Science.gov

Sample records for implantes dentales con

  1. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  2. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  3. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  4. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  5. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    PubMed

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  6. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  7. Head and neck cancer, dental implants, and dental oncology.

    PubMed

    Garg, Arun; Guez, Ghislaine

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a real presence in the dental-implant world--patients who undergo surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation often seek the assistance of dental-implant practitioners to restore them to better function; other patients who have had implants in place for years will return with questions regarding how their treatment will be affected by the presence of their dental implant. As oral-cancer treatment modalities are rapidly changing, practitioners struggle to keep up with the literature surrounding this important subset of the dental-implant population. This month, we look at the numbers of patients suffering from oral cancers, consider the different treatment options for patients with oral cancers, and investigate the role that implants play in improving therapeutic outcomes or changing treatment course. PMID:21323003

  8. Patients awareness and attitude towards dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Shivani; Bhatia, Shekhar; Kaur, Arvinder; Rathakrishnan, Tiviya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the awareness of the patients regarding implant-retained prosthesis as an option for tooth replacement and the knowledge about tooth replacement as a whole including source of information and attitude towards it amongst Malaysian population. Materials and Methods: Information on demographic characteristics, knowledge about implant as an option for missing tooth replacement, source of information and knowledge about other options of tooth replacement were obtained from patients visiting various dental outpatient departments of hospital and private dental clinics using nationwide self-explanatory survey. Results: Amongst the 1013 response retrieved, 27% of respondents felt moderately well informed about the dental implant treatment. Only 9% of the respondents had dental implant treatment before and 17% felt well informed about different alternatives of replacing missing teeth. The dentists were the main source of information regarding dental implant treatment modality followed by friends and electronic media. 55.6% respondents felt implant to be as good as own teeth during function whereas high cost was the major limiting factor for implant treatment. Conclusion: 56% of Malaysian population was aware of dental implant as an alternative for replacing missing teeth. Necessary efforts and measures should be made to raise the awareness of dental implant treatment in the country. PMID:26752875

  9. Techniques for dental implant nanosurface modifications

    PubMed Central

    Bathala, Lakshmana Rao; Sangur, Rajashekar

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Dental implant has gained clinical success over last decade with the major drawback related to osseointegration as properties of metal (Titanium) are different from human bone. Currently implant procedures include endosseous type of dental implants with nanoscale surface characteristics. The objective of this review article is to summarize the role of nanotopography on titanium dental implant surfaces in order to improve osseointegration and various techniques that can generate nanoscale topographic features to titanium implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic electronic search of English language peer reviewed dental literature was performed for articles published between December 1987 to January 2012. Search was conducted in Medline, PubMed and Google scholar supplemented by hand searching of selected journals. 101 articles were assigned to full text analysis. Articles were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criterion. All articles were screened according to inclusion standard. 39 articles were included in the analysis. RESULTS Out of 39 studies, seven studies demonstrated that bone implant contact increases with increase in surface roughness. Five studies showed comparative evaluation of techniques producing microtopography and nanotopography. Eight studies concluded that osteoblasts preferably adhere to nano structure as compared to smooth surface. Six studies illustrated that nanotopography modify implant surface and their properties. Thirteen studies described techniques to produce nano roughness. CONCLUSION Modification of dental osseous implants at nanoscale level produced by various techniques can alter biological responses that may improve osseointegration and dental implant procedures. PMID:25558347

  10. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants. PMID:27433052

  11. Risk factors affecting dental implant survival.

    PubMed

    Vehemente, Valerie A; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Daher, Shadi; Muftu, Ali; Dodson, Thomas B

    2002-01-01

    Given the predictability of dental implant success, the attention of the scientific community is moving from descriptions of implant success toward a more detailed analysis of factors associated with implant failure. The purposes of this study were (1) to estimate the 1- and 5-year survival of Bicon dental implants and (2) to identify risk factors associated with implant failure in an objective, statistically valid manner. To address the research purposes, we used a retrospective cohort study design and a study sample composed of patients who had one or more implants placed. The predictor variables were grouped into the following categories: demographic, health status, anatomic, implant fixture-specific, prosthetic, perioperative, and ancillary variables. The major outcome variable of interest was implant failure defined as implant removal. Overall implant survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Risk factors for implant failure were identified using the Cox proportional hazard regression models. The study sample was composed of 677 patients who had 677 implants randomly selected for analysis. The overall 1- and 5-year survival of the Bicon implant system was 95.2% and 90.2%, respectively. After adjusting for other covariates in a multivariate model, both tobacco use (P = .0004) and single-stage implant placement (P = .01) were statistically associated with an increased risk for failure. The results of these analyses suggest that the overall survival of the Bicon dental implant is comparable with other current implant systems. In addition, after controlling for covariates, we identified 2 exposures associated with implant survival, tobacco use and implant staging. Of interest, both of these exposures are under the clinician's control. PMID:12498449

  12. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  13. Diagnostic imaging for dental implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  14. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy,...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy,...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy,...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  7. Immediate obturator stabilization using mini dental implants.

    PubMed

    Bohle, Gregory C; Mitcherling, William W; Mitcherling, John J; Johnson, Robert M; Bohle, George C

    2008-08-01

    Edentulous patients with maxillary defects face a more challenging oral rehabilitation process than dentate patients. With the use of mini dental implants (MDIs), it is now possible to immediately increase obturator retention and stability. Implant patients can have a retentive obturator that enhances the overall efficacy of the prosthesis both in comfort and function. PMID:18482362

  8. Dental implants in patients with bruxing habits.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E I G; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2006-02-01

    Bruxism (teeth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence for this is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly because of the large variation in the literature in terms of both the technical aspects and the biological aspects of the study material. Although there is still no proof for the suggestion that bruxism causes an overload of dental implants and of their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. There are a few practical guidelines as to minimize the chance of implant failure. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these guidelines concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the protection of the final result with a hard occlusal stabilization splint (night guard). PMID:16457676

  9. Foreign Body Mimicking a Dental Implant Radiographically.

    PubMed

    Demirkol, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Foreign bodies are often encountered in the maxillofacial region and can present in several ways. They frequently occur as a result of accidents, explosions, and gunshot injuries or because of iatrogenic factors in therapeutic interventions in daily dental practice. This report describes an unusual case of a broken elevator blade mimicking a dental implant embedded in alveolar bone radiographically, within the maxillary palatal mucosa during a traumatic maxillary right first molar extraction. PMID:26594991

  10. Factors Influencing Early Dental Implant Failures.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Kisch, J; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of local and systemic factors on the occurrence of dental implant failures up to the second-stage surgery (abutment connection). This retrospective study is based on 2,670 patients who received 10,096 implants and were consecutively treated with implant-supported prostheses between 1980 and 2014 at 1 specialist clinic. Several anatomic-, patient-, health-, and implant-related factors were collected. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients and implants. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used at the patient level as well as the implant level to evaluate the effect of explanatory variables on the failure of implants up to abutment connection. A generalized estimating equation method was used for the implant-level analysis to account for the fact that repeated observations (several implants) were available for a single patient. Overall, 642 implants (6.36%) failed, of which 176 (1.74%) in 139 patients were lost up to second-stage surgery. The distribution of implants in sites of different bone quantities and qualities was quite similar between implants lost up to and after abutment connection. Smoking and the intake of antidepressants were the statistically significant predictors in the multivariate model (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02369562). PMID:27146701

  11. Oral squamous cell carcinoma around dental implants.

    PubMed

    Czerninski, Rakefet; Kaplan, Ilana; Almoznino, Galit; Maly, Alexander; Regev, Eran

    2006-10-01

    It is well documented that oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is related to risk factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption as well as premalignant lesions and conditions such as leukoplakia, oral lichen planus (OLP), and previous malignancy of the upper respiratory system and gastrointestinal tract. Osseointegrated dental implants are rarely reported in association with OSCC. This article presents 2 cases of OSCC adjacent to dental implants in patients at risk for oral cancer--1 was a heavy smoker with OLP; the other had a history of previous oral and colon cancer. Six additional cases of malignancy adjacent to dental implants were retrieved from the literature; the majority of cases had at least 1 recognized risk factor for oral cancer. Although such cases are rarely reported, patients at risk for oral cancer, especially those with multiple existing risk factors, that present with failing dental implants should be thoroughly evaluated to rule out the presence of malignancy disguised as peri-implant disease. PMID:17017632

  12. Nanotechnology Approaches for Better Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Tomsia, Antoni P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Lee, Janice S.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The combined requirements imposed by the enormous scale and overall complexity of designing new implants or complete organ regeneration are well beyond the reach of present technology in many dimensions, including nanoscale, as we do not yet have the basic knowledge required to achieve these goals. The need for a synthetic implant to address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the choice of suitable materials. There is a strong belief that nanoscale materials will produce a new generation of implant materials with high efficiency, low cost, and high volume. The nanoscale in materials processing is truly a new frontier. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades but they have serious shortcomings related to their osseointegration and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. This paper reviews recent advances in the fabrication of novel coatings and nanopatterning of dental implants. It also provides a general summary of the state of the art in dental implant science and describes possible advantages of nanotechnology for further improvements. The ultimate goal is to produce materials and therapies that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and improve quality of life and current standards of care. PMID:21464998

  13. Short dental implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Annibali, S; Cristalli, M P; Dell'Aquila, D; Bignozzi, I; La Monaca, G; Pilloni, A

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence has suggested the utility of short dental implants for oral reconstructive procedures in clinical situations of limited vertical bone height. The aim of this review was to systematically evaluate clinical studies of implants < 10 mm in length, to determine short implant-supported prosthesis success in the atrophic jaw. Implant survival, incidence of biological and biomechanical complications, and radiographic peri-implant marginal bone loss were evaluated. Screening of eligible studies, quality assessment, and data extraction were conducted by two reviewers independently. Meta-analyses were performed by the pooling of survival data by implant surface, surgical technique, implant location, type of edentulism, and prosthetic restoration. Two randomized controlled trials and 14 observational studies were selected and analyzed for data extraction. In total, 6193 short-implants were investigated from 3848 participants. The observational period was 3.2 ± 1.7 yrs (mean ± SD). The cumulative survival rate (CSR) was 99.1% (95%CI: 98.8-99.4). The biological success rate was 98.8% (95%CI: 97.8-99.8), and the biomechanical success rate was 99.9% (95%CI: 99.4-100.0). A higher CSR was reported for rough-surfaced implants. The provision of short implant-supported prostheses in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges appears to be a successful treatment option in the short term; however, more scientific evidence is needed for the long term. PMID:22034499

  14. Silk electrogel coatings for titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Elia, Roberto; Michelson, Courtney D; Perera, Austin L; Harsono, Masly; Leisk, Gray G; Kugel, Gerard; Kaplan, David L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop biocompatible, biodegradable dental implant coatings capable of withstanding the mechanical stresses imparted during implant placement. Two techniques were developed to deposit uniform silk fibroin protein coatings onto dental implants. Two novel coating techniques were implemented to coat titanium shims, studs, and implants. One technique involved electrodeposition of the silk directly onto the titanium substrates. The second technique consisted of melting electrogels and dispensing the melted gels onto the titanium to form the coatings. Both techniques were tested for coating reproducibility using a stylus profilometer and a dial thickness gauge. The mechanical strength of adhered titanium studs was assessed using a universal mechanical testing machine. Uniform, controllable coatings were obtained from both the electrodeposition and melted electrogel coating techniques, tunable from 35 to 1654 µm thick under the conditions studied, and able to withstand delamination during implantation into implant socket mimics. Mechanical testing revealed that the adhesive strength of electrogel coatings, 0.369 ± 0.09 MPa, rivaled other biologically derived coating systems such as collagen, hydroxyapatite, and chitosan (0.07-4.83 MPa). These novel silk-based techniques offer a unique approach to the deposition of safe, simple, mechanically robust, biocompatible, and degradable implant coatings. PMID:25425563

  15. Foreign body ingestion during dental implant procedures.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thiago de Santana; Antunes, Antonio Azoubel; Vajgel, André; Cavalcanti, Thames Bruno Barbosa; Nogueira, Luiz Ricardo Gomes de Caldas; Laureano Filho, José Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Two cases of swallowing of foreign material related to dental implants during dental practice are described. A conservative approach by clinical-radiographic follow-up was performed in both cases; however, one of the patients required colonoscopy under general anesthesia for the removal of the impacted foreign body from the intestinal region. These complications not only have associated economic cost but also carry the risk of malpractice litigation against the professional; thus, the surgeon was responsible for all the costs of hospital and surgery management of this case. Details of the clinical signs, radiographic examinations, type of treatment, and follow-up are presented. PMID:22446442

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Dental Implants: A Utility Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A measure of dental patients' values and preferences was used to assess attitudes of 92 edentulous patients receiving implant and other dental reconstructive therapies. The implant group tended to be younger and better educated and to rate implant reconstruction as more desirable than the nonimplant denture group. (DB)

  17. Osseointegrated dental implants produced via microwave processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutty, Muralithran G.

    This research is a comprehensive effort to develop osseointegrated dental implants via microwave processing. A net-shape microwave sintering procedure was employed to fabricate dental implants. Commercial pure titanium powders (-100, -200 and -325 mesh sizes) were used in this work. This process eliminates the need for machining of implants and prevents contamination. The idea was to take advantage of the peculiar way microwave couple with metallic powders, i.e. generating heat in the interior of the sample and dissipating it away through the surface. The desired features for an implant, a dense core with surface pores, is not possible via conventional sintering. Coating with hydroxyapatite via electrodeposition and chemical combustion vapor deposition was also attempted to further enhance the bioactivity of this layer. Surface roughness and area were measured using a non-contact surface profilometer to further describe the unique surface. In-vitro studies, conducted using osteoblast cells extracted from neonatal rat calvarial, showed improved cell growth on all the uncoated porous samples. However, the highest cell growth was observed on the -200 mesh size samples. The higher surface area of the -200 mesh samples is attributed to this observation. This work was able to identify the processing parameters for titanium in microwave and establishes the importance of surface area as a key parameter for cell growth on porous surfaces as compared to surface roughness.

  18. Medicolegal implications of dental implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Despite the recent economic downturn, the dental implant market continues to grow year on year. Many more dentists are involved in the placement restoration of dental implants and dental implants are being placed in an extended range of clinical scenarios. Dental implant therapy remains a high risk area for the inexperienced interns of civil negligence claims and General Dental Council hearings. Risk can be mitigated by:• Ensuring appropriate indemnity • Complying with the published requirements for training • Maintaining detailed and extensive clinical records • Completing the initial phases of history, examination and investigations robustly • Recording a diagnosis • Providing a bespoke written treatment plan that includes details of the need for treatment, the treatment options (the risks and benefits), the phases of treatment, the costs of treatment,the expected normal sequelae of surgery, the risks and complications of implant therapy and the requirement for future maintenance. The provision of treatment that is different in nature or extent to that agreed can result in a breach of contract as well as a claim for negligence • Engaging sufficiently with the patient to obtain consent • Providing written postoperative instructions detailing emergency arrangements, patients who are anxious or in pain may not retain oral information • Making a frank disclosure of complication or collateral damage • Considering referral at an early stage particularly if reparative surgery is required. The stress of complications or failure may impair a dentist's normally sound judgement; there may be financial pressure, or concerns regarding reputation. In some cases, dentists avoid making a frank disclosure, feel obliged to undertake complicated reparative surgery, fail to make a timely referral, fail to respond appropriately to patient's concerns and in some cases attempt to alter the clinical records.However, in the best of hands and without negligence

  19. Dental devices; reclassification of root-form endosseous dental implants and endosseous dental implant abutments. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2004-05-12

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying root-form endosseous dental implants and endosseous dental implant abutments from class III to class II (special controls). Root-form endosseous dental implants are intended to be surgically placed in the bone of the upper or lower jaw arches to provide support for prosthetic devices, such as artificial teeth, in order to restore the patient's chewing function. Endosseous dental implant abutments are separate components that are attached to the dental implant and intended to aid in prosthetic rehabilitation. FDA is reclassifying these devices on its own initiative on the basis of new information. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for these devices. FDA is taking this action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997, and the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act of 2002. PMID:15141676

  20. Segmental osteotomy for mobilization of dental implant

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Benjamin; Marín, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to evaluate a surgical technique for mobilization of mal posed dental implant in anterior area. Methods A 38-year-old patient consulted our unit for esthetic dissatisfaction with the implant treatment of a central incisor. An implant was observed in 11 and 21, where 11 was 3 mm above the ideal limit, with excessive vestibular angulation. The choice was made to perform a segmental osteotomy and mobilize the bone block and the implant down and forward; a bone block extracted from the mandibular ramus was installed between the implant block and the bed to stabilize the segment. Results After 4 months, a conventional fixed prosthesis was created and the esthetic result achieved was close to what the patient wanted, with no need for further surgery. The surgical condition was stabilized and maintained for the long-time and no complications how necrosis, infection or bone defects was present. Conclusions It was concluded that the procedure is efficient, and the biological arguments in favor of the procedure are discussed. PMID:24236247

  1. Nondestructive methods to assess dental implant stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Tabrizi, Aydin; Berhanu, Bruk; Ochs, Mark W.

    2012-04-01

    The robustness and reliability of two nondestructive evaluation methods to assess dental prostheses stability is presented. The study aims at addressing an increasing need in the biomedical area where robust, reliable, and noninvasive methods to assess the bone-interface of dental and orthopedic implants are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. The methods are based on the electromechanical impedance method and on the propagation of solitary waves. Nobel Biocare® 4.3 x 13 mm implants were entrenched inside bovine rib bones that were immersed inside Normal Saline for 24 hours before test in order to avoid dehydration and simulating physiologic osmolarity of the corticocancellous bone and plasma. Afterwards the bones were immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation, inversely simulating a bone-healing process. This process was monitored by bonding a Piezoceramic Transducer (PZT) to the abutment and measuring the electrical admittance of the PZT over time. On the other hand the bones calcium loss was calculated after immersing in acid by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy over time for comparison. Moreover a novel transducer based on the generation and detection of highly nonlinear solitary waves was used to assess the stiffness of the abutment-implant bone. In these experiments it was found that the PZT's conductance and some of the solitary waves parameters are sensitive to the degradation of the bones and was correlated to the bone calcium loss over time.

  2. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...) Classification. (1) Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II if it is a root-form... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Root-Form Endosseous Dental Implants and Endosseous...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...) Classification. (1) Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II if it is a root-form... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Root-Form Endosseous Dental Implants and Endosseous...

  4. Titanium hypersensitivity. A hidden threat for dental implant patients?

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Bural, Canan; Geckili, Onur

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used for dental prosthetic devices because of their superior mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, the incidence of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy is still unknown and the discussion about its existence is ongoing. Unexplained implant failures have also forced dental clinicians to investigate the possibility of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy. This review focuses on the potential of dental implant-related titanium hypersensitivity or allergic reactions. It includes an examination of the existing scientific literature and current knowledge. Evidence-based data and studies related to titanium hypersensitivity in dental implant patients are also discussed. PMID:24027897

  5. Application of uniform design to improve dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of uniform experimental design to improve dental implant systems subjected to dynamic loads. The dynamic micromotion of the Zimmer dental implant system is calculated and illustrated by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. Endogenous and exogenous factors influence the success rate of dental implant systems. Endogenous factors include: bone density, cortical bone thickness and osseointegration. Exogenous factors include: thread pitch, thread depth, diameter of implant neck and body size. A dental implant system with a crest module was selected to simulate micromotion distribution and stress behavior under dynamic loads using conventional and proposed methods. Finally, the design which caused minimum micromotion was chosen as the optimal design model. The micromotion of the improved model is 36.42 μm, with an improvement is 15.34% as compared to the original model. PMID:26406045

  6. The tri-spade drill for endosseous dental implant installation.

    PubMed

    Kay, J F; Gilman, L; May, T C

    1991-01-01

    Many aspects of endosseous dental implant practice have been addressed over the past several decades. While most of this attention has centered on the dental implant body itself and, most recently, on various aspects of prosthetic restoration, the installation armamentarium for site preparation and implant placement has been neglected. Drills, in particular, have received minimal attention, with most drills currently used for implant placement being identical, or nearly identical, to century-old wood or metal cutting instruments. The tri-spade drill design represents an innovation that has evolved from analysis of currently used implant drills, drill mechanics, and the mechanical and physical properties of bone, in consideration of the clinical realities of contemporary endosseous implant placement. The tri-spade drill design, which features three cutting edges, is much more stable in the hands of the practicing clinician. It reduces crestal chatter upon entry into the bone site (a stable drilling situation), resulting in a more perfectly prepared final hole for placement of a cylindrical root-form dental implant. The drill tip angle is designed specifically for use with bone; the reaming action associated with the sharpened cutting edges adjacent to the large side flutes also allows for efficient debris removal. The tri-spade drill design represents an incremental increase in the dental implant armamentarium and efficacy for the installation of endosseous cylindrical dental implants. PMID:1813652

  7. [Adjusting gingival tissues morphology after dental implantation with fibrin use].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Kolesnikov, I S; Sheplev, B V; Ragimova, T M; Kovyntsev, A N; Kovyntsev, D N; Shevela, A I

    2009-01-01

    In gingival tissues of 62 patients after dental implantation of traditional type and with the use of thrombocyte rich fibrin preparation (TRFP) microcirculation and leucocytal infiltration were studied. It was disclosed that in all terms after titanium screw dental implant setting lymphostasis and leucocytal infiltration were seen as signs of active inflammatory process in gingival tissues. 3 months later after implants setting with the use of TRFP the lymphatic vessels status was normalized, the degree of leucocytal infiltration was reduced; when implantation was made without use of fibrin technologies in gingival tissues more leucocytes were found and lymphatic bed components were remained dilated. Besides fibrin preparation use in the process of dental implantation promoted quicker and stronger implant fixation, but granulomatous inflammatory process could develop and amount of eosinophils in gingival tissues could also increased. PMID:19365340

  8. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, G.; Rodil, S. E.; Arzate, H.; Muhl, S.; Olaya, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb2O5 (a-Nb2O5), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  9. Primary oral squamous cell carcinoma arising around dental osseointegrated implants mimicking peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Eguia del Valle, Asier; Martínez-Conde Llamosas, Rafael; López Vicente, José; Uribarri Etxebarria, Agurne; Aguirre Urizar, José Manuel

    2008-08-01

    Prosthodontic rehabilitation using dental implants has become a common practice in dentistry at the present time. The number of complications related to dental osseointegrated implants has increased according to the generalization of its use along the last decade. Among the most common of these complications are chronic inflammatory conditions affecting both hard and soft tissues around dental implants. Although severe complications are uncommon, in recent years several cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma adjacent to dental implants have been published. In this paper we present a new unusual case of primary oral squamous cell carcinoma arising around a dental fixed prosthesis over osseointegrated implants in a 76 male patient with no previous history of malignance and no risk factors related to oral cancer. PMID:18667981

  10. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems. PMID:25699642

  11. Effects of selected factors on the osseointegration of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Koszuta, Piotr; Grafka, Agnieszka; Koszuta, Agnieszka; Łopucki, Maciej; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osseointegration of dental implants with the maxillary and/or mandibular bone is the basis for implant prosthetic treatment. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of the patients’ gender, age, and in the case of women, their menopausal status (before menopause/after menopause/during hormone replacement therapy) on the osseointegration of dental implants. Material and methods The study evaluated the bone loss after implant loading and the success rate of the procedure in 71 women and 30 men. In the postmenopausal group, 20 (28.1%) women were receiving hormone replacement therapy. The implants used in the treatment of the studied patients were the two-phase dental implants. The extent of bone loss was estimated by comparing the post-implantation radiographs and the post-loading ones. Results The implantation procedure was entirely successful in 81 patients (80.2%). The patients’ age, gender and menopausal status did not significantly affect the implantation procedure success rate or bone loss (p > 0.05). A correlation between bone loss and hormone replacement therapy (p = 0.002) was found. Conclusions The hormone replacement therapy contributes to a greater peri-implant bone loss. The patients receiving hormone replacement therapy who consider replacement of missing teeth with implants should be informed about a greater risk of osseointegration failure, which may affect the success of implant therapy. PMID:26528107

  12. Posterior partially edentulous jaws, planning a rehabilitation with dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Emily V F; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Goiato, Marcelo C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To discuss important characteristics of the use of dental implants in posterior quadrants and the rehabilitation planning. METHODS: An electronic search of English articles was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1990 up to the period of March 2014. The key terms were dental implants and posterior jaws, dental implants/treatment planning and posterior maxilla, and dental implants/treatment planning and posterior mandible. No exclusion criteria were used for the initial search. Clinical trials, randomized and non randomized studies, classical and comparative studies, multicenter studies, in vitro and in vivo studies, case reports, longitudinal studies and reviews of the literature were included in this review. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria of treatment planning of dental implants in posterior jaw and were read in their entirety. The selected articles were categorized with respect to their context on space for restoration, anatomic considerations (bone quantity and density), radiographic techniques, implant selection (number, position, diameter and surface), tilted and pterygoid implants, short implants, occlusal considerations, and success rates of implants placed in the posterior region. The results derived from the review process were described under several different topic headings to give readers a clear overview of the literature. In general, it was observed that the use of dental implants in posterior region requires a careful treatment plan. It is important that the practitioner has knowledge about the theme to evaluate the treatment parameters. CONCLUSION: The use of implants to restore the posterior arch presents many challenges and requires a detailed treatment planning. PMID:25610852

  13. Ailing and failing endosseous dental implants: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Eric T; Covington, Lemuel L; Bishop, Barry G; Breault, Lawrence G

    2003-05-15

    Although the overall success rate of implant dentistry is very high, dental implants occasionally fail. It is essential for the clinician to recognize unhealthy implants and to determine whether they are ailing, failing, or failed prior to beginning any salvage efforts. Ailing and failing implants are amenable to therapy. Implants diagnosed as failed should be removed. This review provides the reader with information on non-surgical and surgical therapies available for managing ailing and failing implants. Undoubtedly, the best steps to avoid encountering ailing or failing implants involve proper case selection, excellent surgical technique, placing an adequate restoration on the implant, educating the implant patient to maintain meticulous oral hygiene, and evaluating the implant both clinically and radiographically at frequent recall visits. PMID:12761588

  14. The feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in edentulous jaws

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Immediate loading of dental implants has been proved to be feasible in partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this retrospective investigation was to assess the feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in fully edentulous jaws. Methods A total of 24 patients aged between 53 and 89 years received a total of 154 implants in their edentulous maxillae or mandibles. Among the implants, 45 were set in fresh extracted sockets and 109 in consolidated alveolar bones. The implants were provisionally managed with chair-side made provisional resin bridges and exposed to immediate loading. Implants were followed up for 1–8 years, including radiographic imaging. Marginal bone levels were evaluated based on radiographic imaging. Results A total of 148 out of the 154 implants survived over the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years, giving a survival rate of 96%. The time or region of the implantation, the pre-implant augmentation, and the length and diameter of the implants had no statistically significant influence on the survival or the success rate. The marginal bone level remained stable with only minimal loss of 0.3 mm after 60 months of loading. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, immediate loading is feasible for dental implants in edentulous jaws. PMID:27588213

  15. Antimicrobial dental implant functionalization strategies -A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Grischke, Jasmin; Eberhard, Jörg; Stiesch, Meike

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation on dental implant surfaces is a serious threat. Up to 50% of all implants show signs of irreversible tissue destruction. The aim of the present systematic review was to summarize the state of the art of strategies to functionalize antimicrobial dental implant surfaces. We searched the following electronic database: SCOPUS, MEDLINE and GOOGLE SCHOLAR and identified relevant controlled trials that evaluated the efficiency of new biomaterial strategies to modify dental implant surfaces, in such a way that biofilm formation was inhibited. The search yielded 2,990 potentially relevant publications. A total of 142 publications met the inclusion criteria. Analysis found that it may be concluded that silver-implanted surfaces, drug-loaded surfaces, surfaces with antimicrobial peptides, bioactive and biopassive polymer coatings as well as nanoscale or UV-activatable surfaces enhance antimicrobial activity compared to commercial pure titanium. PMID:27477219

  16. Imaging of dental implant osseointegration using optical coherent tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Reisen, P.

    2009-02-01

    Investigation of initial implant stability with different dental implant designs is an important task to obtain good quality dental implants. Failure of a dental implant is often related to failure to osseointegrate correctly. Optical Coherent Tomography is a competitive non-invasive method of osseointegration investigation. FD-OCT with Swept Source was used to obtain 3-D image of the peri-implant tissue (soft and hard) in the case of mandible fixed screw. 1350 nm centered laser source give better images than 850 nm laser source for hard tissue imaging. Present work suggests that Optical Coherent Tomography is a proper technique to obtain the image of the contact tissue-metal screw. OCT images are useful to evaluate optical properties of bone tissues.

  17. Implant Education Programs in North American Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbree, Nancy S.; Chapman, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 52 dental schools found that dental implant techniques were taught in 34 pre- and 34 postdoctoral curricula, involving mostly prosthodontics and oral surgery departments, with periodontology departments lagging behind. Most predoctoral programs did not have research involvement. Cooperation among specialties is recommended over implant…

  18. A Brief Historical Perspective on Dental Implants, Their Surface Coatings and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Celeste M

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights a brief, chronological sequence of the history of dental implants. This historical perspective begins with ancient civilizations and spotlights predominant dentists and their contributions to implant development through time. The physical, chemical and biologic properties of various dental implant surfaces and coatings are discussed, and specific surface treatments include an overview of machined implants, etched implants, and sand-blasted implants. Dental implant coatings such as hydroxyapatite, fluoride, and statin usage are further reviewed. PMID:24894638

  19. Microbiological aspects of human mandibular subperiosteal dental implants.

    PubMed

    Rams, Thomas E; Balkin, Burton E; Roberts, Thomas W; Molzan, Arthur K

    2013-12-01

    Clinical, microbiological, and biochemical features of human mandibular subperiosteal dental implants exhibiting peri-implantitis were compared with those experiencing long-term peri-implant health. After evaluation of clinical parameters, submucosal plaque samples were obtained from permucosal implant abutment posts exhibiting probing depths ≥5 mm and bleeding on probing in subjects with peri-implantitis (n = 3) and from posts with peri-implant health in subjects with long-term subperiosteal implant health (n = 8). The microbial specimens were transported in VMGA III and plated onto enriched Brucella blood agar and Hammond's selective medium with anaerobic incubation, and onto selective TSBV with 5% CO2 incubation. Total anaerobic viable counts and selected bacterial species were identified using established phenotypic methods and criteria. In vitro resistance to doxycycline (2 μg/mL), amoxicillin (2 μg/mL), or metronidazole (4 μg/mL) was recorded per subject when bacterial pathogen growth was noted on antibiotic-supplemented isolation plates. Interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in peri-implant crevicular fluid samples from 5 study subjects. Significantly higher Plaque Index scores, higher total anaerobic viable counts, more red complex species, and lower proportions of gram-positive facultative viridans streptococci and Actinomyces species were detected on peri-implantitis-affected subperiosteal implants as compared with subperiosteal implants with long-term peri-implant health. No in vitro resistance to the 3 test antibiotic breakpoint concentrations studied was found, except a Fusobacterium nucleatum strain resistant to doxycycline at 2 μg/mL from 1 peri-implantitis subject. Subperiosteal implants with peri-implantitis tended to yield higher peri-implant crevicular fluid IL-1β levels. The level of peri-implant supramucosal plaque control and the composition of the peri-implant submucosal microbiome may be

  20. Immediate bleeding complications in dental implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Balaguer-Martínez, José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A review is made of the immediate or immediate postoperative bleeding complications in dental implants, with a view to identifying the areas of greatest bleeding risk, the causes of bleeding, the length of the implants associated with bleeding, the most frequently implicated blood vessels, and the treatments used to resolve these complications. Material and Methods: A Medline (PubMed) and Embase search was made of articles on immediate bleeding complications in dental implants published in English up until May 2014. Inclusion criteria: studies in humans subjects with severe bleeding immediately secondary to implant placement, which reported the time until the hemorrhage, the implant lenght, the possible cause of bleeding and the treatment. Exclusion criteria: patients receiving anticoagulation treatment. Results: Fifteen articles met the inclusion criteria. The area with the largest number of bleeding complications corresponded to the mandibular canine. The cause of bleeding was lingual cortical bone perforation during implant placement, with damage to the sublingual artery. The implants associated with bleeding were those measuring 15 mm in length or more. Management focused on securing the airway (with intubation or tracheostomy if necessary), with bleeding control. Conclusions: It’s important to pay special attention when the implants are placed in the mandibular anterior zone, especially if long implants are used. The most frequently cause of bleeding was the perforation of the lingual plate. Treatment involves securing the airway, with bleeding control. Key words:Hemorrhage, complications, immediate, bleeding, dental implants. PMID:25475779

  1. Dental implant complications - extra-oral cutaneous fistula.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, R; Puthussery, F J; Flood, T; Shekhar, K

    2013-07-01

    Dental implants have shown great success in recent years. However, in certain circumstances they can suffer from complications. It usually results from a combination of infection and host inflammatory responses or a lack thereof. This report documents an extra-oral cutaneous fistula associated with an osseointegrated dentoalveolar implant. PMID:23887526

  2. Dental Implant Patients and Their Satisfaction with Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawares, Mary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study developed a profile of dental implant patients from 38 private practices to document characteristics of endosseous implant recipients of the past 10 years. Data were then analyzed using multivariate techniques to examine the relationship between these characteristics and patient-reported outcomes. Patients tended to have high incomes and…

  3. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  4. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Ebker, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  5. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  6. [Implant fracture: a complication of treatment with dental implants--review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Tagger-Green, N; Horwitz, J; Machtei, E E; Peled, M

    2002-10-01

    Dental implants are a functional and esthetic solution to partial and total edentulism. The initial success rate of this treatment modality is 90-95%. But, that treatment modality is not free of complications. One of the rare complications yet, with severe clinical results is fracture of dental implants. The current literature review presents the various causative factors that may lead to implant fracture. Implant failures may be sorted into groups by the timing of their appearance, or by the origin of failure. Fractures belong to the group of late complications, caused by a biomechanical overload. Overload may be caused by inappropriate seat of the superstructure, in-line arrangement of the implants, leverage, heavy occlusal forces (bruxing, clenching), location of the implant and the size of the implant or metal fatigue. Good clinical examinations and correct treatment plans may reduce the risk of implant fracture. PMID:12510252

  7. Electromechanical impedance method to assess dental implant stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizi, Aydin; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Ochs, Mark W.

    2012-11-01

    The stability of a dental implant is a prerequisite for supporting a load-bearing prosthesis and establishment of a functional bone-implant system. Reliable and noninvasive methods able to assess the bone interface of dental and orthopedic implants (osseointegration) are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. In this paper, we propose the electromechanical impedance method as a novel approach for the assessment of dental implant stability. Nobel Biocare® implants with a size of 4.3 mm diameter ×13 mm length were placed inside bovine bones that were then immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation. The degradation simulated the inverse process of bone healing. The implant-bone systems were monitored by bonding a piezoceramic transducer (PZT) to the implants’ abutment and measuring the admittance of the PZT over time. It was found that the PZT’s admittance and the statistical features associated with its analysis are sensitive to the degradation of the bones and can be correlated to the loss of calcium measured by means of the atomic absorption spectroscopy method. The present study shows promising results and may pave the road towards an innovative approach for the noninvasive monitoring of dental implant stability and integrity.

  8. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jemat, A.; Ghazali, M. J.; Razali, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants. PMID:26436097

  9. Cytocompatibility, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigosa, M.; Labarta, V.; Molinari, G.; Bernales, D.

    2007-11-01

    Several types of materials are frequently used for dental prostheses in dental medicine. Different treatments with titanium are the most used. The aim of the present study was to analyze by means of cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility techniques the capacity of dental implants to integrate to the bone tissue. Cultures of UMR 106 cell line derived from an osteosarcoma were used for bioassays mainly because they show many of the properties of osteoblasts. Dental implant samples provided by B&W company were compared with others of recognized trademarks. The first ones contain ASTM titanium (8348 GR2) with acid printing. Cytotoxicity was analyzed by means of lysosome activity, using the neutral red technique and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Cell variability was determined by means of the acridine ethidium-orange bromide technique. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni and Duncan post-ANOVA tests were used for the statistical analysis. The assays did not show significant differences among the dental implants analyzed. Our findings show that the dental prostheses studied present high biocompatibility, quantified by the bioassays performed. The techniques employed revealed that they can be a useful tool for the analysis of other materials for dental medicine use.

  10. Electrochemical Disinfection of Dental Implants – a Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, Dirk; Zehnder, Matthias; Stark, Wendelin J.; Imfeld, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis has gained significant clinical attention in recent years. This disease is an inflammatory reaction to microorganisms around dental implants. Due to the limited accessibility, non-invasive antimicrobial strategies are of high interest. An unexpected approach to implant disinfection may evolve from electrolysis. Given the electrical conductivity of titanium implants, alkalinity or active oxidants can be generated in body fluids. We investigated the use of dental titanium implants as electrodes for the local generation of disinfectants. Our hypothesis was that electrolysis can reduce viable counts of adhering bacteria, and that this reduction should be greater if active oxidative species are generated. Methodology/Principal Findings As model systems, dental implants, covered with a mono-species biofilm of Escherichia coli C43, were placed in photographic gelatin prepared with physiological saline. Implants were treated by a continuous current of 0 - 10 mA for 15 minutes. The reduction of viable counts was investigated on cathodes and anodes. In separate experiments, the local change in pH was visualized using color indicators embedded in the gelatin. Oxidative species were qualitatively detected by potassium iodide-starch paper. The in situ generated alkaline environment around cathodic implants caused a reduction of up to 2 orders of magnitude in viable E. coli counts. On anodic implants, in contrast to cathodic counterparts, oxidative species were detected. Here, a current of merely 7.5 mA caused complete kill of the bacteria. Conclusions/Significance This laboratory study shows that electrochemical treatment may provide access to a new way to decontaminate dental implants in situ. PMID:21264247

  11. Heat generated during seating of dental implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2014-04-01

    Frictional heat can be generated during seating of dental implants into a drill-prepared osteotomy. This in vitro study tested the heat generated by implant seating in dense bovine mandible ramus. A thermocouple was placed approximately 0.5 mm from the rim of the osteotomy during seating of each dental implant. Four diameters of implants were tested. The average temperature increases were 0.075°C for the 5.7-mm-diameter implant, 0.97°C for the 4.7-mm-diameter implant, 1.4°C for the 3.7-mm-diameter implant, and 8.6°C for the 2.5-mm-diameter implant. The results showed that heat was indeed generated and a small temperature rise occurred, apparently by the friction of the implant surface against the fresh-cut bone surface. Bone is a poor thermal conductor. The titanium of the implant and the steel of the handpiece are much better heat conductors. Titanium may be 70 times more heat conductive than bone. The larger diameter and displacement implant may act as a heat sink to draw away any heat produced from the friction of seating the implant at the bone-implant interface. The peak temperature duration was momentary, and not measured, but this was approximately less than 1 second. Except for the 2.5-mm-diameter implants, the temperature rises and durations were found to be below those previously deemed to be detrimental, so no clinically significant osseous damage would be expected during dental implant fixture seating of standard and large-diameter-sized implants. A 2.5-mm implant may generate detrimental heat during seating in nonvital bone, but this may be clinically insignificant in vital bone. The surface area and thermal conductivity are important factors in removing generated heat transfer at the bone-implant interface. The F value as determined by analysis of variance was 69.22, and the P value was less than .0001, demonstrating significant differences between the groups considered as a whole. PMID:24400840

  12. Bisphosphonate treatment and dental implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de-Freitas, Nayara-Ribeiro; de-Moura, Marcos-Boaventura; Veloso-Guedes, Cizelene-do-Carmo-Faleiros; Simamoto-Júnior, Paulo-César; de-Magalhães, Denildo

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze articles that studied patients submitted to diphosphonates therapy and who received dental implants before, during or after bisphosphonate (BP) treatment, compared to healthy patients, analyzing the increase of failure and loss of implants or bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) incidence. Material and Methods The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement was used in this study. The clinical question in “PICO” format was: In patients under bisphosphonate therapy, do dental implants placement, compared to healthy patients, increase the failure and loss of implants or bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw incidence? PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for articles published up until April 15, 2015 using a combination of MeSH terms and their Entry terms. Results The search resulted in 375 articles. After selection according to the eligibility criteria, 15 studies fulfilled were included (eight retrospective, one prospective and six case series), with a total of 1339 patients analyzed, 3748 implants placed, 152 loss of implants and 78 cases of BRONJ. Conclusions Due to the lack of randomized clinical trials looking at this theme, further studies with longer follow-up are needed to elucidate the remaining questions. Thus, it is wise to be careful when planning dental implant surgery in patients undergoing bisphosphonate therapy because of the risk of developing BRONJ as well as occurring failure of implant. Moreover, complete systemic condition of the patient must be also taking into considering when such procedures are performed. Key words:Bisphosphonates, diphosphonates, dental implants, osteonecrosis. PMID:27475681

  13. Dental implants inserted in native bone: Cases series analyses

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Riccardo; Viscioni, Alessandro; Dattola, Frencesco; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concept of osseointegration, i.e., the direct anchorage of endosseous implants made of commercially pure or titanium alloy to the bone caused a breakthrough in oral rehabilitation. The identification of factors for long-term survival and success rate are the main goal of the recent literature. Several variables can influence the final result, and in general they are grouped in surgery-, host-, implant-, and occlusion-related factors. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis on a large series of dental implants was performed to detect those variables influencing the clinical outcome. In the period between January 2007 and December 2009, 157 patients were operated. A total of 429 implants were inserted. Dental implants are reliable devices to be used in oral rehabilitation. Results: Globally, very few implants were lost at the end of the follow-up period. Slight but significant differences existed among different implants types with regard to peri-implant bone resorption. Conclusion: A better clinical outcome was revealed for Sweden and Martina global implant. PMID:23814579

  14. Dental implants and squamous cell carcinoma in the at risk patient--report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kwok, J; Eyeson, J; Thompson, I; McGurk, M

    2008-11-22

    Osseointegrated dental implants are increasingly used in the rehabilitation of the dental patient. They have a particular role in dental rehabilitation following treatment for oral cancer. Data is presented that suggests that, in the at risk patient, squamous cell carcinoma may develop in association with dental implants. PMID:19023308

  15. Dental implants with versus without peri-implant bone defects treated with guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique is highly successful for the treatment of peri-implant bone defects. The aim was to determine whether or not implants associated with GBR due to peri-implant defects show the same survival and success rates as implants placed in native bone without defects. Material and Methods Patients with a minimum of two submerged dental implants: one suffering a dehiscence or fenestration defect during placement and undergoing simultaneous guided bone regeneration (test group), versus the other entirely surrounded by bone (control group) were treated and monitored annually for three years. Complications with the healing procedure, implant survival, implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests setting an alpha value of 0.05. Results Seventy-two patients and 326 implants were included (142 test, 184 control). One hundred and twenty-five dehiscences (average height 1.92±1.11) and 18 fenestrations (average height 3.34±2.16) were treated. At 3 years post-loading, implant survival rates were 95.7% (test) and 97.3% (control) and implant success rates were 93.6% and 96.2%, respectively. Mean marginal bone loss was 0.54 (SD 0.26 mm) for the test group and 0.43 (SD 0.22 mm) for the control group. No statistically significant differences between both groups were found. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, implants with peri-implant defects treated with guided bone regeneration exhibited similar survival and success rates and peri-implant marginal bone loss to implants without those defects. Large-scale randomized controlled studies with longer follow-ups involving the assessment of esthetic parameters and hard and soft peri-implant tissue stability are needed. Key words:Guided bone regeneration, peri-implant defects, dental implants, marginal bone level, success rate, survival rate. PMID:26330931

  16. Dental Implants Installed in Irradiated Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Chambrone, L.; Mandia, J.; Shibli, J.A.; Romito, G.A.; Abrahao, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the survival rate of titanium implants placed in irradiated jaws. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched for studies assessing implants that had been placed in nongrafted sites of irradiated patients. Random effects meta-analyses assessed implant loss in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients and in irradiated patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Of 1,051 potentially eligible publications, 15 were included. A total of 10,150 implants were assessed in the included studies, and of these, 1,689 (14.3%) had been placed in irradiated jaws. The mean survival rate in the studies ranged from 46.3% to 98.0%. The pooled estimates indicated a significant increase in the risk of implant failure in irradiated patients (risk ratio: 2.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.86, 4.05; p < .00001) and in maxillary sites (risk ratio: 5.96; 95% confidence interval: 2.71, 13.12; p < .00001). Conversely, HBO therapy did not reduce the risk of implant failure (risk ratio: 1.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 8.82; p = .80). Radiotherapy was linked to higher implant failure in the maxilla, and HBO therapy did not improve implant survival. Most included publications reported data on machined implants, and only 3 studies on HBO therapy were included. Overall, implant therapy appears to be a viable treatment option for reestablishing adequate occlusion and masticatory conditions in irradiated patients. PMID:24158336

  17. Dental Implant Fractures – Aetiology, Treatment and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Gennari Filho, Humberto; Villa, Luiz Marcelo Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the etiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment options of dental implants fractures through a literature review and to relate a clinical report. Methods: A literature review was performed using the Medline database and this paper describes a case demonstrating the management of implant fracture. Twenty two articles were selected in the present literature review. Results: Nowadays the use of dental implants to rehabilitate completely and partially edentulous patients became the best treatment option; however, this treatment is suitable to failure. The fracture of implant body is a possible complication. The fracture of implant body is a late complication and is related to the failure in implant design or material, non-passive fitting of the prosthetic crown and overloading. Clinically, prosthesis instability and spontaneous bleeding are observed. Three options of treatment have been indicated: complete removal of implant fragment, maintenance of implant fragment, and surface preparation of the fragment with insertion of a new abutment. Conclusion: The literature indicates the complete removal of the fragment as the best treatment option. PMID:24783165

  18. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants' failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants' mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants' mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance. PMID:26583117

  19. Recurrent Pyogenic Granuloma Around Dental Implants: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gefrerer, Lidia; Popowski, Wojciech; Perek, Jan Nikodem; Wojtowicz, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a rare case of a bilateral recurring pyogenic granuloma around dental implants supported by autogenic bone graft. A 55-year-old woman was treated with vertical bone augmentation and dental implants on both sides in the mandible. The patient was followed up for 2 years. Growing granuloma was observed 3 weeks after implants were loaded with splinted porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns. The granulomatous tissue was removed and samples were evaluated histologically and microbiologically with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The pathologic lesion recurred four times on one side and three times on the other side and was removed after each recurrence. Finally, the patient decided to have the implants removed due to the aggressive, permanent, and relapsing nature of the proliferative lesions associated with exposed implant threads. After implant removal, no hyperplasia was seen. Microbiologic contamination was excluded as a cause of this recurring granuloma, and it was presumed that the lesion could have been associated with an insufficient zone of attached gingiva around the implants and exposure of implant threads. However, the etiology of this pyogenic granuloma remains unknown. Due to the high recurrence rate of reactive hyperplastic lesions, a long-term follow-up is necessary. PMID:27333016

  20. Dental student perceptions of predoctoral implant education and plans for providing implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Kaste, Linda M; Lee, Damian J; Harlow, Rand F; Knoernschild, Kent L; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify dental students' perceptions of pre-patient care laboratory exercises (PCLEs) and clinical experiences that influence their future plans for providing implant care. One of two questionnaires was administered to dental student classes at one dental school (D2: Survey 1; D3 and D4: Survey 2). Future plans as graduates to provide implant diagnosis and treatment planning (DxTP), restoration of single-tooth implants (STIs), and implant-retained overdentures (IODs) were cross-sectionally assessed along with potential influences such as PCLE, clinical experiences, gender, and class. The majority of students planned to provide implant services after graduation (DxTP 68.9 percent; STI 61.2 percent; IOD 62.1 percent). Bivariately, males reflected more preparedness from PCLEs than females (p=.002) and the D2 students more than D3 and D4 students (p<.001). Multivariate models revealed the perceived preparedness from PCLEs generally had the strongest association with future plans for performing implant therapy. However, this varied by gender and class. These findings indicate that PCLEs are important for their influence on students' future plans to provide implant therapy. However, further studies are needed to validate actual PCLEs and clinical implant practices (both longitudinally and for other schools) and to determine educational interventions to optimize the provision of implant care. PMID:21642520

  1. Allergy related to dental implant and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, TP

    2013-01-01

    The oral cavity provides an ideal and unique environment for study of biological processes involving metallic dental aids. Dental materials within the mouth interact continually with physiological fluids. Oral tissues are exposed to a veritable bombardment of both chemical and physical stimuli as well as the metabolism of many species of bacteria; yet, for the most part, oral tissues remain healthy. The pH of saliva varies from 5.2 to 7.8. Teeth, restorations, or any prosthesis including dental implants in the oral cavity have to function in one of the most inhospitable environments in the human body. They are subject to larger temperature and pH variations than most other parts of the body. Corrosion, the graded degradation of materials by electrochemical attack, is of concern particularly when dental implants are placed in the hostile electrolytic environment provided by the human mouth. Allergic reactions may occur from the presence of ions produced from the corrosion of implants. The present article describes various manifestations of allergic reactions due to implant material in the oral cavity. PMID:23990733

  2. CO2 laser surface treatment of failed dental implants for re-implantation: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Kasraei, Shahin; Torkzaban, Parviz; Shams, Bahar; Hosseinipanah, Seyed Mohammad; Farhadian, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the success rate of failed implants re-implanted after surface treatment with CO2 laser. Despite the widespread use of dental implants, there are many incidents of failures. It is believed that lasers can be applied to decontaminate the implant surface without damaging the implant. Ten dental implants that had failed for various reasons other than fracture or surface abrasion were subjected to CO2 laser surface treatment and randomly placed in the maxillae of dogs. Three failed implants were also placed as the negative controls after irrigation with saline solution without laser surface treatment. The stability of the implants was evaluated by the use of the Periotest values (PTVs) on the first day after surgery and at 1, 3, and 6 months post-operatively. The mean PTVs of treated implants increased at the first month interval, indicating a decrease in implant stability due to inflammation followed by healing of the tissue. At 3 and 6 months, the mean PTVs decreased compared to the 1-month interval (P < 0.05), indicating improved implant stability. The mean PTVs increased in the negative control group compared to baseline (P < 0.05). Independent t-test showed that the mean PTVs of treated implants were significantly lower than control group at 3 and 6 months after implant placement (P < 0.05). Based on the PTVs, re-implantation of failed implants in Jack Russell Terrier dogs after CO2 laser surface debridement is associated with a high success rate in terms of implant stability. PMID:27126410

  3. XPS, AES and SEM analysis of recent dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung-Soo; Sul, Young-Taeg; Oh, Se-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2009-07-01

    Today, surface chemistry modifications of titanium implants have become a development strategy for dental implants. The present study investigated the chemistry and morphology of commercially available dental implants (Nobel biocare TiUnite, Astra AB OsseoSpeed, 3i Osseotite, ITI-SLA). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and auger electron spectroscopy were employed for the analysis of surface chemistry. The morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The present study demonstrated the major differences of surface properties, mainly dependent on the surface treatment used. The blasting and acid etching technique for the OsseoSpeed, Osseotite and SLA surfaces generally showed mainly TiO(2), but a varying surface morphology. In contrast, the electrochemical oxidation process for TiUnite implants not only produces microporous surface (pore size: 0.5-3.0microm), but also changes surface chemistry due to incorporation of anions of the used electrolyte. As a result, TiUnite implants contain more than 7at.% of P in oxide layer and higher amounts of hydroxides compared to the other implants in XPS analysis. F in OsseoSpeed implants was detected at 0.3% before as well as after sputter cleaning. PMID:19261554

  4. Mechanical assessment of grit blasting surface treatments of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of surface preparation treatments of dental implants on their potential (mechanical) fatigue failure, with emphasis on grit-blasting. The investigation includes limited fatigue testing of implants, showing the relationship between fatigue life and surface damage condition. Those observations are corroborated by a detailed failure analysis of retrieved fracture dental implants. In both cases, the negative effect of embedded alumina particles related to the grit-blasting process is identified. The study also comprises a numerical simulation part of the grit blasting process that reveals, for a given implant material and particle size, the existence of a velocity threshold, below which the rough surface is obtained without damage, and beyond which the creation of significant surface damage will severely reduce the fatigue life, thus increasing fracture probability. The main outcome of this work is that the overall performance of dental implants comprises, in addition to the biological considerations, mechanical reliability aspects. Fatigue fracture is a central issue, and this study shows that uncontrolled surface roughening grit-blasting treatments can induce significant surface damage which accelerate fatigue fracture under certain conditions, even if those treatments are beneficial to the osseointegration process. PMID:25173238

  5. Pre-operative drilling simulation method for dental implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Arataki, Tomohiko; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Ito, Taichi; Miyashita, Yuko; Shimamura, Ichiro; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2007-02-01

    The position, depth and direction of implant placement are often planned based on evaluation of radiographs and study casts. Insertion planned in such a manner may not be adequate for precise and safe surgery in some cases due to inadequate working clearance in the oral cavity. In order to obtain high initial stability and ensure osseointegration at the implant-bone interface, careful and precise drilling must be performed at the implant placement site. Therefore, we propose the necessity of evaluating the operability of implant treatment-devices prior to surgery. The amount of handling space needed during implant placement surgery was determined. The results showed that for implants with a length of 7-18 mm, a vertical distance of as much as 50-60 mm was required, depending on the implant platform. These results suggest the necessity of pre-operative drilling simulation in each individual. Handling space was measured with angled heads and probes fabricated on a trial basis for pre-surgical drilling simulation in the oral cavity. We believe that these instruments may be clinically useful in estimating the amount of handling space required prior to surgery and ensuring precise implant placement. Evaluation of the intra-oral environment for handling of treatment devices should be included in the pre-surgical intra-oral evaluation of dental implant cases to avoid changes in treatment planning due to intra-oral interference during the course of surgery. PMID:17721064

  6. Fatigue failure of dental implants in simulated intraoral media.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D

    2016-09-01

    Metallic dental implants are exposed to various intraoral environments and repetitive loads during service. Relatively few studies have systematically addressed the potential influence of the environment on the mechanical integrity of the implants, which is therefore the subject of this study. Four media (groups) were selected for room temperature testing, namely dry air, saliva substitute, same with 250ppm of fluoride, and saline solution (0.9%). Monolithic Ti-6Al-4V implants were loaded until fracture, using random spectrum loading. The study reveals that the only aggressive medium of all is the saline solution, as it shortens significantly the spectrum fatigue life of the implants. The quantitative scanning electron fractographic analysis indicates that all the tested implants grew fatigue cracks of similar lengths prior to catastrophic fracture. However, the average crack growth rate in the saline medium was found to largely exceed that in other media, suggesting a decreased fracture toughness. The notion of a characteristic timescale for environmental degradation was proposed to explain the results of our spectrum tests that blend randomly low and high cycle fatigue. Random spectrum fatigue testing is powerful technique to assess and compare the mechanical performance of dental implants for various designs and/or environments. PMID:27353062

  7. Composite titanium dental implant fabricated by electro-discharge compaction.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Dominici, J T; Lifland, M I; Okazaki, K

    1997-01-01

    An electro-discharge compaction (EDC) fabrication window was established for producing commercially pure porous titanium dental implants of 4 mm diameter and 7 mm length with a solid titanium cap. The optimum input energy was in the range of 0.58-0.87 kJ g-1 for a powder column of 0.500 g. Input energy greater than 0.58 kJ g-1 resulted in an implant torque strength exceeding 30 N-cm (the retaining screw tightening torque), while input energy greater than 0.72 kJ g-1 exceeded 46.7 N-cm torque strength (at this level the retaining screw failed prior to the implant). The integrity of the internally threaded hole and hexagonal head of the cap were maintained throughout the EDC process. The EDC process did not after the strength and/or microstructure of the components, and the bead-cap interface was stronger than the bead-bead interface. EDC implants produced within the aforementioned window have sufficient compressive strengths and other physical properties to meet the requirement for titanium dental implants. PMID:9022963

  8. Topographic characterisation of dental implants for commercial use

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Arnau, Amparo; Vallecillo-Capilla, Manuel-Francisco; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel-Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Background To characterize the surface topography of several dental implants for commercial use. Material and Methods Dental implants analyzed were Certain (Biomet 3i), Tissue Level (Straumann), Interna (BTI), MG-InHex (MozoGrau), SPI (Alphabio) and Hikelt (Bioner). Surface topography was ascertained using a confocal microscope with white light. Roughness parameters obtained were: Ra, Rq, Rv, Rp, Rt, Rsk and Rku. The results were analysed using single-factor ANOVA and Student-Neuman-Keuls(p<0.05) tests. Results Certain and Hikelt obtained the highest Ra and Rq scores, followed by Tissue Level. Interna and SPI obtained lower scores, and MG-InHex obtained the lowest score. Rv scores followed the same trend. Certain obtained the highest Rp score, followed by SPI and Hikelt, then Interna and Tissue Level. MG-InHex obtained the lowest scores. Certain obtained the highest Rt score, followed by Interna and Hikelt, then SPI and Tissue Level. The lowest scores were for MG-InHex. Rsk was negative (punctured surface) in the MG-InHex, SPI and Tissue Level systems, and positive (pointed surface) in the other systems. Rku was higher than 3 (Leptokurtic) in Tissue Level, Interna, MG-InHex and SPI, and lower than 3 (Platykurtic) in Certain and Hikelt. Conclusions The type of implant determines surface topography, and there are differences in the roughness parameters of the various makes of implants for clinical use. Key words:Implants for clinical use, topography, confocal microscopy. PMID:27475680

  9. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw.

    PubMed

    Gooty, Jagadish Reddy; Palakuru, Sunil Kumar; Guntakalla, Vikram Reddy; Nera, Mahipal

    2014-04-01

    Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants. PMID:24963261

  10. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    PubMed Central

    Gooty, Jagadish Reddy; Palakuru, Sunil Kumar; Guntakalla, Vikram Reddy; Nera, Mahipal

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants. PMID:24963261

  11. Using a diode laser to uncover dental implants in second-stage surgery.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Sam; Jain, Kamlesh; Andreana, Sebastiano

    2005-01-01

    A soft tissue diode laser offers an alternative technique for uncovering dental implants. This article presents two cases in which four dental implants were uncovered using a soft tissue laser. This technique provides an efficient and patient-friendly method to perform second-stage implant surgery, safely allowing a faster rehabilitative phase. PMID:16366049

  12. Computer methods for automating preoperative dental implant planning: implant positioning and size assignment.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Christos C; Sfantsikopoulos, Michael M; Koidis, Petros T; Kafantaris, Nikolaos M; Mpikos, Pavlos G

    2007-04-01

    The paper presents computer-aided methods that allocate a dental implant and suggest its size, during the pre-operative planning stage, in conformance with introduced optimization criteria and established clinical requirements. Based on computed tomography data of the jaw and prosthesis anatomy, single tooth cases are planned for the best-suited implant insertion at a user-defined region. An optimum implantation axis line is produced and cylindrical implants of various candidate sizes are then automatically positioned, while their occlusal end is leveled to bone ridge, and evaluated. Radial safety margins are used for the assessment of the implant safety distance from neighboring anatomical structures and bone quantity and quality are estimated and taken into consideration. A case study demonstrates the concept and allows for its discussion. PMID:17267066

  13. Evidence-based considerations for removable prosthodontic and dental implant occlusion: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Thomas D; Wiens, Jonathan; Carr, Alan

    2005-12-01

    The dental literature is filled with discussions of dental occlusion, occlusal schemes, philosophies, and methods to correct and restore the diseased, worn, or damaged occlusion. Traditionally, these discussions have been empirical in nature and not based on scientific evidence. Due to the empirical nature of the literature, the study of occlusion has been extremely complex and troublesome to both pre- and post-doctoral students. The introduction of osseointegrated implants has further complicated the situation. Dentists may apply the principles of occlusion for the natural dentition directly to implant-supported and retained restorations. Although this may be successful, this rationale may result in overly complex or simplified treatment protocols and outcomes. There is an emerging body of scientific literature related to dental implant therapy that may be useful in formulating treatment protocols and prosthesis designs for implant-supported restorations. This review focuses on some of the "classic" removable prosthodontic literature and the currently available scientific literature involving removable prosthodontic occlusion and dental implant occlusion. The authors reviewed the English peer-reviewed literature prior to 1996 in as comprehensive manner as possible, and material after 1996 was reviewed electronically using MEDLINE. Electronic searches of the literature were performed in MEDLINE using key words-animal studies, case series, clinical trials, cohort studies, complete denture occlusion, dental implant function, dental implant occlusion, dental implant occlusion research, dental implant functional loading, dental implants, dental occlusion, dental occlusion research, denture function, denture occlusion, dentures, implant function, implant functional loading, implant occlusion, occlusion, and removable partial denture occlusion-in various combinations to obtain potential references for review. A total of 5447 English language titles were obtained, many of

  14. The Effect of Titanium Surface Modifications on Dental Implant Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Marco; Guida, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The use of titanium dental implants has consistently changed the way of rehabilitating patients in modern dentistry and can count on high long-term survival and success rates. With respect to its introduction in the late 1960s, clinical indications for implant therapy have been significantly extended and optimal results have been achieved, even in clinical conditions formerly considered as unfavourable. Such evolution owes a lot to the significant progress made in the field of titanium surfaces. The topographical and chemical modification of traditional titanium surfaces has led to a real epochal shift in implant dentistry. Depending on the type and characteristics of the surface treatment applied, a wide range of implants has been produced, which have contributed to the success but also increased the risk of confusion in implant selection criteria for the clinician. This chapter, which provides an updated analysis of the relevant literature, the characteristics of modern implant surfaces, the biological principles underlying their role in promoting osseointegration and the scientific evidence about their clinical use are analyzed and presented. PMID:26201277

  15. Knowledge and attitudes of dental interns in Karnataka state, India, regarding implants.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sohini; Gowda, Triveni M; Kumar, Tarun A B; Mehta, Dhoom S

    2013-10-01

    Implant treatment today is highly reliable as a valid restorative option for missing teeth. As more patients worldwide opt for implant treatment, it is now imperative for dental practitioners to have sound information about dental implants so they can help patients make informed decisions. This study sought to define the knowledge and attitudes regarding dental implants of dental interns in the state of Karnataka, India, and to evaluate the dental implant curriculum structure at the undergraduate level. A survey was conducted of dental interns (students in their fifth, clinical year of undergraduate study) in seven of the forty-five academic dental institutions in this state. The questionnaire consisted of fifteen questions that assessed the respondents' level of knowledge and source of information regarding implants. A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed, and 417 interns responded for a response rate of 83.4 percent. In the results, 73.3 percent reported they were not provided sufficient information about implants in their undergraduate curriculum, and 95.7 percent of them wanted more. Also, 63.5 percent of the respondents believed that high costs could limit the use of dental implants as a tooth replacement modality in India. This study concludes that revision in the undergraduate dental curricula at these schools is needed to better prepare students for practicing implant dentistry. PMID:24098041

  16. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E.; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, and nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. Methods 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1 to 3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. Conclusion No significant relationship exists between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Clinical Significance This clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses because of the absence of a periodontal ligament. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and

  17. From acid etching treatments to tribocorrosive properties of dental implants: do some experimental results on surface treatments have an influence on the tribocorrosion behaviour of dental implants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geringer, Jean; Demanget, Nicolas; Pellier, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Surface treatments of dental implants aim at promoting osseointegration, i.e. the anchorage of the metallic part. Titanium-, grade II-V, based material is used as a bulk material for dental implants. For promoting the anchorage of this metallic biomaterial in human jaw, some strategies have been applied for improving the surface state, i.e. roughness, topography and coatings. A case study, experimental study, is described with the method of acid etching on titanium grade 4, CpTi. The main goal is to find the right proportion in a mixture of two acids in order to obtain the best surface state. Finally, a pure theoretical prediction is quite impossible and some experimental investigations are necessary to improve the surface state. The described acid etching is compared with some other acid etching treatments and some coatings available on dental implants. Thus, the discussion is focused on the tribocorrosion behaviour of titanium-based materials. The purpose of the coating is that the lifetime under tribocorrosion is limited. Moreover, the surgery related to the implantation has a huge impact on the stability of dental implants. Thus, the performance of dental implants depends on factors related to surgery (implantation) that are difficult to predict from the biomaterial characteristics. From the tribocorrosion point of view, i.e. during the mastication step, the titanium material is submitted to some deleterious factors that cause the performance of dental implants to decrease.

  18. Development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma after placement of dental implants: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamiri, Hashem Motahir; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to highlight the development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma after the placement of dental implants. Materials and Methods: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed Interface, for articles published between 2000 and 2014 in English, relating to the occurrence of pyogenic granuloma or hemangioma in relation to dental implants. Results: Our search identified only four case reports of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma related to dental implants as reported in the English literature. Conclusion: Placement of dental implants can cause development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma, indicating that placement of dental implants requires well-trained specialists with perfect skills in dental implantology. Furthermore, the critical selection of the appropriate case is of paramount importance to avoid the occurrence of such complications. PMID:25992330

  19. Pros and cons of subpectoral implantation.

    PubMed

    Papillon, J

    1976-04-01

    At the present time, there is no universally accepted surgical technique or prosthesis for augmenting breast volume. Each surgeon has to choose with regard to shape, consistency, and volume, according to his own conviction and respecting his patient's priorities. These priorities will vary with age, profession, sexual habits, and marital and social status. In order to get the best possible results, the plastic surgeon should be adept at alternative methods and should not be restricted to one technique or one prosthesis. Patients vary considerably so our methods should be diversified. Our subpectoral implantations have given us better results than our retroglandular ones, which have been performed during the same period of time and with the same prosthesis. Consequently, retropectoral implantation is still our preferred procedure. We think that this technique, with its proper indications, deserves wider application. PMID:1261186

  20. Numerical simulation of electrically stimulated osteogenesis in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2014-04-01

    Cell behavior and tissue formation are influenced by a static electric field (EF). Several protocols for EF exposure are aimed at increasing the rate of tissue recovery and reducing the healing times in wounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of the EF action on cells and tissues are still a matter of research. In this work we introduce a mathematical model for electrically stimulated osteogenesis at the bone-dental implant interface. The model describes the influence of the EF in the most critical biological processes leading to bone formation at the bone-dental implant interface. The numerical solution is able to reproduce the distribution of spatial-temporal patterns describing the influence of EF during blood clotting, osteogenic cell migration, granulation tissue formation, displacements of the fibrillar matrix, and formation of new bone. In addition, the model describes the EF-mediated cell behavior and tissue formation which lead to an increased osteogenesis in both smooth and rough implant surfaces. Since numerical results compare favorably with experimental evidence, the model can be used to predict the outcome of using electrostimulation in other types of wounds and tissues. PMID:24413341

  1. Pain Management for Nerve Injury following Dental Implant Surgery at Tokyo Dental College Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    By allowing reconstruction of compromised occlusion, dental implants contribute to an improvement in quality of life (QOL) and diet. Injury to a nerve during such treatment, however, can result in a sudden decline in QOL. And once a nerve has been injured, the chances of a full recovery are slim unless the damage is only slight. If such damage causes neuropathic pain severe enough to prevent sleep, the patient's QOL will deteriorate dramatically. While damage to skin tissue or bone invariably heals over time, damage to nerves does not, indicating the need to avoid such injury while performing implant insertion, for example. This means not relying solely on X-ray images, which can be rather unclear, but also using computed tomography to allow preoperative planning and intraoperative execution to be performed as accurately as possible. Moreover, if sensory damage does occur it is essential to avoid breaking the bond of trust between dentist and patient by giving false assurances of recovery. In such cases, appropriate measures must be taken promptly. This paper describes pain management for nerve injury following dental implant surgery at the Orofacial Pain Center of Tokyo Dental College Suidoubashi Hospital. PMID:22899928

  2. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  3. The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamiri, Hashem-Motahir; Al-Maweri, Sadeq; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the current literature of the survival of dental implants in irradiated head and neck cancer patients considering the role of implant location, bone augmentation, dose of radiation and timing of implant placement. Study Design Pubmed search was conducted to identify articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 and presenting data of dental implant survival with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Studies on animal subjects and craniofacial implants were excluded. Results 18 articles out of 27 were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. 12 out of 18 studies reported favorable outcome of dental implants and radiotherapy with survival rates between 74.4% and 97%. Seven out of ten studies comparing the survival rates according to site of implant placement reported that implants were found to osseointegrate with greater success in the irradiated mandible than irradiated maxilla. 5 studies which compared implant survival in irradiated native bone versus irradiated grafted bone reported that irradiated grafted bone showed a significantly reduced dental implant survival rate in comparison to irradiated native bone. 6 out of 18studies in which radiation doses exceeded 70 Gy reported lower survival rates of dental implants in comparison to the studies in which radiation doses were ≤70Gy. Higher survival rates were reported in 2 studies in which implants placement was before radiotherapy in comparison to the remaining 16 studies in which implants placement was after radiotherapy. Conclusions Dental implants may be affected by radiotherapy especially when they are placed in maxilla, in grafted bone, or after radiation, however, they remain a functional option for rehabilitation of head and cancer patients. More Prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trails are still needed to draw more evidence based conclusions. Key words:Dental implants, implant survival, radiotherapy, head and neck cancer. PMID

  4. Fabrication of titanium dental implants by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Edson; Osakada, Kozo; Shiomi, Masanori; Morita, Masanori; Abe, Fumie

    2004-10-01

    The present paper will discuss the influence of the processing parameters on the characteristics of titanium models built by Selective Laser Melting. The microstructure and the fatigue strength of the three dimensional titanium models formed by Selective Laser Melting with an Nd-yttritrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) pulsed laser are investigated. In order to increase the wear resistance of titanium models, surface alloying via laser-gas-nitriding (LGN) is applied. The mechanical properties of the models built by laser forming are adequate for fabrication of dental implants.

  5. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C-M

    2013-02-21

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm(3) insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm(2) photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm(3) dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm(2) field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT

  6. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A., Jr.; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C.-M.

    2013-02-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose calculation

  7. Antibiotic-modified hydrogel coatings on titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Cometa, S; Mattioli-Belmonte, M; Cafagna, D; Iatta, R; Ceci, E; De Giglio, E

    2012-01-01

    Implant-associated infections represent an occasional but serious problem in dental and/or orthopaedic surgery. A possible solution to prevent the initial bacterial adhesion may be the coating of the implant surface with a thin layer of antibiotic-loaded biocompatible polymer. Hydrogels are one of the promising and versatile materials as antibiotic controlled release systems. In this work, antibiotic-modified poly(ethylene-glycol diacrylate) hydrogel coatings on titanium substrates were prepared by electrochemical polymerization and tested against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 33591). Two different methods to load vancomycin and ceftriaxone were used. We show that the proposed titanium coatings displayed an interesting antibacterial activity, however, further studies on their effective cytotoxicity will furnish evidence of their real clinical efficacy. PMID:23164329

  8. Biocompatibility of natural latex implanted into dental alveolus of rats.

    PubMed

    Balabanian, Cláudia A C A; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; Lamano-Carvalho, Teresa L; Lacerda, Suzie A; Brentegani, Luiz G

    2006-12-01

    The present study investigated the biocompatibility of a biopolymer based on vegetable latex extracted from the Hevea brasiliensis rubber tree, implanted into the bony alveolar cavity after dental extraction in rats. A granule of latex (area = 0.25 +/- 0.04 mm(2)) was implanted inside the alveolus immediately after extraction of the upper right incisor, and the animals were sacrificed 7, 21 and 42 days after the procedure. The hemi-maxillas were decalcified and processed for embedding in paraffin to obtain semi-serial longitudinal sections 5 mum thick, and then stained with hematoxylin-eosin. The latex granule was observed in the cervical third of the alveolus without any foreign body reaction, or persistence of the initial acute inflammatory reaction. Bone repair in the areas adjacent to the material was quantified, and a decrease was noted in the thickness of the fibrous capsule surrounding the implants from 92.8 +/- 9.3 microm on day 7 to 9.4 +/- 1.8 microm on day 42 (ANOVA, P = 0.01). The quantitative data confirmed acceleration of bone formation (statistically significant at 5%) in parallel with a decrease of connective tissue in the areas around the implants. These results show that the tested material is biologically compatible, and progressively integrated into the alveolar bone, simultaneously accelerating bone formation and playing an important role in the healing process. PMID:17220617

  9. Development and Applications of Porous Tantalum Trabecular Metal Enhanced Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Byrd, Warren C.; Altarawneh, Sandra; Hosseini, Bashir; Leong, Austin; Reside, Glenn; Morelli, Thiago; Offenbacher, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem Porous tantalum trabecular metal has recently been incorporated in titanium dental implants as a new form of implant surface enhancement. However, there is little information on the applications of this material in implant dentistry. Methods We, therefore review the current literature on the basic science and clinical uses of this material. Results Porous tantalum metal is used to improve the contact between osseous structure and dental implants; and therefore presumably facilitate osseointegration. Success of porous tantalum metal in orthopedic implants led to the incorporation of porous tantalum metal in the design of root-from endosseous titanium implants. The porous tantalum three-dimensional enhancement of titanium dental implant surface allows for combining bone ongrowth together with bone ingrowth, or osseoincorporation. While little is known about the biological aspect of the porous tantalum in the oral cavity, there seems to be several possible advantages of this implant design. This article reviews the biological aspects of porous tantalum enhanced titanium dental implants, in particular the effects of anatomical consideration and oral environment to implant designs. Conclusions We propose here possible clinical situations and applications for this type of dental implant. Advantages and disadvantages of the implants as well as needed future clinical studies are discussed. PMID:23527899

  10. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current Knowledge and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Mohammed Zaheer; Shah, Altaf H; Khalil, Hesham S; Rabah, Ahmed Mahmoud; Harby, Nehad Mohammed H; Sabra, Seham Ali; Raghav, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have been used in a variety of different forms for many years. Since the mid-20th century, there has been an increase in interest in the implant process for the replacement of missing teeth. Branemark was one of the initial pioneers who applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms an immobile connection with bone. The need for a dental implant to completely address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the surgical and handling protocol. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have serious shortcomings related to their bony union and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. However, anatomic limitation and restorative demands encourage the surgeon to gain precision in planning and surgical positioning of dental implants. Ideal placement of the implant facilitates the establishment of favorable forces on the implants and the prosthetic component as well as ensures an aesthetic outcome. Therefore, it is advisable to establish a logical continuity between the planned restoration and the surgical phases, it is essential to use a transfer device that for sure increases the predictability of success. The surgical guide template is fabricated by a dental technician after the presurgical restorative appointments that primarily include determination of occlusal scheme and implant angulations. Here, authors genuinely attempted to review the evolution and clinical applicability of surgical templates used in the placement of dental implants. PMID:25838757

  11. Progressive immediate loading of a perforated maxillary sinus dental implant: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Juboori, Mohammed Jasim

    2015-01-01

    The displacement of a dental implant into the maxillary sinus may lead to implant failure due to exposure of the apical third or the tip of the implant beyond the bone, resulting in soft tissue growth. This case report discusses dental implant placement in the upper first molar area with maxillary sinus involvement of approximately 2 mm. A new technique for progressive implant loading was used, involving immediately loaded implants with maxillary sinus perforation and low primary stability. Follow-up was performed with resonance frequency analysis and compared with an implant placed adjacent in the upper second premolar area using a conventional delayed loading protocol. Implants with maxillary sinus involvement showed increasing stability during the healing period. We found that progressive implant loading may be a safe technique for the placement of immediately loaded implants with maxillary sinus involvement. PMID:25678816

  12. Development of a Drilling Simulator for Dental Implant Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Nagahata, Masahiro; Takano, Naoki; Takemoto, Shinji; Matsunaga, Satoru; Abe, Shinichi; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a dental implant surgery simulator that allows learners to experience the drilling forces necessary to perform an osteotomy in the posterior mandibular bone. The simulator contains a force-sensing device that receives input and counteracts this force, which is felt as resistance by the user. The device consists of an actuator, a load cell, and a control unit. A mandibular bone model was fabricated in which the predicted forces necessary to drill the cortical and trabecular bone were determined via micro CT image-based 3D finite element analysis. The simulator was evaluated by five dentists from the Department of Implantology at Tokyo Dental College. The ability of the evaluators to distinguish the drilling resistance through different regions of the mandibular bone was investigated. Of the five dentists, four sensed the change in resistance when the drill perforated the upper cortical bone. All five dentists were able to detect when the drill made contact with lingual cortical bone and when the lingual bone was perforated. This project successfully developed a dental implant surgery simulator that allows users to experience the forces necessary to drill through types of bone encountered during osteotomy. Furthermore, the researchers were able to build a device by which excessive drilling simulates a situation in which the lingual cortical bone is perforated--a situation that could lead to negative repercussions in a clinical setting. The simulator was found to be useful to train users to recognize the differences in resistance when drilling through the mandibular bone. PMID:26729688

  13. A retrospective study on related factors affecting the survival rate of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-Kyung; Lee, Ki; Lee, Yong-Sang; Park, Pil-Kyoo

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the relationship between local factors and survival rate of dental implant which had been installed and restored in Seoul Veterans Hospital dental center for past 10 years. And when the relationship is found out, it could be helpful to predict the prognosis of dental implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study of patients receiving root-shaped screw-type dental implants placed from January 2000 to December 2009 was conducted. 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients. The following data were collected from the dental records and radiographs: patient's age, gender, implant type and surface, length, diameter, location of implant placement, bone quality, prosthesis type. The correlations between these data and survival rate were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis, Chi-square test and odds ratio. RESULTS In all, 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients (3120 male, 635 female; mean age 65 ± 10.58 years). 108 implants failed and the cumulative survival rate was 96.33%. There were significant differences in age, implant type and surface, length, location and prosthesis type (P<.05). No significant differences were found in relation to the following factors: gender, diameter and bone quality (P>.05). CONCLUSION Related factors such as age, implant type, length, location and prosthesis type had a significant effect on the implant survival. PMID:22259704

  14. Dental Implants – Perceiving Patients’ Satisfaction in Relation to Clinical and Electromyography Study on Implant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Soumendra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of patients with posterior implants in relation to the clinical success criteria and surface electromyography (sEMG) findings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Total 42 subjects were investigated. Twenty one subjects with posterior dental implants were interviewed using a questionnaire and the clinical success criteria were determined based on The International Congress of Oral Implantologists. The myofunction of the masticatory muscles were assessed using sEMG (21 subjects) and compared to the control group of subjects without implants (21 subjects). Out of 21 subjects, all were satisfied with the aesthetics of their implant. Twenty of them (95.2%) were satisfied with its function and stability. As for clinical criteria, 100% (50) of the implants were successful with no pain, mobility or exudates. sEMG findings showed that patients have significantly lower (p<0.01) basal or resting median power frequency but with muscle burst. During chewing, control subjects showed faster chewing action. There was no difference in reaction and recovery time of clenching for both groups. In conclusion, the satisfaction of implant patients was high, and which was in relation to the successful clinical success criteria and sEMG findings. PMID:26465146

  15. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment for failing dental implants due to peri-implantitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Dawn; Blodgett, Kris; Braga, Charles; Finkbeiner, Larry; Fourrier, Jeanne; George, John; Gregg, Robert; Honigman, Allen; Houser, Bruce; Lamas, William; Lehrman, Neal; Linden, Eric; McCarthy, Delwin; McCawley, Tom; McCormick, Randy; Marcus, Ed; Noraian, Kirk; Rubelman, Peter; Salama, Maurice; Saunders, Steven; Seamons, Brandon; Thein, David; Toms, Michael; Vassos, George; Harris, David M.

    2014-02-01

    A large percentage of dental implants experience complications, most commonly, infection leading to peri-implantitis and peri-mucositis, inflammatory disease involving pathogen contamination. It presents with radiographic findings of crestal bone loss. At this time there appears to be no compelling evidence for an effective intervention. The LANAP protocol is a FDA cleared surgical protocol that produces new attachment and bone regeneration when applied to periodontally infected natural teeth. The LANAP protocol and laser dosimetry have been modified to treat ailing and failing implants. Twenty-one clinicians who have been trained to perform the LANAP protocol and the LAPIPTM protocol have volunteered 26 LAPIP case reports. The time from implant to intervention ranges from 3 months to 16 years. Post-LAPIP radiographs range from 2-48 months. Ten cases were excluded for technical reasons. All 16 remaining cases provide radiographic evidence of increase in crestal bone mass around the implant and, when reported, probe depth reductions. All treating clinicians report control of the infection, reversal of bone loss and rescue of the incumbent implant. Although the success/failure rate cannot be judged from these data, any successes in this area deserve reporting and further study.

  16. Bioactive and Thermally Compatible Glass Coating on Zirconia Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kirsten, A.; Hausmann, A.; Weber, M.; Fischer, J.

    2015-01-01

    The healing time of zirconia implants may be reduced by the use of bioactive glass coatings. Unfortunately, existing glasses are either bioactive like Bioglass 45S5 but thermally incompatible with the zirconia substrate, or they are thermally compatible but exhibit only a very low level of bioactivity. In this study, we hypothesized that a tailored substitution of alkaline earth metals and alkaline metals in 45S5 can lead to a glass composition that is both bioactive and thermally compatible with zirconia implants. A novel glass composition was analyzed using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and heating microscopy to investigate its chemical, physical, and thermal properties. Bioactivity was tested in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF). Smooth and microstructured glass coatings were applied using a tailored spray technique with subsequent thermal treatment. Coating adhesion was tested on implants that were inserted in bovine ribs. The cytocompatibility of the coating was analyzed using L929 mouse fibroblasts. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the novel glass was shown to be slightly lower (11.58·10–6 K–1) than that of the zirconia (11.67·10–6 K–1). After storage in SBF, the glass showed reaction layers almost identical to the bioactive glass gold standard, 45S5. A process window between 800 °C and 910 °C was found to result in densely sintered and amorphous coatings. Microstructured glass coatings on zirconia implants survived a minimum insertion torque of 60 Ncm in the in vitro experiment on bovine ribs. Proliferation and cytotoxicity of the glass coatings was comparable with the controls. The novel glass composition showed a strong adhesion to the zirconia substrate and a significant bioactive behavior in the SBF in vitro experiments. Therefore, it holds great potential to significantly reduce the healing time of zirconia dental implants. PMID:25421839

  17. Bioactive and thermally compatible glass coating on zirconia dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, A; Hausmann, A; Weber, M; Fischer, J; Fischer, H

    2015-02-01

    The healing time of zirconia implants may be reduced by the use of bioactive glass coatings. Unfortunately, existing glasses are either bioactive like Bioglass 45S5 but thermally incompatible with the zirconia substrate, or they are thermally compatible but exhibit only a very low level of bioactivity. In this study, we hypothesized that a tailored substitution of alkaline earth metals and alkaline metals in 45S5 can lead to a glass composition that is both bioactive and thermally compatible with zirconia implants. A novel glass composition was analyzed using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and heating microscopy to investigate its chemical, physical, and thermal properties. Bioactivity was tested in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF). Smooth and microstructured glass coatings were applied using a tailored spray technique with subsequent thermal treatment. Coating adhesion was tested on implants that were inserted in bovine ribs. The cytocompatibility of the coating was analyzed using L929 mouse fibroblasts. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the novel glass was shown to be slightly lower (11.58 · 10(-6) K(-1)) than that of the zirconia (11.67 · 10(-6) K(-1)). After storage in SBF, the glass showed reaction layers almost identical to the bioactive glass gold standard, 45S5. A process window between 800 °C and 910 °C was found to result in densely sintered and amorphous coatings. Microstructured glass coatings on zirconia implants survived a minimum insertion torque of 60 Ncm in the in vitro experiment on bovine ribs. Proliferation and cytotoxicity of the glass coatings was comparable with the controls. The novel glass composition showed a strong adhesion to the zirconia substrate and a significant bioactive behavior in the SBF in vitro experiments. Therefore, it holds great potential to significantly reduce the healing time of zirconia dental implants. PMID:25421839

  18. A radiological evaluation of marginal bone around dental implants: An in-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Nandal, Shikha; Ghalaut, Pankaj; Shekhawat, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Context: This article presents an original research conducted at Government Dental College, PGIDS, Rohtak. Aims: (1) To evaluate the marginal bone level changes around dental implants based on the radiological examination. (2) To evaluate the relationship of various parameters, i.e., gender, implant length, implant diameter and location of implants on the amount of bone loss around dental implants. Materials and Methods: An in-vivo study was undertaken to evaluate the crestal bone loss on mesial and distal aspect of implants, using standardized intra-oral periapical at the end of 6 months after placing the implants, but before prosthetically loading it. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's unpaired t-test. Results: Bone loss was measured and values were recorded immediately after implant placement and after 6 months. Conclusions: (1) Bone loss on mesial and distal aspects of implants was found to be same after period of 6 months. (2) Bone loss was found to be same in both 13 mm and 10 mm implants on mesial aspect, whereas on distal aspect, it was more in 10 mm implants. (3) Bone loss was found to be same in both 3.5 mm and 4.3 mm diameter implants on both mesial and distal aspects of implants. (4) Bone loss was found to be same in both maxilla and mandible on both mesial and distal aspects of implants. (5) Bone loss was found to be more in females on both mesial as well as distal aspects of implants. PMID:25937721

  19. Digital process for an implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jan; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Peter, Thorsten; Brandt, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    A digital process is presented for an implant-supported single-tooth and a 3-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) with customized abutments and monolithic prosthetic zirconia restorations. The digital impression on the implant level was made with a TRIOS intraoral scanner (3Shape). This process included the fabrication of an implant cast with the fused deposition modeling technique and a 3-dimensional printing process with integrated implant analogs. The process enabled the FDPs to be designed with CAD/CAM on the cast before patient contact. Designing a printed implant cast expands the use of the digital workflow in the dental field. PMID:26187099

  20. [Full dental rehabilitation of a patient with implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Imre, Ildikó; Tóth, Zsuzsanna

    2012-06-01

    During dental rehabilitation of a patient with ICD, an upper telescope retained overdenture with acrylic baseplate and lower cantilever bridges were constructed. In the consultation following the anamnesis and the clinical examination, the cardiologist did not believe antibiotic profilaxis to be necessary, adding that it is advisable to avoid the use of ultrasonic depurator and electrocauter. Nowadays after saving the life the improving of patient's better quality of life is an important aspect. The risk of ICD-implantation is minimal however, not negligible, the patient can pursue a way of life free of limitation. According to the latest trends, the number of ICD-implantations will increase exponentially in the near future, due to the aging of the population, the simplification and safeness of implantation and the increase of patients who can be treated with the device. In case of arritmia or putative dysfunction, the latest ICD-s are able to send emergency alert to the arritmia centre with the help of an outer transmitter. Probably the system will completely change the follow-up of patients with ICD within the next few years, clinical researches of its efficiency are going on at present. PMID:22826909

  1. Accidental displacement of a dental implant into the submandibular space during explantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, B H; Kim, B C; Lee, J

    2016-07-01

    Dental implants are reliable and widely used, but complications such as peri-implantitis occasionally necessitate their removal. Accidents during removal are similar to those that may occur during extraction, including displacement into another structure in the maxillofacial region. We present a rare case of accidental displacement into the submandibular space, which happened during an attempt to remove an implant. PMID:26507676

  2. On the use of EMI for the assessment of dental implant stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Malfa Ribolla, Emma; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Gulizzi, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    The achievement and the maintenance of dental implant stability are prerequisites for the long-term success of the osseointegration process. Since implant stability occurs at different stages, it is clinically required to monitor an implant over time, i.e. between the surgery and the placement of the artificial tooth. In this framework, non-invasive tests able to assess the degree of osseointegration are necessary. In this paper, the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method is proposed to monitor the stability of dental implants. A 3D finite element model of a piezoceramic transducer (PZT) bonded to a dental implant placed into the bone was created, considering the presence of a bone-implant interface subjected to Young's modulus change. The numerical model was validated experimentally by testing bovine bone samples. The EMI response of a PZT, bonded to the abutment screwed to implants inserted to the bone, was measured. To simulate the osseointegration process a pulp canal sealer was used to secure the implant to the bone. It was found that the PZT's admittance is sensitive to the stiffness variation of the bone-implant interface. The results show that EMIbased method is able (i) to evaluate the material properties around the implant, and (ii) to promote a novel non-invasive monitoring of dental implant surgical procedure.

  3. Simulated bone remodeling around tilted dental implants in the anterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Weiping; Ajmera, Deepal Haresh; Zhang, Yun; Fan, Yubo; Ji, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Dental implants have to be placed with the long axis in different angulations due to the change in bone morphology. The objective of this study was to investigate the different bone remodeling response induced by the tilted dental implants and to assess whether it could lead to bone loss and implant failure. In this study, bone remodeling due to palato-labially inclined dental implants placed in the anterior maxillary incisor region was simulated. CT-based finite element models of a maxillary bone with dental implants were created herein. Five dental implants were placed at [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively. The remodeling progression was recorded and compared. Model [Formula: see text] (palatal side) shows the highest bone density values, but the inclined implant at [Formula: see text] (labial side) leads to significant bone loss. From a biomechanical perspective, it is speculated that a palatally inclined implant is more likely to enhance the bone density in the maxillary anterior region, but labial inclination of implant could jeopardize its stability. PMID:26285769

  4. Biomechanics and load resistance of small-diameter and mini dental implants: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Istabrak; Bourauel, Christoph; Mundt, Torsten; Stark, Helmut; Heinemann, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, the application of small-diameter and mini dental implants to support removable and fixed prosthesis has dramatically increased. However, the success of these implants under functional biting forces and the reaction of the bone around them need to be analyzed. This review was aimed to present studies that deal with the fatigue life of small-diameter and mini dental implants under normal biting force, and their survival rate. The numerical and experimental studies concluded that an increase in the risk of bone damage or implant failure may be assumed in critical clinical situations and implants with <3 mm diameter have a risk of fracture in clinical practice. The survival rate of the small-diameter and mini dental implants over 5 years was 98.3-99.4%. PMID:24293447

  5. Evidence-based techniques to assess the performance of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kashi, Ajay; Saha, Subrata

    2013-12-01

    The clinical use of evidence-based medicine has been regarded as one of the most significant medical advancements of the last century. As the costs of medical care escalate, clinical decisions have to be made prudently and with a high degree of efficacy. One of the most expensive treatments in dentistry includes the use of dental implants to rehabilitate partial and fully edentulous patients. Due to the high costs of treatments and the ever increasing varieties of dental implants becoming available, the clinician is often faced with a challenging situation to decide the best prostheses for their patients. Furthermore, navigating through the vast database of literature pertaining to dental implants and their related research can be very time consuming and challenging to a dental surgeon before they can make appropriate clinical decisions. Similar to other orthopedic implants, dental implants need to be evaluated for their long-term efficacy in vivo before they are clinically acceptable. In order to help clinician(s) make patient oriented decisions, evidence-based techniques are becoming increasingly popular. This can be a very useful tool in translating research findings into clinical practice, thus narrowing the gap between research and clinical dentistry. This article discusses ways in which evidence-based techniques can help dental surgeons analyze and make informed clinical decisions about dental implant treatments. PMID:21186959

  6. Pyogenic granuloma in relation to dental implants: Clinical and histopathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Pinas, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of pyogenic granuloma in association to dental implants is rare and only five cases have been reported in the literature. Material and Methods Patients charts were analyzed to select patients who had been diagnosed for pyogenic granuloma and its association with dental implants had been evaluated. The clinical status of the dental implants and the prosthesis had also been assessed. Results Clinical and histopathological diagnosis of pyogenic granuloma had been reached for soft mass growth in association with dental implants in 10 patients. Histological analysis of all samples was performed to obtain a firm diagnosis of finding against pyogenic granuloma lesions. Accumulation of dental plaque due to poor oral hygiene and improper design of the prosthesis had been related to the occurrence of pyogenic granuoloma. This lesion showed no predilection to specific surface type and had no significant association with marginal bone loss. Conclusions Pyogenic granuloma should be included in the differential diagnosis of soft mass growth around dental implants. Key words:Reactive lesion, soft mass, pyogenic granuloma, dental implant, titanium. PMID:26535087

  7. Atypical Case of Three Dental Implants Displaced into the Maxillary Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Bruniera, João Felipe Bonatto; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Faria, Paulo Esteves Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Oral rehabilitation with dental implants has become a routine treatment in contemporary dentistry. The displacement of dental implants into the sinus membrane, a complication related to the maxillary sinus, is one of the most common accidents reported in the literature. The treatment for this complication is the surgical removal of the implant. A 60-year-old woman with three dental implants displaced into the maxillary sinus (one implant displaced into the left maxillary sinus and two implants displaced into the right maxillary sinus) underwent surgery for removal of the implants. The surgery to remove the implants was performed under local anesthesia through the Caldwell-Luc technique. The patient was subsequently administered antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic drugs. The patient returned 7 days after the surgery for suture removal and is being regularly monitored to determine whether future rehabilitation of the edentulous area is necessary. In conclusion, surgical removal of the dental implant displaced into the maxillary sinus is the treatment of choice. This technique is appropriate because it allows the use of local anesthesia and provides direct visualization for the removal of the implants. PMID:26635979

  8. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bertoli, Elizangela; Medynski, Denielle C; Khalaf, Mohd W

    2015-01-01

    Nerve trauma caused by dental implant placement is associated with altered sensation and chronic pain. Complete or partial loss of sensation is often reported by patients who have experienced nerve trauma during implant surgery. Some patients report persistent pain and neurosurgery disturbance long after the normal healing time has passed. In addition, neuropathic pain is reported after implant surgery. Practitioners who place dental implants must be familiar with the differential diagnosis, prevention, and management of neuropathic pain. This article provides insights into the prevention and management of neurosensory deficits and chronic persistent neuropathic pain and considerations for patient referral. PMID:25434563

  9. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: pathophysiology, etiology, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Khalaf, Mohd W; Bhavsar, Ishita

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented the successful outcomes of dental implants, but have also reported the association of sensory disturbances with the surgical implant procedure. Postsurgical pain is a normal response to tissue injury, and usually resolves after the tissue heals. However, some patients who receive dental implants experience persistent pain even after normal healing. This article describes the basic anatomy and pathophysiology associated with nerve injury. The incidence and diagnosis of these problems, in addition to factors that result in the development of chronic persistent neuropathic pain and sensory disturbances associated with surgical implant placement, are discussed. PMID:25434562

  10. Piezosurgery in Bone Augmentation Procedures Previous to Dental Implant Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Magrin, Gabriel Leonardo; Sigua-Rodriguez, Eder Alberto; Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Asprino, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The piezosurgery has been used with increasing frequency and applicability by health professionals, especially those who deal with dental implants. The concept of piezoelectricity has emerged in the nineteenth century, but it was applied in oral surgery from 1988 by Tomaso Vercellotti. It consists of an ultrasonic device able to cut mineralized bone tissue, without injuring the adjacent soft tissue. It also has several advantages when compared to conventional techniques with drills and saws, such as the production of a precise, clean and low bleed bone cut that shows positive biological results. In dental implants surgery, it has been used for maxillary sinus lifting, removal of bone blocks, distraction osteogenesis, lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve, split crest of alveolar ridge and even for dental implants placement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of piezosurgery in bone augmentation procedures used previously to dental implants placement. PMID:26966469

  11. Effect of Offset Implant Placement on the Stress Distribution Around a Dental Implant: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Siadat, Hakimeh; Hashemzadeh, Shervin; Geramy, Allahyar; Bassir, Seyed Hossein; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2015-12-01

    There are some anatomical restrictions in which implants are not possible to be inserted in their conventional configuration. Offset placement of implants in relation to the prosthetic unit could be a treatment solution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the offset placement of implant-supported prosthesis on the stress distribution around a dental implant using 3D finite element analysis. 3D finite element models of implant placement in the position of a mandibular molar with 4 configurations (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 mm offset) were created in order to investigate resultant stress/strain distribution. A vertical load of 100 N was applied on the center of the crown of the models. The least stress in peri-implant tissue was found in in-line configuration (0 mm offset). Stress concentration in the peri-implant tissue increased by increasing the amount of offset placement. Maximum stress concentration in all models was detected at the neck of the implant. It can be concluded that the offset placement of a single dental implant does not offer biomechanical advantages regarding reducing stress concentration over the in-line implant configuration. It is suggested that the amount of offset should be as minimum as possible. PMID:24666333

  12. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo; Nart, José; Manzanares, Norberto; Manero, José M; Gil, Francisco Javier; Boyd, Steven K; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10units), Ti_Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10units), and Ti_TSP (silanization treatment, 10units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P<0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis. PMID:27612745

  13. The status of undergraduate implant education in dental schools outside the United States.

    PubMed

    Seckinger, R J; Weintraub, A M; Berthold, P; Weintraub, G S

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the incorporation of implant dentistry into academia has been documented in some detail for North American dental schools but has not been pursued on an international level. In June of 1993, we surveyed 51 dental schools outside of the United States affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine's Office of International Relations concerning their teaching involvement with implant dentistry. Results from the 44 (86 percent) responding schools suggest that implant dentistry is being incorporated into predoctoral curriculums. Industrialized countries were more inclined to provide implant education. Insufficient time and the thought that the predoctoral level was not the place for implant dentistry were cited as some of the reasons for not incorporating implant dentistry into the curriculum. Oral surgery, prosthodontics, and periodontics departments developed and administered the implant curriculum. Formats varied among schools with respect to allotted time, curricular placement, laboratory experience, and clinical participation. Didactic material most frequently presented included a historical overview, diagnosis and treatment planning, classification of dental implants, and surgical and prosthetic concepts. Clinical involvement varied from actual implant placement to observation of prosthodontic procedures. Results were categorized based on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) classification of countries in six regions. PMID:7581232

  14. A pilot study in the recovery and recognition of non-osseointegrated dental implants following cremation.

    PubMed

    Berketa, J; James, H; Marino, V

    2011-12-01

    Minimal dimensional changes in free standing dental implants when incinerated in a kiln to a temperature of 1125°C have been reported previously. However, in the same study colour changes were observed between commercially pure titanium and titanium alloy type of implants, with speculation that this change may be a useful distinguishing tool in cases requiring forensic identification. The present study was instigated to determine what changes occur following cremation to bone-supported dental implants placed within mandibles of sheep. A selection of dental implants was photographed and radiographed. They were then surgically placed in sheep mandibles and the entire sheep heads cremated in a commercial cremator. There was detachment of the dental implants from the mandible, which could have implications for scene recovery. Following retrieval and re-irradiating of the implants, image subtraction evaluation of the radiographs was recorded using Adobe(®) Photoshop.(®) As with the previous study there was slight oxidation of the implant surfaces leading to minor alteration of the images. There was, however, no gold crust colour change in the commercially pure titanium. Photography within the retrieved implants revealed the batch number within the Straumann™ implant was still visible, which could significantly add weight to the identification of deceased persons. PMID:22717912

  15. Optimum gradient material for a functionally graded dental implant using metaheuristic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Sadollah, Ali; Bahreininejad, Ardeshir

    2011-10-01

    Despite dental implantation being a great success, one of the key issues facing it is a mismatch of mechanical properties between engineered and native biomaterials, which makes osseointegration and bone remodeling problematical. Functionally graded material (FGM) has been proposed as a potential upgrade to some conventional implant materials such as titanium for selection in prosthetic dentistry. The idea of an FGM dental implant is that the property would vary in a certain pattern to match the biomechanical characteristics required at different regions in the hosting bone. However, matching the properties does not necessarily guarantee the best osseointegration and bone remodeling. Little existing research has been reported on developing an optimal design of an FGM dental implant for promoting long-term success. Based upon remodeling results, metaheuristic algorithms such as the genetic algorithms (GAs) and simulated annealing (SA) have been adopted to develop a multi-objective optimal design for FGM implantation design. The results are compared with those in literature. PMID:21783149

  16. Effects of Surface Charges on Dental Implants: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cecilia Yan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Tang, Alexander Tin Hong

    2012-01-01

    Osseointegration is a major factor influencing the success of dental implantation. To achieve rapid and strong, durable osseointegration, biomaterial researchers have investigated various surface treatment methods for dental subgingival titanium (Ti) implants. This paper focuses on surface-charge modification on the surface of titanium dental implants, which is a relatively new and very promising methodology for improving the implants' osseointegration properties. We give an overview on both theoretical explanations on how surface-charge affects the implants' osseointegration, as well as a potential surface charge modification method using sandblasting. Additionally, we discuss insights on the important factors affecting effectiveness of surface-charge modification methods and point out several interesting directions for future investigations on this topic. PMID:23093962

  17. The design and production of Ti-6Al-4V ELI customized dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahine, Gilbert; Koike, Mari; Okabe, Toru; Smith, Pauline; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2008-11-01

    This paper addresses the production of customized Ti-6Al-4V ELI dental implants via electron beam melting (EBM). The melting of Ti-6Al-4V ELI powder produces implants with great biocompatibility, fi ne mechanical performance, and a high bone ingrowth potential. The EBM technology is used to produce one-component dental implants that mimic the exact shape of the patient’s tooth, replacing the traditional, three-component, “screw-like” standardized dental implants currently used. The new generation of implants provides the possibility of simplifying pre-insertion procedures leading to faster healing time, and the potential of better and stronger osseointegration, specifi cally through incorporating lattice structure design.

  18. The Application of Virtual Planning and Navigation Devices for Mandible Reconstruction and Immediate Dental Implantation.

    PubMed

    Rahimov, Chingiz R; Farzaliyev, Ismayil M; Fathi, Hamid Reza; Davudov, Mahammad M; Aliyev, Anar; Hasanov, Emin

    2016-06-01

    Routine reconstruction of subtotal defects of the mandible and orthopedic rehabilitation supported by dental implants is achieved by means of detailed planning and lasts over a year. This article shows the outcomes of single-stage surgical treatment and immediate orthopedic rehabilitation performed with the help of preoperative virtual computer simulation. 3D investigation of pathological and donor sites, virtual simulation of tumor resection, positioning of the dental implants into fibula, virtual flap bending and transfer, virtual bending of fixing reconstruction plates, and fabrication of navigation templates and bridge prosthesis supported by dental implants were done preoperatively. The surgery included tumor resection, insertion of dental implants into fibula, elevation of fibula osteocutaneous free flap, rigid fixation within recipient site, and immediate loading by bridge orthopedic device. On 10-month follow-up, functional and esthetic results were asses as reasonable. Radiography showed dental implants to be integrated and positioned appropriately. We found that successful rehabilitation of the patients with extensive defects of the jaws could be achieved by ablative tumor resection, dental implants insertion prior to flap elevation guided by navigation templates, further osteotomy, modeling of the flap based on navigation template, flap transfer, and rigid fixation within recipient site by prebended plates, with application of prefabricated prosthesis. PMID:27162568

  19. In situ microradioscopy and microtomography of fatigue-loaded dental two-piece implants.

    PubMed

    Wiest, Wolfram; Zabler, Simon; Rack, Alexander; Fella, Christian; Balles, Andreas; Nelson, Katja; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Hanke, Randolf

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron real-time radioscopy and in situ microtomography are the only techniques providing direct visible information on a micrometre scale of local deformation in the implant-abutment connection (IAC) during and after cyclic loading. The microgap formation at the IAC has been subject to a number of studies as it has been proposed to be associated with long-term implant success. The next step in this scientific development is to focus on the in situ fatigue procedure of two-component dental implants. Therefore, an apparatus has been developed which is optimized for the in situ fatigue analysis of dental implants. This report demonstrates both the capability of in situ radioscopy and microtomography at the ID19 beamline for the study of cyclic deformation in dental implants. The first results show that it is possible to visualize fatigue loading of dental implants in real-time radioscopy in addition to the in situ fatigue tomography. For the latter, in situ microtomography is applied during the cyclic loading cycles in order to visualize the opening of the IAC microgap. These results concur with previous ex situ studies on similar systems. The setup allows for easily increasing the bending force, to simulate different chewing situations, and is, therefore, a versatile tool for examining the fatigue processes of dental implants and possibly other specimens. PMID:26524314

  20. Predictable dental rehabilitation in maxillomandibular reconstruction with free flaps. The role of implant guided surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cebrian-Carretero, José L.; Sobrino, José A.; Yu, Tomás; Burgueño-García, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of maxillomandibular defects secondary to oral cancer surgery, represent a great challenge for Maxillofacial surgeons. During the last decades the reconstructive surgery has experimented a big advance due to the development of the microsurgical techniques. At present, we are able to reconstruct complex defects using free flaps that provide both soft and bone tissue. Fibula, iliac crest and scapula free flaps have been the three classic options for the maxillomandibular reconstruction owing to the amount of bone that this flaps provide, allowing the posterior dental rehabilitation with implants. Today, our objective it is not only the aesthetic reconstruction, but also the functional reconstruction of the patients enhancing their life quality. Guided implant surgery in free flap reconstructed patients has become an essential tool, helping to define the exact position of the dental implant in the flap. In this way it is possible to look for the areas with better bone conditions, avoiding the osteosynthesis material used to fixate the flap with the native bone and deciding the best biomechanical option, in terms of number and situation of the implants, for the future dental prostheses. In summary, using the guided implant surgery, it is possible to design an exact and predictable dental implant rehabilitation in patients with oral cancer who are reconstructed with free microvascular flap, resulting in an optimal aesthetic and functional result. Key words:Oral cancer, mandibulectomy, maxillectomy, microvascular reconstruction, fibula flap, dental implant, guided surgery. PMID:25129241

  1. Pressure behavior of different PEEK materials for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Spintig, Tobias; Kallage, Ilona; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    Due to its mechanical properties, the biocompatible high-performance material PEEK (polyetheretherketone) and PEEK-based compounds may represent viable alternatives to titanium in the field of dental implantology. Therefore we performed static pressure tests with 11 PEEK materials (two unfilled grades, two grades filled with titanium-dioxide-powder, two grades filled with barium-sulfate-powder, two grades reinforced with short carbon fibers, one grade reinforced with glass fibers and two grades reinforced with continuous carbon fibers) in the form of cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 4, 5 and 6mm. The specimens had a height to diameter ratio of 2:1 and were therefore 8, 10 and 12mm high. The parameters elastic modulus, elastic limit and pressure strength were evaluated. The elastic moduli ranged between 2.65±0.03GPa for specimens of a titanium-dioxide-filled grade and 106.71±14.83GPa for specimens reinforced with continuous carbon fibers. The elastic limits ranged between 808.1±42.44N for specimens of a barium-sulfate-filled grade and 7256.4±519.86N for specimens reinforced with continuous carbon fibers. The lowest pressure strength of 122.77MPa was observed for specimens of an unfilled grade, whereas the highest pressure strength of 712.67±66.02MPa could be evaluated for specimens containing continuous carbon fibers. Regarding the maximum bite force of a first molar, all tested materials seem to be suitable for the use as dental implants. PMID:26492595

  2. Smoking, Radiotherapy, Diabetes and Osteoporosis as Risk Factors for Dental Implant Failure: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Nizhou; Xu, Xinchen; Qu, Xinhua; Lu, Eryi

    2013-01-01

    Background There are conflicting reports as to the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. We undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. Methods A comprehensive research on MEDLINE and EMBASE, up to January 2013, was conducted to identify potential studies. References of relevant studies were also searched. Screening, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool estimates of relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results A total of 51 studies were identified in this meta-analysis, with more than 40,000 dental implants placed under risk-threatening conditions. The pooled RRs showed a direct association between smoking (n = 33; RR = 1.92; 95% CI, 1.67–2.21) and radiotherapy (n = 16; RR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.49–3.51) and the risk of dental implant failure, whereas no inverse impact of diabetes (n = 5; RR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.62–1.32) on the risk of dental implant failure was found. The influence of osteoporosis on the risk of dental implant failure was direct but not significant (n = 4; RR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.79–1.52). The subgroup analysis indicated no influence of study design, geographical location, length of follow-up, sample size, or mean age of recruited patients. Conclusions Smoking and radiotherapy were associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure. The relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of implant failure warrant further study. PMID:23940794

  3. Dental implants with the periodontium: a new approach for the restoration of missing teeth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Dong, Qing-Shan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jun-Rui; Wu, Li-An; Liu, Bao-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss is a common occurrence in mankind and damages human health. Osseointegrated dental implants have been successfully used as a popular prosthetic restoration for the missing teeth for many years. However, osseointegration, representing a direct connection between the implant and bone tissue without the periodontium, causes some inevitable problems, such as masticatory force concentration and immobility of the dental implant. Thus, an ideal dental implant should have its own peri-implant periodontium, as do the natural teeth. A number of attempts have been made to reconstruct the periodontium around the implants. Unfortunately, it has been established that a predictable periodontal reconstruction, especially the acellular cementum reconstruction on the surface of the implant, is a very difficult task. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that the cementum may be a special phenotype of the bone tissue, on the basis of its strong similarity in development, structure, and function. In a certain condition, the bone tissue may change to cementum for special functional needs. In accordance with this hypothesis, we consider a novel approach to reconstruct the peri-implant tissues. Unlike previous studies, this approach imitates the tooth re-plantation process. The key point is to convert the implant-surrounding bone tissues to cementum as a result of adaptive changes to the implant-support demands. This hypothesis, if proven to be valid, will not only represent a breakthrough in cementum research, but also will open a new door to the restoration of missing teeth. PMID:18829177

  4. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration. PMID:23266005

  5. [Experimental study of dental implants with nanostructured non-resorbable coating integration into bone tissue].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ian, A S; Khamraev, T K; Toporkova, A K; Amirov, A R

    2010-01-01

    In 2 dogs on both sides of mandible premolars were removed. In 3 months after dental alveolus healing intraosseous screwdriver dental implants (Konmet, Russia) were installed in the place of the removed teeth. Analogous operation was done on the contralateral side: the same type of implants were installed but with new nanostructured multifunctional biocompatible non-resorbable coating (MBNC) of the Ti-Ca-P-C-O-N composition. The animals were taken out of the experiment in 4 months after implants installation and implant-bone blocks were studied by SEM-method. According to the SEM-data in the region of the contact of implant-bone without new MBNC only fibrous connective tissue was formed. In case when MBNC was used the close welding of bone tissue with implant surface was observed that was considered as sign of osteointegration. PMID:21186642

  6. Rehabilitation of Posterior Maxilla with Zygomatic and Dental Implant after Tumor Resection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ugurlu, Faysal; Yıldız, Coskun; Sener, B. C.; Sertgoz, Atilla

    2013-01-01

    Zygomatic implants have been used for dental rehabilitation in patients with insufficient bone in the posterior upper jaw, due to, for example, tumor resection, trauma, or atrophy. Zygomatic implants are an alternative to complex free or vascularized bone grafting and distraction osteogenesis. A 42-year-old male patient with a severe defect in the right posterior maxilla, starting from the first canine region, which had occurred after tumor resection 3 years earlier, was referred to our department. One zygomatic implant (Brenemark System, Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden) to the zygoma and one dental implant to the canine region were placed. After a 5-month osseointegration period, a fixed denture was fabricated and adapted to the implants. Although the surgical and prosthetic procedures for zygoma implants are not easy, the final outcomes can be successful with appropriate planning. PMID:23533833

  7. Insights on Metal Based Dental Implants and their Interaction with the Surrounding Tissues.

    PubMed

    Popa, Marcela; Hussien, Mohamed D; Cirstea, Alexandra; Grigore, Raluca; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Sakizlian, Monica; Stavropoulou, Elisavet; Bertesteanu, Serban

    2015-01-01

    At present, the use of dental implants is a very common practice as tooth loss is a frequent problem and can occur as a result of disease or trauma. An implant is usually made of biocompatible materials that do not cause rejection reactions and allow the implant union with the respective bone. To achieve this goal, the implant surface may have different structures and coatings, generally used to increase the adherence of the implant to the bone and to decrease the risk of the periimplantar inflammatory reactions. This review gives some insights of the metal based materials used for dental implants, their limits, improvement strategies as well as the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of periimplantary diseases. PMID:25877088

  8. Dental implants in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in dental implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated by dental implants and being previously irradiated in the head and neck region versus nonirradiated patients against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. The study suggests that irradiation negatively affects the survival of implants, as well as the difference in implant location (maxilla vs mandible), but there is no statistically significant difference in survival when implants are inserted before or after 12 months after radiotherapy. The study failed to support the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in irradiated patients. It was observed that there was a tendency of lower survival rates of implants inserted in the patients submitted to higher irradiation doses. The results should be interpreted with caution because of the presence of uncontrolled confounding factors in the included studies. PMID:25242560

  9. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: Update

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María J.; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words “implant” AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication. Key words:Dental implants, medically compromised patient, systemic diseases. PMID:24608222

  10. Management of a malpositioned implant using custom abutment and screw-retained fixed dental prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman with missing permanent mandibular right molars and left first molar presented for treatment. One of the implants were misaligned during the placement due to sudden mouth closure of the patient. All implants success fully osseointegrated. However, the misaligned implant resulted in substantial mechanical and esthetic restorative challenges. The prosthodontic treatment included a custom abutment and a screw-retained fixed dental prosthesis on the right side. The patient did not report any problems with the implants and restorations during the first year of service. The treatment presented in this clinical report may be an alternative option to restore malpositioned implants. PMID:25307826

  11. Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices in Dental, Oral, and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices as life-prolonging and life-saving devices has evolved from a treatment of last resort to a first-line therapy for an increasing number of patients. As these devices become more and more popular in the general population, dental providers utilizing instruments and medications should be aware of dental equipment and medications that may affect these devices and understand the management of patients with these devices. This review article will discuss the various types and indications for pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, common drugs and instruments affecting these devices, and management of patients with these devices implanted for cardiac dysrhythmias. PMID:27269668

  12. Extraordinary sneeze: Spontaneous transmaxillary-transnasal discharge of a migrated dental implant.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Pasquale; De Santis, Daniele; Bertossi, Dario; Albanese, Massimo; Plotegher, Cristina; Zanette, Giovanni; Pardo, Alessia; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-08-16

    This case report describes an extraordinary case of the spontaneous transmaxillary-transnasal discharge of a dental implant, which occurred during a sneeze. The patient was complained of symptoms of acute sinusitis. She underwent a computed tomography scan that revealed a dental implant dislocated in the maxillary sinus. Medical treatment based on antibiotics and mucolytics was administered to the patient in order to prepare her for endoscopic endonasal surgery. The implant was spontaneously discharged two days after during a sneeze. Mucociliary clearance in combination with a local osteolytic inflammatory process and mucolytics therapy are the likely causes of this unusual discharge. PMID:27574611

  13. Extraordinary sneeze: Spontaneous transmaxillary-transnasal discharge of a migrated dental implant

    PubMed Central

    Procacci, Pasquale; De Santis, Daniele; Bertossi, Dario; Albanese, Massimo; Plotegher, Cristina; Zanette, Giovanni; Pardo, Alessia; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes an extraordinary case of the spontaneous transmaxillary-transnasal discharge of a dental implant, which occurred during a sneeze. The patient was complained of symptoms of acute sinusitis. She underwent a computed tomography scan that revealed a dental implant dislocated in the maxillary sinus. Medical treatment based on antibiotics and mucolytics was administered to the patient in order to prepare her for endoscopic endonasal surgery. The implant was spontaneously discharged two days after during a sneeze. Mucociliary clearance in combination with a local osteolytic inflammatory process and mucolytics therapy are the likely causes of this unusual discharge. PMID:27574611

  14. Infrared Thermographic Assessment of Cooling Effectiveness in Selected Dental Implant Systems.

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Karol; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Kosior, Piotr; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Dudek, Krzysztof; Fita, Katarzyna; Parulska, Olga; Rybak, Zbigniew; Skalec, Aleksandra; Szklarz, Magdalena; Janeczek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The excessive temperature fluctuations during dental implant site preparation may affect the process of bone-implant osseointegration. In the presented studies, we aimed to assess the quality of cooling during the use of 3 different dental implant systems (BEGO®, NEO BIOTECH®, and BIOMET 3i®). The swine rib was chosen as a study model. The preparation of dental implant site was performed with the use of 3 different speeds of rotation (800, 1,200, and 1,500 rpm) and three types of cooling: with saline solution at room temperature, with saline solution cooled down to 3°C, and without cooling. A statistically significant difference in temperature fluctuations was observed between BEGO and NEO BIOTECH dental systems when cooling with saline solution at 3°C was used (22.3°C versus 21.8°C). In case of all three evaluated dental implant systems, the highest temperature fluctuations occurred when pilot drills were used for implant site preparation. The critical temperature, defined in the available literature, was exceeded only in case of pilot drills (of all 3 systems) used at rotation speed of 1,500 rpm without cooling. PMID:27110558

  15. In situ microradioscopy and microtomography of fatigue-loaded dental two-piece implants

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Wolfram; Zabler, Simon; Rack, Alexander; Fella, Christian; Balles, Andreas; Nelson, Katja; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Hanke, Randolf

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron real-time radioscopy and in situ microtomography are the only techniques providing direct visible information on a micrometre scale of local deformation in the implant–abutment connection (IAC) during and after cyclic loading. The microgap formation at the IAC has been subject to a number of studies as it has been proposed to be associated with long-term implant success. The next step in this scientific development is to focus on the in situ fatigue procedure of two-component dental implants. Therefore, an apparatus has been developed which is optimized for the in situ fatigue analysis of dental implants. This report demonstrates both the capability of in situ radioscopy and microtomography at the ID19 beamline for the study of cyclic deformation in dental implants. The first results show that it is possible to visualize fatigue loading of dental implants in real-time radioscopy in addition to the in situ fatigue tomography. For the latter, in situ microtomography is applied during the cyclic loading cycles in order to visualize the opening of the IAC microgap. These results concur with previous ex situ studies on similar systems. The setup allows for easily increasing the bending force, to simulate different chewing situations, and is, therefore, a versatile tool for examining the fatigue processes of dental implants and possibly other specimens. PMID:26524314

  16. Infrared Thermographic Assessment of Cooling Effectiveness in Selected Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kirstein, Karol; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Kosior, Piotr; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Dudek, Krzysztof; Fita, Katarzyna; Parulska, Olga; Rybak, Zbigniew; Skalec, Aleksandra; Szklarz, Magdalena; Janeczek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The excessive temperature fluctuations during dental implant site preparation may affect the process of bone-implant osseointegration. In the presented studies, we aimed to assess the quality of cooling during the use of 3 different dental implant systems (BEGO®, NEO BIOTECH®, and BIOMET 3i®). The swine rib was chosen as a study model. The preparation of dental implant site was performed with the use of 3 different speeds of rotation (800, 1,200, and 1,500 rpm) and three types of cooling: with saline solution at room temperature, with saline solution cooled down to 3°C, and without cooling. A statistically significant difference in temperature fluctuations was observed between BEGO and NEO BIOTECH dental systems when cooling with saline solution at 3°C was used (22.3°C versus 21.8°C). In case of all three evaluated dental implant systems, the highest temperature fluctuations occurred when pilot drills were used for implant site preparation. The critical temperature, defined in the available literature, was exceeded only in case of pilot drills (of all 3 systems) used at rotation speed of 1,500 rpm without cooling. PMID:27110558

  17. The effect of cigarette smoking habits on the outcome of dental implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sade, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of smoking habits and other possibly relevant factors on dental implant survival. The study population included all patients who underwent dental implants between the years 1999 and 2008 at a large military dental clinic and were examined in the periodic medical examination center. Correlation between implant characteristics and patients’ smoking habits, as mentioned in the questionnaire answered by patients in the periodic examination, was performed. Besides standard statistical methods, multiple linear regression models were constructed for estimation of the relative influence of some factors on implant survival rate. The long-term results of the implant treatment were good. The study refers to 7,680 implants. 7,359 (95.8%) survived and 321 (4.2%) did not survive. Concerning smoking habits, in a uni-variable analysis, factors found to have an association with implant survival were the smoking status of the patients (smoking/no smoking), the amount of smoking, passive smoking, and the time elapsed in ex-smokers from the time they ceased smoking to the time of implantation. In a multi-variable analysis, factors found to have an association with implant survival were smoking status (smoking/no smoking) and amounts of smoking as expressed in pack years. PMID:25237600

  18. Immediate Dental Implant Placements Using Osteotome Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Al-Almaie, Saad

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case describes the effect of the osteotome technique on the osseointegration of a mandibular dental implant in a 42-year-old female patient with dento-alveolar bony defects and to review the literature regarding immediate implant placement using osteotome technique. The amount of bone expansion at the alveolar ridge and the marginal bone resorption from the time of implant placement to one year after the implant's functional loading were recorded clinically. The esthetic outcome for the restored implant (the gingival margin) was achieved one years after the implant's functional loading. The surgical and prosthetic sites for the implant showed no postoperative complications, and no infection or wound dehiscence was recorded during the follow-up period. The osteotome technique is good for the purpose for which it was introduced, and its advantages with immediate implant placement include reduced surgical trauma and a shorter treatment time. PMID:27583046

  19. Classification of molar extraction sites for immediate dental implant placement: technical note.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard B; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    Dental implants may be successfully placed immediately into fresh extraction sockets when primary implant stability can be attained. This article presents a new classification system for molar extraction sites that describes extraction sockets based upon the bone available within the socket for stabilization of an immediately placed implant. Three categories--types A, B, and C--are employed: the type A socket, which allows for the implant to be placed completely within the septal bone, leaving no gaps between the implant and the socket walls; the type B socket, which has enough septal bone to stabilize but not completely surround the implant, leaving gaps between one or more surfaces of the implant and the socket walls; and the type C socket, which has little to no septal bone, thus requiring that the implant engage the periphery of the socket. Treatment protocols and relevant clinical examples are presented based upon the characterization of the socket according to this classification system. PMID:23748327

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma in association with dental implants: an assessment of previously hypothesized carcinogenic mechanisms and a case report.

    PubMed

    Bhatavadekar, Neel B

    2012-12-01

    Although dental implants have seen tremendous clinical success over the past few decades, there are some worrying reports in literature describing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in close association with dental implants. This article also provides a critical assessment of the published literature relating to the presence of carcinoma in association with dental implants, analyzing the previously published and hypothesized carcinogenic responses to an implant, to try and come to a conclusion regarding the plausibility and clinical risk for cancer formation in association with dental implants. An unusual case of an SCC noted in close proximity to a dental implant is also presented. A systematic search was conducted using Medline (PubMed), Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar with the search terms "cancer," "squamous cell carcinoma," "dental implant," "SCC," "peri-implantitis," "oral cancer," and "implantology" and using multiple combinations using Boolean operators "or" and "and." The search was not limited to dental literature; orthopedic and biomedical literature was also included. The results were then hand screened to pick out the relevant articles. In total, 14 previous published reports were found, where 24 dental implants were reported to be associated with SCC. Not all the reported patients had a history of cancer, but contributory factors such as smoking were found. An analysis of the biological plausibility of previously proposed carcinogenic mechanisms, such as corrosion, metallic ion release, and particulate debris, did not support the etiologic role for dental implants in cancer development, and the standardized incidence ratio was found to be extremely low (0.00017). Peri-implantitis should be assessed cautiously in patients receiving implants who have a previous history of cancer. Dental implants are a safe treatment modality based on the published data, and any change in surgical protocol is not mandated. PMID:21574824

  1. Biomechanical 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Obturator Protheses Retained with Zygomatic and Dental Implants in Maxillary Defects

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Canan; Yaluğ, Suat

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the stress distribution in the bone around zygomatic and dental implants for 3 different implant-retained obturator prostheses designs in a Aramany class IV maxillary defect using 3-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). Material\\Methods A 3-dimensional finite element model of an Aramany class IV defect was created. Three different implant-retained obturator prostheses were modeled: model 1 with 1 zygomatic implant and 1 dental implant, model 2 with 1 zygomatic implant and 2 dental implants, and model 3 with 2 zygomatic implants. Locator attachments were used as a superstructure. A 150-N load was applied 3 different ways. Qualitative analysis was based on the scale of maximum principal stress; values obtained through quantitative analysis are expressed in MPa. Results In all loading conditions, model 3 (when compared models 1 and 2) showed the lowest maximum principal stress value. Model 3 is the most appropirate reconstruction in Aramany class IV maxillary defects. Two zygomatic implants can reduce the stresses in model 3. The distribution of stresses on prostheses were more rational with the help of zygoma implants, which can distribute the stresses on each part of the maxilla. Conclusions Aramany class IV obturator prosthesis placement of 2 zygomatic implants in each side of the maxilla is more advantageous than placement of dental implants. In the non-defective side, increasing the number of dental implants is not as suitable as zygomatic implants. PMID:25714086

  2. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shadid, Rola Muhammed; Sadaqah, Nasrin Rushdi; Othman, Sahar Abdo

    2014-01-01

    Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability. PMID:25126094

  3. Use of HTR synthetic bone grafts in conjunction with immediate dental implants.

    PubMed

    Yukna, Raymond A; Sayed-Suleyman, Amer; Finley, James M; Hochstedler, J; Mayer, Elizabeth T

    2003-09-01

    Immediate placement of dental implants in fresh extraction sockets is associated with remaining voids around the implants and often a partial dehiscence or thinning of the facial alveolar plate. Nine patients had Bioplant HTR synthetic bone used as a ridge preservation/augmentation material in conjunction with immediate placement of 10 implants. Hard tissue replacement (HTR) was used to fill the remaining socket void and enhance the facial ridge width, and the wound closed as completely as possible. Dental implants were uncovered at approximately 6 months. Measurements taken of the internal socket width and total ridge width at the implant placement and uncovering showed the mean internal socket width was maintained (7.2 mm vs 6.9 mm), and the total ridge width exhibited a mean change from 9.6 mm to 8.8 mm. Of the 10 implant sites, 7 showed a net increase, 2 no change, and 1 a decrease in overall ridge width. All 10 implants were restored for at least 6 months. These clinical results suggest that HTR is a useful adjunct in the placement of immediate dental implants for the preservation of ridge width and provides a good base for functional and esthetic prosthetic reconstruction. PMID:14596206

  4. Impact of excessive occlusal load on successfully-osseointegrated dental implants: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael; Chronopoulos, Vasileios; Mattheos, Nikos

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the available evidence on the response of the peri-implant bone when subjected to excessive occlusal forces. The search strategy included papers published in English in the Medline database and the Wiley Online Library from January 1991 to December 2011. Experimental or review papers reporting the conditions of the peri-implant bone of dental implants submitted to excessive occlusal loading in the presence of a controlled oral hygiene regime were eligible for inclusion. The knowledge regarding the response of the peri-implant bone when the dental implant is excessively loaded is limited, and the level of evidence is poor. With animal experimental studies showing conflicting results, it is unclear whether occlusal overload might cause marginal bone loss or total loss of osseointegration to already osseointegrated dental implants when the applied load exceeds the biologically-acceptable limit. This biological limit is also unknown. Furthermore, higher remodeling activity of the peri-implant bone is found around implants subjected to high loading forces. PMID:23918506

  5. Annual bone loss and success rates of dental implants based on radiographic measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Liu, Y; Wismeijer, D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Bone loss around dental implants is generally measured by monitoring changes in marginal bone level using radiographs. After the first year of implantation, an implant should have <0.2 mm annual loss of marginal bone level to satisfy the criteria of success. However, the process of measuring marginal bone level on radiographs has a precision of 0.2 mm (or more) owing to variations in exposure geometry, exposure time and observer perception. Therefore, the value of the annual loss may vary considerably, especially when short intervals are considered. This study investigates how the success rate of dental implants depends on the way annual bone loss is calculated. Methods: Panoramic radiographs of 82 implant patients with an average follow-up of 10.4 years were analysed. Marginal bone levels near the implants were indicated by one observer. The annual loss of marginal bone level was determined according to four different calculation methods. Results: The methods yielded success rates of 9%, 45%, 81% and 89%. Conclusions: The success rate of dental implants measured on radiographs greatly depends on the details of the calculation method. Without rigorous standardization, annual bone loss and implant success rate are not well defined. PMID:25030551

  6. Retrospective study of sintered porous-surfaced dental implants placed in the augmented sinus.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Dong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Mok; Park, In-Sook; Jung, Heui-Seung; Park, Do-Young; Shin, Im-Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical and radiographic outcomes of sintered porous-surfaced dental implants placed in partially edentulous posterior maxillae. The study group consisted of 42 partially edentulous patients who received sinus augmentation using the lateral window technique or crestal approach at Catholic University Hospital of Daegu and one private clinic. The 42 patients received a total of 92 sintered porous-surfaced dental implants in the edentulous posterior maxillae. All implants were restored with fixed prostheses. Of the 92 implants, 17 implants were restored with individual (nonsplinted) crowns, while 75 implants were splinted to other implants. Panoramic views and periapical radiographs using the standardized long-cone paralleling technique were taken at the first visit, postoperatively, at the time of prosthesis seating, and at a follow-up visit. Survival rates of implants in relation to location, length, diameter, crown-to-implant (C/I) ratio, and type of prosthesis were investigated. Statistical data were analyzed using software with the chi-square test. Of the 92 implants, 8 (8.7%) were removed, and the cumulative survival rate was 91.3% after a maximum 9-year functional period (mean: 72.8 months; range: 11 to 107 months). There were no statistical differences in relation to the location of implants, C/I ratio, or type of prosthesis. However, there were statistical differences in relation to the length and diameter of implants. Average crestal bone loss was 0.68 mm at 1-year follow-up and 1.13 mm at final examination. All implants were inserted in the augmented maxillary sites. The cumulative survival rate of sintered porous-surfaced implants in posterior maxillae was 91.3%. Sintered porous-surfaced implants showed satisfactory results in the edentulous posterior maxillae. PMID:25006774

  7. Finite element analysis of the biomechanical effects of PEEK dental implants on the peri-implant bone.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, A D; Abou-Emara, M; Spintig, T; Lackmann, J; Müller, W D

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are mostly fabricated of titanium. Potential problems associated with these implants are discussed in the literature, for example, overloading of the jawbone during mastication due to the significant difference in the elastic moduli of titanium (110 GPa) and bone (≈1-30 GPa). Therefore poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) could represent an alternative biomaterial (elastic modulus 3-4 GPa). Endolign(®) represents an implantable carbon fiber reinforced (CFR)-PEEK including parallel oriented endless carbon fibers. According to the manufacturer it has an elastic modulus of 150 GPa. PEEK compounds filled with powders show an elastic modulus around 4 GPa. The aim of the present finite element analysis was to point out the differences in the biomechanical behavior of a dental implant of Endolign(®) and a commercial powder-filled PEEK. Titanium served as control. These three materials were used for a platform-switched dental implant-abutment assembly, whereas Type 1 completely consisted of titanium, Type 2 of a powder-filled PEEK and Type 3 of Endolign(®). A force of 100 N was applied vertically and of 30° to the implant axis. All types showed a minimum safety factor regarding the yield strength of cortical bone. However, within the limits of this study the Type 2 implant showed higher stresses within the adjacent cortical bone than Type 1 and Type 3. These implant assemblies showed similar stress distributions. Endless carbon fibers give PEEK a high stability. Further investigations are necessary to evaluate whether there is a distinct amount of endless carbon fibers causing an optimal stress distribution behavior of CFR-PEEK. PMID:25435385

  8. Unintentional root fragment retention in proximity to dental implants: a series of six human case reports.

    PubMed

    Langer, Laureen; Langer, Burton; Salem, Daliah

    2015-01-01

    There has been renewed interest in intentionally placing dental implants in proximity to or in contact with tooth root fragments. In clinical practice, human teeth are usually extracted due to nonrestorable caries, vertical or horizontal root fractures, periodontal disease, or endodontic failure, which is commonly accompanied by inflammation and bacterial contamination. The aim of this case series is to present the adverse effects in humans of clinically undetected root-to-implant contact (CURIC), where implants were unintentionally placed in proximity to undetected retained root fragments. The adverse effects of small (3 to 5 mm) root fragments were detectible 6 to 48 months post implant placement. Three out of seven implants in six patients were removed due to severe coronal bone loss. This differs from retrograde peri-implantitis, where only the apical area of the implant is affected and the coronal portion remains integrated. The detrimental effect of root fragment-to-implant contact is described along with its clinical management. Based on the review of currently relevant data, mixed results have been documented regarding the success of dental implants in proximity to tooth-root fragments. Careful evaluation of long-term, postloading results in humans where hopeless teeth have been extracted due to infection and significant bone loss are required before intentional root fragment retention is considered a safe and reliable clinical option for implant placement. PMID:25909518

  9. Frequency of Dental Implants Placed in the Esthetic Zone in Dental Clinic of Tehran University: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Rasouli Ghahroudi, Amir Alireza; Homayouni, Ali; Rokn, Amir Reza; Kia, Fatemeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Khorsand, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Anterior maxilla, known as the esthetic zone, plays an important role in facial and smile esthetics. This study assessed the frequency of implant treatments in the esthetic zone of patients presenting to Dental Implant Department of Tehran University during 2002–2012. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on dental records of patients receiving implant treatment during 2002–2012. Patient records were retrieved from the archives and patient demographics, implant characteristics, failure rate, prevalence of complications and implant systems were collected. The data were reported as frequency and percentage. Results: Of a total of 2,381 implants placed in the mentioned time period, 492 (20.8%) had been placed in the anterior maxilla and 531 (22.3%) had been placed in the anterior mandible from canine to canine. Timing of implant placement was immediate in 12.0%, early in 0.5% and late in 87.4%. Survival rate was 99.1%. Rate of failure was 0.8%. Failure rate was 0.4% in the maxillary and 1.1% in the mandibular canine to canine region. Complications were reported in 10.1% of patients. Rate of complications was 18.3% in the maxillary canine to canine, 8.9% in the mandibular canine to canine, 18.1% in the maxillary first premolar to first premolar and 9.5% in the mandibular first premolar to first premolar. The frequency of bone grafts placed in these areas was 17.6%, 33.9%, 13.6%, 32.1% and 14.3%, respectively. Conclusion: Of implants placed in our center, around 20% were in the anterior maxilla, and delayed implant placement was the most commonly adopted technique.

  10. Computer-aided recognition of dental implants in X-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Pedro; Queirós, Sandro; Moreira, António H. J.; Ferreira, Adriano; Ferreira, Ernesto; Duque, Duarte; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    Dental implant recognition in patients without available records is a time-consuming and not straightforward task. The traditional method is a complete user-dependent process, where the expert compares a 2D X-ray image of the dental implant with a generic database. Due to the high number of implants available and the similarity between them, automatic/semi-automatic frameworks to aide implant model detection are essential. In this study, a novel computer-aided framework for dental implant recognition is suggested. The proposed method relies on image processing concepts, namely: (i) a segmentation strategy for semi-automatic implant delineation; and (ii) a machine learning approach for implant model recognition. Although the segmentation technique is the main focus of the current study, preliminary details of the machine learning approach are also reported. Two different scenarios are used to validate the framework: (1) comparison of the semi-automatic contours against implant's manual contours of 125 X-ray images; and (2) classification of 11 known implants using a large reference database of 601 implants. Regarding experiment 1, 0.97±0.01, 2.24±0.85 pixels and 11.12±6 pixels of dice metric, mean absolute distance and Hausdorff distance were obtained, respectively. In experiment 2, 91% of the implants were successfully recognized while reducing the reference database to 5% of its original size. Overall, the segmentation technique achieved accurate implant contours. Although the preliminary classification results prove the concept of the current work, more features and an extended database should be used in a future work.

  11. Significant improvement of the osseointegration of zirconia dental implants by HS-LEIS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekmans, H.; Breitenstein, D.; Brongersma, H. H.; de Ridder, M.; Tromp, Th. J.

    2010-06-01

    The use of sintered yttria stabilized zirconia dental implants is a recent development. After initial successes with these new implants a pattern of erratic results emerged. Reliable osseointegration would not always occur. High-sensitivity low energy ion scattering (HS-LEIS) is used to investigate both virgin and rejected implants. The surfaces of the implant are found to be covered with both an organic and inorganic contamination layer. Sterilization does not remove this contamination. Using LEIS as analytic tool a new cleaning process has been developed. Since this cleaning process is in use, the failure rate has dropped to a very low value.

  12. Temperature elevations in endosseous dental implants and the peri-implant bone during diode-laser-assisted surface decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreisler, Matthias; Schoof, Juergen; Langnau, Ernst; Al Haj, Haitham; d'Hoedt, Bernd

    2002-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate temperature elevations in the implant surface and the peri-implant bone during simulated surface decontamination of endosseous dental implants with an 809 nm semiconductor laser. Stepped cylinder implants were inserted into bone blocks cut from resected pig femurs. An artificial peri-implant bone defect provided access for the irradiation of the implant surface. A 600 micron optic fiber was used at a distance of 0.5 mm from the implant surface. Power output varied between 0.5 and 2.5 W in the cw-mode. Power density was between 176.9 and 884.6 Wcm-2. The bone block was placed into a 37 degree(s)C water bath in order to simulate in vivo thermal conductivity and diffusitivity of heat. Temperature elevations during irradiation were registered by means of K-Type thermocouples and a short wave thermocamera. In a time and energy-dependant manner, the critical threshold of 47 degree(s)C was exceeded in the peri-implant bone. Surface peak temperatures in the focus of up to 427.8 degree(s)C were observed. Implant surface decontamination with an 809 nm GaAlAs laser must be limited to a maximum of 10 s at an energy density below 350 wcm-2 to ensure a safe clinical treatment.

  13. Mandibular reconstruction using free vascularized iliac crest grafts and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    MOLDOVAN, IULIU; JUNCAR, MIHAI; DINU, CRISTIAN; ONISOR-GLIGOR, FLORIN; ROTAR, HORATIU; BRAN, SIMION; BACIUT, GRIGORE

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim The mandible is frequently affected by tumor masses present in the oral cavity and is included in the tumor ablation procedure, with major functional and esthetic consequences for the patient. A method of high current interest in mandibular reconstruction is based on the use of free vascularized iliac crest grafts, followed by reconstruction using dental implants. Methods This study presents the case of four patients benefiting from this treatment method, and monitors the treatment stages and their clinical evolution after mandibular reconstruction and dental implant placement. Results The postoperative evolution of the patients was favorable, with the integration of the iliac crest grafts and dental implants. After prosthetic loading, the masticatory as well as the esthetic function of the patients was restored to a standard close to the initial one. Conclusions This mandibular reconstruction method proved to be effective, with a high degree of reliability and a significant improvement of the patients’ quality of life. PMID:26609275

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma and dental implants: A systematic review of case reports.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, S; Rajkumar, E; Mary, G Geena; Khan, Parvez Ahmad; Gopal, Harish; Roy, Soumya; Maheswaran, T; Anand, B

    2015-08-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death world-wide. Apart from the most common etiopathological factors related to cancer, at times very rare causes such as irritant or foreign body induced carcinogenesis is not to be overlooked. To systematically review case reports concerned with the association between dental implants and oral squamous cell carcinoma. A Medline (PubMed), Cochrane database, and Google Scholar search was conducted of dental article published in English related to case reports concerned with oral squamous cell carcinoma occurring around dental implants from 2000 to 2014. Twenty articles were retrieved, which included 20 rare case reports which were systematically reviewed and the results were obtained pertaining to age, clinical symptoms, habits, previous history of cancer, potentially malignant disorders, systemic illness, and local factors. It is imperative to identify promptly persisting inflammation associated with implants. Since malignancy may disguise as periimplantitis, especially in patients who are at risk with contributing prominent predisposing factors. PMID:26538881

  15. The effect of mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants during healing abutment replacement.

    PubMed

    Nissan, J; Zenziper, E; Rosner, O; Kolerman, R; Chaushu, L; Chaushu, G

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue shrinkage during the course of restoring dental implants may result in biological and prosthodontic difficulties. This study was conducted to measure the continuous shrinkage of the mucosal cuff around dental implants following the removal of the healing abutment up to 60 s. Individuals treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures were included. Implant data--location, type, length, diameter and healing abutments' dimensions--were recorded. Mucosal cuff shrinkage, following removal of the healing abutments, was measured in bucco-lingual direction at four time points--immediately after 20, 40 and 60 s. anova was used to for statistical analysis. Eighty-seven patients (49 women and 38 men) with a total of 311 implants were evaluated (120 maxilla; 191 mandible; 291 posterior segments; 20 anterior segments). Two-hundred and five (66%) implants displayed thick and 106 (34%) thin gingival biotype. Time was the sole statistically significant parameter affecting mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants (P < 0.001). From time 0 to 20, 40 and 60 s, the mean diameter changed from 4.1 to 4.07, 3.4 and 2.81 mm, respectively. The shrinkage was 1%, 17% and 31%, respectively. The gingival biotype had no statistically significant influence on mucosal cuff shrinkage (P = 0.672). Time required replacing a healing abutment with a prosthetic element should be minimised (up to 20/40 s), to avoid pain, discomfort and misfit. PMID:26132112

  16. Superior biofunctionality of dental implant fixtures uniformly coated with durable bioglass films by magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Popa, A C; Stan, G E; Enculescu, M; Tanase, C; Tulyaganov, D U; Ferreira, J M F

    2015-11-01

    Bioactive glasses are currently considered the suitable candidates to stir the quest for a new generation of osseous implants with superior biological/functional performance. In congruence with this vision, this contribution aims to introduce a reliable technological recipe for coating fairly complex 3D-shaped implants (e.g. dental screws) with uniform and mechanical resistant bioactive glass films by the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering method. The mechanical reliability of the bioactive glass films applied to real Ti dental implant fixtures has been evaluated by a procedure comprised of "cold" implantation in pig mandibular bone from a dead animal, followed by immediate tension-free extraction tests. The effects of the complex mechanical strains occurring during implantation were analysed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron dispersive spectroscopy. Extensive biocompatibility assays (MTS, immunofluorescence, Western blot) revealed that the bioactive glass films stimulated strong cellular adhesion and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells, without promoting their differentiation. The ability of the implant coatings to conserve a healthy stem cell pool is promising to further endorse the fabrication of new osseointegration implant designs with extended lifetime. PMID:26282074

  17. Random spectrum loading of dental implants: An alternative approach to functional performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D

    2016-09-01

    The fatigue performance of dental implants is usually assessed on the basis of cyclic S/N curves. This neither provides information on the anticipated service performance of the implant, nor does it allow for detailed comparisons between implants unless a thorough statistical analysis is performed, of the kind not currently required by certification standards. The notion of endurance limit is deemed to be of limited applicability, given unavoidable stress concentrations and random load excursions, that all characterize dental implants and their service conditions. We propose a completely different approach, based on random spectrum loading, as long used in aeronautical design. The implant is randomly loaded by a sequence of loads encompassing all load levels it would endure during its service life. This approach provides a quantitative and comparable estimate of its performance in terms of lifetime, based on the very fact that the implant will fracture sooner or later, instead of defining a fatigue endurance limit of limited practical application. Five commercial monolithic Ti-6Al-4V implants were tested under cyclic, and another 5 under spectrum loading conditions, at room temperature and dry air. The failure modes and fracture planes were identical for all implants. The approach is discussed, including its potential applications, for systematic, straightforward and reliable comparisons of various implant designs and environments, without the need for cumbersome statistical analyses. It is believed that spectrum loading can be considered for the generation of new standardization procedures and design applications. PMID:27161957

  18. Bone regeneration associated with nontherapeutic and therapeutic surface coatings for dental implants in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Hamdan S; Jansen, John A

    2013-06-01

    Oral implantology is considered as the treatment of choice for replacing missing teeth in elderly people. However, implant complications may occur in patients with osteoporosis. The pathogenesis underlying osteoporosis is due to an alteration in bone cell response to hormonal, nutritional, and aging factors. For such challenging situations, improved bone regeneration has been shown around dental implants for certain surface modifications. These modifications include coatings of titanium implants with calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics. Surface coating developments also allow for the addition of organic biomolecules, like growth factors, into the inorganic coatings that increase the bone formation process at the bone-implant interface. The application of therapeutic-based coatings is becoming a rapidly growing research field of interest. CaP-coated implants have the ability to incorporate anti-osteoporotic drugs, which then can be locally released over time from an implant surface in a controlled manner. Thus, it can be anticipated that nontherapeutic and/or therapeutic coated implants can significantly increase low bone density as well as improve impaired bone regeneration in osteoporosis. This review aims to provide a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms for impaired bone regeneration around dental implants in osteoporosis. Secondly, the review will focus on biological interactions and beneficial role of the surface-coated (i.e., nontherapeutics and therapeutics) bone implants in osteoporotic bone tissue. PMID:23088597

  19. Clinical evidence on titanium-zirconium dental implants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Altuna, P; Lucas-Taulé, E; Gargallo-Albiol, J; Figueras-Álvarez, O; Hernández-Alfaro, F; Nart, J

    2016-07-01

    The use of titanium implants is well documented and they have high survival and success rates. However, when used as reduced-diameter implants, the risk of fracture is increased. Narrow diameter implants (NDIs) of titanium-zirconium (Ti-Zr) alloy have recently been developed (Roxolid; Institut Straumann AG). Ti-Zr alloys (two highly biocompatible materials) demonstrate higher tensile strength than commercially pure titanium. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the existing clinical evidence on dental NDIs made from Ti-Zr. A systematic literature search was performed using the Medline database to find relevant articles on clinical studies published in the English language up to December 2014. Nine clinical studies using Ti-Zr implants were identified. Overall, 607 patients received 922 implants. The mean marginal bone loss was 0.36±0.06mm after 1 year and 0.41±0.09mm after 2 years. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 36 months. Mean survival and success rates were 98.4% and 97.8% at 1 year after implant placement and 97.7% and 97.3% at 2 years. Narrow diameter Ti-Zr dental implants show survival and success rates comparable to regular diameter titanium implants (>95%) in the short term. Long-term follow-up clinical data are needed to confirm the excellent clinical performance of these implants. PMID:26852292

  20. Removal of dental implants: review of five different techniques.

    PubMed

    Stajčić, Z; Stojčev Stajčić, L J; Kalanović, M; Đinić, A; Divekar, N; Rodić, M

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study were to review five different explantation techniques for the removal of failing implants and to propose a practical clinical protocol. During a 10-year period, 95 implants were explanted from 81 patients. Explantation techniques used were the bur-forceps (BF), neo bur-elevator-forceps (ηBEF), trephine drill (TD), high torque wrench (HTW), and scalpel-forceps (SF) techniques. The following parameters were analyzed: indications for explanation, site of implantation, and the type, diameter, and length of the implant removed. The most frequent indications for implant removal were peri-implantitis (n=37) and crestal bone loss (n=48). The posterior maxilla was the most frequent site of implant removal (n=48). The longer implants were more frequently removed (n=78). The majority of implants were removed after 1 year in function (n=69). The BF/ηBEF and SF techniques were found to be the most efficient. Explantation techniques appeared to be successful for the removal of failing implants. The BF/ηBEF and SF techniques demonstrated 100% success. The ηBEF technique enabled safe insertion of a new implant in the same explantation site. The HTW technique appeared to be the most elegant technique with the highest predictability for insertion of another implant. An explantation protocol is proposed. PMID:26688293

  1. Cerebellopontine angle mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after dental implant placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Momota, Y; Kani, K; Takano, H; Azuma, M

    2015-09-01

    This is a rare case report of a cerebellopontine angle (CPA) mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after a dental implant placement. Lingual nerve injury is a common complication following dental implant placement. CPA masses are likely to cause symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia, and thus can mimic and be easily confused with oral diseases. We experienced a case of CPA mass mimicking lingual nerve injury after dental implant placement. The patient was a 57-year-old Japanese female who complained of glossalgia. She underwent dental implant placement in the mandible before visiting our clinic. Panoramic x-ray radiography revealed no abnormalities; the salivary flow rate by gum test was 7.0 ml/10 min. She was diagnosed with lingual nerve injury and secondary burning mouth syndrome. Vitamin B12 and oral moisturizer did not provide relief; furthermore, numbness in the lower lip emerged. A Semmes Weinstein test demonstrated elevation of her sensitivity threshold. Finally, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 20-mm diameter mass in the CPA. The patient is now being followed under conservative management. Our experience underscores the importance of including CPA mass in the differential diagnosis of dental diseases. PMID:25280059

  2. Survival of batch numbers within dental implants following incineration as an aid to identification.

    PubMed

    Berketa, J; James, H; Marino, V

    2010-12-01

    Dental implants have become a popular choice of treatment in replacing individual lost teeth or entire dentitions. The physical properties of high corrosion resistance, high structural strength and high melting point, suggest the retention of intact implants following most physical assaults. As the implants are machine made, they lack the individualisation required for their use as identifiers of the deceased, however the Straumann™ Company (Waldenburg, Switzerland) has recently released information that within the chamber of their implants they have laser etched batch numbers. The number of implants with the same batch number varies from 24 to 2400. The purpose of this study was to ascertain if the batch number was still identifiable following intense heat exposure in a furnace. A Straumann™ Standard Plus 3.3 x 8 mm implant, with no healing cap nor abutment attached was incinerated to 1125 degrees Celsius. Another Straumann™ Standard Plus 3.3 x 8 mm implant was also incinerated in the same way as the first implant but with an abutment attached. The results indicated that the first implant had totally oxidised within the internal chamber whilst the second implant following the removal of the abutment revealed an intact identifiable batch number. If the companies constructing implants were to place individual serial numbers rather than batch numbers on these implants then the potential exists for a new approach to be established for the identification of the deceased. PMID:21239857

  3. Dental implant removal to facilitate suspension laryngoscopy and laser treatment of an obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    Hume-Smith, H; Fowler, A; Vaz, F; Suaris, P

    2010-01-01

    A 29-year-old patient presented with dysphonia, dysphagia and a progressive history of stridor over 6 weeks. His past medical history included childhood nasolabial rhabdomyosarcoma treated by surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This had resulted in marked abnormalities of the facial skeleton, limited neck extension and restricted mouth opening of 1 cm, in part due to dental implants. After careful discussion and planning within a multidisciplinary team, the airway was optimised by temporary removal of the dental implants. This enabled a suspension laryngoscope to be passed, permitting carbon dioxide laser treatment to an obstruction at the laryngeal inlet and eliminating the need for a tracheostomy. PMID:19849679

  4. Rehabilitation of orbital defect with silicone orbital prosthesis retained by dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Guttal, Satyabodh Shesharaj; Desai, Jhanvi; Kudva, Adarsh; Patil, Basavaraj R

    2016-01-01

    Orbital defects can result from cancer, birth anomalies, or trauma leading to an onslaught of problems in the function and psyche of the patient. These defects are restored by surgical reconstruction and followed by placement of orbital prosthesis for cosmetic makeup. The use of dental implants in retaining orbital prosthesis improves patient acceptance of the prosthesis owing to better retention and stability than conventional adhesive retained prosthesis. This case report describes a custom-made magnetic retentive assembly anchored by a dental implant which offers the orbital prosthesis the simplicity of self-alignment and ease of use. PMID:26953033

  5. Surface Damage on Dental Implants with Release of Loose Particles after Insertion into Bone

    PubMed Central

    Senna, Plinio; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Kates, Stephen; Meirelles, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Modern dental implants present surface features of distinct dimensions that can be damaged during the insertion procedure into bone. Purpose The aims of this study were (1) to quantify by means of roughness parameters the surface damage caused by the insertion procedure of dental implants and (2) to investigate the presence of loose particles at the interface. Materials and Methods Three groups of dental implants representing different surface topographies were inserted in fresh cow rib bone blocks. The surface roughness was characterized by interferometry on the same area before and after the insertion. SEM-BSD analysis was used to identify loose particles at the interface. Results The amplitude and hybrid roughness parameters of all three groups were lower after insertion. The surface presenting predominance of peaks (Ssk>0) associated to higher structures (height parameters) presented higher damage associated to more pronounced reduction of material volume. SEM-BSD images revealed loose titanium and aluminum particles at the interface mainly at the crestal cortical bone level. Conclusions Shearing forces during the insertion procedure alters the surface of dental implants. Loose metal particles can be generated at bone-implant interface especially around surfaces composed mainly by peaks and with increased height parameters. PMID:24283455

  6. A contrast and registration template for magnetic resonance image data guided dental implant placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Cosgarea, Raluca; Rieker, Marcus; Kress, Bodo; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    An oral imaging template was developed to address the shortcomings of MR image data for image guided dental implant planning and placement. The template was conctructed as a gadolinium filled plastic shell to give contrast to the dentition and also to be accurately re-attachable for use in image guided dental implant placement. The result of segmentation and modelling of the dentition from MR Image data with the template was compared to plaster casts of the dentition. In a phantom study dental implant placement was performed based on MR image data. MR imaging with the contrast template allowed complete representation of the existing dentition. In the phantom study, a commercially available system for image guided dental implant placement was used. Transformation of the imaging contrast template into a surgical drill guide based on the MR image data resulted in pilot burr hole placement with an accuracy of 2 mm. MRI based imaging of the existing dentition for proper image guided planning is possible with the proposed template. Using the image data and the template resulted in less accurate pilot burr hole placement in comparison to CT-based image guided implant placement.

  7. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2-8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  8. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2–8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  9. [Dental feats 1. An implant-supported orbital prosthesis after ablative tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Cune, M S; Bogie, L B; van Es, R J; Verhoeven, J W; Steijvers, M P; Rutges, P J

    2003-07-01

    Extraoral implants are used with increasing frequency, in order to provide retention for facial prostheses. Facial prostheses can replace lost extraoral hard and soft tissues using acrylic or silicone materials. The surgeon, maxillofacial prosthodontist and dental technician are facing particular treatment considerations and practical problems. Some of these are demonstrated and discussed in this article by means of a case-report. A patient received an orbital prosthesis which obtains its retention from implants, placed in the lateral orbital rim. PMID:12891887

  10. Nasopalatine duct cyst developed in association with dental implant treatment: A case report and histopathological observation

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Kenji; Funaki, Katsuyuki; Jimbo, Ryo; Takahashi, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Placement of an anterior maxillary implant has a risk of interfering with the nasopalatine canal in the maxilla. This case report presents one of our experiences of a nasopalatine duct cyst that developed in association with a dental implant treatment. A 45-year-old man received an implant in the maxillary left central incisor due to root fracture. Preoperative radiograph indicated no anatomical abnormalities. A postextraction immediate implant was placed, and radiographic examination after 28 months revealed an asymptomatic, oval-shaped radiolucency around the apex of the implant, seemingly in contact to the nasopalatine canal. The entire lesion was removed along with a part of the implant. Histopathologically it was diagnosed as nasopalatine duct cyst. Accidental contact with the nasopalatine canal during surgery may have induced development of the nasopalatine duct cyst. Careful planning based on preoperative computed tomography scan may prevent such complications. PMID:24250105

  11. Immediate Dental Implant Placements Using Osteotome Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Almaie, Saad

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case describes the effect of the osteotome technique on the osseointegration of a mandibular dental implant in a 42-year-old female patient with dento-alveolar bony defects and to review the literature regarding immediate implant placement using osteotome technique. The amount of bone expansion at the alveolar ridge and the marginal bone resorption from the time of implant placement to one year after the implant’s functional loading were recorded clinically. The esthetic outcome for the restored implant (the gingival margin) was achieved one years after the implant’s functional loading. The surgical and prosthetic sites for the implant showed no postoperative complications, and no infection or wound dehiscence was recorded during the follow-up period. The osteotome technique is good for the purpose for which it was introduced, and its advantages with immediate implant placement include reduced surgical trauma and a shorter treatment time. PMID:27583046

  12. Dental implants installed in irradiated jaws: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chambrone, L; Mandia, J; Shibli, J A; Romito, G A; Abrahao, M

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the survival rate of titanium implants placed in irradiated jaws. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched for studies assessing implants that had been placed in nongrafted sites of irradiated patients. Random effects meta-analyses assessed implant loss in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients and in irradiated patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Of 1,051 potentially eligible publications, 15 were included. A total of 10,150 implants were assessed in the included studies, and of these, 1,689 (14.3%) had been placed in irradiated jaws. The mean survival rate in the studies ranged from 46.3% to 98.0%. The pooled estimates indicated a significant increase in the risk of implant failure in irradiated patients (risk ratio: 2.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.86, 4.05; p < .00001) and in maxillary sites (risk ratio: 5.96; 95% confidence interval: 2.71, 13.12; p < .00001). Conversely, HBO therapy did not reduce the risk of implant failure (risk ratio: 1.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 8.82; p = .80). Radiotherapy was linked to higher implant failure in the maxilla, and HBO therapy did not improve implant survival. Most included publications reported data on machined implants, and only 3 studies on HBO therapy were included. Overall, implant therapy appears to be a viable treatment option for reestablishing adequate occlusion and masticatory conditions in irradiated patients. PMID:24158336

  13. Predicting Clustered Dental Implant Survival Using Frailty Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, S.-K.; Cai, T.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict future implant survival using information on risk factors and on the survival status of an individual’s existing implant(s). We considered a retrospective cohort study with 677 individuals having 2349 implants placed. We proposed to predict the survival probabilities using the Cox proportional hazards frailty model, with three important risk factors: smoking status, timing of placement, and implant staging. For a non-smoking individual with 2 implants placed, an immediate implant and in one stage, the marginal probability that 1 implant would survive 12 months was 85.8% (95%CI: 77%, 91.7%), and the predicted joint probability of surviving for 12 months was 75.1% (95%CI: 62.1%, 84.7%). If 1 implant was placed earlier and had survived for 12 months, then the second implant had an 87.5% (95%CI: 80.3%, 92.4%) chance of surviving 12 months. Such conditional and joint predictions can assist in clinical decision-making for individuals. PMID:17122171

  14. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser. PMID:27365109

  15. Nanomodified Peek Dental Implants: Bioactive Composites and Surface Modification—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Siddiqui, Fahad; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this review is to summarize and evaluate the relevant literature regarding the different ways how polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be modified to overcome its limited bioactivity, and thereby making it suitable as a dental implant material. Study Selection. An electronic literature search was conducted via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases using the keywords “PEEK dental implants,” “nano,” “osseointegration,” “surface treatment,” and “modification.” A total of 16 in vivo and in vitro studies were found suitable to be included in this review. Results. There are many viable methods to increase the bioactivity of PEEK. Most methods focus on increasing the surface roughness, increasing the hydrophilicity and coating osseoconductive materials. Conclusion. There are many ways in which PEEK can be modified at a nanometer level to overcome its limited bioactivity. Melt-blending with bioactive nanoparticles can be used to produce bioactive nanocomposites, while spin-coating, gas plasma etching, electron beam, and plasma-ion immersion implantation can be used to modify the surface of PEEK implants in order to make them more bioactive. However, more animal studies are needed before these implants can be deemed suitable to be used as dental implants. PMID:26495000

  16. Early detachment of titanium particles from various different surfaces of endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; Bacchelli, B; Martini, D; Pasquale, V De; Orsini, E; Ottani, V; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Giardino, R; Ruggeri, A

    2004-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) endosseous dental screws with different surfaces (smooth titanium--STi, titanium plasma-sprayed-TPS, alumina oxide sandblasted and acid-etched--Al-SLA, zirconium oxide sandblasted and acid etched--Zr-SLA) were implanted in femura and tibiae of sheep to investigate the biological evolution of the peri-implant tissues and detachment of Ti debris from the implant surfaces in early healing. Implants were not loaded. Sections of the screws and the peri-implant tissues obtained by sawing and grinding were analysed by light microscopy immediately after implantation (time 0) and after 14 days. All samples showed new bone trabeculae and vascularised medullary spaces in those areas where gaps between the implants and host bone were visible. In contrast, no osteogenesis was induced in the areas where the implants were initially positioned in close contact with the host bone. Chips of the pre-existing bone inducing new peri-implant neo-osteogenesis were surrounded by new bone trabeculae. The threads of some screws appeared to be deformed where the host bone showed fractures. Ti granules of 3-60 microm were detectable only in the peri-implant tissues of TPS implants both immediately after surgery and after 14 days, thus suggesting that this phenomenon may be related to the friction of the TPS coating during surgical insertion. PMID:14741589

  17. Assessment of metal artefact reduction around dental titanium implants in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, N; Hassan, B; Syriopoulos, K; van der Stelt, P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if the metal artefact reduction (MAR) tool used in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP300 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) can improve the gray value levels in post-operative implant scans. Methods: 20 potential implant sites were selected from 5 edentulous human dry mandibles. Each mandible was scanned by a CBCT scanner, and images were produced under three different conditions: implant sites drilled but no implants inserted, implants inserted without application of MAR and implants inserted with application of MAR. Using Geomagic® Studio 2012 (Geomagic, Morrisville, NC) and 3Diagnosys® v. 5.3.1 (3Diemme® SRL, Cantù, Italy) software, three scans of each mandible were superimposed. The mean gray value of identical regions of bone around the implants was derived for each condition. The differences between gray value measurements at implant sites derived from different conditions were assessed. Results: A significant difference was found between mean gray values from the scans with no implants inserted and with implants inserted (with and without MAR) (p = 0.012). No significant difference was revealed for gray values measured from scans with and without MAR (p = 0.975). Conclusions: The MAR tool in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH OP300 CBCT scanner does not significantly correct the voxel gray values affected by the metal artefact in the vicinity of an implant in human dry mandibles. PMID:25135316

  18. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Pozhitkov, Alex E.; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y.; Leroux, Brian G.; Hunter, Colby M.; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Noble, Peter A.; Bryers, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient’s mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4–5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients. PMID:26461491

  19. Multiple teeth replacement with endosseous one-piece yttrium-stabilized zirconia dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea E.; Fabbri, Alberto; Censi, Rachele; Maiorana, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to clinically and radiographically evaluate survival and success rate of multiple zirconia dental implants positioned in each patient during a follow-up period of at least 12 months up to 48 months. Study Design: Eight patients were treated for multiple edentulism with 29 zirconia dental implants. All implants received immediate temporary restorations and 6 months after surgery were definitively restored. 6 months to 4 years after implant insertion, a clinical-radiographic evaluation was performed in order to estimate peri-implant tissues health and peri-implant marginal bone loss. Results: Survival rate within follow-up period was therefore 100%. The average marginal bone loss (MBL) from baseline to 6 months was +1.375±0.388 mm; from 6 months to 1 year was +0.22±0.598 mm; from 1 year to 2 years was -0.368±0.387 mm; from 2 years to 3 years was -0.0669±0.425 mm; from 3 years to 4 years +0.048±0.262 mm. The mean marginal bone loss at 4 years from the implants insertion was +1.208 mm. Conclusions: According to several studies, when using a radiographic criterion for implant success, marginal bone loss below 0.9-1.6 mm during the first year in function can be considered acceptable. In our work, radiographic measurements of MBL showed values not exceeding 1.6 mm during the first year of loading and also 1 year up to 4 years after surgery further marginal bone loss was minimal and not significant. This peri-implant bone preservation may be associated to the absence of micro-gap between fixture and abutment since zirconia dental implants are one-piece implant. Moreover, zirconia is characterized by high biocompatibility and it accumulates significantly fewer bacteria than titanium. Key words:Zirconia dental implants, multiple implants, radiographic evaluation, marginal bone loss (MBL). PMID:22926479

  20. Cone Beam Computed Tomography for the Dental Implant Patient.

    PubMed

    Klokkevold, Perry R

    2015-09-01

    Cone beam computed tomography offers many advantages over 2-D imaging for the evaluation of potential implant sites. With the use of CBCT scans becoming more commonplace, it is important for clinicians to be knowledgeable and to use this new technology appropriately and judiciously. The purpose of this article is to describe the advantages and limitations of CBCT imaging for the presurgical and postsurgical evaluations of implant treatment and assessment of implant-related complications. PMID:26820009

  1. Short dental implants in reduced alveolar bone height: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tutak, Marcin; Smektała, Tomasz; Schneider, Katarzyna; Gołębiewska, Edyta; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of short dental implants in distally reduced alveolar bone height. Material/Methods MedLine (PubMed and Ovid), ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane databases were used for analysis. Searching was conducted using the search equation: ‘Dental Implants’ [Majr] AND (Short[TIAB] OR Shorter[TIAB]) AND (Implant[TIAB] OR Implants[TIAB]). Abstracts were screened by 2 independent reviewers. The articles included in the analysis were published in the English language and reported data on the use of implants with lengths below 10 mm in the posterior region with reduced alveolar bone height making the placement of longer implants impossible without additional surgical interventions. Articles concerning data on orthodontic implants and post-resection surgery reconstruction were excluded from analysis. Any disagreements between the 2 reviewers were resolved by a third reviewer. No time frame was used. Results Of the 791 articles initially found, automatic rejection of duplicates in the Endnotes X5 software resulted in 538 articles. After the selection of studies from databases, a bibliography of 32 eligible articles was searched for other publications. Through this method, 2 more studies were added. Conclusions The analysis of the results of different studies on the use of short dental implants showed that this treatment could be effective and comparable to the use of standard-length implants. This study revealed that rough-surfaced implants with lengths between 6–10 mm placed in the posterior mandible are the preferred solution. However, more detailed data will require additional prospective studies. PMID:24257121

  2. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cicciù, M.; Cervino, G.; Bramanti, E.; Lauritano, F.; Lo Gudice, G.; Scappaticci, L.; Rapparini, A.; Guglielmino, E.; Risitano, G.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  3. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. Method From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Results Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants. PMID:26696528

  4. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, M; Cervino, G; Bramanti, E; Lauritano, F; Lo Gudice, G; Scappaticci, L; Rapparini, A; Guglielmino, E; Risitano, G

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  5. Occlusion for implant-supported fixed dental prostheses in partially edentulous patients: a literature review and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Sukotjo, Cortino

    2013-01-01

    Implant treatment has become the treatment of choice to replace missing teeth in partially edentulous areas. Dental implants present different biological and biomechanical characteristics than natural teeth. Occlusion is considered to be one of the most important factors contributing to implant success. Most literature on implant occlusal concepts is based on expert opinion, anecdotal experiences, in vitro and animal studies, and only limited clinical research. Furthermore, scientific literature regarding implant occlusion, particularly in implant-supported fixed dental prostheses remains controversial. In this study, the current status of implant occlusion was reviewed and discussed. Further randomized clinical research to investigate the correlation between implant occlusion, the implant success rate, and its risk factors is warranted to determine best clinical practices. PMID:23678387

  6. Occlusion for implant-supported fixed dental prostheses in partially edentulous patients: a literature review and current concepts.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2013-04-01

    Implant treatment has become the treatment of choice to replace missing teeth in partially edentulous areas. Dental implants present different biological and biomechanical characteristics than natural teeth. Occlusion is considered to be one of the most important factors contributing to implant success. Most literature on implant occlusal concepts is based on expert opinion, anecdotal experiences, in vitro and animal studies, and only limited clinical research. Furthermore, scientific literature regarding implant occlusion, particularly in implant-supported fixed dental prostheses remains controversial. In this study, the current status of implant occlusion was reviewed and discussed. Further randomized clinical research to investigate the correlation between implant occlusion, the implant success rate, and its risk factors is warranted to determine best clinical practices. PMID:23678387

  7. Direct method of registering periimplant soft tissue forms for implant-supported fixed dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Karl E

    2016-03-01

    This article describes a direct technique for communicating implant abutment and pontic intaglio surface forms with the dental laboratory. The technique uses a matrix and a screw-retained custom interim restoration. The matrix is used to transfer the interim restoration and periimplant tissue forms from the patient's mouth to an implant position-verified cast. After being connected to this cast, a silicone soft tissue replicating material is injected into the matrix. The result is a definitive cast with accurate implant position and soft tissue forms. PMID:26548881

  8. Resonance frequency analysis of 208 Straumann dental implants during the healing period.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ahmet Umut; Sumer, Mahmut; Duran, Ibrahim; Sandikci, Elif Ozen; Telcioglu, Nazife Tuba

    2013-04-01

    The most important prerequisite for the success of an osseointegrated dental implant is achievement and maintenance of implant stability. The aim of the study was to measure the 208 Straumann dental implant stability quotient (ISQ) values during the osseointegration period and determine the factors that affect implant stability. A total of 164 of the implants inserted were standard surface, and 44 of them were SLActive surface. To determine implant stability as ISQ values, measurements were performed at the stage of implant placement and healing periods by the Osstell mentor. The ISQ value ranges showed a significant increase during the healing period. Except for the initial measurement, the posterior maxilla had the lowest ISQ values, and there was no significant difference among anterior mandible, posterior mandible, and anterior maxilla (P < .05). Implant length did not have a significant influence on ISQ value (P > .05). The second measurement was significantly higher in men compared with women (P < .05). The second measurement was significantly higher than the others at 4.8 mm, and for the final measurement, there were no significant differences between 4.8 and 4.1 mm, which were higher than 3.3 mm (P < .05). When comparing sandblasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) and SLActive surface implants, there were no significant differences for insertion measurements, but for second measurements, SLActive was significantly higher (P = 0), and for the final measurement, there was no significant difference. It appears that repeated ISQ measurements of a specific implant have some diagnostic benefit, and the factors that affect implant stability during the healing period are presented. PMID:22103915

  9. Dental implants in patients with oral mucosal diseases - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Reichart, P A; Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Khongkhunthian, P; Strietzel, F P

    2016-05-01

    To reveal dental implants survival rates in patients with oral mucosal diseases: oral lichen planus (OLP), Sjögren's syndrome (SjS), epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). A systematic literature search using PubMed/Medline and Embase databases, utilising MeSH and search term combinations identified publications on clinical use implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in patients with OLP, SjS, EB, SSc reporting on study design, number, gender and age of patients, follow-up period exceeding 12 months, implant survival rate, published in English between 1980 and May 2015. After a mean observation period (mOP) of 53·9 months (standard deviation [SD] ±18·3), 191 implants in 57 patients with OLP showed a survival rate (SR) of 95·3% (SD ±21·2). For 17 patients with SjS (121 implants, mOP 48·6 ± 28·7 months), 28 patients with EB (165 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months) and five patients with SSc (38 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months), the respective SR was 91·7 ± 5·97% (SjS), 98·5 ± 2·7% (EB) and 97·4 ± 4·8% (SSc). Heterogeneity of data structure and quality of reporting outcomes did not allow for further comparative data analysis. For implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of patients suffering from OLP, SjS, EB and SSc, no evidence-based treatment guidelines are presently available. However, no strict contraindication for the placement of implants seems to be justified in patients with OLP, SjS, EB nor SSc. Implant survival rates are comparable to those of patients without oral mucosal diseases. Treatment guidelines as for dental implantation in patients with healthy oral mucosa should be followed. PMID:26685871

  10. Post-treatment supportive care for the natural dentition and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Gary C; Xenoudi, Pinelopi

    2016-06-01

    Long-term successful treatment of chronic periodontitis requires placement of patients on post-treatment recall programs known as either periodontal maintenance therapy or supportive periodontal therapy. Selection of the recall intervals must be based on the specific needs of individual patients. A single recall interval (e.g. 6 months) is not suitable for all patients. The main purpose of these programs is to prevent the recurrence of periodontitis. The components of every periodontal maintenance therapy program include: review of medical/dental histories; complete oral examination with an emphasis on the detection of gingival inflammation; establishing whether the maintenance program is working by monitoring clinical attachment levels; evaluation of oral hygiene; and full-mouth supragingival and subgingival debridement (i.e. biofilm removal). Long-term post-insertion care for dental implants also requires a similar patient-specific recall program of supportive implant therapy. The main purposes of a supportive implant therapy program are to maintain a healthy peri-implant mucosa and thereby prevent the development of peri-implantitis. In cases in which plaque-induced peri-implant mucositis has occurred, a well-designed supportive implant therapy program can help return the mucosa to a healthy state. At the current time there is no consensus on the optimal interventions for the treatment of peri-implant mucositis. However, all effective supportive implant therapy programs emphasize meticulous oral hygiene practices, careful peri-implant examination, thoughtful analysis of risk factors and periodic removal of microbial deposits from the implants. PMID:27045436

  11. Relationship between Sponsorship and Failure Rate of Dental Implants: A Systematic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Popelut, Antoine; Valet, Fabien; Fromentin, Olivier; Thomas, Aurélie; Bouchard, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background The number of dental implant treatments increases annually. Dental implants are manufactured by competing companies. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis have shown a clear association between pharmaceutical industry funding of clinical trials and pro-industry results. So far, the impact of industry sponsorship on the outcomes and conclusions of dental implant clinical trials has never been explored. The aim of the present study was to examine financial sponsorship of dental implant trials, and to evaluate whether research funding sources may affect the annual failure rate. Methods and Findings A systematic approach was used to identify systematic reviews published between January 1993 and December 2008 that specifically deal with the length of survival of dental implants. Primary articles were extracted from these reviews. The failure rate of the dental implants included in the trials was calculated. Data on publication year, Impact Factor, prosthetic design, periodontal status reporting, number of dental implants included in the trials, methodological quality of the studies, presence of a statistical advisor, and financial sponsorship were extracted by two independent reviewers (kappa  = 0.90; CI95% [0.77–1.00]). Univariate quasi-Poisson regression models and multivariate analysis were used to identify variables that were significantly associated with failure rates. Five systematic reviews were identified from which 41 analyzable trials were extracted. The mean annual failure rate estimate was 1.09%.(CI95% [0.84–1.42]). The funding source was not reported in 63% of the trials (26/41). Sixty-six percent of the trials were considered as having a risk of bias (27/41). Given study age, both industry associated (OR = 0.21; CI95% [0.12–0.38]) and unknown funding source trials (OR = 0.33; (CI95% [0.21–0.51]) had a lower annual failure rates compared with non-industry associated trials. A conflict of interest statement was disclosed in 2

  12. Knowledge and practice of implant-retained restorations among dental students in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Fahim; Shah, Altaf Hussain; Zafar, Mohammad Sohail; Kola, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and practice of implant retained restorations (IRR) among senior dental students in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Four hundred questionnaires were distributed among senior dental students of five dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Student’s knowledge was assessed regarding which implant restoration [cement retained restoration (CRR) or screw retained restoration (SRR)] better provides the desired clinical properties. Students’ practice of IRR, perception of their knowledge and need for further education related to IRR were also assessed. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were employed to assess collected data. Results: Three hundred and fifty four senior dental students responded at a response rate of 88.5%. Thirty three percent respondents did not have any practical experience of IRR. Students showed a clear preference for CRR with regards to aesthetics (71.4%), passive fit (55.3%), fabrication ease (57.3%) and fracture resistance (40%). SRR were considered to provide better retention (59.6%), soft tissue health (51.1%) and ease of retrievability (72%). Nearly 40% of students agreed that they did not get sufficient information related to IRR in undergraduate courses. Conclusions: Clinical training of IRR is compromised in the undergraduate curriculum in dental schools of Saudi Arabia. The knowledge of dental students regarding IRR was broadly in line with current evidence. PMID:26430416

  13. Direct Metal Laser Sintering Titanium Dental Implants: A Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, F.; Chambrone, L.; van Noort, R.; Miller, C.; Hatton, P.; Mangano, C.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed. PMID:25525434

  14. Engineered protein coatings to improve the osseointegration of dental and orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Raphel, Jordan; Karlsson, Johan; Galli, Silvia; Wennerberg, Ann; Lindsay, Christopher; Haugh, Matthew G; Pajarinen, Jukka; Goodman, Stuart B; Jimbo, Ryo; Andersson, Martin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the design of an engineered, elastin-like protein (ELP) that is chemically modified to enable stable coatings on the surfaces of titanium-based dental and orthopaedic implants by novel photocrosslinking and solution processing steps. The ELP includes an extended RGD sequence to confer bio-signaling and an elastin-like sequence for mechanical stability. ELP thin films were fabricated on cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V surfaces using scalable spin and dip coating processes with photoactive covalent crosslinking through a carbene insertion mechanism. The coatings withstood procedures mimicking dental screw and hip replacement stem implantations, a key metric for clinical translation. They promoted rapid adhesion of MG63 osteoblast-like cells, with over 80% adhesion after 24 h, compared to 38% adhesion on uncoated Ti6Al4V. MG63 cells produced significantly more mineralization on ELP coatings compared to uncoated Ti6Al4V. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) had an earlier increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, indicating more rapid osteogenic differentiation and mineral deposition on adhesive ELP coatings. Rat tibia and femur in vivo studies demonstrated that cell-adhesive ELP-coated implants increased bone-implant contact area and interfacial strength after one week. These results suggest that ELP coatings withstand surgical implantation and promote rapid osseointegration, enabling earlier implant loading and potentially preventing micromotion that leads to aseptic loosening and premature implant failure. PMID:26790146

  15. Direct metal laser sintering titanium dental implants: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Mangano, F; Chambrone, L; van Noort, R; Miller, C; Hatton, P; Mangano, C

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed. PMID:25525434

  16. Modeling the electromechanical impedance technique for the assessment of dental implant stability.

    PubMed

    LaMalfa Ribolla, Emma; Rizzo, Piervincenzo

    2015-07-16

    We simulated the electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique to assess the stability of dental implants. The technique consists of bonding a piezoelectric transducer to the element to be monitored. When subjected to an electric field, the transducer induces structural excitations which, in turn, affect the transducer's electrical admittance. As the structural vibrations depend on the mechanical impedance of the element, the measurement of the transducer's admittance can be exploited to assess the element's health. In the study presented in this paper, we created a 3D finite element model to mimic a transducer bonded to the abutment of a dental implant placed in a host bone site. We simulated the healing that occurs after surgery by changing Young's modulus of the bone-implant interface. The results show that as Young's modulus of the interface increases, i.e. as the mechanical interlock of the implant within the bone is achieved, the electromechanical characteristic of the transducer changes. The model and the findings of this numerical study may be used in the future to predict and interpret experimental data, and to develop a robust and cost-effective method for the assessment of primary and secondary dental implant stability. PMID:26070645

  17. Long-Term Fatigue and Its Probability of Failure Applied to Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Gehrke, Sérgio Alexandre; Calvo Guirado, José Luis; Bea, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that dental implants have a high success rate but even so, there are a lot of factors that can cause dental implants failure. Fatigue is very sensitive to many variables involved in this phenomenon. This paper takes a close look at fatigue analysis and explains a new method to study fatigue from a probabilistic point of view, based on a cumulative damage model and probabilistic finite elements, with the goal of obtaining the expected life and the probability of failure. Two different dental implants were analysed. The model simulated a load of 178 N applied with an angle of 0°, 15°, and 20° and a force of 489 N with the same angles. Von Mises stress distribution was evaluated and once the methodology proposed here was used, the statistic of the fatigue life and the probability cumulative function were obtained. This function allows us to relate each cycle life with its probability of failure. Cylindrical implant has a worst behaviour under the same loading force compared to the conical implant analysed here. Methodology employed in the present study provides very accuracy results because all possible uncertainties have been taken in mind from the beginning. PMID:27517052

  18. Localized maxillary ridge augmentation with a block allograft for dental implant placement: case reports.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, Joseph A; Koup, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Autogenous block bone grafts have been highly successful in treating human periodontal defects, restoring esthetics, and developing adequate bone volume for dental implant placement. Limitations in available donor bone, the need for an added surgical procedure, and other potential complications have made the use of allogenic bone graft materials an important alternative. One patient described in this report presented with fractured root syndrome of the right maxillary incisor with severe resorption of the buccal plate. After atraumatic tooth extraction, a staged treatment approach involving localized ridge augmentation with an allogenic iliac bone block material and dental implant placement was used. The host bone completely incorporated the graft with only minor resorption, which enabled the implant to be placed. The allogenic bone block material used in this study was an effective alternative to harvesting and grafting autogenous bone for implant site development. The cases presented in this article clinically demonstrate the efficacy of using a block allograft in generating effective new bone fill for dental implant placement. PMID:14560481

  19. Design improvement and dynamic finite element analysis of novel ITI dental implant under dynamic chewing loads.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this article was to introduce the application of a uniform design for experimental methods to drop the micromotion of a novel ITI dental implant model under the dynamic loads. Combining the characteristics of the traditional ITI and Nano-Tite implants, a new implant with concave holes has been constructed. Compared to the traditional ITI dental implant model, the micromotion of the new dental implant model was significantly reduced by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. From uniform design of experiments, the dynamic finite element analysis method was applied to caluculated the maximum micromotion of the full model. Finally, the chief design in all the experiment simulations which cause the minimum micromotion is picked as the advanced model of the design. Related to the original design, which was associated with a micromotion of 45.11 μm, the micromotion of the improved version was 31.37 μm, for an improvement rate of 30.5%. PMID:26406049

  20. Reliability of linear distance measurement for dental implant length with standardized periapical radiographs.

    PubMed

    Wakoh, Mamoru; Harada, Takuya; Otonari, Takamichi; Otonari-Yamamoto, Mika; Ohkubo, Mai; Kousuge, Yuji; Kobayashi, Norio; Mizuta, Shigeru; Kitagawa, Hiromi; Sano, Tsukasa

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of distance measurements of implant length based on periapical radiographs compared with that of other modalities. We carried out an experimental trial to compare precision in distance measurement. Dental implant fixtures were buried in the canine and first molar regions. These were then subjected to periapical (PE) radiography, panoramic (PA) radiography, conventional (CV) and medical computed (CT) tomography. The length of the implant fixture on each film was measured by nine observers and degree of precision was statistically analyzed. The precision of both PE radiographs and CT tomograms was closest at the highest level. Standardized PE radiography, in particular, was superior to CT tomography in the first molar region. This suggests that standardized PE radiographs should be utilized as a reliable modality for longitudinal and linear distance measurement, depending on implant length at local implantation site. PMID:17344618

  1. In Vitro Evaluation of the Effects of Multiple Oral Factors on Dental Implants Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Sathyanarayanan; Abidi, Zain; Wilson, Thomas G; Valderrama, Pilar; Wadhwani, Chandur; Palmer, Kelli; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2016-06-01

    Presence of metal ions and debris resulting from corrosion processes of dental implants in vivo can elicit adverse tissue reactions, possibly leading to peri-implant bone loss and eventually implant failure. This study hypothesized that the synergistic effects of bacterial biofilm and micromotion can cause corrosion of dental implants and release of metal ions in vivo. The goal is to simulate the oral environment where an implant will be exposed to a combination of acidic electrochemical environment and mechanical forces. Four conditions were developed to understand the individual and synergistic effects of mechanical forces and bacterial biofilm on the surface of dental implants; In condition 1, it was found that torsional forces during surgical insertion did not generate wear particle debris or metal ions. In condition 2, fatigue tests were performed in a wet environment to evaluate the effect of cyclic occlusal forces. The mechanical forces applied on the implants were able to cause implant fracture as well as surface corrosion features such as discoloration, delamination, and fatigue cracks. Immersion testing (condition 3) showed that bacteria ( Streptococcus mutans ) were able to create an acidic condition that triggered surface damage such as discoloration, rusting, and pitting. A novel testing setup was developed to understand the conjoint effects of micromotion and bacterial biofilm (condition 4). Surface damage initiated by acidic condition due to bacteria (condition 3), can be accelerated in tandem with mechanical forces through fretting-crevice corrosion. Permanent damage to surface layers can affect osseointegration and deposition of metal ions in the surrounding tissues can trigger inflammation. PMID:26829492

  2. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Tool for Dental Implant Osseointegration: an Experimental Study in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Botticelli, Daniele; Sivolella, Stefano; Bengazi, Franco; Guazzo, Riccardo; Sbricoli, Luca; Ricci, Sara; Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Velez, Joaquin Urbizo; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The biological interaction between the jaw bones and dental implant is fundamental for the long-term success of dental implant placement. Nevertheless, the insufficient bone volume remains a major clinical problem, especially in case of immediate dental implant. Using a canine model, the present study proves the regenerative potential of adipose- derived stem cells (ADSCs) to repair peri-implant bone defects occurring in immediate dental implant placement. In six labradors, all mandibular premolars and the first molars were extracted bilaterally and three months later dental implants were installed with a marginal gap. The marginal defects were filled with hydroxyapatite (HA)-based scaffolds previously seeded with ADSCs. After one month of healing, specimens were prepared for histological and histomorphometric evaluations. Histological analyses of ground sections show that ADSCs significantly increase bone regeneration. Several new vessels, osteoblasts and new bone matrix were detected. By contrast, no inflammatory cells have been revealed. ADSCs could be used to accelerate bone healing in peri- implant defects in case of immediate dental implant placement. PMID:27014644

  3. Peri-implant crevicular fluid levels of cathepsin-K, RANKL, and OPG around standard, short, and mini dental implants after prosthodontic loading

    PubMed Central

    Marakoğlu, İsmail; Haliloğlu, Seyfullah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite the high success rates of endosseous dental implants, their placement is restricted according to the height and volume of bone available. The use of short or mini dental implants could be one way to overcome this limitation. Thus, this study aimed to compare standard, short, and mini dental implants with regard to associated clinical parameters and peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) levels of cathepsin -K (CTSK), RANK ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG), after prosthodontic loading. Methods A total of 78 non-submerged implants (Euroteknika, Aesthetica+2, Sallanches, France) were installed in 30 subjects (13 male, 17 female; range, 26-62 years) who visited the clinic of the Periodontology Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Selcuk University. Sampling and measurements were performed on the loading date (baseline) and 2, 14, and 90 days after loading. Assessment of the peri-implant status for the implant sites was performed using the pocket probing depth (PPD), modified plaque index, modified gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index, and radiographic signs of bone loss. PICF samples collected from each implant were evaluated for CTSK, RANKL, and OPG levels using the ELISA method. Keratinized tissue and marginal bone loss (MBL) were also noted. Results Clinical parameters statistically significantly increased in each group but did not show statistical differences between groups without PPD. Although implant groups showed a higher MBL in the upper jaw, only the standard dental group demonstrated a statistically significant difference. At 90 days, the OPG: sRANKL ratio and total amounts of CTSK for each group did not differ from baseline. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, both short and mini dental implants were achieving the same outcomes as the standard dental implants in the early period after loading. PMID:26550525

  4. Long-term outcomes of oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Gay-Escoda, Cosme; Pérez-Álvarez, Débora; Camps-Font, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Background The existing information on oral rehabilitations with dental implants in VIH-positive patients is scarce and of poor quality. Moreover, no long-term follow-up studies are available. Hence, the aims of this study were to describe the long-term survival and success rates of dental implants in a group of HIV-positive patients and to identify the most common postoperative complications, including peri-implant diseases. Material and Methods A retrospective case series of HIV-positive subjects treated with dental implants at the School of Dentistry of the University of Barcelona (Spain) was studied. Several clinical parameters were registered, including CD4 cell count, viral load and surgical complications. Additionally, the patients were assessed for implant survival and success rates and for the prevalence of peri-implant diseases. A descriptive statistical analysis of the data was performed. Results Nine participants (57 implants) were included. The patients’ median age was 42 years (IQR=13.5 years). The implant survival and success rates were 98.3% and 68.4%, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 77.5 months (SD=16.1 months). The patient-based prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were 22.2% and 44.4% respectively at the last appointment. Patients that attended regular periodontal maintenance visits had significantly less mean bone loss than non-compliant patients (1.3 mm and 3.9 mm respectively). Conclusions Oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients seems to provide satisfactory results. In order to reduce the considerably high prevalence of peri-implant diseases, strict maintenance programmes must be implemented. Key words:HIV infection, dental implants, oral implantology, complications, peri-implantitis, peri-implant diseases. PMID:26946205

  5. Surface characteristics of a novel hydroxyapatite-coated dental implant

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ui-Won; Hwang, Ji-Wan; Choi, Da-Yae; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kwon, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the surface characteristics and bond strength produced using a novel technique for coating hydroxyapatite (HA) onto titanium implants. Methods HA was coated on the titanium implant surface using a super-high-speed (SHS) blasting method with highly purified HA. The coating was performed at a low temperature, unlike conventional HA coating methods. Coating thickness was measured. The novel HA-coated disc was fabricated. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed directly on the disc to evaluate crystallinity. Four novel HA-coated discs and four resorbable blast medium (RBM) discs were prepared. Their surface roughnesses and areas were measured. Five puretitanium, RBM-treated, and novel HA-coated discs were prepared. Contact angle was measured. Two-way analysis of variance and the post-hoc Scheffe's test were used to analyze differences between the groups, with those with a probability of P<0.05 considered to be statistically significant. To evaluate exfoliation of the coating layer, 7 sites on the mandibles from 7 mongrel dogs were used. Other sites were used for another research project. In total, seven novel HA-coated implants were placed 2 months after extraction of premolars according to the manufacturer's instructions. The dogs were sacrificed 8 weeks after implant surgery. Implants were removed using a ratchet driver. The surface of the retrieved implants was evaluated microscopically. Results A uniform HA coating layer was formed on the titanium implants with no deformation of the RBM titanium surface microtexture when an SHS blasting method was used. Conclusions These HA-coated implants exhibited increased roughness, crystallinity, and wettability when compared with RBM implants. PMID:22586524

  6. Dental occlusion: modern concepts and their application in implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Gunnar E

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the literature on various aspects of occlusion related to implant prosthodontics, using PubMed and the Cochrane library. Even if the number of studies on implants and prosthodontics is very large, no randomized controlled trials or Cochrane reviews were found on the possible influence of occlusal design or characteristics of occlusion on treatment outcome. Therefore, studies and articles of a lower evidence level were accepted as the main part of the review. The widely spread opinion that implants are superior to natural teeth was refuted by two recent consensus conferences, which concluded that the long-term outcome of implant restorations is not better than that of natural teeth. No controlled studies on the optimal features of a harmonious natural and/or restored occlusion, including implant prostheses, were found. Nor was there any evidence that more sophisticated methods in jaw registration, e.g., using face-bows and adjustable articulators, compared with simpler methods, will yield better clinical prosthodontic results. This article discusses, among other things, concepts of occlusion of implant-supported restorations, occlusal material, cantilevers, and occlusal risk factors. Within the limitations of the review, it was concluded that many factors can influence implant failure and peri-implant bone loss but that little is known of the relative importance of such factors. Most probably, however, occlusal factors and details of occlusion are in general of minor importance for the outcome of implant restorations. Occlusion can be managed successfully by using simple methods for jaw registration and different occlusal concepts. PMID:19184293

  7. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma loaded dental implant improves osteogenesis of rat mandible.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Govinda; Lee, Young-Hee; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) has been known for their anti-inflammatory effects. But the application of this molecule in implant-induced inflammation has not been clearly studied yet. Here, we determined in vivo anti-inflammatory and osteogenic effects of PPARγ coated dental implant in the rat mandible. We used chitosan gold nanoparticles (Ch-GNPs) as a non viral vector to carry PPARγ plasmid DNA. Ch-GNPs were conjugated with PPARγ plasmid DNA through a coacervation process. Conjugation was cast over titanium (Ti) implants (4.5 × 0.8 mm) by dipping, and implants were installed in rat mandibles. One, 2, 3, and 6 weeks post-implantation, mandibles were examined by microcomputed tomography (µCT), immunohistochemistry, hematoxylin & eosin, and tartrate resistance acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. In vivo Ch-GNPs/PPARγcoated implants were associated with inhibition of implant induced inflammatory molecules interleukin-1β and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and enhanced expression of osteogenic molecules like bone morphogenetic protein 2 and 7 (BMP-2/-7) by up-regulating anti-oxidant molecules heme oxygenase-1. µCT demonstrated that PPARγ overexpression increased the density and volume of newly formed bone surrounding the implants compared to control (n = 4; p < 0.05). Also, PPARγ reduced the number of TRAP positive cells. These results support the view that PPARγ overexpression diminishes inflammation and enhances osteogenesis around the dental implants. Thus, implant coated with anti-inflammatory molecules could have a significant utilization for the preparation of new biomaterials and may serve as prosthetic materials in patients suffering from inflammatory bone disease. PMID:24962969

  8. Pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. Part 1: management of post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Bryce, G; Bomfim, D I; Bassi, G S

    2014-08-01

    Although dental implant placements have high success rates and a low incidence of morbidity, post-operative pain and complications with the healing process have been reported. There is little guidance available regarding optimal pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. This first paper discusses the mechanisms of pain associated with dental implant placement and offers guidance to clinicians on optimal pre- and post-operative pain management regimes. The second paper aims to discuss pre- and post-operative means of reducing the risk of early healing complications. PMID:25104691

  9. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María F.; Ferrer-García, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics. Key words:Peri-implantitis, treatment, decontamination, implant surface, laser. PMID:23986023

  10. Morse taper dental implants and platform switching: The new paradigm in oral implantology

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, José Paulo; Pereira, Jorge; Vahey, Brendan R.; Henriques, Bruno; Benfatti, Cesar A. M.; Magini, Ricardo S.; López-López, José; Souza, Júlio C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review on the potential benefits with the use of Morse taper dental implant connections associated with small diameter platform switching abutments. A Medline bibliographical search (from 1961 to 2014) was carried out. The following search items were explored: “Bone loss and platform switching,” “bone loss and implant-abutment joint,” “bone resorption and platform switching,” “bone resorption and implant-abutment joint,” “Morse taper and platform switching.” “Morse taper and implant-abutment joint,” Morse taper and bone resorption,” “crestal bone remodeling and implant-abutment joint,” “crestal bone remodeling and platform switching.” The selection criteria used for the article were: meta-analysis; randomized controlled trials; prospective cohort studies; as well as reviews written in English, Portuguese, or Spanish languages. Within the 287 studies identified, 81 relevant and recent studies were selected. Results indicated a reduced occurrence of peri-implantitis and bone loss at the abutment/implant level associated with Morse taper implants and a reduced-diameter platform switching abutment. Extrapolation of data from previous studies indicates that Morse taper connections associated with platform switching have shown less inflammation and possible bone loss with the peri-implant soft tissues. However, more long-term studies are needed to confirm these trends. PMID:27011755

  11. Morse taper dental implants and platform switching: The new paradigm in oral implantology.

    PubMed

    Macedo, José Paulo; Pereira, Jorge; Vahey, Brendan R; Henriques, Bruno; Benfatti, Cesar A M; Magini, Ricardo S; López-López, José; Souza, Júlio C M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review on the potential benefits with the use of Morse taper dental implant connections associated with small diameter platform switching abutments. A Medline bibliographical search (from 1961 to 2014) was carried out. The following search items were explored: "Bone loss and platform switching," "bone loss and implant-abutment joint," "bone resorption and platform switching," "bone resorption and implant-abutment joint," "Morse taper and platform switching." "Morse taper and implant-abutment joint," Morse taper and bone resorption," "crestal bone remodeling and implant-abutment joint," "crestal bone remodeling and platform switching." The selection criteria used for the article were: meta-analysis; randomized controlled trials; prospective cohort studies; as well as reviews written in English, Portuguese, or Spanish languages. Within the 287 studies identified, 81 relevant and recent studies were selected. Results indicated a reduced occurrence of peri-implantitis and bone loss at the abutment/implant level associated with Morse taper implants and a reduced-diameter platform switching abutment. Extrapolation of data from previous studies indicates that Morse taper connections associated with platform switching have shown less inflammation and possible bone loss with the peri-implant soft tissues. However, more long-term studies are needed to confirm these trends. PMID:27011755

  12. The rationale for the introduction of implant dentistry into the dental curriculum.

    PubMed

    Lang, N P; De Bruyn, H

    2009-02-01

    This paper provides arguments for the introduction of implant dentistry into the undergraduate curriculum. The survival of teeth is very high when disease is diagnosed and treated properly and maintenance is taken care of. Nevertheless, tooth replacements by fixed and removable prostheses are highly prevalent. It is expected that dentists will face a dramatically increased need to care for elderly patients and partially edentulous patients. Hence, the demand for implant reconstructions will be substantial and more appropriately trained and competent health professionals will be needed. Increasing demands of the patient regarding aesthetics and function will influence the demands for implant therapy. The improvement of oral function and subjective chewing comfort, the preservation of tooth structures or existing reconstructions and the replacement of missing, strategically important teeth are major indications for implant placement. From both a biological and an economical point of view, the single tooth replacement with an implant is the first choice in situations with no or minimally restored neighbouring teeth compared with conventional bridgework. Stability of full dentures represent a major problem especially for the mandible. It is well documented that placement of two implants supporting an overdenture substantially improve chewing capacity, increase quality of life and is a simple and cost-effective treatment thus rendering such treatment a 'standard of care' procedure. There is no doubt that dental students should learn to incorporate the indication of oral implants in their overall treatment planning. Therefore, they will have to understand the basic aspects of healing and tissue integration, basic biomechanical and material science principles as well as surgical and prosthetic techniques. They will have to be able to monitor continuously the peri-implant tissues, render appropriate supportive therapy and cope with biological and technical complications

  13. Bruxism: overview of current knowledge and suggestions for dental implants planning.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Daniele; Bucci, Marco Brady; Sabattini, Vincenzo Bucci; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Bruxism is commonly considered a detrimental motor activity, potentially causing overload of the stomatognathic structures and representing a risk factor for dental implant survival. The available literature does not provide evidence-based guidelines for the management of bruxers undergoing implant-retained restorations. The present paper reviewed current concepts on bruxism etiology, diagnosis and management, underlining its effects on dental implants in an attempt to provide clinically useful suggestions based on scientifically sound data. Unfortunately, very little data exists on the subject of a cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure, to the point that expert opinions and cautionary approaches are still considered the best available sources for suggesting good practice indicators. By including experimental literature data on the effects of different types of occlusal loading on peri-implant marginal bone loss along with data from studies investigating the intensity of the forces transmitted to the bone itself during tooth-clenching and tooth-grinding activities, the authors were able to compile the suggestions presented here for prosthetic implant rehabilitations in patients with bruxism. PMID:22128671

  14. Acidic pH resistance of grafted chitosan on dental implant.

    PubMed

    Campos, Doris M; Toury, Bérengère; D'Almeida, Mélanie; Attik, Ghania N; Ferrand, Alice; Renoud, Pauline; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decade, access to dental care has increasingly become a service requested by the population, especially in the case of dental implants. However, the major cause of implant failure is an inflammatory disease: peri-implantitis. Currently, the adhesion strength of antibacterial coatings at implant surfaces remains a problem to solve. In order to propose a functionalized implant with a resistant antibacterial coating, a novel method of chitosan immobilization at implant surface has been investigated. Functionalization of the pre-active titanium (Ti) surface was performed using triethoxysilylpropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) as a coupling agent which forms a stable double peptide bond with chitosan. The chitosan presence and the chemical resistibility of the coating under acid pH solutions (pH 5 and pH 3) were confirmed by FTIR-ATR and XPS analyses. Furthermore, peel test results showed high adhesive resistance of the TESPSA/chitosan coating at the substrate. Cytocompatibility was evaluated by cell morphology with confocal imaging. Images showed healthy morphology of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1). Finally, the reported method for chitosan immobilization on Ti surface via peptide bindings allows for the improvement of its adhesive capacities and resistibility while maintaining its cytocompatibility. Surface functionalization using the TESPSA/chitosan coupling method is noncytotoxic and stable even in drastic environments as found in oral cavity, thus making it a valuable candidate for clinical implantology applications. PMID:24972881

  15. Use of the electro-mechanical impedance method for the assessment of dental implant stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Boemio, Giovanni; de Nardo, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    The robustness and reliability of the Electro-Mechanical Impedance (EMI) method to assess dental prostheses stability is presented. The study aim at addressing an increasing need in the biomedical area where robust, reliable, and non-invasive methods to assess the bone-interface of dental and orthopedic implants are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. In this study two different dental screws were entrenched in polyurethane foams and immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation, inversely simulating a bone-healing process. This process was monitored by bonding a Piezoceramic Transducer (PZT) to the implant and measuring the admittance of the PZT over time. To simulate healing, a second set of experiments was conducted. It consisted of placing four dental screws inside a joint compound specimen and observing the setting of the fresh compound allocated in the alveolus containing each implant. In all cases it was found that the PZT's conductance and the statistical features associated with the analysis of the admittance signatures were sensitive to the degradation or the setting process.

  16. Turned versus anodised dental implants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL)and post-operative infection for patients being rehabilitated by turned versus anodised-surface implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in November 2015. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. Thirty-eight publications were included. The results suggest a risk ratio of 2·82 (95% CI 1·95-4·06, P < 0·00001) for failure of turned implants, when compared to anodised-surface implants. Sensitivity analyses showed similar results when only the studies inserting implants in maxillae or mandibles were pooled. There were no statistically significant effects of turned implants on the MBL (mean difference-MD 0·02, 95%CI -0·16-0·20; P = 0·82) in comparison to anodised implants. The results of a meta-regression considering the follow-up period as a covariate suggested an increase of the MD with the increase in the follow-up time (MD increase 0·012 mm year(-1) ), however, without a statistical significance (P = 0·813). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'post-operative infection' was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies. PMID:27295394

  17. Interaction of bone-dental implant with new ultra low modulus alloy using a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, B; Baptista, A A; Patoor, E; Bravetti, P; Eberhardt, A; Laheurte, P

    2014-05-01

    Although mechanical stress is known as being a significant factor in bone remodeling, most implants are still made using materials that have a higher elastic stiffness than that of bones. Load transfer between the implant and the surrounding bones is much detrimental, and osteoporosis is often a consequence of such mechanical mismatch. The concept of mechanical biocompatibility has now been considered for more than a decade. However, it is limited by the choice of materials, mainly Ti-based alloys whose elastic properties are still too far from cortical bone. We have suggested using a bulk material in relation with the development of a new beta titanium-based alloy. Titanium is a much suitable biocompatible metal, and beta-titanium alloys such as metastable TiNb exhibit a very low apparent elastic modulus related to the presence of an orthorhombic martensite. The purpose of the present work has been to investigate the interaction that occurs between the dental implants and the cortical bone. 3D finite element models have been adopted to analyze the behavior of the bone-implant system depending on the elastic properties of the implant, different types of implant geometry, friction force, and loading condition. The geometry of the bone has been adopted from a mandibular incisor and the surrounding bone. Occlusal static forces have been applied to the implants, and their effects on the bone-metal implant interface region have been assessed and compared with a cortical bone/bone implant configuration. This work has shown that the low modulus implant induces a stress distribution closer to the actual physiological phenomenon, together with a better stress jump along the bone implant interface, regardless of the implant design. PMID:24656363

  18. Highly Nonlinear Solitary Waves for the Assessment of Dental Implant Mobility.

    PubMed

    Berhanu, Bruk; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Ochs, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a noninvasive technique based on the propagation of highly nonlinear solitary waves (HNSWs) to monitor the stability of dental implants. HNSWs are nondispersive mechanical waves that can form and travel in highly nonlinear systems, such as one-dimensional chains of spherical particles. The technique is based on the hypothesis that the mobility of a dental implant affects certain characteristics of the HNSWs reflected at the interface between a crystal-based transducer and the implant. To validate the research hypothesis we performed two experiments: first we observed the hydration of commercial plaster to simulate at large the osseointegration process that occurs in the oral connective tissue once a dental-endosteal threaded implant is surgically inserted; then, we monitored the decalcification of treated bovine bones immersed in an acid bath to simulate the inverse of the osseointegration process. In both series, we found a good correlation between certain characteristics of the HNSWs and the stiffness of the material under testing. PMID:24891723

  19. Assessment of dental implant stability by means of the electromechanical impedance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boemio, Giovanni; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; De Nardo, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    Implant stability is a prerequisite for functional recovery in load-bearing prostheses. Robust, reliable and noninvasive methods to assess the bone interface of dental and orthopedic implants are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. In this paper, a study of the feasibility of a noninvasive method based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) to assess dental prostheses stability is presented. Two different dental screws were entrenched in polyurethane foams (Sawbones®) and immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation, inversely simulating a bone healing process. This process was monitored by bonding a piezoceramic transducer (PZT) to the implant and measuring the admittance of the PZT over time. It was found that the PZT's conductance and the statistical features associated with its analysis were sensitive to the degradation of the foams and can be correlated to the Sawbones mechanical properties. The present study shows promising results and may pave the road towards an innovative approach for the noninvasive monitoring of implanted prostheses.

  20. Scapular Free Vascularised Bone Flaps for Mandibular Reconstruction: Are Dental Implants Possible?

    PubMed Central

    Gander, Thomas; Grätz, Klaus; Rostetter, Claudio; Zweifel, Daniel; Bredell, Marius

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Free fibula flap remains the flap of choice for reconstruction of mandibular defects. If free fibula flap is not possible, the subscapular system of flaps is a valid option. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of dental implant placement in patients receiving a scapular free flap for oromandibular reconstruction. Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients undergoing mandible reconstruction with a subscapular system free-tissue (lateral border of the scapula) transfer at the University Hospital Zürich between January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2013. Bone density in cortical and cancellous bone was measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Changes of bone density, height and width were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22. Comparisons of bone dimensions as well as bone density were performed using a chi-square test. Results Ten patients were included. Implantation was conducted in 50%. However, all patients could have received dental implants considering bone stock. Loss of bone height and width were significant (P < 0.001). There was a statistical significant increase in bone density in cortical (P < 0.001) and cancellous (P = 0.004) bone. Conclusions Dental implants are possible after scapular free flap reconstruction of oromandibular defects. Bone height and width were reduced, while bone density increased with time. PMID:26539286

  1. Risk Factors for Wound Dehiscence after Guided Bone Regeneration in Dental Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Yun, Pil-Young

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate risks for wound dehiscence after guided bone regeneration (GBR) in dental implant surgery. Methods: Patients who received dental implant therapy with GBR procedure at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Seongnam, Korea) from June 2004 to May 2007 were included. The clinical outcome of interest was complications related to dental implant surgery. The factors influencing wound dehiscence, classified into patient-related factors, surgery-related factors and material-related factors, were evaluated. Results: One hundred and fifteen cases (202 implants) were included in this study. Wound dehiscence (19.1%) was considered a major complication. The risk of wound dehiscence was higher in males than in females (odds ratio=4.279, P =0.014). In the main graft, the allogenic group had the lowest risk of wound dehiscence (odds ratio=0.106, P =0.006). Though the external connection group had a higher risk of wound dehiscence than the internal connection group (odds ratio=2.381), the difference was not significant (P =0.100). Conclusion: In this study, male gender and main graft have the highest risk of wound dehiscence. To reduce wound dehiscence after GBR, instructions on postoperative care with supplementary procedure for the protection of the wound dehiscence is recommended, especially to male patients. A main graft with a gel base can reduce the risk of wound dehiscence. PMID:27489821

  2. Potential use of a polycarbonate-urethane matrix reinforced with polyethylene fibers for shock-absorbing dental implants.

    PubMed

    Sheikhhassani, Ramtin; Anvari, Pasha; Taei, Simin; Sheikhhassani, Yasmin

    2015-09-01

    The absence of a shock-absorbing mechanism in commercial dental implants is a likely factor in the resulting bone loss and possible implant failure. The aim of the current study is to generate a shock-absorbing dental implant that resembles the periodontal ligament, which naturally absorbs occlusal overloading forces. To achieve this, a polycarbonate-urethane composite reinforced with polyethylene fibers will be constructed. Tests based on finite element analysis and mechanical testing are proposed to further examine this novel implant type. PMID:26008614

  3. Clinical efficacy of early loading versus conventional loading of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanfei; Zheng, Xinyi; Zeng, Guanqi; Xu, Yi; Qu, Xinhua; Zhu, Min; Lu, Eryi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical differences between early and conventional loading protocols for dental implants. A comprehensive search of the Medline, Embase, and OVID databases for studies published through January 10, 2015 was conducted. Fourteen studies were included in our analysis. We found that early loading imposed a significantly higher risk of implant failure than did conventional loading (risk ratio = 2.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.18, 3.69], P = 0.01), while no significant differences between the methods were found with regards to the marginal bone loss (weighted mean differences [WMD] = 0.11, 95% CI [−0.07, 0.28], P = 0.23), periotest value (WMD = 0.02, 95% CI [−0.83, 0.87], P = 0.96), or implant stability quotient (WMD = 0.79, 95% CI [−0.03, 1.62], P = 0.06). As for the health status of the peri-implant tissue, conventionally loaded implants demonstrated better performance than did early loaded implants. Subgroup analyses demonstrated that the sample size, time of publication, loading definition, implant position, extent, and restoration type influenced the results. Although early implant loading is convenient and comfortable for patients, this method still cannot achieve the same clinical outcomes as the conventional loading method. PMID:26542097

  4. Progressive plateau root form dental implant osseointegration: A human retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luiz F; Suzuki, Marcelo; Janal, Malvin N; Tovar, Nick; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Jimbo, Ryo; Gil, Jose N; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-08-01

    Although preclinical and sparse human histology retrieval studies have shown that the interface between implant and bone is constantly remodeling, no human retrieval database has been developed to determine the effect of functional loading time and other clinical/implant design variables on osseointegration. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) increase over functional loading time around dental implants. Due to prosthetic retreatment reasons, 93 human implant retrievals from the same manufacturer (Bicon LLC, Boston, MA, USA) were obtained over a period of approximately 15 years. The retrieved implants were under functional loading from 120 days to ∼18 years and were histomorphologic/metrically evaluated. BIC/BAFO were assessed as a function of multiple independent variables: implant surface type, diameter, length, jaw (maxilla/mandible), region (anterior/posterior), and time of functional loading. The results showed that both BIC and BAFO increased over time independently of implant design/clinical variables, supporting the postulated hypothesis. PMID:25367155

  5. Treatment of Orally Handicapped Edentulous Older Adults Using Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Charles

    2016-07-01

    The oral handicap of complete edentulism is the terminal outcome of a multifactorial process involving biological factors and patient-related factors. Fully edentulous orally handicapped older adults have been neglected because removable acrylic dentures have been the classic therapy for complete edentulism but are only rehabilitative, not therapeutic. Not replacing missing teeth with stable dentures could prevent adequate food intake. Osseointegrated endosseous implants used as a therapeutic adjunct can reduce the problem of long-term bone resorption to less than 0.1 mm per year. Implant-borne prostheses substantially increase the overall health and quality of life of orally handicapped fully edentulous older adults. PMID:27264857

  6. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mellado-Valero, Ana; Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María-Fernanda; Ferrer-García, Juan-Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics. PMID:23986023

  7. Denture-Related Biomechanical Factors for Fixed Partial Dentures Retained on Short Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Pommer, Bernhard; Hingsammer, Lukas; Haas, Robert; Mailath-Pokorny, Georg; Busenlechner, Dieter; Watzek, Georg; Fürhauser, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Prosthodontically driven biomechanical considerations are essential for longterm successful outcomes in dental implant therapy. Correct protocols seek to preclude potential consequences associated with functional and parafunctional occlusal overload such as screw loosening, component fracture, compromised marginal bone maintenance, and the integrity of the induced osseointegration response. Other concerns also need to be addressed, more especially when other implants are selected, for example: bridge insertion torque (BIT) in cases of immediate loading, cantilever length-anteroposterior spread ratio (CL-AP), overall crown-to-implant ratio (oCIR), total bone-to-implant surface area (tBICA), and the status of the opposing dentition. In spite of promising clinical results, evidence-based clinical protocols demand that such biomechanical limits still need to be determined. PMID:26218027

  8. Endoscopic Removal of a Supernumerary Premolar in the Mandible during a Dental Implant Placement

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Víctor; Cantín, Mario; Fuentes, Ramón; Engelke, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    The surgical removal of supernumerary teeth is necessary in some cases, especially before the commencement of any orthodontic or implant treatment procedure. In the mandibular supernumerary premolar, a more conservative approach is required because of the presence of complications associated with conventional surgery due to the close proximity of the said premolar to the alveolar inferior and mental nerves, and the need for bone conservation for implant placement. The endoscopic surgical approach has been used for the removal of the maxillary supernumerary tooth, impacted third molar, and implants. In this case report, we present an endoscopically assisted surgical technique for the removal of an unerupted supernumerary premolar in the mandible associated with a dental implant placement procedure. PMID:24772355

  9. "Rules of 10"--guidelines for successful planning and treatment of mandibular edentulism using dental implants.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lyndon F; Limmer, Bryan M; Gates, W Day

    2012-05-01

    The three "Rules of 10" for treatment planning dental implant therapy in the edentulous mandible are designed to improve the success of both the endosseous implants and the prosthesis. These "rules" acknowledge and provide a method to control the mechanical environment, addressing factors affecting implant and prosthesis longevity, including magnitude of forces, resistance of the prosthesis against these forces, and the biology of bone and its ability to respond to loading environments. The rules specify that for any IRO or ISFP, there must be a minimum of 10 mm of alveolar dimension (inferior/superior) and a minimum of 10 mm of interocclusal (restorative) dimension measured from the soft-tissue ridge crest to the occlusal plane. Additionally, for an ISFP, the anterior/posterior distribution of implants must be greater than 10 mm. This article provides support in the literature for these rules and illustrates their application in the treatment of mandibular edentulism. PMID:22616215

  10. Immediately restored dental implants for partial-arch applications. A literature update.

    PubMed

    Carrillo García, Celia; Boronat López, Araceli; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2008-07-01

    This article carries out a literature update on immediately restored dental implants in partially edentulous patients. A search was made in Medline of all articles published between the year 2000 and February 2007, including all articles published in both English and Spanish, in which immediate restoration of implants was made of partially edentulous areas with a minimum of 12 implants and six months follow-up. Certain decisive factors exist for the success of this technique in partially edentulous patients, such as primary stability, a roughened implant surface, and the absence of parafunctional habits in patients acceptable for this type of treatment. Following the analysis of these studies of immediate restoration of teeth in partially edentulous areas, a weighted mean survival of 95.39% was observed. In spite of the high success rate, major controversy still exists on this subject resulting in few studies and short follow-up periods, making the routine use of this technique questionable. PMID:18587310

  11. A Technique Elucidating the Retrieval of an Adhered Cover Screw in a Dental Implant – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswarri, J.; Chandrasekaran, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dental implants have become one of the most popular and rapidly growing techniques for replacing missing teeth. While their predictability, functionality, and durability make them an attractive option for patients and clinicians alike, complications can arise at any stage from patient assessment to maintenance of therapy. Failure of dental implants not only occurs due to biological factors, like unsuccessful osseointegration or peri-implantitis but may also occur due to technical complications like, failures of implant-supported restorations relating those from the implant components, and those relating to the prosthesis. Technical problems related to implant components include abutment screw fractures and cover screw fractures. In this case report we have elucidated an adhered cover screw in an implant. PMID:24392429

  12. A Comparison of Epithelial Cells, Fibroblasts, and Osteoblasts in Dental Implant Titanium Topographies

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fu-Yuan; Ko, Chia-Ling; Kuo, Hsien-Nan; Hu, Jin-Jia; Lin, Jia-Horng; Lou, Ching-Wen; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Yin-Lai; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The major challenge for dental implants is achieving optimal esthetic appearance and a concept to fulfill this criterion is evaluated. The key to an esthetically pleasing appearance lies in the properly manage the soft tissue profile around dental implants. A novel implant restoration technique on the surface was proposed as a way to augment both soft- and hard-tissue profiles at potential implant sites. Different levels of roughness can be attained by sandblasting and acid etching, and a tetracalcium phosphate was used to supply the ions. In particular, the early stage attaching and repopulating abilities of bone cell osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1), fibroblasts (NIH 3T3), and epithelial cells (XB-2) were evaluated. The results showed that XB-2 cell adhesive qualities of a smooth surface were better than those of the roughened surfaces, the proliferative properties were reversed. The effects of roughness on the characteristics of 3T3 cells were opposite to the result for XB-2 cells. E1 proliferative ability did not differ with any statistical significance. These results suggest that a rougher surface which provided calcium and phosphate ions have the ability to enhance the proliferation of osteoblast and the inhibition of fibroblast growth that enhance implant success ratios. PMID:22287942

  13. Myxofibroma of the maxilla. Reconstruction with iliac crest graft and dental implants after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Martínez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxomas are benign odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origin of rare presentation in the oral cavity, which exhibit locally aggressive behavior and are prone to local recurrence. The controversy has mainly been on therapeutic management with recommendations varying, depending on the clinical cases, from simple curettage of lesion to segmental bone resection. We present a case report describing the reconstruction of an osseous defect in the maxilla and the restoration with dental implants in a 32 year old female patient after radical surgical excision due to an odontogenic fibromyxoma with locally aggressive behavior. The primary reconstruction of maxillary discontinuity defect was carried out by an immediate non-vascularized cortico-cancellous iliac crest graft. Using a computer-guided system for the implant treatment-planning, three dental implants were secondary placed in the bone graft by means of flapless implant surgery. The patient was subsequently restored with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of three years. The surgical, reconstructive and restorative treatment sequence and techniques are discussed. PMID:20526263

  14. Reliability evaluation of alumina-blasted/acid-etched versus laser-sintered dental implants.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Erika O; Júnior, Amilcar C Freitas; Bonfante, Estevam A; Silva, Nelson R F A; Coelho, Paulo G

    2013-05-01

    Step-stress accelerated life testing (SSALT) and fractographic analysis were performed to evaluate the reliability and failure modes of dental implant fabricated by machining (surface treated with alumina blasting/acid etching) or laser sintering for anterior single-unit replacements. Forty-two dental implants (3.75 × 10 mm) were divided in two groups (n=21 each): laser sintered (LS) and alumina blasting/acid etching (AB/AE). The abutments were screwed to the implants and standardized maxillary central incisor metallic crowns were cemented and subjected to SSALT in water. Use-level probability Weibull curves and reliability for a mission of 50,000 cycles at 200 N were calculated. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopes were used for failure analyses. The Beta (β) value derived from use-level probability Weibull calculation of 1.48 for group AB/AE indicated that damage accumulation likely was an accelerating factor, whereas the β of 0.78 for group LS indicated that load alone likely dictated the failure mechanism for this group, and that fatigue damage did not appear to accumulate. The reliability was not significantly different (p>0.9) between AB/AE (61 %) and LS (62 %). Fracture of the abutment and fixation screw was the chief failure mode. No implant fractures were observed. No differences in reliability and fracture mode were observed between LS and AB/AE implants used for anterior single-unit crowns. PMID:22843309

  15. An alumina toughened zirconia composite for dental implant application: in vivo animal results.

    PubMed

    Schierano, Gianmario; Mussano, Federico; Faga, Maria Giulia; Menicucci, Giulio; Manzella, Carlo; Sabione, Cristian; Genova, Tullio; von Degerfeld, Mitzy Mauthe; Peirone, Bruno; Cassenti, Adele; Cassoni, Paola; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic materials are widely used for biomedical applications because of their remarkable biological and mechanical properties. Composites made of alumina and zirconia are particularly interesting owing to their higher toughness with respect to the monolithic materials. On this basis, the present study is focused on the in vivo behavior of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ) dental implants treated with a hydrothermal process. A minipig model was implemented to assess the bone healing through histology and mRNA expression at different time points (8, 14, 28, and 56 days). The novel ATZ implant was compared to a titanium clinical standard. The implants were analyzed in terms of microstructure and surface roughness before in vivo tests. The most interesting result deals with a statistically significant higher digital histology index for ATZ implants with respect to titanium standard at 56 days, which is an unprecedented finding, to the authors' knowledge. Even if further investigations are needed before proposing the clinical use in humans, the tested material proved to be a promising candidate among the possible ceramic dental implants. PMID:25945324

  16. Electrochemical coating of dental implants with anodic porous titania for enhanced osteointegration

    PubMed Central

    Shayganpour, Amirreza; Rebaudi, Alberto; Cortella, Pierpaolo; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Clinical long-term osteointegration of titanium-based biomedical devices is the main goal for both dental and orthopedical implants. Both the surface morphology and the possible functionalization of the implant surface are important points. In the last decade, following the success of nanostructured anodic porous alumina, anodic porous titania has also attracted the interest of academic researchers. This material, investigated mainly for its photocatalytic properties and for applications in solar cells, is usually obtained from the anodization of ultrapure titanium. We anodized dental implants made of commercial grade titanium under different experimental conditions and characterized the resulting surface morphology with scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The appearance of nanopores on these implants confirm that anodic porous titania can be obtained not only on ultrapure and flat titanium but also as a conformal coating on curved surfaces of real objects made of industrial titanium alloys. Raman spectroscopy showed that the titania phase obtained is anatase. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that by carrying out the anodization in the presence of electrolyte additives such as magnesium, these can be incorporated into the porous coating. The proposed method for the surface nanostructuring of biomedical implants should allow for integration of conventional microscale treatments such as sandblasting with additive nanoscale patterning. Additional advantages are provided by this material when considering the possible loading of bioactive drugs in the porous cavities. PMID:26665091

  17. Laser-induced novel patterns: As smart strain actuators for new-age dental implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, Serap; Özden, Hüseyin

    2012-12-01

    Surface morphologies of titanium implants are of crucial importance for long-term mechanical adaptation for following implantation. One major problem is the stress shielding effect which originates from the mismatch of the bone and the implant elasticity. It is time for a paradigm shift and for an exploration of novel smart surfaces to prevent this problem. Several surface treatment methods have traditionally been used to modify the surface morphology of titanium dental implants. The laser micro-machining can be considered as a unique and promising, non-contact, no media, contamination free, and flexible treatment method for modifying surface properties of materials in the biomedical industry. The aim of the present study is two folds; to develop novel 3D smart surfaces which can be acted as strain actuators by nanosecond laser pulse energies and irradiation strategies. And analyze these smart surface morphologies using finite element methods in order to estimate their internal stiffness values which play a great role on stress shielding effect. Novel 3D smart strain actuators were prepared using an ytterbium fiber laser (λ = 1060 nm) with 200-250 ns pulse durations on commercial pure titanium dental implant material specimen surfaces and optimum operation parameters were suggested.

  18. An Alumina Toughened Zirconia Composite for Dental Implant Application: In Vivo Animal Results

    PubMed Central

    Schierano, Gianmario; Faga, Maria Giulia; Menicucci, Giulio; Sabione, Cristian; Genova, Tullio; von Degerfeld, Mitzy Mauthe; Peirone, Bruno; Cassenti, Adele; Cassoni, Paola; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic materials are widely used for biomedical applications because of their remarkable biological and mechanical properties. Composites made of alumina and zirconia are particularly interesting owing to their higher toughness with respect to the monolithic materials. On this basis, the present study is focused on the in vivo behavior of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ) dental implants treated with a hydrothermal process. A minipig model was implemented to assess the bone healing through histology and mRNA expression at different time points (8, 14, 28, and 56 days). The novel ATZ implant was compared to a titanium clinical standard. The implants were analyzed in terms of microstructure and surface roughness before in vivo tests. The most interesting result deals with a statistically significant higher digital histology index for ATZ implants with respect to titanium standard at 56 days, which is an unprecedented finding, to the authors' knowledge. Even if further investigations are needed before proposing the clinical use in humans, the tested material proved to be a promising candidate among the possible ceramic dental implants. PMID:25945324

  19. Dentin dysplasia type I: a challenge for treatment with dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Depprich, Rita A; Ommerborn, Michelle A; Handschel, Jörg GK; Naujoks, Christian D; Meyer, Ulrich; Kübler, Norbert R

    2007-01-01

    Background Dentin dysplasia type I is characterized by a defect of dentin development with clinical normal appearance of the permanent teeth but no or only rudimentary root formation. Early loss of all teeth and concomitant underdevelopment of the jaws are challenging for successful treatment with dental implants. Methods A combination of sinus lifting and onlay bone augmentation based on treatment planning using stereolithographic templates was used in a patient with dentin dysplasia type I to rehabilitate the masticatory function. Results (i) a predisposition for an increased and accelerated bone resorption was observed in our patient, (ii) bone augmentation was successful using a mixture of allogenic graft material with autogenous bone preventing fast bone resorption, (iii) surgical planning, based on stereolithographic models and surgical templates, facilitated the accurate placement of dental implants. Conclusion Bony augmentation and elaborate treatment planning is helpful for oral rehabilitation of patients with dentin dysplasia type I. PMID:17714586

  20. Surface treatment of screw shaped titanium dental implants by high intensity laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pető, G.; Karacs, A.; Pászti, Z.; Guczi, L.; Divinyi, T.; Joób, A.

    2002-01-01

    Machined and Al 2O 3 blasted surfaces of screw shaped Ti dental implants were irradiated by 30 ns pulses of Nd:glass laser at 1064 nm wavelength with 0.5-3 J pulse energy. The laser treatment increased the temperature of the Ti surface well above the melting temperature. The resulting ablation of some surface layers was followed by a very rapid solidification. These thermal processes strongly modified the original morphology of the surface and removed the contaminations. The new morphology was characterized by features mostly in ten micron and partly in submicron ranges. The surface composition was the same as the bulk titanium without any segregation. Animal experiments demonstrated that this surface treatment seems to be promising for the improvement of the osseointegration of dental implants.

  1. Restoration of divergent implants with a 2-piece screw-retained fixed, complete dental implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pelekanos, Stavros; Pozidi, Georgia; Kourtis, Stefanos

    2016-04-01

    Restoring a severely resorbed maxilla is challenging because of poor bone quality and the resorptive pattern that follows tooth loss. When bone augmentation is not possible, implants are placed in suboptimal positions, making the prosthetic rehabilitation more complex. This report presents the steps used to rehabilitate a severely resorbed maxilla with divergent implants, using an implant-supported 2-piece screw-retained prosthesis. PMID:26597464

  2. Bone-Implant Contact around Crestal and Subcrestal Dental Implants Submitted to Immediate and Conventional Loading

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Ana Emília Farias; Ribeiro, Fernando Salimon; Pires, Juliana Rico; Zuza, Elizangela Partata; Piattelli, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the influence of apicocoronal position and immediate and conventional loading in the percentage of bone-implant contact (BIC). Thus, 36 implants were inserted in the edentulous mandible from six dogs. Three implants were installed in each hemimandible, in different positions in relation to the ridge: Bone Level (at crestal bone level), Minus 1 (one millimeter apical to crestal bone), and Minus 2 (two millimeters apical to crestal bone). In addition, each hemimandible was submitted to a loading protocol: immediate (prosthesis installed 24 hours after implantation) or conventional (prosthesis installed 120 days after implantation). Ninety days after, animals were killed, and implant and adjacent tissues were prepared for histometric analysis. BIC values from immediate loaded implants were 58.7%, 57.7%, and 51.1%, respectively, while conventional loaded implants were 61.8%, 53.8%, and 68.4%. Differences statistically significant were not observed among groups (P = 0.10, ANOVA test). These findings suggest that different apicocoronal positioning and loading protocols evaluated did not interfere in the percentage of bone-implant contact, suggesting that these procedures did not jeopardize osseointegration. PMID:25371911

  3. Mandibular implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis with a modified design: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Tourah, Anita; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chee, Winston W

    2014-02-01

    This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a mandibular implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis. Because of the limited restorative space available in the posterior mandible and in considering the higher wear rate of acrylic resin in comparison with titanium when it opposes metal ceramic restorations, the treatment used a milled titanium bar with acrylic resin denture teeth, which replaced the anterior teeth with milled titanium for the posterior occluding surfaces. PMID:24262946

  4. Photogrammetric determination of discrepancies between actual and planned position of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forlani, G.; Rivara, F.

    2014-05-01

    The paper describes the design and testing of a photogrammetric measurement protocol set up to determine the discrepancies between the planned and actual position of computer-guided template-based dental implants. Two moulds with the implants positioned in pre- and post- intervention are produced and separately imaged with a highly redundant block of convergent images; the model with the implants is positioned on a steel frame with control points and with suitable targets attached. The theoretical accuracy of the system is better than 20 micrometers and 0.3-0.4° respectively for positions of implants and directions of implant axes. In order to compare positions and angles between the planned and actual position of an implant, coordinates and axes directions are brought to a common reference system with a Helmert transformation. A procedure for comparison of positions and directions to identify out-of-tolerance discrepancies is presented; a numerical simulation study shows the effectiveness of the procedure in identifying the implants with significant discrepancies between pre- and post- intervention.

  5. Cell Adhesion and in Vivo Osseointegration of Sandblasted/Acid Etched/Anodized Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20% ± 10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58% ± 8.63%), SLA (58.47% ± 12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62% ± 18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  6. Cell adhesion and in vivo osseointegration of sandblasted/acid etched/anodized dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20%±10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58%±8.63%), SLA (58.47%±12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62%±18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  7. Early osseointegration driven by the surface chemistry and wettability of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo Britto; CALASANS-MAIA, José; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of two different commercially available dental implants on osseointegration. The surfaces were sandblasting and acid etching (Group 1) and sandblasting and acid etching, then maintained in an isotonic solution of 0.9% sodium chloride (Group 2). Material and Methods X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed for surface chemistry analysis. Surface morphology and topography was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy (CM), respectively. Contact angle analysis (CAA) was employed for wetting evaluation. Bone-implant-contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) analysis were performed on thin sections (30 μm) 14 and 28 days after the installation of 10 implants from each group (n=20) in rabbits’ tibias. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA at the 95% level of significance considering implantation time and implant surface as independent variables. Results Group 2 showed 3-fold less carbon on the surface and a markedly enhanced hydrophilicity compared to Group 1 but a similar surface roughness (p>0.05). BIC and BAFO levels in Group 2 at 14 days were similar to those in Group 1 at 28 days. After 28 days of installation, BIC and BAFO measurements of Group 2 were approximately 1.5-fold greater than in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion The surface chemistry and wettability implants of Group 2 accelerate osseointegration and increase the area of the bone-to-implant interface when compared to those of Group 1. PMID:26221922

  8. The relationship between dental implant stability and trabecular bone structure using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between primary implant stability as measured by impact response frequency and the structural parameters of trabecular bone using cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT), excluding the effect of cortical bone thickness. Methods We measured the impact response of a dental implant placed into swine bone specimens composed of only trabecular bone without the cortical bone layer using an inductive sensor. The peak frequency of the impact response spectrum was determined as an implant stability criterion (SPF). The 3D microstructural parameters were calculated from CT images of the bone specimens obtained using both micro-CT and CBCT. Results SPF had significant positive correlations with trabecular bone structural parameters (BV/TV, BV, BS, BSD, Tb.Th, Tb.N, FD, and BS/BV) (P<0.01) while SPF demonstrated significant negative correlations with other microstructural parameters (Tb.Sp, Tb.Pf, and SMI) using micro-CT and CBCT (P<0.01). Conclusions There was an increase in implant stability prediction by combining BV/TV and SMI in the stepwise forward regression analysis. Bone with high volume density and low surface density shows high implant stability. Well-connected thick bone with small marrow spaces also shows high implant stability. The combination of bone density and architectural parameters measured using CBCT can predict the implant stability more accurately than the density alone in clinical diagnoses. PMID:27127692

  9. Periodontal Disease, Dental Implants, Extractions and Medications Related to Osteonecrosis of the Jaws.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neha P; Katsarelis, Helen; Pazianas, Michael; Dhariwal, Daljit K

    2015-11-01

    Patients taking bisphosphonates and other anti-resorptive drugs are likely to attend general dental practice. The term 'bisphosphonate'is often immediately associated with osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ). Risk assessment and subsequent management of these patients should be carried out taking into account all the risk factors associated with ONJ. The introduction of newer drugs, also shown to be associated with ONJ, demands increased awareness of general dental practitioners about these medications. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This paper provides an update on medication-related ONJ and considers the effects of anti-resorptive drugs on the management of patients needing exodontia, treatment for periodontal disease and dental implant placement. PMID:26749795

  10. Highly wear-resistant and biocompatible carbon nanocomposite coatings for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Penkov, Oleksiy V; Pukha, Vladimir E; Starikova, Svetlana L; Khadem, Mahdi; Starikov, Vadym V; Maleev, Maxim V; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon coatings are increasingly used as wear-protective coatings for dental implants, artificial joints, etc. Despite their advantages, they may have several weak points such as high internal stress, poor adhesive properties or high sensitivity to ambient conditions. These weak points could be overcome in the case of a new carbon nanocomposite coating (CNC) deposited by using a C60 ion beam on a Co/Cr alloy. The structure of the coatings was investigated by Raman and XPS spectroscopy. The wear resistance was assessed by using a reciprocating tribotester under the loads up to 0.4 N in both dry and wet sliding conditions. Biocompatibility of the dental implants was tested in vivo on rabbits. Biocompatibility, bioactivity and mechanical durability of the CNC deposited on a Co/Cr alloy were investigated and compared with those of bulk Co/Cr and Ti alloys. The wear resistance of the CNC was found to be 250-650 fold higher compared to the Co/Cr and Ti alloys. Also, the CNC demonstrated much better biological properties with respect to formation of new tissues and absence of negative morphological parameters such as necrosis and demineralization. Development of the CNC is expected to aid in significant improvement of lifetime and quality of implants for dental applications. PMID:27336185

  11. Mechanical behavior of single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments for dental implant prosthetic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Llena-Blasco, Oriol; Bruguera, August; Llena-Blasco, Jaime; Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; García-Calderón, Manuel; Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Velázquez-Cayón, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was undertaken to characterize the mechanical response of bare (as-received) and single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments with both internal and external connections that have been developed to enhanced aesthetic restorations. Material and Methods: Sixteen zirconia implant abutments (ZiReal Post®, Biomet 3i, USA) with internal and external connections have been analyzed. Half of the specimens were coated with a 0.5mm-thick layer of a low-fusing fluroapatite ceramic. Mechanical tests were carried out under static (constant cross-head speed of 1mm/min until fracture) and dynamic (between 100 and 400N at a frequency of 1Hz) loading conditions. The failure location was identified by electron microscopy. The removal torque of the retaining screws after testing was also evaluated. Results: The average fracture strength was above 300N for all the abutments, regardless of connection geometry and coating. In most of the cases (94%), failure occurred by abutment fracture. No significant differences were observed either in fatigue behavior and removal torque between the different abutment groups. Conclusions: Mechanical behavior of Zireal zirconia abutments is independent of the type of internal/external connection and the presence/absence of ceramic coating. This may be clinically valuable in dental rehabilitation to improve the aesthetic outcome of zirconia-based dental implant systems. Key words:Dental implant, zirconia, ceramic structure, mechanical properties. PMID:25674313

  12. Clinical and Radiological Classification of the Jawbone Anatomy in Endosseous Dental Implant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kubilius, Marius

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review the classifications suggested for assessment of the jawbone anatomy, to evaluate the diagnostic possibilities of mandibular canal identification and risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury, aesthetic considerations in aesthetic zone, as well as to suggest new classification system of the jawbone anatomy in endosseous dental implant treatment. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandible; mandibular canal; alveolar nerve, inferior; anatomy, cross-sectional; dental implants; classification. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to March 2013. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy and oral surgery books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical and human anatomy studies. Results In total 109 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The classifications suggested for assessment of the jawbone anatomy, diagnostic possibilities of mandibular canal identification and risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury, aesthetic considerations in aesthetic zone were discussed. New classification system of the jawbone anatomy in endosseous dental implant treatment based on anatomical and radiologic findings and literature review results was suggested. Conclusions The classification system proposed here based on anatomical and radiological jawbone quantity and quality evaluation is a helpful tool for planning of treatment strategy and collaboration among specialists. Further clinical studies should be conducted for new classification validation and reliability evaluation. PMID:24422030

  13. The analysis of cost-effectiveness of implant and conventional fixed dental prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, June Sang; Har, Alix; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study conducted an analysis of cost-effectiveness of the implant and conventional fixed dental prosthesis (CFDP) from a single treatment perspective. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Markov model for cost-effectiveness analysis of the implant and CFDP was carried out over maximum 50 years. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed by the 10,000 Monte-Carlo simulations, and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEAC) were also presented. The results from meta-analysis studies were used to determine the survival rates and complication rates of the implant and CFDP. Data regarding the cost of each treatment method were collected from University Dental Hospital and Statistics Korea for 2013. Using the results of the patient satisfaction survey study, quality-adjusted prosthesis year (QAPY) of the implant and CFDP strategy was evaluated with annual discount rate. RESULTS When only the direct cost was considered, implants were more cost-effective when the willingness to pay (WTP) was more than 10,000 won at 10th year after the treatment, and more cost-effective regardless of the WTP from 20th year after the prosthodontic treatment. When the indirect cost was added to the direct cost, implants were more cost-effective only when the WTP was more than 75,000 won at the 10th year after the prosthodontic treatment, more than 35,000 won at the 20th year after prosthodontic treatment. CONCLUSION The CFDP was more cost-effective unless the WTP was more than 75,000 won at the 10th year after prosthodontic treatment. But the cost-effectivenss tendency changed from CFDP to implant as time passed. PMID:26949488

  14. Implant-abutment connections: influence of the design on the microgap and their fatigue and fracture behavior of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Herrero-Climent, M; Lázaro, P; Rios, J V

    2014-07-01

    Microgap between implant and abutment can produce biological and mechanical problems such as peri-implantitis and/or fatigue failures. The aim of this study was to evaluate microgap size and fatigue behavior of external and internal connections. In both systems the torque to tighten the abutment screw of single crown abutments was 45 Ncm. Fifty implants for each connection type were studied. One subgroup (n = 5) was used by the observation and evaluation of the microgap, other (n = 5) was tested for fracture strength and the other (n = 40) was subjected to dynamic loading. The internal connection presents a lower microgap than the external ones. From fatigue results, the external hexagon interface showed superior result compared to the internal hexagon interfaces. The tolerances in the internal connections are better and favour the fatigue behavior but this factor alone is not sufficient to improve the fatigue response in relation to the external connections when the screw is subjected at the same torque. The external system presents a higher value of the area than the internal and it produces a better load distribution. Microgaps and mechanical properties are very important for the long-term behavior of the dental implants and these aspects should be known by the implantologists. PMID:24719176

  15. Management of Limited Vertical Bone Height in the Posterior Mandible: Short Dental Implants Versus Nerve Lateralization With Standard Length Implants.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Erhan; Keceli, Huseyin Gencay; Uysal, Serdar; Güngör, Hamiyet; Muhtarogullari, Mehmet; Tözüm, Tolga Fikret

    2016-05-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization (IANL) and short dental implants (SDI) are 2 viable implant-based treatment approaches in the presence of atrophied posterior mandible. Despite the risks of dysfunction, infection, and pathologic fractures in IANL, it becomes possible to place standard implants. The purpose of this study was to compare SDI and IANL approaches from clinical and radiographic aspects. Fifteen subjects having unilateral atrophic mandibles were allocated to SDI and IANL treatment groups. Following surgical procedures, early postoperative complications, implant survival, and periimplant clinical and radiographic parameters including probing pocket depth, attachment level, keratinized tissue amount, vertical tissue recession, and marginal bone loss were recorded at baseline and 1-year after prosthetic rehabilitation. In both groups, no implant was lost. Except usual postoperative complications, 2 patients had transient paraesthesia after IANL. According to time-dependent evaluation, both groups showed significant increase in probing pocket depth and attachment level at 1-year follow-up compared with baseline (P < 0.05). Except a slight but significant increase in mesial surface of SDI group (P < 0.05), no remarkable time-dependent change was identified in vertical tissue recession. Keratinized tissue amount did not exhibit any inter- or intragroup difference during whole study period. Marginal bone loss did not show any difference between IANL and SDI groups at follow-up. SDI placement or standard length implant placement with IANL can be considered promising alternatives in the treatment of atrophic mandibular posterior regions. However, SDI may be preferred in terms of lower complication risk. PMID:26999693

  16. Indigenous hydroxyapatite coated and bioactive glass coated titanium dental implant system – Fabrication and application in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Surajit; Kundu, Debabrata; Datta, Someswar; Basu, Debabrata; Soundrapandian, Chidambaram

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of different bioactive materials as coating on dental implant to restore tooth function is a growing trend in modern Dentistry. In the present study, hydroxyapatite and the bioactive glass-coated implants were evaluated for their behavior in osseous tissue following implantation in 14 patients. Materials and Methods: Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite formulated and prepared for coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Hydroxyapatite coating was applied on the implant surface by air plasma spray technique and bioactive glass coating was applied by vitreous enameling technique. Their outcome was assessed after 6 months in vivo study in human. Results: Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass coating materials were nontoxic and biocompatible. Uneventful healing was observed with both types of implants. Conclusion: The results showed bioactive glass is a good alternative coating material for dental implant. PMID:22028507

  17. Effects of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on Dental Implant Osseointegration: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Yakup; Erdogan, Ozgur; Kurkcu, Mehmet; Akova, Tolga; Damlar, İbrahim

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPU) on dental implant osseointegration in a rabbit model using mechanical-histomorphometric methods and resonance-frequency analysis (RFA). Methods Twelve skeletally mature, male New Zealand rabbits (3.4 kg±0.5) were included in the study. A total number of 24 implants were placed bilaterally into the tibiae of the subjects. The right tibia of each rabbit received LIPU application (20 min/day) while the left side received sham treatment. The study was carried on for six weeks and the rabbits were sacrificed in 7 days intervals (two rabbits for each week). The rabbits were categorized in the early or late osseointegration period according to their sacrification date. Comparisons between the groups were made using statistical analysis of histomorphometric analysis, resonance frequency analysis and mechanical tests. Results The histomorphometry parameters showed that the bone area and the bone volume values have significantly increased in the early osseointegration period and the bone-implant contact values have significantly increased in the late osseointegration period in the LIPU treated subjects when compared to the control group. RFA scores had mild increase in the LIPU group. However the difference was not statistically significant. Mechanical test results suggest an increased mechanical stability in the LIPU group as well. Conclusions Results of this pilot study indicate that low intensity pulsed ultrasound may have positive effects on osseointegration and stability of dental implants. PMID:19212531

  18. Chlorhexidine hexametaphosphate nanoparticles as a novel antimicrobial coating for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wood, Natalie J; Jenkinson, Howard F; Davis, Sean A; Mann, Stephen; O'Sullivan, Dominic J; Barbour, Michele E

    2015-06-01

    Dental implants are an increasingly popular solution to missing teeth. Implants are prone to colonisation by pathogenic oral bacteria which can lead to inflammation, destruction of bone and ultimately implant failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of chlorhexidine (CHX) hexametaphosphate (HMP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a total CHX concentration equivalent to 5 mM as a coating for dental implants. The CHX HMP NPs had mean diameter 49 nm and composition was confirmed showing presence of both chlorine and phosphorus. The NPs formed micrometer-sized aggregated surface deposits on commercially pure grade II titanium substrates following immersion-coating for 30 s. When CHX HMP NP-coated titanium specimens were immersed in deionised water, sustained release of soluble CHX was observed, both in the absence and presence of a salivary pellicle, for the duration of the study (99 days) without reaching a plateau. Control specimens exposed to a solution of aqueous 25 µM CHX (equivalent to the residual aqueous CHX present with the NPs) did not exhibit CHX release. CHX HMP NP-coated surfaces exhibited antimicrobial efficacy against oral primary colonising bacterium Streptococcus gordonii within 8 h. The antimicrobial efficacy was greater in the presence of an acquired pellicle which is postulated to be due to retention of soluble CHX by the pellicle. PMID:26123234

  19. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Subjects with Successful and Failing Dental Implants. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Koukos, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Christos; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Sakellari, Dimitra; Arsenakis, Minas; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : To investigate the prevalence of the bacterial genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracyclines and metronidazole respectively, in subjects with successful and failing dental implants and to assess the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA gene encoding for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the same samples. Materials and Methodology: The subject sample included 20 participants with clinically healthy osseointegrated implants and 20 participants with implants exhibiting peri-implantitis. Clinical parameters were assessed with an automated probe, samples were collected from the peri-implant sulcus or pocket and analyzed with Polymerase Chain Reaction for blaTEM, tetM, tetQ and nim genes, S. aureus and MRSA using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. Results: Findings have shown high frequencies of detection for both groups for the tetracycline resistance genes tetM (>30%), tetQ (>65%) with no statistical differences between them (z-test with Bonferroni corrections, p<0.05). The blaTEM gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactams, was detected in <15% of the samples. The nim gene, which encodes resistance to metronidazole, S.aureus and the mecA gene encoding for MRSA were not detected in any of the analyzed samples. Conclusions: Healthy peri-implant sulci and peri-implantitis cases often harbor bacterial genes encoding for resistance to the tetracyclines and less often for beta-lactams. Thus, the antimicrobial activity of the tetracyclines and to a lower extent to beta-lactams, might be compromised for treatment of peri-implantitis. Since no metronidazole resistance genes were detected in the present study, its clinical use is supported by the current findings. S.aureus may not participate in peri-implant pathology. PMID:25646133

  20. Patients' experiences of dental implant placement for treatment of partial edentulism in a student clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Seferli, Jotta; Michelin, Mattias; Klinge, Björn; Wettergren, Lena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' experiences of oral implant surgery when performed in a student clinic setting and the potential impact on patients'daily life. Patient selection was carried out during a round, to which undergraduate students in semester 9 and 10 could bring patients that they considered eligible for one or two implants. Partial edentulous patients that fulfilled the inclusion criteria for implant installation at the student's clinic were consequently enrolled to implant surgery with either Astra Tech or 3i implants. The same surgeon accomplished all implant installations and the students were involved in the treatment, initially by assisting during the surgery and subsequently by performing the prosthetic restoration. After the surgery, a study-specific questionnaire was sent to patients for evaluation of discomfort, pain during the surgical procedure and postoperative symptoms. Thirty-six patients were included in the study, 30 patients answered the questionnaire (response rate 83%). When retrospectively assessed, more than half of the patients (60%) perceived discomfort in the course of the implant surgery and 29% reported pain during the surgical procedure. Impact on daily living and postoperative symptoms were rarely reported (most common were pain, swelling and difficulties with chewing) and had a short duration when they occurred. Based on the results of this study conducted at a student's clinic, the impact of implant surgery on daily living appears to be small. However, it is noteworthy that the perception of discomfort and pain during the surgical procedure was frequently reported. Continued research is recommended to expose the patient's experiences of implant surgery in an educational context as well as in general dental practice. PMID:25102718

  1. Pulsed laser-induced micro-and nanosized morphology and composition of titanium dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joób-Fancsaly, Á.; Divinyi, T.; Fazekas, Á.; Daroczi, Cs; Karacs, A.; Petõ, G.

    2002-10-01

    The surface morphology of machined screw-shaped titanium dental implants was modified by pulsed irradiation with an Nd glass laser. This method supplied very different surface elements in nanometer and micrometer ranges identified with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy as well. The surface composition was unchanged during these treatments. A rabbit experiment was carried out to investigate the direct bone contact (osseointegration) which was characterized by the removal torque of the implants. The 50 nm and 10-50 µm sized droplike elements were formed from the machined flat surface by the laser irradiation depending on the laser intensity. The osseointegration was enhanced by the increase of the density of nanosized elements and by the size of the microsized elements, showing the importance of this surface morphology in the direct bone-implant contact.

  2. Characterization and treatment of postsurgical dental implant pain employing intranasal ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Bockow, Rebecca; Korostoff, Jonathan; Pinto, Andres; Hutcheson, Matthew; Secreto, Stacey A; Bodner, Laura; Hersh, Elliot V

    2013-09-01

    The intensity and duration of pain following surgical placement of dental implants has not been well studied. Thus, the aim of this open-label study was to characterize the nature of postsurgical pain following the placement of one to three implants. The secondary goal was to explore the analgesic efficacy and tolerability of intranasal ketorolac in this patient population. Following implant surgery, postoperative pain was rated moderate or severe in 25/28 patients (89 percent), requiring prn analgesic dosing for up to 3 days in 14/25 individuals (56 percent). Intranasal ketorolac displayed an analgesic onset within 20 minutes, a duration of at least 6 hours, and was well tolerated by the cohort with brief stinging of the nasal mucosa reported by 9/25 individuals (36 percent). PMID:24564610

  3. Bacterial contamination along implant-abutment interface in external and internal-hex dental implants

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Greison Rabelo; Olate, Sergio; Pozzer, Leandro; Cavalieri-Pereira, Lucas; Rodrigues-Chessa, Jaime G; Albergaría-Barbosa, José Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate bacterial contamination along the implant-abutment interface in relation to the size of the interface. 80 brand name implants were used, 40 internal-hex and 40 external-hex. The implants were handled in a sterile atmosphere inside a box, where they were inoculated with 0.3 μl of the Streptococcus sanguis ATCC10556 bacterium in the interior and the abutment was immediately installed with a torque of 30 Ncm for the external-hex and 20 Ncm for the internal-hex; the system was included in an Eppendorf control for 30 seconds and then placed in an Eppendorf control for 30 days. The implants were removed and assessed under a scanning electron microscope while the Eppendorf controls were bred in blood agar to analyze the colonies formed. The data were analyzed using the Chi-squared, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, considering a value of p<0.05 to obtain statistical significance. Five implants were excluded due to probable external contamination. Microspaces of up to 86.8 μm were observed in the external-hex implants and up to 53.9 μm in the internal-hex implants with no significant differences between the different systems being observed (p>0.05). The contamination observed was produced mainly in the external-hex implants and statistically significant differences were observed between the different hex systems from the same company. No significant differences were observed between interface size and bacterial contamination. Within our limitations, there was no relation between the size of the implant-abutment interface and bacterial contamination with Streptococcus sanguis ATCC10556. PMID:24753751

  4. Dental implant as an option for tooth replacement: The awareness of patients at a tertiary hospital in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Gbadebo, Olaide Shakeerah; Lawal, Folake Barakat; Sulaiman, Amidu Omotayo; Ajayi, Deborah Mojirade

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A survey was set out to evaluate the knowledge of patients about tooth replacement as a whole, and assess their awareness of implant-retained prosthesis as an option of tooth replacement. Materials and Methods: Information on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge about implant-retained tooth as an option for missing tooth replacement, cost implication, source of information and knowledge about other options of tooth replacement were obtained from patients attending the dental clinics of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, using structured self-administered questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Result: A total of 220 patients aged 18-84 years with a mean age of 37.6 (±16.5) years participated in the study, with a male to female ratio of 1:1.1. The majority (92.5%) knew that missing teeth can be replaced, while a significantly lower proportion (28.9%) knew about dental implants as an option (P < 0.01). Dentists were the major source of information on dental implants (68%). Only 21 (36.8%) of those who had heard about dental implant had knowledge about the cost (P < 0.000). Conclusion: A low level of awareness about dental implant as tooth replacement option exist in this environment, although most of the study participants were aware that missing teeth can be replaced. PMID:25191063

  5. Potential applications of biphosphonates in dental surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Berardi, D; Carlesi, T; Rossi, F; Calderini, M; Volpi, R; Perfetti, G

    2007-01-01

    Biphosphonates are largely used for their unquestionable properties of inhibiting bone resorption by osteoclasts in the treatment of various osteometabolic illnesses such as osteoporosis, multiple myeloma, tumors which metastasize to the bone and malignant hypercalcemia. In this literature review the physico-chemical properties, biologic activities and the mechanisms of action of biphosphonates are described. The use of these drugs is discussed, analyzing the quantity of results which have emerged through in vitro and in vivo experiments on animal models. In this study the efficiency of these drugs is demonstrated in contrasting the osteolitic processes of the alveolar bone, in promoting the neoformation and in bettering the quality of bone implants. However, it is important to draw attention to a worrying correlation which has emerged during the last 3-4 years, between osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) and the systemic administration of aminobiphosphonates. This collateral effect did not emerge following the use of non-aminobiphosphonates. The aim of this review is to identify the guidelines for the use of biphosphonates in oral implant surgery. PMID:17880759

  6. A Review on the Wettability of Dental Implant Surfaces II: Biological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Gittens, Rolando A.; Scheideler, Lutz; Rupp, Frank; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Dental and orthopaedic implants have been under continuous advancement to improve their interactions with bone and ensure a successful outcome for patients. Surface characteristics such as surface topography and surface chemistry can serve as design tools to enhance the biological response around the implant, with in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies confirming their effects. However, the comprehensive design of implants to promote early and long-term osseointegration requires a better understanding of the role of surface wettability and the mechanisms by which it affects the surrounding biological environment. This review provides a general overview of the available information about the contact angle values of experimental and of marketed implant surfaces, some of the techniques used to modify surface wettability of implants, and results from in vitro and clinical studies. We aim to expand the current understanding on the role of wettability of metallic implants at their interface with blood and the biological milieu, as well as with bacteria, and hard and soft tissues. PMID:24709541

  7. A Review on the Wettability of Dental Implant Surfaces: Theoretical and Experimental Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Frank; Gittens, Rolando A.; Scheideler, Lutz; Marmur, Abraham; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The surface wettability of biomaterials determines the biological cascade of events at the biomaterial/host interface. Wettability is modulated by surface characteristics, such as surface chemistry and surface topography. However, the design of current implant surfaces focuses mainly on specific micro- and nanotopographical features and is still far from predicting the concomitant wetting behavior. There is an increasing interest in understanding the wetting mechanisms of implant surfaces and the role of wettability on the biological response at the implant/bone or implant/soft tissue interface. Fundamental knowledge related to the influence of surface roughness (i.e., a quantification of surface topography) on titanium and titanium alloy surface wettability, and the different associated wetting regimes, can improve our understanding of the role of wettability of rough implant surfaces on the biological outcome. Such an approach has been applied to biomaterial surfaces only in a limited way. Focusing on titanium dental and orthopaedic implants, the present study reviews the current knowledge on the wettability of biomaterial surfaces, encompassing basic and applied aspects that include measurement techniques, thermodynamic aspects of wetting, and models predicting topographical and roughness effects on the wetting behavior. PMID:24590162

  8. Immediate provisionalization of dental implants placed in fresh extraction sockets using a flapless technique.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Roberto; Capparè, Paolo; Gherlone, Enrico; Romanos, George

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the 24-month clinical outcomes of immediate provisionalization of dental implants placed in fresh extraction sockets using a flapless technique. Fifteen patients were included under strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients required one or two teeth to be extracted for lesions with a hopeless prognosis in the maxillary monoradicular or first premolar region. Twenty implants were placed immediately after tooth extraction, and immediate provisionalization was performed. Sixteen implants had a diameter of 5 mm, and four implants had a diameter of 3.80 mm, all with a 13-mm length. After 24 months of follow-up, a cumulative survival rate of 100% was reported for all implants. Modified Bleeding Index (mBI), modified Plaque Index (mPI), probing depth (PD), marginal gingiva level (MGL), and keratinized mucosa (KM) remained stable for up to 24 months. Mean MGL at 24 months was 0.22 ± 0.15 mm; no significant changes occurred in MGL between baseline and 24 months. Mean KM remained stable from baseline to 24 months. At 24 months, a mean bone loss of 0.83 ± 0.52 mm was measured. The results of this study indicate that flapless surgery for immediately provisionalized implants placed in fresh extraction sockets provides soft tissue and marginal bone maintenance for up to 24 months of follow-up. PMID:22254223

  9. Impact of a "TED-Style" presentation on potential patients' willingness to accept dental implant therapy: a one-group, pre-test post-test study

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Henry; Abi-Nader, Samer

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE A survey was conducted to assess the impact of a TED-like educational session on participants' willingness to accept dental implant therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Volunteers interested in having information about dental implant therapies were recruited and asked to complete a two-part survey before and after an educational session. The initial survey elicited demographic information, self-perceived knowledge on dental implants and willingness to this kind of treatment. A "TED-style" presentation that provided information about dental implant treatments was conducted before asking the participants to complete a second set of questions assessing the impact of the session. RESULTS The survey was completed by 104 individuals, 78.8% were women and the mean age was 66.5±10.8. Before the educational session, 76.0% of the participants refused dental implants mainly due to lack of knowledge. After the educational session, the rejection of dental implants decreased by almost four folds to 20.2%. CONCLUSION This study proved that an educational intervention can significantly increase willingness to accept treatment with dental implants in a segment of the population who is interested in having information about dental implant therapy. Furthermore, educational interventions, such as TED-like talks, might be useful to increase popular awareness on dental implant therapy. PMID:26816573

  10. Titanium dental implant surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition - From the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Kaluđerović, Milena R; Schreckenbach, Joachim P; Graf, Hans-Ludwig

    2016-12-01

    Commercial titanium-based dental implants are obtained applying various methods such as machining, acid etching, anodization, plasma spraying, grit blasting or combination techniques yielding materials with smooth or micro-roughened surfaces. Those techniques are used to optimize the surface properties and to maximize biocompatibility and bioactivity with bone tissue. Present review is focused on the material surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition (ASD). From the early 1980s till present, the results of numerous studies have shown that anodically oxidized surfaces with different dopants express a positive effect on osteoblasts behavior in vitro and osseointegration in vivo. Those surfaces demonstrated a high biocompatibility and rapid osseointegration in clinical application. This paper provides an overview of the preparation of implant surfaces by employing ASD process. Moreover, reviewed are clinically used ASD implant surfaces (Ticer, TiUnite, Osstem, etc.). The electrolyte variations in ASD process and their influence on surface properties are given herein. Using different electrolytes, anode voltages and temperatures, the above fabrication process can yield various surface morphologies from smooth to rough, porous surfaces. Furthermore, ASD enables thickening of oxide layers and enrichment with different dopands from used electrolyte, which hinder release of potentially toxic titanium ions in surrounding tissue. Particularly exciting results were achieved by calcium and phosphorus doping of the oxide layer (Ticer, ZL Microdent; TiUnite, Nobel Biocare Holding AB) which significantly increased the osteocompatibility. Ticer, a dental implant with anodically oxidized surface and the first among similar materials employed in clinical practice, was found to promote fast osteoblast cell differentiation and mineralization processes. Moreover, Ticer accelerate the integration with the bone, increase the bone/implant contact and improve primary and secondary

  11. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured titanium with balanced actions to bacterial and mammalian cells for dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Shichong; Wang, Manle; Gu, Yingxin; Luo, Huiwen; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong; Lai, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    A versatile strategy to endow dental implants with long-term antibacterial ability without compromising the cytocompatibility is highly desirable to combat implant-related infection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been utilized as a highly effective and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for surface modification of biomedical devices. However, the high mobility and subsequent hazardous effects of the particles on mammalian cells may limit its practical applications. Thus, Ag NPs were immobilized on the surface of sand-blasted, large grit, and acid-etched (SLA) titanium by manipulating the atomic-scale heating effect of silver plasma immersion ion implantation. The silver plasma immersion ion implantation-treated SLA surface gave rise to both good antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with mammalian cells. The antibacterial activity rendered by the immobilized Ag NPs was assessed using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Staphylococcus aureus, commonly suspected pathogens for peri-implant disease. The immobilized Ag NPs offered a good defense against multiple cycles of bacteria attack in both F. nucleatum and S. aureus, and the mechanism was independent of silver release. F. nucleatum showed a higher susceptibility to Ag NPs than S. aureus, which might be explained by the presence of different wall structures. Moreover, the immobilized Ag NPs had no apparent toxic influence on the viability, proliferation, and differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These results demonstrated that good bactericidal activity could be obtained with very small quantities of immobilized Ag NPs, which were not detrimental to the mammalian cells involved in the osseointegration process, and promising for titanium-based dental implants with commercial SLA surfaces. PMID:26604743

  12. Adult Stem Cells Properties in Terms of Commitment, Aging and Biological Safety of Grit-Blasted and Acid-Etched Ti Dental Implants Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo - Guirado, José L.; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  13. A Comparative and a Qualitative Analysis of Patient’s Motivations, Expectations and Satisfaction with Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Komal; Kulkarni, Prasad; Darak, Praveen; Swamy, Shanmukha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental Implants are the norm of today’s prosthetic and restorative dentistry but, is it the answer for edentulism that can affect both individual’s appearance and functioning, therefore having an impact on the psychological and the social well being of the person is an ongoing quest. Also, patient’s beliefs and personal expectations for dental implants vary, which may influence the treatment outcome, thus emphasizing the importance of a good clinician–patient communication. Hence in this study a qualitative analysis was carried out with an earnest attempt to gain an insight into patient’s motivations, personal expectations, satisfaction and impact of clinician’s motivation for implant maintenance. Aim To learn about patient’s expectations and their level of satisfaction from dental implants. To know the impact of clinician’s instructions and motivation for implant maintenance, with the patient’s level of understanding and compare the level of motivation for implant maintenance and care provided by a dentist with Bachelor’s degree to a dentist with a Master’s degree. Materials and Methods A 30 systemically healthy patients who had undergone implant treatment (aged 25-65 years) were considered and divided into two groups: Group A: 15 patients in whom implant placement was done by a dentist with Bachelor’s degree (24 years, 18 years in general and implant practice respectively) and Group B: 15 patients in whom implant placement was done by a dentist with a Master’s degree (Periodontics; 20 years,17 years in general and implant practice respectively). A qualitative analysis with the help of appropriate questionnaires comprising of multiple choice questions specifically designed for this purpose and few open ended questions was carried out with an earnest attempt to gain an insight into patient’s motivations, personal expectations, satisfaction and impact of clinician’s motivation for implant maintenance. Results Patients

  14. Implant dentistry in undergraduate dental curricula in South-East Asia: forum workshop at the University of Hong Kong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, 19-20 November 2010.

    PubMed

    Lang, Niklaus P; Bridges, Susan M; Lulic, Martina

    2011-08-01

    This paper reports on the discussions arising from a 2-day forum on implant dentistry education in South-East Asia. The 10 institutions present represented undergraduate and postgraduate dental curricula from seven countries, including Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, the Philippines, and Singapore. While not aiming to reach consensus as in other such conferences, the outcome was positive in establishing realistic goals in university education in implant dentistry for curriculum leaders and developers. PMID:25426784

  15. An overview of U.S. predoctoral dental implant programs and their directors.

    PubMed

    Barwacz, Christopher A; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Tamegnon, Monelle; Hoogeveen, Kaitlin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of current predoctoral implant programs in the United States, including curricular characteristics and clinical practices regarding implant therapy education and program directors' characteristics. An electronic survey was sent to predoctoral implant program directors of all 64 accredited U.S. dental schools; 52 of the 60 eligible programs responded, for a response rate of 87%. The responding program directors were primarily affiliated with either prosthodontics departments (44%) or restorative dentistry departments (40%). Structurally, 80.8% of the responding schools integrate their implant programs into the third year of the curriculum. Clinical implant therapy exercises reported were simulation exercises without direct patient care (90.4% of responding schools) and direct patient care under supervision (94.2%). The most frequently taught restorative modalities are posterior single-tooth implant crown (96.2%), mandibular implant-retained overdenture (88.5%), and anterior implant-supported single crown (61.5%). A majority (74.5%) of responding programs utilize analog surgical guide planning, while 25.5% reported use of digital guided surgery planning software. All schools in the Northwest and 66.7% in the South Central regions utilize custom abutments as the primary abutment design, while a majority of schools in the North Central (62.5%), Northeast (53.8%), Southwest (66.7%), and Southeast (80%) regions use stock abutments (p=0.02). Regional differences were significant with regard to fixation modality, with all the Northwest programs using screw retention and 90% of Southeast and 87.5% of North Central programs using cement retention (p=0.002). This study demonstrated that while institutions share program director and curricular similarities, clinical practices and modalities vary significantly by region. PMID:25729020

  16. Assessment and Evaluation of Quality of Life (OHRQoL) of Patients with Dental Implants Using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) - A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peri-implant tissue health is a requisite for success of dental implant therapy. Plaque accumulation leads to initiation of gingivitis around natural teeth and peri-implantitis around dental implants. Peri-implantitis around dental implants may result in implant placement failure. For obtaining long-term success, timely assessment of dental implant site is mandatory. Aim To assess and evaluate Quality of Life (OHRQoL) of individuals with dental implants using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Materials and Methods Total 92 patients were evaluated for assessment of the health of peri-implant tissues by recording, Plaque Index (PI), Probing Pocket Depth (PD), Bleeding On Probing (BOP) and Probing Attachment Level (PAL) as compared to contra-lateral natural teeth (control). In the same patients Quality of Life Assessment was done by utilizing Oral Health Impact Profile Index (OHIP-14). Results The mean plaque index around natural teeth was more compared to implants and it was statistically significant. Other three dimensions mean bleeding on probing; mean probing attachment level and mean pocket depth around both natural teeth and implant surfaces was found to be not statistically significant. OHIP-14 revealed that patients with dental implants were satisfied with their Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL). Conclusion Similar inflammatory conditions are present around both natural teeth and implant prostheses as suggested by results of mean plaque index, mean bleeding on probing, mean pocket depth and mean probing attachment level, hence reinforcing the periodontal health maintenance both prior to and after incorporation of dental implants. Influence of implant prostheses on patient’s oral health related quality of life (as depicted by OHIP-14) and patients’ perceptions and expectations may guide the clinician in providing the best implant services. PMID:27190953

  17. Application of high resolution synchrotron micro-CT radiation in dental implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Neldam, Camilla Albeck; Lauridsen, Torsten; Rack, Alexander; Lefolii, Tore Tranberg; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a refined method using high-resolution synchrotron radiation microtomography (SRmicro-CT) to evaluate osseointegration and peri-implant bone volume fraction after titanium dental implant insertion. SRmicro-CT is considered gold standard evaluating bone microarchitecture. Its high resolution, high contrast, and excellent high signal-to-noise-ratio all contribute to the highest spatial resolutions achievable today. Using SRmicro-CT at a voxel size of 5 μm in an experimental goat mandible model, the peri-implant bone volume fraction was found to quickly increase to 50% as the radial distance from the implant surface increased, and levelled out to approximately 80% at a distance of 400 μm. This method has been successful in depicting the bone and cavities in three dimensions thereby enabling us to give a more precise answer to the fraction of the bone-to-implant contact compared to previous methods. PMID:25957106

  18. Bactericidal efficacy of tissue tolerable plasma on microrough titanium dental implants: An in-vitro-study.

    PubMed

    Preissner, Saskia; Wirtz, Henrik C; Tietz, Anne-Kristin; Abu-Sirhan, Shady; Herbst, Sascha R; Hartwig, Stefan; Pierdzioch, Philipp; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Dommisch, Henrik; Hertel, Moritz

    2016-06-01

    Surface decontamination remains challenging in peri-implant infection therapy. To investigate the bactericidal efficacy of tissue tolerable plasma, S. mitis biofilms were created in vitro on 32 microrough titanium dental implants. Biofilm imaging was performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The implants were either rinsed with 1% NaCl as negative control (C) or irradiated with a diode laser (DL) for 60 sec as positive control or plasma (TTP60, TTP120) for 60 or 120 sec. Subsequently, colony forming units (CFU) were counted. Post-treatment, implants were further examined using fluorescence microscopy (FM). Median CFU counts differed significantly between TTP60, TTP120 and C (2.19 and 2.2 vs. 3.29 log CFU/ml; p = 0.012 and 0.024). No significant difference was found between TTP60 and TTP120 (p = 0.958). Logarithmic reduction factors were (TTP60) 2.21, (TTP120) 1.93 and (DL) 0.59. Prior to treatment, CLSM and SEM detected adhering bacteria. Post-treatment FM recorded that the number of dead cells was higher using TTP compared to DL and C. In view of TTP's effectiveness, regardless of resistance patterns and absence of surface alteration, its use in peri-implant infection therapy is promising. The results encourage conducting clinical studies to investigate its impact on relevant parameters. PMID:26349849

  19. A novel computational method for real-time preoperative assessment of primary dental implant stability.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Sigbjørn; Ferguson, Stephen J; Sigrist, Christian; Fritz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Nolte, Lutz P; Hallermann, Wock; Caversaccio, Marco

    2005-02-01

    A novel methodology which allows for fast and fully automatic structural analysis during preoperative planning for dental implant surgery is presented. This method integrates a fully automatic fast finite element solver within the framework of new concepts in computer-assisted preoperative planning for implant surgery. The planning system including optimized structural planning was validated by experimental results. Nine implants were placed in pig mandibles and mechanically loaded using a testing rig. The resulting displacements were measured and compared with those predicted by numerical analysis during planning. The results show that there were no statistically significant differences (P = 0.65) between the results of the models and the experiments. The results show that fast structural analysis can be integrated with surgical planning software allowing the initial axial implant stability to be predicted in real time during planning. It is believed that such a system could be used to select patients for immediate implant loading and, when further developed, be useful in other areas of preoperative surgical planning. PMID:15642031

  20. Evaluation of bone remodeling around single dental implants of different lengths: a mechanobiological numerical simulation and validation using clinical data.

    PubMed

    Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Mercuri, Emílio Graciliano Ferreira; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic models have been proposed to explain adaptive behavior of bone to loading; however, these models have not been applied to explain the biomechanics of short dental implants. Purpose of present study was to simulate bone remodeling around single implants of different lengths using mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation model derived from the Stanford theory, using finite elements analysis (FEA) and to validate the theoretical prediction with the clinical findings of crestal bone loss. Loading cycles were applied on 7-, 10-, or 13-mm-long dental implants to simulate daily mastication and bone remodeling was assessed by changes in the strain energy density of bone after a 3, 6, and 12 months of function. Moreover, clinical findings of marginal bone loss in 45 patients rehabilitated with same implant designs used in the simulation (n = 15) were computed to validate the theoretical results. FEA analysis showed that although the bone density values reduced over time in the cortical bone for all groups, bone remodeling was independent of implant length. Clinical data showed a similar pattern of bone resorption compared with the data generated from mathematical analyses, independent of implant length. The results of this study showed that the mechanoregulatory tissue model could be employed in monitoring the morphological changes in bone that is subjected to biomechanical loads. In addition, the implant length did not influence the bone remodeling around single dental implants during the first year of loading. PMID:26249362

  1. A rationale method for evaluating unscrewing torque values of prosthetic screws in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    SALIBA, Felipe Miguel; CARDOSO, Mayra; TORRES, Marcelo Ferreira; TEIXEIRA, Alexandre Carvalho; LOURENÇO, Eduardo José Veras; TELLES, Daniel de Moraes

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies that evaluated the torque needed for removing dental implant screws have not considered the manner of transfer of the occlusal loads in clinical settings. Instead, the torque used for removal was applied directly to the screw, and most of them omitted the possibility that the hexagon could limit the action of the occlusal load in the loosening of the screws. The present study proposes a method for evaluating the screw removal torque in an anti-rotational device independent way, creating an unscrewing load transfer to the entire assembly, not only to the screw. Material and methods Twenty hexagonal abutments without the hexagon in their bases were fixed with a screw to 20 dental implants. They were divided into two groups: Group 1 used titanium screws and Group 2 used titanium screws covered with a solid lubricant. A torque of 32 Ncm was applied to the screw and then a custom-made wrench was used for rotating the abutment counterclockwise, to loosen the screw. A digital torque meter recorded the torque required to loosen the abutment. Results There was a significant difference between the means of Group 1 (38.62±6.43 Ncm) and Group 2 (48.47±5.04 Ncm), with p=0.001. Conclusion This methodology was effective in comparing unscrewing torque values of the implant-abutment junction even with a limited sample size. It confirmed a previously shown significant difference between two types of screws. PMID:21437472

  2. Magnification rate of digital panoramic radiographs and its effectiveness for pre-operative assessment of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y-K; Park, J-Y; Kim, S-G; Kim, J-S; Kim, J-D

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and effectiveness of digital panoramic radiographs for pre-operative assessment of dental implants. Methods We selected 86 patients (221 implants) and calculated the length of the planned implant based on the distance between a selection of critical anatomical structures and the alveolar crest using the scaling tools provided in the digital panoramic system. We analysed the magnification rate and the difference between the actual inserted implant length and planned implant length according to the location of the implant placement and the clarity of anatomical structures seen in the panoramic radiographs. Results There was no significant difference between the planned implant length and actual inserted implant length (P > 0.05). The magnification rate of the width and length of the inserted implants, seen in the digital panoramic radiographs, was 127.28 ± 13.47% and 128.22 ± 4.17%, respectively. The magnification rate of the implant width was largest in the mandibular anterior part and there was a significant difference in the magnification rate of the length of implants between the maxilla and the mandible (P < 0.05). When the clarity of anatomical structures seen in the panoramic radiographs is low, the magnification rate of the width of the inserted implants is significantly higher (P < 0.05), but there is no significant difference between the planned implant length and actual inserted implant length according to the clarity of anatomical structures (P < 0.05). Conclusions Digital panoramic radiography can be considered a simple, readily available and considerably accurate pre-operative assessment tool in the vertical dimension for dental implant therapy. PMID:21239569

  3. Comparison of the fracture resistance of dental implants with different abutment taper angles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Geng, Jianping; Jones, David; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of abutment taper angles on the fracture strength of dental implants with TIS (taper integrated screwed-in) connection. Thirty prototype cylindrical titanium alloy 5.0mm-diameter dental implants with different TIS-connection designs were divided into six groups and tested for their fracture strength, using a universal testing machine. These groups consisted of combinations of 3.5 and 4.0 mm abutment diameter, each with taper angles of 6°, 8° or 10°. 3-Dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was also used to analyze stress states at implant-abutment connection areas. In general, the mechanical tests found an increasing trend of implant fracture forces as the taper angle enlarged. When the abutment diameter was 3.5 mm, the mean fracture forces for 8° and 10° taper groups were 1638.9 N ± 20.3 and 1577.1 N ± 103.2, respectively, both larger than that for the 6° taper group of 1475.0 N ± 24.4, with the largest increasing rate of 11.1%. Furthermore, the difference between 8° and 6° taper groups was significant, based on Tamhane's multiple comparison test (P<0.05). In 4.0 mm-diameter abutment groups, as the taper angle was enlarged from 6° to 8° and 10°, the mean fracture value was increased from 1066.7 N ± 56.1 to 1241.4 N ± 6.4 and 1419.3 N ± 20.0, with the largest increasing rate of 33.1%, and the differences among the three groups were significant (P<0.05). The FEA results showed that stress values varied in implants with different abutment taper angles and supported the findings of the static tests. In conclusion, increases of the abutment taper angle could significantly increase implant fracture resistance in most cases established in the study, which is due to the increased implant wall thickness in the connection part resulting from the taper angle enlargement. The increasing effects were notable when a thin implant wall was present to accommodate wide abutments. PMID:27040208

  4. A mini dental implant-supported obturator application in a patient with partial maxillectomy due to tumor: case report.

    PubMed

    Dilek, Ozkan Cem; Tezulas, Emre; Dincel, Mert

    2007-03-01

    Following a partial maxillectomy in a patient, the oral and nasal cavities remain open, providing a passageway for transmission of air and fluids between the 2 cavities. In such cases the primary aim should be the construction of an implant-supported obturator prosthesis with adequate retention, stability, and peripheral seal. In this case report, a 34-year-old female patient who underwent a class II (according to Okay et al.) partial maxillectomy 14 years before was fitted with an obturator that was supported by 5 mini dental implants. The reason for the preference of mini dental implants is the lack of adequate bone tissue for conventional implant placement in the resected area and the placement of mini dental implants with a simple surgical procedure. The treatment achieved restoration of the lost functions, which satisfied the patient, restoring her self-confidence and enhancing her quality of life. Thus, applying obturators supported by mini dental implants was successful and may be considered as an alternative to more complicated surgical techniques. Although the presented case is promising, further clinical research is needed to draw more definite conclusions. PMID:17197207

  5. Reconstruction of maxilla alveolus for application of dental implant in patients with cleft defect.

    PubMed

    Dusková, M; Kot'ová, M; Urban, F; Sosna, B; Jirkalová, R; Strnadel, T; Kristen, M; Leamerová, E; Gojis, O

    2004-01-01

    The prospective study of dental implant application into the reconstructed maxilla alveolus of cleft patients was started in 2001. Its aims are to specify precisely the indications, conditions and techniques, as well as the factors justifying the assumption that the results will be successful. Indication was based on an examination by a multidisciplinary therapeutic team (plastic surgeon, dental surgeon, orthodontist, and prosthetist), with the proviso that the patient should have a positive approach. Successful orthodontic treatment of intergnathic relation and shape of the dental arches served as the basis. It was followed by a reconstruction of the defective alveolus using autologous cancellous bone grafts, harvested from an iliac crest. Dental implants were inserted 12-15 weeks after the transplantation and subsequently a prosthetic component was applied with a time delay of at least 2 months. After the orthodontic preparation, reconstruction of the alveolus has so far been performed in 38 patients. Their age was at least 14 years, i.e. the age when growth of the orofacial region was finalised or already complete. The crucial tasks at this stage are to form a stable, three-dimensional voluminous alveolar crest, and to cover the grafts with a sufficient amount of quality soft tissue. We needed an average amount of 3.7 ccm of cancellous bone graft for the reconstruction. This amount can be harvested only from an enchondral bone. For soft tissue shell the mucoperiosteal shift of flap from cleft segment was used. In more serious cases contralateral or even bilateral shift was performed. The relief of tissue tension was performed by double cut-back. Using the approach described we attained a 84.2% success rate. Our results and experience derived within this project show that the success rate of this procedure depends on the continuous flow of the alveolar arch with a good intergnathic relation, with a length of defect between crowns of border teeth of at least 8 mm

  6. Osseointegration behavior of novel Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy for dental implants: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaona; Meng, Xing; Chu, Shunli; Xiang, Xingchen; Liu, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Jinghui; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants on mineral apposition rate and new BIC contact in rabbits. Twelve Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants were fabricated and placed into the right femur sites in six rabbits, and commercially pure titanium implants were used as controls in the left femur. Tetracycline and alizarin red were administered 3 weeks and 1 week before euthanization, respectively. At 4 weeks and 8 weeks after implantation, animals were euthanized, respectively. Surface characterization and implant-bone contact surface analysis were performed by using a scanning electron microscope and an energy dispersive X-ray detector. Mineral apposition rate was evaluated using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Toluidine blue staining was performed on undecalcified sections for histology and histomorphology evaluation. Scanning electron microscope and histomorphology observation revealed a direct contact between implants and bone of all groups. After a healing period of 4 weeks, Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants showed significantly higher mineral apposition rate compared to commercially pure titanium implants (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants and commercially pure titanium implants (P > 0.05) at 8 weeks. No significant difference of bone-to-implant contact was observed between Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants and commercially pure titanium implants implants after a healing period of 4 weeks and 8 weeks. This study showed that Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants could establish a close direct contact comparedto commercially pure titanium implants implants, improved mineral matrix apposition rate, and may someday be an alternative as a material for dental implants. PMID:27534399

  7. Properties of titanium dental implants produced by electro-discharge compaction.

    PubMed

    Lifland, M I; Okazaki, K

    1994-01-01

    Highly porous dental implants of a cylindrical shape were fabricated from commercial grade titanium REP-atomized powders by EDC. They were intended to have the maximum porosity for maximum osseointegration, but to maintain the minimum mechanical properties functionally required. Two level full factorial experiments were conducted with respect to the sample weight, capacitance, input energy and electrode configuration. All samples were X-rayed prior to tests to ascertain the presence, extent and distribution of internal macroscopic voids. Torque and compression tests were conducted to evaluate the yield or ultimate strengths (34-90 cm N and 205-502 MPa, respectively). These results indicate that macroscopic void-free, highly porous implants can be fabricated. PMID:10155680

  8. Proposal for an Ultrasonic Tool to Monitor the Osseointegration of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Marina Storani; Maciel, Carlos Dias; Pereira, José Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The longevity of dental implants depends on osseointegration, which provides load-bearing capacity without putting the prosthesis at risk from micromotions at the implant-bone interface. This research involved an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic evaluation tool to quantify osseointegration. Ultrasonic transmission is directly dependent on the difference between the acoustic impedance of materials in intimate contact with each other. The closer their acoustic impedances the more intense their transmission. Therefore, an analysis of the ultrasonic echoes would presumably allow for a quantitative evaluation of the bone tissue that has grown into the pores of the implant. In addition, the literature reports that bone fracture healing can be accelerated by the application of a controlled low-amplitude mechanical stimulus on the site of the lesion. In fact, acoustic pressure waves of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound are reportedly a secure technique for promoting mechanical stimulus without impairing the healing process. Many experimental and clinical trials have confirmed that daily transcutaneous ultrasound applications on the injured site are beneficial to the enhancement of fractured bone. This proposal aims to bring together the characteristics of ultrasound propagation and the positive effect of ultrasound on bone growth into a single tool that quantitatively monitors the evolution of the osseointegration process. The viability of a device with these features was investigated through simulations and experimentally. The initial simulations were conducted to explore the influence of waveguide shapes on the tool's sensitivity to changes in the implant supporting media. The waveguides were designed in two parts, one consisting of a screw-shaped part to attach to the implant and the other a conical or step-shaped part to which the ultrasonic source was fixed in the first simulations. The step-shaped waveguide proved to be the more sensitive; intermediate stages

  9. Voxel-based registration of simulated and real patient CBCT data for accurate dental implant pose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, António H. J.; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Correia, André Ricardo; Fernandes, Valter; Pinho, A. C. M.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    The success of dental implant-supported prosthesis is directly linked to the accuracy obtained during implant's pose estimation (position and orientation). Although traditional impression techniques and recent digital acquisition methods are acceptably accurate, a simultaneously fast, accurate and operator-independent methodology is still lacking. Hereto, an image-based framework is proposed to estimate the patient-specific implant's pose using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and prior knowledge of implanted model. The pose estimation is accomplished in a threestep approach: (1) a region-of-interest is extracted from the CBCT data using 2 operator-defined points at the implant's main axis; (2) a simulated CBCT volume of the known implanted model is generated through Feldkamp-Davis-Kress reconstruction and coarsely aligned to the defined axis; and (3) a voxel-based rigid registration is performed to optimally align both patient and simulated CBCT data, extracting the implant's pose from the optimal transformation. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the framework: (1) an in silico study using 48 implants distributed through 12 tridimensional synthetic mandibular models; (2) an in vitro study using an artificial mandible with 2 dental implants acquired with an i-CAT system; and (3) two clinical case studies. The results shown positional errors of 67+/-34μm and 108μm, and angular misfits of 0.15+/-0.08° and 1.4°, for experiment 1 and 2, respectively. Moreover, in experiment 3, visual assessment of clinical data results shown a coherent alignment of the reference implant. Overall, a novel image-based framework for implants' pose estimation from CBCT data was proposed, showing accurate results in agreement with dental prosthesis modelling requirements.

  10. Hydrothermal treatment for TiN as abrasion resistant dental implant coating and its fibroblast response.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xingling; Xu, Lingli; Munar, Melvin L; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-04-01

    Dental implant made of pure titanium (Ti) is prone to scratch and abrasion during routine oral hygiene procedures. This results an increase in surface roughness and therefore, facilitates the adhesion of bacteria. In severe cases, this could lead to peri-implantitis. To overcome this problem, surface modification of Ti is necessary to improve its abrasion resistance. Besides, a strong implant-gingiva interface should also be guaranteed to prevent the adhesion of bacteria. In this study, titanium nitride (TiN) coating was first prepared with gas nitriding to increase surface hardness of pure the substrate. Then, the TiN was hydrothermally treated in CaCl2 solution in order to improve its soft tissue biocompatibility. The effect of hydrothermal treatment temperature on surface properties of TiN was investigated and its biocompatibility was assessed in vitro using NIH3T3 fibroblast cell. It was determined that 120°C was the critical temperature for the hydrothermal treatment condition. Treatment below 120°C could incorporate Ca into TiN surface, oxidize TiN surface partially and then improve the wettability while preserving its morphology and hardness. Fibroblast cell attachment and proliferation were improved and cell spreading was enhanced on hydrothermally treated specimens compared with untreated ones. Improved wettability, Ca incorporation and negative surface due to interstitial N were believed to be the main reasons. Hydrothermal treatment is expected to make TiN a promising dental implant coating with excellent abrasion resistance and good soft tissue affinity. PMID:25686920

  11. Dental implants placed on bone subjected to vertical alveolar distraction show the same performance as those placed on primitive bone

    PubMed Central

    León-Camacho, María A.; Somoza-Martín, José M.; Fernández-González, Beatriz; Blanes-Vázquez-Gundín, Silvia; Gándara-Rey, José M.; García-García, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vertical osteogenic alveolar distraction (VOAD) allows for the augmentation of the alveolar ridge for the placement of dental implants in atrophic alveolar ridges. The goal of this paper is to assess long-term peri-implant bone resorption in implants placed on bones subjected to VOAD, comparing it with a group of patients who had implants placed directly on the alveolar bone without previous bone regeneration. Material and Methods: We conducted a follow-up study on 32 patients who were divided into two groups: The Distraction Group (14 patients), and the Distraction-Free Group (18 patients), who received a total of 100 implants. Peri-implant bone loss was measured by means of panoramic X-rays, at the time of loading and one year later, and in 35 implants of each group after 3 years of functional loading. Results: The peri-implant bone resorption (PBR) average observed in the Distraction Group at the time of prosthetic placement is higher (0.50±0.09 mm) than in the Distraction-Free Group (0.25±0.06 mm), showing statistically significant results (p=0.047). PBR levels 1 year after loading were the same for both groups (0.66 mm). At 3 years, they were higher in the Distraction Group (1.03 ± 0.22 mm vs. 0.68 ± 0.08 mm). Key words:Bone resorption, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, dental implants. PMID:23524476

  12. Effect of Luting Agents on Retention of Dental Implant-Supported Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu-Hwa; Lin, Tai-Min; Liu, Perng-Ru; Ramp, Lance C

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the retentive strength of 7 different luting agents in cement-retained implant abutment/analog assemblies. Fifty-six externally hexed dental implant abutment/analog assemblies and cast superstructures were divided randomly into 7 groups for cementation with each of the 7 luting agents. Five definitive cements tested were zinc phosphate cement, All-Bond 2, Maxcem, RelyX Luting cement, HY-Bond, and two provisional cements, ImProv and Premier. Cast superstructures were cemented onto the implant abutments and exposed to 1000 thermal cycles (0°C-55°C) and 100 000 cycles on a chewing simulator (75 N load). A universal testing machine was used to measure cement failure load of the assembled specimens. Cement failure load was evaluated with 1-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range analysis. Significant differences in cement failure loads were measured (P < .0001). Post hoc testing with Duncan's multiple range indicated 4 separate groupings. Maxcem and All-Bond 2 were comparable, having the greatest load failure. RelyX and zinc phosphate cement were analogous, and higher than HY-Bond. Improv and Premier constituted a pair, which demonstrated the lowest retentive values. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, Maxcem and All-Bond 2 are good candidates for cement-retained implant prostheses while concerning retention. PMID:24666355

  13. Dental management of a patient fitted with subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator device and concomitant warfarin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Khalil, Hesham Saleh; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Automated Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (AICD), simply known as an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD), has been used in patients for more than 30 years. An Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is a small battery-powered electrical impulse generator that is implanted in patients who are at a risk of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia or any such related event. Typically, patients with these types of occurrences are on anticoagulant therapy. The desired International Normalized Ratio (INR) for these patients is in the range of 2–3 to prevent any subsequent cardiac event. These patients possess a challenge to the dentist in many ways, especially during oral surgical procedures, and these challenges include risk of sudden death, control of post-operative bleeding and pain. This article presents the dental management of a 60 year-old person with an ICD and concomitant anticoagulant therapy. The patient was on multiple medications and was treated for a grossly neglected mouth with multiple carious root stumps. This case report outlines the important issues in managing patients fitted with an ICD device and at a risk of sudden cardiac death. PMID:26236132

  14. Bruxism: its multiple causes and its effects on dental implants - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Van Der Zaag, J; Naeije, M

    2006-04-01

    There is a growing interest in bruxism, as evidenced by the rapidly increasing number of papers about this subject during the past 5 years. The aim of the present review was to provide an update of two previous reviews from our department (one about the aetiology of bruxism and the other about the possible role of this movement disorder in the failure of dental implants) and to describe the details of the literature search strategies used, thus enabling the readers to judge the completeness of the review. Most studies that were published about the etiology during the past 5 years corroborate the previously drawn conclusions. Similarly, the update of the review about the possible causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure reveals no new points of view. Thus, there is no reason to assume otherwise than that bruxism is mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally, and that there is still insufficient evidence to support or refute a causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure. This illustrates that there is a vast need for well-designed studies to study both the aetiology of bruxism and its purported relationship with implant failure. PMID:16629884

  15. In Vitro Evaluation of Titanium Exfoliation During Simulated Surgical Insertion of Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Sathyanarayanan; Wilson, Thomas G; Valderrama, Pilar; Watkins-Curry, Pilanda; Chan, Julia Y; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2016-02-01

    Dissolution of titanium wear particles in the oral environment, and their accumulation in the surrounding tissues have been associated with failure of dental implants (DI). The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical forces involved in surgical insertion of DI on surface wear and metal particle generation. It was hypothesized that mechanical factors associated with implant placement can lead to the generation of titanium particles in the oral environment. The testing methodology for surface evaluation employed simulated surgical insertion, followed by removal of DI in different densities of simulated bone material. Torsional forces were monitored for the insertion and removal of DI. The surface of the simulated bone materials was inspected with optical microscopy to detect traces of metallic particles that may have been generated during the procedure. Further characterization of the composition of powders collected from osteotomy cavities was conducted with powder X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the different densities of simulated bone material affected the torsional forces associated with implant insertion. However, the mechanical factors involved in the implant insertion/removal procedure did not generate wear particles, as confirmed by powder X-ray experiments. PMID:25785647

  16. Surface modification of Ti dental implants by Nd:YVO 4 laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Francisco J. C.; Marques, Rodrigo F. C.; Filho, Edson de A.; Guastaldi, Antonio C.

    2007-09-01

    Surface modifications have been applied in endosteal bone devices in order to improve the osseointegration through direct contact between neoformed bone and the implant without an intervening soft tissue layer. Surface characteristics of titanium implants have been modified by addictive methods, such as metallic titanium, titanium oxide and hydroxyapatite powder plasma spray, as well as by subtractive methods, such as acid etching, acid etching associated with sandblasting by either AlO 2 or TiO 2, and recently by laser ablation. Surface modification for dental and medical implants can be obtained by using laser irradiation technique where its parameters like repetition rate, pulse energy, scanning speed and fluency must be taken into accounting to the appropriate surface topography. Surfaces of commercially pure Ti (cpTi) were modified by laser Nd:YVO 4 in nine different parameters configurations, all under normal atmosphere. The samples were characterized by SEM and XRD refined by Rietveld method. The crystalline phases αTi, βTi, Ti 6O, Ti 3O and TiO were formed by the melting and fast cooling processes during irradiation. The resulting phases on the irradiated surface were correlated with the laser beam parameters. The aim of the present work was to control titanium oxides formations in order to improve implants osseointegration by using a laser irradiation technique which is of great importance to biomaterial devices due to being a clean and reproducible process.

  17. Marginal bony changes in relation to different vertical positions of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jung-Myung; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Um, Heung-Sik; Lee, Min-Ku

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to radiographically evaluate marginal bony changes in relation to different vertical positions of dental implants. Methods Two hundred implants placed in 107 patients were examined. The implants were classified by the vertical positions of the fixture-abutment connection (microgap): 'bone level,' 'above bone level,' or 'below bone level.' Marginal bone levels were examined in the radiographs taken immediately after fixture insertion, immediately after second-stage surgery, 6 months after prosthesis insertion, and 1 year after prosthesis insertion. Radiographic evaluation was carried out by measuring the distance between the microgap and the most coronal bone-to-implant contact (BIC). Results Immediately after fixture insertion, the distance between the microgap and most coronal BIC was 0.06 ± 0.68 mm; at second surgery, 0.43 ± 0.83 mm; 6 months after loading, 1.36 ± 0.56 mm; and 1 year after loading, 1.53 ± 0.51 mm (mean ± SD). All bony changes were statistically significant but the difference between the second surgery and the 6-month loading was greater than between other periods. In the 'below bone level' group, the marginal bony change between fixture insertion and 1 year after loading was about 2.25 mm, and in the 'bone level' group, 1.47 mm, and in 'above bone level' group, 0.89 mm. Therefore, the marginal bony change was smaller than other groups in the 'above bone level' group and larger than other groups in the 'below bone level' group. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that marginal bony changes occur during the early phase of healing after implant placement. These changes are dependent on the vertical positions of implants. PMID:21072222

  18. The impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible: a before–after study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, A; Brunton, P; Goodwin, M; Horner, K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible, using a “before–after” study design. Methods: Eight dental practitioners, who regularly place dental implants in independent dental practice in the North West of England, were presented with realistic simulations of four edentulous cases. The practitioners were asked to assess case difficulty, select implants and then drill osteotomies in preparation for dental implants in the lower canine regions to support a complete overdenture. In the “before” part of the study, a panoramic and a trans-symphyseal view were available. In the “after” part of the study, a CBCT image was added. Perception of case difficulty, implant selection and the incidence of perforations or “near miss perforations” of the lingual cortical plate were recorded. Two cases were regarded as “regular” and two as “challenging”. Results: In challenging cases, the availability of CBCT led practitioners to select narrower implants and to assess cases as more difficult. In the challenging cases only, there were fewer perforations of the lingual cortical plate after the availability of CBCT, but this difference was not statistically significant. There were no perforations in the regular cases either before or after the availability of CBCT. Conclusions: Perception of case difficulty and implant selection are of importance only if they change the outcome for the patient. This study provided weak evidence that CBCT is helpful in avoiding perforations in challenging cases. The availability of CBCT had no impact in regular cases. PMID:25472617

  19. Histopathological Features of Secondary Squamous Cell Carcinoma Around a Dental Implant in the Mandible After Chemoradiotherapy: A Case Report With a Clinicopathological Review.

    PubMed

    Nariai, Yoshiki; Kanno, Takahiro; Sekine, Joji

    2016-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) around a dental implant is a rare pathologic condition. This report describes a case of recurrent OSCC surrounding a dental implant, histopathologic findings, and a literature review of this condition. A 58-year-old Japanese woman underwent chemoradiotherapy for OSCC in the right lower gingiva, resulting in a complete response. Nine years after primary chemoradiotherapy, a dental implant was placed in her atrophic mandible. Three years later, an OSCC developed around the dental implant in the right lower premolar region. Marginal mandibulectomy was performed. Microscopic examination showed medullary invasion around the implant surface, suggesting that tumor infiltration of the bone was through the interface between the implant and bone. However, no downward invasion through the interface was evident. OSCC can develop around dental implants that are placed for oral rehabilitation after ablative surgery. Staging of OSCC and planning of surgical management should be carried out carefully, because implants placed adjacent to the OSCC can influence tumor invasion. A high degree of vigilance for OSCC is required during follow-up of patients with dental implants who have OSCC risk factors such as premalignant lesions. Detailed evaluation, including biopsy examination, is essential for distinguishing peri-implantitis from OSCC. PMID:26679554

  20. Use of PID and Iterative Learning Controls on Improving Intra-Oral Hydraulic Loading System of Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Cheng; Chan, Manuel; Hsin, Yi-Ping; Ko, Ching-Chang

    This study presents the control design and tests of an intra-oral hydraulic system for quantitatively loading of a dental implant. The computer-controlled system was developed and employed for better pressure error compensation by PID (proportional-integral-derivative) control and point-to-point iterative learning algorithm. In vitro experiments showed that implant loading is precisely controlled (error 3%) for 0.5Hz loading without air inclusion, and reasonably performed (error<10%) with air inclusion up to 20% of the total hydraulic volume. The PID controller maintains forces at the desired level while the learning controller eliminates overshoot/undershoot at the onset of each loading cycle. The system can be potentially used for in vivo animal studies for better understanding of how bone responds to implant loading. Quantitative information derived from this biomechanical model will add to improved designs of dental implants.

  1. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy. PMID:25618702

  2. Characterization and nanomechanical properties of novel dental implant coatings containing copper decorated-carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sasani, N; Vahdati Khaki, J; Mojtaba Zebarjad, S

    2014-09-01

    Fluorapatite-titania coated Ti-based implants are promising for using in dental surgery for restoring teeth. One of the challenges in implantology is to achieve a bioactive coating with appropriate mechanical properties. In this research, simple sol-gel method was developed for synthesis of fluorapatite-titania-carbon nanotube decorated with antibacterial agent. Triethyl phosphate [PO4(C2H5)3], calcium nitrate [Ca(NO3)2] and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) were used as precursors under an ethanol-water based solution for fluorapatite (FA) production. Titanium isopropoxide and isopropanol were used as starting materials for making TiO2 sol-gels. Also, Copper acetate [Cu(C2H3O2)2·H2O] was used as precursor for decoration of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with wet chemical method. The decorated MWCNTs (CNT(Cu)) were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The phase identification of the FA-TiO2-CNT(Cu) coating was carried out by XRD analysis. Morphology of coated samples was investigated by SEM observations. The surface elastic modulus and hardness of coatings were studied using nanoindentation technique. The results indicate that novel dental implant coating containing FA, TiO2 and copper decorated MWCNTs have proper morphological features. The results of nanoindentation test show that incorporation of CNT(Cu) in FA-TiO2 matrix can improve the nanomechanical properties of composite coating. PMID:24905179

  3. Systemic Trans- and Postoperative Evaluations of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Junior, Joel Ferreira Santiago; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Moreno, Amália; Villa, Luiz Marcelo Ribeiro; de Carvalho Dekon, Stefan Fiuza; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to examine the trans- and postoperative systemic characteristics of patients undergoing dental implant surgery and to investigate the relationship between pre- and post- surgery anxiety levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-nine patients were analyzed in 3 call centers to determine anxiety levels, pain levels, and preoperative and postoperative histories using the State–Trait (STAI) questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 93 dental implants were installed, with a success rate of 100%. The most frequently reported systemic disease was hypertension. There was a significantly higher rate of effective clamping (torque) to the mandibular bone than to the maxillary bone. The association between postoperative surgical complications and longer operative time was not significant, but there was a significant correlation between the alteration of mouth opening and daily routine activities and a significant decrease in anxiety levels between the day of surgery and the postoperative time point (p=0.006). CONCLUSION: A longer surgical time was associated with surgery-related complications and with a higher anxiety index on the preoperative evaluation. PMID:27074177

  4. FEM and Von Mises analyses of different dental implant shapes for masticatory loading distribution

    PubMed Central

    CICCIÙ, M.; BRAMANTI, E.; CECCHETTI, F.; SCAPPATICCI, L.; GUGLIELMINO, E.; RISITANO, G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The rehabilitation of edentulous patients is today a challenge for the clinicians. The healthy of the hard and soft issue may be considered a fundamental element for having long-term results. The dental implant progresses about the predictable and safe results made this technique chosen from a large group of practitioners. However some problems related intra-operative and postoperative conditions may create discomfort on the patients and consequently to the clinician. The unfavourable results are often related to the bone tissue quality but sometime the dental implant shape and the prosthesis framework may undergo to technical difficulties. The purpose of this work is, through the use of appropriate FEM models, to analyse the effect of all these parameters in the construction of a prosthesis type “Toronto”, evaluating all the surgical and prosthetic components in order to direct the choices made by the surgeon and to optimize the distribution of loads reducing the patient’s discomfort and having a long term clinical success. PMID:25694795

  5. FEM and Von Mises analyses of different dental implant shapes for masticatory loading distribution.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, M; Bramanti, E; Cecchetti, F; Scappaticci, L; Guglielmino, E; Risitano, G

    2014-01-01

    The rehabilitation of edentulous patients is today a challenge for the clinicians. The healthy of the hard and soft issue may be considered a fundamental element for having long-term results. The dental implant progresses about the predictable and safe results made this technique chosen from a large group of practitioners. However some problems related intra-operative and postoperative conditions may create discomfort on the patients and consequently to the clinician. The unfavourable results are often related to the bone tissue quality but sometime the dental implant shape and the prosthesis framework may undergo to technical difficulties. The purpose of this work is, through the use of appropriate FEM models, to analyse the effect of all these parameters in the construction of a prosthesis type "Toronto", evaluating all the surgical and prosthetic components in order to direct the choices made by the surgeon and to optimize the distribution of loads reducing the patient's discomfort and having a long term clinical success. PMID:25694795

  6. Osseointegration properties of titanium dental implants modified with a nanostructured coating based on ordered porous silica and bioactive glass nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covarrubias, Cristian; Mattmann, Matías; Von Marttens, Alfredo; Caviedes, Pablo; Arriagada, Cristián; Valenzuela, Francisco; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Corral, Camila

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of a nanoporous silica coating loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles (nBG/NSC) on titanium dental implant surface and its in vitro and in vivo evaluation is presented. The coating was produced by a combined sol-gel and evaporation induced self-assembly process. In vitro bioactivity was assessed in simulated body fluid (SBF) and investigating the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). A rat tibial model was employed to analyze the bone response to nBG/NSC-modified titanium implant surface in vivo. The nBG/NSC coating was confirmed at nano level to be constituted by a highly ordered nanoporous silica structure. The coating nanotopography in conjunction with the bioactivity of the BG particles accelerate the in vitro apatite formation and promote the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in absence of osteogenic supplements. These properties accelerate the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant after 3 weeks of implantation. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy images revealed the presence of gaps and soft tissue in the unmodified implant after 6 weeks, whereas the nBG/NSC-modified implant showed mature bone in intimate contact with the implant surface. The nBG/NSC coating appears promising for accelerating the osseointegration of dental implants.

  7. A novel root analogue dental implant using CT scan and CAD/CAM: selective laser melting technology.

    PubMed

    Figliuzzi, M; Mangano, F; Mangano, C

    2012-07-01

    Direct laser metal forming (DLMF) is a new technique which allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by annealing metal powder microparticles in a focused laser beam, according to a computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) model. For dental implants, the fabrication process involves the laser-induced fusion of titanium microparticles, in order to build, layer by layer, the desired object. Modern computed tomography (CT) acquisition and 3D image conversion, combined with the DLMF process, allows the fabrication of custom-made, root-analogue implants (RAI), perfect copies of the radicular units that need replacing. This report demonstrates the successful clinical use of a custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implant. CT images of the residual non-restorable root of a right maxillary premolar were acquired and modified with specific software into a 3D model. From this model, a custom-made, root-analogue, DLMF implant was fabricated. Immediately after tooth extraction, the root-analogue implant was placed in the extraction socket and restored with a single crown. At the 1-year follow-up examination, the custom-made implant showed almost perfect functional and aesthetic integration. The possibility of fabricating custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implants opens new interesting perspectives for immediate placement of dental implants. PMID:22377004

  8. Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in Function Retrieved Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in function retrieved acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was retrieved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the retrieved implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the retrieved failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the retrieved implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a retrieved press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined. PMID:25642739

  9. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant

    PubMed Central

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-01-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine followed by immobilization of the antibiotic cefotaxime sodium (CS) onto the polydopamine-coated Ti through catechol chemistry. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CS grafted on the Ti surface. Our results demonstrated that the antibiotic-grafted Ti substrate showed good biocompatibility and well-behaved haemocompatibility. In addition, the antibiotic-grafted Ti could effectively prevent adhesion and proliferation of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive). Moreover, the inhibition of biofilm formation on the antibiotic-decorated Ti indicated that the grafted CS could maintain its long-term antibacterial activity. This modified Ti substrate with enhanced antibacterial activity holds great potential as implant material for applications in dental and bone graft substitutes. PMID:24647910

  10. Biological characterization of a new silicon based coating developed for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ibáñez, M; Juan-Díaz, M J; Lara-Saez, I; Coso, A; Franco, J; Gurruchaga, M; Suay Antón, J; Goñi, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Taking into account the influence of Si in osteoblast cell proliferation, a series of sol-gel derived silicon based coating was prepared by controlling the process parameters and varying the different Si-alkoxide precursors molar rate in order to obtain materials able to release Si compounds. For this purpose, methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were hydrolysed together and the sol obtained was used to dip-coat the different substrates. The silicon release ability of the coatings was tested finding that it was dependent on the TEOS precursor content, reaching a Si amount value around ninefolds higher for coatings with TEOS than for the pure MTMOS material. To test the effect of this released Si, the in vitro performance of developed coatings was tested with human adipose mesenchymal stem cells finding a significantly higher proliferation and mineralization on the coating with the higher TEOS content. For in vivo evaluation of the biocompatibility, coated implants were placed in the tibia of the rabbit and a histological analysis was performed. The evaluation of parameters such as the bone marrow state, the presence of giant cells and the fibrous capsule proved the biocompatibility of the developed coatings. Furthermore, coated implants seemed to produce a qualitatively higher osteoblastic activity and a higher number of bone spicules than the control (uncoated commercial SLA titanium dental implant). PMID:26936366

  11. Updated clinical considerations for dental implant therapy in irradiated head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takako Imai; Chan, Hsun-Liang; Tindle, David Ira; Maceachern, Mark; Oh, Tae-Ju

    2013-08-01

    An increasing number of reports indicate successful use of dental implants (DI) during oral rehabilitation for head and neck cancer patients undergoing tumor surgery and radiation therapy. Implant-supported dentures are a viable option when patients cannot use conventional dentures due to adverse effects of radiation therapy, including oral dryness or fragile mucosa, in addition to compromised anatomy; however, negative effects of radiation, including osteoradionecrosis, are well documented in the literature, and early loss of implants in irradiated bone has been reported. There is currently no consensus concerning DI safety or clinical guidelines for their use in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. It is important for health care professionals to be aware of the multidimensional risk factors for these patients when planning oral rehabilitation with DIs, and to provide optimal treatment options and maximize the overall treatment outcome. This paper reviews and updates the impact of radiotherapy on DI survival and discusses clinical considerations for DI therapy in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. PMID:23388045

  12. Optimizing Maxillary Aesthetics of a Severe Compromised Tooth through Orthodontic Movement and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Cirelli, Joni Augusto; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Capelozza-Filho, Leopoldino; Borelli Barros, Luiz Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of severe compromised tooth in the maxillary anterior area still poses great challenge to the clinicians. Several treatment modalities have been proposed to restore the function and aesthetics in teeth with advanced periodontal disease. The present study aims to report a case of traumatic injury of a left-maxillary central incisor with ridge preservation, orthodontic movement, and implant therapy. A 45-year-old woman underwent the proposed treatment for her left central incisor: basic periodontal therapy, xenogenous bone graft, and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Six months after the graft procedure, orthodontic movement by means of alignment and leveling was made and a coronal displacement of the gingival margin and vertical bone apposition could be observed after 13 months of active movement. Afterwards, a dental implant was placed followed by a connective tissue graft and immediate provisionalization of the crown. In conclusion, orthodontic movement was effective to improve the gingival tissue and alveolar bone prior to implant placement favoring the aesthetic results. Six years postoperatively, the results revealed height and width alveolar bone gain indicating that the treatment proposed was able to restore all the functional and aesthetic parameters. PMID:24523969

  13. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-06-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine followed by immobilization of the antibiotic cefotaxime sodium (CS) onto the polydopamine-coated Ti through catechol chemistry. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CS grafted on the Ti surface. Our results demonstrated that the antibiotic-grafted Ti substrate showed good biocompatibility and well-behaved haemocompatibility. In addition, the antibiotic-grafted Ti could effectively prevent adhesion and proliferation of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive). Moreover, the inhibition of biofilm formation on the antibiotic-decorated Ti indicated that the grafted CS could maintain its long-term antibacterial activity. This modified Ti substrate with enhanced antibacterial activity holds great potential as implant material for applications in dental and bone graft substitutes. PMID:24647910

  14. Jaw osteonecrosis management around a dental implant inserted 2 years before starting treatment with zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Fernández, Ana-Belén; García Medina, Blas; Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio; Jiménez-Burkhardt, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BP) are a type of drug known to inhibit bone resorption through complex interventions. Their primary mechanism of action is aimed at the cellular level, inhibiting osteoclast activity and so bone resorption. BPs are widely used, with many patients receiving continuous treatment for years. But it is well known that these drugs can produce osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Zoledronic acid (ZA) is an intravenous BP used in the treatment and prophylaxis of bone disease in patients with malignant tumors with bone implication. ZA is the most potent BP in clinical development. This report describes the case of a 62-year-old woman with breast cancer antecedents which relapsed, who had received a maxillary dental implant two years before the start of therapy with zoledronic acid. She later developed osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), which began in the peri-implant area, and was treated for stage 3 ONJ by sub-total maxillectomy. Key words:Bisphosphonates, zoledronic acid, osteonecrosis of the jaw, peri-implantitis, maxillectomy. PMID:26330946

  15. Oral Rehabilitation With Orthognathic Surgery After Dental Implant Placement for Class III Malocclusion With Skeletal Asymmetry and Posterior Bite Collapse.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Seigo; Nakatani, Yuya; Kawasaki, Takako; Tajima, Nobutaka; Tobita, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Noriaki; Sawase, Takashi; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-08-01

    Increasing numbers of older patients are seeking orthognathic surgery to treat jaw deformity. However, orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment is difficult in cases without occlusal vertical stop. A 55-year-old man presented with Class III malocclusion and mandibular protrusion including esthetic problems and posterior bite collapse. He underwent dental implant treatment to reconstruct an occlusal vertical stop before orthognathic surgery. His occlusal function and esthetic problems improved after surgery, and his skeletal and occlusal stability has been maintained for 6 years. Dental implant placement at appropriate positions could help to determine the position of the proximal segment at orthognathic surgery and could shorten the time required to restore esthetic and occlusal function. This case demonstrates how skeletal and dental stability can be maintained long after surgery in a patient with jaw deformity and posterior bite collapse. PMID:26035376

  16. Segmental Alveolar Osteotomy by Palatal Approach to Correct Excessive Angulated Dental Implants in Anterior and Posterior Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Akkas, Ismail; Akpinar, Yusuf Ziya; Ozan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have been used for a long time to achieve better prosthetic and health conditions in the mouth. With the increase in their usage, more complications have occurred, and methods of solving these problems have been developed. One complication is insertion of the implant in the wrong direction. The aim of this case report is to describe an osteotomy technique to reposition a malpositioned dental implant. A female patient, aged 38 years, and a male patient aged 48 years, were referred complaining of the malpositioned osseointegrated implants, which had been placed in the region of the left maxillary first premolar and molar tooth, and in the region of the left maxillary lateral incisor. Due to severe buccal positioning of the implant fixtures, acceptable prosthetic treatment was not possible. Alveolar osteotomy procedure was used to reposition the implants. Satisfactory results were obtained by osteotomy for 18-month of follow up. We conclude that inadequately axially inclined implants can be successfully treated by alveolar osteotomy. The preservation of marginal gingiva permits obtaining better prosthetic results. To avoid the recession of attached gingiva, palatal approach technique may help the clinicians. PMID:26023650

  17. Numerical study of effect of elastomeric stress absorbers on stress reduction in bone-dental implant interface

    PubMed Central

    MEHDI, Ghalem; BELARBI, Abderrahmane; MANSOURI, Bensmaine; AZARI, Zitouni

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper focused on optimal stress distribution in the mandibular bone surrounding a dental implant and is devoted to the development of a modified Osteoplant® implant type in order to minimize stress concentration in the bone-implant interface. Material and Methods This study investigated 0.4 mm thick layers of two elastomeric stress barriers incorporated into the dental implant using 3-D finite element analysis. Results Overall, this proposed implant provoked lower load transfer in bone-implant interface due to the effect of the elastomers as stress absorbers. The stress level in the bone was reduced between 28% and 42% for three load cases: 75 N, 60 N and 27 N in corono-apical, linguo-buccal and disto-mesial direction, respectively. Conclusion The proposed model provided an acceptable solution for load transfer reduction to the mandible. This investigation also permitted to choose how to incorporate two elastomers into the Osteoplant® implant system. PMID:25760271

  18. Comparison and Combination of Dual-Energy- and Iterative-Based Metal Artefact Reduction on Hip Prosthesis and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Malte N.; Schabel, Christoph; Thomas, Christoph; Raupach, Rainer; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare and combine dual-energy based and iterative metal artefact reduction on hip prosthesis and dental implants in CT. Material and Methods A total of 46 patients (women:50%,mean age:63±15years) with dental implants or hip prostheses (n = 30/20) were included and examined with a second-generation Dual Source Scanner. 120kV equivalent mixed-images were derived from reconstructions of the 100/Sn140kV source images using no metal artefact reduction (NOMAR) and iterative metal artefact reduction (IMAR). We then generated monoenergetic extrapolations at 130keV from source images without IMAR (DEMAR) or from source images with IMAR, (IMAR+DEMAR). The degree of metal artefact was quantified for NOMAR, IMAR, DEMAR and IMAR+DEMAR using a Fourier-based method and subjectively rated on a five point Likert scale by two independent readers. Results In subjects with hip prosthesis, DEMAR and IMAR resulted in significantly reduced artefacts compared to standard reconstructions (33% vs. 56%; for DEMAR and IMAR; respectively, p<0.005), but the degree of artefact reduction was significantly higher for IMAR (all p<0.005). In contrast, in subjects with dental implants only IMAR showed a significant reduction of artefacts whereas DEMAR did not (71%, vs. 8% p<0.01 and p = 0.1; respectively). Furthermore, the combination of IMAR with DEMAR resulted in additionally reduced artefacts (Hip prosthesis: 47%, dental implants 18%; both p<0.0001). Conclusion IMAR allows for significantly higher reduction of metal artefacts caused by hip prostheses and dental implants, compared to a dual energy based method. The combination of DE-source images with IMAR and subsequent monoenergetic extrapolation provides an incremental benefit compared to both single methods. PMID:26600188

  19. Coherent Synchrotron-Based Micro-Imaging Employed for Studies of Micro-Gap Formation in Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, T.; Zabler, S.; Rack, A.; Stiller, M.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.; Nelson, K.

    2011-09-01

    Biocompatible materials such as titanium are regularly applied in oral surgery. Titanium-based implants for the replacement of missing teeth demand a high mechanical precision in order to minimize micro-bacterial leakage, especially when two-piece concepts are used. Synchrotron-based hard x-ray radiography, unlike conventional laboratory radiography, allows high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when micro-sized features in such highly attenuating objects are visualized. Therefore, micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the sample under different mechanical loads can be studied. We show the existence of micro-gaps in implants with conical connections and study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential source of implant failure, i.e., bacterial leakage, which can be a stimulus for an inflammatory process.

  20. Coherent Synchrotron-Based Micro-Imaging Employed for Studies of Micro-Gap Formation in Dental Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, T.; Stiller, M.; Nelson, K.; Zabler, S.; Rack, A.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.

    2011-09-09

    Biocompatible materials such as titanium are regularly applied in oral surgery. Titanium-based implants for the replacement of missing teeth demand a high mechanical precision in order to minimize micro-bacterial leakage, especially when two-piece concepts are used. Synchrotron-based hard x-ray radiography, unlike conventional laboratory radiography, allows high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when micro-sized features in such highly attenuating objects are visualized. Therefore, micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the sample under different mechanical loads can be studied. We show the existence of micro-gaps in implants with conical connections and study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential source of implant failure, i.e., bacterial leakage, which can be a stimulus for an inflammatory process.

  1. Validity of ridge mapping and cone beam computed tomography in dental implant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Ruiz, Carmen Teresa; Noriega, Jorge; Guerrero, Maria Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of alveolar ridge measurements obtained with ridge mapping (RM) technique against cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) measurements. Materials and Methods: Twenty partially edentulous patients were recruited for implant placement in the Clinic of San Martin de Porres University. For all the measurements, a vacuum-formed stent was fabricated for each subject. A buccal and lingual point was made in the stent to provide a reference of measurement for each implant site. RM measurements with the stent were obtained before and after surgical flap reflection. Two calibrated observers made the CBCT images measurements. T-test was used for the statistical analysis. Values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Also, specificity and sensibility of CBCT and RM were compared. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)_ was measure between CBCT measurements. Results: A total of 62 implants sites were evaluated. No statistical significant differences were obtained with CBCT and RM measurements (P = 0,207). Detecting proper buccal-lingual ridge, the sensitivity and specificity were 59% and 91% for RM while CBCT obtained 92% of sensitivity and 94% of specificity. Concordance was found “good” (ICC 0.82). Conclusion: Both methods provide valid measurements. Even though, we found diagnostic limitations in the RM, it demonstrated to be a useful method for its exactitude, low cost, the immediate result and no need of radiation. CBCT was recommended when the bone ridge width and height were in the less than ideal for conventional dental implant placement. PMID:26229269

  2. Assessment of demographic and clinical data related to dental implants in a group of Turkish patients treated at a university clinic

    PubMed Central

    Bural, Canan; Bilhan, Hakan; Çilingir, Altuğ

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This retrospective study analyzed the distribution of the dental implants with regards to age and gender of the patients and type of indication for the implant therapy, as well as the location, dimension and type of the implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS The data of demographics (age and gender), type of indication for implant therapy, anatomical location, dimensions (length and diameter) and type (bone and tissue level) of 1616 implants were recorded from patient charts between January 2000 and January 2010. Descriptive statistics were analyzed using a chi-squared test for demographic parameters, type of indication, tooth position, anatomical location, implant dimensions and type (α=.05). RESULTS The patient pool comprised of 350 women and 266 men, with a mean age of 52.12 ± 13.79 years. The difference in n% of the implants of the age groups was statistically significant between the types of indications. The difference in the position of the implants was statistically significant between the n% of the implants of all age groups. Gender did not significantly vary, except that the diameter of the implants was significantly higher for the standard diameter implants in males. The difference between the implant positions was statistically significant when considered according to indication. The relationship between implant length and anatomical location was statistically significant. CONCLUSION The indication for dental implant use is age dependent and the type and size of the implant seems to be strongly related to the location of the implant. PMID:24049578

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr alloy used as dental implant material.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Alexander E; Molotnikov, Andrey; Lapovok, Rimma; Zeller, Rolf; Berner, Simon; Habersetzer, Philippe; Dalla Torre, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Zr alloys have recently started to receive a considerable amount of attention as promising materials for dental applications. This work compares mechanical properties of a new Ti-15Zr alloy to those of commercially pure titanium Grade4 in two surface conditions - machined and modified by sand-blasting and etching (SLA). As a result of significantly smaller grain size in the initial condition (1-2µm), the strength of Ti-15Zr alloy was found to be 10-15% higher than that of Grade4 titanium without reduction in the tensile elongation or compromising the fracture toughness. The fatigue endurance limit of the alloy was increased by around 30% (560MPa vs. 435MPa and 500MPa vs. 380MPa for machined and SLA-treated surfaces, respectively). Additional implant fatigue tests showed enhanced fatigue performance of Ti-15Zr over Ti-Grade4. PMID:27258932

  4. Use of intraoral welding to stabilize dental implants in augmented sites for immediate provisionalization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Avvanzo, Pierluigi; Fabrocini, Lelio A; Ciavarella, Domenico; Avvanzo, Andrea; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; De Maio, Raffaele A

    2012-02-01

    Immediate implant rehabilitation of edentulous arches may be somewhat problematic because of anatomic situations involving insufficient bone thickness or height and tooth position. The aim of this report was to present a retrospective case series of dental implants placed into augmented sites (split crest or sinus augmentation) that were stabilized with an intraorally welded framework at the time of immediate provisionalization. An intraoral welding unit was used to join and stabilize implants as an orthopedic splint to break down forces applied on provisional restorations during healing and osseointegration. This approach allows for the immediate provisionalization of implants in bone-defective areas where multiple implant systems have been enacted. Forty-eight implants in 16 patients were inserted, welded together to a titanium framework, and immediately provisionalized during the same surgery in which split-crest or sinus augmentation procedures were performed. After removing the welded frameworks, 1 of 48 implants failed; the failed implant was associated with a sinus augmentation procedure. Intraoral welding stabilization may be a predictable procedure to allow immediate loading in augmented areas during healing time and to stabilize implants against nonaxial forces, thereby reducing the number of surgical and prosthetic sessions and making patients comfortable and accustomed to immediate fixed provisional and definitive restorations. PMID:20932150

  5. Laser micro-grooved, Arginine-Glycine-Apspartic acid (RGD) coated dental implants, a 5 years radiographic follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Alkhodary, Mohamed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This work has utilized laser direct writing to produce 10 microns wide uniform grooves on the surface of custom made titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) dental implants, and the tri-peptide RGD coating to produce a micromechanical and a chemical union with the tissues around the implant crest module and minimize crestal bone loss. The aim of this study was to follow these implants radiographically after five years of service under a mandibular overdenture. Methodology Standardized digital periapical radiographs and the computer software “Image J” were used to evaluate the bone density profile and vertical bone loss along the mesial and distal sides of the implants used in this study. Results The results of this study demonstrated less vertical bone loss and higher bone density profiles next to the laser microgrooved implants coated with the RGD than those only having the laser micro-grooves. Conclusion The RGD coating has improved the bone density profile and reduced the vertical bone loss around the studied dental implants. However, further studies are needed to compare the effects of the laser micro-grooves versus other uniform or non uniform surface features; also, the RGD coating should be compared to other biomimetic surface coating materials. PMID:25780355

  6. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Salas-Pérez, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Rafael; Aguilar, Mariano; Aguilar, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA)—assessed implant stability (ISQ values) with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) (n = 7) or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA) (n = 10). Sixty 4.5 × 13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA) (P < 0.001), but not of the implants (P = 0.455) or of the interaction of the two factors (P = 0.848). Bonferroni post hoc comparisons showed a lower mean ISQ for implants in decalcified (50.33 ± 2.92) heads than in fresh (66.93 ± 1.10) or fixated (70.77 ± 1.32) heads (both P < 0.001). The ISQ score (fresh) was significantly higher for those in OA (73.52 ± 1.92) versus OP (67.13 ± 1.09) heads. However, mixed linear analysis showed no significant association between ISQ scores and morphologic or histomorphometric results (P > 0.5 in all cases), and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P > 0.08). Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA). This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies. PMID:24995307

  7. Measurement for natural dental neck data of normal adults and its clinical significance on guiding implant restoration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Junjun; Zhou, Chengyuan; Xia, Junnan; Qin, Hongwei; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Provide reference basis for the clinical implant restoration to select implant diameter through measuring each data of 7 teeth in the dental neck of bilateral upper and lower jaws of the young volunteers with normal dentition. Methods: Select 30 healthy young volunteers with complete dentition but no malocclusion, take cone beam CT (CBCT), measure the mesiodistal and buccolingual distance of the tooth root at 1.5 mm from 14 teeth (bilateral upper and lower jaws) to alveolar crest, trace out the outline of each tooth neck in this layer, calculate the cross sectional area and roundness of each tooth neck according to pixel value calibration, and then carry out statistical processing. Results: Complete the data collection and processing of mesiodistal length, buccolingual width, cross sectional area, and cross sectional roundness of the dental neck at 1.5 mm from these seven teeth of the bilateral upper and lower jaws to the alveolar crest of 30 volunteers, and calculate the mean value, variance, and reference value range of medical science of each index. Conclusion: CBCT can effectively obtain the image information of the dental neck. Through mimics 10.0 and Photoshop CS3, it is possible to accurately calculate the dental neck length and width, and cross sectional area of each tooth according to CBCT image information. This result can provide reference basis for the implant restoration of the clinical teeth. PMID:26628955

  8. Titanium dental implants surface-immobilized with gold nanoparticles as osteoinductive agents for rapid osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Hak Rae; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Donghyun; Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jung Haeng; Woo, Yi-Hyung; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Lee, Deok-Won; Kwon, Il Keun

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are quite attractive materials for use as osteogenic agents due to their potential effects on the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation. In this study, an osseo-integrated titanium (Ti) implant surface coated with GNPs was used for promotion of bone regeneration. We prepared a silanized Ti surface by chemical treatment of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and immobilized the GNP layer (Ti-GNP) on their surfaces via Au-S bonding. The GNP layer is uniformly immobilized on the surface and the layer covers the titanium oxide surface well, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Ti-GNP was used to investigate the effectiveness of this system both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results showed that the Ti-GNP significantly enhances the osteogenic differentiation with increased mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation specific genes in human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Furthermore, the in vivo results showed that Ti-GNP had a significant influence on the osseous interface formation. Through these in vitro and vivo tests, we found that Ti-GNP can be useful as osseo-integration inducing dental implants for formation of an osseous interface and maintenance of nascent bone formation. PMID:26874978

  9. Nanoparticulate zinc oxide as a coating material for orthopedic and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Sharili, Amir S; Huang, Jie; Rawlinson, Simon C F; Allaker, Robert P

    2015-03-01

    Orthopedic and dental implants are prone to infection. In this study, we describe a novel system using zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) as a coating material to inhibit bacterial adhesion and promote osteoblast growth. Electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) was employed to deposit mixtures of nZnO and nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) onto the surface of glass substrates. Nano-coated substrates were exposed to Staphylococcus aureus suspended in buffered saline or bovine serum to determine antimicrobial activity. Our results indicate that 100% nZnO and 75% nZnO/25% nHA composite-coated substrates have significant antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, osteoblast function was explored by exposing cells to nZnO. UMR-106 cells exposed to nZnO supernatants showed minimal toxicity. Similarly, MG-63 cells cultured on nZnO substrates did not show release of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines. These results were reinforced by both proliferation and differentiation studies which revealed that a substrate coated with exclusively nZnO is more efficient than composite surface coatings. Finally, electron and light microscopy, together with immunofluorescence staining, revealed that all cell types tested, including human mesenchymal cell (hMSC), were able to maintain normal cell morphology when adhered onto the surface of the nano-coated substrates. Collectively, these findings indicate that nZnO can, on its own, provide an optimal coating for future bone implants that are both antimicrobial and biocompatible. PMID:24862288

  10. Dosimetric distribution of the surroundings of different dental crowns and implants during LINAC photon irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kwo-Ping; Lin, Wei-Ting; Shiau, An-Cheng; Chie, Yu-Huang

    2014-11-01

    In radiotherapy of the head and neck, metal dentures or implants will increase the risk of complications such as mucositis and osteoradionecrosis. The aim of this study is to explore the back scatter effect of commercially available dental metal alloys on the mucosa and bone under 6 MV LINAC irradiation. The Monte Carlo method has been employed to calculate the dose distribution in the heterogeneous media of the designed oral phantom based on the oral cavity geometry. Backscatter dose increases up to a maximum of 53%, and is primarily dependent on the physical density and electron density of the metal crown alloy. Ceramic metal crowns have been quantified to increase backscatter dose up to 10% on mucosa. Ceramic serves as an inherent shield of mucosa. The backscatter dose will be greater for a small field size if the tumor is located at a deeper region. Titanium implants will increase the backscatter dose by 13% to bone but will not affect the mucosa. QC-20 (polystyrene resin) is recommended as a shield material (3 mm) to eliminate the backscatter dose on mucosa due to the high density metals.

  11. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26–67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results. PMID:27313616

  12. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Tunchel, Samy; Blay, Alberto; Kolerman, Roni; Mijiritsky, Eitan; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26-67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results. PMID:27313616

  13. Relevant aspects in the surface properties in titanium dental implants for the cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ortega, E; Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; Monsalve-Guil, L; España-López, A; Jiménez-Guerra, A; Garzón, I; Alaminos, M; Gil, F J

    2016-07-01

    Roughness and topographical features are the most relevant of the surface properties for a dental implant for its osseointegration. For that reason, we studied the four surfaces more used in titanium dental implants: machined, sandblasted, acid etching and sandblasted plus acid etching. The roughness and wettability (contact angle and surface free energy) was studied by means 3D-interferometric microscope and sessile drop method. Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were obtained from small oral mucosa biopsies and were used for cell cultures. To analyze cell integrity, we first quantified the total amount of DNA and LDH released from dead cells to the culture medium. Then, LIVE/DEAD assay was used as a combined method assessing cell integrity and metabolism. All experiments were carried out on each cell type cultured on each Ti material for 24h, 48h and 72h. To evaluate the in vivo cell adhesion capability of each Ti surface, the four types of discs were grafted subcutaneously in 5 Wistar rats. Sandblasted surfaces were significantly rougher than acid etching and machined. Wettability and surface free energy decrease when the roughness increases in sand blasted samples. This fact favors the protein adsorption. The DNA released by cells cultured on the four Ti surfaces did not differ from that of positive control cells (p>0.05). The number of cells per area was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the sand-blasted surface than in the machined and surface for both cell types (7±2 cells for HGF and 10±5 cells for SAOS-2). The surface of the machined-type discs grafted in vivo had a very small area occupied by cells and/or connective tissue (3.5%), whereas 36.6% of the sandblasted plus acid etching surface, 75.9% of sandblasted discs and 59.6% of acid etching discs was covered with cells and connective tissue. Cells cultured on rougher surfaces tended to exhibit attributes of more differentiated osteoblasts than cells cultured on smoother surfaces. These surface

  14. Flapless versus Conventional Flapped Dental Implant Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated by dental implants being inserted by a flapless surgical procedure versus the open flap technique, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 23 publications. The I2 statistic was used to express the percentage of the total variation across studies due to heterogeneity. The inverse variance method was used for random-effects model or fixed-effects model, when indicated. The estimates of relative effect were expressed in risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimeters. Sixteen studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, whereas two studies were considered of moderate risk of bias, and five studies of low risk of bias. The funnel plots indicated absence of publication bias for the three outcomes analyzed. The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures (flapless vs. open flap surgery) significantly affect the implant failure rates (P = 0.03), with a RR of 1.75 (95% CI 1.07–2.86). However, a sensitivity analysis revealed differences when studies of high and low risk of bias were pooled separately. Thus, the results must be interpreted carefully. No apparent significant effects of flapless technique on the occurrence of postoperative infection (P = 0.96; RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.23–4.03) or on the marginal bone loss (P = 0.16; MD −0.07 mm, 95% CI −0.16–0.03) were observed. PMID:24950053

  15. The effects of flute shape and thread profile on the insertion torque and primary stability of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Wei; Lee, Chia-Ching; Fu, Ping-Yuen; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2012-09-01

    Easy insertion of the implant and stable bone purchase is essential for an ideal dental implantation. At the implant tip, the cutting flutes and conical profile are respectively designed to reduce insertion resistance and facilitate the initial insertion. However, the tapered tip might reduce the self-tapping and bone-purchasing abilities of the flutes and the tip threads. Using sawbone blocks as standard specimens, this study experimentally measures the insertion torque, holding power, and bending strength of eight varieties of implant (4 shapes×2 profiles). The bony contact, interfacial mechanism, and the altered shape of the flutes, at different section planes, are used to explain the experimental results. The results reveal that the bone-implant gaps at the tip region significantly suppress both the self-tapping and bone-purchasing abilities of the flutes and the tip threads. This makes initial insertion of the conical implant easier. However, the conical implant eventually requires a higher insertion torque and holding power, due to tighter bony contact, at the tail threads. The bowl-fluted design has the least flute space to store the squeezed bone chips, so both insertion torque and bending strength are significantly higher. For the conical group, the holding powers of three flute designs are nearly comparable. Overall, the conical implant with bowl flutes is the optimal design, with a lower resistance to initial insertion and higher stability, for final instrumentation. PMID:22041130

  16. Mode superposition transient dynamic analysis for dental implants with stress-absorbing elements: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Tohru; Nemoto, Kimiya

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dynamic behavior of a dental implant with a stress-absorbing element, using dynamic analysis. Two model types, stress-absorbing model with a resilient stress absorber made of polyoxymethylene and non-stress-absorbing model with rigid titanium, were employed. In both model types, the implant was 4.0 mm in diameter and 13.0 mm in length and placed in the mandibular first molar region. Shapes of the finite element implant and implant-bone were modeled using computer-aided design. All calculations for the dynamic analysis were performed using the finite element method. It was found that the stress-absorbing model had a lower natural frequency than the non-stress-absorbing model. In addition, the stress-absorbing model had a higher damping effect than the non-stress-absorbing model. It was concluded that mode superposition transient dynamic analysis is a useful technique for determining dynamic behavior around dental implants. PMID:17076317

  17. The impact of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) in osseointegration of oral implants in dental panoramic radiography: texture based evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Georgakopoulos, Ioannis; Tsantis, Stavros; Georgakopoulos, Panagiotis; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Fanti, Elena; Martelli, Marialaura; Costaridou, Lena; Petsas, Theodoros; Panayiotakis, George; Martelli, Francesco Saverio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose In this study the temporal texture differentiation associated with the bone formation properties, around loaded oral implants after Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) employment, was investigated in Panoramic Radiographs. Materials and methods Thirty eligible patients are randomly assigned to two groups. The test group received PRP application around new implants, while in the control group no PRP treatment was made. The bone-to-implant contact region was analyzed in a clinical sample of 60 Digitized Panoramic Radiographs, 30 corresponding to immediate implant loading (Class-I) and 30 after an 8 month follow-up period (Class-II). This region was sampled by 1146 circular Regions-of-Interest (ROIs), resulting from a specifically designed segmentation scheme based on Markov-Random-Fields (MRF). From each ROI, 41 textural features were extracted, then reduced to a subset of 4 features due to redundancy and employed as input to Receiver-Operating-Characteristic (ROC) analysis, to assess the textural differentiation between two classes. Results The selected subset, achieved Area-Under-Curve (AUC) values ranging from 0.77–0.81 in the PRP group, indicating the significant temporal textural differentiation has been made. In the control group, the AUC values ranged from 0.56–0.68 demonstrating lesser osseo integration activity. Conclusion This study provides evidences that PRP application may favor bone formation around loaded dental implants that could modify the dental treatment planning. PMID:25002881

  18. Co-development of pyogenic granuloma and capillary hemangioma on the alveolar ridge associated with a dental implant: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The development of various benign oral mucosal lesions associated with dental implants, such as pyogenic granuloma or peripheral giant cell granuloma, has been rarely reported. However, the occurrence of vascular diseases, such as hemangioma, related to dental implants has not been explored in the literature. In this study, we report a case of co-development of pyogenic granuloma and capillary hemangioma on the alveolar ridge associated with a dental implant in a patient undergoing antithrombotic therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is first case of hemangioma formation associated with a dental implant. Case presentation A 68-year-old Korean man was referred for intermittent bleeding and a dome-shaped overgrowing mass on his upper alveolar ridge. He underwent dental implantation 5 years ago, and was started on warfarin for cerebral infarction a year ago. He had experienced gum bleeding and gingival mass formation 6 months after warfarinization; then, his implant fixture was removed. However, his gingival mass has been gradually increasing. The gingival mass was surgically excised, and revealed the coexistence of pyogenic granuloma and capillary hemangioma in histological analysis of the specimen. The lesion has showed no recurrence for more than a year. Conclusions Regarding immunostaining features, the endothelial cell markers, CD34 and CD31, and the mesenchymal cell marker, vimentin, were strongly detected, but cell proliferation marker, Ki-67, was negatively expressed in the endothelial cells of the hemangioma portion. However, in the pyogenic granuloma portion, CD34 was almost negatively detected, whereas vimentin and Ki-67 were highly detected in the fibroblast-like tumor cells. According to these heterogeneous characteristics of the lesion, the patient was diagnosed with coexistence of pyogenic granuloma and capillary hemangioma associated with the dental implant on the attached gingiva. We recommend that patients with dental implants who

  19. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Study on the Biomechanical Simulation of Various Structured Dental Implants and Their Surrounding Bone Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Hai; Chen, Xianshuai; Wang, Weijun; Chen, Jianyu; Liang, Jimin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. This three-dimensional finite element study observed the stress distribution characteristics of 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues with various structured abutments, implant threads, and healing methods under different amounts of concentrated loading. Materials and Methods. A three-dimensional geometrical model of a dental implant and its surrounding bone tissue was created; the model simulated a screw applied with a preload of 200 N or a torque of 0.2 N·m and a prosthetic crown applied with a vertical or an inclined force of 100 N. The Von Mises stress was evaluated on the 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues. Results. Under the same loading force, the stress influence on the implant threads was not significant; however, the stress influence on the cancellous bone was obvious. The stress applied to the abutment, cortical bone, and cancellous bone by the inclined force applied to the crown was larger than the stress applied by the vertical force to the crown, and the abutment stress of the nonsubmerged healing implant system was higher than that of the submerged healing implant system. Conclusion. A dental implant system characterised by a straight abutment, rectangle tooth, and nonsubmerged healing may provide minimum value for the implant-bone interface. PMID:26904121

  20. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Study on the Biomechanical Simulation of Various Structured Dental Implants and Their Surrounding Bone Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Hai; Chen, Xianshuai; Wang, Weijun; Chen, Jianyu; Liang, Jimin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. This three-dimensional finite element study observed the stress distribution characteristics of 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues with various structured abutments, implant threads, and healing methods under different amounts of concentrated loading. Materials and Methods. A three-dimensional geometrical model of a dental implant and its surrounding bone tissue was created; the model simulated a screw applied with a preload of 200 N or a torque of 0.2 N·m and a prosthetic crown applied with a vertical or an inclined force of 100 N. The Von Mises stress was evaluated on the 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues. Results. Under the same loading force, the stress influence on the implant threads was not significant; however, the stress influence on the cancellous bone was obvious. The stress applied to the abutment, cortical bone, and cancellous bone by the inclined force applied to the crown was larger than the stress applied by the vertical force to the crown, and the abutment stress of the nonsubmerged healing implant system was higher than that of the submerged healing implant system. Conclusion. A dental implant system characterised by a straight abutment, rectangle tooth, and nonsubmerged healing may provide minimum value for the implant-bone interface. PMID:26904121

  1. Displacement of a dental implant into the maxillary sinus after internal sinus floor elevation: report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaojun; Wang, Qing; Guo, Xuehua; Yu, Youcheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental implant placement in the posterior maxilla may be complicated by implant migration into the maxillary sinus. Purpose: To report the clinical and radiological characteristics of a patient who experienced dental implant displacement into the maxillary sinus following sinus floor elevation, and to compare our findings with those of other published reports of the displacement of dental implants. Materials and methods: Implant placement and maxillary sinus elevation were performed simultaneously. The location of the displaced implant was monitored for 8 years, until the ectopic implant was surgically removed using the lateral window approach. The contributing factors, treatment modality, and clinical outcome for our patient were compared with those of patients reported in the literature. Results: The clinical characteristics of our case were similar to those of patients with displaced implants who were also asymptomatic for long periods. The clinical outcome of our case was consistent with that of patients who underwent similar surgeries. Conclusions: Transnasal endoscopic removal of an ectopic implant may be suitable in cases in which the ectopic implant is accessible. Transoral direct approaches are adequate in most cases in which endoscopic approaches may be confounded. The bony-window transoral technique may allow the removal of large implants. PMID:26131057

  2. Alternative to the inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia when placing mandibular dental implants posterior to the mental foramen.

    PubMed

    Heller, A A; Shankland, W E

    2001-01-01

    Local anesthesia block of the inferior alveolar nerve is routinely taught throughout dental education. This commonly used technique eliminates all somatosensory perception of the mandible, mandibular teeth, floor of the mouth, ipsilateral tongue, and all but the lateral (buccal) gingivae. Generally, the dentist or surgeon desires these structures to be anesthetized. However, in the placement of mandibular implants, it may be useful for the patient to be able to sense when the inferior alveolar nerve is in danger of being damaged, possibly producing permanent paresthesia. In this article, the technique of mandibular infiltration prior to mandibular implant placement in the mandible is discussed. PMID:12500871

  3. Mechanical response comparison in an implant overdenture retained by ball attachments on conventional regular and mini dental implants: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Hao; Huang, Shiang-Rung; Huang, Shao-Fu; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the bone/implant mechanical responses in an implant overdenture retained by ball attachments on two conventional regular dental implants (RDI) and four mini dental implants (MDI) using finite element (FE) analysis. Two FE models of overdentures retained by RDIs and MDIs for a mandibular edentulous patient with validation within 6% variation errors were constructed by integrating CT images and CAD system. Bone grafting resulted in 2 mm thickness at the buccal side constructed for the RDIs-supported model to mimic the bone augmentation condition for the atrophic alveolar ridge. Nonlinear hyperelastic material and frictional contact element were used to simulate characteristic of the ball attachment-retained overdentures. The results showed that a denture supported by MDIs presented higher surrounding bone strains than those supported by RDIs under different load conditions. Maximum bone micro strains were up to 6437/2987 and 13323/5856 for MDIs/RDIs under single centric and lateral contacts, respectively. Corresponding values were 4429/2579 and 9557/5774 under multi- centric and lateral contacts, respectively. Bone micro strains increased 2.06 and 1.96-folds under single contact, 2.16 and 2.24-folds under multiple contacts for MDIs and RDIs when lateral to axial loads were compared. The maximum RDIs and MDIs implant stresses in all simulated cases were found by far lower than their yield strength. Overdentures retained using ball attachments on MDIs in poor edentulous bone structure increase the surrounding bone strain over the critical value, thereby damaging the bone when compared to the RDIs. Eliminating the occlusal single contact and oblique load of an implant-retained overdenture reduces the risk for failure. PMID:26212887

  4. Enhanced wear resistance of ball-and-socket joints of dental implants by means of titanium gaseous nitriding.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Canedo, R; Padrós, A; Sada, E

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this research is the surface hardening of the ball-and-socket joint of dental implants by means of heat treatments in order to obtain titanium nitrides. These nitrides minimize the wear of the titanium used in prosthesis. In this paper the optimum heat treatment, the hardness and the wear resistance are described in relation to the ball-and-socket joint without heat treatment. PMID:12222756

  5. [Use of alternating magnetic field with the frequency of spontaneous local vessels oscillation for rehabilitation of patients after dental implantation].

    PubMed

    Ter-Asaturov, G P; Abakarov, S I; Adzhiev, E K; Adzhiev, K S

    2010-01-01

    New software-hardware system for diagnostic and treatment (RF patents: number 75294, 2008 and number 75314, 2008) allowing to use the technique of microcirculatory bed regional pulse vessels control (RF patent number 2383369, 2008) for optimization of patients' rehabilitation process after dental implantation operation. It was shown the normalizing action of alternating magnetic field with the frequency of spontaneous local vessels oscillation by comparison of regional blood flow indices. PMID:20517254

  6. Reliability and fatigue failure modes of implant-supported aluminum-oxide fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Stappert, Christian F. J.; Baldassarri, Marta; Zhang, Yu; Hänssler, Felix; Rekow, Elizabeth D.; Thompson, Van P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate failure modes and reliability of implant-supported aluminum-oxide three-unit fixed-dental-prostheses (FDPs) using two different veneering porcelains. Material and methods Thirty-six aluminum-oxide FDP-frameworks were CAD/CAM fabricated and either hand-veneered(n=18) or over-pressed(n=18). All FDPs were adhesively luted to custom-made zirconium-oxide-abutments attached to dental implant fixtures (RP-4×13mm). Specimens were stored in water prior to mechanical testing. A Step-Stress-Accelerated-Life-Test (SSALT) with three load/cycles varying profiles was developed based on initial single-load-to-failure testing. Failure was defined by veneer chipping or chipping in combination with framework fracture. SSALT was performed on each FDP inclined 30° with respect to the applied load direction. For all specimens, failure modes were analyzed using polarized-reflected-light-microscopy and scanning-electron-microscopy (SEM). Reliability was computed using Weibull analysis software (Reliasoft). Results The dominant failure mode for the over-pressed FDPs was buccal chipping of the porcelain in the loading area of the pontic, while hand-veneered specimens failed mainly by combined failure modes in the veneering porcelain, framework and abutments. Chipping of the porcelain occurred earlier in the over-pressed specimens (350 N/85k, load/cycles) than in the hand-veneered (600 N/110k)(profile I). Given a mission at 300 N load and 100k or 200 K cycles the computed Weibull reliability (2-sided at 90.0 % confidence bounds) was 0.99(1/0.98) and 0.99(1/0.98) for hand-veneered FDPs, and 0.45(0.76/0.10) and 0.05(0.63/0) for over-pressed FDPs, respectively. Conclusions In the range of average clinical loads (300–700 N), hand-veneered aluminum-oxide FDPs showed significantly less failure by chipping of the veneer than the over-pressed. Hand-veneered FDPs under fatigue loading failed at loads ≥ 600N. PMID:22093019

  7. Corrosion behaviour of commercially pure titanium shot blasted with different materials and sizes of shot particles for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Conrado; Gil, F Javier; Fonseca, Carlos; Barbosa, Mario; Planell, Josep Anton

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the osseointegration of the commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) dental implant is improved when the metal is shot blasted in order to increase its surface roughness. This roughness is colonised by bone, which improves implant fixation. However, shot blasting also changes the chemical composition of the implant surface because some shot particles remain adhered on the metal. The c.p. Ti surfaces shot blasted with different materials and sizes of shot particles were tested in order to determine their topographical features (surface roughness, real surface area and the percentage of surface covered by the adhered shot particles) and electrochemical behaviour (open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic polarisation). The results demonstrate that the increased surface area of the material because of the increasing surface roughness is not the only cause for differences found in the electrochemical behaviour and corrosion resistance of the blasted c.p. Ti. Among other possible causes, those differences may be attributed to the compressive residual surface stresses induced by shot blasting. All the materials tested have an adequate corrosion and electrochemical behaviour in terms of its possible use as dental implant material. PMID:12419627

  8. Heat generation and drill wear during dental implant site preparation: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Möhlhenrich, S C; Modabber, A; Steiner, T; Mitchell, D A; Hölzle, F

    2015-10-01

    To identify factors that minimise damage during the drilling of sites for dental implants, we reviewed published papers on the amount of heat that is generated. We systematically searched English language studies published between January 2000 and February 2014 on MEDLINE/PubMed and found 41 articles, of which 27 related to an increase in temperature during preparation of the site. We found only basic research with a low level of evidence. Most of the studies were in vitro, and osteotomies were usually made in non-vital bone from cows or pigs. To measure heat in real time, thermocouples were used in 18 studies and infrared thermographs in 7. Three studies reported the use of immunohistochemical analysis to investigate immediate viability of cells. The highest temperature measured was 64.4°C and the lowest 28.4°C. Drill wear was reported after preparation of 50 sites, and there was a significant increase in temperature and a small change in the physiological balance of the proteins in the bone cells. Differences in the study designs meant that meta-analysis was not appropriate. For future work, we recommend the use of standard variables: an axial load of 2kg, drilling speed of 1500rpm, irrigation, standard artificial bone blocks, and the use of infrared thermography. PMID:26051868

  9. Ultrasound transmission velocity for noninvasive evaluation of jaw bone quality in vivo before dental implantation.

    PubMed

    Klein, M O; Grötz, K A; Manefeld, B; Kann, P H; Al-Nawas, B

    2008-12-01

    For the insertion of dental implants, mechanical bone properties at the implantation site have great impact both for therapeutic regimes as well as for the overall long-term success, making a reliable method for the preoperative assessment of the bone quality desirable. Ultrasound transmission velocity (UTV) has been introduced as a noninvasive method to analyze mechanical properties of bone. The aim of this study was the first intra-oral in vivo assessment of alveolar crest UTV values of edentulous jaws. Partly or fully edentulous patients (n = 108) were enrolled in this study, taking into account possible influence factors that affect bone quality (osteoporosis, radiation therapy). Six intra-oral measurement points were used: left side region, right side region and frontal region, for upper and lower jaw, respectively. Ultrasound transmission velocity values were measured bicortically (in bucco-oral direction) and correlated to sex, age, measurement site and history of osteoporosis or radiation therapy. We found a minimum mouth opening of 30 mm, as well as a residual alveolar ridge height of 8 mm as thresholds for a reliable intra-oral placement of the device. Xerostomia was no contraindication. Assessment of intra-oral UTV showed significantly higher values both for mandibular side regions (female 1713 +/- 153 m/s, male 1734 +/- 221 m/s) and the maxillary frontal region (female 1665 +/- 189 m/s, male 1648 +/- 82 m/s) than for maxillary side regions (female 1538 +/- 177 m/s, male 1583 +/- 90 m/s). These data were even more clarified by intra-individual correlation of upper and lower jaw side region UTV values. We found no correlation between assessed UTV values and the variables sex, age, osteoporosis or radiation therapy. The use of a small UTV device in this study allowed the recording of intra-oral UTV values in a large and heterogeneous patient collective for the first time. Assessment of alveolar-ridge UTV might offer the possibility to identify critical

  10. Introducing high-cost health care to patients: dentists' accounts of offering dental implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vernazza, Christopher R; Rousseau, Nikki; Steele, Jimmy G; Ellis, Janice S; Thomason, John Mark; Eastham, Jane; Exley, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The decision-making process within health care has been widely researched, with shared decision-making, where both patients and clinicians share technical and personal information, often being cited as the ideal model. To date, much of this research has focused on systems where patients receive their care and treatment free at the point of contact (either in government-funded schemes or in insurance-based schemes). Oral health care often involves patients making direct payments for their care and treatment, and less is known about how this payment affects the decision-making process. It is clear that patient characteristics influence decision-making, but previous evidence suggests that clinicians may assume characteristics rather than eliciting them directly. The aim was to explore the influences on how dentists' engaged in the decision-making process surrounding a high-cost item of health care, dental implant treatments (DITs). Methods A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken using a purposive sample of primary care dentists (n = 25). Thematic analysis was undertaken to reveal emerging key themes. Results There were differences in how dentists discussed and offered implants. Dentists made decisions about whether to offer implants based on business factors, professional and legal obligations and whether they perceived the patient to be motivated to have treatment and their ability to pay. There was evidence that assessment of these characteristics was often based on assumptions derived from elements such as the appearance of the patient, the state of the patient's mouth and demographic details. The data suggest that there is a conflict between three elements of acting as a healthcare professional: minimizing provision of unneeded treatment, trying to fully involve patients in shared decisions and acting as a business person with the potential for financial gain. Conclusions It might be expected that in the context of a high

  11. Primary stability and osseointegration of dental implants in polylactide modified bone - A pilot study in Goettingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Krohn, Sebastian; Thiemann, Charlotte; Schulz, Xenia; Kauffmann, Philipp; Tröltzsch, Markus; Schlottig, Falko; Schliephake, Henning; Gruber, Rudolf Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate primary stability (PS) and osseointegration of dental implants in polylactide [70/30 poly(l-lactide-co-d, l-lactide); (PLDLA)] modified bone in 30 Goettingen minipigs. Each animal received three implants per jaw quadrant. In a split-mouth design, one side of the maxilla and mandible was randomly allocated to the experimental treatment (PLDLA applied into the drill hole before implantation), while the contralateral sides served as intraindividual controls (no PLDLA applied). The required insertion torque and the implant stability quotient (ISQ) were measured during implantation. ISQ, volume density (VD) of new bone formation (NBF), and the bone-implant contact (BIC) were evaluated at the end of the observation period (1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively) in six animals each. Across all study groups, the PLDLA treatment resulted in a) a comparable insertion torque, b) an equivalent ISQ, c) a reduced BIC, and d) a reduced VD of NBF, as opposed to the untreated controls. In conclusion, the PLDLA treatment did not affect the PS, but rather led to an impaired osseointegration, which was particularly strong in the compact mandibular bone, and decreased in the spongious maxillary bone. PLDLA induced anchoring in spongious bone should be evaluated in further investigations. PMID:27346283

  12. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens: a co-culture study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-12-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration or bacterial colonization. Co-culture models, in which tissue cells and bacteria battle simultaneously for estate on an implant surface, have been demonstrated to provide a better in vitro mimic of the clinical situation. Here we aim to compare the surface coverage by U2OS osteoblasts cells prior to and after challenge by two anaerobic sub-gingival pathogens in a co-culture model on differently modified titanium (Ti), titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloys and zirconia surfaces. Monoculture studies with either U2OS osteoblasts or bacteria were also carried out and indicated significant differences in biofilm formation between the implant materials, but interactions with U2OS osteoblasts were favourable on all materials. Adhering U2OS osteoblasts cells, however, were significantly more displaced from differently modified Ti surfaces by challenging sub-gingival pathogens than from TiZr alloys and zirconia variants. Combined with previous work employing a co-culture model consisting of human gingival fibroblasts and supra-gingival oral bacteria, results point to a different material selection to stimulate the formation of a soft tissue seal as compared to preservation of osseointegration under the unsterile conditions of the oral cavity. PMID:26674427

  13. Failure risk estimates after dental implants placement associated with plasma rich in growth factor-Endoret in osteoporotic women under bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Mozzati, Marco; Arata, Valentina; Giacomello, Maurizio; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Gallesio, Giorgia; Mortellaro, Carmen; Bergamasco, Laura

    2015-05-01

    There is disagreement as to whether it is safe to place implants in patients under bisphosphonates (BPs) therapy owing to the risk for developing BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ). The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons recommends that dental implants should be avoided in oncologic patients treated with intravenous BPs. Conversely, for patients receiving oral BPs, dental implant placement is not explicitly contraindicated even if a cautious approach is suggested. The aim of the current study was to assess the risk level as related to adverse events such as implant failure and BRONJ in a large cohort of osteoporotic patients submitted to implant placement and concomitant application of plasma rich in growth factor (PGRF)-Endoret. The clinical charts of 235 middle-aged women under oral BPs therapy for osteoporosis, who underwent positioning of 1267 dental implants, were reviewed. The implants were always positioned in association with PRGF-Endoret. The outcomes were implant failure and BRONJ. A model based on personal risk factors distribution was used for risk assessment. Sixteen implants were lost in 16 patients up to 120 months of follow-up, leading to a survival of 98.7% and 93.2% on an implant basis and patient basis, respectively. No cases of BRONJ were reported. In line with the current literature, the present data show that the risk for developing BRONJ associated to dental implant surgery remains low for patients receiving oral BPs. The use of procedures that could enhance and support healing, such as platelet concentrates, should be recommended. PMID:25974785

  14. Increased Crown-To-Implant Ratio May Not Be a Risk Factor for Dental Implant Failure under Appropriate Plaque Control

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Shinsuke; Koretake, Katsunori; Miyamoto, Yasunari; Oue, Hiroshi; Akagawa, Yasumasa

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether increased crown-to-implant (C/I) ratio influences implant stability or not under proper healthy control of peri-implant mucosa. The hypothesis of this study is that implant stability can be maintained despite High C/I, under appropriate plaque control. Materials and Methods Five male Beagle-Labrador hybrid dogs (2 years old) were used. Their bilateral mandibular premolar extraction was performed. After allowing 12 weeks for bone healing, 3 types of vertical marginal bone loss were simultaneously prepared randomly. Then, 30 titanium implants were placed in the edentulous areas and defined as High C/I, Mid C/I and Low C/I groups. This time point was designated as the baseline (0 Week). Twelve weeks after implant placement, metal superstructures were cemented to the implants and an occlusal plate was set at the opposite side. At the same time, Calcein green was injected for remodeling evaluation. Implants were loaded by feeding the dogs a hard pellet diet. Tooth brushing was performed 5 days per week during the study to maintain healthy peri-implant mucosa. Twenty-four weeks following implant placement, the interface structure was evaluated clinically, radiologically, and histologically. Result Implant stability quotient (ISQ) increased with time in all 3 groups, without any significant correlation with the C/I value (p>0.05). Moreover, mean marginal bone loss adjacent around implants in all 3 groups ranged between 0.11 and 0.19 mm, with no significant difference (p>0.05). Many fluorescence-labeled bones are shown in the High C/I group. It is considered that high remodeling activity prevent marginal bone loss in the High C/I group and this may provide favorable implant stability under proper plaque control. Conclusion These findings suggest that increased C/I may not be a risk factor for implant failure if the peri-implant mucosa is kept healthy, as was the case in this animal model. PMID:23737960

  15. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  16. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  17. Studying the issues in the additive manufacturing of dental implants by Electron Beam MeltingRTM (EBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidinia, Mahdi

    The ability of additive manufacturing (AM) processes to produce complex geometries is resulting in their rapid acceptance by a number of industries. This unique capability could be used for the optimization of the design of functional components that could find an application in different industries such as aerospace, automotive, energy, medical, and implants. However, there are still some challenges confronting this technology such as surface finish, residual stress, dimensional tolerance, processing speed, and anisotropy in microstructure and mechanical properties. Any of the mentioned issues could be influenced by the thermal history of a 3D printed component during the layer-by-layer manufacturing. Therefore, an understanding of the thermal cycling during the AM process is essential. In recent years, significant advances have been achieved in the design, manufacturing, and materials used for dental implants. However, there are still some differences between the natural tooth and a dental implant that might decrease patient satisfaction. One of the differences between the natural tooth and a dental implant is in its modulus of elasticity, which could result in an issue known as bone atrophy. The second important difference between a dental implant and a natural tooth is the fact that a natural tooth is surrounded by a periodontal ligament that allows the tooth to move in three directions. However, the periodontal ligament is destroyed during the extraction of a natural tooth. In the absence of the periodontal ligament, the biting force is directly transferred to the jawbone, resulting in discomfort for the patient. Also, the implant cannot be incorporated with the surrounding natural tooth and form a bridge. In this study, the application of a lattice structure for the manufacturing of a biocompatible dental implant is investigated. Three different lattice structures with different unit cell sizes were experimentally and numerically analyzed. The mechanical

  18. Effects of fluoride-ion-implanted titanium surface on the cytocompatibility in vitro and osseointegatation in vivo for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jin; Liu, Hui-ying; Ren, Xiang; Sun, Hui-yan; Zhu, Li-ying; Ying, Xiao-xia; Hu, Shu-hai; Qiu, Ze-wen; Wang, Lang-ping; Wang, Xiao-feng; Ma, Guo-wu

    2015-12-01

    As an attractive technique for the improvement of biomaterials, Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) has been applied to modifying the titanium material for dental implant application. The present study investigated the cytocompatibility and early osseointegration of fluoride-ion-implanted titanium (F-Ti) surface and implants, both characterizing in their composition of titanium oxide and titanium fluoride. The cytocompatibility of F-Ti was evaluated in vitro by using scanning electron microscope, Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the F-Ti weakened the effects that Porphyromonas gingivalis exerted on the MG-63 cells in terms of morphology, proliferation, differentiation, and genetic expression when MG-63 cells and Porphyromonas gingivalis were co-cultured on the surface of F-Ti. Meanwhile, the osteogenic activity of F-Ti implants was assessed in vivo via evaluating the histological morphology and estimating histomorphometric parameters. The analysis of toluidine blue staining indicated that the new bone was more mature in subjects with F-Ti group, which exhibited the Haversian system, and the mean bone-implant contact value of F-Ti group was slightly higher than that of cp-Ti group (p>0.05). Fluorescence bands were wider and brighter in the F-Ti group, and the intensity of fluorochromes deposited at the sites of mineralized bone formation was significantly higher for F-Ti surfaces than for cp-Ti surfaces, within the 2nd, 3rd and 4th weeks (p<0.05). An indication is that the fluoride modified titanium can promote cytocompatibility and early osseointegration, thus providing a promising alternative for clinical use. PMID:26519937

  19. High-density dental implants and radiotherapy planning: evaluation of effects on dose distribution using pencil beam convolution algorithm and Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Çatli, Serap

    2015-01-01

    High atomic number and density of dental implants leads to major problems at providing an accurate dose distribution in radiotherapy and contouring tumors and organs caused by the artifact in head and neck tumors. The limits and deficiencies of the algorithms using in the treatment planning systems can lead to large errors in dose calculation, and this may adversely affect the patient's treatment. In the present study, four commercial dental implants were used: pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), amalgam, and crown. The effects of dental implants on dose distribution are determined with two methods: pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm and Monte Carlo code for 6 MV photon beam. The central axis depth doses were calculated on the phantom for a source-skin distance (SSD) of 100 cm and a 10 × 10 cm2 field using both of algorithms. The results of Monte Carlo method and Eclipse TPS were compared to each other and to those previously reported. In the present study, dose increases in tissue at a distance of 2 mm in front of the dental implants were seen due to the backscatter of electrons for dental implants at 6 MV using the Monte Carlo method. The Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) couldn't precisely account for the backscatter radiation caused by the dental prostheses. TPS underestimated the back scatter dose and overestimated the dose after the dental implants. The large errors found for TPS in this study are due to the limits and deficiencies of the algorithms. The accuracy of the PBC algorithm of Eclipse TPS was evaluated in comparison to Monte Carlo calculations in consideration of the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 65. From the comparisons of the TPS and Monte Carlo calculations, it is verified that the Monte Carlo simulation is a good approach to derive the dose distribution in heterogeneous media. PMID:26699323

  20. Clinical practice guidelines for recall and maintenance of patients with tooth-borne and implant-borne dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; Daubert, Diane M; Garcia, Lily T; Kosinski, Timothy F; Nenn, Conrad A; Olsen, John A; Platt, Jeffrey A; Wingrove, Susan S; Chandler, Nancy Deal; Curtis, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for patient recall regimen, professional maintenance regimen, and at-home maintenance regimen for patients with tooth-borne and implant-borne removable and fixed restorations. The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) convened a scientific panel of experts appointed by the ACP, American Dental Association, Academy of General Dentistry, and American Dental Hygienists Association, who critically evaluated and debated recently published findings from 2 systematic reviews on this topic. The major outcomes and consequences considered during formulation of the clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) were risk for failure of tooth- and implant-borne restorations. The panel conducted a roundtable discussion of the proposed guidelines, which were debated in detail. Feedback was used to supplement and refine the proposed guidelines, and consensus was attained. A set of CPGs was developed for tooth-borne restorations and implant-borne restorations. Each CPG comprised (1) patient recall, (2) professional maintenance, and (3) at-home maintenance. For tooth-borne restorations, the professional maintenance and at-home maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations. For implant-borne restorations, the professional maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations and further divided into biological maintenance and mechanical maintenance for each type of restoration. The at-home maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations. The clinical practice guidelines presented in this document were initially developed using the 2 systematic reviews. Additional guidelines were developed using expert opinion and consensus, which included discussion of the best clinical practices, clinical feasibility, and risk-benefit ratio to the patient. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first CPGs addressing patient recall regimen, professional maintenance regimen, and at

  1. Tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement and titanium-reinforced apatite dental implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, M; Tabata, T; Nakabayashi, N; Yamashita, Y; Borgese, D

    1993-01-01

    Abutment and root portion divided two-piece dental implants were designed to modify the one-piece dense hydroxyapatite (D-HAP) implant. The initial placement of the root portion endosseously ensured an aseptic environment and physical stability for the implant during the bone healing period. The outer D-HAP shell of the root portion was fortified by an inner titanium cylinder and cemented with an adhesive resin cement containing 4-methacryloyoxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and reinforced by fine apatite filler. Upon attaining integration of the bone and implant, the abutment was screwed and fixed into the screw hole of the root portion. The tissue response of both the apatite-filled resin cement and root portion of the two-piece implant was studied by animal canine experiments. Light and electron microscopic examination of specimens taken from experimental animal tissue showed bone contacted directly not only the exposed apatite filler at the surface of the apatite-filled resin cement, but also the resin portion. These findings of direct bone contact suggested that the tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement was approximately similar to the usual D-HAP. Because most of the surface of the outer D-HAP shell of the root portion came in contact with bone, it prevented the deposition of contamination on the D-HAP surface during the manufacturing procedures of the root portion. PMID:10148567

  2. An advanced navigational surgery system for dental implants completed in a single visit: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Goo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Choi, Soon-Chul; Kim, Tae-Il; Yi, Won-Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have developed an advanced navigational implant surgery system to overcome some disadvantages of the conventional method and have evaluated the accuracy of the system under in vitro environment. The patient splint for registration and tracking was improvised using a bite splint without laboratory work and the offset of an exchanged drill was calibrated directly without pivoting during surgery. The mean target registration errors (TRE) were 0.35 ± 0.11 mm using the registration body, 0.34 ± 0.18 mm for the registration method with prerecorded fiducials, and 0.35 ± 0.16 mm for the direct calibration of a drill offset. The mean positional deviations between the planned and placed implants in 110 implant surgeries were 0.41 ± 0.12 mm at the center point of the platform and 0.56 ± 0.14 mm at the center point of the apex. The mean angular deviation was 2.64°± 1.31 for the long axis of the implant. In conclusion, the developed system exhibited high accuracy, and the improved tools and simplified procedures increased the convenience and availability. With this advanced approach, it will be possible to complete dental implant surgery during a single visit at local clinics using a navigational guidance involving cone-beam computed tomographic images. PMID:25434287

  3. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  4. Clinical evaluation of salivary periodontal pathogen levels by real-time polymerase chain reaction in patients before dental implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Taichi; Yasuda, Masaaki; Kaneko, Hajime; Sasaki, Hodaka; Kato, Tetsuo; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Periodontal pathogens in dental plaque are the main causative agents of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. Detection of the presence of such periodontal pathogens early would serve as a useful tool in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the periodontal pathogen levels in saliva were correlated with the periodontal status of patients receiving implant treatment. Materials and Methods A total of 291 patients visiting Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital were divided into four groups: a no-periodontitis (np) group, a mild-periodontitis (mip) group, a moderate-periodontitis (mop) group, and a severe-periodontitis (sp) group. The levels of the following five periodontal pathogens in saliva were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Prevotella intermedia. Results The levels of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly higher in mop group than in np group (P <  0.05). The levels of all periodontal pathogens tested except A. actinomycetemcomitans were significantly higher in sp group than in np group (P <  0.05). Conclusion The detection levels of the periodontal pathogens targeted in saliva samples were correlated with the periodontal status. This suggests that using saliva to screen for periodontopathic bacteria offers an easier-to-use clinical tool than the paper point method in the diagnosis and treatment of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. PMID:23745964

  5. Effects of a Low-Intensity Laser on Dental Implant Osseointegration: Removal Torque and Resonance Frequency Analysis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Blay, Alberto; Blay, Claudia C; Tunchel, Samy; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Groth, Eduardo B; Zezell, Denise M

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how a low-intensity laser affects the stability and reverse torque resistance of dental implants installed in the tibia of rabbits. Thirty rabbits received 60 dental implants with the same design and surface treatment, one in each proximal metaphysis of the tibia. Three groups were prepared (n = 10 animals each): conventional osseointegration without treatment (control group), surgical sites irradiated with a laser beam emitted in the visible range of 680 nm (Lg1 group), surgical sites irradiated with a laser beam with a wavelength in the infrared range of 830 nm (Lg2 group). Ten irradiation sessions were performed 48 hours apart; the first session was during the immediate postoperative period. Irradiation energy density was 4 J/cm(2) per point in 2 points on each side of the tibias. The resonance frequency and removal torque values were measured at 2 time points after the implantations (3 and 6 weeks). Both laser groups (Lg1 and Lg2) presented a significant difference between resonance frequency analysis values at the baseline and the values obtained after 3 and 6 weeks (P > .05). Although the removal torque values of all groups increased after 6 weeks (P < .05), both laser groups presented greater mean values than those of the control group (P < .01). Photobiomodulation using laser irradiation with wavelengths of 680 and 830 nm had a better degree of bone integration than the control group after 6 weeks of observation time. PMID:26652735

  6. Lack of clinical evidence on low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on dental titanium implant: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Prados-Frutos, J C; Rodríguez-Molinero, J; Prados-Privado, M; Torres, J H; Rojo, R

    2016-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proved to have biostimulating effects on tissues over which they are applied, therefore accelerating the healing process. Most studies in implantology were focused on a reduction of the duration of osseointegration. There exist few articles analyzing the potential effects of these therapies on the osseointegration of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LLLT on the interaction between the bone and the titanium dental implant and the methodological quality of the studies. We conducted an electronic search in PubMed, ISI Web, and Cochrane Library. From 37 references obtained, only 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. The analysis of the studies shows that most of the experiments were performed in animals, which have a high risk of bias from the methodological point of view. Only two studies were conducted in human bone under different conditions. Several protocols for the use of low-power laser and different types of laser for all studies analyzed were used. Although animal studies have shown a positive effect on osseointegration of titanium implants, it can be concluded that it is necessary to improve and define a unique protocol to offer a more conclusive result by meta-analysis. PMID:26754180

  7. Numerical investigation into blood clotting at the bone-dental implant interface in the presence of an electrical stimulus.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2013-12-01

    The insertion of a dental implant activates a sequence of wound healing events ending with bone formation and implant osseointegration. This sequence starts with the blood coagulation process and the formation of a fibrin network that detains spilt blood. Fibrin formation can be simplified as the kinetic reaction between thrombin and fibrinogen preceding the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin. Based on experimental observations of the electrical properties of these molecules, we present a hypothesis for the mechanism of a static electrical stimulus in controlling the formation of the blood clot. Specifically, the electrical stimulus increases the fibrin network formation in such a way that a preferential region of higher fibrin density is obtained. This hypothesis is validated by means of a numerical model for the blood clot formation at the bone-dental implant interface. Numerical results compare favorably to experimental observations for blood clotting with and without the static electrical stimulus. It is concluded that the density of the fibrin network depends on the strength of the static electrical stimulus, and that the blood clot formation has a preferential direction of formation in the presence of the electrical signal. PMID:24290924

  8. Macrophage proinflammatory response to the titanium alloy equipment in dental implantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Li, H S; Yin, Y; Feng, Y; Tan, X W

    2015-01-01

    Titanium alloy and stainless steel (SS) had been widely used as dental implant materials because of their affinity with epithelial tissue and connective tissue, and good physical, chemical, biological, mechanical properties and processability. We compared the effects of titanium alloy and SS on macrophage cytokine expression as well as their biocompatibility. Mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells were cultured on titanium alloy and SS surfaces. Cells were counted by scanning electron microscopy. A nitride oxide kit was used to detect released nitric oxide by macrophages on the different materials. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fewer macrophages on the surface of titanium alloy (48.2 ± 6.4 x 10(3) cells/cm(2)) than on SS (135 ± 7.3 x 10(3) cells/cm(2)). The nitric oxide content stimulated by titanium alloy was 22.5 mM, which was lower than that stimulated by SS (26.8 mM), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.07). The level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 released was significantly higher in the SS group (OD value = 0.128) than in the titanium alloy group (OD value = 0.081) (P = 0.024). The transforming growth factor-b1 mRNA expression levels in macrophages after stimulation by titanium alloy for 12 and 36 h were significantly higher than that after stimulation by SS (P = 0.31 and 0.25, respectively). Macrophages participate in the inflammatory response by regulating cytokines such as nitric oxide, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-b1. There were fewer macrophages and lower inflammation on the titanium alloy surface than on the SS surface. Titanium alloy materials exhibited better biological compatibility than did SS. PMID:26345848

  9. Osseointegration of KrF laser hydroxylapatite films on Ti6A14V alloy by mini-pigs: loaded osseointegration of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinek, Miroslav; Himmlova, Lucia; Grivas, Christos

    1999-05-01

    Aim of study was to evaluate osseointegration of the KrF laser hydroxyapatite coated titanium alloy Ti6Al4V dental implants. For deposition KrF excimer laser in stainless- steel deposition chamber was used. Thickness of HA films were round 1 μm . Mini-pigs were used in this investigation. Implants were placed vertically into the lower jaw. After 14 weeks unloaded osseointegration the metal ceramic crowns were inserted. the experimental animals were sacrificed (1 year post insertion). The vertical position of implants was controlled with a radiograph. Microscopical sections were cut and ground. Sections were viewed using microscope with CCD camera. 1 year osseointegration in lower jaw confirmed by all implants presence of newly formed bone around the all implants. Laser-deposited coating the layer of fibrous connective tissue was seen only seldom. In the control group (titamium implant without cover) the fibrous connective tissue was seen between implant and newly formed bone.

  10. Association between tumor necrosis factor-alpha G-308A polymorphism and dental peri-implant disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Weng, Hong; Cen, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Wen, Xiujie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a potent immune-inflammatory mediator involved in the regulation of bone resorption. The single nucleotide polymorphism G-308A in the TNF-α gene increases the level of this cytokine. This phenomenon is also related to several diseases. Although the association between TNF-α (G-308A) polymorphism and dental peri-implant disease has been investigated, results have remained controversial. Hence, we performed this meta-analysis to provide a comprehensive and systematic conclusion on this topic. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure until July 2015. A fixed-effect model was established to calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The calculated values were then used to assess the strength of the association between the TNF-α (G-308A) polymorphism and the dental peri-implant disease risk. The heterogeneity between included studies was evaluated with Cochran Q and I2 statistics. Interstudy publication bias was investigated with a funnel plot. Results: Six eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled ORs did not reveal a significant relationship between the TNF-α (G-308A) polymorphism and the disease susceptibility. Subgroup analyses in terms of ethnicity and disease type yielded similar results. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis revealed that TNF-α (G-308A) polymorphism was not significantly associated with the risk of dental peri-implant disease. However, further studies with large sample sizes should be performed to verify these results. PMID:27583850

  11. Micro-arc oxidation as a tool to develop multifunctional calcium-rich surfaces for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A R; Oliveira, F; Boldrini, L C; Leite, P E; Falagan-Lotsch, P; Linhares, A B R; Zambuzzi, W F; Fragneaud, B; Campos, A P C; Gouvêa, C P; Archanjo, B S; Achete, C A; Marcantonio, E; Rocha, L A; Granjeiro, J M

    2015-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) is commonly used in dental implant applications. Surface modification strategies are being followed in last years in order to build Ti oxide-based surfaces that can fulfill, simultaneously, the following requirements: induced cell attachment and adhesion, while providing a superior corrosion and tribocorrosion performance. In this work micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was used as a tool for the growth of a nanostructured bioactive titanium oxide layer aimed to enhance cell attachment and adhesion for dental implant applications. Characterization of the surfaces was performed, in terms of morphology, topography, chemical composition and crystalline structure. Primary human osteoblast adhesion on the developed surfaces was investigated in detail by electronic and atomic force microscopy as well as immunocytochemistry. Also an investigation on the early cytokine production was performed. Results show that a relatively thick hybrid and graded oxide layer was produced on the Ti surface, being constituted by a mixture of anatase, rutile and amorphous phases where calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) were incorporated. An outermost nanometric-thick amorphous oxide layer rich in Ca was present in the film. This amorphous layer, rich in Ca, improved fibroblast viability and metabolic activity as well as osteoblast adhesion. High-resolution techniques allowed to understand that osteoblasts adhered less in the crystalline-rich regions while they preferentially adhere and spread over in the Ca-rich amorphous oxide layer. Also, these surfaces induce higher amounts of IFN-γ cytokine secretion, which is known to regulate inflammatory responses, bone microarchitecture as well as cytoskeleton reorganization and cellular spreading. These surfaces are promising in the context of dental implants, since they might lead to faster osseointegration. PMID:26046283

  12. Radiation absorbed from dental implant radiography: a comparison of linear tomography, CT scan, and panoramic and intra-oral techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Danforth, R.A.; Barnes, R.W.; Burtch, M.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose in bone marrow, thyroid, salivary gland, eye, and skin entrance was determined by placement of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) at selected anatomical sites within and on a human-like x-ray phantom. The phantom was exposed to radiation from linear tomographic and computer-assisted tomographic (CT) simulated dental implant radiographic examinations. The mean dose was determined for each anatomical site. Resulting dose measurements from linear tomography and computer-assisted tomography are compared with reported panoramic and intra-oral doses. CT examination delivered the greatest dose, while linear tomography was generally lowest. Panoramic and intra-oral doses were similar to those of linear tomography.

  13. Complete mouth reconstruction with implant-supported fixed partial dental prostheses fabricated with zirconia frameworks: a 4-year clinical follow-up.

    PubMed

    Puri, Shweta; Parciak, Ewa C; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2014-09-01

    Few scientific reports regarding the success of complete mouth partial fixed dental prostheses frameworks fabricated with zirconia are available, especially when dental implants serve as the abutments. A complete mouth reconstruction with zirconia frameworks veneered with feldspathic porcelain is reported involving a 65-year-old white woman who presented with partial edentulism and an unrestorable remaining dentition. After examination, 14 implants were planned (8 in the maxillary arch and 6 in the mandibular arch), and implant-supported zirconia framework screw-retained partial fixed dental prostheses (ISZPFDPs) were fabricated and made in sections for easier retrievability and management. No major complications were encountered during follow-up appointments at 6-month intervals for 4 years. However, minor fractures of the veneering ceramic were noted 4 years after placement. The ISZPFDPs were well accepted by the patient and had a favorable outcome in terms of patient acceptability and success, despite some complications. PMID:24674806

  14. Effect of Osteotomy Preparation on Osseointegration of Immediately Loaded, Tapered Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, A; Cochran, D; Obrecht, M; Pippenger, B E; Dard, M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present preclinical in vivo study was to evaluate whether a modified "drill-only" protocol, involving slight underpreparation of the implant site, may have an effect on aspects of osseointegration of a novel bone-level tapered implant, compared with the "standard drilling" protocol involving taping and profiling of the marginal aspect of the implant socket. In each side of the edentulated and completely healed mandible of 11 minipigs, 2 tapered implants (8 mm long × 4.1 mm Ø, BLT; Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) were installed either with the drill-only or the standard drilling protocol. Significantly lower average insertion torque values were recorded for the standard drilling protocol group (52 ± 29 Ncm) compared with the drill-only group (70 ± 27 Ncm) (t test, P ≤ 0.05); no significant difference was observed between the 2 groups regarding implant stability, by means of resonance frequency analysis (75 ± 8 vs. 75 ± 6, respectively). Half of the implants were immediately loaded and the rest were submerged, providing observation times of 8 or 4 wk, respectively. Non-decalcified histological and histomorphometric analysis of the implants with surrounding tissues showed no significant differences between the 2 drilling protocols regarding the distance from the implant platform to the first coronal bone-to-implant contact (f-BIC), the total bone-to-implant contact (BIC) as a percentage of the total implant perimeter, and the bone density in an area extending 1 mm laterally from the implant (BATA) within 2 rectangular regions of interest (ROIs) 4 mm in height, representing the coronal (parallel-walled) and apical (tapered) aspect of the implant (ROI 1 and ROI 2, respectively) in non-submerged implants. In general, marginal peri-implant bone levels were at or slightly apical to the implant platform, and large amounts of bone-to-implant contact were observed. In contrast, immediately loaded implants placed with the drill-only protocol

  15. Single dental implant retained mandibular complete dentures – influence of the loading protocol: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the years, there has been a strong consensus in dentistry that at least two implants are required to retain a complete mandibular denture. It has been shown in several clinical trials that one single median implant can retain a mandibular overdenture sufficiently well for up to 5 years without implant failures, when delayed loading was used. However, other trials have reported conflicting results with in part considerable failure rates when immediate loading was applied. Therefore it is the purpose of the current randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that immediate loading of a single mandibular midline implant with an overdenture will result in a comparable clinical outcome as using the standard protocol of delayed loading. Methods/design This prospective nine-center randomized controlled clinical trial is still ongoing. The final patient will complete the trial in 2016. In total, 180 edentulous patients between 60 and 89 years with sufficient complete dentures will receive one median implant in the edentulous mandible, which will retain the existing complete denture using a ball attachment. Loading of the median implant is either immediately after implant placement (experimental group) or delayed by 3 months of submerged healing at second-stage surgery (control group). Follow-up of patients will be performed for 24 months after implant loading. The primary outcome measure is non-inferiority of implant success rate of the experimental group compared to the control group. The secondary outcome measures encompass clinical, technical and subjective variables. The study was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German research foundation, KE 477/8-1). Discussion This multi-center clinical trial will give information on the ability of a single median implant to retain a complete mandibular denture when immediately loaded. If viable, this treatment option will strongly improve everyday dental practice. Trial registration The trial

  16. Advantages and Disadvantages of Double Threaded Dental Implant Screws As Opposed to Single-Threaded: A Study from a Biomechanical Perspective by the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Arenal, A.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Lasheras, F. Sánchez; Quevedo, M. Mauvezin

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the present article is to study the advantages from a biomechanical point of view of the use of a double-threaded dental implant over the more common single-threaded one. For this purpose a 3D model of a portion of the jaw was generated. In this model four different bone areas were distinguished (transition cortical, transition trabecular, bulk cortical and bulk trabecular). Not only was the portion of the jaw created with CAD software but also two different implants geometries, one with only one thread (single-threaded) and the other with two threads (double-threaded). The loading condition was defined as 150 N intrusive forces and 15 N lingual-labial forces acting on the implant. The results of the present study shown that from a macroscopic point of view, the choice of one or other of the dental implants does not make a significant difference in the general behaviour of the jaw. In spite of this and notwithstanding the effects of the transition bone-implant, the stress distribution achieved by the single-threaded dental implant is more uniform. This effect is better for the biomechanics of the jaw. The advantage presented by the double threaded implant is that due to its larger surface the osseointegration is better than in the single-threaded version.

  17. Assessment of Mechanical Stability and Safety for Fully Edentulous Maxilla with Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahira, Takaaki; Todo, Mitsugu; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    A three-dimensional maxillary bone model was constructed using CT-images. The distribution of Young’s modulus was also estimated from the bone mineral density distribution. Four or six implants were embedded into the maxillary model and a metal prosthesis was attached to the implants. Computational analysis of the maxilla model was performed in order to characterize effects of the number of embedded implants on the stress state of the maxilla under two different loading conditions. For the two loading conditions, the distribution of strain energy density was severely concentrated especially around the right-molar implant, suggesting bone damage and absorption in this region. The 4-implants model with rear implantation and shortened prosthesis showed almost the same value of strain energy density in the 6-implants model. It is thus concluded that this kind of 3-D modeling could clinically be used for predicting the optimal position of implantation corresponding to each patient.

  18. In vitro and in vivo studies of ultrafine-grain Ti as dental implant material processed by ECAP.

    PubMed

    An, Baili; Li, Zhirui; Diao, Xiaoou; Xin, Haitao; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Xiaorui; Wu, Yulu; Li, Kai; Guo, Yazhou

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surface characterization of ultrafine-grain pure titanium (UFG-Ti) after sandblasting and acid-etching (SLA) and to evaluate its biocompatibility as dental implant material in vitro and in vivo. UFG-Ti was produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). Microstructure and yield strength were investigated. The morphology, wettability and roughness of the specimens were analyzed after they were modified by SLA. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were seeded onto the specimens to evaluate its biocompatibility in vitro. For the in vivo study, UFG-Ti implants after SLA were embedded into the femurs of New Zealand rabbits. Osseointegration was investigated though micro-CT analysis, histological assessment and pull-out test. The control group was CP-Ti. UFG-Ti with enhanced mechanical properties was produced by four passes of ECAP in BC route at room temperature. After SLA modification, the hierarchical porous structure on its surface exhibited excellent wettability. The adhesion, proliferation and viability of cells cultured on the UFG-Ti were superior to that of CP-Ti. In the in vivo study, favorable osseointegration occurred between the implant and bone in CP and UFG-Ti groups. The combination intensity of UF- Ti with bone was higher according to the pull-out test. This study supports the claim that UFG-Ti has grain refinement with outstanding mechanical properties and, with its excellent biocompatibility, has potential for use as dental implant material. PMID:27287096

  19. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part I: a Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this first part of a two-part series was to review the literature concerning the indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages and surgical techniques of the lateralization and transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve, followed by the placement of an implant in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC database, academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014 and comprised English-language articles that included adult patients between 18 and 80 years old with minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal who had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning with a minimum 6 months of follow-up. Results A total of 16 studies were included in this review. Nine were related to IAN transposition, 4 to IAN lateralization and 3 to both transposition and lateralization. Implant treatment results and complications were presented. Conclusions Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization and transposition in combination with the installation of dental implants is sometimes the only possible procedure to help patients to obtain a fixed prosthesis, in edentulous atrophic posterior mandibles. With careful pre-operative surgical and prosthetic planning, imaging, and extremely precise surgical technique, this procedure can be successfully used for implant placement in edentulous posterior mandibular segments. PMID:25937873

  20. Evaluation of the effect of ozonated plant oils on the quality of osseointegration of dental implants under the influence of Cyclosporin A an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    El Hadary, Amany A; Yassin, Hala H; Mekhemer, Sameh T; Holmes, Julian C; Grootveld, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Immunosuppressive agents have been recognized as factors that induce changes and modifications in bone metabolism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ozonated plant extracts (herein termed ozonated oil) under the influence of Cyclosporin A (CsA) on osseointegration. A total of 20 dental implants were placed in 20 rabbit tibiae assigned to Group A or B. CsA was injected at an immunosuppressive dose in Groups A and B as a single-dose treatment. At the day of surgery, Group A received a single topical ozonated oil treatment (0.55 mL) around dental implants; Group B, the control group, received no ozonated oil. Animals were sacrificed after 8 weeks. Radiographs were obtained at implant surgery and on the day of sacrifice. Bone quality was compared between the 2 groups. Radiographically, osseointegration was microscopically evaluated using scanning electron and light microscopies. In ozonated Group A specimens, light microscopic examination demonstrated evidence of more organized mature bone compared with Group B. Within the limits of this study, the results suggest that short-term administration of CsA, when administered with topical ozonated oil, may influence bone density and the quality of dental implant osseointegration. Therefore, topically applied ozonated oil may influence bone density and the quality of osseointegration around dental implants. PMID:20545531

  1. A comparison of peripheral marginal bone loss at dental implants measured with conventional intraoral film and digitized radiographs.

    PubMed

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Gülşahı, Ayşe; Genç, Yasemin; Paksoy, Candan Semra

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of conventional and bone-condensing implantation techniques and time (6 and 12 months after implantation) on levels of marginal bone surrounding implants and to assess the level of agreement between measurements made using digitized intraoral images and film. The study group consisted of 14 healthy patients (9 female, 5 male; age range, 23-59 years; mean age, 41.1 years) with 28 single-tooth dental implants. In each patient, an implant was placed on one side using a conventional technique and on the opposite side using a bone-condensing technique. Film radiographs were taken at 6 and 12 months following implant placement and were digitized at 300 dpi and 600 dpi using a laser scanner. All scanned images were stored as both TIFF and JPEG files. A single observer twice measured distal and mesial marginal bone loss from film and digitized images. At the mesial site, there was a significant main effect of time (6 and 12 months after implantation) on the measurement of bone loss, F(1, 26) = 6.08, P = .02, but no significant main effect of implantation technique, F(1, 26) = 1.56, P = .223, and no significant interaction between time and technique, F(1, 26) = 2.09, P = .160. Similarly, at the distal site, there was a significant main effect of time on the measurement of bone loss, F(1, 26) = 14.1, P = .001, but no significant main effect of implantation technique, F(1, 26) = 1.21, P = .281. However, in contrast to the mesial site, there was also significant interaction between technique and time on the distal site, F(1, 26) = 4.974, P = .035. Intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficients and repeatability measurements showed high agreement for all image types. The bone-condensing technique resulted in greater marginal bone loss. Marginal bone measurements made using digitized intraoral images and conventional film showed high levels of agreement. PMID:20712442

  2. Radiographic Vertical Bone Loss Evaluation around Dental Implants Following One Year of Functional Loading

    PubMed Central

    Rasouli Ghahroudi, AAR.; Talaeepour, AR; Mesgarzadeh, A.; Rokn, AR.; Khorsand, A.; Mesgarzadeh, NN.; Kharazi Fard, MJ.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Vertical bone loss evaluations in the Nobel Biocare Replace® Select Tapered ™ implant system in the human after one-year loading time. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed on 31 patients (14 men, 17 women; mean age, 60.39 years) receiving 170 implants (mean, 5.48 for each patient) of Groovy and Non-groovy designs in the Nobel Biocare Replace® Select Tapered ™ system. The marginal bone loss was measured at mesial and distal aspects of the implants on OPG x-rays after one-year follow-up. The data regarding the patient’s gender, age, history of disease, smoking, bone type at implant location, loading time of prosthesis and implant, implant design, diameter and length were recorded by the patients’ records and interview. The data were subjected to multiple linear regression and Pearson coefficient ratio regarding different factors. Results: The mean (standard deviation) distal, mesial and overall bone loss was 0.688 mm (0.851), 0.665 mm (0.849) and 0.935 mm (0.905), respectively in the studied implants. No significant differences were found regarding implant location, bone quality at the implant region, implant design and bone graft reception. In addition, no significant correlation was found between the occurred bone loss and implant diameter, length and number of used splints. Conclusion: Due to the criteria mentioned for implant success in term of bone loss values after one-year loading time, Noble Biocare Replace® Select Tapered ™ implant system is an acceptable treatment option for implant restorations in this regard. PMID:21998781

  3. State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; Montero-Martín, Javier; Prados-Frutos, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objetives: To determine whether preoperative state anxiety and depression modulate or influence objective and subjective postoperative pain following dental implant insertion. Study Design: Prospective, clinical study with 7-day follow-up of a sample of 105 subjects who preoperatively completed the state anxiety questionnaire (STAI-E) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and postoperatively, at 2 and 7 days, recorded objective pain with the Semmes-Weinstein mechanical esthesiometer (SW test) and subjective pain with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: 85.6% and 81.5% of patients, respectively, recorded no signs of state anxiety or depression. The correlation between anxiety and depression for both maxillary bones was the lower (P=0.02). The correlation between subjective and objective pain at 2 and 7 days, and the anatomic regions intervened, was statistically significant in the mandible at day 7 (P<0.01), and highly significant (P<0.001) for the other variables. The correlation between state anxiety and objective pain at day 7 was nearly statistically significant (P=0.07). Conclusions: The correlation between state anxiety and depression, and objective and subjective pain at day 7 was not statistically significant. A strong correlation was found between objective and subjective pain in the immediate postoperative period. Key words:Anxiety, depression, postoperative pain, dental implants. PMID:24880447

  4. Dental Implants Fatigue as a Possible Failure of Implantologic Treatment: The Importance of Randomness in Fatigue Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Privado, María; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Manchón, Ángel; Rojo, Rosa; Felice, Pietro; Bea, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To show how random variables concern fatigue behaviour by a probabilistic finite element method. Methods. Uncertainties on material properties due to the existence of defects that cause material elastic constant are not the same in the whole dental implant the dimensions of the structural element and load history have a decisive influence on the fatigue process and therefore on the life of a dental implant. In order to measure these uncertainties, we used a method based on Markoff chains, Bogdanoff and Kozin cumulative damage model, and probabilistic finite elements method. Results. The results have been obtained by conventional and probabilistic methods. Mathematical models obtained the same result regarding fatigue life; however, the probabilistic model obtained a greater mean life but with more information because of the cumulative probability function. Conclusions. The present paper introduces an improved procedure to study fatigue behaviour in order to know statistics of the fatigue life (mean and variance) and its probability of failure (fatigue life versus probability of failure). PMID:26583137

  5. Computer-designed selective laser sintering surgical guide and immediate loading dental implants with definitive prosthesis in edentulous patient: A preliminary method

    PubMed Central

    Giacomo, Giovanni Di; Silva, Jorge; Martines, Rodrigo; Ajzen, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze a preliminary method of immediately loading dental implants and a definitive prosthesis based on the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing systems, after 2 years of clinical follow-up. Materials and Methods: The study comprised one patient in good general health with edentulous maxilla. Cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) was performed using a radiographic template. The surgical plan was made using the digital imaging and communications in medicine protocol with ImplantViewer (version 1.9, Anne Solutions, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil), the surgical planning software. These data were used to produce a selective laser sintering surgical template. A maxilla prototype was used to guide the prosthesis technician in producing the prosthesis. Eight dental implants and a definitive prosthesis were installed on the same day. A post-operative CBCT image was fused with the image of the surgical planning to calculate the deviation between the planned and the placed implants positions. Patient was followed for 2 years. Results: On average, the match between the planned and placed angular deviation was within 6.0 ± 3.4° and the difference in coronal deviation was 0.7 ± 0.3 mm. At the end of the follow-up, neither the implant nor the prosthesis was lost. Conclusions: Considering the limited samples number, it was possible to install the dental implants and a definitive prosthesis on the same day with success. PMID:24966755

  6. Optimal Er:YAG laser irradiation parameters for debridement of microstructured fixture surfaces of titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoichi; Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ichinose, Shizuko; Takasaki, Aristeo Atsushi; Schwarz, Frank; Izumi, Yuichi

    2013-07-01

    Er:YAG laser (ErL) irradiation has been reported to be effective for treating peri-implant disease. The present study seeks to evaluate morphological and elemental changes induced on microstructured surfaces of dental endosseous implants by high-pulse-repetition-rate ErL irradiation and to determine the optimal irradiation conditions for debriding contaminated microstructured surfaces. In experiment 1, dual acid-etched microstructured implants were irradiated by ErL (pulse energy, 30-50 mJ/pulse; repetition rate, 30 Hz) with and without water spray and for used and unused contact tips. Experiment 2 compared the ErL treatment with conventional mechanical treatments (metal/plastic curettes and ultrasonic scalers). In experiment 3, five commercially available microstructures were irradiated by ErL light (pulse energy, 30-50 mJ/pulse; pulse repetition rate, 30 Hz) while spraying water. In experiment 4, contaminated microstructured surfaces of three failed implants were debrided by ErL irradiation. After the experiments, all treated surfaces were assessed by stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and/or energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The stereomicroscopy, SEM, and EDS results demonstrate that, unlike mechanical treatments, ErL irradiation at 30 mJ/pulse and 30 Hz with water spray induced no color or morphological changes to the microstructures except for the anodized implant surface, which was easily damaged. The optimized irradiation parameters effectively removed calcified deposits from contaminated titanium microstructures without causing substantial thermal damage. ErL irradiation at pulse energies below 30 mJ/pulse (10.6 J/cm(2)/pulse) and 30 Hz with water spray in near-contact mode seems to cause no damage and to be effective for debriding microstructured surfaces (except for anodized microstructures). PMID:22886137

  7. Pilot Study on the Influence of Nutritional Counselling and Implant Therapy on the Nutritional Status in Dentally Compromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wöstmann, Bernd; Simon, Teresa; Neuhäuser-Berthold, Monika; Rehmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the impact of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation combined with nutritional counseling on the nutritional status of patients with severely reduced dentitions. Design An explorative intervention study including an intra-individual comparison of 20 patients with severely reduced dentitions in terms of nutrition- and quality of life-related parameters recorded at baseline and at six and twelve months after implant-prosthetic rehabilitation. Participants Twenty patients from the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry of Justus-Liebig University of Giessen, with an mean age of 63 years, who had fewer than ten pairs of antagonists. Measurements The baseline data collection included dental status, a chewing ability test, laboratory parameters, anthropometric data (body mass index), energy supply, a 3-day dietary record, an analysis of the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) with the OHIP-G14, the Mini-Mental Status (MMS) and Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Six months after implantation and prosthetic rehabilitation, individual nutritional counseling was performed by a dietician. Data were again collected and analyzed. A final follow-up was conducted 12 months after prosthetic rehabilitation. Results Despite the highly significant improvement in masticatory ability and OHRQoL after implant-prosthetic rehabilitation, no significant changes were observed regarding MNA, anthropometric data or energy supply. Except for cholinesterase (p = 0.012), ferritin (p = 0.003), folic acid (p = 0.019) and vitamin A (p = 0.004), no laboratory parameter changed significantly during the investigation period. In addition, no general significant differences were observed for nutrient intake or food choice. Conclusion The present study does not confirm the assumption that the implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with severely reduced residual dentitions with or without an individual nutritional counseling influences nutritional status. PMID:26821352

  8. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P.; Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.; Katiboglu, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface

  9. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P. Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.

    2015-03-30

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface

  10. Long-term outcome of dental implants after maxillary augmentation with and without bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Machuca-Ariza, Jesús; Ruiz-Martos, Alberto; Ramos-Robles, Mª-Carmen; Martínez-Lara, Ildefonso

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to evaluate the technique of sinus bone reformation, which consists of elevating the sinus membrane and placement the implant without bone graft, compared with the widely-used technique involving raising the maxillary sinus and grafting, using animal hydroxyapatite as the filler, while simultaneously fixing the implants. Material and Methods This is a retrospective study on two groups of patients who underwent elevation of the sinus membrane and simultaneous placement of the implant. The grafting technique was applied to one group, while the other had no graft. An alveolar ridge height of 4 to 7 mm was necessary. Radiological control was undertaken at 6 months and one year post-prosthetic loading. In each group 38 implants were placed. Results No significant behavioural differences were observed in the implants according to the Albrektsson success criteria. Implant failure was observed in 2 implants from the bone grafting group (success rate 93%) and in 1 implant from the reformation group (success rate 97%). In this group, bone formation was observed on both sides of each implant, the bone gain was measured using image management software (2.7±0.9mm mesial and 2.6±0.9mm distal). There was no correlation between mesial and distal bone gain and implant´s length. Conclusions The results indicate that bone reformation is a valid technique in cases involving atrophy of the posterior maxilla. Primary stability, maintenance of space by the implant, and the formation of a blood clot are crucial in this technique in order to achieve bone formation around the implant. It is an alternative to the conventional technique of sinus lift with filling material, and has several advantages over this procedure, including a lower infection risk, as it does not involve a biomaterial, reduced cost, a simpler technique, and better acceptance by the patient. Key words:Bone formation, sinus membrane elevation, maxillary sinus, bone grafting. PMID:26827071

  11. The effect of the thread depth on the mechanical properties of the dental implant

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the effect of implant thread depth on primary stability in low density bone. MATERIALS AND METHODS The insertion torque was measured by inserting Ti implants with different thread depths into solid rigid polyurethane blocks (Sawbones) with three different bone densities (0.16 g/cm3, 0.24 g/cm3, and 0.32 g/cm3). The insertion torque value was evaluated with a surgical engine. The static compressive strength was measured with a universal testing machine (UTM) and the Ti implants were aligned at 30° against the loading direction of the UTM. After the static compressive strength test, the Ti implants were analyzed with a Measurescope. RESULTS The Ti implants with deeper thread depth showed statistically higher mean insertion torque values (P<.001). Groups A and group B had similar maximum static compressive strengths, as did groups C and D (P>.05). After the static compressive strength, the thread shape of the Ti implants with deeper thread depth did not show any breakage but did show deformation of the implant body and abutment. CONCLUSION The implants with deeper thread depth had higher mean insertion torque values but not lower compressive strength. The deep threads had a mechanical stability. Implants with deeper thread depth may increase the primary stability in areas of poor quality bone without decreasing mechanical strength. PMID:25932309

  12. Behavior of Dental/Implant Alloys in Commercial Mouthwash Solution Studied by Electrochemical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareci, Daniel; Strugaru, Sorin Iacob; Iacoban, Sorin; Bolat, Georgiana; Munteanu, Corneliu

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates the electrochemical behavior of the various dental materials: Paliag (Ag-Pd based), Wiron 99 (Ni-Cr based), Cp-Ti (commercial pure titanium), and experimental Ti12Mo5Ta alloy in commercial mouthwash solution with 500 ppm F- (Oral B®) and compares it with the behavior of the same dental materials in artificial saliva. Linear potentiodynamic polarization (LPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are the electrochemical procedures of investigation. The passivation of all dental samples in artificial saliva and mouthwash solution occurred spontaneously at open circuit potential. The corrosion current density of all tested dental materials in mouthwash solution were low (1-2 μA/cm2). The results suggest a non-predominant fluoride effect on the passive layer formed on all samples at open circuit potential. No passivation could be established with Paliag alloy when polarized in mouthwash solution. The EIS results confirm that all dental sample exhibit passivity in mouthwash solution at open circuit potential (polarization resistance was around 5 × 105 Ω cm2). For Paliag alloy after LPP in mouthwash solution the protectiveness passive layer was no more present. The corrosion resistances of four dental materials in mouthwash solution are in the following order: Ti12Mo5Ta > Cp-Ti > Wiron 99 > Paliag.

  13. A Novel Scheme and Evaluations on a Long-Term and Continuous Biosensor Platform Integrated with a Dental Implant Fixture and Its Prosthetic Abutment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jung; Lu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    A miniature intra-oral dental implant system including a built-in biosensor device is proposed in this article. The dental implant system, or platform, is replaced over maxilla and allows relatively non-invasive procedures for a novel biosensing scheme for human blood analysis. Due to placement of the implant fixture, periodontal ligaments and the pulp structure, which are regarded as the main origin of pain, are thus removed, and long-term, continuous blood analysis and management through maxillary bone marrow becomes achievable through the dental implant platform. The new pathway of biological sensing is for the first time presented to realize an accurate and painless approach without injections. The dental implant system mainly consists of an implant fixture and a prosthetic abutment, a biosensor module, a bluetooth 4.0 wireless module and a dc button cell battery. The electrochemical biosensor possesses three electrodes, including working, reference and counter ones, which are arranged to pass through the titanium implant fixture below the biosensor module. The electrodes are exposed to the blood pool inside the maxillary bone marrow and perform oxidation/reduction reactions with the coating of biosensing enzyme. To prove the proposed platform, the immobilization process of glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme and in vitro detections of glucose levels are successfully carried out, and proven sensitivity, linearity and repeatability of the glucose biosensor system are obtained. Moreover, a preliminary canine animal model adopting the new pathway shows significant consistency with the traditional method through dermal pricks for blood sugar detection. Despite the prospective results, further challenges in engineering implementation and clinical practices are addressed and discussed. In brief, the novel biosensing pathway and intra-oral biosensor platform may increasingly reveal their promising value and feasibilities in current bio-medical analysis, diagnosis, drug

  14. A Novel Scheme and Evaluations on a Long-Term and Continuous Biosensor Platform Integrated with a Dental Implant Fixture and Its Prosthetic Abutment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Jung; Lu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    A miniature intra-oral dental implant system including a built-in biosensor device is proposed in this article. The dental implant system, or platform, is replaced over maxilla and allows relatively non-invasive procedures for a novel biosensing scheme for human blood analysis. Due to placement of the implant fixture, periodontal ligaments and the pulp structure, which are regarded as the main origin of pain, are thus removed, and long-term, continuous blood analysis and management through maxillary bone marrow becomes achievable through the dental implant platform. The new pathway of biological sensing is for the first time presented to realize an accurate and painless approach without injections. The dental implant system mainly consists of an implant fixture and a prosthetic abutment, a biosensor module, a bluetooth 4.0 wireless module and a dc button cell battery. The electrochemical biosensor possesses three electrodes, including working, reference and counter ones, which are arranged to pass through the titanium implant fixture below the biosensor module. The electrodes are exposed to the blood pool inside the maxillary bone marrow and perform oxidation/reduction reactions with the coating of biosensing enzyme. To prove the proposed platform, the immobilization process of glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme and in vitro detections of glucose levels are successfully carried out, and proven sensitivity, linearity and repeatability of the glucose biosensor system are obtained. Moreover, a preliminary canine animal model adopting the new pathway shows significant consistency with the traditional method through dermal pricks for blood sugar detection. Despite the prospective results, further challenges in engineering implementation and clinical practices are addressed and discussed. In brief, the novel biosensing pathway and intra-oral biosensor platform may increasingly reveal their promising value and feasibilities in current bio-medical analysis, diagnosis, drug

  15. Accuracy of a Dedicated Bone-Supported Surgical Template for Dental Implant Placement with Direct Visual Control.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Agbaje, Jimoh Olubanwo; Kong, Liang; Schepers, Serge; Daems, Luc; Legrand, Paul; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Politis, Constantinus; Vrielinck, Luc

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate feasibility and accuracy of dental implant placement utilizing a dedicated bone-supported surgical template. Thirty-eight implants (sixteen in maxilla, twenty-two in mandible) were placed in seven fully edentulous jaws (three maxillae, four mandibles) guided by the designed bone-supported surgical template. A voxel-based registration technique was applied to match pre- and post-operative CBCT scans. The mean angular deviation and mean linear deviation at the implant hex and apex were 6.4 ± 3.7° (0.7°-14.8°), 1.47 ± 0.64 mm (0.5-2.56 mm) and 1.70 ± 1.01 mm (0.71-4.39 mm), respectively. The presented bone-supported surgical template showed acceptable accuracy for clinical use. In return for reduced accuracy, clinicians gain accessibility when using this type of surgical template for both the maxilla and the mandible. This is particularly important in patients with reduced mouth opening. PMID:27010564

  16. Use of SIG device to accurately place permanent miniature dental implants to retain mandibular overdenture. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Harold I; Goodridge, Opal F

    2006-01-01

    A case of mini-dental implant insertion for retention of a mandibular overdenture in a hospitalized patient has been documented. The additional use of the SIG (drill guide) directional device in the implant placement protocol gave the practitioner more confidence and resulted in the proper alignment of the three ball-top, one-piece fixtures. The three implants were inserted exactly 1 cm apart and parallel to each other. The distal fixtures were approximately 1 cm away from the mental foramina, thereby eliminating the risk of lip paresthesia. Keeper caps were placed in the denture's intaglio after one month. The keeper caps allowed for proper retention of the overdenture. The caps also enabled the patient to easily insert and withdraw his denture, even though he displayed limited manual dexterity. The tissue response was excellent, and oral hygiene was made easier with adequate spacing of the exposed ball-tops. The overall experience for both the operator and the patient was very positive. General dentists should be able to readily master this technique and add it to their armamentarium for the benefit of all their patients. PMID:17036584

  17. Bone properties surrounding hydroxyapatite-coated custom osseous integrated dental implants.

    PubMed

    Baker, M I; Eberhardt, A W; Martin, D M; McGwin, G; Lemons, J E

    2010-10-01

    Calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite or HA) coatings have been applied to Custom Osseous Integrated Implants (COIIs) to improve the quality of the bone-implant integration, yet little is known concerning the biomechanical properties of bone surrounding the HA-coated implants in humans over the long term. The purpose of this study was to characterize the mechanical and histomorphometric properties of the bone along the implant interface. Specimens were prepared from three similar mandibular implants that were functional in three female patients for about 11 years. Histomorphometric analyses showed bone-implant contact averaging 75% for all specimens. Area coverage of residual HA-coating ranged from 52 to 70%. When compared with previous studies, these results show a relatively high percentage of residual HA after a decade in vivo. Nanoindentation showed similar average values of hardness and modulus (p = 0.53 and p = 0.56, respectively) comparing bone adjacent to residual HA-coating and regions where the coating was absent. The elastic modulus was significantly lower for bone near the bone-implant interface (<200 μm) as compared with bone distant (>1000 μm) from the interface (p = 0.05), thereby reflecting different properties of the bone near these interfaces. Backscattered electron imaging showed darker gray levels which indicated decreased mineral content in bone adjacent to the implant, consistent with the nanoindentation results. PMID:20725958

  18. Ultra-structural evaluation of an anodic oxidated titanium dental implant.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Akiyoshi; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nakamura, Mariko; Shirai, Hajime; Matsumoto, Takuya; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Anodic oxidation is used for the surface treatment of commercial implants to improve their functional properties for clinical success. Here we conducted ultrastructural and chemical investigations into the micro- and nanostructure of the anodic oxide film of a titanium implant. The anodic oxidized layer of a Ti6Al4V alloy implant was examined ultrastructurally by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). They were also analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TEM revealed that the oxide layer of the Ti6Al4V implant prepared through anodic oxidation was separated into two layers. Al and V were not present on the top surface of the anodic oxide. This can be attributed to the biocompatibility of the anodic oxidized Ti6Al4V alloy implant, because the release of harmful metal ions such as Al and V can be suppressed by the biocompatibility. PMID:25483382

  19. Finite element analysis of dental implant loading on atrophic and non-atrophic cancellous and cortical mandibular bone - a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Marcián, Petr; Borák, Libor; Valášek, Jiří; Kaiser, Jozef; Florian, Zdeněk; Wolff, Jan

    2014-12-18

    The first aim of this study was to assess displacements and micro-strain induced on different grades of atrophic cortical and trabecular mandibular bone by axially loaded dental implants using finite element analysis (FEA). The second aim was to assess the micro-strain induced by different implant geometries and the levels of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) on the surrounding bone. Six mandibular bone segments demonstrating different grades of mandibular bone atrophy and various bone volume fractions (from 0.149 to 0.471) were imaged using a micro-CT device. The acquired bone STL models and implant (Brånemark, Straumann, Ankylos) were merged into a three-dimensional finite elements structure. The mean displacement value for all implants was 3.1 ±1.2 µm. Displacements were lower in the group with a strong BIC. The results indicated that the maximum strain values of cortical and cancellous bone increased with lower bone density. Strain distribution is the first and foremost dependent on the shape of bone and architecture of cancellous bone. The geometry of the implant, thread patterns, grade of bone atrophy and BIC all affect the displacement and micro-strain on the mandible bone. Preoperative finite element analysis could offer improved predictability in the long-term outlook of dental implant restorations. PMID:25468296

  20. Rehabilitation of the severely atrophied dentoalveolar ridge in the aesthetic region with corticocancellous grafts from the iliac crest and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Lehmijoki, Miikka; Holming, Heli; Thorén, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess changes in bone volume after block bone augmentation and placement of dental implants and further evaluate the aesthetic outcome of the treatment. Material and Methods 9 Patients with atrophied anterior maxilla were included in this study. They received total of 21 implants. Dimensions of the alveolar ridge were measured from cone-beam computed tomography x-rays. The bone level at the implant sites was analysed from intraoral x-rays and the aesthetic outcome was assessed from clinical photographs using a pink aesthetic score (PES) scaling. Results The mean gained horizontal bone width at the marginal crest and 5 mm apically was accordingly 2.7mm and 5.0 mm. The mean PES rating was 9.8/14. The survival rate of. Conclusions Reconstruction of the atrophied anterior maxilla with bone blocks and dental implants is a safe procedure with high survival rate and acceptable aesthetic outcome. Key words:Dental implants, aesthetic region, corticocancellous bone grafts, pink aesthetic score, survival rate. PMID:27475690

  1. Comparative Clinical and Histologic Assessments of Dental Implants Delivered with a Manual Torque Limiting Wrench Versus with an Electronically Controlled Torque Limiting Device.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Myron; Nevins, Marc; De Angelis, Nicola; Ghaffari, Sasan; Bassir, Hossein; Kim, David M

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this preclinical investigation was to evaluate the healing of tapered roughened surfaced dental implants that were delivered by either a manual torque limiting wrench or an electronically controlled torque limiting device. Three canines underwent bilateral extraction of third and fourth premolars and first molar. The extraction sites were allowed to heal for 2 months before two dental implants were placed bilaterally. All animals underwent a normal healing process. One animal was sacrificed at 1 month and the remaining two animals were sacrificed at 2 months to perform histologic evaluations including bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and soft tissue healing. The clinical stability and histologic osseointegration were similar when the results obtained with the manual torque limiting wrench were compared to those delivered by the electronically controlled torque limiting device. However, BIC and maintenance of the crestal bone level achieved appeared to be higher in the electronically controlled torque limiting device groups. PMID:26509985

  2. Effect of tightening torque on the marginal adaptation of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh, Jalil; Dashti, Hossin; Karamad, Reza; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The final position of the abutment changes with the amount of tightening torque. This could eventually lead to loss of passivity and marginal misfit of prostheses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different tightening torques on the marginal adaptation of 3-unit cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Materials and Methods: Two implants (Straumann) were inserted in an acrylic block so that one of the implants was placed vertically and the other at a 15° vertical angle. A straight abutment and a 15° angulated abutment were connected to the vertically and obliquely installed implants, respectively, so that the two abutments were parallel. Then, 10 cement-retained FDPs were waxed and cast. Abutments were tightened with 10, 20, and 35 Ncm torques, respectively. Following each tightening torque, FDPs were luted on respective abutments with temporary cement. The marginal adaptation of the retainers was evaluated using stereomicroscope. FDPs were then removed from the abutments and were sectioned at the connector sites. The retainers were luted again on their respective abutments. Luting procedures and marginal adaptation measurement were repeated. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and least significant difference tests (α = 0.05). After cutting the FDP connectors, the independent samples t-test was used to compare misfit values (α = 0.05). Results: Following 10, 20, and 35 Ncm tightening torques, the marginal discrepancy of the retainers of FDPs significantly increased (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the marginal discrepancies of these two retainers (P > 0.05). The marginal gap values of angulated abutment retainers (ANRs) were significantly higher than those of the straight abutment after cutting the connectors (P = 0.026). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the marginal misfit of cement-retained FDPs increased continuously when the tightening torque increased. After

  3. The Effect of Simplifying Dental Implant Drilling Sequence on Osseointegration: An Experimental Study in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Giro, Gabriela; Tovar, Nick; Marin, Charles; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Suzuki, Marcelo; Janal, Malvin N.; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To test the hypothesis that there would be no differences in osseointegration by reducing the number of drills for site preparation relative to conventional drilling sequence. Methods. Seventy-two implants were bilaterally placed in the tibia of 18 beagle dogs and remained for 1, 3, and 5 weeks. Thirty-six implants were 3.75 mm in diameter and the other 36 were 4.2 mm. Half of the implants of each diameter were placed under a simplified technique (pilot drill + final diameter drill) and the other half were placed under conventional drilling where multiple drills of increasing diameter were utilized. After euthanisation, the bone-implant samples were processed and referred to histological analysis. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone-area-fraction occupancy (BAFO) were assessed. Statistical analyses were performed by GLM ANOVA at 95% level of significance considering implant diameter, time in vivo, and drilling procedure as independent variables and BIC and BAFO as the dependent variables. Results. Both techniques led to implant integration. No differences in BIC and BAFO were observed between drilling procedures as time elapsed in vivo. Conclusions. The simplified drilling protocol presented comparable osseointegration outcomes to the conventional protocol, which proved the initial hypothesis. PMID:23431303

  4. A Novel Multi-Phosphonate Surface Treatment of Titanium Dental Implants: A Study in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    von Salis-Soglio, Marcella; Stübinger, Stefan; Sidler, Michéle; Klein, Karina; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Kämpf, Käthi; Zlinszky, Katalin; Buchini, Sabrina; Curno, Richard; Péchy, Péter; Aronsson, Bjorn-Owe; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new multi-phosphonate surface treatment (SurfLink®) in an unloaded sheep model. Treated implants were compared to control implants in terms of bone to implant contact (BIC), bone formation, and biomechanical stability. The study used two types of implants (rough or machined surface finish) each with either the multi-phosphonate Wet or Dry treatment or no treatment (control) for a total of six groups. Animals were sacrificed after 2, 8, and 52 weeks. No adverse events were observed at any time point. At two weeks, removal torque showed significantly higher values for the multi-phosphonate treated rough surface (+32% and +29%, Dry and Wet, respectively) compared to rough control. At 52 weeks, a significantly higher removal torque was observed for the multi-phosphonate treated machined surfaces (+37% and 23%, Dry and Wet, respectively). The multi-phosphonate treated groups showed a positive tendency for higher BIC with time and increased new-old bone ratio at eight weeks. SEM images revealed greater amounts of organic materials on the multi-phosphonate treated compared to control implants, with the bone fracture (from the torque test) appearing within the bone rather than at the bone to implant interface as it occurred for control implants. PMID:25215424

  5. A novel multi-phosphonate surface treatment of titanium dental implants: a study in sheep.

    PubMed

    von Salis-Soglio, Marcella; Stübinger, Stefan; Sidler, Michéle; Klein, Karina; Ferguson, Stephen J; Kämpf, Käthi; Zlinszky, Katalin; Buchini, Sabrina; Curno, Richard; Péchy, Péter; Aronsson, Bjorn-Owe; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new multi-phosphonate surface treatment (SurfLink®) in an unloaded sheep model. Treated implants were compared to control implants in terms of bone to implant contact (BIC), bone formation, and biomechanical stability. The study used two types of implants (rough or machined surface finish) each with either the multi-phosphonate Wet or Dry treatment or no treatment (control) for a total of six groups. Animals were sacrificed after 2, 8, and 52 weeks. No adverse events were observed at any time point. At two weeks, removal torque showed significantly higher values for the multi-phosphonate treated rough surface (+32% and +29%, Dry and Wet, respectively) compared to rough control. At 52 weeks, a significantly higher removal torque was observed for the multi-phosphonate treated machined surfaces (+37% and 23%, Dry and Wet, respectively). The multi-phosphonate treated groups showed a positive tendency for higher BIC with time and increased new-old bone ratio at eight weeks. SEM images revealed greater amounts of organic materials on the multi-phosphonate treated compared to control implants, with the bone fracture (from the torque test) appearing within the bone rather than at the bone to implant interface as it occurred for control implants. PMID:25215424

  6. Improved osseointegration of dental titanium implants by TiO2 nanotube arrays with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: a pilot in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Kwan; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, Insan; Choi, Won-Youl

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 nanotube arrays on the surface of dental implants were fabricated by two-step anodic oxidation. Their effects on bone-implant contact were researched by a pilot in vivo study. The implants were classified into four groups. An implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was compared with various surface implants, including machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. The diameter of the TiO2 nanotube window and TiO2 nanotube were ~70 nm and ~110 nm, respectively. The rhBMP-2 was loaded into TiO2 nanotube arrays and elution was detected by an interferometric biosensing method. A change in optical thickness of ~75 nm was measured by flow cell testing for 9 days, indicating elution of rhBMP-2 from the TiO2 nanotube arrays. For the in vivo study, the four groups of implants were placed into the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbits. In the implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and rhBMP-2, the bone-to-implant contact ratio was 29.5% and the bone volume ratio was 77.3%. Bone remodeling was observed not only in the periosteum but also in the interface between the bone and implant threads. These values were higher than in the machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. Our results suggest that TiO2 nanotube arrays could potentially be used as a reservoir for rhBMP-2 to reinforce osseointegration on the surface of dental implants. PMID:25709438

  7. Improved osseointegration of dental titanium implants by TiO2 nanotube arrays with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: a pilot in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Kwan; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, Insan; Choi, Won-Youl

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 nanotube arrays on the surface of dental implants were fabricated by two-step anodic oxidation. Their effects on bone-implant contact were researched by a pilot in vivo study. The implants were classified into four groups. An implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was compared with various surface implants, including machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. The diameter of the TiO2 nanotube window and TiO2 nanotube were ~70 nm and ~110 nm, respectively. The rhBMP-2 was loaded into TiO2 nanotube arrays and elution was detected by an interferometric biosensing method. A change in optical thickness of ~75 nm was measured by flow cell testing for 9 days, indicating elution of rhBMP-2 from the TiO2 nanotube arrays. For the in vivo study, the four groups of implants were placed into the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbits. In the implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and rhBMP-2, the bone-to-implant contact ratio was 29.5% and the bone volume ratio was 77.3%. Bone remodeling was observed not only in the periosteum but also in the interface between the bone and implant threads. These values were higher than in the machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. Our results suggest that TiO2 nanotube arrays could potentially be used as a reservoir for rhBMP-2 to reinforce osseointegration on the surface of dental implants. PMID:25709438

  8. Nasal Floor Elevation with Transcrestal Hydrodynamic Approach Combined with Dental Implant Placement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sentineri, Rosario; Lombardi, Teresa; Celauro, Andrea; Stacchi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Severe atrophy of the anterior maxilla represents a major challenge for the clinician when planning an implant-supported rehabilitation. Several surgical options are available for augmenting bone volume in this area, including onlay or interpositional bone grafts, guided bone regeneration, distraction osteogenesis, and nasal floor augmentation. This case report describes a novel approach to nasal floor elevation using ultrasonic instruments to prepare the implant sites followed by transcrestal hydrodynamic nasal mucosa elevation and grafting with a collagenized xenogeneic biomaterial. This minimally invasive technique allowed for vertical augmentation of the atrophic anterior maxilla together with implant placement in a single-stage surgery. PMID:27100805

  9. Modified ridge splitting and bone expansion osteotomy for placement of dental implant in esthetic zone

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Mayur S.; Khairnar, Darshana; Bakshi, Kedar

    2014-01-01

    Ridge splitting with bone expansion is a technique of manipulation of bone to form receptor site for implant without removing any bone from the implant site. Maxillary bone has inherent quality of flexibility which can bemolded to desire location by using series of instrument namely chisels and osteotome. This further improves quality of bone all around implant, at the crest and apex both. This article describes a report of a clinical case with management of bucco-palatal ridge defect with modified ridge splitting and expansion osteotomy technique using chisel and osteotomes in an esthetic zone. PMID:24808709

  10. Modified ridge splitting and bone expansion osteotomy for placement of dental implant in esthetic zone.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Mayur S; Khairnar, Darshana; Bakshi, Kedar

    2014-01-01

    Ridge splitting with bone expansion is a technique of manipulation of bone to form receptor site for implant without removing any bone from the implant site. Maxillary bone has inherent quality of flexibility which can bemolded to desire location by using series of instrument namely chisels and osteotome. This further improves quality of bone all around implant, at the crest and apex both. This article describes a report of a clinical case with management of bucco-palatal ridge defect with modified ridge splitting and expansion osteotomy technique using chisel and osteotomes in an esthetic zone. PMID:24808709

  11. Alveolar bone density and its clinical implication in the placement of dental implants and orthodontic mini-implants

    PubMed Central

    Almasoud, Naif N.; Tanneru, Nagaraju; Marei, Hesham F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the bone density in maxilla and mandible in dentate and edentulous patients in Saudi population. Methods: This study involved a retrospective analysis of cone beam CT images of 100 patients (50 male and 50 female) who have come to College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2014 and 2015. Using the bone density option in the Simplant software, the Hounsfield unit (HU) was calculated at the edentulous sites. While for dentate sites, a region of interest was selected coronally at 3-5 mm to the root apex using I-CAT vision software. The densities of the buccal bone and cancellous bone were measured at interradicular areas of a specific teeth. Results: The highest bone density at the edentulous sites was at the mandibular anterior region (776.5 ± 65.7 HU), followed by the mandibular posterior region (502.2 ± 224.2 HU). Regarding the dentate sites, the highest bone density was at the buccal cortical plate of the lower incisor teeth (937.56 ± 176.92 HU) and the lowest bone density was at the cancellous bone around the posterior maxillary teeth (247.12 ± 46.75 HU). Conclusion: The alveolar bone density at dentate and edentulous sites in our population is generally lower than the norm reference density of other populations, which dictates the need for quantitative assessment of bone density before implants and mini-implants placement. PMID:27279516

  12. Randomized Clinical Trial of Implant-Supported Ceramic-Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Clark, Arthur E.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the survival rates over time of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic prostheses as a function of core-veneer thickness ratio, gingival connector embrasure design, and connector height. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study involving 55 patients missing three teeth in either one or two posterior areas. These patients (34 women; 21 men; age range 52–75 years) were recruited for the study to receive a 3-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Two implants were placed for each of the 72 FDPs in the study. The implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech), which were made of titanium, were grit blasted. A gold-shaded, custom-milled titanium abutment (Atlantis, Astra Tech), was secured to each implant body. Each of the 72 FDPs in 55 patients were randomly assigned based on one of the following options: (1) A. Material: ceramic-ceramic (Yttria-stabilized zirconia core, pressable fluorapatite glass-ceramic, IPS e.max ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent) B. metal-ceramic (palladium-based noble alloy, Capricorn, Ivoclar Vivadent, with press-on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic veneer, IPS InLine POM, Ivoclar Vivadent); (2) occlusal veneer thickness (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm); (3) curvature of gingival embrasure (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mm diameter); and (4) connector height (3, 4, and 5 mm). FDPs were fabricated and cemented with dual-cure resin cement (RelyX, Universal Cement, 3M ESPE). Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. FDPs were examined for cracks, fracture, and general surface quality. Results Recall exams of 72 prostheses revealed 10 chipping fractures. No fractures occurred within the connector or embrasure areas. Two-sided Fisher’s exact tests showed no significant correlation between fractures and type of material system (p = 0.51), veneer thickness (p = 0.75), radius of curvature of gingival embrasure

  13. The influence of soft tissue biotype on the marginal bone changes around dental implants: A 1-year prospective clinico-radiological study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Pragathi Raghavendra; Thakur, Srinath Lakshman; Kulkarni, Sudhindra Sushilendra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The peri-implant mucosa undergoes surgical and bacterial assaults in various stages of implant therapy, however, the literature on changes occurring in the peri-implant mucosa is minimal. This study was thus conducted to evaluate the change in the peri-implant mucosal thickness and its effect on the marginal bone levels around dental implants treated in a conventional two-stage implant therapy. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 implants were placed in 22 subjects. Two subjects dropped out. Thirty-three implants in 20 subjects were then evaluated. Initial mucosal thickness, marginal bone levels on radiographs, pain, and exudation were evaluated. All these parameters were recorded at the time of implant placement, at the time of cementation of final restoration, 6 months and 12 months post cementation/restoration. Results: The peri-implant mucosal thickness reduced from implant placement to second stage and till restorations and was statistically significant, in both the thick and thin biotypes, however, at 12 months there was a rebound of the tissue thickness, which was more in the thick biotype (P < 0.05). At 1-year follow-up, there was a reduction in the marginal bone levels, which was more in the thick biotype as compared to the thin biotype (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The mucosa at implant sites undergoes a reduction in thickness from the time of implant placement till the placement of final restorations. The placement of the final restorations and then end of active therapy leads to a rebound of the tissue thickness. Sites with thicker tissues preoperatively have a lesser bone loss and better rebound as compared to thinner tissues. PMID:26941514

  14. Tissue-supported dental implant prosthesis (overdenture): the search for the ideal protocol. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Laurito, Domenica; Lamazza, Luca; Spink, Michael J.; De Biase, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aims The success of maxillary and mandibular tissue supported implant prostheses varies in the literature, and the ideal protocol may be elusive from given the numerous studies. The oral rehabilitation option is an alternative to conventional dentures and should improve function, satisfaction, and retention. The purpose of this review article is to clarify these questions. Methods The search of literature reviews English non-anecdotal implant overdentures articles from 1991 to 2011. Results The results display an aggregate comprehensive list of categorical variables from the literature review. Overall success of maxillary and mandibular implant overdenture was respectively, 86.6% and 95.8%. Conclusion The literature indicates that the implant overdenture prosthesis provides predictable results – enhanced stability, function and a high-degree of satisfaction compared to conventional removable dentures. PMID:22783448

  15. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  16. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  17. Dexmedetomidine Analgesia Effects in Patients Undergoing Dental Implant Surgery and Its Impact on Postoperative Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sisi; Yang, Yang; Yu, Cong; Yao, Ying; Wu, Yujia; Qian, Lian; Cheung, Chi Wai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether or not dexmedetomidine- (DEX-) based intravenous infusion in dental implantation can provide better sedation and postoperative analgesia via suppressing postoperative inflammation and oxidative stress. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to receive either DEX (group D) or midazolam (group M). Recorded variables were vital sign (SBP/HR/RPP/SpO2/RR), visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation scale (OAAS) scores. The plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected at baseline and after 2, 4, and 24 h of drug administration. The VAS pain scores and OAAS scores were significantly lower for patients in group D compared to group M. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and MDA were significantly lower in group D patients than those in group M at 2 h and 4 h. In group M, SOD levels decreased as compared to group D at 2 h and 4 h. The plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and MDA were positively correlated with VAS pain scores while SOD negatively correlated with VAS pain scores. Therefore, DEX appears to provide better sedation during office-based artificial tooth implantation. DEX offers better postoperative analgesia via anti-inflammatory and antioxidation pathway. PMID:26171113

  18. THE ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF FOUR DENTAL CASTING SUPRASTRUCTURE ALLOYS COUPLED WITH TITANIUM IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Suleyman Hakan; Pekmez, Nuran Ozcícek; Keyf, Filiz; Canlí, Fulya

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: As the choice of suprastructure alloy to be combined with titanium for the oral cavity is still a much debated issue, the aim of this study was to investigate the electrochemical interaction of the suprastructure/implant couples under the determined experiment conditions. Material and Methods: The potentiodynamic polarization curves and open-circuit potentials (OCP) of four UCLA type suprastructures coupled with straight Swiss Plus implant fixtures were taken in Afnor type artificial saliva solution at 37°C. The concentration of ions leached into artificial saliva solutions was estimated with ICP-MS. SEM images of the margins of suprastructure/implant couples were obtained before and after the electrochemical tests. Results: The OCP value of titanium became passive at the most negative potential. The lowest difference between the initial and constant OCP value was exhibited by the Au based suprastructure. Suprastructures made greater contributions to the potentiodynamic polarization curves of the implant/suprastructure couples. According to the ICP-MS results, Pd based and Au based couples dissolved less than Co-Ni based and Co-Cr based couples. Conclusions: Within the conditions this study, it may be concluded that the titanium implant forms a stable passive oxide layer in artificial saliva exposed to open air and does not affect the corrosion properties of the suprastructures. Pd based and Au based couples have been found to be more corrosion-resistant than base alloy couples. PMID:19936528

  19. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cover a tooth Replace a misshapen tooth or dental implant Correct a misaligned tooth Talk to your dentist ... the tooth pulled and replaced with a tooth implant. Your crown could chip or crack: If you grind your teeth or clench your jaw, you may need to ...

  20. [Structural changes of toothbrush bristles by brushing in patients with dental implants].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, N G; Sirak, S V; Sirak, A G

    2014-01-01

    Lack of proper oral hygiene practices can lead to treatment failure in patients with implant-retained restorations. Structural changes of toothbrush bristles were studied using scanning electron microscopy and correlated with cleaning efficiency which was assessed at baseline and after 3 months of use of various toothbrushes types in 146 patients with implant-retained restorations. Oral hygiene was valued according to several indices (Approximal Plaque-Index (API), the Turesky index (PI), a modified superstructure plaque index Silness-Loe (PLIsk). Ultrasound toothbrush provided the best and the most efficient cleaning outcome in patients with implant-retained restorations. Scanning electron microscopy proved ultrasonic toothbrush bristles to be more resistant to abrasion during the three-month use. PMID:24781121

  1. Dental implant materials. I. Some effects of preparative procedures on surface topography.

    PubMed

    Smith, D C; Pilliar, R M; Chernecky, R

    1991-09-01

    The effect of different treatments for preparing implant materials was examined by scanning electron microscopy and by contact angle measurements. The materials examined were Ti6A14V alloy, Co-Cr-Mo alloy, A12O3, and synthetic hydroxyapatite. Samples were prepared with solid or porous surfaces of these materials. These were detergent-cleaned and then either autoclaved (steam sterilization), radiation-sterilized, nitric acid-etched, or plasma-cleaned. The results of wettability studies indicated marked changes in surface energy corresponding to the different preparation methods, and differences in surface morphology were also observed. These differences could have significant consequences on in vivo implant behaviour as mediated by tissue-implant interactions. PMID:1663951

  2. Bacterial Contamination of the Internal Cavity of Dental Implants After Application of Disinfectant or Sealant Agents Under Cyclic Loading In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Podhorsky, Anke; Putzier, Sven; Rehmann, Peter; Streckbein, Philipp; Domann, Eugen; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of two sealants (Kiero Seal, Kuss Dental, and Berutemp 500, Carl-Bechem) and a disinfectant agent (Chlorhexamed gel, GlaxoSmithKline) on bacterial colonization of the implant-abutment interface. Implants were pretreated with the substances or left without sealing before standard abutments were fixed. Half the specimens were subjected to cyclic loading, and the others were not loaded. Following 7 days of incubation in a bacterial solution, bacterial counts of the internal part of the implants were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All pretreatments lowered bacterial counts, but no substance could guarantee sterility of the implants' internal portion. PMID:27611755

  3. [A PhD completed 1. Immediate dental implant placement in the aesthetic zone].

    PubMed

    Slagter, K W

    2016-05-01

    When aesthetics play a role in an extraction, the tendency is to place an implant in the extraction socket immediately, preferably in combination with a temporary crown. This tendency is probably related to evolving social factors: demanding patients who want an instant and attactive result. In 2 randomised clinical trials (total 80 patients) the results of clinical treatment involving immediate implants in the aesthetic zone are investigated. Depending on the size of the bone defect (< 5 or ≥ 5 mm) the number of surgical interventions was reduced from 2 to 1 or from 3 to 2. The treatment result was measured by the following outcome variables: survival rate, changes in hard and soft -peri-implant tissues, aesthetic indecees and patient-satisfaction. The most important conclusion is that immediate placements of implants in the aesthetic zone, results in -outstanding short-term (1-year) results with respect to the outcome variables. If this also leads to good long-term results has yet to be investigated. PMID:27166456

  4. Marginal bone loss and dental implant failure may be increased in smokers.

    PubMed

    Veitz-Keenan, Analia

    2016-03-01

    Data sourcesAn electronic search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to February 2015. References of included studies were also searched. No language restrictions were appliedStudy selectionProspective, retrospective and randomised clinical trials that compared marginal bone loss and failure rates between smokers and non-smokers. Implant failure was considered as total loss of the implant. Studies with patients who had periodontal disease prior to treatment or who had metabolic diseases were excluded.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers were involved in the research and screening process and disagreements were resolved by discussion. The quality of the studies was analysed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale for non-randomised clinical trials. Data extracted from the studies included, when available: follow up period, number of subjects, smoking status, number of implants placed, implant system, implant length and diameter, healing period, antibiotics and mouth-rinse use, marginal bone loss, failure rate and drop-outs. For binary outcomes (implant failure) the estimate of the intervention effect was expressed in the form of an odds ratio (OR) with the confidence interval (CI) of 95%. For continuous outcomes (marginal bone loss) the average and standard deviation (SD) were used to calculate the standardised mean difference with a 95% CI. Meta-analysis was performed for studies with similar outcomes, I(2) a statistical test was used to express the heterogeneity among the studies. Publication bias was explored as well.ResultsA total of 15 observational studies were included in the review. The number of participants ranged from 60 to 1727 and the average age was 52.5 years. The follow-up period ranged from eight to 240 months. The total number of implants placed was 5840 in smokers and 14,683 in non-smokers. The Branemak system, (Noble Biocare AB, Goteborg, Sweden), was the most commonly used implant

  5. Evaluation of survival and success rates of dental implants reported in longitudinal studies with a follow-up period of at least 10 years: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moraschini, V; Poubel, L A da C; Ferreira, V F; Barboza, E dos S P

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the survival and success rates of osseointegrated implants determined in longitudinal studies that conducted a follow-up of at least 10 years. A broad electronic search was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for relevant publications in indexed journals, evaluating the clinical performance of dental implants. Using inclusion and exclusion criteria, two reviewers analyzed titles, abstracts, and complete articles, prioritizing studies of the randomized clinical trial type. A total of 23 articles were included in this review. Ten prospective studies, nine retrospective studies, and four randomized clinical trials, which evaluated 7711 implants, were selected. The mean follow-up time of the studies included was 13.4 years. All of the studies reported survival rates and mean marginal bone resorption values, with cumulative mean values of 94.6% and 1.3mm, respectively. Fourteen studies related success rates. Taking into consideration the disparate outcome measures employed to assess dental implant performance and within the limitations of this systematic review, we may affirm that osseointegrated implants are safe and present high survival rates and minimal marginal bone resorption in the long term. PMID:25467739

  6. Dental implant treatment after healing of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in the same region: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although pathophysiology, incidence, and factors associated with the development of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) and management strategies for patients treated with bisphosphonates or patients with BRONJ are well-established, few guidelines or recommendations are available for patients with a history of successfully healed BRONJ. We present a case of successful dental implant treatment after healing of BRONJ in the same region of the jaw, and speculate that implant placement is possible after healing of BRONJ surgery in select cases. PMID:27429938

  7. An In vivo Model for Short-Term Evaluation of the Implantation Effects of Biomolecules or Stem Cells in the Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda-Pinheiro, Sally; Marchadier, Arnaud; Donãs, Patricio; Septier, Dominique; Benhamou, Laurent; Kellermann, Odile; Goldberg, Michel; Poliard, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The continuously growing rodent incisor is a widely used model to investigate odontogenesis and mineralized tissue formation. This study focused on evaluating the mouse mandibular incisor as an experimental biological tool for analyzing in vivo the capacity of odontoblast-like progenitors or bioactive molecules to contribute to reparative dentinogenesis. We describe here a surgical procedure allowing direct access to the forming part of the incisor dental pulp Amelogenin peptide A+4 adsorbed on agarose beads, or dental pulp progenitor cells were implanted in the pulp following this procedure. After 10 days A+4 induced the formation of an osteodentin occluding almost the totality of the pulp compartment. Implantation of progenitor cells leads to formation of islets of osteodentin-like structures located centrally in the pulp. These pilot studies validate the incisor as an experimental model to test the capacity of progenitor cells or bioactive molecules to induce the formation of reparative dentin. PMID:19088885

  8. Direct v/s Indirect sinus lift in maxillary dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Lack of sufficient bone height along maxillary sinus poses significant difficulty for placement of implants in edentulous maxillary jaw. Minimally invasive sinus augmentation is an effective solution for this problem. The manuscript intends to present long period results of such augmentation using direct (DSAT) and indirect (ISAT) minimally invasive sinus augmentation technique (SAT) from a single center. Materials and Methods: Records of patients who required minimally invasive sinus augmentation to increase residual bone height for implant placement fulfilling predetermined exclusion and inclusion criteria. Only patients with follow-up records for at least a year were considered. Both DSAT and ISAT were employed for sinus augmentation. The age, gender, period of edentulousness, alveolus thickness at crestal level during the pre- and postoperative assessment, implant length, and diameter of implants were collected from case histories. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square, paired test, and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used appropriately. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There were 197 implants placed and mean age of the group was 40.2 ± 10.7 years. There was a slight male predilection (54.3%). The gain in bone height as expressed in percentage after a year was 134.6%. On comparing the length of residual alveolar bone (RAB) at start and end of study, ISAT had a mean preoperative height of 7.88 mm while postoperative height was 13.22 mm. For DSAT, the mean height at start of treatment was 3.94 mm while at the end it was 10.13 mm. The mean increase in height was 6.19 mm. For both cases, P was 0.000. Discussion: Age, gender, and period of edentulism did not influence the outcome. The alveolar width appears to differ and influence the outcome. When alveolar width increases, wider diameter implants can be placed by compromising height. Thus it is a clinical acumen that would be extremely helpful to gauge the outcome of the

  9. Dental Cone-Beam Scans: Important Anatomic Views for the Contemporary Implant Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Gary; Carpentieri, Joseph R; Cavallaro, John

    2015-01-01

    Intraoral cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), otherwise known as volume imaging CT scan, provides 3-dimensional images of mandibular and maxillary structures. These images offer highly accurate and valuable diagnostic information to facilitate treatment planning for implant cases. This article serves as a primer on how to read and interpret CBCT cross sectional views. It identifies anatomic structures of interest and discusses their clinical relevance. PMID:26625166

  10. Options in virtual 3D, optical-impression-based planning of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Reich, Sven; Kern, Thomas; Ritter, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    If a 3D radiograph, which in today's dentistry often consists of a CBCT dataset, is available for computerized implant planning, the 3D planning should also consider functional prosthetic aspects. In a conventional workflow, the CBCT is done with a specially produced radiopaque prosthetic setup that makes the desired prosthetic situation visible during virtual implant planning. If an exclusively digital workflow is chosen, intraoral digital impressions are taken. On these digital models, the desired prosthetic suprastructures are designed. The entire datasets are virtually superimposed by a "registration" process on the corresponding structures (teeth) in the CBCTs. Thus, both the osseous and prosthetic structures are visible in one single 3D application and make it possible to consider surgical and prosthetic aspects. After having determined the implant positions on the computer screen, a drilling template is designed digitally. According to this design (CAD), a template is printed or milled in CAM process. This template is the first physically extant product in the entire workflow. The article discusses the options and limitations of this workflow. PMID:25098158

  11. Tribocorrosion behaviour of anodic treated titanium surfaces intended for dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A. C.; Oliveira, F.; Wenger, F.; Ponthiaux, P.; Celis, J.-P.; Rocha, L. A.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion plays an important role in the lifetime of metallic implants. Once implanted, biomaterials are subjected to micro-movements in aggressive biological fluids. Titanium is widely used as an implant material because it spontaneously forms a compact and protective nanometric thick oxide layer, mainly TiO2, in ambient air. That layer provides good corrosion resistance, and very low toxicity, but its low wear resistance is a concern. In this work, an anodizing treatment was performed on commercial pure titanium to form a homogeneous thick oxide surface layer in order to provide bioactivity and improve the biological, chemical and mechanical properties. Anodizing was performed in an electrolyte containing β-glycerophosphate and calcium acetate. The influence of the calcium acetate content on the tribocorrosion behaviour of the anodized material was studied. The concentration of calcium acetate in the electrolyte was found to largely affect the crystallographic structure of the resulting oxide layer. Better tribocorrosion behaviour was noticed on increasing the calcium acetate concentration.

  12. Location of the Mandibular Canal and Thickness of the Occlusal Cortical Bone at Dental Implant Sites in the Lower Second Premolar and First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Heng-Li; Fuh, Lih-Jyh; Li, Rou-Wei; Wu, Jay; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Shen, Yen-Wen; Tu, Ming-Gene

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the location of the mandibular canal and the thickness of the occlusal cortical bone at dental implant sites in the lower second premolar and lower first molar by using dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Seventy-nine sites (47 second premolar and 32 first molar sites) were identified in the dental CBCT examinations of 47 patients. In this study, 4 parameters were measured: (1) MC—the distance from the mandibular canal to the upper border of the mandible; (2) CD—the distance from the mandibular canal to the buccal border of the mandible; (3) MD—the distance from the mandibular canal to the lingual border of the mandible; (4) TC—the thickness of the cortical bone at the occlusal side. A statistical analysis was employed to compare the size and differences between these 4 parameters at the lower second premolar and lower first molar. Regarding the MC and MD, the experimental results showed no statistical difference between the first molar and second premolar. However, the TC for the second premolar was greater than that of the first molar. Thus, careful consideration is necessary in choosing the size of and operation type for dental implants. PMID:24302975

  13. Mucosal CD30-Positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising in the Oral Cavity Following Dental Implants: Report of the First Case.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jung; Choe, Ji-Young; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Mucosal CD30-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (CD30+ T-cell LPD) is a novel entity with unique clinicopathological features and an indolent behavior. Here we report the first case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD arising in the oral cavity following dental implant. A 70-year-old woman presented with swelling and redness of the oral mucosa of right maxilla and left mandible surrounding dental implants that had been placed 8 years previously. Radiological examination revealed enhancing oral lesions and multiple cervical lymph nodes. Microscopic examination showed diffuse infiltration of large anaplastic cells with characteristic morphology of hallmark cells described in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. These cells were diffusely positive for CD30, CD3, CD4, CD2, CD5, CD7, TIA-1, and TCRβF1, but negative for CD20, CD8, CD45, EMA, ALK, and Epstein-Barr virus. T-cell monoclonality was detected in a TCRγ gene rearrangement study. This a unique case of mucosal CD30+ T-cell LPD with unusual presentation following dental implant. PMID:26261101

  14. Breast augmentation with reduced-height anatomic implants: the pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Spear, S L

    2001-07-01

    The reduced-height anatomic saline-filled implant has certain advantages. It has a distinct footprint and profile that allows the creation of a breast with relatively exaggerated width and abbreviated height. This creation suits certain anatomic situations and often is preferred by women seeking a more natural-looking augmentation, without excessive upper pole fullness. The use of any anatomic design implant requires some dimensional planning and more precise pocket dissection. Although the risk for rotational deformities could be expected to be increased, clinically significant rotational deformities have not been a major problem. PMID:11471961

  15. Assessment of mandibular posterior regional landmarks using cone-beam computed tomography in dental implant surgery.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Lílian Azevedo; Souza Picorelli Assis, Neuza Maria; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida; Pires Carvalho, Antônio Carlos; Devito, Karina Lopes

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study has been to evaluate and correlate the anatomical features of the posterior mandibular region (submandibular fossa depth, bone height and thickness, and mandibular canal corticalization) to improve accident prevention and allow safe planning in implantology. Four parasagittal sections of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) from 100 patients were bilaterally analyzed. Linear measurements of the submandibular fossa depth, bone height and thickness were performed. The submandibular fossa was also classified into non-influential undercuts and influential undercuts for implant placement. Mandibular canal corticalization was also evaluated and classified according to the visualization. Data on patient age and gender were also collected. Forty-one scans (41%) were from male patients, and 59 (59%) were from female patients. Patient age ranged between 18 and 84 years, with an average age of 51.37 years. The submandibular fossa depth and implant bone thickness had a significant effect on the variability of the sample (46.1% and 22.3%, respectively). The submandibular fossa depth was quite variable, and the highest values were observed in the posterior regions. In 18.27% of the cases, the presence of the fossa directly influenced implant placement, considering a bone height of 10mm (standard implant). A significant correlation was observed between fossa depth and bone thickness. Thus, greater attention should be paid to thick ridges; although thick ridges are favorable, they may be associated with deeper submandibular fossae. The mandibular canal was the most influential anatomical structure in the premolar region due to the reduced bone height in this region and the greater difficulty in viewing the canal, and the submandibular fossa was the most influential structure in the molar region due to lower bone height leading up to the fossa and the greater fossa depth in this region. Therefore, CBCT is an important tool for assessing the mandibular region

  16. Effect of heat treatment on H2O2/HCl etched pure titanium dental implant: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Chun-Fei; Yin, Mei-nv; Ren, Ling-Fei; Lin, Hai-sheng; Shi, Geng-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Surface chemistry of dental implant plays an important role in osseointegration. Heat treatment might alter surface chemistry and result in different biological response. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of heat treatment of H2O2/HCl-treated Ti implants in cell attachment, proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation. Material/Methods Sandblasted, dual acid-etched and H2O2/HCl heat-treated discs were set as the control group and sandblasted, dual acid-etched H2O2/HCl-treated discs were the test group. Both groups’ discs were sent for surface characterization. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on these 2 groups’ discs for 3 hours to 14 days, and then cell attachment, cell proliferation and cell differentiation were evaluated. Results Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed that the titanium discs in the 2 groups shared the same surface topography, while x-ray diffraction examination showed an anatase layer in the control group and titanium hydride diffractions in the test group. The cell attachment of the test group was equivalent to that of the control group. Cell proliferation was slightly stimulated at all time points in the control group, but the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OC) production increased significantly in the test group compared with those in the control group at every time point investigated (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Moreover, the osteoblastic differentiation-related genes AKP-2, osteopontin (OPN) and OC were greatly up-regulated in the test group (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Conclusions The results implied that surface chemistry played an important role in cell response, and H2O2/HCl etched titanium surface without subsequent heat treatment might improve osseointegration response. PMID:22739726

  17. Clinical evaluation with 18 months follow-up of new PTTM enhanced dental implants in maxillo-facial post-oncological patients

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Piero; Jamshir, Sara; Brauner, Edoardo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Ceci, Antonio; Piccoli, Luca; Pompa, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this study is to present 18 months follow-up results of porous tantalum trabecular metal-enhanced titanium dental implant (PTTM) in implant supported prosthesis in post-oncological patients. Materials and methods A total of 25 PTTM implants were placed in each jaw of 6 patients that met specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA) was conducted and Implant stability was recorded in ISQ values (Osstell ISQ, Osstell AB, Goteborg, Sweden) at implant placement and after 2,4,6,12 and 18 months of functional loading. Mean bone loss was also evaluated at the same interval of time on each periapical radiographs, bone levels were calculated by measuring the distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone to implant contact. Results Cumulative implant survival rate is 100% (n=25/25) to date and mean ISQ values recorded were: 72.14±5.61 (range= 50–81) at surgery, 64.39±8.12 (range=44–74) after 2 months, 74.26±7.14 (range=44–74) after 4 months, 76.84±7.65 (range=60–83) after 6 months, 78.13±4.14 (range=64–84) after 12 months and 80.22±6.23 (range=68–89) after 18 months of functional loading. Mean crestal marginal bone loss was 0.19±0.25 mm after 2 months of functional loading on periapical radiographs, 0.22±0.4 mm at 4 months, 0.3±0.46 mm at 6 months, 0.57±0.62 at 1 year and 0.64±0.60 mm after 18 months. Conclusions The results of this study, even if limited by the number of implants placed indicate that PTTM dental implants have a clinical efficacy in prosthetic rehabilitation of post-oncological patients, due to trabecular structure of the porous Ta metal that increases bone-implant connection values. PMID:25774249

  18. Induction Plasma Sprayed Nano Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium for Orthopaedic and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports preparation of a highly crystalline nano hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray and their in vitro and in vivo biological response. HA coatings were prepared on Ti using normal and supersonic plasma nozzles at different plate powers and working distances. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis show that the normal plasma nozzle lead to increased phase decomposition, high amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase formation, and severe dehydroxylation of HA. In contrast, coatings prepared using supersonic nozzle retained the crystallinity and phase purity of HA due to relatively short exposure time of HA particles in the plasma. In addition, these coatings exhibited a microstructure that varied from porous and glassy structure at the coating-substrate interface to dense HA at the top surface. The microstructural analysis showed that the coating was made of multigrain HA particles of ~200 nm in size, which consisted of recrystallized HA grains in the size range of 15– 20 nm. Apart from the type of nozzle, working distance was also found to have a strong influence on the HA phase decomposition, while plate power had little influence. Depending on the plasma processing conditions, a coating thickness between 300 and 400 μm was achieved where the adhesive bond strengths were found to be between 4.8 MPa to 24 MPa. The cytotoxicity of HA coatings was examined by culturing human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) on coated surfaces. In vivo studies, using the cortical defect model in rat femur, evaluated the histological response of the HA coatings prepared with supersonic nozzle. After 2 weeks of implantation, osteoid formation was evident on the HA coated implant surface, which could indicate early implant- tissue integration in vivo. PMID:21552358

  19. The development of mercury- and selenium-containing deposits in the kidneys following implantation of dental amalgams in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Eley, B. M.; Cox, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    Examination of light microscopical sections of the kidneys of guinea pigs with chronic exposure to mercury as the result of the breakdown of subcutaneous implants of powdered dental amalgam demonstrated the development of black, refractile deposits in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells in both the straight and convoluted portions of the proximal tubule. The more numerous cytoplasmic deposits were of a particulate nature with dimensions of approximately 1 microgram. The nuclear deposits, which appeared later but which were relatively more common in longer-term animals, took the form of prominent inclusions, 1 to 3 micrograms in diameter. The ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic deposits was higher in animals receiving high copper as compared with conventional amalgam. At electron microscopical level, the cytoplasmic deposits were seen to consist of collections of fine particles within lysosomes. Similar deposits were also found in far smaller numbers in lysosomes in collecting duct cells. The nuclear inclusions in proximal tubular cells were made up of closely packed electron dense granules. X-ray microanalysis showed both lysosomal and nuclear deposits to contain mercury and selenium. The association of mercury with selenium, which was present in the animals' diet at low levels, probably aided the microscopical visualisation of the deposits. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3026428

  20. New Ti-Alloys and Surface Modifications to Improve the Mechanical Properties and the Biological Response to Orthopedic and Dental Implants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kirmanidou, Yvoni; Sidira, Margarita; Drosou, Maria-Eleni; Bennani, Vincent; Bakopoulou, Athina; Tsouknidas, Alexander; Michailidis, Nikolaos; Michalakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are widely used in the orthopedic and dentistry fields for many decades, for joint arthroplasties, spinal and maxillofacial reconstructions, and dental prostheses. However, despite the quite satisfactory survival rates failures still exist. New Ti-alloys and surface treatments have been developed, in an attempt to overcome those failures. This review provides information about new Ti-alloys that provide better mechanical properties to the implants, such as superelasticity, mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies, which investigate the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these new biomaterials, are introduced. In addition, data regarding the bioactivity of new surface treatments and surface topographies on Ti-implants is provided. The aim of this paper is to discuss the current trends, advantages, and disadvantages of new titanium-based biomaterials, fabricated to enhance the quality of life of many patients around the world. PMID:26885506

  1. New Ti-Alloys and Surface Modifications to Improve the Mechanical Properties and the Biological Response to Orthopedic and Dental Implants: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kirmanidou, Yvoni; Sidira, Margarita; Drosou, Maria-Eleni; Bennani, Vincent; Bakopoulou, Athina; Tsouknidas, Alexander; Michailidis, Nikolaos; Michalakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are widely used in the orthopedic and dentistry fields for many decades, for joint arthroplasties, spinal and maxillofacial reconstructions, and dental prostheses. However, despite the quite satisfactory survival rates failures still exist. New Ti-alloys and surface treatments have been developed, in an attempt to overcome those failures. This review provides information about new Ti-alloys that provide better mechanical properties to the implants, such as superelasticity, mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies, which investigate the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these new biomaterials, are introduced. In addition, data regarding the bioactivity of new surface treatments and surface topographies on Ti-implants is provided. The aim of this paper is to discuss the current trends, advantages, and disadvantages of new titanium-based biomaterials, fabricated to enhance the quality of life of many patients around the world. PMID:26885506

  2. Immediate placement of a porous-tantalum, trabecular metal-enhanced titanium dental implant with demineralized bone matrix into a socket with deficient buccal bone: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Byrd, Warren C.; Hosseini, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    A missing or deficient buccal alveolar bone plate is often an important limiting factor for immediate implant placement. Titanium dental implants enhanced with porous, tantalum-based trabecular metal material (PTTM) are designed for osseoincorporation, a combination of vascularized bone ingrowth and osseointegration (bone on-growth). Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) contains growth factors with good handling characteristics. However, the combination of these 2 materials in facial alveolar bone regeneration associated with immediate implant therapy has not been reported. A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a failing central incisor. Most of the buccal alveolar bone plate of the socket was missing. A PTTM enhanced implant was immediately placed with DBM. Cone beam CT scans 12 months after the insertion of the definitive restoration showed regeneration of buccal alveolar bone. A combination of a PTTM enhanced implant, DBM, and a custom healing abutment may have an advantage in retaining biologically active molecules and form a scaffold for neovascularization and osteogenesis. This treatment protocol may be a viable option for immediate implant therapy in a failed tooth with deficient buccal alveolar bone. PMID:25702965

  3. The significance of cone beam computed tomography for the visualization of anatomical variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus for patients hoping to have dental implant-supported maxillary restorations in a private dental office in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the significance of cone bean computed tomography (CBCT) for patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla. Therefore, two studies were planned. One was to compare the prevalence of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus on CBCT of patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla with that in patients with other chief complaints in a private dental office in Japan. The other study was to elucidate the limitations of panoramic radiographs in the detection of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus. Study design Sixty-one pairs of panoramic radiographs and CBCT were retrospectively analyzed in two groups of patients, those who hoped to undergo implant-supported restorations in the maxilla (Implant group) and those who did not (Non-implant group). The presence of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus were analyzed. Results The detection rate of mucosal thickening was significantly higher in the Implant group than in the Non-implant group. The detection rates for the features analyzed were significantly lower on panoramic radiographs. In particular, the detection rates of internal and anterior locations of some features were noticeably lower on panoramic radiographs. A significant relationship was found between the change in the detection rate on panoramic radiographs and the widths of mucosal thickening or the lengths of the major axis of SOLs in the maxillary sinus. If the width of mucosal thickening or the length of the major axis of SOLs was <3 mm or <4 mm, respectively, the detection rate on panoramic radiographs was significantly decreased. Conclusion CBCT is important for patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla because of the mucosal thickening in the maxillary sinus in such patients and their lower detection rates on panoramic radiographs. PMID:24884983

  4. Allergy or Tolerance: Reduced Inflammatory Cytokine Response and Concomitant IL-10 Production of Lymphocytes and Monocytes in Symptom-Free Titanium Dental Implant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter; Wollenberg, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium (Ti) are very rare. Thus, we assessed the proinflammatory response and also potential tolerance favoring in vitro reactivity of human blood lymphocytes and monocytes (PBMC) to Ti in healthy individuals (14 without, 6 with complication-free dental Ti implants). The proliferation index (SI) in lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) and production of cytokines linked to innate immune response (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα) or immune regulation (IL-10) were assessed in response to TiO2 particles or Ti discs. In both groups, the Ti-LTT reactivity was not enhanced (e.g., SI < 3). The control antigen tetanus toxoid (TT) gave adequate reactivity (median SI individuals without/with implant: 20.6 ± 5.97/19.58 ± 2.99). Individuals without implant showed higher cytokine response to Ti materials than individuals with symptom-free implants; for example, TiO2 rutile particle induced increase of IL-1β 70.27-fold/8.49-fold versus control medium culture. PBMC of 5 of the 6 individuals with complication-free Ti implants showed an ex vivo ongoing production of IL-10 (mean 4.18 ± 2.98 pg/mL)-but none of the 14 controls showed such IL-10 production. Thus in vitro IL-1β-, IL-6-, and TNF-α production reflects “normal” unspecific immune response to Ti. This might be reduced by production of tolerogenic IL-10 in individuals with symptom-free Ti dental implants. PMID:24106709

  5. Effect of sustained release of rhBMP-2 from dried and wet hyaluronic acid hydrogel carriers compared with direct dip coating of rhBMP-2 on peri-implant osteogenesis of dental implants in canine mandibles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui; Han, Jeong Joon; Park, Yong-Doo; Cho, Tae Hyung; Hwang, Soon Jung

    2016-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel has been used as a carrier of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 for sustained delivery. To enhance peri-implant osteogenesis, a dried coating of rhBMP-2 HA hydrogel (BMP-HAH) on dental implants was designed; this approach provides the advantage of omitting in situ preparation of wet HA hydrogel. Sustained release of rhBMP-2 was more efficient for dried hydrogel over wet hydrogel. For both types, the released rhBMP-2 consistently led to enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and osterix expression in human mesenchymal stromal cells. Histomorphometric analysis 4 weeks after placement of a dental implant in canine mandibles showed that the dried coating of BMP-HAH (10 μg/ml, n = 6) resulted in a significantly greater bone area (BA) than the