge atoms (InVGe3) at concentration ≥ 0.6 at. %. This behaviour can be suppressed by the addition of C leading to In-C pairing to form InCGe3 complexes. This cluster enables In atoms to recover a four-fold coordinated structure and has the potential to improve the electrical activation of In atoms in Ge.

  7. A comparative study of the structure and cytotoxicity of polytetrafluoroethylene after ion etching and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtansky, D. V.; Glushankova, N. A.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, F. V.; Sheveiko, A. N.; Sigarev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    The ion-plasma treatment has been widely used for modifying the surface structure of polymers in order to improve their properties, but it can lead to destruction of the surface and, as a consequence, to an increase in their toxicity. A comparative study of the structure and cytotoxicity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) after the ion etching (IE) and ion implantation (II) for 10 min with energy densities of 363 and 226 J/cm2, respectively, has been performed. It has been shown that, unlike the ion implantation, the ion etching results in the destruction of the polymer and in the appearance of the cytotoxicity. The factors responsible for this effect, which are associated with the bulk and surface treatment, as well as with the influence of the temperature, have been discussed.

  8. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  9. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy. PMID:25618702

  10. Nano-structure and tribological properties of B + and Ti + co-implanted silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Noda, Katsutoshi; Yamauchi, Yukihiko

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics have been co-implanted with boron and titanium ions at a fluence of 2 × 1017 ions/cm2 and an energy of 200 keV. TEM results indicated that the boron and titanium-implanted layers were amorphized separately and titanium nitride nano-crystallites were formed in the titanium-implanted layer. XPS results indicated that the implantation profile varied a little depending on the ion implantation sequence of boron and titanium ions, with the boron implantation peak shifting to a shallower position when implanted after Ti+-implantation. Wear tests of these ion-implanted materials were carried out using a block-on-ring wear tester under non-lubricated conditions against commercially available silicon nitride materials. The specific wear rate was reduced by ion implantation and showed that the specific wear rate of Ti+-implanted sample was the lowest, followed by B+, Ti+ co-implanted and B+-implanted samples.

  11. Osteoinduction of porous Ti implants with a channel structure fabricated by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Pattanayak, Deepak K; Matsushita, T; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have shown that certain biomaterials with specific porous structures can induce bone formation in non-osseous sites without the need for osteoinductive biomolecules, however, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon (intrinsic osteoinduction of biomaterials) remain unclear. In particular, to our knowledge the type of pore structure suitable for osteoinduction has not been reported in detail. In the present study we investigated the effects of interconnective pore size on osteoinductivity and the bone formation processes during osteoinduction. Selective laser melting was employed to fabricate porous Ti implants (diameter 3.3mm, length 15 mm) with a channel structure comprising four longitudinal square channels, representing pores, of different diagonal widths, 500, 600, 900, and 1200 μm (termed p500, p600, p900, and p1200, respectively). These were then subjected to chemical and heat treatments to induce bioactivity. Significant osteoinduction was observed in p500 and p600, with the highest observed osteoinduction occurring at 5mm from the end of the implants. A distance of 5mm probably provides a favorable balance between blood circulation and fluid movement. Thus, the simple architecture of the implants allowed effective investigation of the influence of the interconnective pore size on osteoinduction, as well as the relationship between bone quantity and its location for different pore sizes. PMID:21295166

  12. Local structural properties of Co-ion-implanted ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. I.; Jin, Zhenlan; Jeong, E. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Han, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    We examined the local structural properties around Co and Zn ions in Co-ion-implanted ZnO nanorods by using an X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Vertically-aligned ZnO nanorods were synthesized on Al2O3 substrates by using a catalyst-free metal-organic chemicalvapor deposition. Co ions (Co+ and Co2+) with energies of 50 and 100 keV and fluxes of 1013 and 1015 particles/cm2 were implanted in the ZnO nanorods, and the ion-implanted ZnO nanorods were annealed at 400-650°C. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses demonstrated that the chemical valence state of the Co ions were mostly 2+. An extended XAFS (EXAFS) analysis revealed that the Co ions were mostly substituted at the Zn sites of ZnO nanorods at a Coion flux of 1015 particles/cm2. However, at a flux of 1013 particles/cm2, Co ions formed Co-O and Co-Co clusters. These results were in contrast to the Co distribution in Co-added ZnO predicted by using a Monte Carlo method.

  13. Predictors of Arrhythmic Events Detected by Implantable Loop Recorders in Renal Transplant Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rodrigo Tavares; Martinelli Filho, Martino; Peixoto, Giselle de Lima; de Lima, José Jayme Galvão; de Siqueira, Sérgio Freitas; Costa, Roberto; Gowdak, Luís Henrique Wolff; de Paula, Flávio Jota; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Ramires, José Antônio Franchini

    2015-01-01

    Background The recording of arrhythmic events (AE) in renal transplant candidates (RTCs) undergoing dialysis is limited by conventional electrocardiography. However, continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring seems to be more appropriate due to automatic detection of arrhythmia, but this method has not been used. Objective We aimed to investigate the incidence and predictors of AE in RTCs using an implantable loop recorder (ILR). Methods A prospective observational study conducted from June 2009 to January 2011 included 100 consecutive ambulatory RTCs who underwent ILR and were followed-up for at least 1 year. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to define predictors of AE. Results During a mean follow-up of 424 ± 127 days, AE could be detected in 98% of patients, and 92% had more than one type of arrhythmia, with most considered potentially not serious. Sustained atrial tachycardia and atrial fibrillation occurred in 7% and 13% of patients, respectively, and bradyarrhythmia and non-sustained or sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) occurred in 25% and 57%, respectively. There were 18 deaths, of which 7 were sudden cardiac events: 3 bradyarrhythmias, 1 ventricular fibrillation, 1 myocardial infarction, and 2 undetermined. The presence of a long QTc (odds ratio [OR] = 7.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.01–26.35; p = 0.002), and the duration of the PR interval (OR = 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02–1.08; p < 0.001) were independently associated with bradyarrhythmias. Left ventricular dilatation (LVD) was independently associated with non-sustained VT (OR = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.01–7.96; p = 0.041). Conclusions In medium-term follow-up of RTCs, ILR helped detect a high incidence of AE, most of which did not have clinical relevance. The PR interval and presence of long QTc were predictive of bradyarrhythmias, whereas LVD was predictive of non-sustained VT. PMID:26351983

  14. The structural changes and optical properties of LiNbO3 after Er implantation using high ion fluencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Pupíková, H.; Nekvindová, P.; Cajzl, J.; Sofer, Z.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Kolitsch, A.; Oswald, J.

    2014-08-01

    The structural and compositional changes of LiNbO3 implanted with 190 keV Er+ ions into various crystallographic cuts with fluencies of 1 × 1016 and 5 × 1016 cm-2 were studied. The effect of post-implantation annealing at 1000 °C in oxygen atmosphere was also examined. Concentration depth profiles of implanted erbium, determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), are broader than those from the SRIM simulation. The maximum erbium concentration (of up to 8 at.%) is observed at the depth of about 50 nm, for all crystal cuts. The structure of the implanted layers were characterised by RBS-channelling method. The lower relative number of disordered atoms in the crystalline matrix was observed in the lithium niobate (LN) implanted at a fluence of 1 × 1016 cm-2, where also the preferential position of the erbium in substitutional sites was observed when compared to the randomly distributed erbium in interstitial positions at a fluence of 5 × 1016 cm-2 after the annealing. Surface-morphology changes at the highest implantation fluencies were studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Since we were interested in the relation between the structural changes and optical properties, erbium luminescence properties were measured in the region of 1440-1650 nm. The positive effect of post-implantation annealing on the luminescence properties caused by structural recovery was proved.

  15. Rate discrimination, gap detection and ranking of temporal pitch in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Stefano; Carlyon, Robert P; Deeks, John M; Parkinson, Wendy; Bierer, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users have poor temporal pitch perception, as revealed by two key outcomes of rate discrimination tests: (i) rate discrimination thresholds (RDTs) are typically larger than the corresponding frequency difference limen for pure tones in normal hearing listeners, and (ii) above a few hundred pulses per second (i.e. the "upper limit" of pitch), CI users cannot discriminate further increases in pulse rate. Both RDTs at low rates and the upper limit of pitch vary across listeners and across electrodes in a given listener. Here, we compare across-electrode and across-subject variation in these two measures with the variation in performance on another temporal processing task, gap detection, in order to explore the limitations of temporal processing in CI users. RDTs were obtained for 4-5 electrodes in each of 10 Advanced Bionics CI users using two interleaved adaptive tracks, corresponding to standard rates of 100 and 400 pps. Gap detection was measured using the adaptive procedure and stimuli described by Bierer et al. (JARO 16:273-284, 2015), and for the same electrodes and listeners as for the rate discrimination measures. Pitch ranking was also performed using a mid-point comparison technique. There was a marginal across-electrode correlation between gap detection and rate discrimination at 400 pps, but neither measure correlated with rate discrimination at 100 pps. Similarly, there was a highly significant across-subject correlation between gap detection and rate discrimination at 400, but not 100 pps, and these two correlations differed significantly from each other. Estimates of low-rate sensitivity and of the upper limit of pitch, obtained from the pitch ranking experiment, correlated well with rate discrimination for the 100- and 400-pps standards, respectively. The results are consistent with the upper limit of rate discrimination sharing a common basis with gap detection. There was no evidence that this limitation also applied to rate

  16. Optimization of an acoustic telemetry array for detecting transmitter-implanted fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Jepsen, D.; Karnowski, M.; Schreck, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    The development of miniature acoustic transmitters and economical, robust automated receivers has enabled researchers to study the movement patterns and survival of teleosts in estuarine and ocean environments, including many species and age-classes that were previously considered too small for implantation. During 2001-2003, we optimized a receiver mooring system to minimize gear and data loss in areas where current action or wave action and acoustic noise are high. In addition, we conducted extensive tests to determine (1) the performance of a transmitter and receiver (Vemco, Ltd.) that are widely used, particularly in North America and Europe and (2) the optimal placement of receivers for recording the passage of fish past a point in a linear-flow environment. Our results suggest that in most locations the mooring system performs well with little loss of data; however, boat traffic remains a concern due to entanglement with the mooring system. We also found that the reception efficiency of the receivers depends largely on the method and location of deployment. In many cases, we observed a range of 0-100% reception efficiency (the percentage of known transmissions that are detected while the receiver is within range of the transmitter) when using a conventional method of mooring. The efficiency was improved by removal of the mounting bar and obstructions from the mooring line. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  17. Simple probabilistic algorithm for detecting community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Yan, Guiying; Liao, Xiaoping; Xiao, Lan

    2009-03-01

    With the growing number of available social and biological networks, the problem of detecting the network community structure is becoming more and more important which acts as the first step to analyze these data. The community structure is generally regarded as that nodes in the same community tend to have more edges and less if they are in different communities. We propose a simple probabilistic algorithm for detecting community structure which employs expectation-maximization (SPAEM). We also give a criterion based on the minimum description length to identify the optimal number of communities. SPAEM can detect overlapping nodes and handle weighted networks. It turns out to be powerful and effective by testing simulation data and some widely known data sets.

  18. High Structural Stability of Textile Implants Prevents Pore Collapse and Preserves Effective Porosity at Strain

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Uwe; Otto, Jens; Mühl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement of tissues by use of textiles is encouraged by the reduced rate of recurrent tissue dehiscence but for the price of an inflammatory and fibrotic tissue reaction to the implant. The latter mainly is affected by the size of the pores, whereas only sufficiently large pores are effective in preventing a complete scar entrapment. Comparing two different sling implants (TVT and SIS), which are used for the treatment of urinary incontinence, we can demonstrate that the measurement of the effective porosity reveals considerable differences in the textile construction. Furthermore the changes of porosity after application of a tensile load can indicate a structural instability, favouring pore collapse at stress and questioning the use for purposes that are not “tension-free.” PMID:25973427

  19. Critical issues in the formation of quantum computer test structures by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schuh, A.; Persaud, A.; Bokor, J.

    2009-04-06

    The formation of quantum computer test structures in silicon by ion implantation enables the characterization of spin readout mechanisms with ensembles of dopant atoms and the development of single atom devices. We briefly review recent results in the characterization of spin dependent transport and single ion doping and then discuss the diffusion and segregation behaviour of phosphorus, antimony and bismuth ions from low fluence, low energy implantations as characterized through depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both phosphorus and bismuth are found to segregate to the SiO2/Si interface during activation anneals, while antimony diffusion is found to be minimal. An effect of the ion charge state on the range of antimony ions, 121Sb25+, in SiO2/Si is also discussed.

  20. Structural and vibrational properties of Co nanoparticles formed by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Cookson, D. J.; Foran, G. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the structural and vibrational properties of Co nanoparticles formed by ion implantation and thermal annealing in amorphous silica. The evolution of the nanoparticle size, phase, and structural parameters were determined as a function of the formation conditions using transmission electron microscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The implantation fluence and annealing temperature governed the spherical nanoparticle size and phase. To determine the latter, x-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis was used to quantify the hexagonal close packed, face-centered cubic and oxide fractions. The structural properties were characterized by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and finite-size effects were readily apparent. With a decrease in nanoparticle size, an increase in structural disorder and a decrease in both coordination number and bondlength were observed as consistent with the non-negligible surface-area-to-volume ratio characteristic of nanoparticles. The surface tension of Co nanoparticles calculated using a liquid drop model was more than twice that of bulk material. The size-dependent vibrational properties were probed with temperature-dependent EXAFS measurements. Using a correlated anharmonic Einstein model and thermodynamic perturbation theory, Einstein temperatures for both nanoparticles and bulk material were determined. Compared to bulk Co, the mean vibrational frequency of the smallest nanoparticles was reduced as attributed to a greater influence of loosely bonded, undercoordinated surface atoms relative to the effect of capillary pressure generated by surface curvature.

  1. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics.

  2. A Structural Equation Modeling Approach to Examining Factors Influencing Outcomes with Cochlear Implant in Mandarin-Speaking Children

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Wong, Lena L. N.; Zhu, Shufeng; Xi, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the direct and indirect effects of demographical factors on speech perception and vocabulary outcomes of Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs). Methods 115 participants implanted before the age of 5 and who had used CI before 1 to 3 years were evaluated using a battery of speech perception and vocabulary tests. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses proposed. Results Early implantation significantly contributed to speech perception outcomes while having undergone a hearing aid trial (HAT) before implantation, maternal educational level (MEL), and having undergone universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) before implantation had indirect effects on speech perception outcomes via their effects on age at implantation. In addition, both age at implantation and MEL had direct and indirect effects on vocabulary skills, while UNHS and HAT had indirect effects on vocabulary outcomes via their effects on age at implantation. Conclusion A number of factors had indirect and direct effects on speech perception and vocabulary outcomes in Mandarin-speaking children with CIs and these factors were not necessarily identical to those reported among their English-speaking counterparts. PMID:26348360

  3. Porous Tantalum Structures for Bone Implants: Fabrication, Mechanical and In vitro Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bodhak, Subhadip; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Relatively high cost of manufacturing and inability to produce modular all tantalum implants has limited its widespread acceptance, in spite of its excellent in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. In this article, we report how to process Ta to create net shape porous structures with varying porosity using Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) for the first time. Porous Ta samples with relative densities between 45 to 73% have been successfully fabricated and characterized for their mechanical properties. In vitro cell materials interactions, using human osteoblast cell line hFOB, have been accessed on these porous Ta structures and compared with porous Ti control samples. The results show that the Young’s modulus of porous Ta can be tailored between 1.5 to 20 GPa by changing the pore volume fraction between 27 and 55%. In vitro biocompatibility in terms of MTT assay and immunochemistry study showed excellent cellular adherence, growth and differentitation with abundant extracellular matrix formation on porous Ta structures compared to porous Ti control. These results indicate that porous Ta structures can promote enhanced/early biological fixation. The enhanced in vitro cell-materials interactions on porous Ta surface are attributed to chemistry and its high wettability and surface energy relative to porous Ti. Our results show that these laser processed porous Ta structures can find numerous applications, particularly among older patients, for metallic implants because of their excellent bioactivity. PMID:20132912

  4. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls usually between 2 and 8 years of age ... MRI scans (radiology techniques designed to show the images of body structures) to find the implant when ...

  5. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  6. [Comparative animal experimental study on the importance of the surface structure for the stability of extension implantations].

    PubMed

    Dördelmann, K; Tetsch, P; Ibing, G

    1977-04-01

    An animal experimental study was undertaken where the embedding of extension implants with a smooth or porous surface was histologically examined. Under extreme functional stress there occurs a mobility of the implants with the formation of a broad connective tissue zone, inflammatory reactions and ingrowth of epithelium, which is independent of the surface structure. Implants under less stress show a narrower connective tissue layer which narrows itself further if the surface is porous. The possible causes of this tissue reaction are discussed. PMID:266991

  7. Usefulness of an Implantable Loop Recorder to Detect Clinically Relevant Arrhythmias in Patients With Advanced Fabry Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Maier, Sebastian K G; Störk, Stefan; Brunner, Thomas; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Seydelmann, Nora; Schneider, Andreas; Becher, Jan; Canan-Kühl, Sima; Blaschke, Daniela; Bijnens, Bart; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Nordbeck, Peter

    2016-07-15

    Patients with genetic cardiomyopathy that involves myocardial hypertrophy often develop clinically relevant arrhythmias that increase the risk of sudden death. Consequently, guidelines for medical device therapy were established for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but not for conditions with only anecdotal evidence of arrhythmias, like Fabry cardiomyopathy. Patients with Fabry cardiomyopathy progressively develop myocardial fibrosis, and sudden cardiac death occurs regularly. Because 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms (ECGs) might not detect clinically important arrhythmias, we tested an implanted loop recorder for continuous heart rhythm surveillance and determined its impact on therapy. This prospective study included 16 patients (12 men) with advanced Fabry cardiomyopathy, relevant hypertrophy, and replacement fibrosis in "loco typico." No patients previously exhibited clinically relevant arrhythmias on Holter ECGs. Patients received an implantable loop recorder and were prospectively followed with telemedicine for a median of 1.2 years (range 0.3 to 2.0 years). The primary end point was a clinically meaningful event, which required a therapy change, captured with the loop recorder. Patients submitted data regularly (14 ± 11 times per month). During follow-up, 21 events were detected (including 4 asystole, i.e., ECG pauses ≥3 seconds) and 7 bradycardia events; 5 episodes of intermittent atrial fibrillation (>3 minutes) and 5 episodes of ventricular tachycardia (3 sustained and 2 nonsustained). Subsequently, as defined in the primary end point, 15 events leaded to a change of therapy. These patients required therapy with a pacemaker or cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and/or anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation. In conclusion, clinically relevant arrhythmias that require further device and/or medical therapy are often missed with Holter ECGs in patients with advanced stage Fabry cardiomyopathy, but they can be detected by telemonitoring with an implantable

  8. Processing and mechanical behavior of lamellar structured degradable magnesium-hydroxyapatite implants.

    PubMed

    Ratna Sunil, B; Ganapathy, C; Sampath Kumar, T S; Chakkingal, Uday

    2014-12-01

    Multilayered (laminated) composites exhibit tunable mechanical behavior compared to bulk materials due to the presence of more interfaces and therefore magnesium based composites are gaining wide popularity as biodegradable materials targeted for temporary implant applications. The objective of the present work is to fabricate magnesium based lamellar metal matrix composites (MMCs) for degradable implant applications. Nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) powder was selected as the secondary phase and lamellar structured magnesium-nano-hydroxyapatite (Mg-HA) composites of 8, 10 and 15wt% HA were fabricated by ball milling and spark plasma sintering. It was found that HA particles were coated on the Mg flakes after 20h of ball milling carried out using tungsten carbide (WC) as the milling media. Spark plasma sintering of the milled powders resulted in the formation of lamellar structure of Mg with the presence of HA and magnesium oxide (MgO) at the inter-lamellar sites of the composites. Phase analysis of the milled powder by an X-ray diffraction (XRD) method confirms the presence of HA and MgO along with Mg after sintering. Corrosion behavior of the composites investigated by potentiodynamic polarization tests shows a reduction in the inter-lamellar corrosion with increase in HA content and the best corrosion resistance is found for the Mg-10% HA composite. This composite also exhibits maximum Vickers hardness. Young׳s modulus and fracture toughness measured by nano-indentation method were higher for the Mg-8% HA composite. The results thus suggest that lamellar structured Mg composites with 8% and 10% HA show promise for temporary degradable orthopedic implant applications because of their improved corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. PMID:25241282

  9. Dynamic based damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sauvik; Ricci, Fabrizio; Baid, Harsh; Mal, Ajit K.

    2009-03-01

    Advanced composites are being used increasingly in state-of-the-art aircraft and aerospace structures. In spite of their many advantages, composite materials are highly susceptible to hidden flaws that may occur at any time during the life cycle of a structure, and if undetected, may cause sudden and catastrophic failure of the entire structure. This paper is concerned with the detection and characterization of hidden defects in composite structures before they grow to a critical size. A methodology for automatic damage identification and localization is developed using a combination of vibration and wave propagation data. The structure is assumed to be instrumented with an array of actuators and sensors to excite and record its dynamic response, including vibration and wave propagation effects. A damage index, calculated from the measured dynamical response of the structure in a previous (reference) state and the current state, is introduced as a determinant of structural damage. The indices are used to identify low velocity impact damages in increasingly complex composite structural components. The potential application of the approach in developing health monitoring systems in defects-critical structures is indicated.

  10. PreImplantation factor (PIF) detection in maternal circulation in early pregnancy correlates with live birth (bovine model)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early identification of viable pregnancy is paramount for successful reproduction. Detection of specific signals from pre-implantation viable embryos in normal pregnancy circulation would indicate initiation of embryo-maternal interaction and create a continuum to accurately reflect embryo/fetal well-being post-implantation. Viable mammalian embryos secrete PreImplantation Factor (PIF), a biomarker which plays key, multi-targeted roles to promote implantation, trophoblast invasion and modulate maternal innate and adaptive immunity toward acceptance. Anti-PIF monoclonal antibody (mAb-based chemiluminescent ELISA) accurately detects PIF in singly cultured embryos media and its increased levels correlate with embryo development up to the blastocyst stage. Herein reported that PIF levels (ELISA) in early maternal serum correlate with pregnancy outcome. Methods Artificially inseminated (AI) blind-coded Angus cattle (N = 21-23) serum samples (day10,15 & 20 post-AI) with known calf birth were blindly tested, using both non-pregnant heifers (N = 30) and steer serum as negative controls. Assay properties and anti-PIF monoclonal antibody specificity were determined by examining linearity, spike and recovery experiments and testing the antibody against 234 different circulating proteins by microarray. Endogenous PIF was detected using <3 kDa filter separation followed by anti-PIF mAb-based affinity chromatography and confirmed by ELISA and HPLC. PIF expression was established in placenta using anti-PIF mAb-based IHC. Results PIF detects viable pregnancy at day 10 post-AI with 91.3% sensitivity, reaching 100% by day 20 and correlating with live calf birth. All non-pregnant samples were PIF negative. PIF level in pregnant samples was a stringent 3 + SD higher as compared to heifers and steer sera. Assay is linear and spike and recovery data demonstrates lack of serum interference. Anti-PIF mAb is specific and does not interact with circulating proteins

  11. Etching and structural changes in nitrogen plasma immersion ion implanted polystyrene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B. K.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Kondyurin, A.; Mizuno, K.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2006-06-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), with nitrogen ions of energy 20 keV in the fluence range of 5 × 1014-2 × 1016 ions cm-2, is used to modify 100 nm thin films of polystyrene on silicon wafer substrates. Ellipsometry is used to study changes in thickness with etching and changes in optical constants. Two distinctly different etch rates are observed as the polymer structure is modified. FTIR spectroscopy data reveals the structural changes, including changes in aromatic and aliphatic groups and oxidation and carbonisation processes, occurring in the polystyrene film as a function of the ion fluence. The transformation to a dense amorphous carbon-like material was observed to progress through an intermediate structural form containing a high concentration of Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds.

  12. Nanopore sequencing detects structural variants in cancer.

    PubMed

    Norris, Alexis L; Workman, Rachael E; Fan, Yunfan; Eshleman, James R; Timp, Winston

    2016-03-01

    Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (<300 bp) of 2nd generation sequencing. Not only do the reads (or paired-end reads) need to straddle a breakpoint, but repetitive elements often lead to ambiguities in the alignment of short reads. We propose to use the long-reads (up to 20 kb) possible with 3rd generation sequencing, specifically nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26787508

  13. Nanopore sequencing detects structural variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Alexis L.; Workman, Rachael E.; Fan, Yunfan; Eshleman, James R.; Timp, Winston

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (<300 bp) of 2nd generation sequencing. Not only do the reads (or paired-end reads) need to straddle a breakpoint, but repetitive elements often lead to ambiguities in the alignment of short reads. We propose to use the long-reads (up to 20 kb) possible with 3rd generation sequencing, specifically nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26787508

  14. RX Puppis - Detection of asymmetrical radio structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Oliversen, R. J.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Cornwell, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Subarcsecond observations of the RX Puppis symbiotic system with the VLA have resolved 2 cm continuum emission which deviates from a previously reported circularly symmetric radio distribution. The radio structure is comprised of at least three nearly colinear components. Under the assumption that the strongest feature is coincident with the hot star, the other two features lie 230 and 590 AU distant. These radio features are reminiscent of small-scale radio structure detected toward R Aquarii, another symbiotic star system, and probably represents material ejected from the RX Puppis system at an earlier epoch.

  15. Leak detection using structure-borne noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen D. (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor); Roberts, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for detection and location of air leaks in a pressure vessel, such as a spacecraft, includes sensing structure-borne ultrasound waveforms associated with turbulence caused by a leak from a plurality of sensors and cross correlating the waveforms to determine existence and location of the leak. Different configurations of sensors and corresponding methods can be used. An apparatus for performing the methods is also provided.

  16. Magnetic and structural properties of CoCrPt-SiO2-based graded media prepared by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nikita; Pandey, K. K. M.; Maurer, S. L.; Piramanayagam, S. N.; Nunes, R. W.; Yang, H.; Bhatia, C. S.

    2011-10-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of graded media fabricated by ion implantation of nitrogen (14 N+), oxygen (16O+), and cobalt (59Co+) ions in the CoCrPt-SiO2 recording layer of prototype disk have been studied. Ion implantation of the species was controlled at the atomic scale to fabricate the graded media. Magnetometric measurements indicated that the coercivity was reduced with an increasing dose of the implanted species. The observation of an increase in magnetic domain size has been attributed to the reduction in magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy, which is desirable for achieving graded media. The study indicates that the magnetic properties can be tailored by the appropriate selection of the implantation dose and species.

  17. Mechanisms of formation of nonlinear optical light guide structures in metal cluster composites produced by ion beam implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, S.S.; Williams, E.K.; Curley, M.; Smith, C.C.; Ila, D.; Venkateswarlu, P.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1997-11-01

    Ion implantation has been shown to produce a high density of metal colloids in glasses and crystalline materials. The high-precipitate volume fraction and small size of metal nanoclusters formed leads to values for the third-order susceptibility much greater than those for metal doped solids. This has stimulated interest in use of ion implantation to make nonlinear optical materials. On the other side, LiNbO{sub 3} has proved to be a good material for optical waveguides produced by MeV ion implantation. Light confinement in these waveguides is produced by refractive index step difference between the implanted region and the bulk material. Implantation of LiNbO{sub 3} with MeV metal ions can therefore result into nonlinear optical waveguide structures with great potential in a variety of device applications. The authors describe linear and nonlinear optical properties of a waveguide structure in LiNbO{sub 3}-based composite material produced by silver ion implantation in connection with mechanisms of its formation.

  18. Quantum structures for multiband photon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2005-09-01

    The work describes multiband photon detectors based on semiconductor micro- and nano-structures. The devices considered include quantum dot, homojunction, and heterojunction structures. In the quantum dot structures, transitions are from one state to another, while free carrier absorption and internal photoemission play the dominant role in homo or heterojunction detectors. Quantum Dots-in-a-Well (DWELL) detectors can tailor the response wavelength by varying the size of the well. A tunneling Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (T-QDIP) could operate at room temperature by blocking the dark current except in the case of resonance. Photoexcited carriers are selectively collected from InGaAs quantum dots by resonant tunneling, while the dark current is blocked by AlGaAs/InGaAs tunneling barriers placed in the structure. A two-color infrared detector with photoresponse peaks at ~6 and ~17 μm at room temperature will be discussed. A Homojunction or HEterojunction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HIWIP or HEIWIP) infrared detector, formed by a doped emitter layer, and an intrinsic layer acting as the barrier followed by another highly doped contact layer, can detect near infrared (NIR) photons due to interband transitions and mid/far infrared (MIR/FIR) radiation due to intraband transitions. The threshold wavelength of the interband response depends on the band gap of the barrier material, and the MIR/FIR response due to intraband transitions can be tailored by adjusting the band offset between the emitter and the barrier. GaAs/AlGaAs will provide NIR and MIR/FIR dual band response, and with GaN/AlGaN structures the detection capability can be extended into the ultraviolet region. These detectors are useful in numerous applications such as environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis, battlefield-imaging, space astronomy applications, mine detection, and remote-sensing.

  19. The structure and tribological properties of gradient layers prepared by plasma-based ion implantation on 2024 Al alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J. X.; Xia, L. F.; Sun, M. R.; Liu, W. M.; Xu, T.; Xue, Q. J.

    2004-02-01

    Using plasma-based ion implantation, two types of gradient layers have been prepared on 2024 Al alloy. One is prepared by N-implantation then C-deposition, the other adds an interlayer composed of a Ti layer and a Ti-N layer between N-implantation and C-deposition. C-deposition is carried out at various implanting voltages or C2H2/H2 ratios. The composition depth profiles of these layers were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The structure, morphologies and microstructure of the C layers were studied using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The surface hardness was measured with a Knoop tester and a mechanical property microprobe. The dry ball-on-disc wear tests were performed in ambient air. The gradient layer without interlayer is composed of an N-implanted layer rich in AlN and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) layer (film), and the two layers are connected with a C-Al transition layer containing Al4C3. The Ti layer rich in agr -Ti and the N-implanted layer are connected by a Ti-Al transition layer containing TiAl3, while the Ti-N layer rich in TiN and the DLC film are connected by a C-Ti transition layer containing TiC, TiCN, etc. Thus, the gradient layer with interlayers has optimized the gradient structure. DLC films are compact and amorphous, contain high sp3/sp2 ratios and depend on the implanting voltage and the C2H2/H2 ratio. Similarly, these gradient layers exhibit significant improvement in morphologies, surface hardness and tribological properties; the interlayer, the implanting voltage and the C2H2/H2 ratio all have prominent effects on these properties.

  20. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  1. Implantable polymer/metal thin film structures for the localized treatment of cancer by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Theriault, Christian; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an implantable polymer/metal alloy thin film structure for localized post-operative treatment of breast cancer. A combination of experiments and models is used to study the temperature changes due to Joule heating by patterned metallic thin films embedded in poly-dimethylsiloxane. The heat conduction within the device and the surrounding normal/cancerous breast tissue is modeled with three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The FEM simulations are used to explore the potential effects of device geometry and Joule heating on the temperature distribution and lesion (thermal dose). The FEM model is validated using a gel model that mimics biological media. The predictions are also compared to prior results from in vitro studies and relevant in vivo studies in the literature. The implications of the results are discussed for the potential application of polymer/metal thin film structures in hyperthermic treatment of cancer.

  2. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  3. Structural health monitoring and impact detection for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosters, Eric; van Els, Thomas J.

    2010-04-01

    The increasing use of thermoplastic carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials in the aerospace industry for primary aircraft structures, such as wing leading-edge surfaces and fuselage sections, has led to rapid growth in the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Impact, vibration, and load can all cause failure, such as delamination and matrix cracking, in composite materials. Moreover, the internal material damage can occur without being visible to the human eye, making inspection of and clear insight into structural integrity difficult using currently available evaluation methods. Here, we describe the detection of impact and its localization in materials and structures by high-speed interrogation of multiple-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors mounted on a composite aircraft component.

  4. Finite element analysis and cellular studies on advanced, controlled porous structures with subsurface continuity in bio-implantable titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P; Ankem, S; Wyatt, Z; Ferlin, K M; Fisher, J

    2014-01-01

    Highly-porous metallic implant onlay materials (specifically those containing surface pores that intersect beneath the onlay surface) have been investigated recently for their potential to reduce bone resorption and to improve the overall stability of the implant. In the current study, sub-surface interconnectivity of high-aspect-ratio pores was created directly in the substrate of an implant material using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). This technique was used to produce intersecting pores with diameters of 180-250 μm on a clinically relevant implant material—commercially pure (CP) Grade 4 Ti—with a very high degree of control over pore morphology. These pores resulted in no significant microstructural modification to the surrounding Ti, and the inner pore surfaces could be thermally oxidized to produce a microrough, bioactive TiO2 layer. Finite element analysis of Ti models containing these EDM-attainable intersecting pore geometries suggested they produce higher bone/implant interface strengths and lower susceptibility to stress shielding of the surrounding bone as compared with models containing simpler surface geometries. In vitro experiments using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) demonstrated mineralized tissue ingrowth of ∼ 300 μm into EDM-produced pores. This amount of ingrowth is expected to allow for full interlocking of mineralized tissue and implant given the proper pore structure design. PMID:23686820

  5. High Mobility SiGe/Si Transistor Structures on Sapphire Substrates Using Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Mueller, C. H.; Croke, E. T.

    2003-01-01

    High mobility n-type SiGe/Si transistor structures have been fabricated on sapphire substrates by ion implanting phosphorus ions into strained 100 Angstrom thick silicon channels for the first time. The strained Si channels were sandwiched between Si(sub 0.7)Ge(sub 0.3) layers, which, in turn, were deposited on Si(sub 0.7)Ge(sub 0.3) virtual substrates and graded SiGe buffer layers. After the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) film growth process was completed, ion thick silicon channels implantation and post-annealing were used to introduce donors. The phosphorous ions were preferentially located in the Si channel at a peak concentration of approximately 1x10(exp 18)/cu cm. Room temperature electron mobilities exceeding 750 sq cm/V-sec at carrier densities of 1x10(exp 12)/sq cm were measured. Electron concentration appears to be the key factor that determines mobility, with the highest mobility observed for electron densities in the 1 - 2x10(exp 12)/sq cm range.

  6. Doping of Graphene by Low-Energy Ion Beam Implantation: Structural, Electronic, and Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Willke, Philip; Amani, Julian A; Sinterhauf, Anna; Thakur, Sangeeta; Kotzott, Thomas; Druga, Thomas; Weikert, Steffen; Maiti, Kalobaran; Hofsäss, Hans; Wenderoth, Martin

    2015-08-12

    We investigate the structural, electronic, and transport properties of substitutional defects in SiC-graphene by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and magnetotransport experiments. Using ion incorporation via ultralow energy ion implantation, the influence of different ion species (boron, nitrogen, and carbon) can directly be compared. While boron and nitrogen atoms lead to an effective doping of the graphene sheet and can reduce or raise the position of the Fermi level, respectively, (12)C(+) carbon ions are used to study possible defect creation by the bombardment. For low-temperature transport, the implantation leads to an increase in resistance and a decrease in mobility in contrast to undoped samples. For undoped samples, we observe in high magnetic fields a positive magnetoresistance that changes to negative for the doped samples, especially for (11)B(+)- and (12)C(+)-ions. We conclude that the conductivity of the graphene sheet is lowered by impurity atoms and especially by lattice defects, because they result in weak localization effects at low temperatures. PMID:26120803

  7. Feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using electronic portal imaging: A comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. . E-mail: eharris@icr.ac.uk; McNair, Helen A.; Evans, Phillip M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using portal images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and Materials: We have made a direct comparison of 4 different methods (2 template matching-based methods, a method incorporating attenuation and constellation analyses and a cross correlation method) that have been published in the literature for the automatic detection of fiducial markers. The cross-correlation technique requires a-priory information from the portal images, therefore the technique is not fully automated for the first treatment fraction. Images of 7 patients implanted with gold fiducial markers (8 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter) were acquired before treatment (set-up images) and during treatment (movie images) using 1MU and 15MU per image respectively. Images included: 75 anterior (AP) and 69 lateral (LAT) set-up images and 51 AP and 83 LAT movie images. Using the different methods described in the literature, marker positions were automatically identified. Results: The method based upon cross correlation techniques gave the highest percentage detection success rate of 99% (AP) and 83% (LAT) set-up (1MU) images. The methods gave detection success rates of less than 91% (AP) and 42% (LAT) set-up images. The amount of a-priory information used and how it affects the way the techniques are implemented, is discussed. Conclusions: Fully automated marker detection in set-up images for the first treatment fraction is unachievable using these methods and that using cross-correlation is the best technique for automatic detection on subsequent radiotherapy treatment fractions.

  8. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, M.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Ammar, M. R.; Rouzaud, J. N.; Deldicque, D.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO2 cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges Rp of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D(3He,p)4He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200-1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower temperatures when D is located

  9. Structural defects and electronic structure of N-ion implanted TiO2: Bulk versus thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Korotin, M. A.; Kim, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    Systematic investigation of atomic structure of N-ion implanted TiO2 (thin films and bulk ceramics) was performed by XPS measurements (core levels and valence bands) and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In bulk samples experiment and theory demonstrate anion N → O substitution. For the thin films case experiments evidence valuable contributions from N2 and NO molecule-like structures and theoretical modeling reveals a possibility of formation of these species as result of the appearance of interstitial nitrogen defects on the various surfaces of TiO2. Energetics of formation of oxygen vacancies and its key role for band gap reduction is also discussed.

  10. Ion implantation induced modification of structural and magnetic properties of perpendicular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nikita; Piramanayagam, S. N.; Maurer, S. L.; Nunes, R. W.; Steen, S.; Yang, H.; Bhatia, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    This study reports the effects of implanting various doses of boron (11B+) and argon (40Ar+) ions into the recording layer and the soft underlayer of CoCrPt-SiO2-based perpendicular recording media. Implantation of a lower dose of boron ions (1011 ions cm-2) in the recording layer was found to reduce the out-of-plane coercivity, whereas no changes in the coercivity were observed when they were implanted into the soft underlayer. In the case of argon ions, lower dose implantation did not show any changes in the coercivity, irrespective of the implanted layer. However, higher dose implantations (1016 ions cm-2) of all the species were found to cause a reduction in coercivity, irrespective of the implanted layer. The reduction in coercivity was more significant when the ions were implanted in the recording layer compared with the case of implantation in the soft underlayer. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results on samples where argon was implanted in the recording layer showed a strong shift in the position of Co (0 0 .2) peaks, indicating an increase in the 'c' parameter. The shift is explained, on the basis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to be arising from intra-layer mixing at the CoCrPt-SiO2/Ru interface. Magnetic force microscopy images indicated an increase in domain size arising from the ion implantation.

  11. Ion implantation processing of sub-stoichiometric titanium nitrides and carbonitrides: chemical structural and micromechanical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guemmaz, M.; Mosser, A.; Grob, J. J.

    Sub-stoichiometric titanium nitrides TiNx ( , and ) and carbonitride TiNxCy ( ) were synthesized at the titanium surface by multiple energy (180, 100, 50 and 20 keV) ion implantation. The in-depth distributions of carbon and nitrogen deduced from RBS and SIMS spectra were compared with TRIM calculations. From the X-ray grazing incidence we observed the following structures: (i) An NaCl type structure for TiN0.35C0.35 and TiN0.61, the latter is commonly known as -titanium nitride; (ii) A nitrogen solid solution in an -Ti structure for TiN0.25, and a mixture of both structures for TiN0.45. In the case of the NaCl structures, the layers were composed of very small strained crystallites (nanocrystals). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of C , N and Ti levels, as well as the valence band spectrum, show that the carbon and the nitrogen are fully bonded to titanium. Nanoindentation measurements show an elastoplastic behavior for the layers. The hardness and Young's modulus were derived from load-displacement curves. The results were discussed in the light of the published work.

  12. Electronic structure and photoluminescence properties of Zn-ion implanted silica glass before and after thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Pchelkina, Z. V.; Gavrilov, N. V.

    2016-01-01

    The results of XPS core-level and valence band measurements, photoluminescence spectra of a-SiO2 implanted by Zn-ions (E=30 keV, D=1*1017 cm^-2) and Density Functional Theory calculations of electronic structure as well as formation energies of structural defects in silica glass induced by Zn-ion implantation are presented. Both theory and experiment show that it is energetically more favorable for implanted zinc ions to occupy the interstitial positions instead of cation substitution. As a result, the Zn-ions embedded to interstitials, form chemical bonds with the surrounding oxygen atoms, formation ZnO-like nanoparticles and oxygen-deficient SiOx matrix. The subsequent thermal annealing at 900 0C (1 hr) strongly reduces the amount of ZnO nanoparticles and induces the formation of {\\alpha}-Zn2SiO4 phase which markedly enhances the green emission.

  13. Detection of refrigerator-associated 60 Hz alternating current as ventricular fibrillation by an implantable defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Al Khadra, Ayman S; Al Jutaily, Abdulaziz; Al Shuhri, Salem

    2006-03-01

    This report describes a patient with an implantable defibrillator who suffered an inappropriate defibrillation shock upon retrieving some food items from his inadequately earthed refrigerator. Noise typical of electrical interference can be observed in the stored electrogram of the episode. The patient was instructed to earth his home appliances, but he decided to avoid his refrigerator altogether, and has had no subsequent shocks. PMID:16627434

  14. Investigation of various phases of Fe-Si structures formed in Si by low energy Fe ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Reinert, Tilo; McDaniel, Floyd D.; Rout, Bibhudutta

    2015-12-01

    The compositional phases of ion beam synthesized Fe-Si structures at two high fluences (0.50 × 1017 atoms/cm2 and 2.16 × 1017 atoms/cm2) were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The distribution of Fe implanted in Si was simulated using a dynamic simulation code (TRIDYN) incorporating target sputtering effects. The Fe depth profiles in the Si matrix were confirmed with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and XPS depth profiling using Ar-ion etching. Based on XPS binding energy shift and spectral asymmetry, the distribution of stable Fe-Si phases in the substrate was analyzed as a function of depth. Results indicate Fe implantation with a fluence of 0.50 × 1017 atoms/cm2 and subsequent thermal annealing produce mainly the β-FeSi2 phase in the whole thickness of the implanted region. But for the samples with a higher fluence Fe implantation, multiple phases are formed. Significant amount of Fe3Si phase are found at depth intervals of 14 nm and 28 nm from the surface. Initially, as-implanted samples show amorphous Fe3Si formation and further thermal annealing at 500 °C for 60 min formed crystalline Fe3Si structures at the same depth intervals. In addition, thermal annealing at 800 °C for 60 min restructures the Fe3Si clusters to form FeSi2 and FeSi phases.

  15. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    SciTech Connect

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombination when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.

  16. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombinationmore » when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.« less

  17. Optimization of a Low Noise Detection Circuit for Probing the Structure of Damage Cascades with IBIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombination when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He+ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.

  18. Local Arsenic Structure in Shallow Implants in Si following SPER: an EXAFS and MEIS study

    SciTech Connect

    Pepponi, G.; Giubertoni, D.; Gennaro, S.; Bersani, M.; Anderle, M.; Grisenti, R.; Werner, M.; Berg, J. A. van den

    2006-11-13

    Solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPER) has been investigated in the last few years as a possible method to form ultra shallow dopant distributions in silicon with a high level of electrical. Despite the interest for this process, few investigations were related to arsenic. Apart from the fact that it is easier to form shallow distribution with arsenic than with boron, it is also well known that at the moderate temperatures implied by SPER (500-700 deg. C) arsenic easily deactivates, probably by forming inactive clusters around point defects in silicon. In order to have a better understanding of the SPER process for arsenic implanted silicon in shallow regime, an EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) and MEIS (medium energy ion scattering) study is reported in this paper. Silicon samples were implanted at 3 keV with arsenic ions (dose was 2E15 at/cm2 producing a 11 nm amorphous layer) and then annealed in nitrogen at temperatures ranging from 500 to 700 deg. C to have different levels of recrystallisation. From the comparison of the recrystallised fraction as measured by MEIS with the electrical activation measured by Hall effect it results evident that a full regrowth of the lattice is not reflected by a high electrical activation. The activated arsenic corresponds to less than one third of the apparently substitutional dopant for all the samples analyzed. This lack of activation was further investigated by EXAFS: the samples that according to MEIS are fully recrystallised do not reveal a clear local order around As atoms suggesting that either the As atoms are not yet completely relocated within the lattice sites or a deactivation occurred resulting in a more disordered local structure.

  19. Characterization of porous glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implant structures: porosity and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Soininmäki, Anne; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo V J; Peltola, Matti; Aro, Hannu T; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the microstructure and mechanical properties of porous fiber-reinforced composites (FRC). Implants made of the FRC structures are intended for cranial applications. The FRC specimens were prepared by impregnating E-glass fiber sheet with non-resorbable bifunctional bis-phenyl glycidyl dimethacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate resin matrix. Four groups of porous FRC specimens were prepared with a different amount of resin matrix. Control group contained specimens of fibers, which were bound together with sizing only. Microstructure of the specimens was analyzed using a micro computed tomography (micro-CT) based method. Mechanical properties of the specimens were measured with a tensile test. The amount of resin matrix in the specimens had an effect on the microstructure. Total porosity was 59.5 % (median) in the group with the lowest resin content and 11.2 % (median) in the group with the highest resin content. In control group, total porosity was 94.2 % (median). Correlations with resin content were obtained for all micro-CT based parameters except TbPf. The tensile strength of the composites was 21.3 MPa (median) in the group with the highest resin content and 43.4 MPa (median) in the group with the highest resin content. The tensile strength in control group was 18.9 MPa (median). There were strong correlations between the tensile strength of the specimens and most of the micro-CT based parameters. This experiment suggests that porous FRC structures may have the potential for use in implants for cranial bone reconstructions, provided further relevant in vitro and in vivo tests are performed. PMID:23929214

  20. Impact detection on airborne multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noharet, Bertrand; Chazelas, Jean; Bonniau, Philippe; Lecuellet, Jerome; Turpin, Marc J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper reviews the progress of an ongoing research program at Thomson-CSF and Bertin & Cie which addresses an optical fiber system dedicated to the assessment of impact induced damages on airborne multilayered structures. The method is based on the use of embedded high birefringence optical fiber sensors and distributed white light interfero-polarimetry. The first part is devoted to the transduction process efficiency within optical fibers depending on the applied force intensity, direction versus the fiber eigen axes and the interaction length. To understand the behavior of these optical fibers and calibrate the detection system, experiments have been conducted on elliptical core fibers, `bow-tie' fibers and side-hole fibers and showed a wide range of available sensitivities. The second step is related to the inclusion of optical fibers in a sandwich structure representative of an airborne dome, and composed of foam between glass/epoxy composite skins. Different designs of grooves in the foam and tube sheathings have been investigated to support and protect the optical fiber. Impacts have been performed on the structure in the 1 to 10 Joules energy range. Experimental impact location and energy measurements have been achieved for a variety of stress fields.

  1. Structural modifications of alumina implanted with zirconium, copper, and titanium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigarré, J.; Fayeulle, S.; Tréheux, D.; Moncoffre, N.

    1997-10-01

    Microstructural modifications (amorphization, lattice deformation, phase transformations) in alumina induced by implantation of zirconium, copper, or titanium ions and by postimplantation thermal annealings were studied using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. It was shown that the amount of lattice deformation and the type of damage resulting in the lattice depend on the ion implanted. When zirconium was implanted, the alumina lattice was highly deformed. Amorphization was observed when a high ion dose was implanted. Copper implantation led to the formation of gamma alumina. With titanium ions, very high strain was created and delta alumina was formed. After postimplantation annealings, lattices returned to their equilibrium state through crystallization of alpha alumina and precipitation of oxides of the implanted species (ZrO2, CuO and CuAl2O4, and TiO2).

  2. Electrical and structural analysis of high-dose Si implantation in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Tan, H.H.; Williams, J.S.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D.J.; Pearton, S.J.; Crawford, M.H.; Karlicek, R.F. , Jr.

    1997-05-01

    For the development of ion implantation processes for GaN to advanced devices, it is important to understand the dose dependence of impurity activation along with implantation-induced damage generation and removal. We find that Si implantation in GaN can achieve 50{percent} activation at a dose of 1{times}10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}2}, despite significant residual damage after the 1100{degree}C activation anneal. The possibility that the generated free carriers are due to implantation damage alone and not Si-donor activation is ruled out by comparing the Si results to those for implantation of the neutral species Ar. Ion channeling and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize the implantation-induced damage both as implanted and after a 1100{degree}C anneal. Both techniques confirm that significant damage remains after the anneal, which suggests that activation of implanted Si donors in GaN doses not require complete damage removal. However, an improved annealing process may be needed to further optimize the transport properties of implanted regions in GaN. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Structural-phase changes in Al6061-T6 alloy during high-dose N-2(+) implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukieh, M.

    2004-02-01

    N 2 + nitrogen ions with an energy of 50 keV were implanted into Al6061-T6 alloy with high dose (10(16) - 2 x 10(17) ions/cm(2)) at room temperature in order to form thin aluminium nitride (AlN) layers. The structural-phase changes in implanted Al 6061-T6 alloy were investigated using Rutherford back-scattering and transmission electron microscopic techniques. The results indicate that nitrogen implantation led to the formation of nitride phases (AlN, Al7N C-3(3)) which improved the surface hardness by 80% and increased the electrical resistance up to 1800% at maximum dose (2 x 10(17) ions/cm(2)).

  4. Structural, optical, and magnetic properties of highly-resistive Sm-implanted GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Fang-Yuh Huang, Cheng-De; Chou, Kai-Chieh; Guo, Jhong-Yu; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chia, Chi-Ta; Ney, Verena; Ney, Andreas; Shvarkov, Stepan; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Chern, Ming-Yau; Massies, Jean

    2014-07-28

    Samarium ions of 200 keV in energy were implanted into highly-resistive molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaN thin films with a focused-ion-beam implanter at room temperature. The implantation doses range from 1 × 10{sup 14} to 1 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}. Structural properties studied by x-ray diffraction and Raman-scattering spectroscopy revealed Sm incorporation into GaN matrix without secondary phase. The optical measurements showed that the band gap and optical constants changed very slightly by the implantation. Photoluminescence measurements showed emission spectra similar to p-type GaN for all samples. Magnetic investigations with a superconducting quantum interference device identified magnetic ordering for Sm dose of and above 1 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} before thermal annealing, while ferromagnetism was only observed after thermal annealing from the sample with highest Sm dose. The long-range magnetic ordering can be attributed to interaction of Sm ions through the implantation-induced Ga vacancy.

  5. Lagrangian based methods for coherent structure detection

    SciTech Connect

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-09-15

    There has been a proliferation in the development of Lagrangian analytical methods for detecting coherent structures in fluid flow transport, yielding a variety of qualitatively different approaches. We present a review of four approaches and demonstrate the utility of these methods via their application to the same sample analytic model, the canonical double-gyre flow, highlighting the pros and cons of each approach. Two of the methods, the geometric and probabilistic approaches, are well established and require velocity field data over the time interval of interest to identify particularly important material lines and surfaces, and influential regions, respectively. The other two approaches, implementing tools from cluster and braid theory, seek coherent structures based on limited trajectory data, attempting to partition the flow transport into distinct regions. All four of these approaches share the common trait that they are objective methods, meaning that their results do not depend on the frame of reference used. For each method, we also present a number of example applications ranging from blood flow and chemical reactions to ocean and atmospheric flows.

  6. Lagrangian based methods for coherent structure detection.

    PubMed

    Allshouse, Michael R; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    There has been a proliferation in the development of Lagrangian analytical methods for detecting coherent structures in fluid flow transport, yielding a variety of qualitatively different approaches. We present a review of four approaches and demonstrate the utility of these methods via their application to the same sample analytic model, the canonical double-gyre flow, highlighting the pros and cons of each approach. Two of the methods, the geometric and probabilistic approaches, are well established and require velocity field data over the time interval of interest to identify particularly important material lines and surfaces, and influential regions, respectively. The other two approaches, implementing tools from cluster and braid theory, seek coherent structures based on limited trajectory data, attempting to partition the flow transport into distinct regions. All four of these approaches share the common trait that they are objective methods, meaning that their results do not depend on the frame of reference used. For each method, we also present a number of example applications ranging from blood flow and chemical reactions to ocean and atmospheric flows. PMID:26428570

  7. Detecting slab structure beneath the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Sun, Daoyuan; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    The presence of subducted slabs in the Mediterranean has been well documented with seismic tomography, however, these images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, underestimate the sharpness of the structures. The position and extent of the slabs and the presence possible tears or gaps in the subducted lithosphere are still debated, yet the shape and location these structures are important for kinematic reconstructions and evolution of the entire subduction zone system. Extensive distribution of broadband seismic instrumentation in the Mediterranean (Italian National Seismic Network in Italy and the NSF-PICASSO project in Spain and Morocco) has allowed us to use alternative methodologies to detect the position of the slabs and slab tears beneath the Central and Western Mediterranean. Using S receiver functions we are able to identify S-to-p conversions from the bottom of the subducted slab and a lack of these signals where there are gaps or tears in the slab. We also analyze broadband waveforms for changes in P wave coda from deep (> 300 km depth) local earthquakes. The waveform records for stations in southern Italy and around the Betic-Rif show large amplitude, high frequency (f > 5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after relatively low-frequency onset. High frequency arrivals are the strongest from events whose raypaths travel within the slab to the stations where they are recorded allowing for mapping of where the subducted material is located within the upper mantle. These two methods, along with inferring the slab position from fast P-wave velocity perturbations in tomography and intermediate depth seismicity, provide additional geophysical evidence to aid in interpretation of the complex, segmented slab structure beneath the Mediterranean.

  8. Clinical assessment of spectral modulation detection for adult cochlear implant recipients: A non-language based measure of performance outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, René H.; Hedley-Williams, Andrea; Spahr, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Spectral modulation detection (SMD) provides a psychoacoustic estimate of spectral resolution. The SMD threshold for an implanted ear is highly correlated with speech understanding and is thus a non-linguistic, psychoacoustic index of speech understanding. This measure, however, is time and equipment intensive and thus not practical for clinical use. Thus the purpose of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of a quick SMD task with the following three study aims: (1) to investigate the correlation between the long psychoacoustic, and quick SMD tasks, (2) to determine the test/retest variability of the quick SMD task, and (3) to evaluate the relationship between the quick SMD task and speech understanding. Design This study included a within-subjects, repeated-measures design. Study sample Seventy-six adult cochlear implant recipients participated. Results The results were as follows: (1) there was a significant correlation between the long psychoacoustic, and quick SMD tasks, (2) the test-retest variability of the quick SMD task was highly significant and, (3) there was a significant positive correlation between the quick SMD task and monosyllabic word recognition. Conclusions The results of this study represent the direct clinical translation of a research-proven task of SMD into a quick, clinically feasible format. PMID:24456178

  9. Comparison of implantation-driven permeation characteristics of fusion reactor structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1986-04-04

    Implantation-driven permeation experiments have been conducted on samples of the ferritic steel HT-9, the austenitic Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) and the vanadium alloy V-15Cr-5Ti using D/sub 3//sup +/ ions under conditions that simulate charge-exchange neutral loading on a fusion reactor first wall. The steels all exhibited an initially intense permeation ''spike'' followed by an exponential decrease to low steady-state values. That spike was not evident in the V-15Cr-5Ti experiments. Steady-state permeation was highest in the vanadium alloy and lowest in the austenitic steel. Though permeation rates in the HT-9 were lower than those in V-15Cr-5Ti, permeation transients were much faster in HT-9 than in other materials tested. Ion-beam sputtering of the surface in the steel experiments resulted in enhanced remission at the front surface, whereas in the vanadium tests, recombination and diffusivity both appeared to diminish as the deuterium concentration rose. This may be due to a phase change in the material. We conclude that for conditions comparable to those of these experiments, tritium retention and loss in first wall structures made of steels will be less than in structures made of V-15Cr-5Ti.

  10. Ultra-structural evaluation of an anodic oxidated titanium dental implant.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Akiyoshi; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nakamura, Mariko; Shirai, Hajime; Matsumoto, Takuya; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Anodic oxidation is used for the surface treatment of commercial implants to improve their functional properties for clinical success. Here we conducted ultrastructural and chemical investigations into the micro- and nanostructure of the anodic oxide film of a titanium implant. The anodic oxidized layer of a Ti6Al4V alloy implant was examined ultrastructurally by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). They were also analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TEM revealed that the oxide layer of the Ti6Al4V implant prepared through anodic oxidation was separated into two layers. Al and V were not present on the top surface of the anodic oxide. This can be attributed to the biocompatibility of the anodic oxidized Ti6Al4V alloy implant, because the release of harmful metal ions such as Al and V can be suppressed by the biocompatibility. PMID:25483382

  11. Damage Detection in Electrically Conductive Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Todd A.

    2002-12-01

    High-technology systems are in need of structures that perform with increased functionality and a reduction in weight, while simultaneously maintaining a high level of performance and reliability. To accomplish this, structural elements must be designed more efficiently and with increased functionality, thereby creating multifunctional structures (MFS). Through the addition of carbon fibers, nanotubes, or particles, composite structures can be made electrically conductive while simultaneously increasing their strength and stiffness to weight ratios. Using the electrical properties of these structures for the purpose of damage detection and location for health and usage monitoring is of particular interest for aerospace structures. One such method for doing this is Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). With EIT, an electric current is applied through a pair of electrodes and the electric potential is recorded at other monitoring electrodes around the area of study. An inverse solution of the governing Maxwell equations is then required to determine the conductivities of discrete areas within the region of interest. However, this method is nearly ill-posed and computationally intensive as it focuses on imaging small changes in conductivity within the region of interest. For locating damage in a medium with an otherwise homogeneous conductivity, an alternative approach is to search for parameters such as the damage location and size. Towards those ends, this study develops an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to determine the state of an electrically conductive region based on applied reference current and electrical potentials at electrodes around the periphery of the region. A significant benefit of the ANN approach is that once trained, the solution of an inverse problem does not require costly computations of the inverse problem. This method also takes advantage of the pattern recognition abilities of neural networks and is a robust solution method in the presence

  12. Subclinical tonic-clonic epileptic seizure detected by an implantable loop recorder.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Ritsuko; Abe, Haruhiko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tamura, Masahito; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Otsuji, Yutaka; Benditt, David G

    2013-01-01

    A 73-year old man received an implantable loop recorder (ILR) for the evaluation of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) spells. His medical history was without any epileptic convulsions or automatism. ILR recording during a spontaneous episode revealed the presence of a regular, narrow QRS complex tachycardia associated with low-amplitude, high-frequency, continuous or discontinuous artifacts, consistent with myopotentials. During the event, the regular, low-amplitude continuous signals gradually became discontinuous, with a prolongation of the inter-signal cycle length, until their disappearance after manual activation of the ILR. The patient was diagnosed as experiencing subclinical tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. Antiepileptic drug treatment was initiated, and the patient has remained free of TLOC symptoms during 13 months follow-up. PMID:24097218

  13. The Effect of Thermal Annealing on Structural-phase Changes in the Ni-Ti Alloy Implanted with Krypton Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltavtseva, V. P.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Ghyngazov, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of thermal annealing within the temperature range 100-300°C on the structural-phase state of a Ni-Ti alloy with shape memory effect (SME) implanted with 84Kr ions at the energies E = 280 keV and 1.75 MeV/nucl and the fluences within 5·1012-1·1020 ion/m2 is investigated. For the samples modified by 84Kr ions at E = 1.75 MeV/nucl up to the fluences 1·1020 and 5·1012 ion/m2, the formation of a martensitic NiTi phase with the B19 ' structure, responsible for the SME, is revealed at the annealing temperatures 100 and 300°C, respectively, in the near-surface region corresponding to the outrange area. This is accompanied by the formation of nanosized NiTi particles in the R-phase. As the implantation fluence increases, the probability of their formation decreases. It is shown that annealing of the implanted structures can increase the strength of the Ni-Ti alloy. The degree of hardening is determined by the value of annealing temperature, and an increase in strength is primarily due to ordering of the radiation-induced defect structures (phases). A correlation between the onset temperature of a forward martensitic transition and the structural-phase state of the thermally annealed Ni-Ti alloy is established.

  14. Hydrogen ion-implantation induced low resistive layer in KNbO3 bulk single crystal: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkawa, A.; Shibasaki, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Tanuma, C.; Kuriyama, K.

    2016-03-01

    Origins of low resistivity in H-ion implanted KNbO3 bulk single crystals are studied by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak ion fluence: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into KNbO3 is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The sheet resistance decreases from ∼108 Ω/□ for an un-implanted KNbO3 sample to 2.33 × 105 Ω/□ for as-implanted, 2.29 × 105 Ω/□ for 100 °C annealed, and 4.25 × 105 Ω/□ for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively. The ERDA experiment using the 1.5 MeV-4He+ beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to around 60 nm. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 1.5 MeV helium beam is 5.1 × 1014 cm-2 for un-implanted KNbO3 sample, 5.6 × 1014 cm-2 for as-implanted, 3.4 × 1014 cm-2 for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively, indicating that a part of hydrogen is diffused out by annealing. The low resistive layer induced in H-ion implanted KNbO3 suggests the existence of a shallow energy level related to the complex defect consisting of hydrogen interstitial and the proton induced defect such as oxygen vacancy.

  15. Hydrogen interstitial in H-ion implanted ZnO bulk single crystals: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaida, T.; Kamioka, K.; Nishimura, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2015-12-01

    The origins of low resistivity in H ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are evaluated by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak concentration: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into ZnO is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The maximum of the concentration of the implanted H estimated by a TRIM simulation is at 3600 nm in depth. The resistivity decreases from ∼103 Ω cm for un implanted ZnO to 6.5 Ω cm for as-implanted, 2.3 × 10-1 Ω cm for 200 °C annealed, and 3.2 × 10-1 Ω cm for 400 °C annealed samples. The ERDA measurements can evaluate the concentration of hydrogens which move to the vicinity of the surface (surface to 300 nm or 100 nm) because of the diffusion by the annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 2.0 MeV helium beam is ∼3.8 × 1013 cm-2 for annealed samples. From EPR measurements, the oxygen vacancy of +charge state (Vo+) is observed in as-implanted samples. The Vo+ related signal (g = 1.96) observed under no illumination disappears after successive illumination with a red LED and appears again with a blue light illumination. The activation energy of as-implanted, 200 °C annealed, and 400 °C annealed samples estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration lies between 29 meV and 23 meV, suggesting the existence of H interstitial as a shallow donor level.

  16. STN area detection using K-NN classifiers for MER recordings in Parkinson patients during neurostimulator implant surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiaffino, L.; Rosado Muñoz, A.; Guerrero Martínez, J.; Francés Villora, J.; Gutiérrez, A.; Martínez Torres, I.; Kohan, y. D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) applies electric pulses into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improving tremor and other symptoms associated to Parkinson’s disease. Accurate STN detection for proper location and implant of the stimulating electrodes is a complex task and surgeons are not always certain about final location. Signals from the STN acquired during DBS surgery are obtained with microelectrodes, having specific characteristics differing from other brain areas. Using supervised learning, a trained model based on previous microelectrode recordings (MER) can be obtained, being able to successfully classify the STN area for new MER signals. The K Nearest Neighbours (K-NN) algorithm has been successfully applied to STN detection. However, the use of the fuzzy form of the K-NN algorithm (KNN-F) has not been reported. This work compares the STN detection algorithm of K-NN and KNN-F. Real MER recordings from eight patients where previously classified by neurophysiologists, defining 15 features. Sensitivity and specificity for the classifiers are obtained, Wilcoxon signed rank non-parametric test is used as statistical hypothesis validation. We conclude that the performance of KNN-F classifier is higher than K-NN with p<0.01 in STN specificity.

  17. Simulation of fracture of the bone implant with the porous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenkov, M. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches to bone defects reconstruction with the use of ceramic materials have been developed recently. Ceramics are identical with bone matrix, provide biomedical compatibility with bone tissue and possess high strength. But with an overall high strength ceramic implants destruct in dynamic mode. The paper presents a study of the effect of the porosity gradient on the destruction of the bone implants under dynamic loading. It is shown that the fracture behavior of the bone implants is changed with increasing levels of the gradient of porosity.

  18. Sensitivity of bilateral cochlear implant users to fine-structure and envelope interaural time differencesa

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Victor A.; Eddington, Donald K.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant users have poor sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of high-rate pulse trains, which precludes use of these stimuli to convey fine-structure ITD cues. However, previous reports of single-neuron recordings in cats demonstrated good ITD sensitivity to 1000 pulses-per-second (pps) pulses when the pulses were sinusoidally amplitude modulated. The ability of modulation to restore ITD sensitivity to high-rate pulses in humans was tested by measuring ITD thresholds for three conditions: ITD encoded in the modulated carrier pulses alone, in the envelope alone, and in the whole waveform. Five of six subjects were not sensitive to ITD in the 1000-pps carrier, even with modulation. One subject's 1000-pps carrier ITD sensitivity did significantly improve due to modulation. Sensitivity to ITD encoded in the envelope was also measured as a function of modulation frequency, including at frequencies from 4 to 16 Hz where much of the speech envelope's energy and information resides. Sensitivity was best at the modulation frequency of 100 Hz and degraded rapidly outside of a narrow range. These results provide little evidence to support encoding ITD in the carrier of current bilateral processors, and suggest envelope ITD sensitivity is poor for an important segment of the speech modulation spectrum. PMID:23556598

  19. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-01

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the <1 0 0> axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4 × 10-19 m2/s.

  20. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-01

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state suggests that there are preferred Si <100> interstitial splits. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8±0.4×10e-19 m2/sec.

  1. Chemical and structural analysis of the bone-implant interface by TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM: Experimental study in animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Anders; Emanuelsson, Lena; Sjövall, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Although bone-anchored implants are widely used in reconstructive medicine, the mechanism of osseointegration is still not fully understood. Novel analytical tools are needed to further understand this process, where both the chemical and structural aspects of the bone-implant interface are important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of combining time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) with optical (LM), scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for studying the bone-implant interface of bone-anchored implants. Laser-modified titanium implants with surrounded bone retrieved after 8 weeks healing in rabbit were dehydrated and resin embedded. Three types of sample preparation were studied to evaluate the information gained by combining TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM. The results show that imaging TOF-SIMS can provide detailed chemical information, which in combination with structural information from microscopy methods provide a more complete characterization of anatomical structures at the bone-implant interface. By investigating various sample preparation techniques, it is shown that grinded cross section samples can be used for chemical imaging using TOF-SIMS, if careful consideration of potential preparation artifacts is taken into account. TOF-SIMS analysis of FIB-prepared bone/implant cross section samples show distinct areas corresponding to bone tissue and implant with a sharp interface, although without chemical information about the organic components.

  2. A Brief Survey of β-Detected NMR of Implanted 8Li+ in Organic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, F. H.; McKenzie, I.; Buck, T.; Daley, C. R.; Forrest, J. A.; Harada, M.; Kiefl, R. F.; Levy, C. D. P.; Morris, G. D.; Pearson, M. R.; Sugiyama, J.; Wang, D.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Unlike the positive muon, we expect the chemistry of the implanted 8Li+β-NMR probe in organic polymers to be simply that of the monovalent ion, but almost nothing is known about the NMR of isolated Li+ in this context. Here, we present a brief survey of 8Li+β-NMR in a variety of insulating polymers at high magnetic field, including polyimide, PET, polycarbonate, polystyrene and polyethylene oxide. In all cases, we find a large-amplitude, broad Lorentzian resonance near the Larmor frequency, consistent with the expected diamagnetic charge state. We also find remarkably fast spin-lattice relaxation rates 1/T1. There is very little dependence of either linewidth or 1/T1 on the proton density, the main source of nuclear dipolar magnetic fields, leading us to conclude the main contribution to both broadening and spin relaxation at room temperature is quadrupolar in origin. This behaviour is very different from crystalline insulators such as MgO and Al2O3, and suggests that 8Li+β-NMR will be an important probe of polymer dynamics. Additionally, we note dramatically different behaviour of one sample above its glass transition, motivating the construction of a high temperature spectrometer to enable further exploration at elevated temperature.

  3. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  4. Structural and optical properties of Mn-doped CdS thin films prepared by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chandramohan, S.; Tripathi, J. K.; Sarangi, S. N.; Som, T.; Kanjilal, A.; Sathyamoorthy, R.

    2009-06-15

    We report on structural and optical properties of Mn-doped CdS thin films prepared by 190 keV Mn-ion implantation at different temperatures. Mn-ion implantation in the fluence range of 1x10{sup 13}-1x10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} does not lead to the formation of any secondary phase. However, it induces structural disorder, causing a decrease in the optical band gap. This is addressed on the basis of band tailing due to creation of localized energy states and Urbach energy calculations. Mn-doped samples exhibit a new band in their photoluminescence spectra at 2.22 eV, which originates from the d-d({sup 4}T{sub 1}->{sup 6}A{sub 1}) transition of tetrahedrally coordinated Mn{sup 2+} ions.

  5. Structural phase states in nickel-titanium surface layers doped with silicon by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, Oleg A.; Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.; Krukovsky, Konstantin V.; Ostapenko, Marina G.; Neiman, Alexey A.; Borisov, Dmitry P.

    2015-10-01

    The paper reports on a study of NiTi-based alloys used for manufacturing self-expanding intravascular stents to elucidate how the technological modes of plasma immersion ion implantation with silicon influence the chemical and phase composition of their surface layers. It is shown that two types of surface structure can be obtained depending on the mode of plasma immersion implantation: quasi-amorphous Si coating and Si-doped surface layer. The Si-doped surface layer contains new phases: a phase structured as the main B2 phase of NiTi but with a lower lattice parameter, R phase, and phase of highly dispersed SiO2 precipitates.

  6. Animal Models for Evaluation of Bone Implants and Devices: Comparative Bone Structure and Common Model Uses.

    PubMed

    Wancket, L M

    2015-09-01

    Bone implants and devices are a rapidly growing field within biomedical research, and implants have the potential to significantly improve human and animal health. Animal models play a key role in initial product development and are important components of nonclinical data included in applications for regulatory approval. Pathologists are increasingly being asked to evaluate these models at the initial developmental and nonclinical biocompatibility testing stages, and it is important to understand the relative merits and deficiencies of various species when evaluating a new material or device. This article summarizes characteristics of the most commonly used species in studies of bone implant materials, including detailed information about the relevance of a particular model to human bone physiology and pathology. Species reviewed include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, sheep, goats, and nonhuman primates. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and limitations of different model species will aid in rigorously evaluating a novel bone implant material or device. PMID:26163303

  7. Structural, mechanical and optical properties of nitrogen-implanted titanium at different pulse frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaif, Mohamed; Mohamed, Sodky H.; Abd El-Rahman, Ahmed M.; Kolitsch, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Plasma-immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a potent method to obtain hard and wear-resistant surface on Ti by nitrogen implantation. This presentation is one part of a sequence of experiments to optimize the microstructure and physical properties of TiN through adapting the plasma-processing parameters. In this work, nitrogen ions were implanted into samples of pure Ti at different nitrogen pulse frequency without using any external source of heating. The nitrogen-implanted surfaces were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), optical microscope, nano-indentation technique, ball-on-disk type tribometer, surface profilemeter, Tafel polarization technique for corrosion performance and ellipsometry. The outcomes show that, nitrogen PIII is an effectual method for nitriding titanium and nitrogen pulse frequency affected the microstructure and physical properties of the treated Ti. X-ray diffraction depicted the formation of α-Ti (N) and the cubic TiN after implanting titanium by nitrogen and the thickness of the nitrided layer increased as the nitrogen pulse frequency increased. The wear and corrosion resistance of the nitrogen-implanted titanium are improved and the friction coefficient decreased from nearly 0.8 for the un-implanted titanium to 0.3 for the implanted titanium, this ascribed to the formation of the titanium nitrided phases. Ellipsometric measurements were carried out on the PIII titanium samples at different nitrogen pulse frequency. The ellipsometric measurements show that, the thickness of the nitrided layer and surface roughness increased while the refractive index decreased with increasing nitrogen pulse frequency.

  8. Investigating the structure and biocompatibility of niobium and titanium oxides as coatings for orthopedic metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, D; Wren, A W; Misture, S T; Mellott, N P

    2016-01-01

    Applying sol gel based coatings to orthopedic metallic implant materials can significantly improve their properties and lifespan in vivo. For this work, niobium (Nb2O5) and titanium (TiO2) oxides were prepared via solution processing in order to determine the effect of atomic arrangement (amorphous/crystalline) on bioactivity. Thermal evaluation on the synthesized materials identified an endotherm for Nb2O5 at 75 °C with 40% weight loss below 400 °C, and minimal weight loss between 400 and 850 °C. Regarding TiO2 an endotherm was present at 92 °C with 25% weight loss below 400 °C, and 4% between 400 and 850 °C. Phase evolution was determined using High Temperature X-ray Diffraction (HT-XRD) where amorphous-Nb2O5 (450 °C), hexagonal-Nb2O5 (525 °C), orthorhombic-Nb2O5 (650 °C), amorphous-TiO2 (275 °C) and tetragonal TiO2 (500 °C) structures were produced. Simulated body fluid (SBF) testing was conducted over 1, 7 and 30 days and resulted in positive chemical and morphological changes for crystalline Nb2O5 (525 °C) and TiO2 (500 °C) after 30 days of incubation. Rod-like CaP deposits were observed on the surfaces using Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Grazing Incidence-X-ray Diffraction (GI-XRD) shows that the deposits were X-ray amorphous. Cell viability was higher with the TiO2 (122%) samples when compared to the growing cell population while Nb2O5 samples exhibited a range of viability (64-105%), partially dependent on materials atomic structure. PMID:26478387

  9. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Study on the Biomechanical Simulation of Various Structured Dental Implants and Their Surrounding Bone Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Hai; Chen, Xianshuai; Wang, Weijun; Chen, Jianyu; Liang, Jimin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. This three-dimensional finite element study observed the stress distribution characteristics of 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues with various structured abutments, implant threads, and healing methods under different amounts of concentrated loading. Materials and Methods. A three-dimensional geometrical model of a dental implant and its surrounding bone tissue was created; the model simulated a screw applied with a preload of 200 N or a torque of 0.2 N·m and a prosthetic crown applied with a vertical or an inclined force of 100 N. The Von Mises stress was evaluated on the 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues. Results. Under the same loading force, the stress influence on the implant threads was not significant; however, the stress influence on the cancellous bone was obvious. The stress applied to the abutment, cortical bone, and cancellous bone by the inclined force applied to the crown was larger than the stress applied by the vertical force to the crown, and the abutment stress of the nonsubmerged healing implant system was higher than that of the submerged healing implant system. Conclusion. A dental implant system characterised by a straight abutment, rectangle tooth, and nonsubmerged healing may provide minimum value for the implant-bone interface. PMID:26904121

  10. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Study on the Biomechanical Simulation of Various Structured Dental Implants and Their Surrounding Bone Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Hai; Chen, Xianshuai; Wang, Weijun; Chen, Jianyu; Liang, Jimin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. This three-dimensional finite element study observed the stress distribution characteristics of 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues with various structured abutments, implant threads, and healing methods under different amounts of concentrated loading. Materials and Methods. A three-dimensional geometrical model of a dental implant and its surrounding bone tissue was created; the model simulated a screw applied with a preload of 200 N or a torque of 0.2 N·m and a prosthetic crown applied with a vertical or an inclined force of 100 N. The Von Mises stress was evaluated on the 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues. Results. Under the same loading force, the stress influence on the implant threads was not significant; however, the stress influence on the cancellous bone was obvious. The stress applied to the abutment, cortical bone, and cancellous bone by the inclined force applied to the crown was larger than the stress applied by the vertical force to the crown, and the abutment stress of the nonsubmerged healing implant system was higher than that of the submerged healing implant system. Conclusion. A dental implant system characterised by a straight abutment, rectangle tooth, and nonsubmerged healing may provide minimum value for the implant-bone interface. PMID:26904121

  11. A study of silicon-on-insulator structures formed by heavy-dose nitrogen implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Polchlopek, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon substrates were implanted with heavy doses of high-energy nitrogen. After implantation, the substrates underwent high-temperature annealing. The resulting substrates were studied in an effort to determine the processing parameters necessary to create the optimum-buried silicon nitride insulating layer. Atomic concentration depth profiles were obtained with the use of Auger Electron Spectroscopy. The van der Pauw technique was used to determine carrier Hall mobility, dopant activation, and sheet resistivity in the top layer. Buried-layer leakage was studied using both electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) analysis and direct front-to-back current-voltage measurements. Implant parameters studied include dose, temperature, and energy. Annealing conditions studied include time and temperature. Samples implanted with lower doses of nitrogen (dose < 1.4 {times} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2}) possess very leaky buried layers. Higher-dose implants (dose = 1.4 {times} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2} or greater) produce substrates with good-quality buried dielectrics. It is discovered that very-high-dose nitrogen implantation is necessary to produce good-quality buried insulators.

  12. Percutaneous Implants with Porous Titanium Dermal Barriers: An In Vivo Evaluation of Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Isackson, Dorthyann; McGill, Lawrence D.; Bachus, Kent N.

    2010-01-01

    Osseointegrated percutaneous implants are a promising prosthetic alternative for a subset of amputees. However, as with all percutaneous implants, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Theoretically, host tissues could attach to the metal implant creating a barrier to infection. When compared with smooth surfaces, it is hypothesized that porous surfaces improve the attachment of the host tissues to the implant, and decrease the infection risk. In this study, 4 titanium implants, manufactured with a percutaneous post and a subcutaneous disk, were placed subcutaneously on the dorsum of eight New Zealand White rabbits. Beginning at four weeks post-op, the implants were inoculated weekly with 108 CFU Staphylococcus aureus until signs of clinical infection presented. While we were unable to detect a difference in the incidence of infection of the porous metal implants, smooth surface (no porous coating) percutaneous and subcutaneous components had a 7-fold increased risk of infection compared to the implants with a porous coating on one or both components. The porous coated implants displayed excellent tissue ingrowth into the porous structures; whereas, the smooth implants were surrounded with a thick, organized fibrotic capsule that was separated from the implant surface. This study suggests that porous coated metal percutaneous implants are at a significantly lower risk of infection when compared to smooth metal implants. The smooth surface percutaneous implants were inadequate in allowing a long-term seal to develop with the soft tissue, thus increasing vulnerability to the migration of infecting microorganisms. PMID:21145778

  13. Benefits of preserving stationary and time-varying formant structure in alternative representations of speech: Implications for cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Nittrouer, Susan; Lowenstein, Joanna H.; Wucinich, Taylor; Tarr, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants have improved speech recognition for deaf individuals, but further modifications are required before performance will match that of normal-hearing listeners. In this study, the hypotheses were tested that (1) implant processing would benefit from efforts to preserve the structure of the low-frequency formants and (2) time-varying aspects of that structure would be especially beneficial. Using noise-vocoded and sine-wave stimuli with normal-hearing listeners, two experiments examined placing boundaries between static spectral channels to optimize representation of the first two formants and preserving time-varying formant structure. Another hypothesis tested in this study was that children might benefit more than adults from strategies that preserve formant structure, especially time-varying structure. Sixty listeners provided data to each experiment: 20 adults and 20 children at each of 5 and 7 years old. Materials were consonant-vowel-consonant words, four-word syntactically correct, meaningless sentences, and five-word syntactically correct, meaningful sentences. Results showed that listeners of all ages benefited from having channel boundaries placed to optimize information about the first two formants, and benefited even more from having time-varying structure. Children showed greater gains than adults only for time-varying formant structure. Results suggest that efforts would be well spent trying to design processing strategies that preserve formant structure. PMID:25324085

  14. Benefits of preserving stationary and time-varying formant structure in alternative representations of speech: implications for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Nittrouer, Susan; Lowenstein, Joanna H; Wucinich, Taylor; Tarr, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Cochlear implants have improved speech recognition for deaf individuals, but further modifications are required before performance will match that of normal-hearing listeners. In this study, the hypotheses were tested that (1) implant processing would benefit from efforts to preserve the structure of the low-frequency formants and (2) time-varying aspects of that structure would be especially beneficial. Using noise-vocoded and sine-wave stimuli with normal-hearing listeners, two experiments examined placing boundaries between static spectral channels to optimize representation of the first two formants and preserving time-varying formant structure. Another hypothesis tested in this study was that children might benefit more than adults from strategies that preserve formant structure, especially time-varying structure. Sixty listeners provided data to each experiment: 20 adults and 20 children at each of 5 and 7 years old. Materials were consonant-vowel-consonant words, four-word syntactically correct, meaningless sentences, and five-word syntactically correct, meaningful sentences. Results showed that listeners of all ages benefited from having channel boundaries placed to optimize information about the first two formants, and benefited even more from having time-varying structure. Children showed greater gains than adults only for time-varying formant structure. Results suggest that efforts would be well spent trying to design processing strategies that preserve formant structure. PMID:25324085

  15. Sonication of Explanted Cardiac Implants Improves Microbial Detection in Cardiac Device Infections

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Alessandra; Nguyen, Bich Lien; Mascellino, Maria T.; D'Abramo, Alessandra; Iannetta, Marco; Ciccaglioni, Antonio; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The sonication technique has been shown to be a promising tool for microbiological diagnosis of device-related infections. We evaluated the usefulness of the sonication method for pathogen detection in 80 explanted cardiac components collected from 40 patients, and the results were compared with those of conventional cultures. Forty subjects undergoing cardiac device removal were studied: 20 had cardiac device infection, and 20 subjects underwent elective generator replacement or revision in the absence of infection. Sonication of explanted devices was more sensitive than traditional culture for microbial detection (67% and 50%, respectively; P = 0.0005). The bacterial count detected in sonication fluid culture was significantly higher than that detected in traditional culture in both infected (P = 0.019) and uninfected (P = 0.029) devices. In the infected patients, sonication fluid culture yielded a significantly higher rate of pathogen detection in explanted electrodes than traditional culture (65% versus 45%; P = 0.02), while no differences were found in the generators. Ten strains were detected only through sonication fluid culture: 6 Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, 1 Staphylococcus hominis strain, 2 Corynebacterium striatum strains, and 1 Brevundimonas sp. Neither the type nor the duration of antimicrobial therapy before device removal had an effect on the diagnostic performance of sonication fluid culture (P = 0.75 and P = 0.56, respectively). In the patients without infection, sonication fluid culture was positive in 8 cases (40%), whereas conventional culture was positive in only 4 (20%). In summary, the sonication technique improves the microbiological diagnosis of explanted cardiac devices. PMID:23196364

  16. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer. PMID:27413269

  17. Effect of retention design of artificial teeth and implant-supported titanium CAD-CAM structures on fracture resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ladetzki, Kristin; Mateos-Palacios, Rocío; Pascual-Moscardó, Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Background For implant-supported hybrid prostheses, high mastication forces and reduced acrylic resin thickness over a metal substructure often cause failures arising from tooth or resin fractures. To assay fracture resistance of artificial teeth and resin in implant-supported hybrid prostheses in relation to the titanium structure and retention design supporting teeth. Material and Methods 40 specimens bearing incisors were divided into four groups according to the titanium structure supporting the teeth and the type of load force applied: Group I (Control; n=10): Application of static loading to ten incisors set over a metal structure with internal retention. Group II (Control; n=10): Application of static loading to ten incisors set over a metal structure with external retention. The remaining study specimens (n=20) were subjected to 120,000 masticatory and thermal cycles in a chewing simulator. Afterwards, static loading was applied until the point of fracture using an Instron machine. Group III (Study; n=10): Application of dynamic and static loading to ten incisors set over a metal structure with internal retention. Group IV (Study; n=10): Application of dynamic and static loading to ten incisors set over a metal structure with external retention. Data obtained for the four groups was analyzed and compared, determining the type of fracture (cohesive or adhesive) using a reflected light microscope. Results Statistical analysis confirmed that there were significant differences in fracture resistance between the four groups. External retention was found to have more fracture resistance than the internal retention. Conclusions Hybrid prostheses with titanium substructures and external retention obtained significantly better results than samples with internal retention. Key words:Chewing simulator, thermocycler, fatigue, implant-supported hybrid prosthesis, acrylic teeth, fracture, metal structure design. PMID:27034748

  18. In Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandagor, Vincent; Cela, Carlos J.; Sanders, Charlene A.; Greenbaum, Elias; Lazzi, Gianluca; Zhou, David D.; Castro, Richard; Gaikwad, Sanjay; Little, Jim

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model "eye," beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  19. Detection of entrapped moisture in honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallmark, W. B.

    1967-01-01

    Thermal neutron moisture detection system detects entrapped moisture in intercellular areas of bonded honeycomb sandwich structures. A radium/beryllium fast neutron source bombards a specimen. The emitted thermal neutrons from the target nucleus are detected and counted by a boron trifluoride thermal neutron detector.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering studies of different damage structures in P/sup +/ implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Sadana, D.K.; Stratham, M.; Washburn, J.; Booker, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and MeV He/sup +/ channelling methods have been used to examine different damage structures present under the color bands visible at the surface of a high-dose-rate P/sup +/ implanted (111) Si implanted to a dose of 7.5 x 10/sup 15/ ions/cm/sup 2/. TEM and channelling results obtained from individual colored regions showed a good qualitative correlation in that discrete damage layers observed in the cross-sectional TEM micrographs appeared as discrete peaks in the channelled spectra. The mean depths of the damage layers obtained from these two methods were in agreement. However, the widths of the deeper lying damage layers calculated from the channelling measurements were always greater than the widths observed by TEM. An empirical method based on subtraction of dechannelling background in the channelling spectra gave damage layer widths that were in close agreement with the TEM results.

  1. Construction of waveguiding structures in potassium lithium tantalate niobate crystals by combined laser ablation and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashar, Ayelet Badichi; Ilan, Harel; Agranat, Aharon J.

    2015-02-01

    A generic methodology for constructing complex integrated electro-optic circuits in waveguided configurations is presented. The method is based on combining two techniques, "laser ablation" and "refractive index engineering by ion implantations." The constructed circuits are side-cladded by air trenches that were produced using laser ablation and bottom-cladded by a layer with a reduced refractive index which is generated through the implantation of He+ ions. This fabrication technique enables the construction of circular structures with complex geometry featuring small radii of curvature, and further can be employed to construct microfluidic channels on the same substrate. The research demonstrates waveguides in both linear and circular configurations that were constructed in a potassium lithium tantalate niobate (KLTN) substrate using the aforementioned method, proving that this substrate is a suitable candidate for use in creating laboratories-on-a-chip with multifunctional capabilities. The proposed techniques used in the research are generic and applicable to a wide range of substrates.

  2. Two-dimensional profiling of large tilt angle, low energy boron implanted structure using secondary-ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, G.A.; Pearson, P.; Gibbons, R.; Dowsett, M.G.; Hill, C.

    1996-01-01

    Experimentally determined two-dimensional dopant maps of implants into semiconductors are required for the calibration and verification of process simulation tools used in very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuit design. Direct measurement with currently available techniques is not possible owing to the physical size of the areas in question. Using a specially fabricated structure and a modified secondary-ion mass spectroscopy instrument, it has been possible to measure profiles with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this article we present the results of an investigation of a complex boron implant into silicon, as used in advanced VLSI {ital P}-type metal{endash}oxide{endash}semiconductor source{endash}drain regions, and compare it with results from process simulators. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  3. Charge accumulation in the buried oxide of SOI structures with the bonded Si/SiO2 interface under γ-irradiation: effect of preliminary ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, O. V.; Fomin, B. I.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of preliminary boron or phosphorous implantation on charge accumulation in the buried oxide of SOI-MOSFETs irradiated with γ-rays in the total dose range (D) of 105-5 × 107 rad. The buried oxide was obtained by high-temperature thermal oxidation of Si, and it was not subjected to any implantation during the fabrication process of SOI structures. It was found that implantation with boron or phosphorous ions, used in fabrication technologies of SOI-MOSFETs, increases the concentration of precursor traps in the buried oxide of SOI structures. Unlike in the case of boron implantation, phosphorous implantation leads to an increased density of states at the Si/buried SiO2 interface during subsequent γ-irradiation. In the γ-irradiated SOI-MOSFETs, the accumulated charge density and the density of surface states in the Si/buried oxide layer systems both vary in proportion to kiln D. The coefficients ki for as-fabricated and ion-implanted Si/buried SiO2 systems were evaluated. From the data obtained, it was concluded that a low density of precursor hole traps was a factor limiting the positive charge accumulation in the buried oxide of as-fabricated (non-implanted) SOI structures with the bonded Si/buried SiO2 interface.

  4. Structured back gates for high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems using oxygen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berl, M.; Tiemann, L.; Dietsche, W.; Karl, H.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a reliable method to obtain patterned back gates compatible with high mobility molecular beam epitaxy via local oxygen ion implantation that suppresses the conductivity of an 80 nm thick silicon doped GaAs epilayer. Our technique was optimized to circumvent several constraints of other gating and implantation methods. The ion-implanted surface remains atomically flat which allows unperturbed epitaxial overgrowth. We demonstrate the practical application of this gating technique by using magneto-transport spectroscopy on a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) with a mobility exceeding 20 × 106 cm2/V s. The back gate was spatially separated from the Ohmic contacts of the 2DES, thus minimizing the probability for electrical shorts or leakage and permitting simple contacting schemes.

  5. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  6. Structural and optical characterization of GaN nanostructures formed by using N+ implantation into GaAs at various temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Gi-Dong; Choi, Han-Woo; Kim, Joon-Kon

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the evolution of GaN phase nanocrystallite formation in a GaAs matrix by using nitrogen-ion implantation and subsequent rapid thermal annealing. A semi-insulating GaAs (100) wafer was implanted with 50-keV nitrogen ions at fluences in the range of 0.5 ˜ 4.0 × 1017 cm-2 at temperatures of room temperature, 500 °C and 700 °C, followed by post-implantation annealing at 500 ˜ 900 °C under a pure nitrogen gas flow. In the case of high-temperature implantation, there were no significant changes in the UV-VIS absorption spectra after high-temperature annealing compared with the spectra of the as-implanted sample. On the other hand, microscopic blistering and/or exfoliation is preferred after post-implantation annealing at high temperatures above 600 °C. As a consequence, low-temperature implantation (<200 °C is recommended in order to keep a morphologically-clean sample surfaces especially at an implantation fluence of 2 × 1017 cm-2 or more. Formation of nanometer-sized GaN crystallites was confirmed by using X-ray diffraction, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the effects of different annealing conditions on the evolution of the structures of the crystallites are described.

  7. The Effect of Study Design Biases on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Silicone Breast Implant Ruptures: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae W.; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Bellfi, Lillian T.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Background All silicone breast implant recipients are recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration to undergo serial screening to detect implant rupture with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the quality of diagnostic accuracy studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture and conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effect of study design biases on the estimation of MRI diagnostic accuracy measures. Method Studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of MRI and ultrasound in evaluating ruptured silicone breast implants were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases. Two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion and extracted data. Study design biases were assessed using the QUADAS tool and the STARDS checklist. Meta-analyses estimated the influence of biases on diagnostic odds ratios. Results Among 1175 identified articles, 21 met the inclusion criteria. Most studies using MRI (n= 10 of 16) and ultrasound (n=10 of 13) examined symptomatic subjects. Meta-analyses revealed that MRI studies evaluating symptomatic subjects had 14-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using an asymptomatic sample (RDOR 13.8; 95% CI 1.83–104.6) and 2-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using a screening sample (RDOR 1.89; 95% CI 0.05–75.7). Conclusion Many of the published studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture are flawed with methodological biases. These methodological shortcomings may result in overestimated MRI diagnostic accuracy measures and should be interpreted with caution when applying the data to a screening population. PMID:21364405

  8. Implantable SERS nanosensors for pre-symptomatic detection of BW agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honggang; Sun, Jian; Alexander, Troy A.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2005-05-01

    The early detection of biological warfare (BW) agents before any symptoms are present is critical for saving lives and reducing cost of therapy. Protein expression in T-cells represents one of the earliest detectable cellular signaling events to occur in response to the exposure to various toxins or BW agents. In order to fully understand a cellular response to a particular BW agent, it is often necessary to monitor the expression of specific proteins. Therefore, we have developed a novel class of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) immuno-nanosensors for the real-time monitoring of protein expression within individual living cells. In this work, we have developed and optimized novel nanosphere-based silver coated SERS nanosensors for the detection of proteins at cellular levels. SERS nanosensors were optimized in terms of nanosphere size, silver coating methods, number of silver layers, antibody binding and affinity. These nanosensors are capable of being inserted into individual cells and non-invasively positioned to the sub-cellular location of interest using optical tweezers. They were constructed from monodisperse silica nanospheres. These nanospheres were condensed from tetraalkoxysilanes in an alcoholic solution of water and ammonia. Accurate control of the silica nanospheres" diameter was achieved by varying the reaction conditions. Nanosphere-based SERS immuno-nanosensors were then prepared by depositing multiple layers of silver on silica spheres, followed by binding of the antibody of interest to the silver. In binding the antibodies, different cross linker agents were characterized and compared. On one end, each of these cross linker agents contained sulfur or isothiocyanate groups which bound to the silver surface, while the other end contained a carboxylic or primary amine group which reacted readily with the antibodies. In order to improve sensitivity of these nanosensors, optimal silver surface coverage with crosslinkers was determined

  9. Thymoma of the left thymic lobe with a contralateral small pleural implant successfully detected with diffusion-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common primary neoplasm of the anterior mediastinum. At diagnosis, up to 40% of patients present with advanced disease. Because advanced thymomas receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, diagnostic imaging is crucial to plan the correct treatment. For characterizing thymomas, CT is the first choice modality, whereas 18F-FDG/PET is reserved for questionable cases and MRI is not routinely employed. Hereby, we describe a case of thymoma with a single contralateral pleural implant in a 30-year-old woman. The small pleural thickening detected at CT was correctly interpreted as pleural seeding related to thymoma at diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI after a negative 18F-FDG/PET scan, and was subsequently confirmed at surgery. Precise diagnosis and accurate preoperative staging are crucial in managing thymic epithelial tumours in order to design the appropriate treatment and improve prognosis. Indeed, when stage IVa for pleural seeding is diagnosed preoperatively, a multimodality approach including primary chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy/chemotherapy is recommended. This is the first report that used DW-MRI for the characterization of pleural seeding in thymoma and demonstrates that DW-MRI could be useful for the correct pre-operatory staging in thymoma patients, especially in cases with indeterminate pleural thickenings at CT, in order to define the correct management. PMID:25702681

  10. Relationship between the surface chemical composition of implants and contact with the substrate.

    PubMed

    Lima da Costa Valente, Mariana; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Marcantonio Junior, Elcio; Reis, Andréa Candido Dos

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to use scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry to assess possible morphologic and chemical changes after performing double-insertion and pullout tests of implants of different shapes and surface treatments. Four different types of implants were used-cylindrical machined-surface implants, cylindrical double-surface-treated porous implants, cylindrical surface-treated porous implants, and tapered surface-treated porous implants-representing a total of 32 screws. The implants were inserted into synthetic bone femurs, totaling 8 samples, before performing each insertion with standardized torque. After each pullout the implants were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry using a universal testing machine and magnified 35 times. No structural changes were detected on morphological surface characterization, only substrate accumulation. As for composition, there were concentration differences in the titanium, oxygen, and carbon elements. Implants with surface acid treatment undergo greater superficial changes in chemical composition than machined implants, that is, the greater the contact area of the implant with the substrate, the greater the oxide layer change. In addition, prior manipulation can alter the chemical composition of implants, typically to a greater degree in surface-treated implants. PMID:23339297

  11. On the Structure of Phoneme Categories in Listeners with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Harlan; Denny, Margaret; Guenther, Frank H.; Hanson, Helen M.; Marrone, Nicole; Matthies, Melanie L.; Perkell, Joseph S.; Stockmann, Ellen; Tiede, Mark; Vick, Jennell; Zandipour, Majid

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe cochlear implant users' phoneme labeling, discrimination, and prototypes for a vowel and a sibilant contrast, and to assess the effects of 1 year's experience with prosthetic hearing. Method: Based on naturally produced clear examples of "boot," "beet," "said," and "shed" by 1 male and 1 female speaker, continua with 13…

  12. Structural and optical properties of rare-earth doped lithium niobate waveguides formed by MeV helium ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Herreros, B.; Lifante, G.; Cusso, F.; Kling, A.; Soares, J.C.; Silva, M.F. da; Townsend, P.D.; Chandler, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Results of investigations of optical waveguides formed by high energy helium implantation into lithium niobate codoped with 5 mol% MgO and 1 mol% Tm{sup 3+} or 1 mol% Er{sup 3+} are reported. A comparative study of structural and luminescence properties between implanted and untreated samples has been performed by means of Rutherford backscattering (RBS) combined with channeling and photoluminescence methods, respectively in order to investigate residual lattice damage and the incorporation of the optical active rare earths. For the case of Tm a full substitutional incorporation of the optical active rare earths. For the case of Tm a full substitutional incorporation on the lithium site and a high crystal quality in both bulk and implanted waveguide material has been found. For Er doped lithium niobate the channeling results show a fraction of Er randomly incorporated or forming precipitates and a deterioration of the waveguide`s lattice. The optical investigations show in both cases only a slight broadening of the emission lines of the rare earths in the waveguides compared to the bulk material.

  13. Production of porous oxide coatings with ultrafine crystalline structure on medical implants fabricated from alloy 12Cr18Ni9Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Igor V.; Fomina, Marina A.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Poshivalova, Elena Yu.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.

    2015-06-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy the crystalline structure of porous oxide coatings produced by air-thermal oxidation of orthopedic implants of alloy 12Cr18Ni9Ti at the temperatures of 350 and 400 °C and duration of 1.5 hours was studied. In vivo tests revealed that the resulting coatings promote successful engraftment of thermally modified implants in the body with highly efficient interaction between morphologically heterogeneous coatings and surrounding bone tissue.

  14. Usefulness of implantable loop recorders in office-based practice for evaluation of syncope in patients with and without structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mason, Pamela K; Wood, Mark A; Reese, Daniel B; Lobban, John H; Mitchell, Mark A; DiMarco, John P

    2003-11-01

    Early use of an implantable loop recorder for evaluating unexplained syncope in an office-based electrophysiology practice is an effective approach in patients with and without structural heart disease. Documentation of rhythm with an implantable loop recorder at the time of symptoms is possible in approximately 50% and 80% of patients in both groups after 1 and 2 years of follow-up, respectively. PMID:14583373

  15. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  16. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection for Surfaces and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Roberson, Luke; Medelius, Pedro; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steen; Snyder, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Current designs for inflatable or semi-rigidized structures for habitats and space applications use a multiple-layer construction, alternating thin layers with thicker, stronger layers, which produces a layered composite structure that is much better at resisting damage. Even though such composite structures or layered systems are robust, they can still be susceptible to penetration damage. The ability to detect damage to surfaces of inflatable or semi-rigid habitat structures is of great interest to NASA. Damage caused by impacts of foreign objects such as micrometeorites can rupture the shell of these structures, causing loss of critical hardware and/or the life of the crew. While not all impacts will have a catastrophic result, it will be very important to identify and locate areas of the exterior shell that have been damaged by impacts so that repairs (or other provisions) can be made to reduce the probability of shell wall rupture. This disclosure describes a system that will provide real-time data regarding the health of the inflatable shell or rigidized structures, and information related to the location and depth of impact damage. The innovation described here is a method of determining the size, location, and direction of damage in a multilayered structure. In the multi-dimensional damage detection system, layers of two-dimensional thin film detection layers are used to form a layered composite, with non-detection layers separating the detection layers. The non-detection layers may be either thicker or thinner than the detection layers. The thin-film damage detection layers are thin films of materials with a conductive grid or striped pattern. The conductive pattern may be applied by several methods, including printing, plating, sputtering, photolithography, and etching, and can include as many detection layers that are necessary for the structure construction or to afford the detection detail level required. The damage is detected using a detector or

  17. Optical and structural characterization of zinc implanted silica under various thermal treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, R.; Chen, J.; Gu, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Zn ion implanted silica with controlled thermal annealing was investigated. Low temperature optical measurements indicate presence of Zn cluster in as-implanted silica. Optical spectra of the annealed sample under a reducing environment suggest Zn cluster and Zn metal colloid formation. The absorption peak at 5.3 eV may be due to surface plasma absorption of Zn metal colloids in silica. Oxidized samples (10 and 6x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}) show an absorption peak at 4.3 and 4.8 eV, respectively, and imply ZnO quantum dot formation. The blueshift in exciton absorption can be attributed to quantum confinement effects.

  18. Structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: detection and scaling.

    PubMed

    Uritsky, V M; Pouquet, A; Rosenberg, D; Mininni, P D; Donovan, E F

    2010-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of statistical properties of turbulent current and vorticity structures at a given time using cluster analysis. The data stem from numerical simulations of decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of an imposed uniform magnetic field; the magnetic Prandtl number is taken equal to unity, and we use a periodic box with grids of up to 1536³ points and with Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 1100. The initial conditions are either an X -point configuration embedded in three dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang vortex, or an Arn'old-Beltrami-Childress configuration with a fully helical velocity and magnetic field. In each case two snapshots are analyzed, separated by one turn-over time, starting just after the peak of dissipation. We show that the algorithm is able to select a large number of structures (in excess of 8000) for each snapshot and that the statistical properties of these clusters are remarkably similar for the two snapshots as well as for the two flows under study in terms of scaling laws for the cluster characteristics, with the structures in the vorticity and in the current behaving in the same way. We also study the effect of Reynolds number on cluster statistics, and we finally analyze the properties of these clusters in terms of their velocity-magnetic-field correlation. Self-organized criticality features have been identified in the dissipative range of scales. A different scaling arises in the inertial range, which cannot be identified for the moment with a known self-organized criticality class consistent with magnetohydrodynamics. We suggest that this range can be governed by turbulence dynamics as opposed to criticality and propose an interpretation of intermittency in terms of propagation of local instabilities. PMID:21230595

  19. Structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Detection and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Pouquet, A.; Rosenberg, D.; Mininni, P. D.; Donovan, E. F.

    2010-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of statistical properties of turbulent current and vorticity structures at a given time using cluster analysis. The data stem from numerical simulations of decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of an imposed uniform magnetic field; the magnetic Prandtl number is taken equal to unity, and we use a periodic box with grids of up to 15363 points and with Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 1100. The initial conditions are either an X -point configuration embedded in three dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang vortex, or an Arn’old-Beltrami-Childress configuration with a fully helical velocity and magnetic field. In each case two snapshots are analyzed, separated by one turn-over time, starting just after the peak of dissipation. We show that the algorithm is able to select a large number of structures (in excess of 8000) for each snapshot and that the statistical properties of these clusters are remarkably similar for the two snapshots as well as for the two flows under study in terms of scaling laws for the cluster characteristics, with the structures in the vorticity and in the current behaving in the same way. We also study the effect of Reynolds number on cluster statistics, and we finally analyze the properties of these clusters in terms of their velocity-magnetic-field correlation. Self-organized criticality features have been identified in the dissipative range of scales. A different scaling arises in the inertial range, which cannot be identified for the moment with a known self-organized criticality class consistent with magnetohydrodynamics. We suggest that this range can be governed by turbulence dynamics as opposed to criticality and propose an interpretation of intermittency in terms of propagation of local instabilities.

  20. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  1. Using the whole read: structural variant detection using NGS data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several classes of Structural Variants (SV) remain difficult to detect within sequenced genomes. Deletions and tandem duplications may affect a large proportion of variable genomic sequence space, yet their detection is still difficult to discern from false positive signals. Here, we present a metho...

  2. Effect of Piezoelectric Implant on the Structural Integrity of Composite Laminates Subjected to Tensile Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, Sahir; El Mahi, Abderrahim; Turki, Saïd

    2016-07-01

    The embedment of sensors within composite structures gives the opportunity to develop smart materials for health and usage monitoring systems. This study investigates the use of acoustic emission monitoring with embedded piezoelectric sensor during mechanical tests in order to identify the effects of introducing the sensor into the composite materials. The composite specimen with and without embedded sensor were subject to tensile static and fatigue loading. The analysis and observation of AE signals show that the integration of a sensor presents advantage of the detection of the acoustic events and also show the presence of three or four types of damage during tests. The incorporation of piezoelectric sensor has a negligible influence on the mechanical properties of materials.

  3. Size-dependent structure of CdSe nanoclusters formed after ion implantation in MgO

    SciTech Connect

    Huis, M.A. van . E-mail: m.a.vanhuis@tnw.tudelft.nl; Veen, A. van; Schut, H.; Eijt, S.W.H.; Kooi, B.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    2005-03-01

    The band gap as well as the optical and structural properties of semiconductor CdSe nanoclusters change as a function of the nanocluster size. Embedded CdSe nanoclusters in MgO were created by means of sequential Cd and Se ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. Changes during annealing were monitored using optical absorption and positron annihilation spectroscopy. High-resolution TEM on cross-sections after annealing at a temperature of 1300 K showed that clusters with a size below 5 nm have the high-pressure rock-salt structure and are in a cube-on-cube orientation relation with MgO, whereas clusters larger than 5 nm adopt the stable wurtzite crystal structure and were observed in two different orientation relations with MgO.

  4. The efficacy of the Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler in the detection of free-flap compromise: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Riaz A; Gundogan, Buket; Fowler, Alexander J; Bragg, Thomas W H; Orgill, Dennis P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler monitors venous or arterial blood flow from free flaps and can detect free-flap compromise. Previous studies have shown that the use of this Doppler can improve detection and salvage rates as it provides an earlier warning than the current method of clinical assessment. Such studies assert that the implantable Doppler is of great value in monitoring free flaps in current microsurgical units. This systematic review aims to compare the efficacy of the Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler in monitoring free-flap compromise against conventional clinical free-flap monitoring techniques. Methods and analysis Various electronic databases will be systematically searched for studies that compare the use of Cook-Swartz implantable Doppler with clinical assessment. The selected studies will then have their titles and abstracts screened by two authors. Articles selected after title and abstract screen will have full text downloaded and the complete article will be assessed for suitability. Once the articles have been selected for inclusion, data extraction will take place. For data analysis, the outcomes of the studies will be tabulated, with descriptive statistics performed as appropriate and the detection rate of the Doppler and clinical assessment will be compared and synthesised where possible. Ethics and dissemination The authors hope to disseminate the findings as widely as possible. This systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and include a number of recommendations as its conclusion based on the evidence contained within. Given the wide range of specialties now utilising flaps, it will be presented at a wide range of national and international conferences. Protocol Registration in PROSPERO CRD42013005818 The literature search and data extraction went on until 28 January 2014. These steps were revised in line with peer review comments. PMID:24622948

  5. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  6. Capacitance-based damage detection sensing for aerospace structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, P.; Yamamoto, N.; Chen, Y.; Manohara, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damage detection technology needs improvement for aerospace engineering application because detection within complex composite structures is difficult yet critical to avoid catastrophic failure. Damage detection is challenging in aerospace structures because not all the damage detection technology can cover the various defect types (delamination, fiber fracture, matrix crack etc.), or conditions (visibility, crack length size, etc.). These defect states are expected to become even more complex with future introduction of novel composites including nano-/microparticle reinforcement. Currently, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods with X-ray, ultrasound, or eddy current have good resolutions (< 0.1 mm), but their detection capabilities is limited by defect locations and orientations and require massive inspection devices. System health monitoring (SHM) methods are often paired with NDE technologies to signal out sensed damage, but their data collection and analysis currently requires excessive wiring and complex signal analysis. Here, we present a capacitance sensor-based, structural defect detection technology with improved sensing capability. Thin dielectric polymer layer is integrated as part of the structure; the defect in the structure directly alters the sensing layer's capacitance, allowing full-coverage sensing capability independent of defect size, orientation or location. In this work, capacitance-based sensing capability was experimentally demonstrated with a 2D sensing layer consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched by electrodes. These sensing layers were applied on substrate surfaces. Surface indentation damage (~1mm diameter) and its location were detected through measured capacitance changes: 1 to 250 % depending on the substrates. The damage detection sensors are light weight, and they can be conformably coated and can be part of the composite structure. Therefore it is suitable for aerospace structures such as cryogenic tanks and rocket

  7. Bipart: Learning Block Structure for Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Lo, Henry Z.; Ding, Wei; Amaral, Kevin; Crouter, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity consists complex behavior, typically structured in bouts which can consist of one continuous movement (e.g. exercise) or many sporadic movements (e.g. household chores). Each bout can be represented as a block of feature vectors corresponding to the same activity type. This paper introduces a general distance metric technique to use this block representation to first predict activity type, and then uses the predicted activity to estimate energy expenditure within a novel framework. This distance metric, dubbed Bipart, learns block-level information from both training and test sets, combining both to form a projection space which materializes block-level constraints. Thus, Bipart provides a space which can improve the bout classification performance of all classifiers. We also propose an energy expenditure estimation framework which leverages activity classification in order to improve estimates. Comprehensive experiments on waist-mounted accelerometer data, comparing Bipart against many similar methods as well as other classifiers, demonstrate the superior activity recognition of Bipart, especially in low-information experimental settings. PMID:25328361

  8. Postnatal width changes in the internal structures of the human mandible: a longitudinal three-dimensional cephalometric study using implants.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents case-specific quantitative evidence of the systematic lateral displacement of metallic implants in the mandibles of treated and untreated human subjects between the ages of 8.5 and 15.5 years. This evidence appears to be consistent with the inference of small, but systematic increases in distance between the internal structures of the two sides of the osseous mandible during growth. Such a conclusion, however, is inconsistent with traditional beliefs that the internal structures of the mandibular symphysis fuse at the midline during the first post-natal year and remain dimensionally constant thereafter. We recently published evidence of statistically significant transverse displacement of metallic implants in the mandibular body region for 12 of 28 subjects for whom longitudinal data were available. Of the twelve subjects for whom statistically significant changes were observed, widening occurred in eleven cases and narrowing in one. Matching data are now available on concurrent ramus changes for 22 of the same 28 subjects, including 11 of the 12 for whom statistically significant width changes had previously been noted in the body region. In eight of these 11 subjects, statistically significant widening in the ramus region was also observed. No subject had statistically significant widening in the ramus region without also having statistically significant widening in the body region. No subject had statistically significant trans-ramus narrowing. PMID:1486926

  9. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species. PMID:27142589

  10. Underlying modal data issues for detecting damage in truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashangaki, Thomas A-L.; Smith, Suzanne Weaver; Lim, Tae W.

    1992-01-01

    Independent of the modal identification techniques employed for damage detection, use of measured modal data limits the expectations for damage location. These limitations are examined using the distribution of modal strain energy and the sensitivity of the frequency and mode shapes to structural stiffness changes. For given measured modal information of specific accuracy, this examination reveals the following: (1) damage detection is feasible for members that contribute significantly to the strain energy of the measured modes, (2) the modes which are most effective in detecting damage to certain critical members can be identified, and (3) a relationship can be drawn between the accuracy of the measured modes and frequencies and damage detection feasibility.

  11. Detection of nanoscale structural changes in bone using random lasers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qinghai; Xu, Zhengbin; Choi, Seung Ho; Sun, Xuanhao; Xiao, Shumin; Akkus, Ozan; Kim, Young L.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that the unique characteristics of random lasing in bone can be used to assess nanoscale structural alterations as a mechanical or structural biosensor, given that bone is a partially disordered biological nanostructure. In this proof-of-concept study, we conduct photoluminescence experiments on cortical bone specimens that are loaded in tension under mechanical testing. The ultra-high sensitivity, the large detection area, and the simple detection scheme of random lasers allow us to detect prefailure damage in bone at very small strains before any microscale damage occurs. Random laser-based biosensors could potentially open a new possibility for highly sensitive detection of nanoscale structural and mechanical alterations prior to overt microscale changes in hard tissue and biomaterials. PMID:21258558

  12. Detection of karst structures using airborne EM and VLF

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, L.P. Nyquist, J.E.; Carpenter, P.J.

    1994-12-31

    Through the combined use of multi-frequency helicopter electromagnetic and VLF data, it is possible to detect and delineate a wide variety of karst structures and possibly to assess their interconnectedness. Multi-frequency EM Can detect karst features if some element of the structure is conductive. This conductive aspect may derive from thick, moist soils in the depression commonly associated with a doline, from conductive fluids in the cavity, or from conductive sediments in the cavity if these occupy a significant portion of it. Multiple loop configurations may also increase the likelihood of detecting karst features. Preliminary evidence indicates total field VLF measurements may be able to detect interconnected karst pathways, so long as the pathways are water or sediment filled. Neither technique can effectively detect dry, resistive air-filled cavities.

  13. Use of prefabricated titanium abutments and customized anatomic lithium disilicate structures for cement-retained implant restorations in the esthetic zone.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Zandinejad, Amirali; Martin, William C; Morton, Dean

    2014-03-01

    This report describes the fabrication of customized abutments consisting of prefabricated 2-piece titanium abutments and customized anatomic lithium disilicate structures for cement-retained implant restorations in the esthetic zone. The heat-pressed lithium disilicate provides esthetic customized anatomic structures and crowns independently of the computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing process. PMID:24360007

  14. The Effect of Automatic Gain Control Structure and Release Time on Cochlear Implant Speech Intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Khing, Phyu P.; Swanson, Brett A.; Ambikairajah, Eliathamby

    2013-01-01

    Nucleus cochlear implant systems incorporate a fast-acting front-end automatic gain control (AGC), sometimes called a compression limiter. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of replacing the front-end compression limiter with a newly proposed envelope profile limiter. A secondary objective was to investigate the effect of AGC speed on cochlear implant speech intelligibility. The envelope profile limiter was located after the filter bank and reduced the gain when the largest of the filter bank envelopes exceeded the compression threshold. The compression threshold was set equal to the saturation level of the loudness growth function (i.e. the envelope level that mapped to the maximum comfortable current level), ensuring that no envelope clipping occurred. To preserve the spectral profile, the same gain was applied to all channels. Experiment 1 compared sentence recognition with the front-end limiter and with the envelope profile limiter, each with two release times (75 and 625 ms). Six implant recipients were tested in quiet and in four-talker babble noise, at a high presentation level of 89 dB SPL. Overall, release time had a larger effect than the AGC type. With both AGC types, speech intelligibility was lower for the 75 ms release time than for the 625 ms release time. With the shorter release time, the envelope profile limiter provided higher group mean scores than the front-end limiter in quiet, but there was no significant difference in noise. Experiment 2 measured sentence recognition in noise as a function of presentation level, from 55 to 89 dB SPL. The envelope profile limiter with 625 ms release time yielded better scores than the front-end limiter with 75 ms release time. A take-home study showed no clear pattern of preferences. It is concluded that the envelope profile limiter is a feasible alternative to a front-end compression limiter. PMID:24312408

  15. Vibration-based damage detection algorithm for WTT structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Choi, Sang-Hoon; Ryu, Joo-Young; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the integrity of a wind turbine tower (WTT) structure is nondestructively estimated using its vibration responses. Firstly, a damage detection algorithm using changes in modal characteristics to predict damage locations and severities in structures is outlined. Secondly, a finite element (FE) model based on a real WTT structure is established by using a commercial software, Midas FEA. Thirdly, forced vibration tests are performed on the FE model of the WTT structure under various damage scenarios. The changes in modal parameters such as natural frequencies and mode shapes are examined for damage monitoring in the structure. Finally, the feasibility of the vibration-based damage detection method is numerically verified by predicting locations and severities of the damage in the FE model of the WTT structure.

  16. Metabolic and structural changes in newly synthesized proteoglycans induced by implantation of a polyethylene sheet in the rabbit knee joint.

    PubMed

    Ribault, D; Garcia, F; Riera, H; Mritovic, D R

    1993-07-01

    A sheet of polyethylene was surgically implanted in a rabbit right patello-femoral joint and changes in the structure and chemical composition of newly synthesized articular cartilage proteoglycans (PGs) were studied 1 month after surgery. The articular cartilage from implanted and sham-operated control knee joints was labeled in vitro with 3H-glycine and 35S-SO4 and then extracted with 4 M guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) solution. Labeled extracts were analyzed by dissociative CsCl gradient centrifugation and by Sepharose CL-2B column chromatography. The labeled glycosaminoglycan side chains were analyzed by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography and specific enzymatic digestions. Compared with sham-operation, the trochlear articular cartilage of operated joints incorporated more 35S-SO4 and 3H-glycine into newly synthesized PGs and proteins. It also synthesized a higher proportion of extractable, hydrodynamically large and high density 35S-PG monomers with increased proportion of molecules, able to interact with exogeneous hyaluronan (HA). The fibro-cartilagenous 'osteo-chondrophytic' spurs, compared with trochlear hyaline articular cartilages, incorporated less 35S-SO4 and 3H-glycine and synthesized less extractable high density 35S-PG monomers able to interact with exogenous HA. Their 35S-GAG side chains were more heterogeneous and segregated into three distinct peaks as shown by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography. The results of the present studies demonstrate that, in response to the implant, there was an increase in the biosynthetic capacity of chondrocytes which synthetized larger PG monomers able to interact wih HA. PMID:15449426

  17. Direct synthesis of ultrathin SOI structure by extremely low-energy oxygen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Yasushi; Yachida, Gosuke; Inoue, Kodai; Toyohara, Taiga; Nakata, Jyoji

    2016-06-01

    We performed extremely low-energy 16O+ implantation at 10 keV (Rp ˜ 25 nm) followed by annealing aiming at directly synthesizing an ultrathin Si layer separated by a buried SiO2 layer in Si(001) substrates, and then investigated feasible condition of recrystallization and stabilization of the superficial Si and the buried oxide layer by significantly low temperature annealing. The elemental compositions were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The crystallinity of the superficial Si layer was quantitatively confirmed by ananlyzing RBS-channeling spectra. Cross-sectional morphologies and atomic configurations were observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). As a result, we succeeded in directly synthesizing an ultrathin single-crystalline silicon layer with ≤20 nm thick separated by a thin buried stoichiometric SiO2 layer with ≤20 nm thick formed by extremely low-energy 16O+ implantation followed by surprisingly low temperature annealing at 1050∘ C.

  18. Finite element analysis of provisional structures of implant-supported complete prostheses.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Bruno Albuquerque; de Brito, Rui Barbosa; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-04-01

    The use of provisional resin implant-supported complete dentures is a fast and safe procedure to restore mastication and esthetics of patients soon after surgery and during the adaptation phase to the new denture. This study assessed stress distribution of provisional implant-supported fixed dentures and the all-on-4 concept using self-curing acrylic resin (Tempron) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp) to simulate functional loads through the three-dimensional finite element method. Solidworks software was used to build three-dimensional models using acrylic resin (Tempron, model A) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp, model B) for denture captions. Two loading patterns were applied on each model: (1) right unilateral axial loading of 150 N on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth and (2) oblique loading vector of 150 N at 45°. The results showed that higher stress was found on the bone crest below oblique load application with a maximum value of 187.57 MPa on model A and 167.45 MPa on model B. It was concluded that model B improved stress distribution on the denture compared with model A. PMID:24779949

  19. Properties of Zn implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Strite, S.; Epperlein, P.W.; Dommann, A.; Rockett, A.; Broom, R.F.

    1996-11-01

    The authors report the optical and structural properties of ion implanted GaN:Zn. Post-implant annealing up to 1,100 C was performed under flowing N{sub 2} in both a tube furnace and a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system, with and without SiN{sub x} encapsulation layers. The implantation damage is quantified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) detects significant rearrangement of implanted Zn only at the highest temperatures and doses investigated. Strain reduction, observed in GaN:Zn annealed at or above 975 C by high-resolution x-ray diffractometry (HRXRD), indicates successful damage removal. The optical activation of annealed GaN:Zn is measured by photoluminescence (PL). The room temperature (RT) Zn acceptor transition at {approximately} 430 nm is consistently observed in annealed GaN:Zn, but at low efficiency. The authors conclude that residual implantation damage and/or N loss during annealing limits the optical quality of implanted GaN:Zn.

  20. Detection of structural damage using novelty detection algorithm under variational environmental and operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mountassir, M.; Yaacoubi, S.; Dahmene, F.

    2015-07-01

    Novelty detection is a widely used algorithm in different fields of study due to its capabilities to recognize any kind of abnormalities in a specific process in order to ensure better working in normal conditions. In the context of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), this method is utilized as damage detection technique because the presence of defects can be considered as abnormal to the structure. Nevertheless, the performance of such a method could be jeopardized if the structure is operating in harsh environmental and operational conditions (EOCs). In this paper, novelty detection statistical technique is used to investigate the detection of damages under various EOCs. Experiments were conducted with different scenarios: damage sizes and shapes. EOCs effects were simulated by adding stochastic noise to the collected experimental data. Different levels of noise were studied to determine the accuracy and the performance of the proposed method.

  1. Effect of thermal processing on the structure and optical properties of crystalline silicon with GaSb nanocrystals formed with the aid of high-doze ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, F. F.; Ismailova, G. A.; Mil'chanin, O. V.; Parkhomenko, I. N.; Zhusipbekova, F. B.; Yar-Mukhamedova, G. Sh.

    2015-09-01

    Rutherford backscattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to study distributions of impurities and structure of the GaSb + Si nanocomposites in several regimes of ion implantation and thermal processing. It is demonstrated that the hot implantation and annealing lead to a significant loss of impurity and the shift of the maximum concentration of impurity atoms toward the surface. The TEM data prove the formation of nanocrystals with sizes ranging from 20 to 100 nm, dislocation defects, and residual mechanical stresses. Raman spectroscopy is used to study the structure and phase composition of experimental silicon samples containing various nanocrystalline impurities.

  2. Multilayer out-of-plane overlap electrostatic energy harvesting structure actuated by blood pressure for powering intra-cardiac implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deterre, M.; Risquez, S.; Bouthaud, B.; Dal Molin, R.; Woytasik, M.; Lefeuvre, E.

    2013-12-01

    We present an innovative multilayer out-of-plane electrostatic energy harvesting device conceived in view of scavenging energy from regular blood pressure in the heart. This concept involves the use of a deformable packaging for the implant in order to transmit the blood pressure to the electrostatic transducer. As shown in previous work, this is possible by using thin metal micro-bellows structure, providing long term hermeticity and high flexibility. The design of the electrostatic device has overcome several challenges such as the very low frequency of the mechanical excitation (1 to 2 Hz) and the small available room in the medical implant. Analytical and numerical models have been used to maximize the capacitance variation, and hence to optimize the energy conversion. We have theoretically shown that a 25-layer transducer with 6-mm diameter and 1-mm thickness could harvest at least 20 mJ per heart beat in the left ventricle under a maximum voltage of 75 V. These results show that the proposed concept is promising and could power the next generation of leadless pacemakers.

  3. Structural and electrical properties of Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiO{sub 2} by ion implantation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Duguay, S.; Grob, J.J.; Slaoui, A.; Le Gall, Y.; Amann-Liess, M.

    2005-05-15

    Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) on Si layers with embedded germanium nanocrystals (Ge-ncs) were fabricated using Ge{sup +} implantation and subsequent annealing. Transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry have been used to study the Ge redistribution in the SiO{sub 2} films as a function of annealing temperature. A monolayer of Ge-ncs near the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface was formed under specific annealing conditions. This layer, with a nc density and mean size measured to be, respectively, 1.1x10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} and 5 nm, is located at approximately 4 nm from the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. Capacitance-voltage measurements were performed on metal-oxide-semiconductor structures containing such implanted SiO{sub 2} layers in order to study their electrical properties. The results indicate a strong memory effect at relatively low programming voltages (<5 V) due to the presence of Ge-ncs near the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  4. Detection of Component Failures for Smart Structure Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Hiroshi

    Uncertainties in the dynamics model of a smart structure are often of significance due to model errors caused by parameter identification errors and reduced-order modeling of the system. Design of a model-based Failure Detection and Isolation (FDI) system for smart structures, therefore, needs careful consideration regarding robustness with respect to such model uncertainties. In this paper, we proposes a new method of robust fault detection that is insensitive to the disturbances caused by unknown modeling errors while it is highly sensitive to the component failures. The capability of the robust detection algorithm is examined for the sensor failure of a flexible smart beam control system. It is shown by numerical simulations that the proposed method suppresses the disturbances due to model errors and markedly improves the detection performance.

  5. CONSERTING: integrating copy number analysis with structural variation detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Gupta, Pankaj; Wang, Jianmin; Nakitandwe, Joy; Roberts, Kathryn; Dalton, James D.; Parker, Matthew; Patel, Samir; Holmfeldt, Linda; Payne, Debbie; Easton, John; Ma, Jing; Rusch, Michael; Wu, Gang; Patel, Aman; J. Baker, Suzanne; Dyer, Michael A.; Shurtleff, Sheila; Espy, Stephen; Pounds, Stanley; Downing, James R.; Ellison, David W.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Zhang, Jinghui

    2015-01-01

    We developed Copy Number Segmentation by Regression Tree in Next Generation Sequencing (CONSERTING), a novel algorithm for detecting somatic copy number alteration (CNA) using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data. CONSERTING performs iterative analysis of segmentation by read depth change and localized structural variation detection, achieving high accuracy and sensitivity. Analysis of 43 pediatric and adult cancer genomes revealed novel oncogenic CNAs, complex re-arrangements and subclonal CNAs missed by alternative approaches. PMID:25938371

  6. Hidden Corrosion Detection in Aircraft Metallic Structures Using Lamb Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Titry, C.; Lepoutre, F.

    2005-04-09

    The corrosion of aeronautics structures in aluminum is difficult to detect at an early stage. Lamb waves are sometimes very sensitive to this damage and can be considered as good candidates for its detection. Unfortunately, the complex time evolution of Lamb wave signals makes difficult both utilization and interpretation of their interaction with defects. This paper demonstrates that, for many reasons, the analysis based on wavelets transform is of great help for recognition of Lamb modes and allows the cartography of corroded areas.

  7. Electrical properties and electronic structure of Si-implanted hexagonal boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    He, B.; Yuen, M. F.; Zhang, W. J.; Qiu, M.

    2014-07-07

    Si ion implantation with a set of ion energies and ion doses was carried out to dope hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) thin films synthesized by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. Hall effect measurements revealed n-type conduction with a low resistivity of 0.5 Ω cm at room temperature, corresponding to an electron concentration of 2.0 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} and a mobility of 0.6 cm{sup 2}/V s. Temperature-dependent resistivity measurements in a wide temperature range from 50 to 800 K demonstrated two shallow donor levels in the hBN band gap induced by Si doping, which was in consistence with the theoretical calculation by density function theory.

  8. Modification of implant material surface properties by means of oxide nano-structured coatings deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Vladimir; Zykova, Anna; Smolik, Jerzy; Rogowska, Renata; Lukyanchenko, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Dmitrii

    2014-08-01

    The deposition of functional coatings on the metal surface of artificial joints is an effective way of enhancing joint tribological characteristics. It is well-known that nanostructured oxide coatings have specific properties advantageous for future implant applications. In the present study, we measured the high hardness parameters, the adhesion strength and the low friction coefficient of the oxide magnetron sputtered coatings. The corrosion test results show that the oxide coating deposition had improved the corrosion resistance by a factor of ten for both stainless steel and titanium alloy substrates. Moreover, the hydrophilic nature of coated surfaces in comparison with the metal ones was investigated in the tensiometric tests. The surfaces with nanostructured oxide coatings demonstrated improved biocompatibility for in vitro and in vivo tests, attributed to the high dielectric constants and the high values of the surface free energy parameters.

  9. Structural-mechanical and antibacterial properties of a soft elastic polyurethane surface after plasma immersion N2(+) implantation.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Ilya A; Mamaev, Alexander S; Osorgina, Irina V; Lemkina, Larisa M; Korobov, Vladimir P; Belyaev, Anton Yu; Porozova, Svetlana E; Sherban, Marina G

    2016-05-01

    The surface of elastic polyurethane treated by plasma immersion N2(+) ion implantation at different fluences has been investigated. A folded surface structure is observed in all cases. Analysis has been performed to study the structural (roughness, steepness and fraction of folds, fractal characteristics), mechanical (stiffness, adhesion force between the AFM probe and the material) and wetting properties of surfaces. Under uniaxial stretching the cracks orthogonal to the axis of deformation and longitudinal folds are formed on the examined surfaces. After unloading the initial structure of the surface of deformed materials exposed to low fluences becomes smoother and does not recover, i.e. it has plastic properties. By contrast, the structure of the surfaces of materials subjected to high-fluence treatment recovers without visible changes and the cracks are fully closed. The study of Staphylococcus colonies grown on these materials has demonstrated significant reduction (from 3 to 5 times) in the vitality of bacteria on treated surfaces. This result was repeated on samples after 11months of storage. Such antibacterial properties are primarily related to the structural changes of the surfaces accompanied by the increased hydrophilicity. PMID:26952420

  10. KrF resists for implant layers patterning extreme high-aspect ratio structures with a double focal plane exposure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaelli, Giorgio; Ferri, Fabio; Volpi, Stefano; Hong, Chisun

    2012-03-01

    The design rules for advanced image sensor applications are requiring continuous CD shrinkage, and increasing aspect ratios which resulting in major challenges associated with using KrF technology. For the implant photo layers in particular, the need to block high-energy boron implants (well above 2 MeV) with extremely localized implant profiles requires an aspect ratio of deep well structures greater than 10:1. Other desirable attributes of a good photoresist for such demanding applications are high transparency, a steep wall profile consistent throughout the entire film, good adhesion with no structure collapse, and a wide process window. In this paper, we will discuss the role of a chemically amplified, ESCAP-type of resist in meeting these design criteria using a double focal plane exposure technique.

  11. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  12. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  13. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  14. Carmustine Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Carmustine implant is used along with surgery and sometimes radiation therapy to treat malignant glioma (a certain type of ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to ...

  15. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  16. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated Safety Information (Consumer Article) FDA Provides Updated Safety Data on Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants (Press Announcement) [ARCHIVED] Breast Implant Guidance for Industry (2006) Post Approval Studies Webpage Freedom of Information ...

  17. Effects of structural defects on the activation of sulfur donors in GaN/x/As/1-x/ formed by N implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jasinski, J.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Washburn, J.

    2001-07-16

    The effects of structural defects on the electrical activity of S doped GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} layers formed by S and N coimplantation in GaAs are reported. S and N ions were implanted to the depth of about 0.4 {micro}m. Electrochemical capacitance voltage measurements on samples annealed at 945 C for 10s show that in a thin (<0.1 {micro}m) surface layer the concentration of active shallow donors is almost an order of magnitude larger in S and N co-implanted samples than in samples implanted with S alone. The activation efficiency of S donors also shows a broad minimum at a depth of about 0.2 {micro}m below the surface. The results of these electrical measurements are correlated with the distribution of structural defects revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs show that in addition to a band of dislocation loops commonly found in ion implanted GaAs, an additional band of small voids is observed in samples co-implanted with S and N. The location of this band correlates well with the region of reduced electrical activation of S donors, suggesting that formation of the voids through N accumulation results in a lower concentration of active, substitutional N atoms.

  18. Implant-supported overdenture manufactured using CAD/CAM techniques to achieve horizontal path insertion between the primary and secondary structure: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the case of an edentulous patient with an atrophic maxilla and severe class III malocclusion. Prosthetic rehabilitation was performed using CAD/CAM techniques for manufacturing an implant-supported overdenture with horizontal insertion. A vestibulo-lingual insertion overdenture is a precision prosthesis with a fixation system affording a good fit between the primary and secondary structure. Both structures exhibit passive horizontal adjustment. This treatment option requires the same number of implants as implant-supported fixed dentures. The horizontal assembly system prevents the prosthesis from loosening or moving in response to axial and non-axial forces. The technique was used to rehabilitate a patient presenting an atrophic upper maxilla, with the insertion of 8 implants. No complications were reported at follow-up 3, 6 and 12 months after fitting of the prosthesis. This system offers solutions to the clinical and laboratory complications associated with hybrid prostheses, concealing emergence of the chimneys and improving implant-prosthesis hygiene. PMID:26140179

  19. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that a multidisciplinary nondestructive evaluation approach for impact damage detection in composite structures can be used to produce a more efficient inspection. The multidisciplinary NDE approach relies on fast large area thermographic inspections along with detailed ultrasonic volumetric imaging. The thermal inspection technique rapidly identifies the impact damage. The ultrasonic volumetric imaging quantifies the impact generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  20. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Farley, Gary; Smith, Barry T.

    1991-01-01

    NDE results from thermographic and volumetric ultrasonic techniques are presented to illustrate the multidisciplinary NDE approach to impact-damage detection in such composite structures as are increasingly prevalent in helicopters. Attention is given to both flat-panel and 'y-stiffened' panel specimens; these were fabricated either with kevlar or carbon fiber through-the-thickness reinforcements. While thermal inspection identifies impact damage, volumetric imaging quantifies the impact-generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  1. A damage detection technique for reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ai-Lun; Yang, Jann N.; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2012-04-01

    Civil engineering structures, such as reinforced concrete frames, exhibit nonlinear hysteretic behavior when subject to dynamic loads, such as earthquakes. The ability to detect damages in structures after a major earthquake will ensure their reliability and safety. Innovative analysis techniques for damage detection of structures have been extensively studied recently. However, practical and effective damage identification techniques remain to be developed for nonlinear structures, in particular hysteretic reinforced concrete (RC) structures. In this paper, a smooth hysteretic model with stiffness and strength degradations and with the pinching effect is used to represent the dynamic characteristics of reinforced concrete (RC) frames. A system identification method capable of detecting damages in nonlinear structures, referred to as the adaptive quadratic sum-square error with unknown inputs (AQSSE-UI), is used to detect damages in hysteretic RC frames. The performance of the AQSSE-UI technique is demonstrated by the experimental data. A 1/3 scale 2-story RC frame has been tested experimentally on the shake table at NCREE, Taiwan. This 2-story RC frame was subject to different levels of ground excitations back to back. The RC frame is firstly considered as a linear model with rotational springs and the tracking of the degradation of the stiffness parameters is carried out using the AQSSE-UI technique. Then the same RC frame is considered as a nonlinear structure with plastic hinges following a smooth hysteretic model. Experimental results show that the AQSSE-UI technique is quite effective for tracking of : (i) the stiffness degradation of linear structures, and (ii) the non-linear hysteretic parameters with stiffness and strength degradations.

  2. Biofilm formation on surface characterized micro-implants for skeletal anchorage in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Chin, Mervyn Y H; Sandham, Andrew; de Vries, Joop; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2007-04-01

    Micro-implants are increasingly popular in clinical orthodontics to effect skeletal anchorage. However, biofilm formation on their surfaces and subsequent infection of peri-implant tissues can result in either exfoliation or surgical removal of these devices. The present study aimed to assess biofilm formation on five commercially available, surface characterized micro-implant systems in vitro. The elemental surface compositions of as-received and autoclave-sterilized micro-implants were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. High carbon contamination was detected on the oxide surfaces, along with traces of inorganic elements (Ca, Cu, Cr, Pb, Zn, and P) which disappeared after Ar(+) ion sputtering. The mean surface roughnesses (R(a)) were around 182nm for titanium micro-implants, and 69nm for stainless steel micro-implants, as measured by atomic force microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed different surface topographies between manufacturers, varying from typical machined grooves to structural defects like pores and pits. Overnight biofilms were grown on micro-implant surfaces by immersion in pooled human whole saliva. Biofilms on micro-implants treated with chlorhexidine and fluoride mouthrinses contained comparable numbers of viable organisms, but significantly less than did untreated micro-implants. Comparison of different implant systems using multiple linear regression analysis indicated that biofilm formation was governed by roughness of the implant surface and the prevalence of carbon- and oxygen-rich components. PMID:17194475

  3. Structural impact detection with vibro-haptic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hwee-Kwon; Park, Gyuhae; Todd, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new sensing paradigm for structural impact detection using vibro-haptic interfaces. The goal of this study is to allow humans to ‘feel’ structural responses (impact, shape changes, and damage) and eventually determine health conditions of a structure. The target applications for this study are aerospace structures, in particular, airplane wings. Both hardware and software components are developed to realize the vibro-haptic-based impact detection system. First, L-shape piezoelectric sensor arrays are deployed to measure the acoustic emission data generated by impacts on a wing. Unique haptic signals are then generated by processing the measured acoustic emission data. These haptic signals are wirelessly transmitted to human arms, and with vibro-haptic interface, human pilots could identify impact location, intensity and possibility of subsequent damage initiation. With the haptic interface, the experimental results demonstrate that human could correctly identify such events, while reducing false indications on structural conditions by capitalizing on human’s classification capability. Several important aspects of this study, including development of haptic interfaces, design of optimal human training strategies, and extension of the haptic capability into structural impact detection are summarized in this paper.

  4. Early detection of local buckling in structural members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Bashir; Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Hughes, Derke

    2005-05-01

    Most structural health monitoring analyses to date have focused on the determination of damage in the form of crack growth in metallic materials or delamination or other types of damage growth in composite materials. However, in many applications, local instability in the form of buckling can be the precursor to more extensive damage and unstable failure of the structure. If buckling could be detected in the very early stages, there is a possibility of taking preventive measures to stabilize and save the structure. Relatively few investigations have addressed this type of damage initiation in structures. Recently, during the structural health monitoring of a wind turbine blade, local buckling was identified as the cause of premature failure. A stress wave propagation technique was used in this test to detect the precursor to the buckling failure in the form of early changes in the local curvature of the blade. These conditions have also been replicated in the laboratory and results are reported in this paper. A composite column was subjected to axial compression to induce various levels of buckling deformation. Two different techniques were used to detect the precursors to buckling in this column. The first identifier is the change in the vibration shapes and natural frequencies of the column. The second is the change in the characteristics of diagnostic Lamb waves during the buckling deformation. Experiments indicate that very small changes in curvature during the initial stages of buckling are detectable using the structural health monitoring techniques. The experimental vibration characteristics of the column with slight initial curvatures compared qualitatively with finite element results. The finite element analysis is used to identify the frequencies that are most sensitive to buckling deformation, and to select suitable locations for the placement of sensors that can detect even small changes in the local curvature.

  5. Laser-based structural sensing and surface damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldur, Burcu

    Damage due to age or accumulated damage from hazards on existing structures poses a worldwide problem. In order to evaluate the current status of aging, deteriorating and damaged structures, it is vital to accurately assess the present conditions. It is possible to capture the in situ condition of structures by using laser scanners that create dense three-dimensional point clouds. This research investigates the use of high resolution three-dimensional terrestrial laser scanners with image capturing abilities as tools to capture geometric range data of complex scenes for structural engineering applications. Laser scanning technology is continuously improving, with commonly available scanners now capturing over 1,000,000 texture-mapped points per second with an accuracy of ~2 mm. However, automatically extracting meaningful information from point clouds remains a challenge, and the current state-of-the-art requires significant user interaction. The first objective of this research is to use widely accepted point cloud processing steps such as registration, feature extraction, segmentation, surface fitting and object detection to divide laser scanner data into meaningful object clusters and then apply several damage detection methods to these clusters. This required establishing a process for extracting important information from raw laser-scanned data sets such as the location, orientation and size of objects in a scanned region, and location of damaged regions on a structure. For this purpose, first a methodology for processing range data to identify objects in a scene is presented and then, once the objects from model library are correctly detected and fitted into the captured point cloud, these fitted objects are compared with the as-is point cloud of the investigated object to locate defects on the structure. The algorithms are demonstrated on synthetic scenes and validated on range data collected from test specimens and test-bed bridges. The second objective of

  6. Gain analysis of higher-order-mode amplification in a dielectric-implanted multi-beam traveling wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Anthony; Shin, Young-Min; Accelerator Physics Center , Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory , Batavia, Illinois 60510

    2013-07-15

    A multi-beam traveling wave amplifier designed with an overmoded staggered double grating array was examined by small signal analysis combined with simulation. Eigenmode and S-parameter analyses show that the 2 cm long slow wave structure (SWS) has 1–5 dB insertion loss over the passband (TM{sub 31} mode) with ∼28% cold bandwidth. Analytic gain calculation indicates that in the SWS, TM{sub 31}-mode is amplified with 15–20 dB/beam at 64–84 GHz with three elliptical beams of 10 kV and 150 mA/beam, which was compared with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PIC analysis on the analysis of instability with zero-input driving excitations demonstrated that background noises and non-operating lower order modes are noticeably suppressed by implanting equidistant dielectric absorbers; the overmoded structure only allowed the desired 3rd order mode to propagate in the structure. The designed circuit structure can be widely applied to multi-beam devices for high power RF generation.

  7. Gain analysis of higher-order-mode amplification in a dielectric-implanted multi-beam traveling wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Anthony; Shin, Young-Min

    2013-01-01

    A multi-beam traveling wave amplifier designed with an overmoded staggered double grating array was examined by small signal analysis combined with simulation. Eigenmode and S-parameter analyses show that the 2cm long slow wave structure (SWS) has 1-5dB insertion loss over the passband (TM31 mode) with ~28% cold bandwidth. Analytic gain calculation indicates that in the SWS, TM31-mode is amplified with 15–20 dB/beam at 64–84GHz with three elliptical beams of 10kV and 150mA/beam, which was compared with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PIC analysis on the analysis of instability with zero-input driving excitations demonstrated that background noises and non-operating lower order modes are noticeably suppressed by implanting equidistant dielectric absorbers; the overmoded structure only allowed the desired 3rd order mode to propagate in the structure. The designed circuit structure can be widely applied to multi-beam devices for high power RF generation.

  8. Detection of structural deterioration and associated airline maintenance problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henniker, H. D.; Mitchell, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Airline operations involving the detection of structural deterioration and associated maintenance problems are discussed. The standard approach to the maintenance and inspection of aircraft components and systems is described. The frequency of inspections and the application of preventive maintenance practices are examined. The types of failure which airline transport aircraft encounter and the steps taken to prevent catastrophic failure are reported.

  9. Damage detection and health monitoring of operational structures

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.; Mayes, R.; Carne, T.; Reese, G.

    1994-09-01

    Initial damage detection/health monitoring experiments have been performed on three different operational structures: a fracture critical bridge, a composite wind turbine blade, and an aging aircraft. An induced damage test was performed on the Rio Grande/I40 bridge before its demolition. The composite wind turbine test was fatgued to failure with periodic modal testing performed throughout the testing. The front fuselage of a DC-9 aircraft was used as the testbed for an induced damage test. These tests have yielded important insights into techniques for experimental damage detection on real structures. Additionally, the data are currently being used with current damage detection algorithms to further develop the numerical technology. State of the art testing technologies such as, high density modal testing, scanning laser vibrometry and natural excitation testing have also been utilized for these tests.

  10. Detecting Community Structure by Using a Constrained Label Propagation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ratnavelu, Kuru

    2016-01-01

    Community structure is considered one of the most interesting features in complex networks. Many real-world complex systems exhibit community structure, where individuals with similar properties form a community. The identification of communities in a network is important for understanding the structure of said network, in a specific perspective. Thus, community detection in complex networks gained immense interest over the last decade. A lot of community detection methods were proposed, and one of them is the label propagation algorithm (LPA). The simplicity and time efficiency of the LPA make it a popular community detection method. However, the LPA suffers from instability detection due to randomness that is induced in the algorithm. The focus of this paper is to improve the stability and accuracy of the LPA, while retaining its simplicity. Our proposed algorithm will first detect the main communities in a network by using the number of mutual neighbouring nodes. Subsequently, nodes are added into communities by using a constrained LPA. Those constraints are then gradually relaxed until all nodes are assigned into groups. In order to refine the quality of the detected communities, nodes in communities can be switched to another community or removed from their current communities at various stages of the algorithm. We evaluated our algorithm on three types of benchmark networks, namely the Lancichinetti-Fortunato-Radicchi (LFR), Relaxed Caveman (RC) and Girvan-Newman (GN) benchmarks. We also apply the present algorithm to some real-world networks of various sizes. The current results show some promising potential, of the proposed algorithm, in terms of detecting communities accurately. Furthermore, our constrained LPA has a robustness and stability that are significantly better than the simple LPA as it is able to yield deterministic results. PMID:27176470

  11. Detecting Community Structure by Using a Constrained Label Propagation Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jia Hou; Ratnavelu, Kuru

    2016-01-01

    Community structure is considered one of the most interesting features in complex networks. Many real-world complex systems exhibit community structure, where individuals with similar properties form a community. The identification of communities in a network is important for understanding the structure of said network, in a specific perspective. Thus, community detection in complex networks gained immense interest over the last decade. A lot of community detection methods were proposed, and one of them is the label propagation algorithm (LPA). The simplicity and time efficiency of the LPA make it a popular community detection method. However, the LPA suffers from instability detection due to randomness that is induced in the algorithm. The focus of this paper is to improve the stability and accuracy of the LPA, while retaining its simplicity. Our proposed algorithm will first detect the main communities in a network by using the number of mutual neighbouring nodes. Subsequently, nodes are added into communities by using a constrained LPA. Those constraints are then gradually relaxed until all nodes are assigned into groups. In order to refine the quality of the detected communities, nodes in communities can be switched to another community or removed from their current communities at various stages of the algorithm. We evaluated our algorithm on three types of benchmark networks, namely the Lancichinetti-Fortunato-Radicchi (LFR), Relaxed Caveman (RC) and Girvan-Newman (GN) benchmarks. We also apply the present algorithm to some real-world networks of various sizes. The current results show some promising potential, of the proposed algorithm, in terms of detecting communities accurately. Furthermore, our constrained LPA has a robustness and stability that are significantly better than the simple LPA as it is able to yield deterministic results. PMID:27176470

  12. Exploring representations of protein structure for automated remote homology detection and mapping of protein structure space

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to rapid sequencing of genomes, there are now millions of deposited protein sequences with no known function. Fast sequence-based comparisons allow detecting close homologs for a protein of interest to transfer functional information from the homologs to the given protein. Sequence-based comparison cannot detect remote homologs, in which evolution has adjusted the sequence while largely preserving structure. Structure-based comparisons can detect remote homologs but most methods for doing so are too expensive to apply at a large scale over structural databases of proteins. Recently, fragment-based structural representations have been proposed that allow fast detection of remote homologs with reasonable accuracy. These representations have also been used to obtain linearly-reducible maps of protein structure space. It has been shown, as additionally supported from analysis in this paper that such maps preserve functional co-localization of the protein structure space. Methods Inspired by a recent application of the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) model for conducting structural comparisons of proteins, we propose higher-order LDA-obtained topic-based representations of protein structures to provide an alternative route for remote homology detection and organization of the protein structure space in few dimensions. Various techniques based on natural language processing are proposed and employed to aid the analysis of topics in the protein structure domain. Results We show that a topic-based representation is just as effective as a fragment-based one at automated detection of remote homologs and organization of protein structure space. We conduct a detailed analysis of the information content in the topic-based representation, showing that topics have semantic meaning. The fragment-based and topic-based representations are also shown to allow prediction of superfamily membership. Conclusions This work opens exciting venues in designing novel

  13. Method for Real-Time Model Based Structural Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy A. (Inventor); Urnes, James M., Sr. (Inventor); Reichenbach, Eric Y. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and methods for real-time model based vehicle structural anomaly detection are disclosed. A real-time measurement corresponding to a location on a vehicle structure during an operation of the vehicle is received, and the real-time measurement is compared to expected operation data for the location to provide a modeling error signal. A statistical significance of the modeling error signal to provide an error significance is calculated, and a persistence of the error significance is determined. A structural anomaly is indicated, if the persistence exceeds a persistence threshold value.

  14. Nonlinear damage detection in composite structures using bispectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Pickering, Simon; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Literature offers a quantitative number of diagnostic methods that can continuously provide detailed information of the material defects and damages in aerospace and civil engineering applications. Indeed, low velocity impact damages can considerably degrade the integrity of structural components and, if not detected, they can result in catastrophic failure conditions. This paper presents a nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) method, based on ultrasonic guided waves (GW), for the detection of the nonlinear signature in a damaged composite structure. The proposed technique, based on a bispectral analysis of ultrasonic input waveforms, allows for the evaluation of the nonlinear response due to the presence of cracks and delaminations. Indeed, such a methodology was used to characterize the nonlinear behaviour of the structure, by exploiting the frequency mixing of the original waveform acquired from a sparse array of sensors. The robustness of bispectral analysis was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged carbon fibre reinforce plastic (CFRP) composite panel, and the nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy. Unlike other linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods for damage detection, this methodology does not require any baseline with the undamaged structure for the evaluation of the nonlinear source, nor a priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Moreover, bispectral analysis can be considered as a nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) technique for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  15. Structure and composition of silicon carbide films synthesized by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussupov, K. Kh.; Beisenkhanov, N. B.; Zharikov, S. K.; Beisembetov, I. K.; Kenzhaliev, B. K.; Akhmetov, T. K.; Seitov, B. Zh.

    2014-11-01

    The mathematical decomposition of the IR absorption spectrum obtained from a Si layer after the C+ ion implantation with an energy of 10 or 40 keV or from a homogeneous SiC0.7 film has demonstrated that fractions of weak elongated Si-C bonds in the amorphous phase, strong shortened Si-C bonds on the surface of small nanocrystals, and tetrahedral Si-C bonds in the crystalline phase (degree of crystallinity) after high-temperature annealing (1250-1400°C) of the layers are equal to 29/29/42, 22/7/71, and 21/31/48%, respectively. A system of SiC2.0, SiO2, SiC0.8, and SiC0.6 layers in the film on the Si substrate has been identified using X-ray reflectometry and the simulation with the Release software. The reflectometry data on fluctuations of the intensity of X-ray reflections in the region of the main maximum have been interpreted in terms of variations in the density over the depth of the layer with a Gaussian distribution of carbon atoms from 2.55 and 2.90 g/cm3 for the SiC0.25 and SiC0.65 layers, respectively, to 3.29 g/cm3 for the SiC1.36 layer.

  16. Structural and compositional characterization of X-cut LiNbO 3 crystals implanted with high energy oxygen and carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentini, G. G.; Bianconi, M.; Cerutti, A.; Chiarini, M.; Pennestrì, G.; Sada, C.; Argiolas, N.; Bazzan, M.; Mazzoldi, P.; Guzzi, R.

    2005-10-01

    High energy implantation of medium-light elements such as oxygen and carbon was performed in X-cut LiNbO3 single crystals in order to prepare high quality optical waveguides. The compositional and damage profiles, obtained by exploiting the secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford back-scattering techniques respectively, were correlated to the structural properties measured by the high resolution X-ray diffraction. This study evidences the development of tensile strain induced by the ion implantation that can contribute to the decrease of the ordinary refractive index variation through the photo-elastic effect.

  17. Structural valve deterioration of a mitral Carpentier-Edwards pericardial bioprosthesis in an 87-year-old woman 16 years after its implantation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kensuke; Haruki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yurio

    2011-01-01

    The second-generation pericardial valve, the Carpentier-Edwards perimount bioprosthetic (CEP) valve, shows dramatically improved durability as compared to the first-generation pericardial valve, and excellent performance has been obtained, in both the aortic and mitral positions. Especially in elderly patients with an implanted CEP valve, reoperation due to structural valve deterioration (SVD) is rarely required. Here, we report the case of an 87-year-old woman with an explanted CEP valve in the mitral position due to SVD, 16 years after its implantation. PMID:21729285

  18. Human population structure detection via multilocus genotype clustering

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoyi; Starmer, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Background We describe a hierarchical clustering algorithm for using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) genetic data to assign individuals to populations. The method does not assume Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage equilibrium among loci in sample population individuals. Results We show that the algorithm can assign sample individuals highly accurately to their corresponding ethnic groups in our tests using HapMap SNP data and it is also robust to admixed populations when tested with Perlegen SNP data. Moreover, it can detect fine-scale population structure as subtle as that between Chinese and Japanese by using genome-wide high-diversity SNP loci. Conclusion The algorithm provides an alternative approach to the popular STRUCTURE program, especially for fine-scale population structure detection in genome-wide association studies. This is the first successful separation of Chinese and Japanese samples using random SNP loci with high statistical support. PMID:17592628

  19. Ti-6Al-4V triply periodic minimal surface structures for bone implants fabricated via selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunze; Hao, Liang; Hussein, Ahmed; Young, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) structures have already been shown to be a versatile source of biomorphic scaffold designs. Therefore, in this work, Ti-6Al-4V Gyroid and Diamond TPMS lattices having an interconnected high porosity of 80-95% and pore sizes in the range of 560-1600 μm and 480-1450 μm respectively were manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) for bone implants. The manufacturability, microstructure and mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices were evaluated. Comparison between 3D micro-CT reconstructed models and original CAD models of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices shows excellent reproduction of the designs. The as-built Ti-6Al-4V struts exhibit the microstructure of columnar grains filled with very fine and orthogonally oriented α' martensitic laths with the width of 100-300 nm and have the microhardness of 4.01 ± 0.34 GPa. After heat treatment at 680°C for 4h, the α' martensite was converted to a mixture of α and β, in which the α phase being the dominant fraction is present as fine laths with the width of 500-800 nm and separated by a small amount of narrow, interphase regions of dark β phase. Also, the microhardness is decreased to 3.71 ± 0.35 GPa due to the coarsening of the microstructure. The 80-95% porosity TPMS lattices exhibit a comparable porosity with trabecular bone, and the modulus is in the range of 0.12-1.25 GPa and thus can be adjusted to the modulus of trabecular bone. At the same range of porosity of 5-10%, the moduli of cortical bone and of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices are in a similar range. Therefore, the modulus and porosity of Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be tailored to the levels of human bones and thus reduce or avoid "stress shielding" and increase longevity of implants. Due to the biomorphic designs, and high interconnected porosity and stiffness comparable to human bones, SLM-made Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be a promising material for load bearing bone implants. PMID:26210549

  20. Detection of coherent structures in photospheric turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Rempel, Erico L.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte; Shadden, Shawn C.; Welsch, Brian T.; Yeates, Anthony R. E-mail: rempel@ita.br

    2014-05-01

    We study coherent structures in solar photospheric flows in a plage in the vicinity of the active region AR 10930 using the horizontal velocity data derived from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope magnetograms. Eulerian and Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) are detected by computing the Q-criterion and the finite-time Lyapunov exponents of the velocity field, respectively. Our analysis indicates that, on average, the deformation Eulerian coherent structures dominate over the vortical Eulerian coherent structures in the plage region. We demonstrate the correspondence of the network of high magnetic flux concentration to the attracting Lagrangian coherent structures (aLCSs) in the photospheric velocity based on both observations and numerical simulations. In addition, the computation of aLCS provides a measure of the local rate of contraction/expansion of the flow.

  1. High holding voltage segmentation stacking silicon-controlled-rectifier structure with field implant as body ties blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Shiang-Shiou; Cheng, Chun-Hu; Lan, Yu-Pin; Chiu, Yu-Chien; Fan, Chia-Chi; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsuan; Chang, Shao-Chin; Jiang, Zhe-Wei; Hung, Li-Yue; Tsai, Chi-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-04-01

    High electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection robustness and good transient-induced latchup immunity are two important issues for high voltage integrate circuit application. In this study, we report a high-voltage-n-type-field (HVNF) implantation to act as the body ties blocking layer in segmented topology silicon-controlled-rectifier (SCR) structure in 0.11 µm 32 V high voltage process. This body ties blocking layer eliminate the elevated triggered voltage in segmented technique. Using a large resistance as shunt resistor in resistor assisted triggered SCRs stacking structure, the double snapback phenomenon is eliminate. The series SCR could be decoupled a sufficient voltage drop to turned-on when a very low current flow through the shunt resistor. The holding voltage and the failure current of 22 V and 3.4 A are achieved in the best condition of segmented topology SCR stacking structure, respectively. It improves the latchup immunity at high voltage ICs application. On the other hand, the triggered voltage almost keep the same value which is identical to SCR single cell without using segmented topology.

  2. Biomechanical, histological, and ultrastructural analyses of laser micro- and nano-structured titanium alloy implants: a study in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, Anders; Lindberg, Fredrik; Emanuelsson, Lena; Brånemark, Rickard; Engqvist, Håkan; Thomsen, Peter

    2010-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties and ultrastructure of the bone response of partly laser-modified Ti6Al4V implants compared with turned, machined implants after 8 weeks in rabbit. The surface analyses performed with interference microscopy and electron microscopy showed increased surface topography with micro- and nano-sized surface features as well as increased oxide thickness of the modified surface. The biomechanical testing demonstrated a 270% increase in torque value for the surface modified implants compared with the control implants. Histological evaluation of ground sections of specimens subjected to biomechanical testing revealed ongoing bone formation and remodeling. A histological feature exclusively observed at the laser-modified surface was the presence of fracture in the mineralized bone rather than at the interface between the bone and implant. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on Focused Ion Beam (FIB) prepared samples of the intact bone-implant interface, demonstrating a direct contact between nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and the oxide of the laser-modified implant surface. In conclusion, laser-modified titanium alloy implants have significantly stronger bone anchorage compared with machined implants and show no adverse tissue reactions. PMID:19425049

  3. Effect of H + ion implantation on structural, morphological, optical and dielectric properties of L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, K.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Kumar, P.; Bhagvannarayana, G.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2011-06-01

    L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate (LAHCl) single crystals have been implanted with 100 keV H + ions at different ion fluence ranging from 10 12 to 10 15 ions/cm 2. Implanted LAHCl single crystals have been investigated for property changes. Crystal surface and crystalline perfection of the pristine and implanted crystals were analyzed by atomic force microscope and high-resolution X-ray diffraction studies, respectively. Optical absorption bands induced by colour centers, refractive index and birefringence, mechanical stability and dielectric constant of implanted crystals were studied at different ion fluence and compared with that of pristine LAHCl single crystal.

  4. Compressive behaviour of gyroid lattice structures for human cancellous bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Yánez, A; Herrera, A; Martel, O; Monopoli, D; Afonso, H

    2016-11-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) was used to fabricate porous titanium alloy structures. The elastic modulus of these porous structures was similar to the elastic modulus of the cancellous human bone. Two types of cellular lattice structures were manufactured and tested: gyroids and diamonds. The design of the gyroid structures was determined by the main angle of the struts with respect to the axial direction. Thus, structures with angles of between 19 and 68.5° were manufactured. The aim of the design was to reduce the amount of material needed to fabricate a structure with the desired angles to increase the range of stiffness of the scaffolds. Compression tests were conducted to obtain the elastic modulus and the strength. Both parameters increased as the angle decreased. Finally, the specific strength of the gyroid structures was compared with that of the diamond structures and other types of structures. It is shown that, for angles lower than 35°, the gyroid structures had a high strength to weight ratios. PMID:27524040

  5. Language Structures Used by Kindergartners with Cochlear Implants: Relationship to Phonological Awareness, Lexical Knowledge and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Nittrouer, Susan; Sansom, Emily; Low, Keri; Rice, Caitlin; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Objective Listeners use their knowledge of how language is structured to aid speech recognition in everyday communication. When it comes to children with congenital hearing loss severe enough to warrant cochlear implants (CIs), the question arises of whether these children can acquire the language knowledge needed to aid speech recognition, in spite of only having spectrally degraded signals available to them. That question was addressed in the current study. Specifically there were three goals: (1) to compare the language structures used by children with CIs to those of children with normal hearing (NH); (2) to assess the amount of variance in the language measures explained by phonological awareness and lexical knowledge; and (3) to assess the amount of variance in the language measures explained by factors related to the hearing loss itself and subsequent treatment. Design Language samples were obtained and transcribed for 40 children who had just completed kindergarten: 19 with NH and 21 with CIs. Five measures were derived from Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT): (1) mean length of utterance in morphemes, (2) number of conjunctions, excluding and, (3) number of personal pronouns, (4) number of bound morphemes, and (5) number of different words. Measures were also collected on phonological awareness and lexical knowledge. Statistics examined group differences, as well as the amount of variance in the language measures explained by phonological awareness, lexical knowledge, and factors related to hearing loss and its treatment for children with CIs. Results Mean scores of children with CIs were roughly one standard deviation below those of children with NH on all language measures, including lexical knowledge, matching outcomes of other studies. Mean scores of children with CIs were closer to two standard deviations below those of children with NH on two out of three measures of phonological awareness (specifically those related to phonemic

  6. Pedestrian Detection with Spatially Pooled Features and Structured Ensemble Learning.

    PubMed

    Paisitkriangkrai, Sakrapee; Shen, Chunhua; Hengel, Anton van den

    2016-06-01

    Many typical applications of object detection operate within a prescribed false-positive range. In this situation the performance of a detector should be assessed on the basis of the area under the ROC curve over that range, rather than over the full curve, as the performance outside the prescribed range is irrelevant. This measure is labelled as the partial area under the ROC curve (pAUC). We propose a novel ensemble learning method which achieves a maximal detection rate at a user-defined range of false positive rates by directly optimizing the partial AUC using structured learning. In addition, in order to achieve high object detection performance, we propose a new approach to extracting low-level visual features based on spatial pooling. Incorporating spatial pooling improves the translational invariance and thus the robustness of the detection process. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, and we show that it is possible to train state-of-the-art pedestrian detectors using the proposed structured ensemble learning method with spatially pooled features. The result is the current best reported performance on the Caltech-USA pedestrian detection dataset. PMID:26336118

  7. Ultrasonic Techniques for Baseline-Free Damage Detection in Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debaditya

    This research presents ultrasonic techniques for baseline-free damage detection in structures in the context of structural health monitoring (SHM). Conventional SHM methods compare signals obtained from the pristine condition of a structure (baseline signals) with those from the current state, and relate certain changes in the signal characteristics to damage. While this approach has been successful in the laboratory, there are certain drawbacks of depending on baseline signals in real field applications. Data from the pristine condition are not available for most existing structures. Even if they are available, operational and environmental variations tend to mask the effect of damage on the signal characteristics. Most important, baseline measurements may become meaningless while assessing the condition of a structure after an extreme event such as an earthquake or a hurricane. Such events may destroy the sensors themselves and require installation of new sensors at different locations on the structure. Baseline-free structural damage detection can broaden the scope of SHM in the scenarios described above. A detailed discussion on the philosophy of baseline-free damage detection is provided in Chapter 1. Following this discussion, the research questions are formulated. The organization of this document and the major contributions of this research are also listed in this chapter. Chapter 2 describes a fully automated baseline-free technique for notch and crack detection in plates using a collocated pair of piezoelectric wafer transducers for measuring ultrasonic signals. Signal component corresponding to the damage induced mode-converted Lamb waves is extracted by processing the originally measured ultrasonic signals. The damage index is computed as a function of this mode-converted Lamb wave signal component. An over-determined system of Lamb wave measurements is used to find a least-square estimate of the measurement errors. This error estimate serves as the

  8. Detecting small scale CO2 emission structures using OCO-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Eldering, Annmarie; Verhulst, Kristal R.; Miller, Charles E.; Nguyen, Hai M.; Oda, Tomohiro; O'Dell, Christopher; Rao, Preeti; Kahn, Brian; Crisp, David; Gunson, Michael R.; Sanchez, Robert M.; Ashok, Manasa; Pieri, David; Linick, Justin P.; Yuen, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emission structures cover spatial domains of less than 50 km diameter and include cities and transportation networks, as well as fossil fuel production, upgrading and distribution infra-structure. Anthropogenic sources increasingly upset the natural balance between natural carbon sources and sinks. Mitigation of resulting climate change impacts requires management of emissions, and emissions management requires monitoring, reporting and verification. Space-borne measurements provide a unique opportunity to detect, quantify, and analyze small scale and point source emissions on a global scale. NASA's first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the July 2014 launched Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2), now leads the afternoon constellation of satellites (A-Train). Its continuous swath of 2 to 10 km in width and eight footprints across can slice through coincident emission plumes and may provide momentary cross sections. First OCO-2 results demonstrate that we can detect localized source signals in the form of urban total column averaged CO2 enhancements of ~2 ppm against suburban and rural backgrounds. OCO-2's multi-sounding swath observing geometry reveals intra-urban spatial structures reflected in XCO2 data, previously unobserved from space. The transition from single-shot GOSAT soundings detecting urban/rural differences (Kort et al., 2012) to hundreds of soundings per OCO-2 swath opens up the path to future capabilities enabling urban tomography of greenhouse gases. For singular point sources like coal fired power plants, we have developed proxy detections of plumes using bands of imaging spectrometers with sensitivity to SO2 in the thermal infrared (ASTER). This approach provides a means to automate plume detection with subsequent matching and mining of OCO-2 data for enhanced detection efficiency and validation. © California Institute of Technology

  9. Extended Kalman filter based structural damage detection for MR damper controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong; Jiang, Zhaoshuo; Christenson, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The Magneto-rheological (MR) dampers have been widely used in many building and bridge structures against earthquake and wind loadings due to its advantages including mechanical simplicity, high dynamic range, low power requirements, large force capacity, and robustness. However, research about structural damage detection methods for MR damper controlled structures is limited. This paper aims to develop a real-time structural damage detection method for MR damper controlled structures. A novel state space model of MR damper controlled structure is first built by combining the structure's equation of motion and MR damper's hyperbolic tangent model. In this way, the state parameters of both the structure and MR damper are added in the state vector of the state space model. Extended Kalman filter is then used to provide prediction for state variables from measurement data. The two techniques are synergistically combined to identify parameters and track the changes of both structure and MR damper in real time. The proposed method is tested using response data of a three-floor MR damper controlled linear building structure under earthquake excitation. The testing results show that the adaptive extended Kalman filter based approach is capable to estimate not only structural parameters such as stiffness and damping of each floor, but also the parameters of MR damper, so that more insights and understanding of the damage can be obtained. The developed method also demonstrates high damage detection accuracy and light computation, as well as the potential to implement in a structural health monitoring system.

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Oliemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease. PMID:25374670

  11. Spin wave resonance detection using magnetic tunnel junction structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Chong; Fan, Xin; Pan, Liqing; Kou, Xiaoming; Wu, Jun; Yang, Qinghui; Zhang, Huaiwu; Xiao, John Q.

    2011-11-01

    We have demonstrated that spin wave resonance in a permalloy microstrip can be detected by an electrical method based on magnetic tunnel junction structures. The detection method promises high spatial resolution and sensitivity. Both even and odd spin wave resonance modes can be clearly observed in a permalloy microstrip. The spin wave induced voltage is proportional to the input microwave power at each resonance mode. Data analysis using the model of quantized dipole-exchange spin wave resonance suggests the edge pinning of spin wave sensitively depends on the order of the spin wave mode, as well as on the excitation frequency for modes of the higher order.

  12. Fast Detection of Material Deformation through Structural Dissimilarity

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2015-10-29

    Designing materials that are resistant to extreme temperatures and brittleness relies on assessing structural dynamics of samples. Algorithms are critically important to characterize material deformation under stress conditions. Here, we report on our design of coarse-grain parallel algorithms for image quality assessment based on structural information and on crack detection of gigabyte-scale experimental datasets. We show how key steps can be decomposed into distinct processing flows, one based on structural similarity (SSIM) quality measure, and another on spectral content. These algorithms act upon image blocks that fit into memory, and can execute independently. We discuss the scientific relevance of the problem, key developments, and decomposition of complementary tasks into separate executions. We show how to apply SSIM to detect material degradation, and illustrate how this metric can be allied to spectral analysis for structure probing, while using tiled multi-resolution pyramids stored in HDF5 chunked multi-dimensional arrays. Results show that the proposed experimental data representation supports an average compression rate of 10X, and data compression scales linearly with the data size. We also illustrate how to correlate SSIM to crack formation, and how to use our numerical schemes to enable fast detection of deformation from 3D datasets evolving in time.

  13. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  14. TEM investigation of the surface layer structure [111]{sub B2} of the single NiTi crystal modified by the Si-ion beam implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Girsova, S. L. Poletika, T. M.; Meisner, S. N. Meisner, L. L.

    2015-10-27

    The study was carried on for the single NiTi crystals subjected to the Si-ion beam implantation. Using the transmission electron microscopy technique (TEM), the surface layer structure [111]{sub B2} was examined for the treated material. The modified near-surface sublayers were found to have different composition. Thus the uppermost sublayer contained mostly oxides; the lower-lying modified sublayer material was in an amorphous state and the thin underlying sublayer had a defect structure.

  15. Apparatus and method for detecting tampering in flexible structures

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C.; Haynes, Howard D.

    2011-02-01

    A system for monitoring or detecting tampering in a flexible structure includes taking electrical measurements on a sensing cable coupled to the structure, performing spectral analysis on the measured data, and comparing the spectral characteristics of the event to those of known benign and/or known suspicious events. A threshold or trigger value may used to identify an event of interest and initiate data collection. Alternatively, the system may be triggered at preset intervals, triggered manually, or triggered by a signal from another sensing device such as a motion detector. The system may be used to monitor electrical cables and conduits, hoses and flexible ducts, fences and other perimeter control devices, structural cables, flexible fabrics, and other flexible structures.

  16. Evaluation of defibrillation safety and shock reduction in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients with increased time to detection: A randomized SANKS study

    PubMed Central

    Noro, Mahito; Zhu, Xin; Takagi, Takahito; Sahara, Naohiko; Narabayashi, Yuriko; Hashimoto, Hikari; Ito, Naoshi; Enomoto, Yoshinari; Kujime, Shingo; Sakai, Tuyoshi; Sakata, Takao; Matushita, Noriko; Fukamizu, Seiji; Okano, Yoshifumi; Anami, Yoshiaki; Tejima, Tomoyuki; Kuroiwa, Kouji; Ikeda, Takanori; Sakurada, Harumizu; Sugi, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Abstract11Abstract publication information: The abstracts of this study were presented at the conferences below:[1] Mahito N, Naoshi I, Yoshinari E, et al. Evaluation of defibrillation safety with the increased number of sensing to reduce shocks for ventricular fibrillation in Japanese ICD patients. 5th APHRS; 2012.[2] Mahito N, Xin Z, Naoshi I, et al. Evaluation of Defibrillation Safety with the increased Number of Sensing to Reduce Shocks for Ventricular Tachyarrhythmia in Japanese ICD Patients – SANKS STUDY. Venue of the 8th Tawara-Aschoff-Meeting; 2012. Background The need for ways to minimize the number of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks is increasing owing to the risk of its adverse effects on life expectancy. Studies have shown that a longer detection time for ventricular tachyarrhythmia reduces the safety of therapies, in terms of syncope and mortality, but not substantially in terms of the success rate. We aimed to evaluate the effects of increased number of intervals to detect (NID) VF on the safety of ICD shock therapy and on the reduction of inappropriate shocks. Methods The present study was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, crossover study. Randomized VF induction testing with NID 18/24 or 30/40 was performed to compare the success rate of defibrillation with a 25-J shock and the time to detection. Inappropriate shock episodes were simulated retrospectively to evaluate a possibility of episodes avoidable at NID 24/32 and 30/40. Results Thirty-one consecutive patients implanted with an ICD or cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator (CRT-D) were enrolled in this study. The success rate of defibrillation was 100% in both NID groups at the first shock. The time from VF induction to detection showed a significant increase in the NID 30/40 group (6.16±1.29 s vs. 9.00±1.31 s, p<0.001). Among the 120 patients implanted with an ICD or CRT-D, 10 experienced 32 inappropriate shock episodes. The inappropriate shock

  17. Structural Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for a large class of damage detection and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper starts with a brief review of PWAS physical principles and basic modelling and continues by considering the various ways in which PWAS can be used for damage detection: (a) embedded guided-wave ultrasonics, i.e., pitch-catch, pulse-echo, phased arrays, thickness mode; (b) high-frequency modal sensing, i.e., the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance method; (c) passive detection, i.e., acoustic emission and impact detection. An example of crack-like damage detection and localization with PWAS phased arrays on a small metallic plate is given. The modelling of PWAS detection of disbond damage in adhesive joints is achieved with the analytical transfer matrix method (TMM). The analytical methods offer the advantage of fast computation which enables parameter studies and carpet plots. A parametric study of the effect of crack size and PWAS location on disbond detection is presented. The power and energy transduction between PWAS and structure is studied analytically with a wave propagation method. Special attention is given to the mechatronics modeling of the complete transduction cycle from electrical excitation into ultrasonic acoustic waves by the piezoelectric effect, the transfer through the structure, and finally reverse piezoelectric transduction to generate the received electric signal. It is found that the combination of PWAS size and wave frequency/wavelength play an important role in identifying transduction maxima and minima that could be exploited to achieve an optimum power-efficient design. The multi-physics finite element method (MP-FEM), which permits fine discretization of damaged regions and complicated structural geometries, is used to study the generation of guided waves in a plate from an electrically excited transmitter PWAS and the capture of these waves as electric

  18. Structural and mechanical implications of PMMA implant shape and interface geometry in cranioplasty--A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ridwan-Pramana, Angela; Marcián, Petr; Borák, Libor; Narra, Nathaniel; Forouzanfar, Tim; Wolff, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This computational study investigates the effect of shape (defect contour curvature) and bone-implant interface (osteotomy angle) on the stress distribution within PMMA skull implants. Using finite element methodology, 15 configurations--combinations of simplified synthetic geometric shapes (circular, square, triangular, irregular) and interface angulations--were simulated under 50N static loads. Furthermore, the implant fixation devices were modelled and analysed in detail. Negative osteotomy configurations demonstrated the largest stresses in the implant (275 MPa), fixation devices (1258 MPa) and bone strains (0.04). The circular implant with zero and positive osteotomy performed well with maximum observed magnitudes of--implant stress (1.2 MPa and 1.2 MPa), fixation device stress (11.2 MPa and 2.2 MPa), bone strain (0.218e-3 and 0.750e-4). The results suggest that the preparation of defect sites is a critical procedure. Of the greatest importance is the angle at which the edges of the defect are sawed. If under an external load, the implant has no support from the interface and the stresses are transferred to the fixation devices. This can endanger their material integrity and lead to unphysiological strains in the adjacent bone, potentially compromising the bone morphology required for anchoring. These factors can ultimately weaken the stability of the entire implant assembly. PMID:26646634

  19. Statistical method for detecting structural change in the growth process.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Atsushi

    2008-03-01

    Due to competition among individual trees and other exogenous factors that change the growth environment, each tree grows following its own growth trend with some structural changes in growth over time. In the present article, a new method is proposed to detect a structural change in the growth process. We formulate the method as a simple statistical test for signal detection without constructing any specific model for the structural change. To evaluate the p-value of the test, the tube method is developed because the regular distribution theory is insufficient. Using two sets of tree diameter growth data sampled from planted forest stands of Cryptomeria japonica in Japan, we conduct an analysis of identifying the effect of thinning on the growth process as a structural change. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method is useful to identify the structural change caused by thinning. We also provide the properties of the method in terms of the size and power of the test. PMID:17608782

  20. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G [Knoxville, TN; Rajic, Slobodan [Knoxville, TN; Datskou, Irene [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well structure, physical stresses are created within the sensor, similar to a "bimetallic effect." The stresses cause the sensor to bend. The extent of deflection of the sensor can be measured through any of a variety of conventional means to provide a measurement of the photons striking the sensor. A large number of such sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional array to provide imaging capability.

  1. Sensor failure detection using generalized parity relations for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1989-01-01

    Analytical redundancy may be preferable to hardware redundancy in failure detection/isolation tasks for such large-scale systems as space structures. Generalized single-sensor parity relations are presently applied to this problem; they are noted to yield a very simple isolation logic, and their generation is found to be extremely rapid, even in the case of extremely complex systems, provided only that the eigenstructure of the system be known. Their implementation is, however, extremely sensitive to modeling errors and noise.

  2. A method for detecting structural deterioration in bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. A., Jr.; Reed, R. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of detecting deterioration in bridge structures is studied with the use of Randomdec analysis. Randomdec signatures, derived from the ambient bridge vibrations in the acoustic range, were obtained for a girder bridge over a period of a year to show the insensitivity of the signatures to environmental changes. A laboratory study was also conducted to show the sensitivity of signatures to fatigue cracks on the order of a centimeter in length in steel beams.

  3. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  4. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosobrodova, E.; Kondyurin, A.; Chrzanowski, W.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2014-06-01

    At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of Cdbnd O bonds and much lower concentration of O-H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered island-like structure were observed.

  5. The effect of local IL-4 delivery or CCL2 blockade on implant fixation and bone structural properties in a mouse model of wear particle induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taishi; Pajarinen, Jukka; Behn, Anthony; Jiang, Xinyi; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Yao, Zhenyu; Egashira, Kensuke; Yang, Fan; Goodman, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Modulation of macrophage polarization and prevention of CCL2-induced macrophage chemotaxis are emerging strategies to reduce wear particle induced osteolysis and aseptic total joint replacement loosening. In this study, the effect of continuous IL-4 delivery or bioactive implant coating that constitutively releases a protein inhibitor of CCL2 signaling (7ND) on particle induced osteolysis were studied in the murine continuous femoral intramedullary particle infusion model. Polyethylene particles with or without IL-4 were infused into mouse distal femurs implanted with hollow titanium rods using subcutaneous infusion pumps. In another experimental group, particles were infused into the femur through a 7ND coated rod. After 4 weeks, fixation of the implant was assessed using a pullout test. The volume of trabecular bone and the geometry of the local cortical bone were assessed by µCT and the corresponding structural properties of the cortical bone determined by torsional testing. Continuous IL-4 delivery led to increased trabecular bone volume as well as enhanced local bone geometry and structural properties, while 7ND implant coating did not have effect on these parameters. The results suggest that local IL-4 treatment is a promising strategy to mitigate wear particle induced osteolysis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2255-2262, 2016. PMID:27114284

  6. Airframe structural damage detection: a non-linear structural surface intensity based technique.

    PubMed

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Conlon, Stephen C; Barnard, Andrew R

    2011-04-01

    The non-linear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection technique is extended to airframe applications. The selected test structure is an upper cabin airframe section from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter (Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford, CT). Structural damage is simulated through an impact resonator device, designed to simulate the induced vibration effects typical of non-linear behaving damage. An experimental study is conducted to prove the applicability of NSSI on complex mechanical systems as well as to evaluate the minimum sensor and actuator requirements. The NSSI technique is shown to have high damage detection sensitivity, covering an extended substructure with a single sensing location. PMID:21476618

  7. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration. PMID:23266005

  8. Ti-Nb-(Zr,Ta) superelastic alloys for medical implants: Thermomechanical processing, structure, phase transformations and functional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinskiy, Sergey

    The aim of this project is to develop a new class of orthopaedic implant materials that combine the excellent biocompatibility of pure titanium with the outstanding biomechanical compatibility of Ti-Ni-based shape memory alloys. The most suitable candidates for such a role are Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Ta near-beta shape memory alloys. Since this class of materials was developed quite recently, the influence of thermomechanical treatment on their structure and functional properties has not as yet been the subject of any comprehensive study. Consequently, this project is focused on the interrelations between the composition, the microstructure and the functional properties of superelastic Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Ta alloys for biomedical application. The principal objective is to improve the functional properties of these alloys, more specifically their superelastic properties and fatigue resistance, through optimization of the alloys' composition and thermomechanical processing. It is shown in this thesis that the structure and functional properties of Ti-Nb-based shape memory alloys can be effectively controlled by thermomechanical processing including cold deformation with post-deformation annealing and ageing. It is also shown that the formation of nanosubgrain substructure leads to a significant improvement of superelasticity and fatigue resistance in these alloys. The influence of ageing on the ω-phase precipitation kinetics and, consequently, on the functional properties of Ti-Nb-Zr and Ti-Nb-Ta alloys is also observed. Based on the results obtained, optimized regimes of thermomechanical treatment resulting in a best combination of functional properties are recommended for each alloy, from the orthopaedic implant materials standpoint. An original tensile stage for a low-temperature chamber of an X-ray diffractometer is developed and used in this project. A unique low-temperature (-150...+100°C) comparative in situ X-ray study of the transformations' features and crystal

  9. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  10. A Stochastic Model for Detecting Overlapping and Hierarchical Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiao; Jin, Di; Guo, Xiaojie; Tang, Xianchao

    2015-01-01

    Community detection is a fundamental problem in the analysis of complex networks. Recently, many researchers have concentrated on the detection of overlapping communities, where a vertex may belong to more than one community. However, most current methods require the number (or the size) of the communities as a priori information, which is usually unavailable in real-world networks. Thus, a practical algorithm should not only find the overlapping community structure, but also automatically determine the number of communities. Furthermore, it is preferable if this method is able to reveal the hierarchical structure of networks as well. In this work, we firstly propose a generative model that employs a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) formulization with a l2,1 norm regularization term, balanced by a resolution parameter. The NMF has the nature that provides overlapping community structure by assigning soft membership variables to each vertex; the l2,1 regularization term is a technique of group sparsity which can automatically determine the number of communities by penalizing too many nonempty communities; and hence the resolution parameter enables us to explore the hierarchical structure of networks. Thereafter, we derive the multiplicative update rule to learn the model parameters, and offer the proof of its correctness. Finally, we test our approach on a variety of synthetic and real-world networks, and compare it with some state-of-the-art algorithms. The results validate the superior performance of our new method. PMID:25822148

  11. Optimization of dipole structures for detection of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhena, Henrique; McMeekin, Scott G.; Holmes-Smith, A. Sheila; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2015-05-01

    Metamaterials are being increasingly used as highly sensitive detection devices. The design of these structures and the ability to effect changes in response through small changes in the geometry of their constituent elements allow for the enhancement of known analysis techniques such as infrared or Raman spectroscopy. High electromagnetic fields have been shown to occur in features such as small gaps and sharp tips and these so called "hot-spots" are the main focus of recent work in Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). Previous work has shown dipole pairs with small gaps between them to be suitable for the SERS detection of very small amounts of organic compounds. The main difficulties lie in the small dimensions (<=100 nm) necessary to attain a significant response at the typical Raman pump wavelengths. Also the small size of the gaps is a challenge when it comes to prevent "bridging" between the structures during the fabrication process. In this work we show, through simulations, that carefully controlling the length of dipolar structures as well as the gap between these dipoles a resonant response can be achieved close to the pump Raman wavelengths. Also, we see that increasing the width of the dipole pair shifts the resonant peaks to longer wavelengths. By optimizing their geometry, more efficient and easier to fabricate structures can be used as environmental organic sensors.

  12. A stochastic model for detecting overlapping and hierarchical community structure.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiao; Jin, Di; Guo, Xiaojie; Tang, Xianchao

    2015-01-01

    Community detection is a fundamental problem in the analysis of complex networks. Recently, many researchers have concentrated on the detection of overlapping communities, where a vertex may belong to more than one community. However, most current methods require the number (or the size) of the communities as a priori information, which is usually unavailable in real-world networks. Thus, a practical algorithm should not only find the overlapping community structure, but also automatically determine the number of communities. Furthermore, it is preferable if this method is able to reveal the hierarchical structure of networks as well. In this work, we firstly propose a generative model that employs a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) formulization with a l(2,1) norm regularization term, balanced by a resolution parameter. The NMF has the nature that provides overlapping community structure by assigning soft membership variables to each vertex; the l(2,1) regularization term is a technique of group sparsity which can automatically determine the number of communities by penalizing too many nonempty communities; and hence the resolution parameter enables us to explore the hierarchical structure of networks. Thereafter, we derive the multiplicative update rule to learn the model parameters, and offer the proof of its correctness. Finally, we test our approach on a variety of synthetic and real-world networks, and compare it with some state-of-the-art algorithms. The results validate the superior performance of our new method. PMID:25822148

  13. Active loose bolt detection in a complex satellite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Whitney D.; Doyle, Derek; Arritt, Brandon

    2010-03-01

    This work focuses on the detection, localization, and quantification of damage in the form of loose bolts on an isogrid satellite structure. In the process of rapid satellite development and deployment, it is necessary to quickly complete several levels of validation tests. Structural Health Monitoring methods are being investigated as a means for reducing the number of validation tests required. This method for detecting loose bolts enables quick confirmation of proper assembly, and verification that structural fasteners are still intact after validation testing. Within this testing framework, feature selection is presented as well as a localization methodology. Quantification of fastener torque is also developed. Locating damage in an isogrid structure is complicated by the directionally dependent dispersion characteristics caused by a propagating wave passing through ribs and holes. For this reason, an actuation frequency with the best first wave arrival clarity is selected. A methodology is presented in which a time map is constructed for each actuator-sensor pair which establishes times of flight for each location on the sample. Differences in time between healthy and damaged sensor signals are then extracted and used to create a map of possible damage locations. These resulting solution maps are merged yielding a final damage position. Fastener torque is correlated to a damage parameter, and the loose bolt position is calculated within 3 cm.

  14. Photogrammetric detection technique for rotor blades structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enei, C.; Bernardini, G.; Serafini, J.; Mattioni, L.; Ficuciello, C.; Vezzari, V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an innovative use of photogrammetric detection techniques to experimentally estimate structural/inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades. The identification algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions are an extension of the ones proposed by Larsen, whereas the procedure for torsional properties determination (stiffness and shear center position) is based on the Euler-Prandtl beam theory. These algorithms rely on measurements performed through photogrammetric detection, which requires the collection of digital photos allowing the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D pictures. The displacements are evaluated by comparing the positions of markers in loaded and reference configuration. Being the applied loads known, the structural characteristics can be directly obtained from the measured displacements. The accuracy of the proposed identification algorithms has been firstly verified by comparison with numerical and experimental data, and then applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopter applications.

  15. Nondestructive Structural Damage Detection in Flexible Space Structures Using Vibration Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricles, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft are susceptible to structural damage over their operating life from impact, environmental loads, and fatigue. Structural damage that is not detected and not corrected may potentially cause more damage and eventually catastrophic structural failure. NASA's current fleet of reusable spacecraft, namely the Space Shuttle, has been flown on several missions. In addition, configurations of future NASA space structures, e.g. Space Station Freedom, are larger and more complex than current structures, making them more susceptible to damage as well as being more difficult to inspect. Consequently, a reliable structural damage detection capability is essential to maintain the flight safety of these structures. Visual inspections alone can not locate impending material failure (fatigue cracks, yielding); it can only observe post-failure situations. An alternative approach is to develop an inspection and monitoring system based on vibration characterization that assesses the integrity of structural and mechanical components. A methodology for detecting structural damage is presented. This methodology is based on utilizing modal test data in conjunction with a correlated analytical model of the structure to: (1) identify the structural dynamic characteristics (resonant frequencies and mode shapes) from measurements of ambient motions and/or force excitation; (2) calculate modal residual force vectors to identify the location of structural damage; and (3) conduct a weighted sensitivity analysis in order to assess the extent of mass and stiffness variations, where structural damage is characterized by stiffness reductions. The approach is unique from other existing approaches in that varying system mass and stiffness, mass center locations, the perturbation of both the natural frequencies and mode shapes, and statistical confidence factors for structural parameters and experimental instrumentation are all accounted for directly.

  16. Detection of bondline delaminations in multilayer structures with lossy components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Winfree, William P.; Smith, B. T.; Heyman, Joseph H.

    1988-01-01

    The detection of bondline delaminations in multilayer structures using ultrasonic reflection techniques is a generic problem in adhesively bonded composite structures such as the Space Shuttles's Solid Rocket Motors (SRM). Standard pulse echo ultrasonic techniques do not perform well for a composite resonator composed of a resonant layer combined with attenuating layers. Excessive ringing in the resonant layer tends to mask internal echoes emanating from the attenuating layers. The SRM is made up of a resonant steel layer backed by layers of adhesive, rubber, liner and fuel, which are ultrasonically attenuating. The structure's response is modeled as a lossy ultrasonic transmission line. The model predicts that the acoustic response of the system is sensitive to delaminations at the interior bondlines in a few narrow frequency bands. These predictions are verified by measurements on a fabricated system. Successful imaging of internal delaminations is sensitive to proper selection of the interrogating frequency. Images of fabricated bondline delaminations are presented based on these studies.

  17. [Silicone breast implants].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M; Brandt, B; Breiting, V B; Christensen, L H; Thomsen, J L

    1989-12-18

    A brief review of the use of silicone breast implants, their structure, methods of implantation and complications is presented. Acute complications are rare, being mainly infection and hematoma. Long-term complications, on the contrary, are common, consisting mainly of capsular contracture around the prosthesis with subsequent pain and deformation of the breast. More rarely silicone granulomas form, and prosthesis rupture or herniation occurs. The importance of silicone leakage for these complications is discussed separately as well as the treatment of and prevention of capsular contracture and demonstration of silicone in tissue. A critical attitude towards the use of silicone breast implants, when these are used for purely cosmetic purposes, is recommended at present. New improved types of silicone breast implants are currently being tested clinically. PMID:2692262

  18. Multicycle rapid thermal annealing optimization of Mg-implanted GaN: Evolution of surface, optical, and structural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlee, Jordan D.; Feigelson, Boris N.; Anderson, Travis J.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Mastro, Michael A.; Eddy, Charles R.; Hobart, Karl D.; Kub, Francis J.; Tadjer, Marko J.

    2014-08-14

    The first step of a multi-cycle rapid thermal annealing process was systematically studied. The surface, structure, and optical properties of Mg implanted GaN thin films annealed at temperatures ranging from 900 to 1200 °C were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Nomarski microscopy. The GaN thin films are capped with two layers of in-situ metal organic chemical vapor deposition -grown AlN and annealed in 24 bar of N{sub 2} overpressure to avoid GaN decomposition. The crystal quality of the GaN improves with increasing annealing temperature as confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy and the full widths at half maximums of the E{sub 2} and A{sub 1} (LO) Raman modes. The crystal quality of films annealed above 1100 °C exceeds the quality of the as-grown films. At 1200 °C, Mg is optically activated, which is determined by photoluminescence measurements. However, at 1200 °C, the GaN begins to decompose as evidenced by pit formation on the surface of the samples. Therefore, it was determined that the optimal temperature for the first step in a multi-cycle rapid thermal anneal process should be conducted at 1150 °C due to crystal quality and surface morphology considerations.

  19. The challenges and importance of structural variation detection in livestock

    PubMed Central

    Bickhart, Derek M.; Liu, George E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in humans and other model organisms have demonstrated that structural variants (SVs) comprise a substantial proportion of variation among individuals of each species. Many of these variants have been linked to debilitating diseases in humans, thereby cementing the importance of refining methods for their detection. Despite progress in the field, reliable detection of SVs still remains a problem even for human subjects. Many of the underlying problems that make SVs difficult to detect in humans are amplified in livestock species, whose lower quality genome assemblies and incomplete gene annotation can often give rise to false positive SV discoveries. Regardless of the challenges, SV detection is just as important for livestock researchers as it is for human researchers, given that several productive traits and diseases have been linked to copy number variations (CNVs) in cattle, sheep, and pig. Already, there is evidence that many beneficial SVs have been artificially selected in livestock such as a duplication of the agouti signaling protein gene that causes white coat color in sheep. In this review, we will list current SV and CNV discoveries in livestock and discuss the problems that hinder routine discovery and tracking of these polymorphisms. We will also discuss the impacts of selective breeding on CNV and SV frequencies and mention how SV genotyping could be used in the future to improve genetic selection. PMID:24600474

  20. [Implant allergies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2010-03-01

    An increasing number of patients receive and benefit from osteosynthesis materials or artificial joint replacement. The most common complications are mechanical problems or infection. Metals like nickel, chromium and cobalt as well as bone cement components like acrylates and gentamicin are potential contact allergens which can cause intolerance reactions to implants. Eczema, delayed wound/bone healing, recurrent effusions, pain and implant loosening all have been described as manifestation of implant allergy. In contrast to the high incidence of cutaneous metal allergy, allergies associated with implants are rare. Diagnosis of metal implant allergy is still difficult. Thus differential diagnoses--in particular infection--have to be excluded and a combined approach of allergologic diagnostics by patch test and histopathology of peri-implant tissue is recommended. It is still unknown which conditions induce allergic sensitization to implants or trigger peri-implant allergic reactions in the case of preexisting cutaneous metal allergy. Despite the risk of developing complications being unclear, titanium based osteosynthesis materials are recommended for metal allergic patients and the use of metal-metal couplings in arthroplasty is not recommended for such patients. If the regular CoCr-polyethylene articulation is employed, the patient should give informed written consent. PMID:20204719

  1. Online anomaly detection in crowd scenes via structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Fang, Jianwu; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal behavior detection in crowd scenes is continuously a challenge in the field of computer vision. For tackling this problem, this paper starts from a novel structure modeling of crowd behavior. We first propose an informative structural context descriptor (SCD) for describing the crowd individual, which originally introduces the potential energy function of particle's interforce in solid-state physics to intuitively conduct vision contextual cueing. For computing the crowd SCD variation effectively, we then design a robust multi-object tracker to associate the targets in different frames, which employs the incremental analytical ability of the 3-D discrete cosine transform (DCT). By online spatial-temporal analyzing the SCD variation of the crowd, the abnormality is finally localized. Our contribution mainly lies on three aspects: 1) the new exploration of abnormal detection from structure modeling where the motion difference between individuals is computed by a novel selective histogram of optical flow that makes the proposed method can deal with more kinds of anomalies; 2) the SCD description that can effectively represent the relationship among the individuals; and 3) the 3-D DCT multi-object tracker that can robustly associate the limited number of (instead of all) targets which makes the tracking analysis in high density crowd situation feasible. Experimental results on several publicly available crowd video datasets verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24988603

  2. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  3. A structural framework for anomalous change detection and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    We present a spatially adaptive scheme for automatically searching a pair of images of a scene for unusual and interesting changes. Our motivation is to bring into play structural aspects of image features alongside the spectral attributes used for anomalous change detection (ACD). We leverage a small but informative subset of pixels, namely edge pixels of the images, as anchor points of a Delaunay triangulation to jointly decompose the images into a set of triangular regions, called trixels, which are spectrally uniform. Such decomposition helps in image regularization by simple-function approximation on a feature-adaptive grid. Applying ACD to this trixel grid instead of pixels offers several advantages. It allows: (1) edge-preserving smoothing of images, (2) speed-up of spatial computations by significantly reducing the representation of the images, and (3) the easy recovery of structure of the detected anomalous changes by associating anomalous trixels with polygonal image features. The latter facility further enables the application of shape-theoretic criteria and algorithms to characterize the changes and recognize them as interesting or not. This incorporation of spatial information has the potential to filter out some spurious changes, such as due to parallax, shadows, and misregistration, by identifying and filtering out those that are structurally similar and spatially pervasive. Our framework supports the joint spatial and spectral analysis of images, potentially enabling the design of more robust ACD algorithms.

  4. Tools to detect structures in dynamical systems using Jet Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Palau, Daniel; Masdemont, Josep J.; Gómez, Gerard

    2015-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the development of some dynamical indicators that allow the determination of regions and structures that separate different dynamic regimes in autonomous and non-autonomous dynamical systems. The underlying idea is closely related to the Lagrangian coherent structures concept introduced by Haller. In the present paper, instead of using the Cauchy-Green tensor, that determines the domains where the flow associated to a differential equation is expanding in the normal direction, the Jet Transport methodology is used. This is a semi-numerical tool, that has as basic ingredients a polynomial algebra package and a numerical integration method, allowing, at each integration step, the propagation under a flow of a neighbourhood U instead of a single initial condition. The output of the procedure is a polynomial in several variables that represents the image of U up to a selected order, containing high order terms of the variational equations. Using these high order representation, the places where the normal direction expands can be easily detected, in a similar manner as the procedures for calculating the Lagrangian coherent structures do. In order to illustrate the methodology, first the results obtained in the determination of the separatrices of the simple and the periodically perturbed pendulum are given. Later, the applications to the circular restricted three body problem are considered, where the aim is the detection of invariant manifolds of libration point orbits, as well as in the non-autonomous vector field defined by the elliptic restricted three body problem.

  5. Efficient measurement-device-independent detection of multipartite entanglement structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Witnessing entanglement is crucial in quantum information processing. With properly preparing ancillary states, it has been shown previously that genuine entanglement can be witnessed without trusting measurement devices. In this work we generalize the scenario and show that generic multipartite entanglement structures, including entanglement of subsystems and entanglement depth, can be witnessed via measurement-device-independent means. As the original measurement-device-independent entanglement witness scheme exploits only one out of four Bell measurement outcomes for each party, a direct generalization to multipartite quantum states will inevitably cause inefficiency in entanglement detection after taking account of statistical fluctuations. To resolve this problem, we also present a way to utilize all the measurement outcomes. The scheme is efficient for multipartite entanglement detection and can be realized with state-of-the-art technologies.

  6. Socially Constrained Structural Learning for Groups Detection in Crowd.

    PubMed

    Solera, Francesco; Calderara, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita

    2016-05-01

    Modern crowd theories agree that collective behavior is the result of the underlying interactions among small groups of individuals. In this work, we propose a novel algorithm for detecting social groups in crowds by means of a Correlation Clustering procedure on people trajectories. The affinity between crowd members is learned through an online formulation of the Structural SVM framework and a set of specifically designed features characterizing both their physical and social identity, inspired by Proxemic theory, Granger causality, DTW and Heat-maps. To adhere to sociological observations, we introduce a loss function ( G -MITRE) able to deal with the complexity of evaluating group detection performances. We show our algorithm achieves state-of-the-art results when relying on both ground truth trajectories and tracklets previously extracted by available detector/tracker systems. PMID:27046841

  7. Detection of damage in welded structure using experimental modal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Husain, N.; Ouyang, H.

    2011-07-01

    A typical automotive structure could contain thousands of spot weld joints that contribute significantly to the vehicle's structural stiffness and dynamic characteristics. However, some of these joints may be imperfect or even absent during the manufacturing process and they are also highly susceptible to damage due to operational and environmental conditions during the vehicle lifetime. Therefore, early detection and estimation of damage are important so necessary actions can be taken to avoid further problems. Changes in physical parameters due to existence of damage in a structure often leads to alteration of vibration modes; thus demonstrating the dependency between the vibration characteristics and the physical properties of structures. A sensitivity-based model updating method, performed using a combination of MATLAB and NASTRAN, has been selected for the purpose of this work. The updating procedure is regarded as parameter identification which aims to bring the numerical prediction to be as closely as possible to the measured natural frequencies and mode shapes data of the damaged structure in order to identify the damage parameters (characterised by the reductions in the Young's modulus of the weld patches to indicate the loss of material/stiffness at the damage region).

  8. Detection of community structure in networks based on community coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hu; Wei, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Determining community structure in networks is fundamental to the analysis of the structural and functional properties of those networks, including social networks, computer networks, and biological networks. Modularity function Q, which was proposed by Newman and Girvan, was once the most widely used criterion for evaluating the partition of a network into communities. However, modularity Q is subject to a serious resolution limit. In this paper, we propose a new function for evaluating the partition of a network into communities. This is called community coefficient C. Using community coefficient C, we can automatically identify the ideal number of communities in the network, without any prior knowledge. We demonstrate that community coefficient C is superior to the modularity Q and does not have a resolution limit. We also compared the two widely used community structure partitioning methods, the hierarchical partitioning algorithm and the normalized cuts (Ncut) spectral partitioning algorithm. We tested these methods on computer-generated networks and real-world networks whose community structures were already known. The Ncut algorithm and community coefficient C were found to produce better results than hierarchical algorithms. Unlike several other community detection methods, the proposed method effectively partitioned the networks into different community structures and indicated the correct number of communities.

  9. Defects in ion-implanted hcp-titanium: A first-principles study of electronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raji, Abdulrafiu T.; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Scandolo, Sandro; Nsengiyumva, Schadrack; Härting, Margit; Britton, David T.

    2011-12-01

    The electronic structures of hexagonal closed-packed (h.c.p) titanium containing a vacancy and krypton impurity atoms at various insertion sites are calculated by first-principles methods in the framework of the density-functional theory (DFT). The density of states (DOS) for titanium containing a vacancy defect shows resonance-like features. Also, the bulk electron density decreases from ˜0.15/Å 3 to ˜0.05/Å 3 at the vacancy centre. Electronic structure calculations have been performed to investigate what underlies the krypton site preference in titanium. The DOS of the nearest-neighbour (NN) titanium atoms to the octahedral krypton appears to be less distorted (relative to pure titanium) when compared to the NN titanium atoms to the tetrahedral krypton. The electronic density deformation maps show that polarization of the titanium atoms is stronger when the krypton atom is located at the tetrahedral site. Since krypton is a closed-shell atom, thus precluding any bonding with the titanium atoms, we may conclude that the polarization of the electrons in the vicinity of the inserted krypton atoms and the distortion of the DOS of the NN titanium atoms to the krypton serve to indicate which defect site is preferred when a krypton atom is inserted into titanium. Based on these considerations, we conclude that the substitutional site is the most favourable one, and the octahedral is the preferred interstitial site, in agreement with recent DFT calculations of the energetics of krypton impurity sites.

  10. Formation of donor centers upon the annealing of silicon light-emitting structures implanted with oxygen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A. Danilov, D. V.; Aleksandrov, O. V.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Sakharov, V. I.; Serenkov, I. T.; Shek, E. I.; Trapeznikova, I. N.

    2015-03-15

    It is found that the implantation of silicon with oxygen ions and subsequent annealing at high temperatures are accompanied by the formation of electrically active donor centers and by the p-n conversion of the conductivity of silicon. The concentration and spatial distribution of these centers depend on the annealing temperature. The results are accounted for by the interaction of oxygen atoms with intrinsic point defects formed upon the annealing of implantation damages.

  11. Enhancement of local bone remodeling in osteoporotic rabbits by biomimic multilayered structures on Ti6Al4V implants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Luo, Zhong; Hu, Yan; Shen, Xinkun; Li, Menghuan; Li, Liqi; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Weihu; Liu, Peng; Cai, Kaiyong

    2016-06-01

    To enhance long-term survival of titanium implants in patients with osteoporosis, chitosan/gelatin multilayers containing bone morphogenetic protein 2(BMP2) and an antiosteoporotic agent of calcitonin (CT) are deposited on the Ti6Al4V (TC4) implants through layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic assembly technique. Here, the obtained titanium alloy implant (TC4/LBL/CT/BMP2) can regulate the release of loaded calcitonin and BMP2 agents in a sustaining manner to accelerate the bone formation and simultaneously inhibit bone resorption. In vitro results show that the bone-related cells on TC4/LBL/CT/BMP2 present the lowest production level of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) but the highest (p < 0.05) level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin production, mineralization capacity and osteoblast-related gene expression among all groups after treatment for 7 or 21 days, respectively. Besides, in vivo studies of micro-CT analysis, routine histological and immunohistochemical analysis also collectively demonstrate that the TC4/LBL/CT/BMP2 implant can dramatically promote the formation and remodeling of new bone in osteoporotic rabbits after implantation for 30 days and 90 days, respectively. In vivo push-out testing further confirms that the TC4/LBL/CT/BMP2 implant has the highest (p < 0.01) interfacial shear strength and favorable bone-implant osseointegration. Overall, this study establishes a simple and profound methodology to fabricate a biofunctional TC4 implant for the treatment of local osteoporotic fractures in vivo. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1437-1451, 2016. PMID:26822259

  12. The role of well-defined nanotopography of titanium implants on osseointegration: cellular and molecular events in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karazisis, Dimitrios; Ballo, Ahmed M; Petronis, Sarunas; Agheli, Hossein; Emanuelsson, Lena; Thomsen, Peter; Omar, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms governing the cellular interactions with well-defined nanotopography are not well described in vivo. This is partly due to the difficulty in isolating a particular effect of nanotopography from other surface properties. This study employed colloidal lithography for nanofabrication on titanium implants in combination with an in vivo sampling procedure and different analytical techniques. The aim was to elucidate the effect of well-defined nanotopography on the molecular, cellular, and structural events of osseointegration. Materials and methods Titanium implants were nanopatterned (Nano) with semispherical protrusions using colloidal lithography. Implants, with and without nanotopography, were implanted in rat tibia and retrieved after 3, 6, and 28 days. Retrieved implants were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, histology, immunohistochemistry, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Results Surface characterization showed that the nanotopography was well defined in terms of shape (semispherical), size (79±6 nm), and distribution (31±2 particles/µm2). EDS showed similar levels of titanium, oxygen, and carbon for test and control implants, confirming similar chemistry. The molecular analysis of the retrieved implants revealed that the expression levels of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and the osteoclastic marker, CatK, were reduced in cells adherent to the Nano implants. This was consistent with the observation of less CD163-positive macrophages in the tissue surrounding the Nano implant. Furthermore, periostin immunostaining was frequently detected around the Nano implant, indicating higher osteogenic activity. This was supported by the EDS analysis of the retrieved implants showing higher content of calcium and phosphate on the Nano implants. Conclusion The results show that Nano implants elicit less periimplant macrophage infiltration and downregulate the early expression of inflammatory (TNF-α) and

  13. DAMAGE DETECTION IN PLATE STRUCTURES USING MODAL POWER FLOW ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Wong, W. O.; Cheng, L.

    2010-05-28

    The power flow and energy distribution of a vibration mode of a damaged plate is studied experimentally. Variation of the modal reactive power distribution of a damaged plate is experimentally evaluated with a scanning LDV and compared to the theoretical predictions. Large variation of local reactive power flow in or around the damage region of a plate under resonant vibration is found to be related to the change of strain and kinetic energies in the damage region. Feasibility of damage identification based on the detection of this local variation of modal reactive power flow in a structure is studied.

  14. Fast algorithm for detecting community structure in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E.

    2004-06-01

    Many networks display community structure—groups of vertices within which connections are dense but between which they are sparser—and sensitive computer algorithms have in recent years been developed for detecting this structure. These algorithms, however, are computationally demanding, which limits their application to small networks. Here we describe an algorithm which gives excellent results when tested on both computer-generated and real-world networks and is much faster, typically thousands of times faster, than previous algorithms. We give several example applications, including one to a collaboration network of more than 50 000 physicists.

  15. Structure-Assisted Functional Anchor Implantation in Robust Metal-Organic Frameworks with Ultra large Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Feng, DW; Zhou, HC

    2015-02-04

    A facile functionalization assisted by the structural attributes of PCN-333 has been studied while maintaining the integrity of the parent MOF including ultralarge pores, chemical robustness, and crystallinity. Herein we thoroughly analyzed ligand exchange phenomena in PCN-333 and demonstrate that the extent of exchange can be tailored by varying the exchange conditions as potential applications may require. Through this method a variety of functional groups are incorporated into PCN-333. To further show the capabilities of this system introduction of a BODIPY fluorophore as a secondary functionality was performed to the functionalized framework via a click reaction. We anticipate the PCN-333 with functional anchor can serve as a stable platform for further chemistry to be explored in future applications

  16. Structure-Assisted Functional Anchor Implantation in Robust Metal–Organic Frameworks with Ultralarge Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jihye; Feng, Dawei; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-02-04

    A facile functionalization assisted by the structural attributes of PCN-333 has been studied while maintaining the integrity of the parent MOF including ultralarge pores, chemical robustness, and crystallinity. Herein we thoroughly analyzed ligand exchange phenomena in PCN-333 and demonstrate that the extent of exchange can be tailored by varying the exchange conditions as potential applications may require. Through this method a variety of functional groups are incorporated into PCN-333. To further show the capabilities of this system introduction of a BODIPY fluorophore as a secondary functionality was performed to the functionalized framework via a click reaction. We anticipate the PCN-333 with functional anchor can serve as a stable platform for further chemistry to be explored in future applications.

  17. Interest area selection for navigation based on structured edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao; Shang, Ke; Li, ShaoJun; Dou, Hao; Tian, JinWen; Ming, Delie

    2015-12-01

    The scene matching based navigation is an important precision navigation technology for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Selection of interest area where reference image is made has an important influence on the precision of matching result besides the performance of match algorithm. In this paper, a method to select interest area based on structured edge detection is proposed. We use a data driven approach that classifies each pixel with a typical structured edge label. We propose a method that combines these labels into a feature measuring suitable to match of a region. Then a SVM classifier is trained to classify the features and get the final result of the selection of interest area. The experimental result shows that the proposed method is valid and effective.

  18. A Coupled Approach for Structural Damage Detection with Incomplete Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Cao, Timothy; Kaouk, Mo; Zimmerman, David

    2013-01-01

    This historical work couples model order reduction, damage detection, dynamic residual/mode shape expansion, and damage extent estimation to overcome the incomplete measurements problem by using an appropriate undamaged structural model. A contribution of this work is the development of a process to estimate the full dynamic residuals using the columns of a spring connectivity matrix obtained by disassembling the structural stiffness matrix. Another contribution is the extension of an eigenvector filtering procedure to produce full-order mode shapes that more closely match the measured active partition of the mode shapes using a set of modified Ritz vectors. The full dynamic residuals and full mode shapes are used as inputs to the minimum rank perturbation theory to provide an estimate of damage location and extent. The issues associated with this process are also discussed as drivers of near-term development activities to understand and improve this approach.

  19. Community structures and role detection in music networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitelbaum, T.; Balenzuela, P.; Cano, P.; Buldú, Javier M.

    2008-12-01

    We analyze the existence of community structures in two different social networks using data obtained from similarity and collaborative features between musical artists. Our analysis reveals some characteristic organizational patterns and provides information about the driving forces behind the growth of the networks. In the similarity network, we find a strong correlation between clusters of artists and musical genres. On the other hand, the collaboration network shows two different kinds of communities: rather small structures related to music bands and geographic zones, and much bigger communities built upon collaborative clusters with a high number of participants related through the period the artists were active. Finally, we detect the leading artists inside their corresponding communities and analyze their roles in the network by looking at a few topological properties of the nodes.

  20. Community structures and role detection in music networks.

    PubMed

    Teitelbaum, T; Balenzuela, P; Cano, P; Buldú, Javier M

    2008-12-01

    We analyze the existence of community structures in two different social networks using data obtained from similarity and collaborative features between musical artists. Our analysis reveals some characteristic organizational patterns and provides information about the driving forces behind the growth of the networks. In the similarity network, we find a strong correlation between clusters of artists and musical genres. On the other hand, the collaboration network shows two different kinds of communities: rather small structures related to music bands and geographic zones, and much bigger communities built upon collaborative clusters with a high number of participants related through the period the artists were active. Finally, we detect the leading artists inside their corresponding communities and analyze their roles in the network by looking at a few topological properties of the nodes. PMID:19123615

  1. Coherent Turbulence Structure Detection in Plant Canopies using a Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian Detection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, B. N.; Stoll, R.

    2012-12-01

    Early studies of turbulence in plant canopies have found several universal features unique to this type of flow. Perhaps the most striking is the observation of highly coherent turbulent motions that are exceptionally efficient in transporting momentum and scalars even in the presence of low gradients. This efficient transport mechanism has come to be associated with coherent structures that have length scales on the order of the canopy height. These structures are thought to be produced by an inviscid instability mechanism at the canopy top analogous to that of a planar mixing-layer. The most complete picture of the spatial composition of these canopy structures has come form the large-eddy simulation study of [Finnigan, J. J., R. H. Shaw, E. G. Patton, 2009. Turbulence structure above a vegetation canopy. J. Fluid Mech. 637, pp. 387-424.]. This study reports that these mixing-layer-like structures begin their life as rolled 'Stuart' vortices that, through turbulent fluctuations, evolve into hairpin vortices. These vortices have a tendency to become paired as a set of upwind head-down and downwind head-up hairpins, which are linked to scalar ramps commonly reported in canopy flow studies. There are still several unanswered questions about canopy-scale coherent structures, particularly in terms of how these structures originate and how they behave before and after pairing. Discovering the underlying mechanisms behind these structures is a critical part of understanding and modeling canopy transport processes. To answer these questions, we have developed a structure detection method that uses Lagrangian particle trajectories as a trigger for composite averaging of Eulerian flow variables obtained from large-eddy simulations. This method is able to detect the head-down and head-up hairpins independently using single particles, or at various stages in the pairing process using multiple particles. Results paint a clear picture of the spatial details of the composite

  2. Robust detection of dynamic community structure in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Porter, Mason A.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Carlson, Jean M.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2013-03-01

    We describe techniques for the robust detection of community structure in some classes of time-dependent networks. Specifically, we consider the use of statistical null models for facilitating the principled identification of structural modules in semi-decomposable systems. Null models play an important role both in the optimization of quality functions such as modularity and in the subsequent assessment of the statistical validity of identified community structure. We examine the sensitivity of such methods to model parameters and show how comparisons to null models can help identify system scales. By considering a large number of optimizations, we quantify the variance of network diagnostics over optimizations ("optimization variance") and over randomizations of network structure ("randomization variance"). Because the modularity quality function typically has a large number of nearly degenerate local optima for networks constructed using real data, we develop a method to construct representative partitions that uses a null model to correct for statistical noise in sets of partitions. To illustrate our results, we employ ensembles of time-dependent networks extracted from both nonlinear oscillators and empirical neuroscience data.

  3. Robust detection of dynamic community structure in networks.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Danielle S; Porter, Mason A; Wymbs, Nicholas F; Grafton, Scott T; Carlson, Jean M; Mucha, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    We describe techniques for the robust detection of community structure in some classes of time-dependent networks. Specifically, we consider the use of statistical null models for facilitating the principled identification of structural modules in semi-decomposable systems. Null models play an important role both in the optimization of quality functions such as modularity and in the subsequent assessment of the statistical validity of identified community structure. We examine the sensitivity of such methods to model parameters and show how comparisons to null models can help identify system scales. By considering a large number of optimizations, we quantify the variance of network diagnostics over optimizations ("optimization variance") and over randomizations of network structure ("randomization variance"). Because the modularity quality function typically has a large number of nearly degenerate local optima for networks constructed using real data, we develop a method to construct representative partitions that uses a null model to correct for statistical noise in sets of partitions. To illustrate our results, we employ ensembles of time-dependent networks extracted from both nonlinear oscillators and empirical neuroscience data. PMID:23556979

  4. Automatic Detection and Quantification of WBCs and RBCs Using Iterative Structured Circle Detection Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Yazan M.; Zaharatul Azma, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation and counting of blood cells are considered as an important step that helps to extract features to diagnose some specific diseases like malaria or leukemia. The manual counting of white blood cells (WBCs) and red blood cells (RBCs) in microscopic images is an extremely tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate process. Automatic analysis will allow hematologist experts to perform faster and more accurately. The proposed method uses an iterative structured circle detection algorithm for the segmentation and counting of WBCs and RBCs. The separation of WBCs from RBCs was achieved by thresholding, and specific preprocessing steps were developed for each cell type. Counting was performed for each image using the proposed method based on modified circle detection, which automatically counted the cells. Several modifications were made to the basic (RCD) algorithm to solve the initialization problem, detecting irregular circles (cells), selecting the optimal circle from the candidate circles, determining the number of iterations in a fully dynamic way to enhance algorithm detection, and running time. The validation method used to determine segmentation accuracy was a quantitative analysis that included Precision, Recall, and F-measurement tests. The average accuracy of the proposed method was 95.3% for RBCs and 98.4% for WBCs. PMID:24803955

  5. Structural Damage Detection Using Slopes of Longitudinal Vibration Shapes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, W.; Zhu, W. D.; Smith, S. A.; Cao, M. S.

    2016-03-18

    While structural damage detection based on flexural vibration shapes, such as mode shapes and steady-state response shapes under harmonic excitation, has been well developed, little attention is paid to that based on longitudinal vibration shapes that also contain damage information. This study originally formulates a slope vibration shape for damage detection in bars using longitudinal vibration shapes. To enhance noise robustness of the method, a slope vibration shape is transformed to a multiscale slope vibration shape in a multiscale domain using wavelet transform, which has explicit physical implication, high damage sensitivity, and noise robustness. These advantages are demonstrated in numericalmore » cases of damaged bars, and results show that multiscale slope vibration shapes can be used for identifying and locating damage in a noisy environment. A three-dimensional (3D) scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the longitudinal steady-state response shape of an aluminum bar with damage due to reduced cross-sectional dimensions under harmonic excitation, and results show that the method can successfully identify and locate the damage. Slopes of longitudinal vibration shapes are shown to be suitable for damage detection in bars and have potential for applications in noisy environments.« less

  6. Filtering and detection of low contrast structures on ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Quintero, Lorena; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Arámbula, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a detection method of low contrast structures in medical ultrasound images. Since noise speckle makes difficult the analysis of ultrasound images, two approaches based on the wavelet and Hermite-transforms for enhancement and noise reduction are compared. These techniques assume that speckle pattern is a random signal characterized by a Rayleigh distribution and affects the image as a multiplicative noise. For the wavelet-based approach, a Bayesian estimator at subband level for pixel classification is used. All the estimation parameters are calculated using an adjustment method derived from the first and second order statistical moments. The Hermite method computes a mask to find those pixels that are corrupted by speckle. In this work, we consider a statistical detection model that depends on the variable size and contrast of the image speckle. The algorithms have been evaluated using several real and synthetic ultrasound images. Combinations of the implemented methods can be helpful for automatic detection applications of tumors in mammographic ultrasound images. The employed filtering techniques are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with other previously published methods applied on ultrasound medical images.

  7. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane. PMID:24085150

  8. Surface plasmon resonance for detecting clenbuterol: Influence of monolayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman; Morita, Kinichi; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance sensor equipped with a fabricated immunosensor chip is used for detecting clenbuterol in this study. Since clenbuterol is a small analyte, indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay is employed. For fabricating the immunosurface, the Au-chip was functionalized by succinimidyl-terminated alkanethiol, and the terminal N-hydroxysuccinimide group of the self-assembled monolayer was either replaced with clenbuterol or blocked with ethanolamine. Scanning tunneling microscope experiments and electrochemical measurements depicted the domain structures of the succinimide group of succinimidyl-terminated propanethiol monolayer. The surface concentration and the orientation of succinimide group was significantly dependent on the concentration of dithiobis(succinimidyl) propionate (DSP) used in fabricating the monolayer. Furthermore, the structure of monolayer significantly influenced both the surface concentration and the orientation of clenbuterol on the sensor surface. Consequently, high coverage and standing-up configuration of clenbuterol showed high affinity for clenbuterol antibody. However, high affinity constant exhibited by the sensor surface was coupled with a low sensitivity. By contrast, lowest concentration of DSP solution (0.1 mM) used in fabricating the immunosurface showed a detection sensitivity of 3 ppt - the highest reported sensitivity for clenbuterol. For regeneration the immunosurface, 0.1 M NaOH was used and the same sensor surface could be reused for performing >100 rapid immunoreaction.

  9. Corrosion detection in multi-layered rotocraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    ROACH,DENNIS P.; WALKINGTON,PHILLIP D.; HOHMAN,ED; MARSHALL,GREG

    2000-04-25

    Rotorcraft structures do not readily lend themselves to quantifiable inspection methods due to airframe construction techniques. Periodic visual inspections are a common practice for detecting corrosion. Unfortunately, when the telltale signs of corrosion appear visually, extensive repair or refurbishment is required. There is a need to nondestructively evaluate airframe structures in order to recognize and quantify corrosion before visual indications are present. Nondestructive evaluations of rotorcraft airframes face inherent problems different from those of the fixed wing industry. Most rotorcraft lap joints are very narrow, contain raised fastener heads, may possess distortion, and consist of thinner gage materials ({approximately}0.012--0.125 inches). In addition the structures involve stack-ups of two and three layers of thin gage skins that are separated by sealant of varying thickness. Industry lacks the necessary data techniques, and experience to adequately perform routine corrosion inspection of rotorcraft. In order to address these problems, a program is currently underway to validate the use of eddy current inspection on specific rotorcraft lap joints. Probability of detection (POD) specimens have been produced that simulate two lap joint configurations on a model TH-57/206 helicopter. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center (AANC) at Sandia Labs and Bell Helicopter have applied single and dual frequency eddy current (EC) techniques to these test specimens. The test results showed enough promise to justify beta site testing of the eddy current methods evolved in this study. The technique allows users to distinguish between corrosion signals and those caused by varying gaps between the assembly of skins. Specific structural joints were defined as prime corrosion areas and a series of corrosion specimens were produced with 5--20% corrosion distributed among the layers of each joint. Complete helicopter test beds were used to validate the laboratory

  10. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  11. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... which the type of tissue that lines the uterus [womb] grows in other areas of the body ... with the treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications ...

  12. Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.; Yoshida, Y.

    In this tutorial we describe the basic principles of the ion implantation technique and we demonstrate that emission Mössbauer spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique to investigate the atomic and electronic configuration around implanted atoms. The physics of dilute atoms in materials, the final lattice sites and their chemical state as well as diffusion phenomena can be studied. We focus on the latest developments of implantation Mössbauer spectroscopy, where three accelerator facilities, i.e., Hahn-Meitner Institute Berlin, ISOLDE-CERN and RIKEN, have intensively been used for materials research in in-beam and on-line Mössbauer experiments immediately after implantation of the nuclear probes.

  13. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  14. Uncooled IR photon detection using MEMS micro-structures

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

    1998-08-01

    Generation of free carriers in a semiconductor gives rise to mechanical stress. Photo-induced stress phenomena in MEMS micro-structures can be used in the room temperature detection of infrared photons. Choice of the appropriate semiconductor material for the MEMS micro-structures determines the cutoff wavelength of the uncooled infrared photon detector. The authors have measured the deflection of silicon and indium antimonide micro-structures resulting from a photo-induced stress. The excess charge carriers responsible for the photo-induced stress were produced via photon irradiation from both a diode laser and a black body source. In the case of Si, the photo-induced stress is of opposite direction and about four times larger than the thermal stress. For indium antimonide the direction of stress is the same as due to thermal effects. The photo-induced stress can be distinguished from the thermal stress based on the cut-off wavelength, response speed, and perhaps the direction of the microstructure deflection.

  15. Damage detection in bridges through fiber optic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornink, J. D.; Phares, B. M.; Wipf, T. J.; Wood, D. L.

    2006-10-01

    A fiber optic structural health monitoring (SHM) system was developed and deployed by the Iowa State University (ISU) Bridge Engineering Center (BEC) to detect gradual or sudden damage in fracture-critical bridges (FCBs). The SHM system is trained with measured performance data, which are collected by fiber optic strain sensors to identify typical bridge behavior when subjected to ambient traffic loads. Structural responses deviating from the trained behavior are considered to be signs of structural damage or degradation and are identified through analytical procedures similar to control chart analyses used in statistical process control (SPC). The demonstration FCB SHM system was installed on the US Highway 30 bridge near Ames, IA, and utilizes 40 fiber bragg grating (FBG) sensors to continuously monitor the bridge response when subjected to ambient traffic loads. After the data is collected and processed, weekly evaluation reports are developed that summarize the continuous monitoring results. Through use of the evaluation reports, the bridge owner is able to identify and estimate the location and severity of the damage. The information presented herein includes an overview of the SHM components, results from laboratory and field validation testing on the system components, and samples of the reduced and analyzed data.

  16. Detection and Monitoring of Microparticles Under Skin by Optical Coherence Tomography as an Approach to Continuous Glucose Sensing Using Implanted Retroreflectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Sherlock, Tim; Salazar, Betsy; Sudheendran, Narendran; Manapuram, Ravi Kiran; Kourentzi, Katerina; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Willson, Richard C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image and detect 2.8 μm diameter microparticles (stationary and moving) on a highly-reflective gold surface both in clear media and under skin in vitro. The OCT intensity signal can clearly report the microparticle count, and the OCT response to the number of microparticles shows a good linearity. The detect ability of the intensity change (2.9% ± 0.5%) caused by an individual microparticle shows the high sensitivity of monitoring multiple particles using OCT. An optical sensing method based on this feasibility study is described for continuously measuring blood sugar levels in the subcutaneous tissue, and a molecular recognition unit is designed using competitive binding to modulate the number of bound microparticles as a function of glucose concentration. With further development, an ultra-small, implantable sensor might provide high specificity and sensitivity for long-term continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration. PMID:26413034

  17. Effect of cobalt implantation on structural and optical properties of rutile TiO2(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Shalik Ram; Padmanabhan, B.; Chanda, Anupama; Malik, V. K.; Mishra, N. C.; Kanjilal, D.; Varma, Shikha

    2016-07-01

    Photo-absorption properties of Co implantation in rutile TiO2(110) have been investigated. Nearly five times enhancement in absorbance of visible light and 1.7 times increase in UV light have been observed. Formation of crystalline CoTiO3 and Ti1- x Co x O2 phases at high and low fluences, respectively, demonstrates a crucial role in increasing the photo-absorbance, especially in the visible regime. Ti-rich nanostructures and Ti3+ vacancies that develop after ion implantation also reveal significant contribution in these observations. These Co implanted rutile TiO2 surfaces will be useful for visible light photo-catalysis.

  18. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  19. Modification of Structural Phase State and Mechanical Properties of Poly-Grained Titanium Alloy Implanted by Aluminum Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonenko, A. V.; Popova, N. A.; Nikonenko, E. L.; Kalashnikov, M. P.; Kurzina, A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents TEM analysis of microstructure, phase composition, and mechanical properties of commercially pure titanium. These properties of two types of grains are compared before and after modification of titanium by aluminum ions, namely: large grains (1.4 μm) and small (0.5 μm) grains. The analysis shows that ion implantation results in a considerable improvement of mechanical properties of both large and small grains throughout their implantation depth. However, with increase of the grain size, the stress in the ion- modified surface layer decreases while in the subsurface layer it increases.

  20. Detection of Coherent Structures in Extreme-Scale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Iverson, J; Kirk, R; Karypis, G

    2012-03-24

    The analysis of coherent structures is a common problem in many scientific domains ranging from astrophysics to combustion, fusion, and materials science. The data from three-dimensional simulations are analyzed to detect the structures, extract statistics on them, and track them over time to gain insights into the phenomenon being modeled. This analysis is typically done off-line, using data that have been written out by the simulations. However, the move towards extreme scale architectures, with multi-core processors and graphical processing units, will affect how such analysis is done as it is unlikely that the systems will support the I/O bandwidth required for off-line analysis. Moving the analysis in-situ is a solution only if we know a priori what analysis will be done, as well as the algorithms used and their parameter settings. Even then, we need to ensure that this will not substantially increase the memory requirements or the data movement as the former will be limited and the latter will be expensive. In the Exa-DM project, a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and University of Minnesota, we are exploring ways in which we can address the conflicting demands of coherent structure analysis of simulation data and the architecture of modern parallel systems, while enabling scientific discovery at the exascale. In this paper, we describe our work in two areas: the in situ implementation of an existing algorithm for coherent structure analysis and the use of graph-based techniques to efficiently compress the data.

  1. Dark matter direct detection with non-Maxwellian velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Weiner, Neal; Diemand, Jürg; Moore, Ben; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Madau, Piero; Zemp, Marcel E-mail: neal.weiner@nyu.edu E-mail: pmadau@ucolick.org E-mail: dpotter@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: mzemp@umich.edu

    2010-02-01

    The velocity distribution function of dark matter particles is expected to show significant departures from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. This can have profound effects on the predicted dark matter - nucleon scattering rates in direct detection experiments, especially for dark matter models in which the scattering is sensitive to the high velocity tail of the distribution, such as inelastic dark matter (iDM) or light (few GeV) dark matter (LDM), and for experiments that require high energy recoil events, such as many directionally sensitive experiments. Here we determine the velocity distribution functions from two of the highest resolution numerical simulations of Galactic dark matter structure (Via Lactea II and GHALO), and study the effects for these scenarios. For directional detection, we find that the observed departures from Maxwell-Boltzmann increase the contrast of the signal and change the typical direction of incoming DM particles. For iDM, the expected signals at direct detection experiments are changed dramatically: the annual modulation can be enhanced by more than a factor two, and the relative rates of DAMA compared to CDMS can change by an order of magnitude, while those compared to CRESST can change by a factor of two. The spectrum of the signal can also change dramatically, with many features arising due to substructure. For LDM the spectral effects are smaller, but changes do arise that improve the compatibility with existing experiments. We find that the phase of the modulation can depend upon energy, which would help discriminate against background should it be found.

  2. DNA Barcode Detects High Genetic Structure within Neotropical Bird Species

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Erika Sendra; Gonçalves, Priscila; Miyaki, Cristina Yumi; Baker, Allan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Towards lower latitudes the number of recognized species is not only higher, but also phylogeographic subdivision within species is more pronounced. Moreover, new genetically isolated populations are often described in recent phylogenies of Neotropical birds suggesting that the number of species in the region is underestimated. Previous COI barcoding of Argentinean bird species showed more complex patterns of regional divergence in the Neotropical than in the North American avifauna. Methods and Findings Here we analyzed 1,431 samples from 561 different species to extend the Neotropical bird barcode survey to lower latitudes, and detected even higher geographic structure within species than reported previously. About 93% (520) of the species were identified correctly from their DNA barcodes. The remaining 41 species were not monophyletic in their COI sequences because they shared barcode sequences with closely related species (N = 21) or contained very divergent clusters suggestive of putative new species embedded within the gene tree (N = 20). Deep intraspecific divergences overlapping with among-species differences were detected in 48 species, often with samples from large geographic areas and several including multiple subspecies. This strong population genetic structure often coincided with breaks between different ecoregions or areas of endemism. Conclusions The taxonomic uncertainty associated with the high incidence of non-monophyletic species and discovery of putative species obscures studies of historical patterns of species diversification in the Neotropical region. We showed that COI barcodes are a valuable tool to indicate which taxa would benefit from more extensive taxonomic revisions with multilocus approaches. Moreover, our results support hypotheses that the megadiversity of birds in the region is associated with multiple geographic processes starting well before the Quaternary and extending to more recent geological periods

  3. Acoustic Emission Detection of Impact Damage on Space Shuttle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia as a result of impact damage from foam debris during ascent has led NASA to investigate the feasibility of on-board impact detection technologies. AE sensing has been utilized to monitor a wide variety of impact conditions on Space Shuttle components ranging from insulating foam and ablator materials, and ice at ascent velocities to simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. Impact testing has been performed on both reinforced carbon composite leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. Results of these impact tests will be presented with a focus on the acoustic emission sensor responses to these impact conditions. These tests have demonstrated the potential of employing an on-board Shuttle impact detection system. We will describe the present plans for implementation of an initial, very low frequency acoustic impact sensing system using pre-existing flight qualified hardware. The details of an accompanying flight measurement system to assess the Shuttle s acoustic background noise environment as a function of frequency will be described. The background noise assessment is being performed to optimize the frequency range of sensing for a planned future upgrade to the initial impact sensing system.

  4. Structural Plasticity Controlled by Calcium Based Correlation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver; Diesmann, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Hebbian learning in cortical networks during development and adulthood relies on the presence of a mechanism to detect correlation between the presynaptic and the postsynaptic spiking activity. Recently, the calcium concentration in spines was experimentally shown to be a correlation sensitive signal with the necessary properties: it is confined to the spine volume, it depends on the relative timing of pre- and postsynaptic action potentials, and it is independent of the spine's location along the dendrite. NMDA receptors are a candidate mediator for the correlation dependent calcium signal. Here, we present a quantitative model of correlation detection in synapses based on the calcium influx through NMDA receptors under realistic conditions of irregular pre- and postsynaptic spiking activity with pairwise correlation. Our analytical framework captures the interaction of the learning rule and the correlation dynamics of the neurons. We find that a simple thresholding mechanism can act as a sensitive and reliable correlation detector at physiological firing rates. Furthermore, the mechanism is sensitive to correlation among afferent synapses by cooperation and competition. In our model this mechanism controls synapse formation and elimination. We explain how synapse elimination leads to firing rate homeostasis and show that the connectivity structure is shaped by the correlations between neighboring inputs. PMID:19129936

  5. Detecting and representing predictable structure during auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use psychophysics and MEG to test how sensitivity to input statistics facilitates auditory-scene-analysis (ASA). Human subjects listened to 'scenes' comprised of concurrent tone-pip streams (sources). On occasional trials a new source appeared partway. Listeners were more accurate and quicker to detect source appearance in scenes comprised of temporally-regular (REG), rather than random (RAND), sources. MEG in passive listeners and those actively detecting appearance events revealed increased sustained activity in auditory and parietal cortex in REG relative to RAND scenes, emerging ~400 ms of scene-onset. Over and above this, appearance in REG scenes was associated with increased responses relative to RAND scenes. The effect of temporal structure on appearance-evoked responses was delayed when listeners were focused on the scenes relative to when listening passively, consistent with the notion that attention reduces 'surprise'. Overall, the results implicate a mechanism that tracks predictability of multiple concurrent sources to facilitate active and passive ASA. PMID:27602577

  6. Predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for brain atrophy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xintao; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Li, Kaiming; Liu, Tianming

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present an approach of predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for the detection of brain atrophy based on cross-sectional MRI image. The underlying premise of applying predictive modeling for atrophy detection is that brain atrophy is defined as significant deviation of part of the anatomy from what the remaining normal anatomy predicts for that part. The steps of predictive modeling are as follows. The central cortical surface under consideration is reconstructed from brain tissue map and Regions of Interests (ROI) on it are predicted from other reliable anatomies. The vertex pair-wise distance between the predicted vertex and the true one within the abnormal region is expected to be larger than that of the vertex in normal brain region. Change of white matter/gray matter ratio within a spherical region is used to identify the direction of vertex displacement. In this way, the severity of brain atrophy can be defined quantitatively by the displacements of those vertices. The proposed predictive modeling method has been evaluated by using both simulated atrophies and MRI images of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Detecting and representing predictable structure during auditory scene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use psychophysics and MEG to test how sensitivity to input statistics facilitates auditory-scene-analysis (ASA). Human subjects listened to ‘scenes’ comprised of concurrent tone-pip streams (sources). On occasional trials a new source appeared partway. Listeners were more accurate and quicker to detect source appearance in scenes comprised of temporally-regular (REG), rather than random (RAND), sources. MEG in passive listeners and those actively detecting appearance events revealed increased sustained activity in auditory and parietal cortex in REG relative to RAND scenes, emerging ~400 ms of scene-onset. Over and above this, appearance in REG scenes was associated with increased responses relative to RAND scenes. The effect of temporal structure on appearance-evoked responses was delayed when listeners were focused on the scenes relative to when listening passively, consistent with the notion that attention reduces ‘surprise’. Overall, the results implicate a mechanism that tracks predictability of multiple concurrent sources to facilitate active and passive ASA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19113.001 PMID:27602577

  8. Preimplantation Exposure to Bisphenol A and Triclosan May Lead to Implantation Failure in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Mu; Bai, Ming-Zhu; Huang, Xu-Feng; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Jing; Hu, Min-Hao; Zheng, Wei-Qian; Jin, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are chemicals that have the capacity to interfere with normal endocrine systems. Two EDCs, bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS), are mass-produced and widespread. They both have estrogenic properties and similar chemical structures and pharmacokinetic features and have been detected in human fluids and tissues. Clinical evidence has suggested a positive association between BPA exposure and implantation failure in IVF patients. Studies in mouse models have suggested that preimplantation exposure to BPA and TCS can lead to implantation failure. This paper reviews the relationship between preimplantation exposure to BPA and TCS and implantation failure and discusses the remaining problems and possible solutions. PMID:26357649

  9. Corrosion and fatigue of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Implants for the treatment of femoral fractures, mechanisms leading to the failure or degradation of such structures, and current perspectives on surgical implants are discussed. Under the first heading, general usage, materials and procedures, environmental conditions, and laboratory analyses of implants after service are considered. Corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion, pitting corrosion, fatigue, and corrosion fatigue are the principal degradation mechanisms described. The need for improvement in the reliability of implants is emphasized.

  10. Audiological results with the cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Thielemeir, M A; Brimacombe, J A; Eisenberg, L S

    1982-01-01

    Audiological test results from 135 adult, profoundly deaf, single-electrode cochlear implant subjects are presented. Unaided, aided, and cochlear implant warble-tone and speech detection thresholds have been analyzed, as well as word, word stress, and environmental sound discrimination scores. Results indicate that implant thresholds are significantly better than aided thresholds at all frequencies tested and for speech detection. Also, word, word stress, and environmental sound discrimination scores are all significantly better with the implant than with a hearing aid. Although the implant does not provide speech discrimination, subjects report that it does provide valuable speech and sound awareness, which aids in speechreading and voice monitoring. A small group of subjects has shown that an an implant in the poorer ear can also be successfully combined with a hearing aid in the better ear. The audiological test results clearly show that the implant is a viable alternative for the profoundly deaf. PMID:6805394

  11. Electrochemical immunosensor based on hyperbranched structure for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jingjing; Wang, Xiaobo; Lu, Liandi; Zhu, Peiyuan; Mao, Chun; Zhao, Haolin; Song, Youchao; Shen, Jian

    2014-08-15

    Sensitive determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is very important in clinical research and diagnosis. Herein we report the design and synthesis of a new kind of immunosensor based on the benefits of hyperbranched structure. The hyperbranched polyester was grafted to the surface of indium tin oxides glass (ITO) electrode, and the grafting processes were characterized by attentuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After CEA and horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled antibody-conjugated AuNPs (HRP-Ab2-AuNPs) bioconjugates were immobilized on the surface of the hyperbranched structure-modified electrode, the optimized conditions of the above electrode were investigated. Moreover, the analytical performance of the proposed immunosensor showed a high sensitivity, a linear range from 0.01 to 80ng/mL with a low detection limit of 2.36pg/mL, and good selectivity for CEA. The designed immunoassay system holds great potential for ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing of other analytes. PMID:24607616

  12. Detection, sequence patterns and function of unusual DNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J N

    1986-01-01

    Unusual DNA structures were detected by an electrophoretic procedure in which DNA fragments were separated according to size on agarose gels and then by shape on polyacrylamide gels. Fragments from yeast centromeres migrated faster in polyacrylamide than predicted from their base composition and size and this property was attributed to a nonrandom distribution of oligomeric A tracts that exhibited minima at 10-11 base intervals. Fragments from seven loci in 107 kb of DNA migrated anomalously slow and these fragments contained blocks of A2-6 in a 10-11 base periodicity which is indicative of bent DNA. The most pronounced bent sequences were found within yeast ARS1 and centered at 245 and 240 bp from the left and right ends of the adenovirus genome. Each sequence is approximately 150 bp away from a replication origin and the adenovirus sequences are within 50 bp of enhancers. Nuclear matrix attachment sites, which are also adjacent to enhancers, contain sequences characteristic of bent DNA. These results suggest that bent structures reside at the base of DNA loops in chromosomes. Images PMID:3786134

  13. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%–50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1–0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  14. Singularity detection for structural health monitoring using holder exponents.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. N.; Farrar, C. R.; Sohn, H.

    2003-01-01

    The majority of structural health monitoring studies reported in the technical literature focus on identifying damage sensitive features that can be extracted from dynamic response data . However, many of these studies assume the structure can be modeled as a linear system before and after damage and use parameters of these models as the damage sensitive features. The study summarized in this paper proposes a damage sensitive feature that takes advantage of the nonlinearities associated with discontinuities introduced into the dynamic response data as a result of certain types of damage. Specifically, the Holder exponent, a measure of the degree to which a signal is differentiable, is the feature that is used to detect the presence of damage and when that damage occurred . A procedure for capturing the time varying nature of the Holder exponent based on wavelet transforms is demonstrated through applications to non-stationary random signals with underlying discontinuities and then to a harmonically excited mechanical system that contains a loose part . Also, a classification procedure is developed to quantify when changes in the Holder exponent are significant . The results presented herein show the Holder exponent to be an effective feature for identifying damage that introduces discontinuities into the measured dynamic response data .

  15. Primary human nasal epithelial cell response to titanium surface with a nanonetwork structure in nasal implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei-En; Lan, Ming-Ying; Lee, Sheng-Wei; Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Huang, Her-Hsiung

    2015-04-01

    In nasal reconstruction applications, the response of cells to titanium (Ti) implants is largely determined by the surface characteristics of the implant. This study investigated an electrochemical anodization surface treatment intended to improve the response of primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNEpC) to Ti surfaces in nasal implant applications. We used a simple and fast electrochemical anodization treatment, i.e., applying anodic current, to produce a titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanonetwork layer on the Ti surface with average lateral pore size below 100 nm, depending on the current applied. The TiO2 nanonetwork layer exhibited enhanced hydrophilicity and protein adsorption ability compared with untreated Ti surfaces. In addition, the spreading morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, and proliferation of HNEpC on the nanonetwork layer indicated excellent cell response characteristics. This research advances our understanding regarding the means by which a TiO2 nanonetwork layer can improve the response of HNEpC to Ti surfaces in nasal implant applications.

  16. Spinal cord injury repair by implantation of structured hyaluronic acid scaffold with PLGA microspheres in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yujun; Yu, Shukui; Wu, Yanhong; Ju, Rongkai; Wang, Hao; Liu, Yujun; Wang, Ying; Xu, Qunyuan

    2016-04-01

    In order to create an optimal microenvironment for neural regeneration in the lesion area after spinal cord injury (SCI), we fabricated a novel scaffold composed of a hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel with a longitudinal multi-tubular conformation. The scaffold was modified by binding with an anti-Nogo receptor antibody (antiNgR) and mixed further with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres containing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor (HA+PLGA). In the rat, after implantation of this composite into an injured area created by a dorsal hemisection at T9-10 of the spinal cord, favorable effects were seen with regard to the promotion of spinal repair, including excellent integration of the implants with host tissue, inhibition of inflammation, and gliosis. In particular, large numbers of new blood vessels and regenerated nerve fibers were found within and around the implants. Simultaneously, the implanted rats exhibited improved locomotor recovery. Thus, this novel composite material might provide a suitable microenvironment for neural regeneration following SCI. PMID:26463048

  17. Photoluminescence and structural studies on extended defect evolution during high-temperature processing of ion-implanted epitaxial silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, P. K.; Coffa, S.; Raineri, V.; Privitera, V.; Galvagno, G.; La Ferla, A.; Rimini, E.

    2001-04-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy (OM) have been carried out to investigate the origin of radiative recombination from various extended defects that evolve during high-temperature processing of ion-implanted epitaxial silicon. From PL studies on N2-annealed samples, we provide spectroscopic evidence of precipitation of the implanted impurities well below the solid-solubility limit. This result is being supported by observations from secondary ion mass spectrometry and spreading resistance profiling of the implanted ions. Cross sectional TEM analyses on these samples reveal <111>-oriented precipitates located in a region containing a high dislocation density. Postimplantation annealing in oxygen ambient results in the formation of dislocations and oxidation-induced stacking faults (OISF). A systematic analysis of PL spectra on different-implanted and preannealed samples, in conjunction with TEM and OM analyses, reveals that the conventionally observed dislocation-related D1 and D2 lines in the PL spectrum is not a characteristic of the OISF, but of the dislocations only. It is shown that the OISF acts as a nonradiative channel for luminescence in silicon. Various other sources of nonradiative channels in silicon are also presented and the efficacy of photoluminescence technique in the characterization of process-induced defects in silicon is discussed.

  18. The structure of crystallographic damage in GaN formed during rare earth ion implantation with and without an ultrathin AlN capping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloux, F.; Ruterana, P.; Wojtowicz, T.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2006-10-01

    The crystallographic nature of the damage created in GaN implanted by rare earth ions at 300 keV and room temperature has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy versus the fluence, from 7×10 13 to 2×10 16 at/cm 2, using Er, Eu or Tm ions. The density of point defect clusters was seen to increase with the fluence. From about 3×10 15 at/cm 2, a highly disordered 'nanocrystalline layer' (NL) appears on the GaN surface. Its structure exhibits a mixture of voids and misoriented nanocrystallites. Basal stacking faults (BSFs) of I 1, E and I 2 types have been noticed from the lowest fluence, they are I 1 in the majority. Their density increases and saturates when the NL is observed. Many prismatic stacking faults (PSFs) with Drum atomic configuration have been identified. The I 1 BSFs are shown to propagate easily through GaN by folding from basal to prismatic planes thanks to the PSFs. When implanting through a 10 nm AlN cap, the NL threshold goes up to about 3×10 16 at/cm 2. The AlN cap plays a protective role against the dissociation of the GaN up to the highest fluences. The flat surface after implantation and the absence of SFs in the AlN cap indicate its high resistance to the damage formation.

  19. Pleomorphic structural imperfections caused by pulsed Bi-implantation in the bulk and thin-film morphologies of TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Kim, S. S.; Zhidkov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The results of combined experimental and theoretical study of pleomorphic substitutional and clustering effects in Bi-doped TiO2 hosts (bulk and thin-film morphologies) are presented. Bi-doping of the bulk and thin-film titanium dioxide was made with help of pulsed ion-implantation (EBi+ = 30 keV, D = 1 × 1017 cm-2) without posterior tempering. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) qualification (core-levels and valence bands) and Density-Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were employed in order to study the electronic structure of Bi-ion implanted TiO2 samples. According to XPS data obtained and DFT calculations, the Bi → Ti cation substitution occurs in Bi-implanted bulk TiO2, whereas in the thin-film morphology of TiO2:Bi the Bi-atoms have metal-like clusters segregation tendency. Based on the combined XPS and DFT considerations the possible reasons and mechanism for the observed effects are discussed. It is believed that established peculiarities of bismuth embedding into employed TiO2 hosts are mostly the sequence of pleomorphic origin for the formed "bismuth-oxygen" chemical bonding.

  20. Imaging for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Annis, J A; Robinson, P J

    1990-07-01

    Insertion of a sound amplification device into the round window niche (extracochlear implant) or into the coils of the cochlea (intracochlear implant) can give significant benefits to some carefully selected, severely deaf patients. Imaging has an essential role in selective and pre-operative assessment. Severe otosclerosis and post-meningitic labyrinthitis ossificans are common causes of deafness in these patients and can be demonstrated by computed tomography (CT). The most suitable side for operation can be assessed. We describe our experiences with 165 patients, 69 of whom were found suitable for implants. Thin (1 mm) section CT in axial and coronal planes is the best imaging investigation of the petrous temporal bones but the place of magnetic resonance scanning to confirm that the inner ear is fluid-filled and polytomography to show a multichannel implant in the cochlea is discussed. No implants were used for congenital deformities, but some observations are made of this type of structural deformity of the inner ear. PMID:2390686

  1. Early detection of ovarian cancer: background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, P. E.; Chambers, J. T.; Taylor, K. J.; Pellerito, J.; Hammers, L.; Cole, L. A.; Yang-Feng, T. L.; Smith, P.; Mayne, S. T.; Makuch, R.

    1991-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has received national attention as a highly virulent disease. Its lack of early warning symptoms and the failure to develop highly sensitive screening tests have led some physicians to recommend prophylactic oophorectomies to women with relatives who have had ovarian cancer. Others have recommended routine screening of otherwise normal women for CA 125, a circulating tumor marker, and ultrasound examinations. Each of these techniques is associated with substantial false-positive rates that could lead to unnecessary surgery. A review of epidemiologic data suggests that familial ovarian cancer kindreds are rare, but women with first-degree relatives who have had ovarian cancer have a significant risk themselves for developing ovarian cancer. In addition, women with a great number of ovulatory cycles are at an increased risk for the disease. Circulating tumor markers are frequently elevated in women with advanced ovarian cancer, but their value in early detection of ovarian cancer has yet to be established. Advances in endovaginal ultrasound and color Doppler flow technology have significantly improved our ability to assess pelvic organs. This article presents the background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program for ovarian cancer, whose goals are to identify the best techniques for diagnosing ovarian cancer in an early stage, to determine the frequency with which such tests should be employed, to assess false-positive results, and to identify women who might benefit from prophylactic oophorectomies. PMID:1810100

  2. [Early Detection of Iliac Artery Rupture by Sudden Steep Reduction of Regional Saturation of Oxygen at the Ipsilateral Foot during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Saito, Shun; Ishii, Hisanari

    2016-02-01

    An 80-year-old woman with severe aortic stenosis was planned to undergo transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) under general anesthesia. Due to severe stenosis of the femoral arteries, the left iliac artery was cut down and a 16 F Edwards SAPIEN Expandable Sheath (eSheath : Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) was inserted into the artery smoothly. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV), an artificial valve was tried to deploy but stuck in the middle of eSheath. Suddenly regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) at the ipsilateral foot decreased steeply without other significant hemodynamic instabilities. At insertion site of eSheath, the left external iliac artery rupture occurred. To our surprise, there was almost no major bleeding because of the artery spasm and suppression of the large bore sheath. eSheath and the stuck valve were taken out together and TAVI was discontinued. The artery was replaced with a graft, and rSO2 of the foot recovered. Her aortic stenosis improved to moderate by balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) according to transthoracic echocardiography. The patient was discharged on foot without complications. To our knowledge, this is a first report of a silent rupture of the iliac artery during TAVI to be detected by sudden decrease of the foot rSO2 and treated with no fatal events. PMID:27017778

  3. [Imaging in silicone breast implantation].

    PubMed

    Gielens, Maaike P M; Koolen, Pieter G L; Hermens, Roland A E C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been concerns regarding the use of breast implants from Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne sur Mer, France) for breast augmentation due to their tendency to rupture and the possibility of having toxic contents. MRI using a specific silicone-sensitive sequence has proven to be the most sensitive and specific technique in the detection of intra- and extracapsular implant rupture. However, given its high costs, it is important that this technique is used sparingly. In this clinical lesson, we compare the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasound, CT and MRI for the detection of breast implant rupture. Based on two cases, a diagnostic approach is given in order to reduce health care costs. PMID:24252405

  4. Structural damage detection of space truss structures using best achievable eigenvectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.; Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1994-01-01

    A method is presented by which measured modes and frequencies from a modal test can be used to determine the location and magnitude of damage in a space struss structure. The damage is located by computing the Euclidean distances between the measured mode shapes and the best achievable eigenvectors. The best achievable eigenvectors are the projection of the measured mode shapes onto the subspace defined by the refined analytical model of the structure and the measured frequencies. Loss of both stiffness and mass properties can be located and quantified. To examine the performance of the method when experimentally measured modes are employed, various damage detection studies using a laboratory eight-bay truss structure were conducted. The method performs well even though the measurement errors inevitably make the damage location more difficult.

  5. Structural damage detection of space truss structures using best achievable eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Tae W.; Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1994-05-01

    A method is presented by which measured modes and frequencies from a modal test can be used to determine the location and magnitude of damage in a space truss structure. The damage is located by computing the Euclidean distances between the measured mode shapes and the best achievable eigenvectors. The best achievable eigenvectors are the projection of the measured mode shapes onto the subspace defined by the refined analytical model of the structure and the measured frequencies. Loss of both stiffness and mass properties can be located and quantified. To examine the performance of the method when experimentally measured modes are employed, various damage detection studies using a laboratory eight-bay truss structure were conducted. The method performs well even though the measurement errors inevitably make the damage location more difficult.

  6. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-07-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  7. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-02-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  8. RETRACTION: Redistribution of infused and implanted dopants in a multilayer structure during annealing of dopant and radiation defects for the production of a system of p-n junctions Redistribution of infused and implanted dopants in a multilayer structure during annealing of dopant and radiation defects for the production of a system of p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, E. L.

    2009-04-01

    It has come to the attention of IOP Publishing that this article should not have been submitted for publication owing to its substantial replication of other published papers by the same author: E L Pankratov 2008 Optimization of laser annealing of radiation defects for production of an implanted-junction rectifier J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 115105 E L Pankratov 2008 Redistribution of dopant during microwave annealing of a multilayer structure for production p-junction J. Appl. Phys. 103 064320 and E L Pankratov 2008 Redistribution of dopant in a multilayer structure during annealing of radiation defects by laser pulses for production an implanted-junction rectifier Phys. Lett. A 372 4510-4516 Consequently the two papers in Semiconductor Science and Technology and Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics have been retracted by IOP Publishing.

  9. Structural health monitoring and probability of detection estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, David S.

    2016-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) methods are often based on nondestructive testing (NDT) sensors and are often proposed as replacements for NDT to lower cost and/or improve reliability. In order to take advantage of SHM for life cycle management, it is necessary to determine the Probability of Detection (POD) of the SHM system just as for traditional NDT to ensure that the required level of safety is maintained. Many different possibilities exist for SHM systems, but one of the attractive features of SHM versus NDT is the ability to take measurements very simply after the SHM system is installed. Using a simple statistical model of POD, some authors have proposed that very high rates of SHM system data sampling can result in high effective POD even in situations where an individual test has low POD. In this paper, we discuss the theoretical basis for determining the effect of repeated inspections, and examine data from SHM experiments against this framework to show how the effective POD from multiple tests can be estimated.

  10. Formation of a periodic diffractive structure based on poly(methyl methacrylate) with ion-implanted silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyautdinov, M. F.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Fattakhov, Ya. V.; Farrakhov, B. F.; Valeev, V. F.; Osin, Yu. N.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    We propose to form optical diffractive elements on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by implanting the polymer with silver ions ( E = 30 keV; D = 5.0 × 1014 to 1.5 × 1017 ion/cm2; I = 2 μA/cm2) through a nickel grid (mask). Ion implantation leads to the nucleation and growth of silver nanoparticles in unmasked regions of the polymer. The formation of periodic surface microstructures during local sputtering of the polymer by incident ions was monitored using an optical microscope. The diffraction efficiency of obtained gratings is demonstrated under conditions of their probing with semiconductor laser radiation in the visible spectral range.

  11. Effect of nitrogen ion implantation on corrosion inhibition of nickel coated 316 stainless steel and correlation with nano-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayeli-Korpi, Ali-Reza; Savaloni, Hadi

    2012-10-01

    The influence of implantation of N+ with 20 keV energy and different fluences in the range of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1018 ions/cm2 in the nickel coated type 316 stainless steel (SS) on the corrosion inhibition of SS in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution is investigated. The highest available N+ fluence showed highest corrosion inhibition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed formation of nickel nitride phases that enhanced by increasing the N+ fluence. Surface morphology was studied by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after corrosion test, respectively. AFM results showed that by increasing N+ fluence surface of the sample becomes smoother that may be the result of heat accumulation during implantation causing higher rate of diffusion in the sample.

  12. Ion implantation in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As : damage structures and amorphization mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, B. W.; Turkot, B. A.; Robertson, I. M.; Coleman, J. J.; Roh, S. D.; Forbes, D. V.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois

    1998-07-01

    We review previous research on ion implantation in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As-GaAs heterostructures, and include observations from our current work in order to assess the various mechanisms that have been proposed to account for damage accumulation and amorphization in this system. In considering all of the experimental observations, the most consistent description is one where amorphization occurs by a combination of point-defect buildup and direct impact amorphization mechanisms.

  13. Electronic structure of Ga1- x Al x As nanostructures grown on the GaAs surface by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaev, S. B.; Umirzakov, B. E.; Tashmukhamedova, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    The surface morphology and electronic properties of nanocrystalline phases and 2-7-nm-thick Ga1- x Al x As films grown on the GaAs(111) surface by Al+ ion implantation with subsequent (laser + thermal) annealing are studied. It is found that bandgap E g of the Ga0.5Al0.5As nanocrystalline surface phase 25-30 nm in size equals 2.8-2.9 eV.

  14. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  15. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  16. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  17. Monitoring and restabilizing structures under external excitations through detection and prediction of changes in structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastijanovic, Nebojsa

    The primary goal of this dissertation is the development of methods for prediction and detection of damage in structures under external excitations through the use of sensors and actuators. The first example involves developing an active flutter suppression algorithm for a flat panel in flight and space vehicles using embedded piezoceramic actuators. A basic eigenvector orientation approach is used to evaluate the possibility of controlling the onset of panel flutter. Eigenvectors for two consecutive modes are usually orthogonal and the onset of flutter condition can be observed earlier as they start to lose their orthogonality. Piezoelectric layers are assumed to be bonded to the top and bottom surfaces of the panel in order to provide counter-bending moments at joints between elements. The controllers are designed to modify the stiffness of the structure and re-stabilize the system; as a result, flutter occurrence can be offset to a higher flutter speed. To illustrate the applicability and effectiveness of the developed method, several simple wide beam examples using piezoelectric layers as actuators are studied and presented. Controllers based on different control objectives are considered and the effects of control moment locations are studied. Potential applications of this basic method may be straightforwardly applied to plate and shell structures of laminated composites. The second example includes developing a method for detecting, locating, and quantifying structural damage using acceleration measurements as feedback. This method directly uses time domain structural vibration measurements and the effects of different damages are decoupled in the controller design. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated with illustrative examples of a three and an eight-story model as well as a single story steel frame model with changes in joint flexibility. Finally, the progress on developing a hybrid structural health monitoring system is presented through

  18. Breast implants as a preventive factor.

    PubMed

    Vincent, N; Barletta, L; Laguens, M

    2008-09-01

    After a large number of patients with silicone breast implants worldwide had been evaluated [2, 9], it was concluded that such implants were not carcinogenic. This allowed for experimentation with rats to determine the benefits and potential risks associated with implants. By means of a high-precision monitor, temperature measurements were obtained from 100 silicone-implanted rats. These measurements then were divided into various groups to compare the reaction of their implanted and nonimplanted mammary glands at different hormone levels. The temperature measurements were analyzed and compared. Dysthermia was detected in the skin area immediately overlying the implant. The results also demonstrated that at high hormone levels, implants act as neutralizing agents. By contrast, glandular alterations with severe signs of anisocytosis and anisokoryosis were observed in nonimplanted glands. PMID:18551342

  19. Influence of Ni deposition and subsequent N + ion implantation at different substrate temperatures on nano-structure and corrosion behaviour of type 316 and 304 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Habibi, Maryam

    2011-10-01

    Ni thin films of 250 nm thicknesses were coated on type 304 and 316 stainless steels and post N + ion implanted at 15 keV energy with a fluence of 5 × 10 17 N + cm -2 at different substrate temperatures. Surface nano-structure of the samples were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) before corrosion test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after corrosion test. Corrosion behaviour of the samples in 1.0 M H 2SO 4 solution was investigated by means of potentiodynamic technique. Nano-structure and crystallography of the films showed the development of Ni 3N(1 1 1) and Ni 4N(2 0 0) orientations with a minimum surface roughness and grain size at 400 K substrate temperature. The highest corrosion resistance with a corrosion current of 0.01 μA cm -2 (for SS(316)) and 0.56 μA cm -2 (for SS(304)) was achieved in case of samples which were N + ion implanted at 400 K. Results for both types of stainless steels showed good agreement and the better performance of SS(316) was attributed to the 2% molybdenum contents in the alloy composition of this type of stainless steel, which enhances the effectiveness of nitrogen in retarding the corrosion process.

  20. Microstrip structures of ZnO nanoparticle aggregates of millimetric length formed by selected-area ion implantation and thermal oxidation.

    PubMed

    Amekura, H; Wang, H-S; Hishita, S; Pan, J; Kishimoto, N; Buchal, Ch; Mantl, S

    2009-02-11

    Regularly arrayed microstrip regions of width approximately 1.4 microm and length extending up to approximately 5 mm, consisting of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) of diameter approximately 50 nm, were fabricated on silica substrates by a two-step process: i.e., selected-area ion implantation and thermal oxidation. The implantation of 60 keV Zn ions in periodic microstrip regions via a resist mask generated periodic grooves with large wings on the surface of silica glass, which can be ascribed to the radiation-induced plastic deformation of silica and sputtering loss. This is the lowest record of the electronic energy loss (S(e)) value to induce the radiation-induced plastic deformation of silica, while no or very low threshold energy has been predicted from a recent study. After thermal oxidation at 700 degrees C for 1 h, the groove structures with the wings disappeared, and periodic microstrips of ZnO nanoparticle aggregates up to 5 mm long appeared on the surface of the substrate. A clear free-exciton peak due to ZnO NPs is observed from these microstrip structures both in optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra. PMID:19417379

  1. Changes in the surface of bone and acid-etched and sandblasted implants following implantation and removal

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Eskitascioglu, Murat; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any changes in the surface of bone or implant structures following the removal of a screwed dental implant. Materials and Methods: For this, six individual samples of acid-etched and sandblasted implants from three different manufacturers’ implant systems were used. They were screwed in a D1 bovine bone, and they were removed after primary stabilization. The bone and implant surfaces are evaluated with scanning electron microscope. Results: Through examination of the surfaces of the bone prior to implantation and of the used and unused implant surfaces, it was found that inhomogeneity in the implant surface can cause microcracking in the bone. Conclusions: This is attributed to the stress induced during the implantation of self-tapping implants and suggests that a tap drill may be required in some instances to protect the implant surface. PMID:27011744

  2. Structural damage detection via nonlinear system identification and structural intensity methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semperlotti, Fabio

    sensory system for data acquisition. The second technique presented in this work is based on the use of Structural Intensity (SI) as a damage detection tool. Although SI has been used in the past for structural vibrations and noise control systems, applications to damage detection are still very limited. A numerical study exploring the relationship between several structural (loss factors, damage size) and experimental (frequency resolution, sensor size and placements) parameters and the SI field is presented. The changes in SI at discrete structural locations are used as the damage metric. In order to improve performance and adaptability of the SI based system over a wide spectrum of structures, the concept of Active Energy Sink (AES) is introduced. A feedback control system is used to realize the absorption device. The AES design is presented, and validated through experimental testing. An increase in the closed loop loss factors up to eta=29% was measured for the low frequency modes. Finally, the concept of Nonlinear Structural Surface Intensity (NSSI) is presented. The SI-based SHM was initially developed by relying on the availability of a baseline for the healthy structure. In order to develop a baseline-free technique, the HHRS is integrated into the SI concept. This approach results in a single technique which benefits from the localization capabilities from the HHRS approach and of the sizing capabilities proper of the SI approach.

  3. Effect of the Graded-Gap Layer Composition on the Formation of n + -n - -p Structures in Boron-Implanted Heteroepitaxial Cd x Hg1- x Te Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talipov, N. Kh.; Voitsekhovskii, А. V.; Grigor'ev, D. V.

    2014-07-01

    Processes of formation of n + -n--p-structures in boron-implanted heteroepitaxial (HEL) CdxHg1-xTe (CMT) layers of p-type grown by molecular beam epitaxy (HEL CMT MBE) with different compositions of the upper graded-gap layer are studied. It is shown that the surface composition (xs) of HEL CMT MBE significantly affects both the electrical parameters of the implanted layer and the spatial distribution of radiation defects of donor type. For HEL CMT MBE with the small surface composition xs = 0.22-0.33, it is found that the layer electron concentration (Ns) is decreased after saturation with accumulation of radiation defects, as the dose of B+ ions is increased in the range of D = 1ṡ1011-3ṡ1015 сm-2. An increase of the surface composition up to xs = 0.49-0.56 results in a significant decrease in Ns and a disappearance of the saturation of concentration in the whole dose range. The value of Ns monotonically increases with the energy (E) of boron ions and composition xs. It is found that for B+-ion energies E = 20-100 keV, the depth of the surface n + -layer increases with increasing energy and exceeds the total projected path of boron ions. However, in the energy range E = 100-150 keV, the depth of n+-layer stops increasing with the increase of the surface composition. The depth (dn) of a lightly doped n--layer monotonically decreases with increasing energy of boron ions in the entire range of E = 20-150 keV. With increasing dose (D) of B+ ions in the interval D = 1ṡ1014-1ṡ1015сm-2, deep n--layers with dn = 4-5 μm are formed only in the HEL CMT MBE with xs = 0.22-0.33. For the samples with xs = 0.49-0.56, the depth changes in the interval dn = 1.5-2.5 μm. At D ≤ 3ṡ1013сm-2, n + -n--p-structure is not formed for all surface compositions, if implantation is performed at room temperature. However, implantation at T = 130°C leads to the formation of a deep n--layer. Planar photodiodes with the n-p-junction area of A = 35×35 μm2 made on the basis of

  4. [Structure and solidity of new bone in a cortical gliding hole by implanted leg screw (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hutzschenreuter, P; Claes, L

    1976-07-23

    Leg screws were implanted in 30 tibia diaphysis. 112 days later in the gliding hole there was new lamellar bone round of the screw head, neck of screw and into the both first screw threads. After screw explantation we measured in 8 cases the solidity of the new bone. Under conditions of tension measurement, we use 341 N per millimeter cortical thread surfaces to put out all new bone from the gliding hole. The results of these tension measurements were cylindric fragments. The remodelling into the gliding hole seems to be the results of static stress and dynamic compensation for reaching a defect in living cortical bone. PMID:962685

  5. Hip Implant Modified To Increase Probability Of Retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canabal, Francisco, III

    1995-01-01

    Modification in design of hip implant proposed to increase likelihood of retention of implant in femur after hip-repair surgery. Decreases likelihood of patient distress and expense associated with repetition of surgery after failed implant procedure. Intended to provide more favorable flow of cement used to bind implant in proximal extreme end of femur, reducing structural flaws causing early failure of implant/femur joint.

  6. Structural, compositional, mechanical characterization and biological assessment of bovine-derived hydroxyapatite coatings reinforced with MgF2 or MgO for implants functionalization.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Natalia; Stan, G E; Duta, L; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bleotu, Coralia; Sopronyi, M; Luculescu, C; Oktar, F N; Mihailescu, I N

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a consecrated biomaterial for bone reconstruction. In the form of thin films deposited by pulsed laser technologies, it can be used to cover metallic implants aiming to increase biocompatibility and osseointegration rate. HA of animal origin (bovine, BHA) reinforced with MgF2 (2wt.%) or MgO (5wt.%) were used for deposition of thin coatings with improved adherence, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity. For pulsed laser deposition experiments, a KrF* (λ=248nm, τFWHM≤25ns) excimer laser source was used. The deposited structures were characterized from a physical-chemical point of view by X-Ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy in top- and cross-view modes, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy and Pull-out adherence tests. The microbiological assay using the HEp-2 cell line revealed that all target materials and deposited thin films are non-cytotoxic. We conducted tests on three strains isolated from patients with dental implants failure, i.e. Microccocus sp., Enterobacter sp. and Candida albicans sp. The most significant anti-biofilm effect against Microcococcus sp. strain, at 72h, was obtained in the presence of BHA:MgO thin films. For Enterobacter sp. strain a superior antimicrobial activity at 72h was noticed, in respect with simple BHA or Ti control. The enhanced antimicrobial performances, correlated with good cytocompatibility and mechanical properties recommend these biomaterials as an alternative to synthetic HA for the fabrication of reliable implant coatings for dentistry and other applications. PMID:26652442

  7. Evaluation of fit of cement-retained implant-supported 3-unit structures fabricated with direct metal laser sintering and vacuum casting techniques.

    PubMed

    Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José Francisco; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Suárez-García, María Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the vertical discrepancy of implant-fixed 3-unit structures. Frameworks were constructed with laser-sintered Co-Cr, and vacuum-cast Co-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, and Pd-Au. Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion using resin-modified glass-ionomer, self-adhesive, and acrylic/urethane-based cements (n = 12 each). Discrepancies were SEM analyzed. Three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P < 0.05). Laser-sintered structures achieved the best fit per cement tested. Within each alloy group, resin-modified glass-ionomer and acrylic/urethane-based cements produced comparably lower discrepancies than the self-adhesive agent. The abutment position did not yield significant differences. All misfit values could be considered clinically acceptable. PMID:22075754

  8. Ion-implantation-induced stress in glasses: Variation of damage mode efficiency with changes in glass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. W.

    1988-05-01

    Ion implantation induces lateral stress in glass due to the volume dilatation in the implanted near-surface region. Cantilever-beam experiments allow these quantities to be measured as a function of fluence. For fused silica the stress data for various incident ions are found to scale with atomic collision energy deposition. In sharp contrast, Pyrex (alkali-borosilicate) glass, (1 - x)(Na, K) 2O· xB 2O 3·3SiO 2 glass, and a sodalime (microscope slide) glass, yield stress values which scale with energy deposition into electronic processes. More significantly, this mode of damage production is dominant for the nuclear waste glasses PNL 76-68 and SRP. The void space in fused silica allows room for displaced Si and/or O. For the complex alkali-containing silicates, the interstitial volume is restricted. In the latter case, the probability increases that permanent defects can be formed by ionization-induced bond-breaking and network relaxation. These data imply that alpha-particle ionization energy deposition may be an important factor in nuclear waste glass radiation damage production, but the magnitude of this contribution has not yet been evaluated.

  9. Investigations of silicone breast implants with the NMR-MOUSE.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Mirko; Schwarz, Annett; Blümich, Bernhard

    2007-02-01

    Silicone breast implants are used for breast augmentation and breast reconstruction. The issues of concern associated with such implants are: (a) the quality control of each implant before implantation, and (b) the detection of implant bleeding after implantation. We have studied the use of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-MObile Universal Surface Explorer (NMR-MOUSE) for the nondestructive testing of (a) the quality of implant shells, and (b) changes in implant gel due to leakage of body fluid into the implant. Depth profiles measured nondestructively through implant shells at different positions of each implant by the Profile NMR-MOUSE assured good reproducibility of the quality and thickness of different shell layers. The leakage of implants upon rupture was mimicked by observing changes in the transverse NMR relaxation time of the implant gel upon ingress of physiological saline solution and safflower oil through the rupture. Results demonstrate that nondestructive testing with unilateral NMR is a potential method for use in the quality control of implants and for the screening of implants for rupture after implantation. PMID:17275616

  10. Miniature implantable ultrasonic echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A miniature echosonometer adapted for implantation in the interior of an animal for imaging the internal structure of a organ, tissue or vessel is presented. The echosonometer includes a receiver/transmitter circuit which is coupled to an ultrasonic transducer. Power is coupled to the echosonometer by electromagnetic induction through the animal's skin. Imaging signals from the echosonometer are electromagnetically transmitted through the animal's skin to an external readout apparatus.

  11. Salient man-made structure detection in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-jie; Zhou, Fu-gen; Jin, Ting

    2013-09-01

    Target detection, segmentation and recognition is a hot research topic in the field of image processing and pattern recognition nowadays, among which salient area or object detection is one of core technologies of precision guided weapon. Many theories have been raised in this paper; we detect salient objects in a series of input infrared images by using the classical feature integration theory and Itti's visual attention system. In order to find the salient object in an image accurately, we present a new method to solve the edge blur problem by calculating and using the edge mask. We also greatly improve the computing speed by improving the center-surround differences method. Unlike the traditional algorithm, we calculate the center-surround differences through rows and columns separately. Experimental results show that our method is effective in detecting salient object accurately and rapidly.

  12. Information fusion approach for detection of brain structures in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shademan, Azad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents an information fusion approach for automatic detection of mid-brain nuclei (caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus) from MRI. The method is based on fusion of anatomical information, obtained from brain atlases and expert physicians, into MRI numerical information within a fuzzy framework, employed to model intrinsic uncertainty of problem. First step of this method is segmentation of brain tissues (gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid). Physical landmarks such as inter-hemispheric plane alongside numerical information from segmentation step are then used to describe the nuclei. Each nucleus is defined according to a unique description according to physical landmarks and anatomical landmarks, most of which are the previously detected nuclei. Also, a detected nucleus in slice n serves as key landmark to detect same nucleus in slice n+1. These steps construct fuzzy decision maps. Overall decision is made after fusing all of decisions according to a fusion operator. This approach has been implemented to detect caudate, putamen, and thalamus from a sequence of axial T1-weighted brain MRI's. Our experience shows that final nuclei detection results are highly dependent upon primary tissue segmentation. The method is validated by comparing resultant nuclei volumes with those obtained using manual segmentation performed by expert physicians.

  13. Distribution of pseudoexfoliation material on anterior segment structures in human autopsy eyes after cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Schmack, Ingo; Auffarth, Gerd Uwe

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the distribution and amount of pseudoexfoliation material (PXM) on anterior segment structures in pseudophakic human autopsy eyes with pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome and to study its impact on fixation and decentration of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs). Sixteen human autopsy eyes (donor age [mean ± SD] 77.5 ± 8.6 years; range, 70-90 years) with history of cataract surgery and PEX syndrome were analyzed for distribution and accumulation of PXM on structures of the anterior segment by light microscopy. Quantitative IOL decentration measurements were performed using the Miyake-Apple posterior view technique. All 16 eyes displayed IOLs which were either fixed symmetrically in the capsular bag (n = 8) or asymmetrically with one haptic in the sulcus and one in the bag (n = 7) or at the pars plicata of the ciliary body (n = 1). In the majority, PXM was found around the pars plicata (average grade: 1.6 ± 0.53 µm) and the lens capsule (average grade: 1.05 ± 0.46 µm). Minor amounts were detected at the pars plana and the trabecular meshwork. IOL decentration measurements ranged from 0.51 ± 0.35 (symmetrical-fixation) to 0.61 ± 0.43 mm (asymmetrical-fixation). There was only a weak statistically not significant correlation in regard to the amount of PXM and IOL decentration and between PXM distribution and the IOL fixation site. PXM contributes to weakening of the suspensory apparatus of the crystalline lens. Although PXM induced tissue alterations predispose for a broad spectrum of intra- and postoperative complications, the amount and distribution of PXM on different anterior segment structures showed only a weak correlation to IOL decentration or fixation location. PMID:26307751

  14. Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, K.; Allen, D. W.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

  15. On the origins of structural defects in BF2(+)-implanted and rapid thermally annealed silicon: Conditions for defect free regrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, T.; Washburn, J.; Myers, E.; Sadana, D. K.

    1984-07-01

    The rapid thermal annealing behavior of BF2(+)-implanted silicon pre-amorphized with Si(+) and Ge(+) was investigated with conventional and high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Three distinct layers of defects (types I, II and III) are identified. Fine clusters (type III) in the near-surface regions of both Si(+) and Ge(+) pre-amorphized samples are shown to be related to fluorine. In addition, models for the nucleation of interstitial dislocation loops (type I) and hairpin dislocations (type II) are presented. These models and the experimental results suggest that the densities of type I and type II defects can be reduced by pre-amorphizing with Ge(+) instead of Si(+). Furthermore, defect-free regrowth is demonstrated for samples which are pre-amorphized with Ge(+) and rapid-thermally annealed at 1150 C.

  16. Characterization of high energy ion implantation into Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, M. P.; Stephenson, K.; Findley, K. O.

    2009-06-01

    Ion implantation is a surface modification process that can improve the wear, fatigue, and corrosion resistance for several metals and alloys. Much of the research to date has focused on ion energies less than 1 MeV. With this in mind, Ti-6Al-4V was implanted with Al 2+, Au 3+, and N + ions at energies of 1.5 and 5 MeV and various doses to determine the effects on strengthening of a high energy beam. A post heat treatment on the specimens implanted with Al 2+ samples was conducted to precipitate Ti xAl type intermetallics near the surface. Novel techniques, such as nanoindentation, are available now to determine structure-mechanical property relationships in near-surface regions of the implanted samples. Thus, nanoindentation was performed on pre-implanted, as-implanted, and post heat treated samples to detect differences in elastic modulus and hardness at the sub-micron scale. In addition, sliding wear tests were performed to qualitatively determine the changes in wear performance. The effect of this processing was significant for samples implanted with Al 2+ ions at 1.5 MeV with a dose higher than 1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 where precipitation hardening likely occurs and with N + ions.

  17. Detection of deception in structured interviews using sensors and algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Meredith G.; Clarke, Alissa C.; Martin, Jennifer Z.; Beauregard, Jason R.; Webb, Andrea K.; Hensley, Asher A.; Keshava, Nirmal Q.; Martin, Daniel J.

    2010-04-01

    Draper Laboratory and MRAC have recently completed a comprehensive study to quantitatively evaluate deception detection performance under different interviewing styles. The interviews were performed while multiple physiological waveforms were collected from participants to determine how well automated algorithms can detect deception based upon changes in physiology. We report the results of a multi-factorial experiment with 77 human participants who were deceptive on specific topics during interviews conducted with one of two styles: a forcing style which relies on more coercive or confrontational techniques, or a fostering approach, which relies on open-ended interviewing and elements of a cognitive interview. The interviews were performed in a state-of-the-art facility where multiple sensors simultaneously collect synchronized physiological measurements, including electrodermal response, relative blood pressure, respiration, pupil diameter, and ECG. Features extracted from these waveforms during honest and deceptive intervals were then submitted to a hypothesis test to evaluate their statistical significance. A univariate statistical detection algorithm then assessed the ability to detect deception for different interview configurations. Our paper will explain the protocol and experimental design for this study. Our results will be in terms of statistical significances, effect sizes, and ROC curves and will identify how promising features performed in different interview scenarios.

  18. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  19. Dosimetry of a thyroid uptake detected in seed migration survey following a patient's iodine-125 prostate implant and in vitro measurements of intentional seed leakages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qinsheng; Russell, John L. Jr.; Macklis, Roger R.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Blair, Henry F.

    2006-07-15

    As a quality control procedure, a post-implant seed migration survey has been accomplished on 340 prostate cancer patients since November 2001. Pulmonary seed embolization and intracardiac seed embolization have been detected. A case of thyroid uptake due to leaking iodine-125 (I-125) sources was also seized. In order to determine the dose to the thyroid, a dosimetry method was developed to link in vivo measurements and the cumulated dose to the thyroid. The calculated source leakage half-life in the case was approximately 15 days based on the measurements and the estimated cumulated dose to thyroid was 204 cGy. It is concluded that one seed was leaking. In order to verify the in vivo measurements, intentional in vitro seed leakage tests were performed. A seed was cut open and placed in a sealed glass container filled with a given volume of saline. The I-125 concentration in the saline was subsequently measured over a period of six months. Consistent in vivo and in vitro results were obtained. Recent incidents of seed leaks reported from other centers have drawn practitioners' attention to this problem. In order to make the measurements more useful, the seed leakage tests were expanded to include I-125 seeds from six other vendors. The results show that the leakage half-lives of those seeds varied from nine days to a half-year. Two seed models demonstrated least leakage. Since the measurements lasted for six months, the escape of iodine resulted from oxidation of iodide in the saline was a concern for the measurement accuracy. As a reference, another set of leakage tests were performed by adding sodium thiosulfate salt (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O) to the saline. Sodium thiosulfate is a reducing agent that prevents the conversion of iodide to iodate so as to minimize I-125 evaporation. As a result, significantly shortened leakage half-lives were observed in this group. Seed agitation was also performed and no significant deviations of the

  20. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  1. New nondestructive techniques for the detection and quantification of corrosion in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Cramer, K. E.; Johnston, P. H.; Namkung, M.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is presented of several techniques under development at NASA Langley Research Center for detection and quantification of corrosion in aircraft structures. The techniques have been developed as part of the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program. The techniques focus on the detection of subsurface corrosion in thin laminated structures. Results are presented on specimens with both manufactured defects, for calibration of the techniques, and on specimens removed from aircraft.

  2. Time-series methods for fault detection and identification in vibrating structures.

    PubMed

    Fassois, Spilios D; Sakellariou, John S

    2007-02-15

    An overview of the principles and techniques of time-series methods for fault detection, identification and estimation in vibrating structures is presented, and certain new methods are introduced. The methods are classified, and their features and operation are discussed. Their practicality and effectiveness are demonstrated through brief presentations of three case studies pertaining to fault detection, identification and estimation in an aircraft panel, a scale aircraft skeleton structure and a simple nonlinear simulated structure. PMID:17255046

  3. Abridged Technique for Precise Implant Angulation.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Praveen; Chander, Gopi Naveen; Viswanathan, Anitha Kuttae; Reddy, Ramesh; Muthukumar, B

    2015-12-01

    Enormous scientific knowledge with evidence and clinical dexterity impart definitive ground for success in implant dentistry. Nevertheless, the unfeasibility to access the inner bone tissue makes the situation altogether more demanding. Presently the advent of numerous imaging techniques and associated surgical guide templates are documented for evaluation of implant angulation. However, they are not cost effective and consume more time to plan and design the structure. This article describes a simple concise technique for precise implant angulation. PMID:26816997

  4. Abridged Technique for Precise Implant Angulation

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Praveen; Chander, Gopi Naveen; Reddy, Ramesh; Muthukumar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Enormous scientific knowledge with evidence and clinical dexterity impart definitive ground for success in implant dentistry. Nevertheless, the unfeasibility to access the inner bone tissue makes the situation altogether more demanding. Presently the advent of numerous imaging techniques and associated surgical guide templates are documented for evaluation of implant angulation. However, they are not cost effective and consume more time to plan and design the structure. This article describes a simple concise technique for precise implant angulation. PMID:26816997

  5. Detection of Anatomic Structures in Human Retinal Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Chaum, Edward; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2007-01-01

    The widespread availability of electronic imaging devices throughout the medical community is leading to a growing body of research on image processing and analysis to diagnose retinal disease such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). Productive computer-based screening of large, at-risk populations at low cost requires robust, automated image analysis. In this paper we present results for the automatic detection of the optic nerve and localization of the macula using digital red-free fundus photography. Our method relies on the accurate segmentation of the vasculature of the retina followed by the determination of spatial features describing the density,average thickness, and average orientation of the vasculature in relation to the position of the optic nerve. Localization of the macula follows using knowledge of the optic nerve location to detect the horizontal raphe of the retina using a geometric model of the vasculature. We report 90.4% detection performance for the optic nerve and 92.5% localization performance for the macula for red-free fundus images representing a population of 345 images corresponding to 269 patients with 18 different pathologies associated with DR and other common retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  6. A soft kinetic data structure for lesion border detection

    PubMed Central

    Kockara, Sinan; Mete, Mutlu; Yip, Vincent; Lee, Brendan; Aydin, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The medical imaging and image processing techniques, ranging from microscopic to macroscopic, has become one of the main components of diagnostic procedures to assist dermatologists in their medical decision-making processes. Computer-aided segmentation and border detection on dermoscopic images is one of the core components of diagnostic procedures and therapeutic interventions for skin cancer. Automated assessment tools for dermoscopic images have become an important research field mainly because of inter- and intra-observer variations in human interpretations. In this study, a novel approach—graph spanner—for automatic border detection in dermoscopic images is proposed. In this approach, a proximity graph representation of dermoscopic images in order to detect regions and borders in skin lesion is presented. Results: Graph spanner approach is examined on a set of 100 dermoscopic images whose manually drawn borders by a dermatologist are used as the ground truth. Error rates, false positives and false negatives along with true positives and true negatives are quantified by digitally comparing results with manually determined borders from a dermatologist. The results show that the highest precision and recall rates obtained to determine lesion boundaries are 100%. However, accuracy of assessment averages out at 97.72% and borders errors' mean is 2.28% for whole dataset. Contact: skockara@uca.edu PMID:20529909

  7. Enhanced Detectability of Pre-reionization 21 cm Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Pen, Ue-Li; Chang, Tzu-Ching

    2010-11-01

    Before the universe was reionized, it was likely that the spin temperature of intergalactic hydrogen was decoupled from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by UV radiation from the first stars through the Wouthuysen-Field effect. If the intergalactic medium (IGM) had not yet been heated above the CMB temperature by that time, then the gas would appear in absorption relative to the CMB. Large, rare sources of X-rays could inject sufficient heat into the neutral IGM, so that δTb >0 at comoving distances of tens to hundreds of Mpc, resulting in large 21 cm fluctuations with δTb ~= 250 mK on arcminute to degree angular scales, an order of magnitude larger in amplitude than that caused by ionized bubbles during reionization, δTb ~= 25 mK. This signal could therefore be easier to detect and probe higher redshifts than that due to patchy reionization. For the case in which the first objects to heat the IGM are QSOs hosting 107 M sun black holes with an abundance exceeding ~1 Gpc-3 at z ~ 15, observations with either the Arecibo Observatory or the Five Hundred Meter Aperture Spherical Telescope could detect and image their fluctuations at greater than 5σ significance in about a month of dedicated survey time. Additionally, existing facilities such as MWA and LOFAR could detect the statistical fluctuations arising from a population of 105 M sun black holes with an abundance of ~104 Gpc-3 at z ~= 10-12.

  8. Detection of Structural Faults by Modal Data, Lower Bounds and Shadow Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contursi, T.; Mangialardi, L. M.; Messina, A.

    1998-02-01

    Different algorithms have recently been developed for the diagnosis of many types of civil and mechanical structures using modal data, such as natural frequencies and mode shapes. Although many solutions have been proposed, some important questions seem to be absent in the technical literature. If changes in a structure's modal parameters are able to reflect structural faults, it is important to know what is the smallest detectable physical change in that structure.It is suggested that damage detection by means of modal data can be useful for macro-damage rather than for micro-damage. This resulted from numerical and experimental tests using a simple correlation between measurement noise and sensitivity of modal data, with respect to structural changes in different parts of a system. An automatic sensitivity approach is presented to obtain the lower bound of structural faults for the particular structure under study. The same automatic procedure is able to detect possible shadow sites within the frequency range analyzed.

  9. An unusual case of a ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implant associated with xanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Dinets, Andrii; Unukovych, Dmytro; Khrapach, Vasyl; Zakhartseva, Olga; Sulik, Volodymyr; Kaminskyi, Edgar; Khrapach, Olexandr; Meloyan, Ani; Zakhartseva, Lubov; Mishalov, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A suspicious breast mass was intra-operatively found in a female patient previously operated for breast augmentation with the Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) implants. The neoplasm was verified as xanthoma and an asymptomatic microrupture of PIP was also detected. This report discusses possible association of breast xanthoma with PIP implant rupture.

  10. An unusual case of a ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implant associated with xanthoma.

    PubMed

    Dinets, Andrii; Unukovych, Dmytro; Khrapach, Vasyl; Zakhartseva, Olga; Sulik, Volodymyr; Kaminskyi, Edgar; Khrapach, Olexandr; Meloyan, Ani; Zakhartseva, Lubov; Mishalov, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    A suspicious breast mass was intra-operatively found in a female patient previously operated for breast augmentation with the Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) implants. The neoplasm was verified as xanthoma and an asymptomatic microrupture of PIP was also detected. This report discusses possible association of breast xanthoma with PIP implant rupture. PMID:27583262

  11. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  12. A new approach for structural health monitoring by applying anomaly detection on strain sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichias, Konstantinos; Pijpers, Richard; Meeuwissen, Erik

    2014-03-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems help to monitor critical infrastructures (bridges, tunnels, etc.) remotely and provide up-to-date information about their physical condition. In addition, it helps to predict the structure's life and required maintenance in a cost-efficient way. Typically, inspection data gives insight in the structural health. The global structural behavior, and predominantly the structural loading, is generally measured with vibration and strain sensors. Acoustic emission sensors are more and more used for measuring global crack activity near critical locations. In this paper, we present a procedure for local structural health monitoring by applying Anomaly Detection (AD) on strain sensor data for sensors that are applied in expected crack path. Sensor data is analyzed by automatic anomaly detection in order to find crack activity at an early stage. This approach targets the monitoring of critical structural locations, such as welds, near which strain sensors can be applied during construction and/or locations with limited inspection possibilities during structural operation. We investigate several anomaly detection techniques to detect changes in statistical properties, indicating structural degradation. The most effective one is a novel polynomial fitting technique, which tracks slow changes in sensor data. Our approach has been tested on a representative test structure (bridge deck) in a lab environment, under constant and variable amplitude fatigue loading. In both cases, the evolving cracks at the monitored locations were successfully detected, autonomously, by our AD monitoring tool.

  13. A two-layer structure prediction framework for microscopy cell detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Wu, Weiying; Chang, Eric I-Chao; Chen, Danny; Mu, Jian; Lee, Peter P; Blenman, Kim R M; Tu, Zhuowen

    2015-04-01

    The task of microscopy cell detection is of great biological and clinical importance. However, existing algorithms for microscopy cell detection usually ignore the large variations of cells and only focus on the shape feature/descriptor design. Here we propose a new two-layer model for cell centre detection by a two-layer structure prediction framework, which is respectively built on classification for the cell centres implicitly using rich appearances and contextual information and explicit structural information for the cells. Experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method over competing state-of-the-art methods, providing a viable alternative for microscopy cell detection. PMID:25082065

  14. Multi-stage identification scheme for detecting damage in structures under ambient excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Chunxiao; Hao, Hong; Li, Zhong-Xian

    2013-04-01

    Structural damage identification methods are critical to the successful application of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems to civil engineering structures. The dynamic response of civil engineering structures is usually characterized by high nonlinearity and non-stationarity. Accordingly, an improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) method which is adaptive, output-only and applicable to system identification of in-service structures under ambient excitations is developed in this study. Based on this method, a multi-stage damage detection scheme including the detection of damage occurrence, damage existence, damage location and the estimation of damage severity is developed. In this scheme, the improved HHT method is used to analyse the structural acceleration response, the obtained instantaneous frequency detects the instant of damage occurrence, the instantaneous phase is sensitive to minor damage and provides reliable damage indication, and the damage indicator developed based on statistical analysis of the Hilbert marginal spectrum detects damage locations. Finally, the response sampled at the detected damage location is continuously analysed to estimate the damage severity. Numerical and experimental studies of frame structures under ambient excitations are performed. The results demonstrate that this scheme accomplishes the above damage detection functions within one flow. It is robust, time efficient, simply implemented and applicable to the real-time SHM of in-service structures.

  15. Damage Detection with Streamlined Structural Health Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Deng, Jun; Xie, Weizhi

    2015-01-01

    The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM) systems often overwhelms the systems’ capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compression, interactive sensor data retrieval, and structural knowledge discovery, which aim to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and robustness of on-line SHM systems. Adoption of this new concept will enable the design of an on-line SHM system with more uniform data generation and data handling capacity for its subsystems. To examine this concept in the context of vibration-based SHM systems, real sensor data from an on-line SHM system comprising a scaled steel bridge structure and an on-line data acquisition system with remote data access was used in this study. Vibration test results clearly demonstrated the prominent performance characteristics of the proposed integrated SHM system including rapid data access, interactive data retrieval and knowledge discovery of structural conditions on a global level. PMID:25884788

  16. Testing Structural Equation Models or Detection of Misspecifications?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saris, Willem E.; Satorra, Albert; van der Veld, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the correctness of a structural equation model is essential to avoid drawing incorrect conclusions from empirical research. In the past, the chi-square test was recommended for assessing the correctness of the model but this test has been criticized because of its sensitivity to sample size. As a reaction, an abundance of fit indexes…

  17. Pulsed phase thermography for defect detection of honeycomb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Feng, Lichun; Li, Yanhong; Zhang, Cunlin

    2009-07-01

    Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) has been reported as a powerful technique of the thermal NDE. In this paper, the authors show that the original phase-images of two kinds of honeycomb structure defects by PPT based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) for the signal of temperature-time of each pixel. One is the artificial defects in honeycomb structure core under surface skin, and the defects can be identified easily. The other is disbonding defect between surface skin and core, and the difference is apparent compared with bonding and no-bonding between surface skin and core. To improve the signal to noise ratio for defect inspection of honeycomb structure, the temperature decay curve of each pixel is smoothed by moving average filter and then fitted by exponential function. After FFT on the fitted data of temperature, the fitted phase-images of two kinds of honeycomb structure defects are given. Compared with the original thermal-images of PT and original phase-images, the calculated phase-images are much more improved. Another advantage is the data could be represented by coefficients of fitting functions, and the storage of data could be greatly reduced. At last, the calculation process of temperature decay curve and analysis of the influence caused by increasing sampling time and frequency are given.

  18. Detecting Unspecified Structure in Low-count Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Nathan M.; van Dyk, David A.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2015-11-01

    Unexpected structure in images of astronomical sources often presents itself upon visual inspection of the image, but such apparent structure may either correspond to true features in the source or be due to noise in the data. This paper presents a method for testing whether inferred structure in an image with Poisson noise represents a significant departure from a baseline (null) model of the image. To infer image structure, we conduct a Bayesian analysis of a full model that uses a multiscale component to allow flexible departures from the posited null model. As a test statistic, we use a tail probability of the posterior distribution under the full model. This choice of test statistic allows us to estimate a computationally efficient upper bound on a p-value that enables us to draw strong conclusions even when there are limited computational resources that can be devoted to simulations under the null model. We demonstrate the statistical performance of our method on simulated images. Applying our method to an X-ray image of the quasar 0730+257, we find significant evidence against the null model of a single point source and uniform background, lending support to the claim of an X-ray jet.

  19. Damage detection with streamlined structural health monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Deng, Jun; Xie, Weizhi

    2015-01-01

    The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM) systems often overwhelms the systems' capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compression, interactive sensor data retrieval, and structural knowledge discovery, which aim to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and robustness of on-line SHM systems. Adoption of this new concept will enable the design of an on-line SHM system with more uniform data generation and data handling capacity for its subsystems. To examine this concept in the context of vibration-based SHM systems, real sensor data from an on-line SHM system comprising a scaled steel bridge structure and an on-line data acquisition system with remote data access was used in this study. Vibration test results clearly demonstrated the prominent performance characteristics of the proposed integrated SHM system including rapid data access, interactive data retrieval and knowledge discovery of structural conditions on a global level. PMID:25884788

  20. Detection of small exchange fields in S/F structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenko, A. S.; Kawabata, S.; Ozaeta, A.; Golubov, A. A.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Bergeret, F. S.; Hekking, F. W. J.

    2015-06-01

    Ferromagnetic materials with exchange fields Eex smaller or of the order of the superconducting gap Δ are important for applications of corresponding (s-wave) superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor (SFS) junctions. Presently such materials are not known but there are several proposals how to create them. Small exchange fields are in principle difficult to detect. Based on our results we propose reliable detection methods of such small Eex. For exchange fields smaller than the superconducting gap the subgap differential conductance of the normal metal-ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor (NFIS) junction shows a peak at the voltage bias equal to the exchange field of the ferromagnetic layer, eV =Eex. Thus measuring the subgap conductance one can reliably determine small Eex < Δ. In the opposite case Eex > Δ one can determine the exchange field in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiment. The density of states of the FS bilayer measured at the outer border of the ferromagnet shows a peak at the energy equal to the exchange field, E =Eex. This peak can be only visible for small enough exchange fields of the order of few Δ.

  1. Microbiological aspects of human mandibular subperiosteal dental implants.

    PubMed

    Rams, Thomas E; Balkin, Burton E; Roberts, Thomas W; Molzan, Arthur K

    2013-12-01

    Clinical, microbiological, and biochemical features of human mandibular subperiosteal dental implants exhibiting peri-implantitis were compared with those experiencing long-term peri-implant health. After evaluation of clinical parameters, submucosal plaque samples were obtained from permucosal implant abutment posts exhibiting probing depths ≥5 mm and bleeding on probing in subjects with peri-implantitis (n = 3) and from posts with peri-implant health in subjects with long-term subperiosteal implant health (n = 8). The microbial specimens were transported in VMGA III and plated onto enriched Brucella blood agar and Hammond's selective medium with anaerobic incubation, and onto selective TSBV with 5% CO2 incubation. Total anaerobic viable counts and selected bacterial species were identified using established phenotypic methods and criteria. In vitro resistance to doxycycline (2 μg/mL), amoxicillin (2 μg/mL), or metronidazole (4 μg/mL) was recorded per subject when bacterial pathogen growth was noted on antibiotic-supplemented isolation plates. Interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in peri-implant crevicular fluid samples from 5 study subjects. Significantly higher Plaque Index scores, higher total anaerobic viable counts, more red complex species, and lower proportions of gram-positive facultative viridans streptococci and Actinomyces species were detected on peri-implantitis-affected subperiosteal implants as compared with subperiosteal implants with long-term peri-implant health. No in vitro resistance to the 3 test antibiotic breakpoint concentrations studied was found, except a Fusobacterium nucleatum strain resistant to doxycycline at 2 μg/mL from 1 peri-implantitis subject. Subperiosteal implants with peri-implantitis tended to yield higher peri-implant crevicular fluid IL-1β levels. The level of peri-implant supramucosal plaque control and the composition of the peri-implant submucosal microbiome may be

  2. Effects of implantation of three-dimensional engineered bone tissue with a vascular-like structure on repair of bone defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Masanori; Matsumoto, Rena; Dong, Jian; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2012-12-01

    Previously, to create an implantable bone tissue associated with blood vessels, we co-cultured rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with MSC-derived endothelial cells (ECs) within a porous polylactic acid-based scaffold utilizing a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Here, this engineered tissue was orthotopically implanted into defects made in femurs of immunodeficient rats, and histological analysis were carried out to examine the repair of the damage and the formation of bone around the implant. The bone defects were better repaired in the implanted group than control group after 3 weeks. The results indicate that the engineered bone could repair bone defects.

  3. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ. PMID:26590206

  4. Bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse Implant Rupture: An Uncommon Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mallon, Peter; Ganachaud, François; Malhaire, Caroline; Brunel, Raphael; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Feron, Jean-Guillaume; Couturaud, Benoit; Fitoussi, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Summary: A woman in her 50s underwent delayed bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse implant reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer. Symptoms of implant rupture developed 43 months after surgery with an erythematous rash on her trunk. The rash then spread to her reconstructed breast mounds. Initial ultrasound scan and magnetic resonance imaging were normal; however, subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated left implant rupture only. In theater, following removal of both implants, both were found to be ruptured. The rash on her trunk resolved within 3 weeks in the postoperative period. Chemical analyses of silicone in both implants confirmed a nonauthorized silicone source; in addition, the chemical structure was significantly different between the left and right implant, perhaps explaining the variation in presentation. PMID:25289223

  5. Detecting the temporal structure of sound sequences in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Háden, Gábor P; Honing, Henkjan; Török, Miklós; Winkler, István

    2015-04-01

    Most high-level auditory functions require one to detect the onset and offset of sound sequences as well as registering the rate at which sounds are presented within the sound trains. By recording event-related brain potentials to onsets and offsets of tone trains as well as to changes in the presentation rate, we tested whether these fundamental auditory capabilities are functional at birth. Each of these events elicited significant event-related potential components in sleeping healthy neonates. The data thus demonstrate that the newborn brain is sensitive to these acoustic features suggesting that infants are geared towards the temporal aspects of segregating sound sources, speech and music perception already at birth. PMID:25722025

  6. Wireless system for explosion detection in underground structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Bochorishvili, N.; Akhvlediani, I.; Kukhalashvili, D.; Kalichava, I.; Mataradze, E.

    2009-06-01

    Considering the growing threat of terrorist or accidental explosions in underground stations, underground highway and railway sections improvement of system for protecting people from explosions appears urgent. Current automatic protective devices with blast identification module and blast damping absorbers of various designs as their basic elements cannot be considered effective. Analysis revealed that low reliability of blast detection and delayed generation of start signal for the activation of an absorber are the major disadvantages of protective devices. Besides the transmission of trigger signal to an energy absorber through cable communication reduces the reliability of the operation of protective device due to a possible damage of electric wiring under blast or mechanical attack. This paper presents the outcomes of the studies conducted to select accurate criteria for blast identification and to design wireless system of activation of defensive device. The results of testing of blast detection methods (seismic, EMP, optical, on overpressure) showed that the proposed method, which implies constant monitoring of overpressure in terms of its reliability and response speed, best meets the requirements. Proposed wireless system for explosions identification and activation of protective device consists of transmitter and receiver modules. Transmitter module contains sensor and microprocessor equipped with blast identification software. Receiver module produces activation signal for operation of absorber. Tests were performed in the underground experimental base of Mining Institute. The time between the moment of receiving signal by the sensor and activation of absorber - 640 microsecond; distance between transmitter and receiver in direct tunnel - at least 150m; in tunnel with 900 bending - 50m. This research is sponsored by NATO's Public Diplomacy Division in the framework of "Science for Peace".

  7. Probability of Detection Study on Impact Damage to Honeycomb Composite Structure using Thermographic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Walker, James L., II

    2008-01-01

    A probability of detection study was performed for the detection of impact damage using flash heating infrared thermography on a full scale honeycomb composite structure. The honeycomb structure was an intertank structure from a previous NASA technology demonstration program. The intertank was fabricated from IM7/8552 carbon fiber/epoxy facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The intertank was impacted in multiple locations with a range of impact energies utilizing a spherical indenter. In a single blind study, the intertank was inspected with thermography before and after impact damage was incurred. Following thermographic inspection several impact sites were sectioned from the intertank and cross-sectioned for microscopic comparisons of NDE detection and actual damage incurred. The study concluded that thermographic inspection was a good method of detecting delamination damage incurred by impact. The 90/95 confidence level on the probability of detection was close to the impact energy that delaminations were first observed through cross-sectional analysis.

  8. Effect of Neurohormonal Blockade Drug Therapy on Outcomes and Left Ventricular Function and Structure After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Grupper, Avishay; Zhao, Yanjun M; Sajgalik, Pavol; Joyce, Lyle D; Park, Soon J; Pereira, Naveen L; Stulak, John M; Burnett, John C; Edwards, Brooks S; Daly, Richard C; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Schirger, John A

    2016-06-01

    Neurohormonal blockade drug therapy (NHBDT) is the cornerstone therapy in heart failure (HF) management for promoting reverse cardiac remodeling and improving outcomes. It's utility in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) supported patients remains undefined. Sixty-four patients who received continuous flow LVAD at our institution were retrospectively reviewed and divided into 2 groups: no-NHBDT group (n = 33) received LVAD support only and NHBDT group (n = 31) received concurrent NHBDT based on the clinical judgment of the attending physicians. Cardiac remodeling (echocardiographic parameters and biomarkers) and clinical outcome (functional status, HF-related hospital readmissions, and mortality) data were collected. A statistically significant increase in ejection fraction, decrease in LV end-diastolic diameter index and LV mass index, and a sustained reduction in N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) were observed in the NHBDT group at 6 months after LVAD implant (p <0.05). NHBDT-treated patients experienced significantly greater improvement in New York Heart Association functional classification and 6-minute-walk distance throughout the study. The combined end point of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization was significantly reduced in patients receiving NHBDT (p = 0.013) associated primarily with a 12.1% absolute reduction in HF-related hospitalizations (p = 0.046). In conclusion, NHBDT in LVAD-supported patients is associated with a significant reversal in adverse cardiac remodeling and a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared with LVAD support alone. PMID:27079215

  9. Retrograde peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Shivakumar, B; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  10. Giant magnetoresistance sensing technologies for detecting small defects in metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeid, Simon

    Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) has been used with Eddy current testing to detect small defects not only in thin film structures but also in multilayered metallic structures. This work detected small scratches in the thin film under the surface where these defects were unable to be inspected or monitored by regular testing. In addition, rotational GMR magnetic sensor based Eddy current probes were used for detecting buried corner cracks at the edge of holes in metallic structures. The results of this study proved that giant magnetoresistance is very powerful and effective to sense the magnetic field, which is the result from the perturbation of the Eddy currents caused by a defect. This method can be used for quality control of metallization layers on silicon wafer and to detect cracks in thick structures such as cracks in aging aircraft.

  11. Local concurrent error detection and correction in data structures using virtual backpointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. C.; Chen, P. P.; Fuchs, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on virtual backpointers, for local concurrent error detection and correction in linked data structures is presented. Two new data structures, the Virtual Double Linked List, and the B-tree with Virtual Backpointers, are described. For these structures, double errors can be detected in 0(1) time and errors detected during forward moves can be corrected in 0(1) time. The application of a concurrent auditor process to data structure error detection and correction is analyzed, and an implementation is described, to determine the effect on mean time to failure of a multi-user shared database system. The implementation utilizes a Sequent shared memory multiprocessor system operating on a shared databased of Virtual Double Linked Lists.

  12. Instability signature for detecting snap-through buckling of dome structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guirong; Duan, Qiuhua; Hua, Xugang

    2016-04-01

    Dome structures have been built as roofs for venues where many people convene. Failure of this type of structure may jeopardize the safety of hundreds or even thousands people. For this type of structure, snap-through buckling may occur in a local area and gradually expand to the entire structure, leading to a failure of the overall structure. Although numerous structural health monitoring techniques and damage detection approaches have been developed, no research on the detection of a snap-through buckling has been reported. The objective of this study is to find a signature that is sensitive to snap-through buckling in dome structures and can be used to detect snap-through buckling. Considering that a snap-through buckling results in a significant deformation in a local area, which can be reflected by the change in tilting angles of members in that local area, the change in tilting angles of members will be proposed to be a signature to detect snap-through buckling. To verify the proposed instability signature, a reticulated dome structure will be investigated. Both an eigenvalue buckling analysis and a nonlinear buckling analysis will be conducted. The significant changes in tilting angles of members in the buckled regions have demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed instability signature. This research will bridge the research gap between structural health monitoring and structural stability research.

  13. Damage detection strategies for aircraft shell-like structures based on propagation guided elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dot Zak, A.; Ostachowicz, W.; Krawczuk, M.

    2011-07-01

    Damage of aircraft structural elements in any form always present high risks. Failures of these elements can be caused by various reasons including material fatigue or impact leading to damage initiation and growth. Detection of these failures at their earliest stage of development, estimation of their size and location, are one of the most crucial factors for each damage detection method. Structural health monitoring strategies based on propagation of guided elastic waves in structures and wave interaction with damage related discontinuities are very promising tools that offer not only damage detection capabilities, but are also meant to provide precise information about the state of the structures and their remaining lifetime. Because of that various techniques are employed to simulate and mimic the wave-discontinuity interactions. The use of various types of sensors, their networks together with sophisticated contactless measuring techniques are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Certain results of numerical simulations obtained by the use of the spectral finite element method are presented by the authors and related with propagation of guided elastic waves in shell-type aircraft structures. Two types of structures are considered: flat 2D panels with or without stiffeners and 3D shell structures. The applicability of two different damage detection approaches is evaluated in order to detect and localise damage in these structures. Selected results related with the use of laser scanning vibrometry are also presented and discussed by the authors.

  14. Peri-implantitis: from diagnosis to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hieu, Tung; Borghetti, Alain; Aboudharam, Gérard

    2012-05-01

    Peri-implantitis is an infection of the tissue around an implant, resulting in the loss of supporting bone. Risk factors for peri-implantitis consist of a history of periodontitis, dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, smoking, alcohol consumption and diabetes. A clinical diagnosis indicates inflammatory signs including bleeding on probing with or without suppuration and a peri-implant pocket depth ≥5 mm. A radiograph shows images of marginal bone loss ≥2 mm. A differential diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis, occlusal overload, retrograde peri-implantitis and inflammatory implant periapical lesions suggests the appropriate treatment in each case. The non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis, including a mechanical treatment alone or combined with antiseptics or antibiotics can improve clinical parameters in the short term but residual defects may still persist. Surgical treatment such as guided bone regeneration results in a gain of clinical attachment level and bone reconstruction in the long term. The limited effect of laser-assisted therapy needs to be further evaluated. The concept of prevention based on early detection and regular maintenance plays a principal role in reducing the occurrence of peri-implantitis. PMID:22383175

  15. Detecting the temporal structure of intermittent phase locking

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungwoo; Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores a method to characterize temporal structure of intermittent phase locking in oscillatory systems. When an oscillatory system is in a weakly synchronized regime away from a synchronization threshold, it spends most of the time in parts of its phase space away from synchronization state. Therefore characteristics of dynamics near this state (such as its stability properties/Lyapunov exponents or distributions of the durations of synchronized episodes) do not describe system’s dynamics for most of the time. We consider an approach to characterize the system dynamics in this case, by exploring the relationship between the phases on each cycle of oscillations. If some overall level of phase locking is present, one can quantify when and for how long phase locking is lost, and how the system returns back to the phase-locked state. We consider several examples to illustrate this approach: coupled skewed tent maps, which stability can be evaluated analytically, coupled Rössler and Lorenz oscillators, undergoing through different intermittencies on the way to phase synchronization, and a more complex example of coupled neurons. We show that the obtained measures can describe the differences in the dynamics and temporal structure of synchronization/desynchronization events for the systems with similar overall level of phase locking and similar stability of synchronized state. PMID:21867267

  16. Detecting the temporal structure of intermittent phase locking.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungwoo; Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L

    2011-07-01

    This study explores a method to characterize the temporal structure of intermittent phase locking in oscillatory systems. When an oscillatory system is in a weakly synchronized regime away from a synchronization threshold, it spends most of the time in parts of its phase space away from the synchronization state. Therefore characteristics of dynamics near this state (such as its stability properties and Lyapunov exponents or distributions of the durations of synchronized episodes) do not describe the system's dynamics for most of the time. We consider an approach to characterize the system dynamics in this case by exploring the relationship between the phases on each cycle of oscillations. If some overall level of phase locking is present, one can quantify when and for how long phase locking is lost, and how the system returns back to the phase-locked state. We consider several examples to illustrate this approach: coupled skewed tent maps, the stability of which can be evaluated analytically; coupled Rössler and Lorenz oscillators, undergoing through different intermittency types on the way to phase synchronization; and a more complex example of coupled neurons. We show that the obtained measures can describe the differences in the dynamics and temporal structure of synchronization and desynchronization events for the systems with a similar overall level of phase locking and similar stability of the synchronized state. PMID:21867267

  17. Detecting the temporal structure of intermittent phase locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungwoo; Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L.

    2011-07-01

    This study explores a method to characterize the temporal structure of intermittent phase locking in oscillatory systems. When an oscillatory system is in a weakly synchronized regime away from a synchronization threshold, it spends most of the time in parts of its phase space away from the synchronization state. Therefore characteristics of dynamics near this state (such as its stability properties and Lyapunov exponents or distributions of the durations of synchronized episodes) do not describe the system’s dynamics for most of the time. We consider an approach to characterize the system dynamics in this case by exploring the relationship between the phases on each cycle of oscillations. If some overall level of phase locking is present, one can quantify when and for how long phase locking is lost, and how the system returns back to the phase-locked state. We consider several examples to illustrate this approach: coupled skewed tent maps, the stability of which can be evaluated analytically; coupled Rössler and Lorenz oscillators, undergoing through different intermittency types on the way to phase synchronization; and a more complex example of coupled neurons. We show that the obtained measures can describe the differences in the dynamics and temporal structure of synchronization and desynchronization events for the systems with a similar overall level of phase locking and similar stability of the synchronized state.

  18. Structuring an event ontology for disease outbreak detection

    PubMed Central

    Kawazoe, Ai; Chanlekha, Hutchatai; Shigematsu, Mika; Collier, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    Background This paper describes the design of an event ontology being developed for application in the machine understanding of infectious disease-related events reported in natural language text. This event ontology is designed to support timely detection of disease outbreaks and rapid judgment of their alerting status by 1) bridging a gap between layman's language used in disease outbreak reports and public health experts' deep knowledge, and 2) making multi-lingual information available. Construction and content This event ontology integrates a model of experts' knowledge for disease surveillance, and at the same time sets of linguistic expressions which denote disease-related events, and formal definitions of events. In this ontology, rather general event classes, which are suitable for application to language-oriented tasks such as recognition of event expressions, are placed on the upper-level, and more specific events of the experts' interest are in the lower level. Each class is related to other classes which represent participants of events, and linked with multi-lingual synonym sets and axioms. Conclusions We consider that the design of the event ontology and the methodology introduced in this paper are applicable to other domains which require integration of natural language information and machine support for experts to assess them. The first version of the ontology, with about 40 concepts, will be available in March 2008. PMID:18426553

  19. Damage detection and identification in smart structures using SVM and ANN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, M.; Zheng, H.; Nagabhushana, A.; Roy, S.; Burkett, S.; Barkey, M.; Kotru, S.; Sazonov, E.

    2012-04-01

    A critical part of structural health monitoring is accurate detection of damages in the structure. This paper presents the results of two multi-class damage detection and identification approaches based on classification using Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The article under test was a fiber composite panel modeled by a Finite Element Model (FEM). Static strain data were acquired at 6 predefined locations and mixed with Gaussian noise to simulate performance of real strain sensors. Strain data were then normalized by the mean of the strain values. Two experiments were performed for the performance evaluation of damage detection and identification. In both experiments, one healthy structure and two damaged structures with one and two small cracks were simulated with varying material properties and loading conditions (45 cases for each structure). The SVM and ANN models were trained with 70% of these samples and the remaining 30% samples were used for validation. The objective of the first experiment was to detect whether or not the panel was damaged. In this two class problem the average damage detection accuracy for ANN and SVM were 93.2% and 96.66% respectively. The objective of second experiment was to detect the severity of the damage by differentiating between structures with one crack and two cracks. In this three class problem the average prediction accuracy for ANN and SVM were 83.5% and 90.05% respectively. These results suggest that for noisy data, SVM may perform better than ANN for this problem.

  20. Pediatric cochlear implant candidacy issues.

    PubMed

    Osberger, M J; Chute, P M; Pope, M L; Kessler, K S; Carotta, C C; Firszt, J B; Zimmerman-Phillips, S

    1991-01-01

    Children with progressive sensorineural hearing impairment represent a special challenge to the audiologist and the otologist. These are patients with some residual auditory abilities that deteriorate with time as the hearing loss progresses. No doubt, the unnecessary implantation of an ear that significantly benefits from amplification needs to be avoided at all costs. By the same token however, there appears to be no advantage to waiting an inordinate amount of time after the loss of functional auditory abilities before recommending implantation. At times when a complete loss is predictable, implantation may be advantageous before the onset of complete auditory deprivation. Steps the clinicians should take to manage these patients effectively are briefly summarized below: Implementation of rigorous and frequent audiologic monitoring. If, for instance, a significant progressive loss of hearing has occurred over a 6-month period, resulting in a complete absence of open-set speech recognition abilities in the auditory-alone mode with appropriate hearing aids, it is probably counterproductive to wait to the point of a complete absence of aided speech detection. Implantation at a critical point in time will prevent complete auditory deprivation. Parental counseling concerning various management strategies, such as use of vibrotactile devices, changing communication skills, and issues involving cochlear implants need to be undertaken early. Parents need to be involved in every phase of the evaluation process because they are the ones who make the final decision concerning the implantation of their child. Relatively early implantation should be considered in light of what is known concerning the effects of disruption in a child's linguistic, cognitive, and emotional development resulting from complete auditory deprivation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2069195

  1. Detecting Key Structural Features within Highly Recombined Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, John E; McGregor, Karen F; Bessen, Debra E

    2007-01-01

    Many microorganisms exhibit high levels of intragenic recombination following horizontal gene transfer events. Furthermore, many microbial genes are subject to strong diversifying selection as part of the pathogenic process. A multiple sequence alignment is an essential starting point for many of the tools that provide fundamental insights on gene structure and evolution, such as phylogenetics; however, an accurate alignment is not always possible to attain. In this study, a new analytic approach was developed in order to better quantify the genetic organization of highly diversified genes whose alleles do not align. This BLAST-based method, denoted BLAST Miner, employs an iterative process that places short segments of highly similar sequence into discrete datasets that are designated “modules.” The relative positions of modules along the length of the genes, and their frequency of occurrence, are used to identify sequence duplications, insertions, and rearrangements. Partial alleles of sof from Streptococcus pyogenes, encoding a surface protein under host immune selection, were analyzed for module content. High-frequency Modules 6 and 13 were identified and examined in depth. Nucleotide sequences corresponding to both modules contain numerous duplications and inverted repeats, whereby many codons form palindromic pairs. Combined with evidence for a strong codon usage bias, data suggest that Module 6 and 13 sequences are under selection to preserve their nucleic acid secondary structure. The concentration of overlapping tandem and inverted repeats within a small region of DNA is highly suggestive of a mechanistic role for Module 6 and 13 sequences in promoting aberrant recombination. Analysis of pbp2X alleles from Streptococcus pneumoniae, encoding cell wall enzymes that confer antibiotic resistance, supports the broad applicability of this tool in deciphering the genetic organization of highly recombined genes. BLAST Miner shares with phylogenetics the

  2. Genome-Wide Structural Variation Detection by Genome Mapping on Nanochannel Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Angel C. Y.; Lai, Yvonne Y. Y.; Lam, Ernest T.; Kwok, Tsz-Piu; Leung, Alden K. Y.; Poon, Annie; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hastie, Alex R.; Stedman, William; Anantharaman, Thomas; Andrews, Warren; Zhou, Xiang; Pang, Andy W. C.; Dai, Heng; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Wu, Jacob J. K.; Li, Catherine M. L.; Li, Jing-Woei; Yim, Aldrin K. Y.; Chan, Saki; Sibert, Justin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Chan, Ting-Fung; Yip, Kevin Y.; Xiao, Ming; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive whole-genome structural variation detection is challenging with current approaches. With diploid cells as DNA source and the presence of numerous repetitive elements, short-read DNA sequencing cannot be used to detect structural variation efficiently. In this report, we show that genome mapping with long, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules imaged on nanochannel arrays can be used for whole-genome structural variation detection without sequencing. While whole-genome haplotyping is not achieved, local phasing (across >150-kb regions) is routine, as molecules from the parental chromosomes are examined separately. In one experiment, we generated genome maps from a trio from the 1000 Genomes Project, compared the maps against that derived from the reference human genome, and identified structural variations that are >5 kb in size. We find that these individuals have many more structural variants than those published, including some with the potential of disrupting gene function or regulation. PMID:26510793

  3. A New Program for Detecting the Geometrical Core of a Set of Structures of Macromolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Vakulenko, Yu A; Nagaev, B E; Alexeevski, A V; Karyagina, A S; Spirin, S A

    2016-04-01

    Comparison of structures of homological proteins often helps to understand functionally significant features of these structures. This concerns not only structures of separate protein chains, but also structures of macromolecular complexes. In particular, a comparison of complexes of homologous proteins with DNA is significant for analysis of the recognition of DNA by proteins. We present program LCore for detecting geometrical cores of a family of structures; a geometrical core is a set of amino acid residues and nucleotides that disposed similarly in all structures of the family. We describe the algorithm of the program, its web interface, and an example of its application to analysis of complexes of homeodomains with DNA. PMID:27293101

  4. Feasibility of PZT ceramics for impact damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Gerges; Koricho, Ermias; Karpenko, Oleksii; Haq, Mahmood; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish S.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber reinforced plastic composites are becoming widely used in vehicles and airframe structures due to their high strength to weight ratio. However unlike metals, the multilayered composite structures are more susceptible to damage mechanisms such as disbonds and delaminations due to impacts. It is often difficult to visually detect the damage. Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) thin films are becoming popular for in-situ structural health monitoring due to their small size, high piezoelectric coupling coefficient, and ease of surface-mounting and/or embedding in composite structures. A network of such transducers could be utilized for damage detection using guided wave techniques, impedance techniques, or passive impact detection techniques. However, the PZT films are subject to the same impact probabilities that the structure encounters. If the transducers fail due to the subjected impacts, they can result in false readings and ultimately failing to correctly detect damage in the structure. This paper presents a feasibility study using the guided wave S0 mode for detecting impact damage. The health of the structure is quantified using guided wave measurements, and the PZT health is monitored using impedance methods.

  5. Detection of fetal structural abnormalities with US during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fong, Katherine W; Toi, Ants; Salem, Shia; Hornberger, Lisa K; Chitayat, David; Keating, Sarah J; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Johnson, Jo-Ann

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is performed during early pregnancy for dating, determination of the number of fetuses, assessment of early complications, and increasingly for evaluation of the fetus, including measurement of the thickness of the nuchal translucency (NT). Measurement of NT thickness between 11 and 14 weeks gestation, combined with maternal age and maternal serum biochemistry, can be an effective method of screening for trisomy 21 and other chromosomal abnormalities. Furthermore, an increased NT thickness in the presence of a normal karyotype is associated with an increased frequency of structural defects and genetic syndromes. Therefore, this finding is an indication for a more detailed anatomic survey of the fetus. Besides nuchal abnormalities, a wide range of other congenital anomalies can be diagnosed with US at 11-14 weeks gestation, including defects of the central nervous system, heart, anterior abdominal wall, urinary tract, and skeleton. The anatomic survey can be performed with a standardized protocol by using transabdominal US and, when necessary, transvaginal US. A thorough knowledge of the US features of normal fetal development is necessary to avoid potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:14730044

  6. A Novel Structurally Stable Multiepitope Protein for Detection of HCV

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Alexsandro S.; Santos, José C.; Souza, Marilen Q.; Nóbrega, Yanna K. M.; Xavier, Mary-Ann E.; Felipe, Maria S. S.; Freitas, Sonia M.; Torres, Fernando A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as the major pathogen of liver diseases in recent years leading to worldwide blood-transmitted chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accurate diagnosis for differentiation of hepatitis C from other viruses is thus of pivotal importance for proper treatment. In this work we developed a recombinant multiepitope protein (rMEHCV) for hepatitis C diagnostic purposes based on conserved and immunodominant epitopes from core, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5 regions of the virus polyprotein of genotypes 1a, 1b, and 3a, the most prevalent genotypes in South America (especially in Brazil). A synthetic gene was designed to encode eight epitopes in tandem separated by a flexible linker and bearing a his-tag at the C-terminal end. The recombinant protein was produced in Escherichia coli and purified in a single affinity chromatographic step with >95% purity. Purified rMEHCV was used to perform an ELISA which showed that the recombinant protein was recognized by IgG and IgM from human serum samples. The structural data obtained by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that rMEHCV is a highly thermal stable protein at neutral and alkaline conditions. Together, these results show that rMEHCV should be considered an alternative antigen for hepatitis C diagnosis. PMID:26942007

  7. Alternative Conformations of Cytochrome c: Structure, Function, and Detection.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Tomasina, Florencia; Capdevila, Daiana A; Demicheli, Verónica; Tórtora, Verónica; Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Jemmerson, Ronald; Murgida, Daniel H; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-26

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) is a cationic hemoprotein of ∼100 amino acid residues that exhibits exceptional functional versatility. While its primary function is electron transfer in the respiratory chain, cyt c is also recognized as a key component of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, the mitochondrial oxidative protein folding machinery, and presumably as a redox sensor in the cytosol, along with other reported functions. Transition to alternative conformations and gain-of-peroxidase activity are thought to further enable the multiple functions of cyt c and its translocation across cellular compartments. In vitro, direct interactions of cyt c with cardiolipin, post-translational modifications such as tyrosine nitration, phosphorylation, methionine sulfoxidation, mutations, and even fine changes in electrical fields lead to a variety of conformational states that may be of biological relevance. The identification of these alternative conformations and the elucidation of their functions in vivo continue to be a major challenge. Here, we unify the knowledge of the structural flexibility of cyt c that supports functional moonlighting and review biochemical and immunochemical evidence confirming that cyt c undergoes conformational changes during normal and altered cellular homeostasis. PMID:26720007

  8. A novel texture descriptor for detection of glandular structures in colon histology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirinukunwattana, Korsuk; Snead, David R.; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2015-03-01

    The first step prior to most analyses on most histopathology images is the detection of area of interest. In this work, we present a superpixel-based approach for glandular structure detection in colon histology images. An image is first segmented into superpixels with the constraint on the presence of glandular boundaries. Texture and color information is then extracted from each superpixel to calculate the probability of that superpixel belonging to glandular regions, resulting in a glandular probability map. In addition, we present a novel texture descriptor derived from a region covariance matrix of scattering coefficients. Our approach shows encouraging results for the detection of glandular structures in colon tissue samples.

  9. Evolution of secondary defects in arsenic implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, He; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Bingpo; Wu, Huizhen; Sun, Yan; Hu, Gujin; Dai, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Behavior of defects in ion-implanted semiconductors is an everlasting topic and becomes even more critical as semiconductor devices continuously shrink and ion implantation technique has been increasingly employed. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) were employed to investigate the structural evolution of arsenic (As) implanted silicon (Si). Project range (PR) defects and end of range (EOR) dislocations are observed via HRTEM. EDX characterization proves the two types of defects are related to dopant atoms precipitations. The sizes of both PR defects and EOR dislocations enlarge at the expense of small ones with the elevation of annealing temperature. The characterizations of electrochemical capacitance-voltage and EDX conclude that the SiO2/Si interface is playing an indispensable role in the deactivation of dopant atoms during the annealing process. As atoms are detected in the As-implanted Si region near the SiO2/Si interface but not in the silica layer. Nanoparticles composed of Si atoms in the silica layer are observed in the 1150 °C-annealed samples, which proves the migration of oxygen atoms at the SiO2/Si interface.

  10. Complications of Poly Implant Prothèse breast implants: the current discussion.

    PubMed

    Kolios, Leila; Hirche, Christoph; Spiethoff, Alexander; Daigeler, Adrien; Lehnhardt, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    Against the background of the current discussion about Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne-sur-mer, France) breast implants, we want to present a case demonstrating the complications such as implant rupture, silicone dissemination and level III silicone lymphadenopathy. A 29-year-old woman with cosmetic breast augmentation with PIP implants 5 years previously showed a sensitive swelling in her right axilla and neck region. All tests to detect an infectious or lymphomatous lymphadenopathy were negative. After ultrasound and MRI, rupture of the right implant was assumed and multiple pathologically enlarged lymph nodes up to supraclavicular region were shown. An excision biopsy of one axillary lymph node was performed; the histological examination detected a strong silicone lymphadenopathy. Surgical removal of both implants as well as capsulectomy was performed and 14 axillary lymph nodes up to level II were resected. Histologic evaluation confirmed the previous results. Our case underlines the actual discussion concerning increased rupture rate and massive silicone lymphadenopathy by PIP implants. The Agence Francaise de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (AFSSAPS) recommends clinical and ultrasound examination every 6 months for women with PIP implants. Any rupture, suspected rupture or leakage of prosthesis should lead to its explantation as well as that of the contralateral implant. In cases of unusual signs of inflammation, histological and immunohistochemical samples are to be taken. PMID:23480085

  11. Magnetic and structural changes in the near-surface epitaxial Y2.95La0.05Fe5O12 films after high-dose ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Fodchuk, I M; Gutsuliak, I I; Dovganiuk, V V; Kotsyubynskiy, A O; Pietsch, U; Pashniak, N V; Bonchyk, O Yu; Syvorotka, I M; Lytvyn, P M

    2016-04-20

    The method of magnetic force microscopy was used to study the domain structure of various-thickness epitaxial Y2.95La0.05Fe5O12 iron-yttrium garnet films modified by high-dose implantation of N+ nitrogen ions. The results of multi-crystal x-ray diffractometry were analyzed, and a possible defect structure of garnets prior to and after implantation was identified. It was established that the reduction of magnetic losses observed after high-dose ion implantation is accompanied by the essential ordering of magnetic domains on the surface of implanted films. There is a direct dependence of electromagnetic properties on the dose of implanted atoms followed by a considerable sputtering and amorphization of the near-surface film layer and formation of a well-defined electromagnetic structure. PMID:27140121

  12. A New Approach to Overcoming Spatial Aliasing in Structural Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Mark J.; Naser, Ahmad S.; Thyagarajan, Sunil K.; Mickens, Travluss; Pai, Frank

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft, reusable launch vehicles,unmanned aircraft, and other advanced structures are being built using lightweight composite materials/metals with design safety factors as low as 1.25. These advanced structures operate in uncertain and severe environments and are susceptible to damage such as delamination, fiber/matrix damage, hydrothermal strain in composite materials, and fatigue and cracking in metals. To ensure human safety and load-bearing integrity these structures must be inspected to detect and locate often invisible damage and faults before they become catastrophic. Conventional methods of non-destructive evaluation sometimes miss significant damage and are time consuming and expensive to perform. In contrast, vibrometry or vibration signature techniques are a global method of structural integrity monitoring that potentially can efficiently detect damage on large structures, including damage that is away from sensor locations, and in the interior of structures. However, a barrier problem in damage detection using vibration measurements is the need to measure the vibration response at a large number of points on the structure. Typically, model reduction or expansion procedures such as Guyan reduction or dynamic expansion are attempted to overcome the problem of insufficient measurements or spatial aliasing. These approaches depend on using information from the healthy model, and thus put error into the reduction used to represent the damaged structure. In this paper, a Frequency Response Function technique is used to detect damage to a fixed-free beam. The technique uses measured frequency response functions from the healthy structure as reference data, and then monitors vibration measurements during the life of the structure to detect damage. In an analytical simulation using a finite-element model of a beam, damage was located using only sparse measurements because the technique uses both rotation and translation measurements from the damaged structure.

  13. A scanning method for detecting clustering pattern of both attribute and structure in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tai-Chi; Phoa, Frederick Kin Hing

    2016-03-01

    Community/cluster is one of the most important features in social networks. Many cluster detection methods were proposed to identify such an important pattern, but few were able to identify the statistical significance of the clusters by considering the likelihood of network structure and its attributes. Based on the definition of clustering, we propose a scanning method, originated from analyzing spatial data, for identifying clusters in social networks. Since the properties of network data are more complicated than those of spatial data, we verify our method's feasibility via simulation studies. The results show that the detection powers are affected by cluster sizes and connection probabilities. According to our simulation results, the detection accuracy of structure clusters and both structure and attribute clusters detected by our proposed method is better than that of other methods in most of our simulation cases. In addition, we apply our proposed method to some empirical data to identify statistically significant clusters.

  14. Local concurrent error detection and correction in data structures using virtual backpointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chung-Chi Jim; Chen, Paul Peichuan; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1989-01-01

    A new technique, based on virtual backpointers, for local concurrent error detection and correction in linked data strutures is presented. Two new data structures, the Virtual Double Linked List, and the B-tree with Virtual Backpointers, are described. For these structures, double errors can be detected in 0(1) time and errors detected during forward moves can be corrected in 0(1) time. The application of a concurrent auditor process to data structure error detection and correction is analyzed, and an implementation is described, to determine the effect on mean time to failure of a multi-user shared database system. The implementation utilizes a Sequent shared memory multiprocessor system operating on a shared database of Virtual Double Linked Lists.

  15. Spatial scanning for anomaly detection in acoustic emission testing of an aerospace structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensman, James; Worden, Keith; Eaton, Mark; Pullin, Rhys; Holford, Karen; Evans, Sam

    2011-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of engineering structures potentially provides a convenient, cost-effective means of performing structural health monitoring. Networks of AE sensors can be easily and unobtrusively installed upon structures, giving the ability to detect and locate damage-related strain releases ('events') in the structure. Use of the technique is not widespread due to the lack of a simple and effective method for detecting abnormal activity levels: the sensitivity of AE sensor networks is such that events unrelated to damage are prevalent in most applications. In this publication, we propose to monitor AE activity in a structure using a spatial scanning statistic, developed and used effectively in the field of epidemiology. The technique is demonstrated on an aerospace structure - an Airbus A320 main landing gear fitting - undergoing fatigue loading, and the method is compared to existing techniques. Despite its simplicity, the scanning statistic proves to be an extremely effective tool in detecting the onset of damage in the structure: it requires little to no user intervention or expertise, is inexpensive to compute and has an easily interpretable output. Furthermore, the generic nature of the method allows the technique to be used in a variety of monitoring scenarios, to detect damage in a wide range of structures.

  16. Similarity between community structures of different online social networks and its impact on underlying community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.

    2015-03-01

    As social networking services are popular, many people may register in more than one online social network. In this paper we study a set of users who have accounts of three online social networks: namely Foursquare, Facebook and Twitter. Community structure of this set of users may be reflected in these three online social networks. Therefore, high correlation between these reflections and the underlying community structure may be observed. In this work, community structures are detected in all three online social networks. Also, we investigate the similarity level of community structures across different networks. It is found that they show strong correlation with each other. The similarity between different networks may be helpful to find a community structure close to the underlying one. To verify this, we propose a method to increase the weights of some connections in networks. With this method, new networks are generated to assist community detection. By doing this, value of modularity can be improved and the new community structure match network's natural structure better. In this paper we also show that the detected community structures of online social networks are correlated with users' locations which are identified on Foursquare. This information may also be useful for underlying community detection.

  17. Sensor failure detection and isolation in flexible structures using system realization redundancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, David C.; Lyde, Terri L.

    1993-06-01

    Sensor failure detection and isolation for flexible structures is approached from a system realization perspective. Instead of using hardware or analytical model redundancy, system realization is utilized to provide an experimental based model redundancy. The failure detection and isolation algorithm utilizes the eigensystem realization algorithm to determine a minimum-order state-space realization of the structure in the presence of noisy measurements. The failure detection and isolation algorithm utilizes statistical comparisons of successive realizations to detect and isolate the failed sensor component. Because of the nature in which the failure detection and isolation algorithm is formulated, it is also possible to classify the failure mode of the sensor. Results are presented using both numerically simulated and actual experimental data.

  18. Mid-infrared-pumped quantum cascade structure for high-sensitive terahertz detection.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Yang, Ning; Duan, Suqing; Chu, Weidong

    2016-07-11

    Based on multiple quantum wells, we design a pumping-detection quantum cascade structure for the detection of terahertz (THz) radiation. In the structure, carriers are first pumped by a mid-infrared (MIR) laser to an excited state, to get enough energy space for the following fast longitudinal optical (LO) phonon extraction. Within the LO-phonon extraction stair, an absorption well is designed for THz detection. Due to the establishment of LO-phonon stair extractor, carriers transport between quantum wells in picosecond range and a high responsivity for THz absorption can be obtained. We also find that doping in both MIR active well and extractor region is significant for high-speed response of the THz detection. Our design is expected to extend the high-sensitive detection of a quantum cascade photodetector from middle wave of MIR to THz region. PMID:27410796

  19. Statistical damage detection method for frame structures using a confidence interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiming; Zhu, Hongping; Luo, Hanbin; Xia, Yong

    2010-03-01

    A novel damage detection method is applied to a 3-story frame structure, to obtain statistical quantification control criterion of the existence, location and identification of damage. The mean, standard deviation, and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) are applied to detect damage information according to statistical process control (SPC) theory. It is concluded that the detection is insignificant with the mean and EWMA because the structural response is not independent and is not a normal distribution. On the other hand, the damage information is detected well with the standard deviation because the influence of the data distribution is not pronounced with this parameter. A suitable moderate confidence level is explored for more significant damage location and quantification detection, and the impact of noise is investigated to illustrate the robustness of the method.

  20. Techniques for dental implant nanosurface modifications

    PubMed Central

    Bathala, Lakshmana Rao; Sangur, Rajashekar

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Dental implant has gained clinical success over last decade with the major drawback related to osseointegration as properties of metal (Titanium) are different from human bone. Currently implant procedures include endosseous type of dental implants with nanoscale surface characteristics. The objective of this review article is to summarize the role of nanotopography on titanium dental implant surfaces in order to improve osseointegration and various techniques that can generate nanoscale topographic features to titanium implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic electronic search of English language peer reviewed dental literature was performed for articles published between December 1987 to January 2012. Search was conducted in Medline, PubMed and Google scholar supplemented by hand searching of selected journals. 101 articles were assigned to full text analysis. Articles were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criterion. All articles were screened according to inclusion standard. 39 articles were included in the analysis. RESULTS Out of 39 studies, seven studies demonstrated that bone implant contact increases with increase in surface roughness. Five studies showed comparative evaluation of techniques producing microtopography and nanotopography. Eight studies concluded that osteoblasts preferably adhere to nano structure as compared to smooth surface. Six studies illustrated that nanotopography modify implant surface and their properties. Thirteen studies described techniques to produce nano roughness. CONCLUSION Modification of dental osseous implants at nanoscale level produced by various techniques can alter biological responses that may improve osseointegration and dental implant procedures. PMID:25558347

  1. Evaluation of modal-based damage detection techniques for composite aircraft sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Composite sandwich structures are important as structural components in modern lightweight aircraft, but are susceptible to catastrophic failure without obvious forewarning. Internal damage, such as disbonding between skin and core, is detrimental to the structures' strength and integrity and thus must be detected before reaching critical levels. However, highly directional low density cores, such as Nomex honeycomb, make the task of damage detection and health monitoring difficult. One possible method for detecting damage in composite sandwich structures, which seems to have received very little research attention, is analysis of global modal parameters. This study will investigate the viability of modal analysis techniques for detecting skin-core disbonds in carbon fiber-Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels through laboratory testing. A series of carbon fiber prepreg and Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels-representative of structural components used in lightweight composite airframes-were fabricated by means of autoclave co-cure. All panels were of equal dimensions and two were made with predetermined sizes of disbonded areas, created by substituting areas of Teflon release film in place of epoxy film adhesive during the cure. A laser vibrometer was used to capture frequency response functions (FRF) of all panels, and then real and imaginary FRFs at different locations on each plate and operating shapes for each plate were compared. Preliminary results suggest that vibration-based techniques hold promise for damage detection of composite sandwich structures.

  2. Simulations to Improve Structural Defect Detection and Classification in Swiss-Cheese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, J.; Haapalainen, J.; Alavuotunki, A.; Hæggström, E.; Alatossava, T.

    2008-02-01

    Ultrasonic 2D simulations to facilitate defect detection and classification for structural quality control of Swiss-cheese are presented. Three economically relevant structure types were modeled with different geometry parameters and the back-scattered ultrasonic field from the structure boundary was simulated to obtain reference data for waveform analysis. Simulated waveform characteristics were evaluated and compared to the experimental ones. Two parameters were introduced to classify different defects by exploiting the frequency spectrum of the signals. Signal waveform and correlation analysis, based on the simulation results, improved defect detection probability.

  3. Thermography Inspection for Early Detection of Composite Damage in Structures During Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Parker, F. Raymond; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Wright, Christopher W.; Bly, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composite structures are commonly tested under controlled loading. Understanding the initiation and progression of composite damage under load is critical for validating design concepts and structural analysis tools. Thermal nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is used to detect and characterize damage in composite structures during fatigue loading. A difference image processing algorithm is demonstrated to enhance damage detection and characterization by removing thermal variations not associated with defects. In addition, a one-dimensional multilayered thermal model is used to characterize damage. Lastly, the thermography results are compared to other inspections such as non-immersion ultrasonic inspections and computed tomography X-ray.

  4. Fatigue crack detection in metallic structures with Lamb waves and 3D laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszewski, W. J.; Lee, B. C.; Traynor, R.

    2007-03-01

    The paper presents the application of ultrasonic guided waves for fatigue crack detection in metallic structures. The study involves a simple fatigue test performed to introduce a crack into an aluminium plate. Lamb waves generated by a low-profile, surface-bonded piezoceramic transducer are sensed using a tri-axis, multi-position scanning laser vibrometer. The results demonstrate the potential of laser vibrometry for simple, rapid and robust detection of fatigue cracks in metallic structures. The method could be used in quality inspection and in-service maintenance of metallic structures in aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering industries.

  5. Rapid detection of delamination areas in laminated structural elements by means of optically monitored strain solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Dreiden, G. V.; Petrov, N. V.; Samsonov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Modern structural elements are often made of laminated polymer materials or composites on the base of polymer matrices. The proper functioning of these elements may be of vital importance especially in automotive and aerospace industries, in gas and oil transportation. The major problem in their performance is a possibility of a sudden and irreversible delamination caused by various factors. We propose and study a NDT approach aimed to detect delamination areas in adhesively bonded layered structural elements made of different materials. The proposed approach is evaluated by use of holographic detection and monitoring of the evolution of bulk strain solitons generated in such structures.

  6. Drug-eluting medical implants.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Kraitzer, Amir; Grinberg, Orly; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2010-01-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are actually active implants that induce healing effects, in addition to their regular task of support. This effect is achieved by controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) into the surrounding tissue. In this chapter we focus on three types of drug-eluting devices: drug-eluting vascular stents, drug-eluting wound dressings and protein-eluting scaffolds for tissue regeneration, thus describing both internal and external implants. Each of these drug-eluting devices also presents an approach for solving the drug release issue. Most drug-eluting vascular stents are loaded with water-insoluble antiproliferative agents, and their diffusion from the device to the surrounding tissue is relatively slow. In contrast, most drug-eluting wound dressings are loaded with highly water-soluble antibacterial agents and the issue of fast release must therefore be addressed. Growth factor release from scaffolds for tissue regeneration offers a new approach of incorporating high-molecular-weight bioactive agents which are very sensitive to process conditions and preserve their activity during the preparation stage. The drug-eluting medical implants are described here in terms of matrix formats and polymers, incorporated drugs and their release profiles from the implants, and implant functioning. Basic elements, such as new composite core/shell fibers and structured films, can be used to build new antibiotic-eluting devices. As presented in this chapter, the effect of the processing parameters on the microstructure and the resulting drug release profiles, mechanical and physical properties, and other relevant properties, must be elucidated in order to achieve the desired properties. Newly developed implants and novel modifications of previously developed approaches have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important biomedical applications. PMID:20217535

  7. Structure Detection of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Aeroelastic Flight Test Data. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Brenner, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the applicability of NARMAX structure detection to aeroelastic systems. In conclusion, the simulation results demonstrate bootstrap approach for structure computation of aircraft structural stiffness provided a high rate of true model selection: 1. T-test and stepwise regression methods had difficulty providing accurate results 2. Work contributes to understanding of the use of structure detection for modelling and identification of aerospace systems. 3. Limitation of model complexity that can be studied with these structure computation techniques 4. Result of the large number of candidate terms, for a given model order, and the data length required to guarantee convergence 5. Another approach to structure computation problem uses a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)

  8. Fabricating specialised orthopaedic implants using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that AM is ideal for patient specific orthopaedic implants such as those used in bone cancer treatment, that can rapidly build structures such as lattices for bone and tissues to in-grow, that would be impossible using current conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to describe the adoption of AM (direct metal laser sintering and electron beam melting) into the design manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes and the early clinical use. Prior to the clinical use of AM implants, extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of both laser and electron beam fabrications were undertaken. Concurrently, post-manufacturing processes evaluated included hipping, cleaning and coating treatments. The first clinical application of a titanium alloy mega-implant was undertaken in November 2010. A 3D model of the pelvic wing implant was designed from CT scans. Novel key features included extensive lattice structures at the bone interfaces and integral flanges to fix the implant to the bone. The pelvic device was implanted with the aid of navigation and to date the patient remains active. A further 18 patient specific mega-implants have now been implanted. The early use of this advanced manufacturing route for patient specific implants has been very encouraging enabling the engineer to produce more advanced and anatomical conforming implants. However, there are a new set of design, manufacturing and regulatory challenges that require addressing to permit this technique to be used more widely. This technology is changing the design and manufacturing paradigm for the fabrication of specialised orthopaedic implants.

  9. Study on the neotype zirconia's implant coated nanometer hydroxyapatite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. W.; Yang, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    In recent years, biologic ceramics is a popular material of implants and bioactive surface modification of dental implant became a research emphasis, which aims to improve bioactivity of implants materials and acquire firmer implants-bone interface. The zirconia ceramic has excellent mechanical properties and nanometer HA ceramics is a bioceramic well known for its bioactivity, therefore, nanometer HA ceramics coating on zirconia, allows combining the excellent mechanical properties of zirconia substrates with its bioactivity. This paper shows a new method for implant shape design and bioactive modification of dental implants surface. Zirconia's implant substrate was prepared by sintered method, central and lateral tunnels were drilled in the zirconia hollow porous cylindrical implants by laser processing. The HA powders and needle-like HA crystals were made by a wet precipitation and calcining method. Its surface was coated with nanometer HA ceramics which was used brush HA slurry and vacuum sintering. Mechanical testing results revealed that the attachment strength of nanometer HA ceramics coated zirconia samples is high. SEM and interface observation after inserted experiment indicated that calcium and phosphor content increased and symmetrically around coated implant-bone tissue interface. A significantly higher affinity index was demonstrated in vivo by histomorphometric evaluation in coated versus uncoated implants. SEM analysis demonstrated better bone adhesion to the material in coated implant at any situation. In addition, the hollow porous cylindrical implant coated with nanometer HA ceramics increase the interaction of bone and implant, the new bone induced into the surface of hollow porous cylindrical implant and through the most tunnels filled into central hole. The branch-like structure makes the implant and bone a body, which increased the contact area and decreased elastic ratio. Therefore, the macroscopical and microcosmic nested structure of

  10. Evaluation of implant sonication as a diagnostic tool in implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Lehner, Burkhard; Burckhardt, Irene; Zimmermann, Stefan; Hänsch, Gertrud M; Ewerbeck, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Infections of implants pose a severe problem in the field of orthopedic surgery, because they can cause bone degradation with subsequent loosening of the implant. The discrimination between septic implant loosening and aseptic loosening can be a challenge, and hence novel diagnostic methods have been introduced to improve the detection of bacteria. Because a major problem is their firm adherence to implants due to biofilm formation, sonication has been introduced, followed by identification of bacteria by culture or genetic methods. In this study, we compared the results obtained after sonication pretreatment with those of microbiological testing of tissue samples and histopathological evaluation of the same tissue. Furthermore, we related the results obtained following sonication to the clinical diagnosis of septic or aseptic implant loosening, respectively. Sonication of explanted devices also enhances the likelihood of detecting bacterial growth in patients who were considered "aseptic" based on the clinical evaluation. PMID:25199070

  11. The study of composition, structure, mechanical properties and platelet adhesion of Ti-O/TiN gradient films prepared by metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, F.; Huang, N.; Sun, H.; Wan, G. J.; Chu, P. K.; Leng, Y.

    2004-07-01

    Titanium oxide and titanium nitrogen gradient films were prepared by three different processes using metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MPIII-D). The mechanical properties of the films synthesized on silicon wafers, Ti6A14V and low temperature isotropic carbon (LTIC) were evaluated by nano-indentation, pin-on-disc wear, and scratching test. The hardness of the film was measured to be 19.5 GPa. Investigation by XRD shows that the surface Ti-O layer possesses a rutile structure and analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) discloses that the surface composition of the synthesized TiN/Ti-O films is non-stoichiometric. The gradient characteristics of the films were corroborated by qualitative analysis of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The thickness of films was 510-940 nm. Platelet adhesion experiments adopted to estimate the blood compatibility of the films show that the adsorption and deformation of platelets on the synthesized TiN/Ti-O gradient films have been significantly suppressed compared to LTIC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used to assess the wear and scratch tracks discloses that the films exhibit good wear resistance and high adhesion strength.

  12. Defect structure transformation after thermal annealing in a surface layer of Zn-implanted Si(001) substrates.

    PubMed

    Shcherbachev, Kirill; Privezentsev, Vladimir; Kulikauskas, Vaclav; Zatekin, Vladimir; Saraykin, Vladimir

    2013-08-01

    A combination of high-resolution X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) methods were used to characterize structural transformations of the damaged layer in Si(001) substrates heavily doped by Zn ions after a multistage thermal treatment. The shape of the SIMS profiles for Zn atoms correlates with the crystal structure of the damaged layer and depends on the presence of the following factors influencing the mobility of Zn atoms: (i) an amorphous/crystalline (a/c) interface, (ii) end-of-range defects, which are located slightly deeper than the a/c interface; (iii) a surface area enriched by Si vacancies; and (iv) the chemical interaction of Zn with Si atoms, which leads to the formation of Zn-containing phases in the surface layer. PMID:24046492

  13. Reduced representation of protein structure: implications on efficiency and scope of detection of structural similarity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Computational comparison of two protein structures is the starting point of many methods that build on existing knowledge, such as structure modeling (including modeling of protein complexes and conformational changes), molecular replacement, or annotation by structural similarity. In a commonly used strategy, significant effort is invested in matching two sets of atoms. In a complementary approach, a global descriptor is assigned to the overall structure, thus losing track of the substructures within. Results Using a small set of geometric features, we define a reduced representation of protein structure, together with an optimizing function for matching two representations, to provide a pre-filtering stage in a database search. We show that, in a straightforward implementation, the representation performs well in terms of resolution in the space of protein structures, and its ability to make new predictions. Conclusions Perhaps unexpectedly, a substantial discriminating power already exists at the level of main features of protein structure, such as directions of secondary structural elements, possibly constrained by their sequential order. This can be used toward efficient comparison of protein (sub)structures, allowing for various degrees of conformational flexibility within the compared pair, which in turn can be used for modeling by homology of protein structure and dynamics. PMID:20338066

  14. Effect of implant design and bioactive glass coating on biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite implants.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Ahmed M; Akca, Eralp; Ozen, Tuncer; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Närhi, Timo

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of implant design and bioactive glass (BAG) coating on the response of bone to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implants. Three different FRC implant types were manufactured for the study: non-threaded implants with a BAG coating; threaded implants with a BAG coating; and threaded implants with a grit-blasted surface. Thirty-six implants (six implants for each group per time point) were installed in the tibiae of six pigs. After an implantation period of 4 and 12 wk, the implants were retrieved and prepared for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), push-out testing, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Micro-CT demonstrated that the screw-threads and implant structure remained undamaged during the installation. The threaded FRC/BAG implants had the highest bone volume after 12 wk of implantation. The push-out strengths of the threaded FRC/BAG implants after 4 and 12 wk (463°N and 676°N, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the threaded FRC implants (416°N and 549°N, respectively) and the nonthreaded FRC/BAG implants (219°N and 430°N, respectively). Statistically significant correlation was found between bone volume and push-out strength values. This study showed that osseointegrated FRC implants can withstand the static loading up to failure without fracture, and that the addition of BAG significantly improves the push-out strength of FRC implants. PMID:24863874

  15. Homolog detection using global sequence properties suggests an alternate view of structural encoding in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scheraga, Harold A.; Rackovsky, S.

    2014-01-01

    We show that a Fourier-based sequence distance function is able to identify structural homologs of target sequences with high accuracy. It is shown that Fourier distances correlate very strongly with independently determined structural distances between molecules, a property of the method that is not attainable using conventional representations. It is further shown that the ability of the Fourier approach to identify protein folds is statistically far in excess of random expectation. It is then shown that, in actual searches for structural homologs of selected target sequences, the Fourier approach gives excellent results. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the global information detected by the Fourier representation is an essential feature of structure encoding in protein sequences and a key to structural homology detection. PMID:24706836

  16. Ultrasonic damage detection of concrete structures by using pulse-echo sensor arrays and SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li-hua; Shao, Zhi-xue; Shao, Zhe

    2009-07-01

    In ultrasonic nondestructive testing (NDT) of concrete structures, the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) can improve the resolution of target and therefore gives a better image display of the B-scan data. In traditional B-scan of concrete structures the ultrasonic transducers are usually moved manually to detect the whole structure, the detection speed and the consistency in different test points are greatly affected. A PZT sensor array is designed in this paper to perform B-scan on large concrete structures more efficiently. The excitation of the sensor array and the data processing techniques for the array data are discussed. A signal processing approach is proposed to improve the consistency between different test channels in the array. Experiments on real structures show the embedded objects can be located accurately by using the array sensor and SAFT method.

  17. A dynamic social systems model for considering structural factors in HIV prevention and detection

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl; Weeks, Margaret; Glasman, Laura; Galletly, Carol; Albarracin, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    We present a model for HIV-related behaviors that emphasizes the dynamic and social nature of the structural factors that influence HIV prevention and detection. Key structural dimensions of the model include resources, science and technology, formal social control, informal social influences and control, social interconnectedness, and settings. These six dimensions can be conceptualized on macro, meso, and micro levels. Given the inherent complexity of structural factors and their interrelatedness, HIV prevention interventions may focus on different levels and dimensions. We employ a systems perspective to describe the interconnected and dynamic processes of change among social systems and their components. The topics of HIV testing and safer injection facilities are analyzed using this structural framework. Finally, we discuss methodological issues in the development and evaluation of structural interventions for HIV prevention and detection. PMID:20838871

  18. CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A; Kandagor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  19. More-reliable SOS ion implantations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Conducting layer prevents static charges from accumulating during implantation of silicon-on-sapphire MOS structures. Either thick conducting film or thinner film transparent to ions is deposited prior to implantation, and gaps are etched in regions to be doped. Grounding path eliminates charge flow that damages film or cracks sapphire wafer. Prevention of charge buildup by simultaneously exposing structure to opposite charges requires equipment modifications less practical and more expensive than deposition of conducting layer.

  20. Structural damage detection for in-service highway bridge under operational and environmental variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Li, Jingcheng; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong; Christenson, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Structural health monitoring has drawn significant attention in the past decades with numerous methodologies and applications for civil structural systems. Although many researchers have developed analytical and experimental damage detection algorithms through vibration-based methods, these methods are not widely accepted for practical structural systems because of their sensitivity to uncertain environmental and operational conditions. The primary environmental factor that influences the structural modal properties is temperature. The goal of this article is to analyze the natural frequency-temperature relationships and detect structural damage in the presence of operational and environmental variations using modal-based method. For this purpose, correlations between natural frequency and temperature are analyzed to select proper independent variables and inputs for the multiple linear regression model and neural network model. In order to capture the changes of natural frequency, confidence intervals to detect the damages for both models are generated. A long-term structural health monitoring system was installed on an in-service highway bridge located in Meriden, Connecticut to obtain vibration and environmental data. Experimental testing results show that the variability of measured natural frequencies due to temperature is captured, and the temperature-induced changes in natural frequencies have been considered prior to the establishment of the threshold in the damage warning system. This novel approach is applicable for structural health monitoring system and helpful to assess the performance of the structure for bridge management and maintenance.

  1. Nano hydroxyapatite-coated implants improve bone nanomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, R; Coelho, P G; Bryington, M; Baldassarri, M; Tovar, N; Currie, F; Hayashi, M; Janal, M N; Andersson, M; Ono, D; Vandeweghe, S; Wennerberg, A

    2012-12-01

    Nanostructure modification of dental implants has long been sought as a means to improve osseointegration through enhanced biomimicry of host structures. Several methods have been proposed and demonstrated for creating nanotopographic features; here we describe a nanoscale hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated implant surface and hypothesize that it will hasten osseointegration and improve its quality relative to that of non-coated implants. Twenty threaded titanium alloy implants, half prepared with a stable HA nanoparticle surface and half grit-blasted, acid-etched, and heat-treated (HT), were inserted into rabbit femurs. Pre-operatively, the implants were morphologically and topographically characterized. After 3 weeks of healing, the samples were retrieved for histomorphometry. The nanomechanical properties of the surrounding bone were evaluated by nanoindentation. While both implants revealed similar bone-to-implant contact, the nanoindentation demonstrated that the tissue quality was significantly enhanced around the HA-coated implants, validating the postulated hypothesis. PMID:23045363

  2. Machine oil inhibits the osseointegration of orthopaedic implants by impairing osteoblast attachment and spreading.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A; Goldberg, Victor M; Greenfield, Edward M

    2015-07-01

    The most important factor contributing to short-term and long-term success of cementless total joint arthroplasties is osseointegration. Osseointegration leads to a direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of an implant. Surface contaminants may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and impair osseointegration. For example, specific lots of hip replacement Sulzer Inter-OP(TM) acetabular shells that were associated with impaired osseointegration and early failure rates were found to be contaminated with both bacterial debris and machine oil residues. However, the effect of machine oil on implant integration is unknown. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if machine oil inhibits the osseointegration of orthopaedic implants. To test this hypothesis in vivo we used our murine model of osseointegration where titanium alloy implants are implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur. We found that machine oil inhibited bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures. Machine oil on titanium alloy discs inhibited early stages of MC3T3-E1 osteogenesis in vitro such as attachment and spreading. Inhibition of osteoblast attachment and spreading occurred in both areas with and without detectable oil. Osteoblast growth was in turn inhibited on discs with machine oil due to both a decrease in proliferation and an increase in cell death. Later stages of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization on titanium alloy discs were also inhibited. Thus, machine oil can inhibit osseointegration through cell autonomous effects on osteoblast cells. These results support routine testing by manufacturers of machine oil residues on orthopaedic implants. PMID:25676177

  3. Acoustic-sensor-based detection of damage in composite aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Peter; Martin, Tony; Read, Ian

    2004-03-01

    Acoustic emission detection is a well-established method of locating and monitoring crack development in metal structures. The technique has been adapted to test facilities for non-destructive testing applications. Deployment as an operational or on-line automated damage detection technology in vehicles is posing greater challenges. A clear requirement of potential end-users of such systems is a level of automation capable of delivering low-level diagnosis information. The output from the system is in the form of "go", "no-go" indications of structural integrity or immediate maintenance actions. This level of automation requires significant data reduction and processing. This paper describes recent trials of acoustic emission detection technology for the diagnosis of damage in composite aerospace structures. The technology comprises low profile detection sensors using piezo electric wafers encapsulated in polymer film ad optical sensors. Sensors are bonded to the structure"s surface and enable acoustic events from the loaded structure to be located by triangulation. Instrumentation has been enveloped to capture and parameterise the sensor data in a form suitable for low-bandwidth storage and transmission.

  4. On the cross correlation function amplitude vector and its application to structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhichun; Yu, Zhefeng; Sun, Hao

    2007-10-01

    A new approach to detecting structure damage using the cross correlation function amplitude vector (CorV) of the measured vibration responses is proposed. It is verified that under a steady random excitation with specific frequency spectrum, the CorV of a structure only depends on the frequency response function matrix of the structure, and it is also found that the normalized CorV has a specific shape. Thus the damage can be detected and located with the correlation and the relative difference between the CorVs obtained from intact and damaged structures. The Cross Correlation Function Amplitude Vector Assurance Criterion (CVAC) is then defined and can be used to quantify the variation of CorV. It is found that the CVAC decreases monotonously with the increasing of damage factor, which indicates the change of CorV is related to the damage severity. The methods of damage locating with CorV are then proposed and demonstrated by the experiments. Finally, the experiment on detection in the fasteners loosing of an aircraft panel model are presented to illustrate the application of the CorV. The feature of this approach lies in that the CorV is obtained from the time domain vibration responses of the structure under steady random excitation, and it has the advantages of simplicity in calculation and the damage detection, so it is possible that the presented approach applies to the structural health monitoring (SHM) with steady ambient excitations.

  5. An implantable blood pressure and flow transmitter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henriksen, J. K. C.

    1973-01-01

    A miniature totally implantable FM/FM telemetry system has been developed to simultaneously measure blood pressure and blood flow, thus providing an appreciation of the hemodynamics of the circulation to the entire body or to a particular organ. Developed for work with animal subjects, the telemetry system's transmission time is controlled by an RF signal that permits an operating life of several months. Pressure is detected by a miniature intravascular transducer and flow is detected by an extravascular interferometric ultrasonic technique. Both pressure and flow are calibrated prior to implanting. The pressure calibration can be checked after the implanting by cannulation; flow calibration can be verified only at the end of the experiment by determining the voltage output from the implanted sensing system as a function of several measured flow rates. The utility of this device has been established by its use in investigating canine renal circulation during exercise, emotional encounters, administration of drugs, and application of accelerative forces.

  6. Hidden corrosion detection in aircraft aluminum structures using laser ultrasonics and wavelet transform signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, M Z; Gouyon, R; Lepoutre, F

    2003-06-01

    Preliminary results of hidden corrosion detection in aircraft aluminum structures using a noncontact laser based ultrasonic technique are presented. A short laser pulse focused to a line spot is used as a broadband source of ultrasonic guided waves in an aluminum 2024 sample cut from an aircraft structure and prepared with artificially corroded circular areas on its back surface. The out of plane surface displacements produced by the propagating ultrasonic waves were detected with a heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Time-frequency analysis of the signals using a continuous wavelet transform allowed the identification of the generated Lamb modes by comparison with the calculated dispersion curves. The presence of back surface corrosion was detected by noting the loss of the S(1) mode near its cutoff frequency. This method is applicable to fast scanning inspection techniques and it is particularly suited for early corrosion detection. PMID:12782263

  7. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  8. Structure Detection of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Aeroelastic Flight Test Data. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Brenner, martin J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the 1. Motivation for the study 2. Nonlinear Model Form 3. Structure Detection 4. Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) 5. Objectives 6. Results 7. Assess LASSO as a Structure Detection Tool: Simulated Nonlinear Models 8. Applicability to Complex Systems: F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Flight Test Data. The authors conclude that 1. this is a novel approach for detecting the structure of highly over-parameterised nonlinear models in situations where other methods may be inadequate 2. that it is a practical significance in the analysis of aircraft dynamics during envelope expansion and could lead to more efficient control strategies and 3. this could allow greater insight into the functionality of various systems dynamics, by providing a quantitative model which is easily interpretable

  9. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn0.85Mg0.15O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-01

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on <100> Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000 °C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of <101¯0> and <101¯3> peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the <0002> peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15 K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic exciton-exciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45 eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic exciton-exciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  10. Hair implant complications.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Norins, A L; Pantzer, J G; Bennett, J E

    1981-04-01

    Four men who underwent hair implantation for pattern baldness were treated for complications such as infection, foreign-body reaction, pruritus, and scarring. The complications were similar to those reported with synthetic modacrylic fiber implants that have been used for the same purpose. Although we believe this is the first article to report complications from hair implants, the illogical basis of the procedure suggests that complications will occur in many unsuspecting patients who undergo hair implantation. PMID:7009899

  11. Temporal variation in the deposition of different types of collagen within a porous biomaterial implant.

    PubMed

    White, Jacinta F; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Bisucci, Teresa; Darby, Ian A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2014-10-01

    The deposition of new collagen in association with a medical implant has been studied using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular replacement samples implanted subcutaneously in sheep, for up to 28 days. New type I collagen mRNA synthesis was followed by in situ hybridization, while the accumulation of new collagen types III, V, VI, XII, and XIV was followed by immunohistochemistry. All the collagen detected in the pores of the implant were newly deposited at various times after implantation and were not due to any pre-existing dermal collagen that may have been present around the implant. Collagen deposition was seen initially surrounding the implant and, with time, was seen to infiltrate within its pores. In situ hybridization showed that the majority of infiltrating cells had switched on mRNA that coded for type I collagen production. Histology showed that cellular infiltration increased with time, accompanied by increasing collagen deposition. The deposition of different collagen types happened at different rates. The type V and VI collagens preceded the major interstitial collagens in the newly deposited tissue, although at longer time points, detection of type V collagen appeared to decrease. After disruption of the interstitial collagens with enzyme, the "masked" type V collagen was clearly still visible by immunohistochemistry. Little type XII collagen could be seen within the porous mesh, although it was seen in the surrounding tissues. By contrast, type XIV was seen throughout the porous structure of the implanted mesh, with less being visible outside the material where type XII was more abundant. PMID:24243831

  12. Electronic Structure Modification of Ion Implanted Graphene: The Spectroscopic Signatures of p- and n-Type Doping.

    PubMed

    Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Hardcastle, Trevor P; Seabourne, Che R; Bangert, Ursel; Zan, Recep; Amani, Julian Alexander; Hofsäss, Hans; Nicholls, Rebecca J; Brydson, Rik M D; Scott, Andrew J; Ramasse, Quentin M

    2015-11-24

    A combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations is used to describe the electronic structure modifications incurred by free-standing graphene through two types of single-atom doping. The N K and C K electron energy loss transitions show the presence of π* bonding states, which are highly localized around the N dopant. In contrast, the B K transition of a single B dopant atom shows an unusual broad asymmetric peak which is the result of delocalized π* states away from the B dopant. The asymmetry of the B K toward higher energies is attributed to highly localized σ* antibonding states. These experimental observations are then interpreted as direct fingerprints of the expected p- and n-type behavior of graphene doped in this fashion, through careful comparison with density functional theory calculations. PMID:26446310

  13. A study of structure and properties of Ti-doped DLC film by reactive magnetron sputtering with ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guojia; Gong, Shuili; Lin, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lin; Sun, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Ti-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared on Ti alloys by reactive magnetron sputtering combined with PSII technology. The structure and properties of unmodified and Ti-doped DLC films were analyzed in a systematic way by different testing, such as TEM, XPS, frictional wear testing, contact angle measurement and so on. The results showed that Ti-doped DLC was a typical a-C:H film containing TiC nanometer grains, whose mechanical properties were obviously improved, such as hardness, wear resistance and cohesive strength, still kept good wear resistance at the ambient temperature of 450 °C, and held a rather large mean water contact angle of 104.2 ± 1°.

  14. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed. PMID:25498816

  15. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  16. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  17. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, D.J.; Klima, S.J.; Kiser, J.D.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics. 20 references.

  18. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  19. High-sensitive nonlinear detection of steroids by resonant double grating waveguide structures-based immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriano, Alejandro; Salvador, J.-Pablo; Galve, Roger; Marco, M.-Pilar; Thayil K. N., Anisha; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Soria, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    We report the non linear fluorescence real-time detection of methylboldenone, an androgenic anabolic steroid used illegally as growth promoter based on a resonant sensing chip: a double grating waveguide structure. The limit of detection of this synthetic steroid is two orders of magnitude lower than the Minimum Required Performance Limit required by the World Anti-Doping Agency. The immunoreagents have been have been immobilized onto the surface of the resonant sensor after being activated with phosphonohexanoic acid spacers. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of illegal dopants and food contaminants.

  20. Factors that affect reliability of nondestructive detection of flaws in structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The factors that affect reliability of nondestructive detection of flaws in structural ceramics by microfocus radiography and scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) were investigated. Reliability of void detection in silicon nitride and silicon carbide by microfocus X-rays was affected by photon energy level, material chemistry in the immediate vicinity of the void, and the presence of loose powder aggregates inside the void cavity. The sensitivity of SLAM to voids was affected by material microstructure, the level of porosity, and the condition of the specimen surfaces. Statistical results are presented in the form of probability of detection as a function of void diameter for green compacts and sintered materials.

  1. Low-loss waveguiding and detecting structure for surface plasmon polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, M. Aihara, T.; Ota, M.; Sakai, H.; Ishii, Y.; Fukuda, M.

    2014-02-24

    A simple and low-loss metal/semiconductor surface plasmon polariton (SPP) device consisting of a SPP waveguide and a detector is studied theoretically and experimentally. We demonstrate a simple diffraction structure (a metal grating) where the SPP couples from the waveguide to the detector. The SPP can propagate without large losses at the air/Au interface, and this interface was used for SPP waveguiding. To convert the SPP into an electric signal using internal photoemission, the propagating SPP is coupled into the Au/Si interface by the diffraction structure. The propagation direction of the coupled SPP at the Au/Si interface depends on the slit pitch of the diffraction structure, and the direction can be controlled by adjusting the pitch. The slit pitch is also modeled using a diffraction grating equation, and the results show good agreement with those of simulations using the finite-difference time-domain method. When diffraction structures consisting of a multi-slit structure and a disk array are placed at the end of the waveguide, SPP coupling into the Au/Si interface is also observed. The photocurrents detected at the Au/Si interface are much larger when compared with that detected for the device without the diffraction structure (26 times for the multi-slit structure and 10 times for the disk array). From the polarization angle dependence of the detected photocurrent, we also confirmed that the photocurrent was caused by the SPP propagating at the air/Au interface.

  2. Detection of sudden structural damage using blind source separation and time-frequency approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morovati, V.; Kazemi, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    Seismic signal processing is one of the most reliable methods of detecting the structural damage during earthquakes. In this paper, the use of the hybrid method of blind source separation (BSS) and time-frequency analysis (TFA) is explored to detect the changes in the structural response data. The combination of the BSS and TFA is applied to the seismic signals due to the non-stationary nature of them. Firstly, the second-order blind identification technique is used to decompose the response signal of structural vibration into modal coordinate signals which will be mono-components for TFA. Then each mono-component signal is analyzed to extract instantaneous frequency of structure. Numerical simulations and a real-world seismic-excited structure with time-varying frequencies show the accuracy and robustness of the developed algorithm. TFA of extracted sources shows that used method can be successfully applied to structural damage detection. The results also demonstrate that the combined method can be used to identify the time instant of structural damage occurrence more sharply and effectively than by the use of TFA alone.

  3. Sensor failure detection and isolation in flexible structures using the eigensystem realization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, David C.; Lyde, Terri L.

    Sensor failure detection and isolation (FDI) for flexible structures is approached from a system realization perspective. Instead of using hardware or analytical model redundancy, system realization is utilized to provide an experimental model based redundancy. The FDI algorithm utilizes the eigensystem realization algorithm to determine a minimum-order state space realization of the structure in the presence of noisy measurements. The FDI algorithm utilizes statistical comparisons of successive realizations to detect and isolate the failed sensor component. Due to the nature in which the FDI algorithm is formulated, it is also possible to classify the failure mode of the sensor. Results are presented using both numerically simulated and actual experimental data.

  4. Structure dependence of lasing action in organic polymer films on DFB gratings for dinitrotoluene vapor detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiufeng; Qiu, Keqiang; He, Shengnan; Liu, Honglin; Liu, Zhengkun; Hong, Yilin; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-06-20

    Structure effects of distributed feedback (DFB) gratings on lasing action have been investigated for detecting explosive vapors. For the first time, we have established the optimized profiles of the DFB grating, and given the theoretical path to design its structure for amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of organic polymer films based on Bragg conditions. A poly(p-phenylene ethynylene) (PPE) film can realize detection of dinitrotoluene (DNT) vapors in 2 min with a reduced excitation threshold of 26 mJ cm(-2) by using a simple and common 405 nm laser. PMID:27277339

  5. Guided Wave Subsurface Damage Detection for a Composite on a Half-Space Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X.; Rose, J. L.; Smith, E.

    2010-02-01

    Guided waves are applied for subsurface damage detection in the structure of a composite skin on a half-space. The global matrix method with a 2D root search is used to determine the complex wave numbers. The dispersion relations and wave structures are obtained for both propagating and attenuating modes in which the attenuation is caused by the leakage from the waveguide to the half-space. The scattering of leaky waves by skin-substrate disbond is analyzed by a finite element model. Theoretically driven experiments are conducted on a composite rotor blade section to detect the disbond between skin and substrate.

  6. A Unified Framework for Salient Structure Detection by Contour-Guided Visual Search.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Fu; Li, Hui; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-08-01

    We define the task of salient structure (SS) detection to unify the saliency-related tasks, such as fixation prediction, salient object detection, and detection of other structures of interest in cluttered environments. To solve such SS detection tasks, a unified framework inspired by the two-pathway-based search strategy of biological vision is proposed in this paper. First, a contour-based spatial prior (CBSP) is extracted based on the layout of edges in the given scene along a fast non-selective pathway, which provides a rough, task-irrelevant, and robust estimation of the locations where the potential SSs are present. Second, another flow of local feature extraction is executed in parallel along the selective pathway. Finally, Bayesian inference is used to auto-weight and integrate the local cues guided by CBSP and to predict the exact locations of SSs. This model is invariant to the size and features of objects. The experimental results on six large datasets (three fixation prediction datasets and three salient object datasets) demonstrate that our system achieves competitive performance for SS detection (i.e., both the tasks of fixation prediction and salient object detection) compared with the state-of-the-art methods. In addition, our system also performs well for salient object construction from saliency maps and can be easily extended for salient edge detection. PMID:27244740

  7. Damage of composite structures: Detection technique, dynamic response and residual strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Wahyu

    2001-10-01

    Reliable and accurate health monitoring techniques can prevent catastrophic failures of structures. Conventional damage detection methods are based on visual or localized experimental methods and very often require prior information concerning the vicinity of the damage or defect. The structure must also be readily accessible for inspections. The techniques are also labor intensive. In comparison to these methods, health-monitoring techniques that are based on the structural dynamic response offers unique information on failure of structures. However, systematic relations between the experimental data and the defect are not available and frequently, the number of vibration modes needed for an accurate identification of defects is much higher than the number of modes that can be readily identified in the experiment. These motivated us to develop an experimental data based detection method with systematic relationships between the experimentally identified information and the analytical or mathematical model representing the defective structures. The developed technique use changes in vibrational curvature modes and natural frequencies. To avoid misinterpretation of the identified information, we also need to understand the effects of defects on the structural dynamic response prior to developing health-monitoring techniques. In this thesis work we focus on two type of defects in composite structures, namely delamination and edge notch like defect. Effects of nonlinearity due to the presence of defect and due to the axial stretching are studied for beams with delamination. Once defects are detected in a structure, next concern is determining the effects of the defects on the strength of the structure and its residual stiffness under dynamic loading. In this thesis, energy release rate due to dynamic loading in a delaminated structure is studied, which will be a foundation toward determining the residual strength of the structure.

  8. The Effect of Breast Implants on Mammogram Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kam, Kelli; Lee, Esther; Pairawan, Seyed; Anderson, Kendra; Cora, Cherie; Bae, Won; Senthil, Maheswari; Solomon, Naveenraj; Lum, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer detection in women with implants has been questioned. We sought to evaluate the impact of breast implants on mammographic outcomes. A retrospective review of women undergoing mammography between March 1 and October 30, 2013 was performed. Demographic characteristics and mammogram results were compared between women with and without breast implants. Overall, 4.8 per cent of 1863 women identified during the study period had breast implants. Median age was 59 years (26-93). Women with implants were younger (53.9 vs 59.2 years, P < 0.0001), had lower body mass index (25.4 vs 28.9, P < 0.0001), and were more likely to have dense breast tissue (72.1% vs 56.4%, P = 0.004) than those without. There were no statistically significant differences with regards to Breast Imaging Recording and Data System 0 score (13.3% with implants vs 21.4% without), call back exam (18.9% with vs 24.1% without), time to resolution of abnormal imaging (58.6 days with vs 43.3 without), or cancer detection rate (0% with implants vs 1.0% without). Because implants did not significantly affect mammogram results, women with implants should be reassured that mammography remains useful in detecting cancer. However, future research is required to determine whether lower call back rates and longer time to resolution of imaging findings contribute to delays in diagnosis in patients with implants. PMID:26463307

  9. An automated procedure for covariation-based detection of RNA structure

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, S.; Overbeek, R.; Woese, C.R.; Olsen, G.J.; Pfluger, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper summarizes our investigations into the computational detection of secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA. We have developed a new automated procedure that not only identifies potential bondings of secondary and tertiary structure, but also provides the covariation evidence that supports the proposed bondings, and any counter-evidence that can be detected in the known sequences. A small number of previously unknown bondings have been detected in individual RNA molecules (16S rRNA and 7S RNA) through the use of our automated procedure. Currently, we are systematically studying mitochondrial rRNA. Our goal is to detect tertiary structure within 16S rRNA and quaternary structure between 16S and 23S rRNA. Our ultimate hope is that automated covariation analysis will contribute significantly to a refined picture of ribosome structure. Our colleagues in biology have begun experiments to test certain hypotheses suggested by an examination of our program's output. These experiments involve sequencing key portions of the 23S ribosomal RNA for species in which the known 16S ribosomal RNA exhibits variation (from the dominant pattern) at the site of a proposed bonding. The hope is that the 23S ribosomal RNA of these species will exhibit corresponding complementary variation or generalized covariation. 24 refs.

  10. Active cardiac model and its application on structure detection from early fetal ultrasound sequences.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinhui; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shen, Yuzhong; Chen, Ping

    2012-04-01

    The structure of an early fetal heart provides vital information for the diagnosis of fetus defects. However, early fetal hearts are difficult to detect due to their relatively small size and the low signal-to-noise ratio of ultrasound images. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for automatic detection of early fetal cardiac structure from ultrasound images. The proposed method consists of two major parts which are the preprocessing phase and the active cardiac model: (1) The preprocessing phase consists of two sub-steps. (a) The region of interest is first automatically selected based on an accumulated motion image, which is able to represent the motion information of the fetal heart more accurately. (b) Then by combining Rayleigh-trimmed filter and anisotropic diffusion in 3-dimensional space, a despeckling method is developed to suppress the speckle noise and emphasize the motion information for subsequent cardiac structure detection. (2) The active cardiac model is proposed for the detection of fetal heart structure, which is a key contribution of this paper. It takes into account both the structure and motion information of fetal hearts simultaneously. Both learning and inference of the active cardiac model are described in the paper. Experiments on seven ultrasound sequences demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:21620676

  11. An improved modal strain energy method for damage detection in offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingchao; Wang, Shuqing; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Chunmei

    2016-04-01

    The development of robust damage detection methods for offshore structures is crucial to prevent catastrophes caused by structural failures. In this research, we developed an Improved Modal Strain Energy (IMSE) method for detecting damage in offshore platform structures based on a traditional modal strain energy method (the Stubbs index method). The most significant difference from the Stubbs index method was the application of modal frequencies. The goal was to improve the robustness of the traditional method. To demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed IMSE method, both numerical and experimental studies were conducted for different damage scenarios using a jacket platform structure. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of the IMSE method in damage location when only limited, spatially incomplete, and noise-polluted modal data is available. Comparative studies showed that the IMSE index outperformed the Stubbs index and exhibited stronger robustness, confirming the superiority of the proposed approach.

  12. Detection of Secondary and Supersecondary Structures of Proteins from Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Goswami, Samrat; Zhang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) have enabled the quantitative visualization of the structural building blocks of proteins at improved resolutions. We provide algorithms to detect the secondary structures (α-helices and β-sheets) from proteins for which the volumetric maps are reconstructed at 6–10Å resolution. Additionally, we show that when the resolution is coarser than 10Å, some of the super-secondary structures can be detected from 3D EM maps. For both these algorithms, we employ tools from computational geometry and differential topology, specifically the computation of stable/unstable manifolds of certain critical points of the distance function induced by the molecular surface. Our results connect mathematically well-defined constructions with bio-chemically induced structures observed in proteins. PMID:22186625

  13. An improved modal strain energy method for damage detection in offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingchao; Wang, Shuqing; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Chunmei

    2016-06-01

    The development of robust damage detection methods for offshore structures is crucial to prevent catastrophes caused by structural failures. In this research, we developed an Improved Modal Strain Energy (IMSE) method for detecting damage in offshore platform structures based on a traditional modal strain energy method (the Stubbs index method). The most significant difference from the Stubbs index method was the application of modal frequencies. The goal was to improve the robustness of the traditional method. To demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed IMSE method, both numerical and experimental studies were conducted for different damage scenarios using a jacket platform structure. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of the IMSE method in damage location when only limited, spatially incomplete, and noise-polluted modal data is available. Comparative studies showed that the IMSE index outperformed the Stubbs index and exhibited stronger robustness, confirming the superiority of the proposed approach.

  14. Formation of silicon nanocrystals in sapphire by ion implantation and the origin of visible photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Yerci, S.; Serincan, U.; Dogan, I.; Tokay, S.; Genisel, M.; Aydinli, A.; Turan, R.

    2006-10-01

    Silicon nanocrystals, average sizes ranging between 3 and 7 nm, were formed in sapphire matrix by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Evolution of the nanocrystals was detected by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Raman spectra display that clusters in the matrix start to form nanocrystalline structures at annealing temperatures as low as 800 deg. C in samples with high dose Si implantation. The onset temperature of crystallization increases with decreasing dose. Raman spectroscopy and XRD reveal gradual transformation of Si clusters into crystalline form. Visible photoluminescence band appears following implantation and its intensity increases with subsequent annealing process. While the center of the peak does not shift, the intensity of the peak decreases with increasing dose. The origin of the observed photoluminescence is discussed in terms of radiation induced defects in the sapphire matrix.

  15. Device-detected atrial fibrillation and risk for stroke: an analysis of >10 000 patients from the SOS AF project (Stroke preventiOn Strategies based on Atrial Fibrillation information from implanted devices)

    PubMed Central

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Glotzer, Taya V.; Santini, Massimo; West, Teena M.; De Melis, Mirko; Sepsi, Milan; Gasparini, Maurizio; Lewalter, Thorsten; Camm, John A.; Singer, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the association between maximum daily atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and risk of ischaemic stroke. Background Cardiac implanted electronic devices (CIEDs) enhance detection of AF, providing a comprehensive measure of AF burden. Design, setting, and patients A pooled analysis of individual patient data from five prospective studies was performed. Patients without permanent AF, previously implanted with CIEDs, were included if they had at least 3 months of follow-up. A total of 10 016 patients (median age 70 years) met these criteria. The risk of ischaemic stroke associated with pre-specified cut-off points of AF burden (5 min, 1, 6, 12, and 23 h, respectively) was assessed. Results During a median follow-up of 24 months, 43% of 10 016 patients experienced at least 1 day with at least 5 min of AF burden and for them the median time to the maximum AF burden was 6 months (inter-quartile range: 1.3–14). A Cox regression analysis adjusted for the CHADS2 score and anticoagulants at baseline demonstrated that AF burden was an independent predictor of ischaemic stroke. Among the thresholds of AF burden that we evaluated, 1 h was associated with the highest hazard ratio (HR) for ischaemic stroke, i.e. 2.11 (95% CI: 1.22–3.64, P = 0.008). Conclusions Device-detected AF burden is associated with an increased risk of ischaemic stroke in a relatively unselected population of CIEDs patients. This finding may add to the basis for timely and clinically appropriate decision-making on anticoagulation treatment. PMID:24334432

  16. Detection of fault structures with airborne LiDAR point-cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Du, Lei

    2015-08-01

    The airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology is a new type of aerial earth observation method which can be used to produce high-precision DEM (Digital Elevation Model) quickly and reflect ground surface information directly. Fault structure is one of the key forms of crustal movement, and its quantitative description is the key to the research of crustal movement. The airborne LiDAR point-cloud data is used to detect and extract fault structures automatically based on linear extension, elevation mutation and slope abnormal characteristics. Firstly, the LiDAR point-cloud data is processed to filter out buildings, vegetation and other non-surface information with the TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) filtering method and Burman model calibration method. TIN and DEM are made from the processed data sequentially. Secondly, linear fault structures are extracted based on dual-threshold method. Finally, high-precision DOM (Digital Orthophoto Map) and other geological knowledge are used to check the accuracy of fault structure extraction. An experiment is carried out in Beiya Village of Yunnan Province, China. With LiDAR technology, results reveal that: the airborne LiDAR point-cloud data can be utilized to extract linear fault structures accurately and automatically, measure information such as height, width and slope of fault structures with high precision, and detect faults in areas with vegetation coverage effectively.

  17. TEM investigation of hydrogen implanted and laser annealed silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, P.; Saint-Jacques, R.G.; Terreault, B.; Veilleux, G.

    1995-09-01

    In order to explain the relatively easy laser-induced desorption of hydrogen implanted in silicon, and particularly the lower temperature needed for desorption at higher implantation energy, the microstructural modifications produced by laser pulses were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy. The structural damage, such as defect clusters and hydrogen gas bubbles was observed. In the case of low dose implantation (H/SI {le} 15%), most of the bubbles were produced during laser annealing rather than during implantation. This bubble formation in the course of desorption explains the higher temperature needed. When blisters are already present on the as-implanted surface, desorption starts at a lower temperature.

  18. Two dimensional profiling of ultra-shallow implants using SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, G. A.; Gibbons, R.; Dowsett, M. G.

    1998-11-24

    The lateral spread of dopant under the implant mask edge and its behavior during thermal processing is becoming increasingly important as device dimensions are reduced. Direct measurement of the distribution by high spatial resolution SIMS is not possible owing to the very few impurity atoms present in the analyte volume at junction concentrations. In this paper we describe a SIMS based technique, using a special sample structure, that may be used to access this information and discuss the instrumental requirements, resolution and detection limits, as well as presenting cross sectional dopant data.

  19. Application of new advanced CNN structure with adaptive thresholds to color edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shaojiang; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Xipeng; Wei, Pengcheng; Qin, Mingfu

    2012-04-01

    Color edge detection is much more efficient than gray scale detection when edges exist at the boundary between regions of different colors with no change in intensity. This paper presents adaptive templates, which are capable of detecting various color and intensity changes in color image. To avoid conception of multilayer proposed in literatures, modification has been done to the CNN structure. This modified structure allows a matrix C, which carries the change information of pixels, to replace the control parts in the basic CNN equation. This modification is necessary because in multilayer structure, it faces the challenge of how to represent the intrinsic relationship among each primary layer. Additionally, in order to enhance the accuracy of edge detection, adaptive detection threshold is employed. The adaptive thresholds are considered to be alterable criteria in designing matrix C. The proposed synthetic system not only avoids the problem which is engendered by multi-layers but also exploits full information of pixels themselves. Experimental results prove that the proposed method is efficient.

  20. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993