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Sample records for implement dynamic wafer

  1. Implementation strategy of wafer-plane and aerial-plane inspection for advanced mask manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Sun; Chung, Dong-Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Cho, HanKu; Huang, William; Miller, John; Inderhees, Gregg; Pinto, Becky; Hur, Jiuk; Park, Kihun; Han, Jay

    2009-04-01

    Inspection of aggressive Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) designs, improvement of usable sensitivity, and reduction of cost of ownership are the three major challenges for today's mask inspection methodologies. In this paper we will discuss using aerial-plane inspection and wafer-plane inspection as novel approaches to address these challenges for advanced reticles. Wafer-plane inspection (WPI) and aerial-plane inspection (API) are two lithographic inspection modes. This suite of new inspection modes is based on high resolution reflected and transmitted light images in the reticle plane. These images together with scanner parameters are used to generate the aerial plane image using either vector or scalar models. Then information about the resist is applied to complete construction of the wafer plane image. API reports defects based on intensity differences between test and reference images at the aerial plane, whereas WPI applies a resist model to the aerial image to enhance discrimination between printable and non-printable defects at the wafer plane. The combination of WPI and API along with the industry standard Reticle Plane Inspection (RPI) is designed to handle complex OPC features, improve usable sensitivity and reduce the cost of ownership. This paper will explore the application of aerial-plane and wafer-plane die-to-die inspections on advanced reticles. Inspection sensitivity, inspectability, and comparison with Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMSTM[1]) or wafer-print-line will be analyzed. Most importantly, the implementation strategy of a combination of WPI and API along with RPI leading-edge mask manufacturing will be discussed.

  2. Modeling of hydrophilic wafer bonding by molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Litton, David A.; Garofalini, Stephen H.

    2001-06-01

    The role of moisture in hydrophilic wafer bonding was modeled using molecular dynamics computer simulations of interface formation between amorphous silica surfaces. Three different surface treatments were used in order to determine the effect of moisture on the formation of siloxane (Si{endash}O{endash}Si) bridges across the interface at two temperatures. The three surface conditions that were studied were: (a) wet interfaces containing 1 monolayer of water adsorbed at the interface (based on the room temperature bulk density of water), (b) hydroxylated interfaces with concentrations of 3{endash}5 silanols/nm2 on each surface and no excess water molecules initially in the system, and (c) pristine interfaces that had only Si and O and no water or H present. The surfaces were slowly brought together and siloxane bond formation was monitored. In the pristine interfaces, siloxane bridges formed across the interface by the coalescence of various defect species in each surface. A bimodal distribution of siloxane bond angles formed during the first 2.5 Aa of approach after the first siloxane bond was formed. These bond angles were much lower than and higher than the bulk average, indicating the formation of less stable bonds. The hydroxylated (with no excess water) and wet surfaces showed a more uniform distribution of siloxane bond angles, with no highly reactive small bond angles forming. The presence of water molecules enhanced H-bond formation across the interface, but trapped water molecules inhibited formation of the strong siloxane bridges across the interface. In real systems, high temperatures are required to remove this trapped moisture. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Implementation of a gap-closing differential capacitive sensing Z-axis accelerometer on an SOI wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Pao; Yip, Ming-Chuen; Fang, Weileun

    2009-07-01

    This study presents a novel capacitive-type Z-axis (out-of-plane) accelerometer implemented on an SOI wafer. This accelerometer contains special designed gap-closing differential sensing electrodes. The present Z-axis accelerometer has four merits: (1) mass of the proof mass is increased by combining both device and handle silicon layers of the SOI wafer, (2) the sensitivity is improved by the gap-closing differential electrodes design, (3) the electrical interconnection between the device and handle silicon layers of the SOI wafer is available by means of the metal-vias, and (4) the sensing gap thickness is precisely defined by the buried-oxide layer of the SOI wafer. In application, the Z-axis accelerometer is fabricated and characterized. Typical measurement results demonstrate that the presented Z-axis accelerometer has a sensitivity of 196.3 mV G-1 (42.5 fF G-1) and a maximum nonlinearity of 2% over the range of 0.1-1 G.

  4. Glass Transition of Polystyrene Thin Films on Silicon Wafer Measured by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Catheryn; Lan, Tian; Caporale, Stefan; Torkelson, John

    Measuring the glass transition temperature, Tg, of polymer films in the thickness range of 20-500 nm is non-routine but commercially important for polymer films used in applications such as membranes and electronic circuit boards. Various specialized methods have been used or developed to determine Tg in thin films, including thermal ellipsometry and many others. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a more conventional method that has been used to measure Tg, but since the thin films must be scraped from the wafer, consolidation and annealing can occur in the pan and may negate effects due to film thickness. Here we report results for polystyrene (PS) spin coated on silicon wafers in the range of 20-500 nm using a benchtop dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) in the 3-point bending mode. For the DMA, the peak tan δ temperature is related to the polymer Tg and effects due to confinement as a function of film thickness are compared to literature values. We use thermal ellipsometry as a control method to measure film thickness and Tg in parallel. Low level additives present in commercial PS were observed to strongly affect the results for thin films and are described.

  5. Wafer-scale fabrication and growth dynamics of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroo; Kaneko, Toshiro; Shibuta, Yasushi; Ohno, Munekazu; Maekawa, Yuki; Kato, Toshiaki

    2016-06-01

    Adding a mechanical degree of freedom to the electrical and optical properties of atomically thin materials can provide an excellent platform to investigate various optoelectrical physics and devices with mechanical motion interaction. The large scale fabrication of such atomically thin materials with suspended structures remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate the wafer-scale bottom-up synthesis of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays (over 1,000,000 graphene nanoribbons in 2 × 2 cm2 substrate) with a very high yield (over 98%). Polarized Raman measurements reveal graphene nanoribbons in the array can have relatively uniform-edge structures with near zigzag orientation dominant. A promising growth model of suspended graphene nanoribbons is also established through a comprehensive study that combined experiments, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations with a phase-diagram analysis. We believe that our results can contribute to pushing the study of graphene nanoribbons into a new stage related to the optoelectrical physics and industrial applications.

  6. Clean solutions to the incoming wafer quality impact on lithography process yield limits in a dynamic copper/low-k research and development environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysaght, Patrick S.; Ybarra, Israel; Sax, Harry; Gupta, Gaurav; West, Michael; Doros, Theodore G.; Beach, James V.; Mello, Jim

    2000-06-01

    The continued growth of the semiconductor manufacturing industry has been due, in large part, to improved lithographic resolution and overlay across increasingly larger chip areas. Optical lithography continues to be the mainstream technology for the industry with extensions of optical lithography being employed to support 180 nm product and process development. While the industry momentum is behind optical extensions to 130 nm, the key challenge will be maintaining an adequate and affordable process latitude (depth of focus/exposure window) necessary for 10% post-etch critical dimension (CD) control. If the full potential of optical lithography is to be exploited, the current lithographic systems can not be compromised by incoming wafer quality. Impurity specifications of novel Low-k dielectric materials, plating solutions, chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) slurries, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) precursors are not well understood and more stringent control measures will be required to meet defect density targets as identified in the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (NTRS). This paper identifies several specific poor quality wafer issues that have been effectively addressed as a result of the introduction of a set of flexible and reliable wafer back surface clean processes developed on the SEZ Spin-Processor 203 configured for processing of 200 mm diameter wafers. Patterned wafers have been back surface etched by means of a novel spin process contamination elimination (SpCE) technique with the wafer suspended by a dynamic nitrogen (N2) flow, device side down, via the Bernoulli effect. Figure 1 illustrates the wafer-chuck orientation within the process chamber during back side etch processing. This paper addresses a number of direct and immediate benefits to the MicraScan IIITM deep-ultraviolet (DUV) step-and-scan system at SEMATECH. These enhancements have resulted from the resolution of three significant problems: (1) back surface

  7. Wafer-scale fabrication and growth dynamics of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiroo; Kaneko, Toshiro; Shibuta, Yasushi; Ohno, Munekazu; Maekawa, Yuki; Kato, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Adding a mechanical degree of freedom to the electrical and optical properties of atomically thin materials can provide an excellent platform to investigate various optoelectrical physics and devices with mechanical motion interaction. The large scale fabrication of such atomically thin materials with suspended structures remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate the wafer-scale bottom–up synthesis of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays (over 1,000,000 graphene nanoribbons in 2 × 2 cm2 substrate) with a very high yield (over 98%). Polarized Raman measurements reveal graphene nanoribbons in the array can have relatively uniform-edge structures with near zigzag orientation dominant. A promising growth model of suspended graphene nanoribbons is also established through a comprehensive study that combined experiments, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations with a phase-diagram analysis. We believe that our results can contribute to pushing the study of graphene nanoribbons into a new stage related to the optoelectrical physics and industrial applications. PMID:27250877

  8. Wafer screening device and methods for wafer screening

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rupnowski, Przemyslaw

    2014-07-15

    Wafer breakage is a serious problem in the photovoltaic industry because a large fraction of wafers (between 5 and 10%) break during solar cell/module fabrication. The major cause of this excessive wafer breakage is that these wafers have residual microcracks--microcracks that were not completely etched. Additional propensity for breakage is caused by texture etching and incomplete edge grinding. To eliminate the cost of processing the wafers that break, it is best to remove them prior to cell fabrication. Some attempts have been made to develop optical techniques to detect microcracks. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to detect microcracks that are embedded within the roughness/texture of the wafers. Furthermore, even if such detection is successful, it is not straightforward to relate them to wafer breakage. We believe that the best way to isolate the wafers with fatal microcracks is to apply a stress to wafers--a stress that mimics the highest stress during cell/module processing. If a wafer survives this stress, it has a high probability of surviving without breakage during cell/module fabrication. Based on this, we have developed a high throughput, noncontact method for applying a predetermined stress to a wafer. The wafers are carried on a belt through a chamber that illuminates the wafer with an intense light of a predetermined intensity distribution that can be varied by changing the power to the light source. As the wafers move under the light source, each wafer undergoes a dynamic temperature profile that produces a preset elastic stress. If this stress exceeds the wafer strength, the wafer will break. The broken wafers are separated early, eliminating cost of processing into cell/module. We will describe details of the system and show comparison of breakage statistics with the breakage on a production line.

  9. Investigation of optically injected charge carrier dynamics in silicon wafers using terahertz spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Thomas; De Biasio, Martin; Muehleisen, Wolfgang; Leitner, Raimund

    2012-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy has proven to be a promising technology for a wide range of applications, such as inspection of nished products or materials, quality control, biomedical imaging and diagnostics, counterfeit detection and characterization of semiconductors. This paper investigates the applicability of THz time-domain spectroscopy for the characterization of silicon solar cell properties such as: conductivity, charge carrier mobility and density. Moreover, the possibilities for THz spectroscopy and imaging for the defect analysis in semiconductor and photovoltaic materials are investigated. THz-pump/THz-probe measurements were carried out on silicon wafers which were illuminated by a halogen light source to inject free charge carriers. Initial results indicate that THz time-domain spectroscopy is a promising technique for the characterization of silicon wafers for the photovoltaic industry.

  10. Machining lead wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Schamaun, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Recently, MEC-6 machined some 4-inch-diameter lead wafers to precision tolerances. The tolerance on the wafer thickness was +-0.000080 inch. A diamond tool was used to machine the wafers on a Moore No. 3 lathe. This report discusses the methods used to machine the wafers, the fixtures used to hold the wafers, and the inspection methods and results.

  11. Barrier reduction via implementation of InGaN interlayer in wafer-bonded current aperture vertical electron transistors consisting of InGaAs channel and N-polar GaN drain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeonghee Laurent, Matthew A.; Li, Haoran; Lal, Shalini; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-01-12

    This letter reports the influence of the added InGaN interlayer on reducing the inherent interfacial barrier and hence improving the electrical characteristics of wafer-bonded current aperture vertical electron transistors consisting of an InGaAs channel and N-polar GaN drain. The current-voltage characteristics of the transistors show that the implementation of N-polar InGaN interlayer effectively reduces the barrier to electron transport across the wafer-bonded interface most likely due to its polarization induced downward band bending, which increases the electron tunneling probability. Fully functional wafer-bonded transistors with nearly 600 mA/mm of drain current at V{sub GS} = 0 V and L{sub go} = 2 μm have been achieved, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of using wafer-bonded heterostructures for applications that require active carrier transport through both materials.

  12. Performance Evaluations of Ceramic Wafer Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    Future hypersonic vehicles will require high temperature, dynamic seals in advanced ramjet/scramjet engines and on the vehicle airframe to seal the perimeters of movable panels, flaps, and doors. Seal temperatures in these locations can exceed 2000 F, especially when the seals are in contact with hot ceramic matrix composite sealing surfaces. NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced ceramic wafer seals to meet the needs of these applications. High temperature scrub tests performed between silicon nitride wafers and carbon-silicon carbide rub surfaces revealed high friction forces and evidence of material transfer from the rub surfaces to the wafer seals. Stickage between adjacent wafers was also observed after testing. Several design changes to the wafer seals were evaluated as possible solutions to these concerns. Wafers with recessed sides were evaluated as a potential means of reducing friction between adjacent wafers. Alternative wafer materials are also being considered as a means of reducing friction between the seals and their sealing surfaces and because the baseline silicon nitride wafer material (AS800) is no longer commercially available.

  13. Organizational Readiness for Stage-Based Dynamics of Innovation Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, D. Dwayne

    2009-01-01

    Implementing innovations in social and health-related service programs is a dynamic stage-based process. This article discusses training, adoption, implementation, and practice as sequential elements of a conceptual framework for effective preparation and implementation of evidence-based innovations. However, systems need to be prepared for change…

  14. Wafer-level reliability characterization for wafer-level packaged microbolometer with ultra-small array size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Yeoun; Yang, Chungmo; Park, Jae Hong; Jung, Ho; Kim, Taehyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Woo; Mitchell, Jay; Hwang, Wook Joong; Lee, Kwyro

    2013-06-01

    For the development of small and low cost microbolometer, wafer level reliability characterization techniques of vacuum packaged wafer are introduced. Amorphous silicon based microbolometer-type vacuum sensors fabricated in 8 inch wafer are bonded with cap wafer by Au-Sn eutectic solder. Membrane deflection and integrated vacuum sensor techniques are independently used to characterize the hermeticity in a wafer-level. For the packaged wafer with membrane thickness below 100um, it is possible to determine the hermeticity as screening test by optical detection technique. Integrated vacuum sensor having the same structure as bolometer pixel shows the vacuum level below 100mTorr. All steps from packaging process to fine hermeticity test are implemented in wafer level to prove the high volume and low cost production.

  15. Scriber for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A.; Fortier, E. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for dividing silicon wafers into rectangular chips is characterized by a base including a horizontally oriented bed with a planar support surface, a vacuum chuck adapted to capture a silicon wafer seated on the support for translation in mutually perpendicular directions. A stylus support mounted on the bed includes a shaft disposed above and extended across the bed and a truck mounted on the shaft and supported thereby for linear translation along a path extended across the bed a vertically oriented scribe has a diamond tip supported by the truck also adapted as to engage a silicon wafer captured by the chuck and positioned beneath it in order to form score lines in the surface of the wafer as linear translation is imparted to the truck. A chuck positioning means is mounted on the base and is connected to the chuck for positioning the chuck relative to the stylus.

  16. Wafer characteristics via reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2010-10-19

    Various exemplary methods (800, 900, 1000, 1100) are directed to determining wafer thickness and/or wafer surface characteristics. An exemplary method (900) includes measuring reflectance of a wafer and comparing the measured reflectance to a calculated reflectance or a reflectance stored in a database. Another exemplary method (800) includes positioning a wafer on a reflecting support to extend a reflectance range. An exemplary device (200) has an input (210), analysis modules (222-228) and optionally a database (230). Various exemplary reflectometer chambers (1300, 1400) include radiation sources positioned at a first altitudinal angle (1308, 1408) and at a second altitudinal angle (1312, 1412). An exemplary method includes selecting radiation sources positioned at various altitudinal angles. An exemplary element (1650, 1850) includes a first aperture (1654, 1854) and a second aperture (1658, 1858) that can transmit reflected radiation to a fiber and an imager, respectfully.

  17. Reciprocating Saw for Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.; Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Concept increases productivity and wafer quality. Cutting wafers from silicon ingots produces smooth wafers at high rates with reduced blade wear. Involves straight reciprocating saw blade and slight rotation of ingot between cutting strokes. Many parallel blades combined to cut many wafers simultaneously from ingot.

  18. A User Driven Dynamic Circuit Network Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Guok, Chin; Robertson, David; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Thompson, Mary; Johnston, William; Tierney, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The requirements for network predictability are becoming increasingly critical to the DoE science community where resources are widely distributed and collaborations are world-wide. To accommodate these emerging requirements, the Energy Sciences Network has established a Science Data Network to provide user driven guaranteed bandwidth allocations. In this paper we outline the design, implementation, and secure coordinated use of such a network, as well as some lessons learned.

  19. Stable wafer-carrier system

    DOEpatents

    Rozenzon, Yan; Trujillo, Robert T; Beese, Steven C

    2013-10-22

    One embodiment of the present invention provides a wafer-carrier system used in a deposition chamber for carrying wafers. The wafer-carrier system includes a base susceptor and a top susceptor nested inside the base susceptor with its wafer-mounting side facing the base susceptor's wafer-mounting side, thereby forming a substantially enclosed narrow channel. The base susceptor provides an upward support to the top susceptor.

  20. Investigation of intrinsic gettering for germanium doped Czochralski silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiahe; Yang, Deren; Ma, Xiangyang; Wang, Weiyan; Zeng, Yuheng; Que, Duanlin

    2007-06-01

    The intrinsic gettering (IG) effects in a germanium-doped Czochralski (GCz) silicon wafer have been investigated through a processing simulation of dynamic random access memory making and an evaluation on IG capability for copper contamination. It has been suggested that both the good quality defect-free denuded zones (DZs) and the high-density bulk microdefect (BMD) regions could be generated in GCz silicon wafer during device fabrication. Meanwhile, it was also indicated that the tiny oxygen precipitates were hardly presented in DZs of silicon wafer with the germanium doping. Furthermore, it was found in GCz silicon wafer that the BMDs were higher in density but smaller in size in contrast to that in conventional Cz silicon wafer. Promoted IG capability for metallic contamination was therefore induced in the germanium-doped Cz silicon wafer. A mechanism of the germanium doping on oxygen precipitation in Cz silicon was discussed, which was based on the hypothesis of germanium-related complexes.

  1. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-05-20

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  2. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-11-25

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  3. Within-wafer CD variation induced by wafer shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi-hao; Yang, Mars; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2016-03-01

    In order to meet the increasing storage capacity demand and reduce bit cost of NAND flash memories, 3D stacked vertical flash cell array has been proposed. In constructing 3D NAND flash memories, the bit number per unit area is increased as increasing the number of stacked layers. However, the increased number of stacked layers has made the film stress control extremely important for maintaining good process quality. The residual film stress alters the wafer shape accordingly several process impacts have been readily observed across wafer, such as film deposition non-uniformity, etch rate non-uniformity, wafer chucking error on scanner, materials coating/baking defects, overlay degradation and critical dimension (CD) non-uniformity. The residual tensile and compressive stresses on wafers will result in concave and convex wafer shapes, respectively. This study investigates within-wafer CD uniformity (CDU) associated with wafer shape change induced by the 3D NAND flash memory processes. Within-wafer CDU was correlated with several critical parameters including different wafer bow heights of concave and convex wafer shapes, photo resists with different post exposure baking (PEB) temperature sensitivities, and DoseMapper compensation. The results indicated the trend of within-wafer CDU maintains flat for convex wafer shapes with bow height up to +230um and concave wafer shapes with bow height ranging from 0 ~ -70um, while the within-wafer CDU trends up from -70um to -246um wafer bow heights. To minimize the within-wafer CD distribution induced by wafer warpage, carefully tailoring the film stack and thermal budget in the process flow for maintaining the wafer shape at CDU friendly range is indispensable and using photo-resist materials with lower PEB temperature sensitivity is also suggested. In addition, DoseMapper compensation is also an alternative to greatly suppress the within-wafer CD non-uniformity but the photo-resist profile variation induced by across-wafer

  4. Dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipole implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, W.C.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Pai, C.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.

    2010-05-02

    AC-dipole magnets are typically implemented as a parallel LC resonant circuit. To maximize efficiency, it's beneficial to operate at a high Q. This, however, limits the magnet to a narrow frequency range. Current designs therefore operate at a low Q to provide a wider bandwidth at the cost of efficiency. Dynamically tuning a high Q resonant circuit tries to maintain a high efficiency while providing a wide frequency range. The results of ongoing efforts at BNL to implement dynamically tuned high-Q AC dipoles will be presented.

  5. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  6. Minimum wafer thickness by rotated ingot ID wafering. [Inner Diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The efficient utilization of materials is critical to certain device applications such as silicon for photovoltaics or diodes and gallium-gadolinium-garnet for memories. A variety of slicing techniques has been investigated to minimize wafer thickness and wafer kerf. This paper presents the results of analyses of ID wafering of rotated ingots based on predicted fracture behavior of the wafer as a result of forces during wafering and the properties of the device material. The analytical model indicated that the minimum wafer thickness is controlled by the depth of surface damage and the applied cantilever force. Both of these factors should be minimized. For silicon, a minimum thickness was found to be approximately 200 x 10 - 6th m for conventional sizes of rotated ingot wafering. Fractures through the thickness of the wafer rather than through the center supporting column were found to limit the minimum wafer thickness. The model suggested that the use of a vacuum chuck on the wafer surface to enhance cleavage fracture of the center supporting core and, with silicon, by using 111-line-type ingots could have potential for reducing minimum wafer thickness.

  7. Wafer level warpage characterization of 3D interconnect processing wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yi; Ku, Yi-Sha

    2012-03-01

    We present a new metrology system based on a fringe reflection method for warpage characterizations during wafer thinning and temporary bonding processes. A set of periodic fringe patterns is projected onto the measuring wafer and the reflected fringe images are captured by a CCD camera. The fringe patterns are deformed due to the slope variation of the wafer surface. We demonstrate the use of phase-shit algorithms, the wafer surface slope variation and quantitative 3D surface profile even tiny dimples and dents on a wafer can be reconstructed. The experimental results show the warpages of the bonded wafer are below 20 μm after thinning down to the nominal thickness of 75 μm and 50 μm. The measurement precision is better than 2 um.

  8. Augmented reality for wafer prober

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenkrantz, Pascal

    2011-03-01

    The link between wafer manufacturing and wafer test is often weak: without common information system, Test engineers have to read locations of test structures from reference documents and search them on the wafer prober screen. Mask Data Preparation team is ideally placed to fill this gap, given its relationship with both design and manufacturing sides. With appropriate design extraction scripts and design conventions, mask engineers can provide exact wafer locations of all embedded test structures to avoid a painful camera search. Going a step further, it would be a great help to provide to wafer probers a "map" of what was build on wafers. With this idea in mind, mask design database can simply be provided to Test engineers; but the real added value would come from a true integration of real-wafer camera views and design database used for wafer manufacturing. As proven by several augmented reality applications, like Google Maps' mixed Satellite/Map view, mixing a real-world view with its theoretical model is very useful to understand the reality. The creation of such interface can only be made by a wafer prober manufacturer, given the high integration of these machines with their control panel. But many existing software libraries could be used to plot the design view matching the camera view. Standard formats for mask design are usually GDSII and OASIS (SEMI P39 standard); multiple free software and commercial viewers/editors/libraries for these formats are available.

  9. Equipment and wafer modeling of batch furnaces by neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesch, N.; Schneider, Claus; Lehnert, Wolfgang; Pfitzner, Lothar; Ryssel, Heiner

    1999-04-01

    In semiconductor manufacturing there is a great demand for innovations towards higher cost-effectiveness. The increasing employment of advanced control systems for process and equipment control is one means to improve manufacturing processes effectively and, hence, to lower costs. A precondition for an accurate and fast control is the availability of process models. In this paper neural networks are applied to non-linear system identification as an alternative or addition to physical models. Neural empirical models are developed with the help of measured input and output data of a system or process. After a brief summary of the theory of neural networks their application to system identification is described in detail. The capabilities of the neural network models are demonstrated by several examples. The temperature dynamics of a vertical furnace for the oxidation of 300 mm wafers as well as the zone temperatures of a 150 mm LPCVD furnace are simulated and the results are verified by measurements. Moreover, in order to control wafer temperatures in batch furnaces, an appropriate model was developed and implemented in a model- based controller.

  10. Design Study of Wafer Seals for Future Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Future hypersonic vehicles require high temperature, dynamic seals in advanced hypersonic engines and on the vehicle airframe to seal the perimeters of movable panels, flaps, and doors. Current seals do not meet the demanding requirements of these applications, so NASA Glenn Research Center is developing improved designs to overcome these shortfalls. An advanced ceramic wafer seal design has shown promise in meeting these needs. Results from a design of experiments study performed on this seal revealed that several installation variables played a role in determining the amount of leakage past the seals. Lower leakage rates were achieved by using a tighter groove width around the seals, a higher seal preload, a tighter wafer height tolerance, and a looser groove length. During flow testing, a seal activating pressure acting behind the wafers combined with simulated vibrations to seat the seals more effectively against the sealing surface and produce lower leakage rates. A seal geometry study revealed comparable leakage for full-scale wafers with 0.125 and 0.25 in. thicknesses. For applications in which lower part counts are desired, fewer 0.25-in.-thick wafers may be able to be used in place of 0.125-in.-thick wafers while achieving similar performance. Tests performed on wafers with a rounded edge (0.5 in. radius) in contact with the sealing surface resulted in flow rates twice as high as those for wafers with a flat edge. Half-size wafers had leakage rates approximately three times higher than those for full-size wafers.

  11. Implementation of the force decomposition machine for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Borštnik, Urban; Miller, Benjamin T; Brooks, Bernard R; Janežič, Dušanka

    2012-09-01

    We present the design and implementation of the force decomposition machine (FDM), a cluster of personal computers (PCs) that is tailored to running molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the distributed diagonal force decomposition (DDFD) parallelization method. The cluster interconnect architecture is optimized for the communication pattern of the DDFD method. Our implementation of the FDM relies on standard commodity components even for networking. Although the cluster is meant for DDFD MD simulations, it remains general enough for other parallel computations. An analysis of several MD simulation runs on both the FDM and a standard PC cluster demonstrates that the FDM's interconnect architecture provides a greater performance compared to a more general cluster interconnect. PMID:23085166

  12. High-speed dynamic domino circuit implemented with gaas mesfets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Long (Inventor); Long, Stephen I. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A dynamic logic circuit (AND or OR) utilizes one depletion-mode metal-semiconductor FET for precharging an internal node A, and a plurality of the same type of FETs in series, or a FET in parallel with one or more of the series connected FETs for implementing the logic function. A pair of FETs are connected to provide an output inverter with two series diodes for level shift. A coupling capacitor may be employed with a further FET to provide level shifting required between the inverter and the logic circuit output terminal. These circuits may be cascaded to form a domino chain.

  13. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  14. Design and implementation of dynamic hybrid Honeypot network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Peili; Hu, Shan-Shan; Zhai, Ji-Qiang

    2013-05-01

    The method of constructing a dynamic and self-adaptive virtual network is suggested to puzzle adversaries, delay and divert attacks, exhaust attacker resources and collect attacking information. The concepts of Honeypot and Honeyd, which is the frame of virtual Honeypot are introduced. The techniques of network scanning including active fingerprint recognition are analyzed. Dynamic virtual network system is designed and implemented. A virtual network similar to real network topology is built according to the collected messages from real environments in this system. By doing this, the system can perplex the attackers when Hackers attack and can further analyze and research the attacks. The tests to this system prove that this design can successfully simulate real network environment and can be used in network security analysis.

  15. Wafer-level vacuum/hermetic packaging technologies for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Mitchell, Jay; Welch, Warren; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil

    2010-02-01

    An overview of wafer-level packaging technologies developed at the University of Michigan is presented. Two sets of packaging technologies are discussed: (i) a low temperature wafer-level packaging processes for vacuum/hermeticity sealing, and (ii) an environmentally resistant packaging (ERP) technology for thermal and mechanical control as well as vacuum packaging. The low temperature wafer-level encapsulation processes are implemented using solder bond rings which are first patterned on a cap wafer and then mated with a device wafer in order to encircle and encapsulate the device at temperatures ranging from 200 to 390 °C. Vacuum levels below 10 mTorr were achieved with yields in an optimized process of better than 90%. Pressures were monitored for more than 4 years yielding important information on reliability and process control. The ERP adopts an environment isolation platform in the packaging substrate. The isolation platform is designed to provide low power oven-control, vibration isolation and shock protection. It involves batch flip-chip assembly of a MEMS device onto the isolation platform wafer. The MEMS device and isolation structure are encapsulated at the wafer-level by another substrate with vertical feedthroughs for vacuum/hermetic sealing and electrical signal connections. This technology was developed for high performance gyroscopes, but can be applied to any type of MEMS device.

  16. Through-wafer optical probe characterization for microelectromechanical systems positional state monitoring and feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jeremy M.; Chen, Jingdong; Brown, Kolin S.; Famouri, Parviz F.; Hornak, Lawrence A.

    2000-12-01

    Implementation of closed-loop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) control enables mechanical microsystems to adapt to the demands of the environment that they are actuating, opening a broad range of new opportunities for future MEMS applications. Integrated optical microsystems have the potential to enable continuous in situ optical interrogation of MEMS microstructure position fully decoupled from the means of mechanical actuation that is necessary for realization of feedback control. We present the results of initial research evaluating through-wafer optical microprobes for surface micromachined MEMS integrated optical position monitoring. Results from the through-wafer free-space optical probe of a lateral comb resonator fabricated using the multiuser MEMS process service (MUMPS) indicate significant positional information content with an achievable return probe signal dynamic range of up to 80% arising from film transmission contrast. Static and dynamic deflection analysis and experimental results indicate a through-wafer probe positional signal sensitivity of 40 mV/micrometers for the present setup or 10% signal change per micrometer. A simulation of the application of nonlinear sliding control is presented illustrating position control of the lateral comb resonator structure given the availability of positional state information.

  17. Influence of the bonding front propagation on the wafer stack curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, E.; Bréchet, Y.; Barthelemy, A.; Radu, I.; Pardoen, T.; Raskin, J.-P.

    2014-08-11

    The influence of the dynamics of the direct wafer bonding process on the curvature of the final wafer stack is investigated. An analytical model for the final curvature of the bonded wafers is developed, as a function of the different load components acting during the bonding front propagation, using thin plate theory and considering a strain discontinuity locked at the bonding interface. Experimental profiles are measured for different bonding conditions and wafer thicknesses. A very good agreement with the model prediction is obtained and the influence of the thin air layer trapped in-between the two wafers is demonstrated. The proposed model contributes to further improvement of the bonding process, in particular, for the stacking of layers of electronic devices, which requires a high accuracy of wafer-to-wafer alignment and a very low distortion level.

  18. Dynamics of the public concern and risk communication program implementation.

    PubMed

    Zaryabova, Victoria; Israel, Michel

    2015-09-01

    The public concern about electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure varies due to different reasons. A part of them are connected with the better and higher quality of information that people receive from science, media, Internet, social networks, industry, but others are based on good communication programs performed by the responsible institutions, administration and persons. Especially, in Bulgaria, public concern follows interesting changes, some of them in correlation with the European processes of concern, but others following the economic and political processes in the country. Here, we analyze the dynamics of the public concern over the last 10 years. Our explanation of the decrease of the people's complaints against EMF exposure from base stations for mobile communication is as a result of our risk communication program that is in implementation for >10 years. PMID:26444205

  19. Highly parallel implementation of non-adiabatic Ehrenfest molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Yosuke; Schleife, Andre; Draeger, Erik; Anisimov, Victor; Correa, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    While the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation tremendously lowers computational effort, many questions in modern physics, chemistry, and materials science require an explicit description of coupled non-adiabatic electron-ion dynamics. Electronic stopping, i.e. the energy transfer of a fast projectile atom to the electronic system of the target material, is a notorious example. We recently implemented real-time time-dependent density functional theory based on the plane-wave pseudopotential formalism in the Qbox/qb@ll codes. We demonstrate that explicit integration using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme is very suitable for modern highly parallelized supercomputers. Applying the new implementation to systems with hundreds of atoms and thousands of electrons, we achieved excellent performance and scalability on a large number of nodes both on the BlueGene based ``Sequoia'' system at LLNL as well as the Cray architecture of ``Blue Waters'' at NCSA. As an example, we discuss our work on computing the electronic stopping power of aluminum and gold for hydrogen projectiles, showing an excellent agreement with experiment. These first-principles calculations allow us to gain important insight into the the fundamental physics of electronic stopping.

  20. Granular Flow and Dynamics of Lunar Simulants in Excavating Implements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of the lunar surface will rely on properly designed excavation equipment for surface preparations and for collection of lunar regolith in In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) processes. Performance efficiency, i.e minimizing loading forces while maximizing material collection, and mass and volume reductions are major design goals. The NASA Glenn Research Center has embarked on an experimental program to determine the flow characteristics and dynamic forces produced by excavation operations using various excavator bucket designs. A new large scale soil bin facility, 2.27 m x 5.94 m x 0.76 m (nominally 8 ft. x 20 ft. x 27 in.) in size, capable of accommodating moderately large test implements was used for the simulations of lunar operations. The soil bin is filled with GRC-3simulant (a mixture of industrial sands and silt with a particle size distribution and the bulk mechanical (shear) strength representative of an average of lunar regolith from different regions) and uses motorized horizontal rails and a vertical actuator to drive the implement through the lunar simulant soil. A six-axis load cell and encoders provide well resolved measurements of the three dimensional forces and torques and motion of the bucket. In addition, simultaneous video allows for the analysis of the flow behavior and structure formation of the regolith during excavation. The data may be useful in anchoring soil mechanic models and to provide engineering data for design consideration.

  1. Wafer Replacement Cluster Tool (Presentation);

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, H. M.

    2008-04-01

    This presentation on wafer replacement cluster tool discusses: (1) Platform for advanced R and D toward SAI 2015 cost goal--crystal silicon PV at area costs closer to amorphous Si PV, it's 15% efficiency, inexpensive substrate, and moderate temperature processing (<800 C); (2) Why silicon?--industrial and knowledge base, abundant and environmentally benign, market acceptance, and good efficiency; and (3) Why replace wafers?--expensive, high embedded energy content, and uses 50-100 times more silicon than needed.

  2. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  3. Wafer handling and placement tool

    DOEpatents

    Witherspoon, Linda L.

    1988-01-05

    A spring arm tool is provided for clamp engaging and supporting wafers while the tool is hand held. The tool includes a pair of relatively swingable jaw element supporting support arms and the jaw elements are notched to enjoy multiple point contact with a wafer peripheral portion. Also, one disclosed form of the tool includes remotely operable workpiece ejecting structure carried by the jaw elements thereof.

  4. Design and implementation of high dynamic GNSS digital receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hanmei; Geng, Shengqun; Wang, Ce; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Qishan

    2007-11-01

    The paper presents a scheme of high dynamic GNSS digital receiver using FPGA xc4vsx55 of XILINX and DSP TMS320VC6701 of TI as core controller. Besides brief introduction of scheme design and hardware structure, the paper comprehensively introduces design and implementation of algorithms of fast acquisition and tracking of spread spectrum signal in high dynamic environment. Through optimized design, fast acquisition and tracking of both C code (coarse ranging code) and P code (precision ranging code) are realized in one chip of FPGA, under the control of DSP. Employing FFT-based fast acquisition algorithm, acquisition unit realizes the fast acquisition by duplicated using two FFT/IFFT units with time-sharing fashion, and other optimized FFT calculation structures. Carrier tracking loop is realized by adopting FLL+PLL method which using FLL tracking carrier Doppler shift with greater bandwidth making loop closed rapidly and using PLL precisely tracking carrier phase so as to achieve perfect tracking effects. PN code tracking loop is realized by using multiple non-coherent DLLs with various correlation spacing, which satisfying the requirements of larger tracking range as well as higher tracking precision by using broad spacing accomplishing initial tracking and narrow spacing realizing high precision tracking.

  5. Note: Near infrared interferometric silicon wafer metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. S.; Park, H. M.; Joo, K. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, two near infrared (NIR) interferometric techniques for silicon wafer metrology are described and verified with experimental results. Based on the transparent characteristic of NIR light to a silicon wafer, the fiber based spectrally resolved interferometry can measure the optical thickness of the wafer and stitching low coherence scanning interferometry can reconstruct entire surfaces of the wafer.

  6. Strategy optimization for mask rule check in wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuen Huei; Lin, Shaina; Lin, Roger; Wang, Alice; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    Photolithography process is getting more and more sophisticated for wafer production following Moore's law. Therefore, for wafer fab, consolidated and close cooperation with mask house is a key to achieve silicon wafer success. However, generally speaking, it is not easy to preserve such partnership because many engineering efforts and frequent communication are indispensable. The inattentive connection is obvious in mask rule check (MRC). Mask houses will do their own MRC at job deck stage, but the checking is only for identification of mask process limitation including writing, etching, inspection, metrology, etc. No further checking in terms of wafer process concerned mask data errors will be implemented after data files of whole mask are composed in mask house. There are still many potential data errors even post-OPC verification has been done for main circuits. What mentioned here are the kinds of errors which will only occur as main circuits combined with frame and dummy patterns to form whole reticle. Therefore, strategy optimization is on-going in UMC to evaluate MRC especially for wafer fab concerned errors. The prerequisite is that no impact on mask delivery cycle time even adding this extra checking. A full-mask checking based on job deck in gds or oasis format is necessary in order to secure acceptable run time. Form of the summarized error report generated by this checking is also crucial because user friendly interface will shorten engineers' judgment time to release mask for writing. This paper will survey the key factors of MRC in wafer fab.

  7. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-04-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity Defect(R) data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  8. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2008-10-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefecTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  9. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-03-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefectTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  10. Improving on-wafer CD correlation analysis using advanced diagnostics and across-wafer light-source monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Paolo; Zurita, Omar; Rechtsteiner, Gregory; Lalovic, Ivan; Bekaert, Joost

    2014-04-01

    With the implementation of multi-patterning ArF-immersion for sub 20nm integrated circuits (IC), advances in equipment monitoring and control are needed to support on-wafer yield performance. These in-situ equipment monitoring improvements, along with advanced litho-cell corrections based on on-wafer measurements, enable meeting stringent overlay and CD control requirements for advanced lithography patterning. The importance of light-source performance on lithography pattering (CD and overlay) has been discussed in previous publications.[1-3] Recent developments of Cymer ArF light-source metrology and on-board monitoring enable end-users to detect, for each exposed wafer, changes in the near-field and far-field spatial profiles and polarization performance, [4-6] in addition to the key `optical' scalar parameters, such as bandwidth, wavelength and energy. The major advantage of this capability is that the key performance metrics are sampled at rates matched to wafer performance, e.g. every exposure field across the wafer, which is critical for direct correlation with on-wafer performance for process control and excursion detection.

  11. Implementation of Green's function molecular dynamics: An extension to LAMMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling Ti; Bartels, Guido; Campañá, Carlos; Denniston, Colin; Müser, Martin H.

    2009-06-01

    The Green's function molecular dynamics method, which enables one to study the elastic response of a three-dimensional solid to an external stress field by taking into consideration only the surface atoms, was implemented as an extension to an open source classical molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS. This was done in the style of fixes. The first fix, FixGFC, measures the elastic stiffness coefficients for a (small) solid block of a given material by making use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. With the help of the second fix, FixGFMD, the coefficients obtained from FixGFC can then be used to compute the elastic forces for a (large) block of the same material. Both fixes are designed to be run in parallel and to exploit the functions provided by LAMMPS. Program summaryProgram title: FixGFC/FixGFMD Catalogue identifier: AECW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 33 469 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 383 631 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: All Operating system: Linux Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized via MPI RAM: Depends on the problem Classification: 7.7 External routines: MPI, FFTW 2.1.5 ( http://www.fftw.org/), LAMMPS version May 21, 2008 ( http://lammps.sandia.gov/) Nature of problem: Using molecular dynamics to study elastically deforming solids imposes very high computational costs because portions of the solid far away from the interface or contact points need to be included in the simulation to reproduce the effects of long-range elastic deformations. Green's function molecular dynamics (GFMD) incorporates the full elastic response of semi-infinite solids so that only surface atoms have to be considered in molecular dynamics simulations, thus

  12. Wafer sampling by regression for systematic wafer variation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byungsool; McNames, James; Whitefield, Bruce; Rudolph, Paul; Zola, Jeff

    2005-05-01

    In-line measurements are used to monitor semiconductor manufacturing processes for excessive variation using statistical process control (SPC) chart techniques. Systematic spatial wafer variation often occurs in a recognizable pattern across the wafer that is characteristic of a particular manufacturing step. Visualization tools are used to associate these patterns with specific manufacturing steps preceding the measurement. Acquiring the measurements is an expensive and slow process. The number of sites measured on a wafer must be minimized while still providing sufficient data to monitor the process. We address two key challenges to effective wafer-level monitoring. The first challenge is to select a small sample of inspection sites that maximize detection sensitivity to the patterns of interest, while minimizing the confounding effects of other types of wafer variation. The second challenge is to develop a detection algorithm that maximizes sensitivity to the patterns of interest without exceeding a user-specified false positive rate. We propose new sampling and detection methods. Both methods are based on a linear regression model with distinct and orthogonal components. The model is flexible enough to include many types of systematic spatial variation across the wafer. Because the components are orthogonal, the degree of each type of variation can be estimated and detected independently with very few samples. A formal hypothesis test can then be used to determine whether specific patterns are present. This approach enables one to determine the sensitivity of a sample plan to patterns of interest and the minimum number of measurements necessary to adequately monitor the process.

  13. A practical approach to LWIR wafer-level optics for thermal imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symmons, Alan; Pini, Ray

    2013-06-01

    The development and implementation of wafer level packaging for commercial microbolometers has opened the pathway towards full wafer-based thermal imaging systems. The next challenge in development is moving from discrete element LWIR imaging systems to a wafer based optical system, similar to lens assemblies found in cell phone cameras. This paper will compare a typical high volume thermal imaging design manufactured from discrete lens elements to a similar design optimized for manufacture through a wafer based approach. We will explore both performance and cost tradeoffs as well as review the manufacturability of all designs.

  14. Performance of a 10 Gbps FSO System Implementing Novel Beam Tracking a Dynamic Buffering Modem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiriazes, John; Valencia, J. Emilio; Peach, Robert; Visone, Chris; Burdge, Geoffrey; Vickers, John; Leclerc, Troy; Sauer, Paul; Andrews, Larry; Phillips, Ron

    2012-01-01

    A 10 Gbps Free space optical (FSO) system implements beam tracking, a high dynamic range optical receiver, and a dynamic buffering packet modem. Performance was characterized at the 4.5 km Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center Florida.

  15. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

  16. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, S.R.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

  17. Allowable silicon wafer thickness versus diameter for ingot rotation ID wafering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Inner diameter (ID) wafering of ingot rotation reduce the ID saw blade diameter was investigated. The blade thickness can be reduced, resulting in minimal kerf loss. However, significant breakage of wafers occurs during the rotation wafering as the wafer thickness decreases. Fracture mechanics was used to develop an equation relating wafer thickness, diameter and fracture behavior at the point of fracture by using a model of a wafer, supported by a center column and subjected to a cantilever force. It is indicated that the minimum allowable wafer thickness does not increase appreciably with increasing wafer diameter and that fracture through the thickness rather than through the center supporting column limits the minimum allowable wafer thickness. It is suggested that the minimum allowable wafer thickness can be reduced by using a vacuum chuck on the wafer surface to enhance cleavage fracture of the center core and by using 111 ingots.

  18. Relative unitary implementability of perturbed quantum field dynamics on de-Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Gary K.

    In this article, we study the quantum dynamics of a Klein-Gordon field on de-Sitter space. We prove time evolution is not unitarily implementable. We also consider a Klein-Gordon field perturbed by a local potential V. In this case we prove that the deviation from the V = 0 dynamics is unitarily implementable.

  19. Determination of wafer center position during the transfer process by using the beam-breaking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Gen; Huang, Bo-Kai

    2014-09-01

    A wafer on a robot blade may slip due to inertia sliding during the acceleration or deceleration process. This study presents the implementation and experimental verification of a novel real-time wafer positioning system to be used during the transfer process. A system-integration computer program involving a human-machine interface (HMI) was also developed, exhibiting the following functions: (a) moving direction judgment; (b) notch-passing judgment; (c) indicating the sensor by which the notch passes; and (d) computing the wafer center in real time. The position of the wafer center is calculated based on the time-sequence of the beam-breaking signals from two optical sensors, and the geometric relations among the sensing points of the robot blade and wafer. When using eight-inch wafers, the experimental results indicated the capabilities of the proposed positioning system under various conditions, including distinct parameters regarding the moving direction, wafer displacement and notch-passing sensors. The accuracy and precision (repeatability) of the measurement in various conditions were calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the experimental results demonstrate that, after combining the novel wafer positioning system and HMI program, the proposed method can be used to compute the position of the wafer center in real time in various conditions.

  20. Wafering economies for industrialization from a wafer manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, T. P.; Fuerst, F. P.

    1982-02-01

    The key technical limitations which inhibit the lowering of value-added costs for state-of-the-art wafering techniques are assessed. From the best experimental results to date, a projection was made to identify those parts of each system which need to be developed in order to meet or improve upon the value-added cost reduction necessary for $0.70/Wp photovoltaics modules.

  1. Wafering economies for industrialization from a wafer manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, T. P.; Fuerst, F. P.

    1982-01-01

    The key technical limitations which inhibit the lowering of value-added costs for state-of-the-art wafering techniques are assessed. From the best experimental results to date, a projection was made to identify those parts of each system which need to be developed in order to meet or improve upon the value-added cost reduction necessary for $0.70/Wp photovoltaics modules.

  2. Temperature Dependent Electrical Properties of PZT Wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, T.; Sen, S.; Seal, A.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The electrical and electromechanical properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) wafers were investigated and compared with PZT bulk. PZT wafers were prepared by tape casting technique. The transition temperature of both the PZT forms remained the same. The transition from an asymmetric to a symmetric shape was observed for PZT wafers at higher temperature. The piezoelectric coefficient (d 33) values obtained were 560 pc/N and 234 pc/N, and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (k p) values were 0.68 and 0.49 for bulk and wafer, respectively. The reduction in polarization after fatigue was only ~3% in case of PZT bulk and ~7% for PZT wafer.

  3. Support apparatus for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Torres, Kenneth J.

    2003-06-10

    A support apparatus for minimizing gravitational stress in semiconductor wafers, and particularly silicon wafers, during thermal processing. The support apparatus comprises two concentric circular support structures disposed on a common support fixture. The two concentric circular support structures, located generally at between 10 and 70% and 70 and 100% and preferably at 35 and 82.3% of the semiconductor wafer radius, can be either solid rings or a plurality of spaced support points spaced apart from each other in a substantially uniform manner. Further, the support structures can have segments removed to facilitate wafer loading and unloading. In order to withstand the elevated temperatures encountered during semiconductor wafer processing, the support apparatus, including the concentric circular support structures and support fixture can be fabricated from refractory materials, such as silicon carbide, quartz and graphite. The claimed wafer support apparatus can be readily adapted for use in either batch or single-wafer processors.

  4. An Approach for Dynamic Optimization of Prevention Program Implementation in Stochastic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuncheol; Prabhu, Vittal

    The science of preventing youth problems has significantly advanced in developing evidence-based prevention program (EBP) by using randomized clinical trials. Effective EBP can reduce delinquency, aggression, violence, bullying and substance abuse among youth. Unfortunately the outcomes of EBP implemented in natural settings usually tend to be lower than in clinical trials, which has motivated the need to study EBP implementations. In this paper we propose to model EBP implementations in natural settings as stochastic dynamic processes. Specifically, we propose Markov Decision Process (MDP) for modeling and dynamic optimization of such EBP implementations. We illustrate these concepts using simple numerical examples and discuss potential challenges in using such approaches in practice.

  5. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  6. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency. PMID:19518394

  7. An SSM-Based Approach to Implement a Dynamic Performance Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Piedade Francisco, Roberto; Azevedo, Américo

    This paper underlines how the use of Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) for an efficient planning, implementation and monitoring of a dynamic performance management system supported by a conceptual scheme that enables a conscious and prepared implementation, can provide instances of performance of a collaborative network, and also promote alignment among the partners. A systematic way to implement it and a review on two practical applications in Brazilian collaborative networks of SMEs are also presented.

  8. Dynamic Training Elements in a Circuit Theory Course to Implement a Self-Directed Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krouk, B. I.; Zhuravleva, O. B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of a self-directed learning process in a circuit theory course, incorporating dynamic training elements which were designed on the basis of a cybernetic model of cognitive process management. These elements are centrally linked in a dynamic learning frame, created on the monitor screen, which displays the…

  9. Dynamic Visualizations: How Attraction, Motivation and Communication Affect Streaming Video Tutorial Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The rapid advancement in the capabilities of computer technologies has made it easier to design and deploy dynamic visualizations in web-based learning environments; yet, the implementation of these dynamic visuals has been met with mixed results. While many guidelines exist to assist instructional designers in the design and application of…

  10. Wafer-bonded surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berini, Pierre; Mattiussi, Greg; Lahoud, Nancy; Charbonneau, Robert

    2007-02-01

    Direct wafer bonding and thinning were explored as an approach for constructing long-range surface plasmon waveguides. The structures consist of a thin metal stripe deposited into a shallow trench etched into one of the claddings, to which another cladding of the same material is directly bonded. The approach was developed first using Pyrex wafers in order to assess feasibility and then using lithium niobate wafers. Optical and electro-optical measurements validate the approach.

  11. Stress Voiding During Wafer Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.

    1999-03-01

    Wafer processing involves several heating cycles to temperatures as high as 400 C. These thermal excursions are known to cause growth of voids that limit reliability of parts cut from the wafer. A model for void growth is constructed that can simulate the effect of these thermal cycles on void growth. The model is solved for typical process steps and the kinetics and extent of void growth are determined for each. It is shown that grain size, void spacing, and conductor line width are very important in determining void and stress behavior. For small grain sizes, stress relaxation can be rapid and can lead to void shrinkage during subsequent heating cycles. The effect of rapid quenching from process temperatures is to suppress void growth but induce large remnant stress in the conductor line. This stress can provide the driving force for void growth during storage even at room temperature. For isothermal processes the model can be solved analytically and estimates of terminal void size a nd lifetime are obtained.

  12. An optimized ultrasound digital beamformer with dynamic focusing implemented on FPGA.

    PubMed

    Almekkawy, Mohamed; Xu, Jingwei; Chirala, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    We present a resource-optimized dynamic digital beamformer for an ultrasound system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). A comprehensive 64-channel receive beamformer with full dynamic focusing is embedded in the Altera Arria V FPGA chip. To improve spatial and contrast resolution, full dynamic beamforming is implemented by a novel method with resource optimization. This was conceived using the implementation of the delay summation through a bulk (coarse) delay and fractional (fine) delay. The sampling frequency is 40 MHz and the beamformer includes a 240 MHz polyphase filter that enhances the temporal resolution of the system while relaxing the Analog-to-Digital converter (ADC) bandwidth requirement. The results indicate that our 64-channel dynamic beamformer architecture is amenable for a low power FPGA-based implementation in a portable ultrasound system. PMID:25570695

  13. MEMS packaging with etching and thinning of lid wafer to form lids and expose device wafer bond pads

    SciTech Connect

    Chanchani, Rajen; Nordquist, Christopher; Olsson, Roy H; Peterson, Tracy C; Shul, Randy J; Ahlers, Catalina; Plut, Thomas A; Patrizi, Gary A

    2013-12-03

    In wafer-level packaging of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices a lid wafer is bonded to a MEMS wafer in a predermined aligned relationship. Portions of the lid wafer are removed to separate the lid wafer into lid portions that respectively correspond in alignment with MEMS devices on the MEMS wafer, and to expose areas of the MEMS wafer that respectively contain sets of bond pads respectively coupled to the MEMS devices.

  14. LQR Control of Thin Shell Dynamics: Formulation and Numerical Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delRosario, R. C. H.; Smith, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    A PDE-based feedback control method for thin cylindrical shells with surface-mounted piezoceramic actuators is presented. Donnell-Mushtari equations modified to incorporate both passive and active piezoceramic patch contributions are used to model the system dynamics. The well-posedness of this model and the associated LQR problem with an unbounded input operator are established through analytic semigroup theory. The model is discretized using a Galerkin expansion with basis functions constructed from Fourier polynomials tensored with cubic splines, and convergence criteria for the associated approximate LQR problem are established. The effectiveness of the method for attenuating the coupled longitudinal, circumferential and transverse shell displacements is illustrated through a set of numerical examples.

  15. Implementing efficient dynamic formal verification methods for MPI programs.

    SciTech Connect

    Vakkalanka, S.; DeLisi, M.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Kirby, R. M.; Thakur, R.; Gropp, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Utah; Univ. of Illinois

    2008-01-01

    We examine the problem of formally verifying MPI programs for safety properties through an efficient dynamic (runtime) method in which the processes of a given MPI program are executed under the control of an interleaving scheduler. To ensure full coverage for given input test data, the algorithm must take into consideration MPI's out-of-order completion semantics. The algorithm must also ensure that nondeterministic constructs (e.g., MPI wildcard receive matches) are executed in all possible ways. Our new algorithm rewrites wildcard receives to specific receives, one for each sender that can potentially match with the receive. It then recursively explores each case of the specific receives. The list of potential senders matching a receive is determined through a runtime algorithm that exploits MPI's operation ordering semantics. Our verification tool ISP that incorporates this algorithm efficiently verifies several programs and finds bugs missed by existing informal verification tools.

  16. Analysis of a color space conversion engine implemented using dynamic partial reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toukatly, Ryan; Patru, Dorin; Saber, Eli; Peskin, Eric; Roylance, Gene; Larson, Brad

    2013-02-01

    Dynamic Partial Reconfiguration allows parts of a Field Programmable Gate Array to be reconfigured, while the rest of the system continues uninterrupted operation. A Color Space Conversion Engine is a digital image-processing pipeline, which requires frequent reconfiguration of some, but not all of its stages. Therefore, it is a digital signal processing system that presumably can take advantage of dynamic partial reconfiguration. This paper describes the necessary design changes, testing, and performance analysis of a color space conversion engine implemented onto a field programmable gate array using dynamic partial reconfiguration. The analysis provides insight into the operational scenarios in which dynamic partial reconfiguration is advantageous or not.

  17. Influence of Internal Electric Field on the Recombination Dynamics of Localized Excitons in an InGaN Double-Quantum-Well Laser Diode Wafer Operated at 450 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Takeyoshi; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.; Aoyama, Toyomi; Nakajima, Kiyomi; Ahmet, Parhat; Azuhata, Takashi; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Sota, Takayuki; Nagahama, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    Optical and structural properties of an InGaN double-quantum-well (DQW) laser diode (LD) wafer that lased at 450 nm were investigated to discuss an enormous impact of a polarization-induced electric field on the recombination dynamics in InGaN quantum structures. The quantum-well (QW) structure was shown to have the well thickness as thin as approximately 1 nm and InN molar fraction x of approximately 14%. The gross effective electric field in the QW (FQW) was estimated to be 490 kV/cm from the Franz-Keldysh oscillation (FKO) period in the electroreflectance (ER) spectrum, implying that an internal piezoelectric field (Fpiz) of approximately 1.4 MV/cm was cancelled by the pn junction built-in field (Fbi) and Coulomb screening due to carriers in the DQW. The magnitude of FQW can be further weakened by applying reverse bias (VR) on the junction; the decrease in the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime at low temperature measured under VR was explained to be due to a recovery of electron-hole wavefunction overlap for small VR (|VR|<4 V), and due mainly to the tunneling escape of carriers through the barriers for larger VR. By applying an appropriate VR smaller than 4 V, electron-hole wavefunction overlap, which had been separated vertically along the c-axis due to quantum-confined Stark effect, could be partially recovered, and then the time-resolved PL signals exhibited a less-pronounced stretched exponential decay, giving a scaling parameter (β) of 0.85 and effective in-plane localization depth (E0) of 40-50 meV for the spontaneous emission. These values were closer to those of much homogeneous QWs compared to those reported previously for InGaN QWs having similar InN molar fractions. The use of very thin QWs is considered to bring easier Coulomb screening of FQW and population inversion under high excitation conditions.

  18. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  19. Modeling human target reaching with an adaptive observer implemented with dynamic neural fields.

    PubMed

    Fard, Farzaneh S; Hollensen, Paul; Heinke, Dietmar; Trappenberg, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    Humans can point fairly accurately to memorized states when closing their eyes despite slow or even missing sensory feedback. It is also common that the arm dynamics changes during development or from injuries. We propose a biologically motivated implementation of an arm controller that includes an adaptive observer. Our implementation is based on the neural field framework, and we show how a path integration mechanism can be trained from few examples. Our results illustrate successful generalization of path integration with a dynamic neural field by which the robotic arm can move in arbitrary directions and velocities. Also, by adapting the strength of the motor effect the observer implicitly learns to compensate an image acquisition delay in the sensory system. Our dynamic implementation of an observer successfully guides the arm toward the target in the dark, and the model produces movements with a bell-shaped velocity profile, consistent with human behavior data. PMID:26559472

  20. A system dynamics evaluation model: implementation of health information exchange for public health reporting

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Jacqueline A; Deegan, Michael; Wilson, Rosalind V; Kaushal, Rainu; Fredericks, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the complex dynamics involved in implementing electronic health information exchange (HIE) for public health reporting at a state health department, and to identify policy implications to inform similar implementations. Materials and methods Qualitative data were collected over 8 months from seven experts at New York State Department of Health who implemented web services and protocols for querying, receipt, and validation of electronic data supplied by regional health information organizations. Extensive project documentation was also collected. During group meetings experts described the implementation process and created reference modes and causal diagrams that the evaluation team used to build a preliminary model. System dynamics modeling techniques were applied iteratively to build causal loop diagrams representing the implementation. The diagrams were validated iteratively by individual experts followed by group review online, and through confirmatory review of documents and artifacts. Results Three casual loop diagrams captured well-recognized system dynamics: Sliding Goals, Project Rework, and Maturity of Resources. The findings were associated with specific policies that address funding, leadership, ensuring expertise, planning for rework, communication, and timeline management. Discussion This evaluation illustrates the value of a qualitative approach to system dynamics modeling. As a tool for strategic thinking on complicated and intense processes, qualitative models can be produced with fewer resources than a full simulation, yet still provide insights that are timely and relevant. Conclusions System dynamics techniques clarified endogenous and exogenous factors at play in a highly complex technology implementation, which may inform other states engaged in implementing HIE supported by federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) legislation. PMID:23292910

  1. One-step implementation of a Toffoli gate of separated superconducting qubits via quantum Zeno dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-Feng; Chen, Yong-Fa; Ma, Song-She

    2016-04-01

    Based on the quantum Zeno dynamics, a scheme is presented to implement a Toffoli gate of three separated superconducting qubits (SQs) by one step. Three separated SQs are connected by two resonators. The scheme is insensitive to the resonator decay because the Zeno subspace does not include the state of the resonators being excited. Numerical simulations indicate that the scheme is robust to the fluctuation of the parameters and the Toffoli gate can be implemented with high fidelity.

  2. Parallel implementation of three-dimensional molecular dynamic simulation for laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this article is to report the parallel implementation of the 3D molecular dynamic simulation code for laser-cluster interactions. The benchmarking of the code has been done by comparing the simulation results with some of the experiments reported in the literature. Scaling laws for the computational time is established by varying the number of processor cores and number of macroparticles used. The capabilities of the code are highlighted by implementing various diagnostic tools. To study the dynamics of the laser-cluster interactions, the executable version of the code is available from the author.

  3. Molecular Dynamics implementation of BN2D or 'Mercedes Benz' water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, Arturs; Bardik, Vitaliy; Pavlov, Evgen; Nerukh, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional 'Mercedes Benz' (MB) or BN2D water model (Naim, 1971) is implemented in Molecular Dynamics. It is known that the MB model can capture abnormal properties of real water (high heat capacity, minima of pressure and isothermal compressibility, negative thermal expansion coefficient) (Silverstein et al., 1998). In this work formulas for calculating the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties in microcanonical (NVE) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensembles for the model from Molecular Dynamics simulation are derived and verified against known Monte Carlo results. The convergence of the thermodynamic properties and the system's numerical stability are investigated. The results qualitatively reproduce the peculiarities of real water making the model a visually convenient tool that also requires less computational resources, thus allowing simulations of large (hydrodynamic scale) molecular systems. We provide the open source code written in C/C++ for the BN2D water model implementation using Molecular Dynamics.

  4. Automated Array Assembly Task In-depth Study of Silicon Wafer Surface Texturizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. T.; Rhee, S. S.

    1979-01-01

    Several aspects of silicon wafer surface texturizing were studied. A low cost cleaning method that utilizes recycled Freon in an ultrasonic vapor degreaser to remove organic and inorganic contaminants from the surface of silicon wafers as received from silicon suppliers was investigated. The use of clean dry air and high throughout wafer batch drying techniques was shown to lower the cost of wafer drying. A two stage texturizing process was examined for suitability in large scale production. Also, an in-depth gettering study with the two stage texturizing process was performed for the enhancement of solar cell efficiency, minimization of current versus voltage curve dispersion, and improvement in process reproducibility. The 10% efficiency improvement goal was exceeded for the near term implementation of flat plate photovoltaic cost reduction.

  5. Diffusion length and resistivity distribution characteristics of silicon wafer by photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Dohyun; Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Analytical photoluminescence efficiency calculation and PL intensity ratio method are developed. • Wafer resistivity and diffusion length characteristics are investigated by PL intensity ratio. • PL intensity is well correlated with resistivity, diffusion length or defect density on wafer measurement. - Abstract: Photoluminescence is a convenient, contactless method to characterize semiconductors. Its use for room-temperature silicon characterization has only recently been implemented. We have developed the PL efficiency theory as a function of substrate doping densities, bulk trap density, photon flux density, and reflectance and compared it with experimental data initially for bulk Si wafers. New developed PL intensity ratio method is able to predict the silicon wafer properties, such as doping densities, minority carrier diffusion length and bulk trap density.

  6. Development of megasonic cleaning for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, A.

    1980-01-01

    A cleaning and drying system for processing at least 2500 three in. diameter wafers per hour was developed with a reduction in process cost. The system consists of an ammonia hydrogen peroxide bath in which both surfaces of 3/32 in. spaced, ion implanted wafers are cleaned in quartz carriers moved on a belt past two pairs of megasonic transducers. The wafers are dried in the novel room temperature, high velocity air dryer in the same carriers used for annealing. A new laser scanner was used effectively to monitor the cleaning ability on a sampling basis.

  7. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  8. Evolution of Ada technology in the flight dynamics area: Implementation/testing phase analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quimby, Kelvin L.; Esker, Linda; Miller, John; Smith, Laurie; Stark, Mike; Mcgarry, Frank

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the software engineering issues related to the use of Ada for the implementation and system testing phases of four Ada projects developed in the flight dynamics area. These projects reflect an evolving understanding of more effective use of Ada features. In addition, the testing methodology used on these projects has changed substantially from that used on previous FORTRAN projects.

  9. Implementation of Abstract Data Types in Dynamic Sketches for Learning Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasute, Egle; Dagiene, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    A long-term observation of students' usage of a dynamic geometry in a classroom at all grade levels has challenged to develop an approach for learning and understanding mathematics in an easier way for both students and teachers. The paper deals with the results of a study that investigates the process and outcomes of the implementation of…

  10. Enhanced capture rate for haze defects in production wafer inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Ditza; Shulman, Adi; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    Photomask degradation via haze defect formation is an increasing troublesome yield problem in the semiconductor fab. Wafer inspection is often utilized to detect haze defects due to the fact that it can be a bi-product of process control wafer inspection; furthermore, the detection of the haze on the wafer is effectively enhanced due to the multitude of distinct fields being scanned. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel application for enhancing the wafer inspection tool's sensitivity to haze defects even further. In particular, we present results of bright field wafer inspection using the on several photo layers suffering from haze defects. One way in which the enhanced sensitivity can be achieved in inspection tools is by using a double scan of the wafer: one regular scan with the normal recipe and another high sensitivity scan from which only the repeater defects are extracted (the non-repeater defects consist largely of noise which is difficult to filter). Our solution essentially combines the double scan into a single high sensitivity scan whose processing is carried out along two parallel routes (see Fig. 1). Along one route, potential defects follow the standard recipe thresholds to produce a defect map at the nominal sensitivity. Along the alternate route, potential defects are used to extract only field repeater defects which are identified using an optimal repeater algorithm that eliminates "false repeaters". At the end of the scan, the two defect maps are merged into one with optical scan images available for all the merged defects. It is important to note, that there is no throughput hit; in addition, the repeater sensitivity is increased relative to a double scan, due to a novel runtime algorithm implementation whose memory requirements are minimized, thus enabling to search a much larger number of potential defects for repeaters. We evaluated the new application on photo wafers which consisted of both random and haze defects. The evaluation procedure

  11. Analysis of organic contaminants from silicon wafer and disk surfaces by thermal desorption-GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenzind, Mark J.; Ahmed, Latif; Kumar, Anurag

    1999-03-01

    Organic contaminants can affect semiconductor wafer processing including gate oxide integrity, polysilicon growth, deep ultraviolet photoresist line-width, and cleaning & etching steps. Organophosphates are known to counter dope silicon wafers. Organic contaminants in disk drives can cause failures due to stiction or buildup on the heads. Therefore, it is important to identify organic contaminants adsorbed on wafer or disk surfaces and find their sources so they can be either completely eliminated or at least controlled. Dynamic headspace TD-GC-MS (Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry) methods are very sensitive and can be used to identify organic contaminants on disks and wafers, in air, or outgassing from running drives or their individual components.

  12. Grand-Canonical Adaptive Resolution Centroid Molecular Dynamics: Implementation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Animesh; Delle Site, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    We have implemented the Centroid Molecular Dynamics scheme (CMD) into the Grand Canonical-like version of the Adaptive Resolution Simulation Molecular Dynamics (GC-AdResS) method. We have tested the implementation on two different systems, liquid parahydrogen at extreme thermodynamic conditions and liquid water at ambient conditions; the reproduction of structural as well as dynamical results of reference systems are highly satisfactory. The capability of performing GC-AdResS CMD simulations allows for the treatment of a system characterized by some quantum features and open boundaries. This latter characteristic not only is of computational convenience, allowing for equivalent results of much larger and computationally more expensive systems, but also suggests a tool of analysis so far not explored, that is the unambiguous identification of the essential degrees of freedom required for a given property.

  13. Characteristics of nanocomposites and semiconductor heterostructure wafers using THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan, Hakan

    All optical, THz-Time Domain Spectroscopic (THz-TDS) methods were employed towards determining the electrical characteristics of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Ion Implanted Si nanoclusters and Si1-xGe x, HFO2, SiO2 on p-type Si wafers. For the nanoscale composite materials, Visible Pump/THz Probe spectroscopy measurements were performed after observing that the samples were not sensitive to the THz radiation alone. The results suggest that the photoexcited nanotubes exhibit localized transport due to Lorentz-type photo-induced localized states from 0.2 to 0.7THz. The THz transmission is modeled through the photoexcited layer with an effective dielectric constant described by a Drude + Lorentz model and given by Maxwell-Garnett theory. Comparisons are made with other prevalent theories that describe electronic transport. Similar experiments were repeated for ion-implanted, 3-4nm Si nanoclusters in fused silica for which a similar behavior was observed. In addition, a change in reflection from Si1-xGex on Si, 200mm diameter semiconductor heterostructure wafers with 10% or 15% Ge content, was measured using THz-TDS methods. Drude model is utilized for the transmission/reflection measurements and from the reflection data the mobility of each wafer is estimated. Furthermore, the effect of high-kappa dielectric material (HfO2) on the electrical properties of p-type silicon wafers was characterized by utilizing non-contact, differential (pump-pump off) spectroscopic methods to differ between HfO2 and SiO 2 on Si wafers. The measurements are analyzed in two distinct transmission models, where one is an exact representation of the layered structure for each wafer and the other assumed that the response observed from the differential THz transmission was solely due to effects from interfacial traps between the dielectric layer and the substrate. The latter gave a more accurate picture of the carrier dynamics. From these measurements the effect of interfacial defects on

  14. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  15. Adhesive wafer bonding for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, Viorel; Glinsner, Thomas; Mittendorfer, Gerald; Wieder, Bernhard; Lindner, Paul

    2003-04-01

    Low temperature wafer bonding is a powerful technique for MEMS/MOEMS devices fabrication and packaging. Among the low temperature processes adhesive bonding focuses a high technological interest. Adhesive wafer bonding is a bonding approach using an intermediate layer for bonding (e.g. glass, polymers, resists, polyimides). The main advantages of this method are: surface planarization, encapsulation of structures on the wafer surface, particle compensation and decrease of annealing temperature after bonding. This paper presents results on adhesive bonding using spin-on glass and Benzocyclobutene (BCB) from Dow Chemicals. The advantages of using adhesive bonding for MEMS applications will be illustrated be presenting a technology of fabricating GaAs-on-Si substrates (up to 150 mm diameter) and results on BCB bonding of Si wafers (200 mm diameter).

  16. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-22

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  17. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  18. Design and implementation of the flight dynamics system for COMS satellite mission operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung-Sun; Hwang, Yoola; Kim, Hae-Yeon; Kim, Jaehoon

    2011-04-01

    The first Korean multi-mission geostationary Earth orbit satellite, Communications, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS) was launched by an Ariane 5 launch vehicle in June 26, 2010. The COMS satellite has three payloads including Ka-band communications, Geostationary Ocean Color Imager, and Meteorological Imager. Although the COMS spacecraft bus is based on the Astrium Eurostar 3000 series, it has only one solar array to the south panel because all of the imaging sensors are located on the north panel. In order to maintain the spacecraft attitude with 5 wheels and 7 thrusters, COMS should perform twice a day wheel off-loading thruster firing operations, which affect on the satellite orbit. COMS flight dynamics system provides the general on-station functions such as orbit determination, orbit prediction, event prediction, station-keeping maneuver planning, station-relocation maneuver planning, and fuel accounting. All orbit related functions in flight dynamics system consider the orbital perturbations due to wheel off-loading operations. There are some specific flight dynamics functions to operate the spacecraft bus such as wheel off-loading management, oscillator updating management, and on-station attitude reacquisition management. In this paper, the design and implementation of the COMS flight dynamics system is presented. An object oriented analysis and design methodology is applied to the flight dynamics system design. Programming language C# within Microsoft .NET framework is used for the implementation of COMS flight dynamics system on Windows based personal computer.

  19. Finite element implementation of a dynamic residual-based LES model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, Nicholas

    We are introduced to a new dynamic model for k, the filtered fine-scale kinetic energy, in the context of the Residual-Based Variational Multiscale method (RBVMS) for Large Eddy Simulation (LES). We transform the strong form of the equation for k into its stabilized finite element form. With this result, we take strides toward implementing this model into PHASTA, an open source code for solving compressible and incompressible flows. Three test cases are conducted to verify the proper implementation of various components of the model. The results of these tests provide evidence to suggest that the current implementation of this new model into PHASTA is correct thus far. We conclude with a number of steps to take in the future to fully implement the model.

  20. Response to Intervention and Dynamic Assessment: Implementing Systematic, Dynamic and Individualised Interventions in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Stefan; Svensson, Idor; Fälth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, response to intervention (RTI) has been the focus of research, debate and educational implementations, especially regarding early reading instruction. RTI provides an educational framework characterised by different tiers or layers of instruction, providing increasingly more intense and individualised interventions for children in…

  1. Genesis Ultrapure Water Megasonic Wafer Spin Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Stansbery, Eileen K.; Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, Melissa C.

    2013-01-01

    A device removes, with high precision, the majority of surface particle contamination greater than 1-micron-diameter in size from ultrapure semiconductor wafer materials containing implanted solar wind samples returned by NASA's Genesis mission. This cleaning device uses a 1.5-liter/minute flowing stream of heated ultrapure water (UPW) with 1- MHz oscillating megasonic pulse energy focused at 3 to 5 mm away from the wafer surface spinning at 1,000 to 10,000 RPM, depending on sample size. The surface particle contamination is removed by three processes: flowing UPW, megasonic cavitations, and centripetal force from the spinning wafer. The device can also dry the wafer fragment after UPW/megasonic cleaning by continuing to spin the wafer in the cleaning chamber, which is purged with flowing ultrapure nitrogen gas at 65 psi (.448 kPa). The cleaner also uses three types of vacuum chucks that can accommodate all Genesis-flown array fragments in any dimensional shape between 3 and 100 mm in diameter. A sample vacuum chuck, and the manufactured UPW/megasonic nozzle holder, replace the human deficiencies by maintaining a consistent distance between the nozzle and wafer surface as well as allowing for longer cleaning time. The 3- to 5-mm critical distance is important for the ability to remove particles by megasonic cavitations. The increased UPW sonication time and exposure to heated UPW improve the removal of 1- to 5-micron-sized particles.

  2. Analyzes Data from Semiconductor Wafers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-07-23

    This program analyzes reflectance data from semiconductor wafers taken during the deposition or evolution of a thin film, typically via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is used to determine the growth rate and optical constants of the deposited thin films using a virtual interface concept. Growth rates and optical constants of multiple-layer structures is possible by selecting appropriate sections in the reflectance vs time waveform. No prior information or estimatesmore » of growth rates and materials properties is required if an absolute reflectance waveform is used. If the optical constants of a thin film are known, then the growth rate may be extracted from a relative reflectance data set. The analysis is valid for either s or p polarized light at any incidence angle and wavelength. The analysis package is contained within an easy-to-use graphical user interface. The program is based on the algorighm described in the following two publications: W.G. Breiland and K.P. Killen, J. Appl. Phys. 78 (1995) 6726, and W. G. Breiland, H.Q. Hou, B.E. Hammons, and J.F. Klem, Proc. XXVIII SOTAPOCS Symp. Electrochem. Soc. San Diego, May 3-8, 1998. It relies on the fact that any multiple-layer system has a reflectance spectrum that is mathematically equivalent to a single-layer thin film on a virtual substrate. The program fits the thin film reflectance with five adjustable parameters: 1) growth rate, 2) real part of complex refractive index, 3) imaginary part of refractive index, 4) amplitude of virtual interface reflectance, 5) phase of virtual interface reflectance.« less

  3. Implementation of Parallel Dynamic Simulation on Shared-Memory vs. Distributed-Memory Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Wu, Di; Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-09

    Power system dynamic simulation computes the system response to a sequence of large disturbance, such as sudden changes in generation or load, or a network short circuit followed by protective branch switching operation. It consists of a large set of differential and algebraic equations, which is computational intensive and challenging to solve using single-processor based dynamic simulation solution. High-performance computing (HPC) based parallel computing is a very promising technology to speed up the computation and facilitate the simulation process. This paper presents two different parallel implementations of power grid dynamic simulation using Open Multi-processing (OpenMP) on shared-memory platform, and Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed-memory clusters, respectively. The difference of the parallel simulation algorithms and architectures of the two HPC technologies are illustrated, and their performances for running parallel dynamic simulation are compared and demonstrated.

  4. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 3. Binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Frenkel, Michael

    2009-02-01

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for binary chemical systems. Five activity-coefficient models have been implemented for representation of phase-equilibrium data (vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid equilibrium): NRTL, UNIQUAC, Van Laar, Margules/Redlich-Kister, and Wilson. Implementation of these models in TDE is fully described. Properties modeled individually are densities, surface tensions, critical temperatures, critical pressures, excess enthalpies, and the transport properties-viscosity and thermal conductivity. Extensions to the class structure of the program are described with emphasis on special features allowing close linkage between mixture and pure-component properties required for implementation of the models. Details of gas-phase models used in conjunction with the activity-coefficient models are shown. Initial implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept for reactions is demonstrated with evaluation of enthalpies of formation for compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. Directions for future enhancements are outlined. PMID:19434848

  5. An easy implementation of displacement calculations in 3D discrete dislocation dynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivel, Marc; Depres, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Barnett's coordinate-free expression of the displacement field of a triangular loop in an isotropic media is revisited in a view to be implemented in 3D discrete dislocation dynamics codes. A general meshing procedure solving the problems of non-planar loops is presented. The method is user-friendly and can be used in numerical simulations since it gives the contribution of each dislocation segment to the global displacement field without defining the connectivity of closed loops. Easy to implement in parallel calculations, this method is successfully applied to large-scale simulations.

  6. Multiscale molecular dynamics/hydrodynamics implementation of two dimensional "Mercedes Benz" water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, A.; Nerukh, D.; Pavlov, E.; Karabasov, S.; Markesteijn, A.

    2015-09-01

    A multiscale Molecular Dynamics/Hydrodynamics implementation of the 2D Mercedes Benz (MB or BN2D) [1] water model is developed and investigated. The concept and the governing equations of multiscale coupling together with the results of the two-way coupling implementation are reported. The sensitivity of the multiscale model for obtaining macroscopic and microscopic parameters of the system, such as macroscopic density and velocity fluctuations, radial distribution and velocity autocorrelation functions of MB particles, is evaluated. Critical issues for extending the current model to large systems are discussed.

  7. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    DOEpatents

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  8. Improvement of focus accuracy on processed wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashibata, Satomi; Komine, Nobuhiro; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Koike, Takashi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    As feature size shrinkage in semiconductor device progress, process fluctuation, especially focus strongly affects device performance. Because focus control is an ongoing challenge in optical lithography, various studies have sought for improving focus monitoring and control. Focus errors are due to wafers, exposure tools, reticles, QCs, and so on. Few studies are performed to minimize the measurement errors of auto focus (AF) sensors of exposure tool, especially when processed wafers are exposed. With current focus measurement techniques, the phase shift grating (PSG) focus monitor 1) has been already proposed and its basic principle is that the intensity of the diffraction light of the mask pattern is made asymmetric by arranging a π/2 phase shift area on a reticle. The resist pattern exposed at the defocus position is shifted on the wafer and shifted pattern can be easily measured using an overlay inspection tool. However, it is difficult to measure shifted pattern for the pattern on the processed wafer because of interruptions caused by other patterns in the underlayer. In this paper, we therefore propose "SEM-PSG" technique, where the shift of the PSG resist mark is measured by employing critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) to measure the focus error on the processed wafer. First, we evaluate the accuracy of SEM-PSG technique. Second, by applying the SEM-PSG technique and feeding the results back to the exposure, we evaluate the focus accuracy on processed wafers. By applying SEM-PSG feedback, the focus accuracy on the processed wafer was improved from 40 to 29 nm in 3σ.

  9. MPI implementation of PHOENICS: A general purpose computational fluid dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Simunovic, S.; Zacharia, T.; Baltas, N.; Spalding, D.B.

    1995-04-01

    PHOENICS is a suite of computational analysis programs that are used for simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, and dynamical reaction processes. The parallel version of the solver EARTH for the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program PHOENICS has been implemented using Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Implementation of MPI version of PHOENICS makes this computational tool portable to a wide range of parallel machines and enables the use of high performance computing for large scale computational simulations. MPI libraries are available on several parallel architectures making the program usable across different architectures as well as on heterogeneous computer networks. The Intel Paragon NX and MPI versions of the program have been developed and tested on massively parallel supercomputers Intel Paragon XP/S 5, XP/S 35, and Kendall Square Research, and on the multiprocessor SGI Onyx computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The preliminary testing results of the developed program have shown scalable performance for reasonably sized computational domains.

  10. MPI implementation of PHOENICS: A general purpose computational fluid dynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunovic, S.; Zacharia, T.; Baltas, N.; Spalding, D. B.

    1995-03-01

    PHOENICS is a suite of computational analysis programs that are used for simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, and dynamical reaction processes. The parallel version of the solver EARTH for the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program PHOENICS has been implemented using Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Implementation of MPI version of PHOENICS makes this computational tool portable to a wide range of parallel machines and enables the use of high performance computing for large scale computational simulations. MPI libraries are available on several parallel architectures making the program usable across different architectures as well as on heterogeneous computer networks. The Intel Paragon NX and MPI versions of the program have been developed and tested on massively parallel supercomputers Intel Paragon XP/S 5, XP/S 35, and Kendall Square Research, and on the multiprocessor SGI Onyx computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The preliminary testing results of the developed program have shown scalable performance for reasonably sized computational domains.

  11. Implementing Molecular Dynamics on Hybrid High Performance Computers - Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W Michael; Kohlmeyer, Axel; Plimpton, Steven J; Tharrington, Arnold N

    2012-01-01

    The use of accelerators such as graphics processing units (GPUs) has become popular in scientific computing applications due to their low cost, impressive floating-point capabilities, high memory bandwidth, and low electrical power requirements. Hybrid high-performance computers, machines with nodes containing more than one type of floating-point processor (e.g. CPU and GPU), are now becoming more prevalent due to these advantages. In this paper, we present a continuation of previous work implementing algorithms for using accelerators into the LAMMPS molecular dynamics software for distributed memory parallel hybrid machines. In our previous work, we focused on acceleration for short-range models with an approach intended to harness the processing power of both the accelerator and (multi-core) CPUs. To augment the existing implementations, we present an efficient implementation of long-range electrostatic force calculation for molecular dynamics. Specifically, we present an implementation of the particle-particle particle-mesh method based on the work by Harvey and De Fabritiis. We present benchmark results on the Keeneland InfiniBand GPU cluster. We provide a performance comparison of the same kernels compiled with both CUDA and OpenCL. We discuss limitations to parallel efficiency and future directions for improving performance on hybrid or heterogeneous computers.

  12. Implementing molecular dynamics on hybrid high performance computers - Particle-particle particle-mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. Michael; Kohlmeyer, Axel; Plimpton, Steven J.; Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2012-03-01

    The use of accelerators such as graphics processing units (GPUs) has become popular in scientific computing applications due to their low cost, impressive floating-point capabilities, high memory bandwidth, and low electrical power requirements. Hybrid high-performance computers, machines with nodes containing more than one type of floating-point processor (e.g. CPU and GPU), are now becoming more prevalent due to these advantages. In this paper, we present a continuation of previous work implementing algorithms for using accelerators into the LAMMPS molecular dynamics software for distributed memory parallel hybrid machines. In our previous work, we focused on acceleration for short-range models with an approach intended to harness the processing power of both the accelerator and (multi-core) CPUs. To augment the existing implementations, we present an efficient implementation of long-range electrostatic force calculation for molecular dynamics. Specifically, we present an implementation of the particle-particle particle-mesh method based on the work by Harvey and De Fabritiis. We present benchmark results on the Keeneland InfiniBand GPU cluster. We provide a performance comparison of the same kernels compiled with both CUDA and OpenCL. We discuss limitations to parallel efficiency and future directions for improving performance on hybrid or heterogeneous computers.

  13. Cost-Effective Silicon Wafers for Solar Cells: Direct Wafer Enabling Terawatt Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: 1366 is developing a process to reduce the cost of solar electricity by up to 50% by 2020—from $0.15 per kilowatt hour to less than $0.07. 1366’s process avoids the costly step of slicing a large block of silicon crystal into wafers, which turns half the silicon to dust. Instead, the company is producing thin wafers directly from molten silicon at industry-standard sizes, and with efficiencies that compare favorably with today’s state-of-the-art technologies. 1366’s wafers could directly replace wafers currently on the market, so there would be no interruptions to the delivery of these products to market. As a result of 1366’s technology, the cost of silicon wafers could be reduced by 80%.

  14. Silicon Wafer-Scale Substrate for Microshutters and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Franz, David E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Jhabvala, Christine; Babu, Sachi; Snodgrass, Stephen; Costen, Nicholas; Zincke, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The silicon substrate carrier was created so that a large-area array (in this case 62,000+ elements of a microshutter array) and a variety of discrete passive and active devices could be mounted on a single board, similar to a printed circuit board. However, the density and number of interconnects far exceeds the capabilities of printed circuit board technology. To overcome this hurdle, a method was developed to fabricate this carrier out of silicon and implement silicon integrated circuit (IC) technology. This method achieves a large number of high-density metal interconnects; a 100-percent yield over a 6-in. (approximately equal to 15-cm) diameter wafer (one unit per wafer); a rigid, thermally compatible structure (all components and operating conditions) to cryogenic temperatures; re-workability and component replaceability, if required; and the ability to precisely cut large-area holes through the substrate. A method that would employ indium bump technology along with wafer-scale integration onto a silicon carrier was also developed. By establishing a silicon-based version of a printed circuit board, the objectives could be met with one solution. The silicon substrate would be 2 mm thick to survive the environmental loads of a launch. More than 2,300 metal traces and over 1,500 individual wire bonds are required. To mate the microshutter array to the silicon substrate, more than 10,000 indium bumps are required. A window was cut in the substrate to allow the light signal to pass through the substrate and reach the microshutter array. The substrate was also the receptacle for multiple unpackaged IC die wire-bonded directly to the substrate (thus conserving space over conventionally packaged die). Unique features of this technology include the implementation of a 2-mmthick silicon wafer to withstand extreme mechanical loads (from a rocket launch); integrated polysilicon resistor heaters directly on the substrate; the precise formation of an open aperture

  15. Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems. The detector is fabricated using wafer fusion to insert an electrically conductive grid, typically comprising a metal, between two solid semiconductor pieces, one having a cathode (negative electrode) and the other having an anode (positive electrode). The wafer fused semiconductor radiation detector functions like the commonly used Frisch grid radiation detector, in which an electrically conductive grid is inserted in high vacuum between the cathode and the anode. The wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector can be fabricated using the same or two different semiconductor materials of different sizes and of the same or different thicknesses; and it may utilize a wide range of metals, or other electrically conducting materials, to form the grid, to optimize the detector performance, without being constrained by structural dissimilarity of the individual parts. The wafer-fused detector is basically formed, for example, by etching spaced grooves across one end of one of two pieces of semiconductor materials, partially filling the grooves with a selected electrical conductor which forms a grid electrode, and then fusing the grooved end of the one semiconductor piece to an end of the other semiconductor piece with a cathode and an anode being formed on opposite ends of the semiconductor pieces.

  16. Wafer plane inspection evaluated for photomask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; Badger, Karen; Lawliss, Mark; Kodera, Yutaka; Azpiroz, Jaione Tirapu; Pang, Song; Zhang, Hongqin; Eugenieva, Eugenia; Clifford, Chris; Goonesekera, Arosha; Tian, Yibin

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to inspection, developed to enable high inspectability on fragmented mask features at the optimal defect sensitivity. It builds on well-established high resolution inspection capabilities to complement existing manufacturing methods. The production of defect-free photomasks is practical today only because of informed decisions on the impact of defects identified. The defect size, location and its measured printing impact can dictate that a mask is perfectly good for lithographic purposes. This inspection - verification - repair loop is timeconsuming and is predicated on the fact that detectable photomask defects do not always resolve or matter on wafer. This paper will introduce and evaluate an alternative approach that moves the mask inspection to the wafer plane. WPI uses a high NA inspection of the mask to construct a physical mask model. This mask model is used to create the mask image in the wafer plane. Finally, a threshold model is applied to enhance sensitivity to printing defects. WPI essentially eliminates the non-printing inspection stops and relaxes some of the pattern restrictions currently placed on incoming photomask designs. This paper outlines the WPI technology and explores its application to patterns and substrates representative of 32nm designs. The implications of deploying Wafer Plane Inspection will be discussed.

  17. Environmentally benign processing of YAG transparent wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Yiquan

    2015-12-01

    Transparent yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) wafers were successfully produced via aqueous tape casting and vacuum sintering techniques using a new environmentally friendly binder, a copolymer of isobutylene and maleic anhydride with the commercial name ISOBAM (noted as ISOBAM). Aqueous YAG slurries were mixed by ball-milling, which was followed by de-gassing and tape casting of wafers. The final YAG green tapes were homogenous and flexible, and could be bent freely without cracking. After the drying and sintering processes, transparent YAG wafers were achieved. The microstructures of both the green tape and vacuum-sintered YAG ceramic were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Phase compositions were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical transmittance was measured in UV-VIS regions with the result that the transmittance is 82.6% at a wavelength of 800 nm.

  18. Video-rate fuzzy Golay processor for wafer scale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Steinvorth, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The fuzzy Golay transformation is a novel approach for gray-level image processing. Fuzzy-set theory is used to modify the binary image processing techniques developed by M. J. Golay to permit direct gray-level image processing without thresholding. The comparison between gray-level pixels is accomplished with the Pixel Closeness Value (PCV) while comparison between gray-level neighborhoods uses the Neighborhood Closeness Value (NCV). Feature extraction is done by comparing the gray-level image neighborhood to a subset of the fourteen Golay neighborhoods using the NCV function. The Fuzzy Golay Processor (FGP) is an architecture designed to implement the fuzzy Golay transformation. The design of the FGP has been optimized to permit a successful implementation in Wafer Scale Integration (WSI). A system containing four FGPs is capable of performing thirty fuzzy Golay transformations per second on a 256 by 256 eight-bit pixel image. Such a system could fit on a four-inch wafer with enough redundant dies to allow a 30% die yield. The required dies are four Input-Output Modules (IOM) and 56 Neighborhood Evaluation Modules (NEM).

  19. Making Porous Luminescent Regions In Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W.; Jones, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    Regions damaged by ion implantation stain-etched. Porous regions within single-crystal silicon wafers fabricated by straightforward stain-etching process. Regions exhibit visible photoluminescence at room temperature and might constitute basis of novel class of optoelectronic devices. Stain-etching process has advantages over recently investigated anodic-etching process. Process works on both n-doped and p-doped silicon wafers. Related development reported in article, "Porous Si(x)Ge(1-x) Layers Within Single Crystals of Si," (NPO-18836).

  20. Laser furnace and method for zone refining of semiconductor wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, Donald B. (Inventor); zur Burg, Frederick W. (Inventor); Penn, Wayne M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A method of zone refining a crystal wafer (116 FIG. 1) comprising the steps of focusing a laser beam to a small spot (120) of selectable size on the surface of the crystal wafer (116) to melt a spot on the crystal wafer, scanning the small laser beam spot back and forth across the surface of the crystal wafer (116) at a constant velocity, and moving the scanning laser beam across a predetermined zone of the surface of the crystal wafer (116) in a direction normal to the laser beam scanning direction and at a selectible velocity to melt and refine the entire crystal wafer (116).

  1. Design and implementation of a fault-tolerant and dynamic metadata database for clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Zhou, Z.; Talini, E.; Documet, J.; Liu, B.

    2007-03-01

    In recent imaging-based clinical trials, quantitative image analysis (QIA) and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) methods are increasing in productivity due to higher resolution imaging capabilities. A radiology core doing clinical trials have been analyzing more treatment methods and there is a growing quantity of metadata that need to be stored and managed. These radiology centers are also collaborating with many off-site imaging field sites and need a way to communicate metadata between one another in a secure infrastructure. Our solution is to implement a data storage grid with a fault-tolerant and dynamic metadata database design to unify metadata from different clinical trial experiments and field sites. Although metadata from images follow the DICOM standard, clinical trials also produce metadata specific to regions-of-interest and quantitative image analysis. We have implemented a data access and integration (DAI) server layer where multiple field sites can access multiple metadata databases in the data grid through a single web-based grid service. The centralization of metadata database management simplifies the task of adding new databases into the grid and also decreases the risk of configuration errors seen in peer-to-peer grids. In this paper, we address the design and implementation of a data grid metadata storage that has fault-tolerance and dynamic integration for imaging-based clinical trials.

  2. A multiply parallel implementation of finite element-based discrete dislocation dynamics for arbitrary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, Joshua C.; Chung, Peter W.; Leiter, Kenneth W.; Knap, Jaroslaw; Aubry, Sylvie; Hommes, Gregg; Arsenlis, Athanasios

    2014-04-01

    Discrete dislocation dynamics (DD) approaches have proven useful in modeling the dynamics of large ensembles of dislocations. Continuing interest in finite body effects via image stresses has extended DD numerical approaches to improve the handling of surfaces. However, a physically accurate, yet computationally scalable, implementation has been elusive. This paper presents a new framework and implementation of a finite element-based discrete DD code that (1) treats arbitrarily shaped non-convex surfaces through image tractions, (2) allows for systematic refinement of the finite element mesh both in the bulk and on the surface and (3) provides a platform to scale to relatively larger and lengthier simulations. The approach is based on the capabilities of the Parallel Dislocation Simulator coupled through a distributed shared memory implementation for the calculation of large numbers of dislocation segments interacting with an independently large number of surface finite elements. Surface tracking approaches enable topological features at surfaces to be modeled. We verify the computed results via comparisons with analytical solutions for an infinite screw dislocation and prismatic loop near a surface and examine surface effects on a Frank-Read source. Convergence of the image force error with h- and p-refinement is shown to indicate the computational robustness. Additionally, through larger numerical experiments, we demonstrate the new capabilities in a three-dimensional elastic body of finite extent.

  3. A canonical replica exchange molecular dynamics implementation with normal pressure in each replica.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel K; Pivkin, Igor V; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, we present a new canonical replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation method with normal pressure for all replicas (REMD-NV(p) T). This method is suitable for systems for which conventional constant NPT-setups are difficult to implement. In this implementation, each replica has an individual volume, with normal pressure maintained for each replica in the simulation. We derive a novel exchange term and validate this method on the structural properties of SPC/E water and dialanine (Ala2) in the bulk and in the presence of a graphene layer. Compared to conventional constant NPT-REMD and NVT-REMD simulations, we find that the structural properties of our new method are in good agreement with simulations in the NPT-ensemble at all temperatures. The structural properties of the systems considered are affected by high pressures at elevated temperatures in the constant NVT-ensemble, an effect that our method corrects for. Unprojected distributions reveal that essential motions of the peptide are affected by the presence of the barostat in the NPT implementation but that the dynamical eigenmodes of the NV(p)T method are in close quantitative agreement with the NVT-ensemble. PMID:27475393

  4. A canonical replica exchange molecular dynamics implementation with normal pressure in each replica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Emanuel K.; Pivkin, Igor V.; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new canonical replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation method with normal pressure for all replicas (REMD-NV(p) T). This method is suitable for systems for which conventional constant NPT-setups are difficult to implement. In this implementation, each replica has an individual volume, with normal pressure maintained for each replica in the simulation. We derive a novel exchange term and validate this method on the structural properties of SPC/E water and dialanine (Ala2) in the bulk and in the presence of a graphene layer. Compared to conventional constant NPT-REMD and NVT-REMD simulations, we find that the structural properties of our new method are in good agreement with simulations in the NPT-ensemble at all temperatures. The structural properties of the systems considered are affected by high pressures at elevated temperatures in the constant NVT-ensemble, an effect that our method corrects for. Unprojected distributions reveal that essential motions of the peptide are affected by the presence of the barostat in the NPT implementation but that the dynamical eigenmodes of the NV(p)T method are in close quantitative agreement with the NVT-ensemble.

  5. Wafer-to-wafer bonding of nonplanarized MEMS surfaces using solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, D.; Queen, G.; Weston, R.; Woodward, G.; Putty, M.; Jordan, L.; Zarabadi, S.; Jayakar, K.

    2001-11-01

    The fabrication and reliability of a solder wafer-to-wafer bonding process is discussed. Using a solder reflow process allows vacuum packaging to be accomplished with unplanarized complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) surface topography. This capability enables standard CMOS processes, and integrated microelectromechanical systems devices to be packaged at the chip-level. Alloy variations give this process the ability to bond at lower temperatures than most alternatives. Factors affecting hermeticity, shorts, Q values, shifting cavity pressure, wafer saw cleanliness and corrosion resistance will be covered.

  6. Effect of wafer geometry on lithography chucking processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Kevin T.; Sinha, Jaydeep K.

    2015-03-01

    Wafer flatness during exposure in lithography tools is critical and is becoming more important as feature sizes in devices shrink. While chucks are used to support and flatten the wafer during exposure, it is essential that wafer geometry be controlled as well. Thickness variations of the wafer and high-frequency wafer shape components can lead to poor flatness of the chucked wafer and ultimately patterning problems, such as defocus errors. The objective of this work is to understand how process-induced wafer geometry, resulting from deposited films with non-uniform stress, can lead to high-frequency wafer shape variations that prevent complete chucking in lithography scanners. In this paper, we discuss both the acceptable limits of wafer shape that permit complete chucking to be achieved, and how non-uniform residual stresses in films, either due to patterning or process non-uniformity, can induce high spatial frequency wafer shape components that prevent chucking. This paper describes mechanics models that relate non-uniform film stress to wafer shape and presents results for two example cases. The models and results can be used as a basis for establishing control strategies for managing process-induced wafer geometry in order to avoid wafer flatness-induced errors in lithography processes.

  7. Apparatus for edge etching of semiconductor wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casajus, A.

    1986-01-01

    A device for use in the production of semiconductors, characterized by etching in a rapidly rotating etching bath is described. The fast rotation causes the surface of the etching bath to assume the form of a paraboloid of revolution, so that the semiconductor wafer adjusted at a given height above the resting bath surface is only attacked by etchant at the edges.

  8. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  9. Development of a rubber component model suitable for being implemented in railway dynamic simulation programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, A.; Gil-Negrete, N.; Nieto, J.; Giménez, J. G.

    2013-06-01

    Rubber elements are widely used in the railway industry in order to achieve vibration transmission requirements. Although they are critical components in railway vehicles, their modelling in the dynamic models of railway vehicles is usually relatively simple: it is usual to characterise them using a simple linear model formed by a spring and a viscous dashpot in parallel. In this paper the behaviour of typical rubber elements is analysed and a model that allows more accurately the prediction of its behaviour is proposed. The methodology to implement this model in railway simulation programs is also discussed.

  10. Reconfigurable Flight Control Using Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion with a Special Accelerometer Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, Barton J.; Ostroff, Aaron J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to on-line control design for aircraft that have suffered either actuator failure, missing effector surfaces, surface damage, or any combination. The approach is based on a modified version of nonlinear dynamic inversion. The approach does not require a model of the baseline vehicle (effectors at zero deflection), but does require feedback of accelerations and effector positions. Implementation issues are addressed and the method is demonstrated on an advanced tailless aircraft. An experimental simulation analysis tool is used to directly evaluate the nonlinear system's stability robustness.

  11. Studying chemical reactions in biological systems with MBN Explorer: implementation of molecular mechanics with dynamical topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Verkhovtsev, Alexey V.; Volkov, Sergey N.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of molecular mechanics force field has been widely accepted nowadays for studying various processes in biomolecular systems. In this paper, we suggest a modification for the standard CHARMM force field that permits simulations of systems with dynamically changing molecular topologies. The implementation of the modified force field was carried out in the popular program MBN Explorer, and, to support the development, we provide several illustrative case studies where dynamical topology is necessary. In particular, it is shown that the modified molecular mechanics force field can be applied for studying processes where rupture of chemical bonds plays an essential role, e.g., in irradiation- or collision-induced damage, and also in transformation and fragmentation processes involving biomolecular systems. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo Garcia and Eugene Surdutovich.

  12. Inspection of mechanical and electrical properties of silicon wafers using terahertz tomography and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Thomas; Muehleisen, Wolfgang; Schicker, Johannes; Hirschl, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Two different THz applications in the semiconductor industry were explored and validated against established reference measurement techniques and simulations. The first application investigated the possibility of measuring mechanical deformation behaviour of silicon wafers. Time-domain THz tomography mapping scans were carried out to measure wafer thickness and flatness, both in the native state and under different external mechanical loads. These measurements were carried out for a variety of wafers, and the ensuing deformation maps used to validate newly developed numerical simulation models for wafer deformation, and vice versa. In the second part of this paper, carrier dynamics of optically injected charges were investigated by THz spectroscopy. THz pump/probe measurements were carried out in transmission and reflection arrangements on silicon wafers illuminated by a metal halide light source. The light source generates free charge carriers in the semiconductor material that affect the transmission and reflection properties of the semiconductor material. The results of the THz measurements are compared to established standard techniques, like microwave-detected photo-conductance decay (MWPCD) or quasi-steady-state photo conductance (QSSPC) measurements. The defective areas identified with the THz measurements are in good agreement with the defective areas identified by the reference methods. A common benefit of time-domain THz measurements is that the wafer thickness, which is an important measure for the interaction volume of the THz radiation with the semiconductor material, can be calculated from the time- domain signals. The results indicate that THz spectroscopy and imaging can be valuable tools for defect analysis and quality control of silicon wafers, especially since the measurement is fully contact-free and can determine mechanical and electrical properties within a single modality.

  13. Wafer capping of MEMS with fab-friendly metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Inertial MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) sensors are normally sealed in hermetic enclosures. Some are assembled in hermetic packages but wafer level packaging has become much more important in recent years. Anodic bonding can be used to achieve wafer level seals between silicon and glass but most suppliers of inertial sensors screen print glass frit onto silicon cap wafers. After removing the organic vehicle, these patterned cap wafers are sealed to device wafer prior to wafer singulation and plastic packaging. Anodic and glass frit bonding are both cost-effective. However, they impose size, quality and performance limitations. Wafer level sealing with a metal removes some of these limitations but introduces other concerns. This paper will review the current wafer level hermetic processes followed by a description of a thermocompression metal seal technology that is compatible with IC fabrication.

  14. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  15. Analysis of the Noble Metals on Silicon Wafers by Chemical Collection and ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, H.; Hureau, D.; Groz, M.; Despois, D.; Louis, C.

    2011-11-01

    The measurement of Ag, Pt and Au on wafer surfaces was addressed by a liquid phase chemical collection coupled to ICPMS analysis. Three chemistries were evaluated from intentionally contaminated wafers in the E12 to E15 at/cm2 concentration range. Different modes of voluntary wafer contamination allowed us to consider both the chemical form of the contaminant (i.e. ionic and metal forms) and its localization (i.e. on the surface and included in the oxide layer). Diluted HNO3 was used for Ag collection on the wafer surface allowing a collection efficiency (CE) higher than 90%. Regarding Pt and Au, diluted aqua regia and diluted HF/aqua regia were used. The first solution leads to a good collection of Au and Pt on the wafer surface (CE >90%) and is inefficient for contamination included in the oxide layer while the second one addresses the two cases with collection rates higher than 94%. Finally, detection limits of few E10 at/cm2 were determined showing the relevance of the technique implemented.

  16. Evaluation of water based intelligent fluids for resist stripping in single wafer cleaning tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Matthias; Esche, Silvio; Hohle, Christoph; Schumann, Dirk; Steinke, Philipp; Thrun, Xaver; von Sonntag, Justus

    2016-03-01

    The application of phasefluid based intelligent fluids® in the field of photoresist stripping was studied. Due to their highly dynamic inner structure, phasefluids penetrate into the polymer network of photoresists and small gaps between resist layer and substrate and lift off the material from the surface. These non-aggressive stripping fluids were investigated regarding their efficiency in various resist stripping applications including initial results on copper metallization. Furthermore intelligent fluids® have been evaluated on an industry standard high volume single wafer cleaner. A baseline process on 300 mm wafers has been developed and characterized in terms of metallic and ionic impurities and defect level. Finally a general proof of concept for removal of positive tone resist from 300 mm silicon wafers is demonstrated.

  17. Method to reduce particles and defects on unprocessed wafers caused by clusterization and cross contamination from processed wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, Sanket

    2012-10-01

    One of the leading problems in the semiconductor industry with device scaling is defects and particles. Of this the most important ones are particles that can clusterize (condensate) with exposure to atmosphere. These clusters can be formed by residual halides or halide structures on the wafer surface reacting with surface moisture which is unavoidable. Such clusters can prove detrimental to the processed wafer, but more interestingly can migrate inside the FOUP onto unetched wafers. This migration of clusters can cause micro masking and other defects when these wafers are processed. This reduces the wafer yield and is challenging to resolve as we move towards smaller nodes. In this work, different methods of eliminating cross condensation defects and avoiding cluster formation on processed wafers are discussed. UV, Ozone and heat are the primary candidates explored and the mechanism behind each method is explored and optimized. Impact of each mechanism on wafer yield, part corrosion in a reactor platform and wafer throughput has been studied.

  18. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping LER and defect density on production wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabtay, Saar; Blumberg, Yuval; Levi, Shimon; Greenberg, Gadi; Harel, Daniel; Conley, Amiad; Meshulach, Doron; Kan, Kobi; Dolev, Ido; Kumar, Surender; Mendel, Kalia; Goto, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Naoaki; Iriuchijima, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Shinichi; Nagaoka, Shirou; Sekito, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) constitute a higher percentage of the line-width and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include: scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, lithography stack thickness and composition variations, exposure variations, etc. These process variations in advanced VLSI manufacturing processes, specifically in memory devices where CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations, are well known to significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or Optical Critical Dimension (OCD) metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time and cover only a small fraction of the wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials® and Nikon Corporation®, on the implementation of a complementary method to the CD-SEM and OCD tools, to monitor post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM), is based on measuring variations in the light reflected from periodic structures, under optimized illumination and collection conditions, and is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV brightfield (BF) wafer inspection tool. It will be shown that full polarization control in illumination and collection paths of the wafer inspection tool is critical to enable to set an optimized Process Variation Monitoring recipe.

  19. Non-linear dynamics in recurrently connected neural circuits implement Bayesian inference by sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticchi, Alessandro; Faisal, Aldo A.; Brain; Behaviour Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    Experimental evidence at the behavioural-level shows that the brains are able to make Bayes-optimal inference and decisions (Kording and Wolpert 2004, Nature; Ernst and Banks, 2002, Nature), yet at the circuit level little is known about how neural circuits may implement Bayesian learning and inference (but see (Ma et al. 2006, Nat Neurosci)). Molecular sources of noise are clearly established to be powerful enough to pose limits to neural function and structure in the brain (Faisal et al. 2008, Nat Rev Neurosci; Faisal et al. 2005, Curr Biol). We propose a spking neuron model where we exploit molecular noise as a useful resource to implement close-to-optimal inference by sampling. Specifically, we derive a synaptic plasticity rule which, coupled with integrate-and-fire neural dynamics and recurrent inhibitory connections, enables a neural population to learn the statistical properties of the received sensory input (prior). Moreover, the proposed model allows to combine prior knowledge with additional sources of information (likelihood) from another neural population, and to implement in spiking neurons a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm which generates samples from the inferred posterior distribution.

  20. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations at Extreme Scale: GPU Algorithms, Implementation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George; Crunch Team

    2014-03-01

    We present a scalable dissipative particle dynamics simulation code, fully implemented on the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using a hybrid CUDA/MPI programming model, which achieves 10-30 times speedup on a single GPU over 16 CPU cores and almost linear weak scaling across a thousand nodes. A unified framework is developed within which the efficient generation of the neighbor list and maintaining particle data locality are addressed. Our algorithm generates strictly ordered neighbor lists in parallel, while the construction is deterministic and makes no use of atomic operations or sorting. Such neighbor list leads to optimal data loading efficiency when combined with a two-level particle reordering scheme. A faster in situ generation scheme for Gaussian random numbers is proposed using precomputed binary signatures. We designed custom transcendental functions that are fast and accurate for evaluating the pairwise interaction. Computer benchmarks demonstrate the speedup of our implementation over the CPU implementation as well as strong and weak scalability. A large-scale simulation of spontaneous vesicle formation consisting of 128 million particles was conducted to illustrate the practicality of our code in real-world applications. This work was supported by the new Department of Energy Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4). Simulations were carried out at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility through the INCITE program under project BIP017.

  1. ThermoData Engine (TDE) software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 7. Ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Muzny, Chris D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Frenkel, Michael

    2012-01-23

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for ternary chemical systems. The method involves construction of Redlich-Kister type equations for individual properties (excess volume, thermal conductivity, viscosity, surface tension, and excess enthalpy) and activity coefficient models for phase equilibrium properties (vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibrium). Constructed ternary models are based on those for the three pure component and three binary subsystems evaluated on demand through the TDE software algorithms. All models are described in detail, and extensions to the class structure of the program are provided. Reliable evaluation of properties for the binary subsystems is essential for successful property evaluations for ternary systems, and algorithms are described to aid appropriate parameter selection and fitting for the implemented activity coefficient models (NRTL, Wilson, Van Laar, Redlich-Kister, and UNIQUAC). Two activity coefficient models based on group contributions (original UNIFAC and NIST-KT-UNIFAC) are also implemented. Novel features of the user interface are shown, and directions for future enhancements are outlined. PMID:22107452

  2. On the implementation of error handling in dynamic interfaces to scientific codes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, C.J.

    1993-11-01

    With the advent of powerful workstations with windowing systems, the scientific community has become interested in user friendly interfaces as a means of promoting the distribution of scientific codes to colleagues. Distributing scientific codes to a wider audience can, however, be problematic because scientists, who are familiar with the problem being addressed but not aware of necessary operational details, are encouraged to use the codes. A more friendly environment that not only guides user inputs, but also helps catch errors is needed. This thesis presents a dynamic graphical user interface (GUI) creation system with user controlled support for error detection and handling. The system checks a series of constraints defining a valid input set whenever the state of the system changes and notifies the user when an error has occurred. A naive checking scheme was implemented that checks every constraint every time the system changes. However, this method examines many constraints whose values have not changed. Therefore, a minimum evaluation scheme that only checks those constraints that may have been violated was implemented. This system was implemented in a prototype and user testing was used to determine if it was a success. Users examined both the GUI creation system and the end-user environment. The users found both to be easy to use and efficient enough for practical use. Moreover, they concluded that the system would promote distribution.

  3. Efficient implementation of constant pH molecular dynamics on modern graphics processors.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Evan J; Brooks, Charles L

    2016-09-15

    The treatment of pH sensitive ionization states for titratable residues in proteins is often omitted from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. While static charge models can answer many questions regarding protein conformational equilibrium and protein-ligand interactions, pH-sensitive phenomena such as acid-activated chaperones and amyloidogenic protein aggregation are inaccessible to such models. Constant pH molecular dynamics (CPHMD) coupled with the Generalized Born with a Simple sWitching function (GBSW) implicit solvent model provide an accurate framework for simulating pH sensitive processes in biological systems. Although this combination has demonstrated success in predicting pKa values of protein structures, and in exploring dynamics of ionizable side-chains, its speed has been an impediment to routine application. The recent availability of low-cost graphics processing unit (GPU) chipsets with thousands of processing cores, together with the implementation of the accurate GBSW implicit solvent model on those chipsets (Arthur and Brooks, J. Comput. Chem. 2016, 37, 927), provide an opportunity to improve the speed of CPHMD and ionization modeling greatly. Here, we present a first implementation of GPU-enabled CPHMD within the CHARMM-OpenMM simulation package interface. Depending on the system size and nonbonded force cutoff parameters, we find speed increases of between one and three orders of magnitude. Additionally, the algorithm scales better with system size than the CPU-based algorithm, thus allowing for larger systems to be modeled in a cost effective manner. We anticipate that the improved performance of this methodology will open the door for broad-spread application of CPHMD in its modeling pH-mediated biological processes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27405884

  4. Innovative optical alignment technique for CMP wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaya, Ayako; Kanaya, Yuho; Nakajima, Shinichi; Nagayama, Tadashi; Shiraishi, Naomasa

    2002-07-01

    Detecting position of the wafers such as after CMP process is critical theme of current and forthcoming IC manufacturing. The alignment system must be with high accuracy for any process. To satisfy such requirements, we have studied and analyzed factors that have made alignment difficult. From the result of the studies, we have developed new optical alignment techniques which improve the accuracy of FIA (alignment sensor of Nikon's NSR series) and examined them. The approaches are optimizing the focus position, developing an advanced algorithm for position detection, and selecting a suitable mark design. For experiment, we have developed the special wafers that make it possible to evaluate the influence of CMP processes. The experimental results show that the overlay errors decrease dramatically with the new alignment techniques. FIA with these new techniques will be much accurate and suitable alignment sensor for CMP and other processes of future generation ULSI production.

  5. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  6. Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.; St. Martin, Edward; Arora, Michelle; de la Garza, Linda

    2009-03-24

    Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Wafer level packaging of MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-07-01

    Wafer level packaging plays many important roles for MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems), including cost, yield and reliability. MEMS structures on silicon chips are encapsulated between bonded wafers or by surface micromachining, and electrical interconnections are made from the cavity. Bonding at the interface, such as glass-Si anodic bonding and metal-to-metal bonding, requires electrical interconnection through the lid vias in many cases. On the other hand, lateral electrical interconnections on the surface of the chip are used for bonding with intermediate melting materials, such as low melting point glass and solder. The cavity formed by surface micromachining is made using sacrificial etching, and the openings needed for the sacrificial etching are plugged using deposition sealing methods. Vacuum packaging methods and the structures for electrical feedthrough for the interconnection are discussed in this review.

  8. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  9. Wafer dicing utilizing unique beam shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd; Ohar, Orest

    2007-09-01

    Laser dicing of wafers is of keen interest to the semiconductor and LED industry. Devices such as ASICs, Ultra-thin Wafer Scale Packages and LEDS are unique in that they typically are formed from various materials in a multilayered structure. Many of these layers include active device materials, passivation coatings, conductors and dielectric films all deposited on top of a bulk wafer substrate and all potentially having differing ablation thresholds. These composite multi-layered structures require high finesse laser processes to ensure yields, cut quality and low process cost. Such processes have become very complex over the years as new devices have become miniaturized, requiring smaller kerf sizes. Of critical concern is the need to minimize substrate micro-cracking or lift off of upper layers along the dicing streets which directly corresponds to bulk device strength and device operational integrity over its projected lifetime. Laser processes involving the sequential use of single or multiple diode pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers, such as UV DPSS (355nn, 266nm, 532 nm), VIS DPSS (~532 nm) and IR DPSS (1064nm, 1070nm) as well as (UV, VIS, NIR, FIR and Eye Safe Wavelengths) DPFL (Diode Pumped Fiber Lasers) lasers to penetrate various and differing material layers and substrates including Silicon Carbide (SiC), Silicon, GaAs and Sapphire. Development of beam shaping optics with the purpose of permitting two or more differing energy densities within a single focused or imaged beam spot would provide opportunities for pre-processing or pre-scribing of thinner cover layers, while following through with a higher energy density segment to cut through the bulk base substrates. This paper will describe the development of beam shaping optical elements with unique beam shapes that could benefit dicing and patterning of delicate thin film coatings. Various designs will be described, with processing examples using LED wafer materials.

  10. Precipitating Chromium Impurities in Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new treatments for silicon wafers improve solar-cell conversion efficiency by precipitating electrically-active chromium impurities. One method is simple heat treatment. Other involves laser-induced damage followed by similar heat treatment. Chromium is one impurity of concern in metallurgical-grade silicon for solar cells. In new treatment, chromium active centers are made electrically inactive by precipitating chromium from solid solution, enabling use of lower grade, lower cost silicon in cell manufacture.

  11. VLED for Si wafer-level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chen-Fu; Chen, Chiming; Yen, Jui-Kang; Chen, Yung-Wei; Tsou, Chingfu; Chang, Chunming; Doan, Trung; Tran, Chuong Anh

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we introduced the advantages of Vertical Light emitting diode (VLED) on copper alloy with Si-wafer level packaging technologies. The silicon-based packaging substrate starts with a <100> dou-ble-side polished p-type silicon wafer, then anisotropic wet etching technology is done to construct the re-flector depression and micro through-holes on the silicon substrate. The operating voltage, at a typical cur-rent of 350 milli-ampere (mA), is 3.2V. The operation voltage is less than 3.7V under higher current driving conditions of 1A. The VLED chip on Si package has excellent heat dissipation and can be operated at high currents up to 1A without efficiency degradation. The typical spatial radiation pattern emits a uniform light lambertian distribution from -65° to 65° which can be easily fit for secondary optics. The correlated color temperature (CCT) has only 5% variation for daylight and less than 2% variation for warm white, when the junction temperature is increased from 25°C to 110°C, suggesting a stable CCT during operation for general lighting application. Coupled with aspheric lens and micro lens array in a wafer level process, it has almost the same light distribution intensity for special secondary optics lighting applications. In addition, the ul-tra-violet (UV) VLED, featuring a silicon substrate and hard glass cover, manufactured by wafer level pack-aging emits high power UV wavelengths appropriate for curing, currency, document verification, tanning, medical, and sterilization applications.

  12. Mask-to-wafer alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Haney, Steven J.

    2003-11-04

    A modified beam splitter that has a hole pattern that is symmetric in one axis and anti-symmetric in the other can be employed in a mask-to-wafer alignment device. The device is particularly suited for rough alignment using visible light. The modified beam splitter transmits and reflects light from a source of electromagnetic radiation and it includes a substrate that has a first surface facing the source of electromagnetic radiation and second surface that is reflective of said electromagnetic radiation. The substrate defines a hole pattern about a central line of the substrate. In operation, an input beam from a camera is directed toward the modified beam splitter and the light from the camera that passes through the holes illuminates the reticle on the wafer. The light beam from the camera also projects an image of a corresponding reticle pattern that is formed on the mask surface of the that is positioned downstream from the camera. Alignment can be accomplished by detecting the radiation that is reflected from the second surface of the modified beam splitter since the reflected radiation contains both the image of the pattern from the mask and a corresponding pattern on the wafer.

  13. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly-efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the past decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks, bringing high-speed internet to our homes. Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flash light shaping elements, the secondary camera, ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by the semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. This review paper recapitulates major steps and inventions in wafer-scale micro-optics technology. The state-of-the-art of fabrication, testing and packaging technology is summarized.

  14. Wafer level test solutions for IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessmann, Sebastian; Werner, Frank-Michael

    2014-05-01

    Wafer probers provide an established platform for performing electrical measurements at wafer level for CMOS and similar process technologies. For testing IR sensors, the requirements are beyond the standard prober capabilities. This presentation will give an overview about state of the art IR sensor probing systems reaching from flexible engineering solutions to automated production needs. Cooled sensors typically need to be tested at a target temperature below 80 K. Not only is the device temperature important but also the surrounding environment is required to prevent background radiation from reaching the device under test. To achieve that, a cryogenic shield is protecting the movable chuck. By operating that shield to attract residual gases inside the chamber, a completely contamination-free test environment can be guaranteed. The use of special black coatings are furthermore supporting the removal of stray light. Typically, probe card needles are operating at ambient (room) temperature when connecting to the wafer. To avoid the entrance of heat, which can result in distorted measurements, the probe card is fully embedded into the cryogenic shield. A shutter system, located above the probe field, is designed to switch between the microscope view to align the sensor under the needles and the test relevant setup. This includes a completely closed position to take dark current measurements. Another position holds a possible filter glass with the required aperture opening. The necessary infrared sources to stimulate the device are located above.

  15. Wrinkled bilayer graphene with wafer scale mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Javadi, Alireza; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-05-01

    Wafer-scale strained bilayer graphene is demonstrated by employing a silicon nitride (Si3N4) stressor layer. Different magnitudes of compressive stress up to 840 MPa were engineered by adjusting the Si3N4 deposition recipes, and different strain conditions were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The strained graphene displayed significant G peak shifts and G peak splitting with 16.2 cm-1 and 23.0 cm-1 of the G band and two-dimensional band shift, which corresponds to 0.26% of strain. Raman mapping of large regions of the graphene films found that the largest shifts/splitting occurred near the bilayer regions of the graphene films. The significance of our approach lies in the fact that it can be performed in a conventional microfabrication process, i.e., the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, and thus easily implemented for large scale production.

  16. Wafer weak point detection based on aerial images or WLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Philipp, Peter; Litt, Lloyd C.; Ackmann, Paul; Crell, Christian; Chen, Norman

    2015-10-01

    Aerial image measurement is a key technique for model based optical proximity correction (OPC) verification. Actual aerial images obtained by AIMS (aerial image measurement system) or WLCD (wafer level critical dimension) can detect printed wafer weak point structures in advance of wafer exposure and defect inspection. Normally, the potential wafer weak points are determined based on optical rule check (ORC) simulation in advance. However, the correlation to real wafer weak points is often not perfect due to the contribution of mask three dimension (M3D) effects, actual mask errors, and scanner lens effects. If the design weak points can accurately be detected in advance, it will reduce the wafer fab cost and improve cycle time. WLCD or AIMS tools are able to measure the aerial images CD and bossung curve through focus window. However, it is difficult to detect the wafer weak point in advance without defining selection criteria. In this study, wafer weak points sensitive to mask mean-to-nominal values are characterized for a process with very high MEEF (normally more than 4). Aerial image CD uses fixed threshold to detect the wafer weak points. By using WLCD through threshold and focus window, the efficiency of wafer weak point detection is also demonstrated. A novel method using contrast range evaluation is shown in the paper. Use of the slope of aerial images for more accurate detection of the wafer weak points using WLCD is also discussed. The contrast range can also be used to detect the wafer weak points in advance. Further, since the mean to nominal of the reticle contributes to the effective contrast range in a high MEEF area this work shows that control of the mask error is critical for high MEEF layers such as poly, active and metal layers. Wafer process based weak points that cannot be detected by wafer lithography CD or WLCD will be discussed.

  17. Steering quantum dynamics via bang-bang control: Implementing optimal fixed-point quantum search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhole, Gaurav; Anjusha, V. S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    A robust control over quantum dynamics is of paramount importance for quantum technologies. Many of the existing control techniques are based on smooth Hamiltonian modulations involving repeated calculations of basic unitaries resulting in time complexities scaling rapidly with the length of the control sequence. Here we show that bang-bang controls need one-time calculation of basic unitaries and hence scale much more efficiently. By employing a global optimization routine such as the genetic algorithm, it is possible to synthesize not only highly intricate unitaries, but also certain nonunitary operations. We demonstrate the unitary control through the implementation of the optimal fixed-point quantum search algorithm in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. Moreover, by combining the bang-bang pulses with the crusher gradients, we also demonstrate nonunitary transformations of thermal equilibrium states into effective pure states in three- as well as five-qubit NMR systems.

  18. Implementation of a protein reduced point charge model toward molecular dynamics applications.

    PubMed

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2011-11-17

    A reduced point charge model was developed in a previous work from the study of extrema in smoothed charge density distribution functions generated from the Amber99 molecular electrostatic potential. In the present work, such a point charge distribution is coupled with the Amber99 force field and implemented in the program TINKER to allow molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins. First applications to two polypeptides that involve α-helix and β-sheet motifs are analyzed and compared to all-atom MD simulations. Two types of coarse-grained (CG)-based trajectories are generated using, on one hand, harmonic bond stretching terms and, on the other hand, distance restraints. Results show that the use of the unrestrained CG conditions are sufficient to preserve most of the secondary structure characteristics but restraints lead to a better agreement between CG and all-atom simulation results such as rmsd, dipole moment, and time-dependent mean square deviation functions. PMID:21800922

  19. A scalable implementation of a finite-volume dynamical core in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A A; Sawyer, W B

    2004-09-24

    A distributed memory message-passing parallel implementation of a finite-volume discretization of the primitive equations in the Community Atmosphere Model is presented. Due to the data dependencies resulting from the polar singularity of the latitude-longitude coordinate system, we employ two separate domain decompositions within the dynamical core--one in latitude/level space, and the other in longitude/latitude space. This requires that the data be periodically redistributed between these two decompositions. In addition, the domains contain halo regions that cover the nearest neighbor data dependencies. A combination of several techniques, such as one-sided communication and multithreading, are presented to optimize data movements. The resulting algorithm is shown to scale to very large machine configurations, even for relatively coarse resolutions.

  20. Dynamic detection of window starting positions and its implementation within an activity recognition framework.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qin; Patterson, Timothy; Cleland, Ian; Nugent, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Activity recognition is an intrinsic component of many pervasive computing and ambient intelligent solutions. This has been facilitated by an explosion of technological developments in the area of wireless sensor network, wearable and mobile computing. Yet, delivering robust activity recognition, which could be deployed at scale in a real world environment, still remains an active research challenge. Much of the existing literature to date has focused on applying machine learning techniques to pre-segmented data collected in controlled laboratory environments. Whilst this approach can provide valuable ground truth information from which to build recognition models, these techniques often do not function well when implemented in near real time applications. This paper presents the application of a multivariate online change detection algorithm to dynamically detect the starting position of windows for the purposes of activity recognition. PMID:27392647

  1. Implementation of non-uniform FFT based Ewald summation in dissipative particle dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Laaksonen, Aatto; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2013-02-01

    The ENUF method, i.e., Ewald summation based on the non-uniform FFT technique (NFFT), is implemented in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation scheme to fast and accurately calculate the electrostatic interactions at mesoscopic level. In a simple model electrolyte system, the suitable ENUF-DPD parameters, including the convergence parameter α, the NFFT approximation parameter p, and the cut-offs for real and reciprocal space contributions, are carefully determined. With these optimized parameters, the ENUF-DPD method shows excellent efficiency and scales as O(NlogN). The ENUF-DPD method is further validated by investigating the effects of charge fraction of polyelectrolyte, ionic strength and counterion valency of added salts on polyelectrolyte conformations. The simulations in this paper, together with a separately published work of dendrimer-membrane complexes, show that the ENUF-DPD method is very robust and can be used to study charged complex systems at mesoscopic level.

  2. A Scalable Implementation of a Finite-Volume Dynamical Core in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, W; Mirin, A

    2004-06-25

    A distributed memory message-passing parallel implementation of a finite-volume discretization of the primitive equations in the Community Atmosphere Model is presented. Due to the data dependencies resulting from the polar singularity of the latitude-longitude coordinate system, it is necessary to employ two separate domain decompositions within the dynamical core. Data must be periodically redistributed between these two decompositions. In addition, the domains contain halo regions that cover the nearest neighbor data dependencies. A combination of several techniques, such as one-sided communication and multithreading, are presented to optimize data movements. The resulting algorithm is shown to scale to very large machine configurations, even for relatively coarse resolutions.

  3. FPGA implementation of dynamic channel assignment algorithm for cognitive wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Daniela M.; Andrade, Ángel G.

    2015-07-01

    The reliability of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in industrial applications can be thwarted due to multipath fading, noise generated by industrial equipment or heavy machinery and particularly by the interference generated from other wireless devices operating in the same spectrum band. Recently, cognitive WSNs (CWSNs) were proposed to improve the performance and reliability of WSNs in highly interfered and noisy environments. In this class of WSN, the nodes are spectrum aware, that is, they monitor the radio spectrum to find channels available for data transmission and dynamically assign and reassign nodes to low-interference condition channels. In this work, we present the implementation of a channel assignment algorithm in a field-programmable gate array, which dynamically assigns channels to sensor nodes based on the interference and noise levels experimented in the network. From the results obtained from the performance evaluation of the CWSN when the channel assignment algorithm is considered, it is possible to identify how many channels should be available in the network in order to achieve a desired percentage of successful transmissions, subject to constraints on the signal-to-interference plus noise ratio on each active link.

  4. Clinical implementation of dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Dosimetric aspects and initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, S. S.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Davis, C. A.; Ravichandran, R.; Kannadhasan, S.; Biunkumar, J. P.; El Ghamrawy, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the initial experience of quality assurance (QA) tests performed on the millennium multi-leaf collimator (mMLC) for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using sliding window technique. The various QA tests verified the mechanical and dosimetric stability of the mMLC of linear accelerator when operated in dynamic mode (dMLC). The mechanical QA tests also verified the positional accuracy and kinetic properties of the dMLC. The stability of dMLC was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using radiographic film and Omnipro IMRT software. The output stability, variation in output for different sweeping gap widths, and dosimetric leaf separation were measured. Dose delivery with IMRT was verified against the dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS). Monitor units (MUs) calculated by the planning system for the IMRT were cross-checked with independent commercial dose management software. Visual inspection and qualitative analysis showed that the leaf positioning accuracy was well within the acceptable limits. Dosimetric QA tests confirmed the dosimetric stability of the mMLC in dynamic mode. The verification of MUs using commercial software confirmed the reliability of the IMRT planning system for dose computation. The dosimetric measurements validated the fractional dose delivery. PMID:19893693

  5. Thinning of PLZT ceramic wafers for sensor integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Na; Liu, Weiguo

    2010-08-01

    Characteristics of transparent PLZT ceramics can be tailored by controlling the component of them, and therefore showed excellent dielectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric and ferroelectric properties. To integrate the ceramics with microelectronic circuit to realize integrated applications, the ceramic wafers have to be thinned down to micrometer scale in thickness. A7/65/35 PLZT ceramic wafer was selected in this study for the thinning process. Size of the wafer was 10×10mm with an initial thickness of 300μm. A novel membrane transfer process (MTP) was developed for the thinning and integration of the ceramic wafers. In the MTP process, the ceramic wafer was bonded to silicon wafer using a polymer bonding method. Mechanical grinding method was applied to reduce the thickness of the ceramic. To minimize the surface damage in the ceramic wafer caused by the mechanical grinding, magnetorheological finishing (MRF) method was utilized to polish the wafer. White light interference (WLI) apparatus was used to monitor the surface qualities of the grinded and ploished ceramic wafers. For the PLZT membrane obtained from the MTP process, the final thickness of the thinned and polished wafer was 10μm, the surface roughness was below 1nm in rms, and the flatness was better than λ/5.

  6. Electrooptic shutter devices utilizing PLZT ceramic wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Optical transparency was achieved in lead zirconate-titanate ferroelectric ceramics by substituting moderate amounts of the element lanthanum (8 to 12%) for lead. These compositions exhibit the quadratic (Kerr) electrooptic effect. The excellent optical qualities of these materials (designated PLZT) has permitted the practical utilization of their electrooptic properties in a number of devices. All of these devices utilize the classic Kerr cell arrangement. A PLZT wafer with optical axis oriented at 45/sup 0/ with respect to the axes of polarization is sandwiched between crossed polarizers. Application of an electric field via an interdigital array of electrodes on opposing wafer surfaces forces the PLZT material into a tetragonal state with the resulting induced birefringence proportional to the square of the applied electric field. Hence, the electrooptic wafer provides a retardation of light so that a component is passed by the second crossed polarizer to achieve an ON or open state. Maximum transmission is achieved when the retardation is half-wave. Shutter devices developed by Sandia and those in continuing development are described with respect to operational characteristics and physical configuration. The devices range in size from very small apertures of 50 ..mu..m x 2 mm with center-to-center repeat dimensions of 125 ..mu..m - to very large - apertures of 15.2 cm in single pieces and mosaics with apertures of 15.2 cm x 20.3 cm. Major efforts have centered on shutter development for the protection of aircrew from eye-damaging weapon effects. Other devices are also described which: provide eye protection for welders, protect vidicon tubes, function as page composers for holographic memories serve as large aperture photographic shutters, provide stereoscopic three-dimensional TV displays, and serve as data links in a fiber-optic transmission path.

  7. Understanding the dynamics of information technology implementation: a study of clinical information systems.

    PubMed

    Paré, G; Elam, J J

    1995-01-01

    the work of a variety of clinicians. Finally, we study a nursing assessment system used by two groups of nurses (intensive care unit and resuscitation unit) at a state-of-the-art, newly established Trauma Center. Qualitative was gathered through semi-structured interviews with people involved in the implementation process as well as a sample of user representatives. More than 90 interviews were conducted over a period of six months. Observational data completed our qualitative assessment. Quantitative evidence was gathered through questionnaires administered to a small sample of key informants. Three techniques of qualitative data analysis are being used in combination, namely, coding, analytical memos and displays. Data analysis is still in its infancy at this point. Regarding its relevance to the role of the administrator, this study will allow general and health care management as well as IT professionals to gain insight into the dynamics of the implementation of innovative technologies. In other words, results from this study will provide clear and relevant answers to the questions of how and why the outcome of the information system project is influenced by the way in which the technology is introduced. PMID:8591258

  8. Super-flat wafer chucks: from simulation and testing to a complete 300mm wafer chuck with low wafer deformation between pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Renate; Afanasiev, Kanstantin; Ziemann, Marcel; Schmidt, Volker

    2014-04-01

    Berliner Glas is a privately owned, mid-sized manufacturer of precision opto-mechanics in Germany. One specialty of Berliner Glas is the design and production of high performance vacuum and electrostatic wafer chucks. Driven by the need of lithography and inspection for smaller overlay values, we pursue the production of an ideally flat wafer chuck. An ideally flat wafer chuck holds a wafer with a completely flat backside and without lateral distortion within the wafer surface. Key parameters in influencing the wafer chucks effective flatness are thermal performance and thermal management, roughness of the surface, choice of materials and the contact area between wafer and wafer chuck. In this presentation we would like to focus on the contact area. Usually this is decreased as much as possible to avoid sticking effects and the chance of trapped particles between the chuck surface and the backside of the wafer. This can be realized with a pin structure on the chuck surface. Making the pins smaller and moving pins further apart from each other makes the contact area ever smaller but also adds new challenges to achieve a flat and undistorted wafer on the chuck. We would like to address methods of designing and evaluating such a pin structure. This involves not only the capability to simulate the ideal pattern of pins on the chuck's surface, for which we will present 2D and 3D simulation results. As well, we would like to share first results of our functional models. Finally, measurement capability has to be ensured, which means improving and further development of Fizeau flatness test interferometers.

  9. Photoluminescence method of testing double heterostructure wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Besomi, P.R.; Wilt, D.P.

    1984-04-10

    Under photoluminescence (PL) excitation, the lateral spreading of photo-excited carriers can suppress the photoluminescence signal from double heterostructure (DH) wafers containing a p-n junction. In any DH with a p-n junction in the active layer, PL is suppressed if the power of the excitation source does not exceed a threshold value. This effect can be advantageously used for a nondestructive optical determination of the top cladding layer sheet conductance as well as p-n junction misplacement, important parameters for injection lasers and LEDs.

  10. Wafer-scale aluminum nano-plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Matthew C.; Nielson, Stew; Petrova, Rumyana; Frasier, James; Gardner, Eric

    2014-09-01

    The design, characterization, and optical modeling of aluminum nano-hole arrays are discussed for potential applications in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and surface-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SEFS). In addition, recently-commercialized work on narrow-band, cloaked wire grid polarizers composed of nano-stacked metal and dielectric layers patterned over 200 mm diameter wafers for projection display applications is reviewed. The stacked sub-wavelength nanowire grid results in a narrow-band reduction in reflectance by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which can be tuned throughout the visible spectrum for stray light control.

  11. A new dynamic tactile display for reconfigurable braille: implementation and tests

    PubMed Central

    Motto Ros, Paolo; Dante, Vittorio; Mesin, Luca; Petetti, Erminio; Del Giudice, Paolo; Pasero, Eros

    2014-01-01

    Different tactile interfaces have been proposed to represent either text (braille) or, in a few cases, tactile large-area screens as replacements for visual displays. None of the implementations so far can be customized to match users' preferences, perceptual differences and skills. Optimal choices in these respects are still debated; we approach a solution by designing a flexible device allowing the user to choose key parameters of tactile transduction. We present here a new dynamic tactile display, a 8 × 8 matrix of plastic pins based on well-established and reliable piezoelectric technology to offer high resolution (pin gap 0.7mm) as well as tunable strength of the pins displacement, and refresh rate up to 50s−1. It can reproduce arbitrary patterns, allowing it to serve the dual purpose of providing, depending on contingent user needs, tactile rendering of non-character information, and reconfigurable braille rendering. Given the relevance of the latter functionality for the expected average user, we considered testing braille encoding by volunteers a benchmark of primary importance. Tests were performed to assess the acceptance and usability with minimal training, and to check whether the offered flexibility was indeed perceived by the subject as an added value compared to conventional braille devices. Different mappings between braille dots and actual tactile pins were implemented to match user needs. Performances of eight experienced braille readers were defined as the fraction of correct identifications of rendered content. Different information contents were tested (median performance on random strings, words, sentences identification was about 75%, 85%, 98%, respectively, with a significant increase, p < 0.01), obtaining statistically significant improvements in performance during the tests (p < 0.05). Experimental results, together with qualitative ratings provided by the subjects, show a good acceptance and the effectiveness of the proposed solution

  12. Parallel implementation of the particle simulation method with dynamic load balancing: Toward realistic geodynamical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, M.; Nishiura, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully Lagrangian methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and Discrete Element Method (DEM) have been widely used to solve the continuum and particles motions in the computational geodynamics field. These mesh-free methods are suitable for the problems with the complex geometry and boundary. In addition, their Lagrangian nature allows non-diffusive advection useful for tracking history dependent properties (e.g. rheology) of the material. These potential advantages over the mesh-based methods offer effective numerical applications to the geophysical flow and tectonic processes, which are for example, tsunami with free surface and floating body, magma intrusion with fracture of rock, and shear zone pattern generation of granular deformation. In order to investigate such geodynamical problems with the particle based methods, over millions to billion particles are required for the realistic simulation. Parallel computing is therefore important for handling such huge computational cost. An efficient parallel implementation of SPH and DEM methods is however known to be difficult especially for the distributed-memory architecture. Lagrangian methods inherently show workload imbalance problem for parallelization with the fixed domain in space, because particles move around and workloads change during the simulation. Therefore dynamic load balance is key technique to perform the large scale SPH and DEM simulation. In this work, we present the parallel implementation technique of SPH and DEM method utilizing dynamic load balancing algorithms toward the high resolution simulation over large domain using the massively parallel super computer system. Our method utilizes the imbalances of the executed time of each MPI process as the nonlinear term of parallel domain decomposition and minimizes them with the Newton like iteration method. In order to perform flexible domain decomposition in space, the slice-grid algorithm is used. Numerical tests show that our

  13. Wafer-Level Membrane-Transfer Process for Fabricating MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    A process for transferring an entire wafer-level micromachined silicon structure for mating with and bonding to another such structure has been devised. This process is intended especially for use in wafer-level integration of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) that have been fabricated on dissimilar substrates. Unlike in some older membrane-transfer processes, there is no use of wax or epoxy during transfer. In this process, the substrate of a wafer-level structure to be transferred serves as a carrier, and is etched away once the transfer has been completed. Another important feature of this process is that two electrodes constitutes an electrostatic actuator array. An SOI wafer and a silicon wafer (see Figure 1) are used as the carrier and electrode wafers, respectively. After oxidation, both wafers are patterned and etched to define a corrugation profile and electrode array, respectively. The polysilicon layer is deposited on the SOI wafer. The carrier wafer is bonded to the electrode wafer by using evaporated indium bumps. The piston pressure of 4 kPa is applied at 156 C in a vacuum chamber to provide hermetic sealing. The substrate of the SOI wafer is etched in a 25 weight percent TMAH bath at 80 C. The exposed buried oxide is then removed by using 49 percent HF droplets after an oxygen plasma ashing. The SOI top silicon layer is etched away by using an SF6 plasma to define the corrugation profile, followed by the HF droplet etching of the remaining oxide. The SF6 plasma with a shadow mask selectively etches the polysilicon membrane, if the transferred membrane structure needs to be patterned. Electrostatic actuators with various electrode gaps have been fabricated by this transfer technique. The gap between the transferred membrane and electrode substrate is very uniform ( 0.1 m across a wafer diameter of 100 mm, provided by optimizing the bonding control). Figure 2 depicts the finished product.

  14. Wafer level reliability testing: An idea whose time has come

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trapp, O. D.

    1987-01-01

    Wafer level reliability testing has been nurtured in the DARPA supported workshops, held each autumn since 1982. The seeds planted in 1982 have produced an active crop of very large scale integration manufacturers applying wafer level reliability test methods. Computer Aided Reliability (CAR) is a new seed being nurtured. Users are now being awakened by the huge economic value of the wafer reliability testing technology.

  15. Verification Benchmarks to Assess the Implementation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Hemolysis Prediction Models.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; D'Souza, Gavin; Horner, Marc; Malinauskas, Richard A; Myers, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop verification and validation (V&V) standards for using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the evaluation of medical devices, we have developed idealized flow-based verification benchmarks to assess the implementation of commonly cited power-law based hemolysis models in CFD. Verification process ensures that all governing equations are solved correctly and the model is free of user and numerical errors. To perform verification for power-law based hemolysis modeling, analytical solutions for the Eulerian power-law blood damage model (which estimates hemolysis index (HI) as a function of shear stress and exposure time) were obtained for Couette and inclined Couette flow models, and for Newtonian and non-Newtonian pipe flow models. Subsequently, CFD simulations of fluid flow and HI were performed using Eulerian and three different Lagrangian-based hemolysis models and compared with the analytical solutions. For all the geometries, the blood damage results from the Eulerian-based CFD simulations matched the Eulerian analytical solutions within ∼1%, which indicates successful implementation of the Eulerian hemolysis model. Agreement between the Lagrangian and Eulerian models depended upon the choice of the hemolysis power-law constants. For the commonly used values of power-law constants (α  = 1.9-2.42 and β  = 0.65-0.80), in the absence of flow acceleration, most of the Lagrangian models matched the Eulerian results within 5%. In the presence of flow acceleration (inclined Couette flow), moderate differences (∼10%) were observed between the Lagrangian and Eulerian models. This difference increased to greater than 100% as the beta exponent decreased. These simplified flow problems can be used as standard benchmarks for verifying the implementation of blood damage predictive models in commercial and open-source CFD codes. The current study only used power-law model as an illustrative example to emphasize the need

  16. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-15

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

  17. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  18. The impact of wafering on organic and inorganic surface contaminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S.; Wahl, S.; Timmel, S.; Köpge, R.; Jang, B.-Y.

    2016-08-01

    Beside the silicon feedstock material, the crystallization process and the cell processing itself, the wafer sawing process can strongly determine the final solar cell quality. Especially surface contamination is introduced in this process step because impurities from sawing meet with a virgin silicon surface which is highly reactive until the oxide layer is formed. In this paper we quantitatively analysed both, the organic and inorganic contamination on wafer surfaces and show that changes of process parameters during wafering may cause dramatic changes in surface purity. We present powerful techniques for the monitoring of wafer surface quality which is essential for the production of high efficiency and high quality solar cells.

  19. Dominant factors of the laser gettering of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, Yu. I. E-mail: yuibokhan@gmail.com; Kamenkov, V. S.; Tolochko, N. K.

    2015-02-15

    The laser gettering of silicon wafers is experimentally investigated. The typical gettering parameters are considered. The surfaces of laser-treated silicon wafers are investigated by microscopy. When studying the effect of laser radiation on silicon wafers during gettering, a group of factors determining the conditions of interaction between the laser beam and silicon-wafer surface and affecting the final result of treatment are selected. The main factors determining the gettering efficiency are revealed. Limitations on the desired value of the getter-layer capacity on surfaces with insufficiently high cleanness (for example, ground or matte) are established.

  20. Mask qualification strategies in a wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnert, Carmen; Kunowski, Angela

    2007-02-01

    Having consistent high quality photo masks is one of the key factors in lithography in the wafer fab. Combined with stable exposure- and resist processes, it ensures yield increases in production and fast learning cycles for technology development and design evaluation. Preventive controlling of incoming masks and quality monitoring while using the mask in production is essential for the fab to avoid yield loss or technical problems caused by mask issues, which eventually result in delivery problems to the customer. In this paper an overview of the procedures used for mask qualification and production release, for both logic and DRAM, at Infineon Dresden is presented. Incoming qualification procedures, such as specification checks, incoming inspection, and inline litho process window evaluation, are described here. Pinching and electrical tests, including compatibility tests for mask copies for high volume products on optimized litho processes, are also explained. To avoid mask degradation over lifetime, re-inspection checks are done for re-qualification while using the mask in production. The necessity of mask incoming inspection and re-qualification, due to the repeater printing from either the processing defects of the original mask or degrading defects of being used in the fab (i.e. haze, ESD, and moving particles, etc.), is demonstrated. The need and impact of tight mask specifications, such as CD uniformity signatures and corresponding electrical results, are shown with examples of mask-wafer CD correlation.

  1. Wafer-scale Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Davila, Antonio; Zand, Katayoun; Douglas, Wallace C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial metabolic and biophysical parameters are associated with degenerative diseases and the aging process. To evaluate these biochemical parameters, current technology requires several hundred milligrams of isolated mitochondria for functional assays. Here, we demonstrate manufacturable wafer-scale mitochondrial functional assay lab-on-a-chip devices, which require mitochondrial protein quantities three orders of magnitude less than current assays, integrated onto 4” standard silicon wafer with new fabrication processes and materials. Membrane potential changes of isolated mitochondria from various well-established cell lines such as human HeLa cell line (Heb7A), human osteosarcoma cell line (143b) and mouse skeletal muscle tissue were investigated and compared. This second generation integrated lab-on-a-chip system developed here shows enhanced structural durability and reproducibility while increasing the sensitivity to changes in mitochondrial membrane potential by an order of magnitude as compared to first generation technologies. We envision this system to be a great candidate to substitute current mitochondrial assay systems. PMID:22627274

  2. Combined aerodynamic and structural dynamic problem emulating routines (CASPER): Theory and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William H.

    1985-01-01

    The Combined Aerodynamic and Structural Dynamic Problem Emulating Routines (CASPER) is a collection of data-base modification computer routines that can be used to simulate Navier-Stokes flow through realistic, time-varying internal flow fields. The Navier-Stokes equation used involves calculations in all three dimensions and retains all viscous terms. The only term neglected in the current implementation is gravitation. The solution approach is of an interative, time-marching nature. Calculations are based on Lagrangian aerodynamic elements (aeroelements). It is assumed that the relationships between a particular aeroelement and its five nearest neighbor aeroelements are sufficient to make a valid simulation of Navier-Stokes flow on a small scale and that the collection of all small-scale simulations makes a valid simulation of a large-scale flow. In keeping with these assumptions, it must be noted that CASPER produces an imitation or simulation of Navier-Stokes flow rather than a strict numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. CASPER is written to operate under the Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX), which is described in a separate report.

  3. Capabilities and performance of the Automated Planet Finder telescope with the implementation of a dynamic scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jennifer; Holden, Bradford; Hanson, Russell; Laughlin, Greg; Vogt, Steve; Butler, Paul; Keiser, Sandy; Deich, William

    2015-10-01

    We report initial performance results emerging from 600 h of observations with the Automated Planet Finder (APF) telescope and Levy spectrometer located at UCO/Lick Observatory. We have obtained multiple spectra of 80 G, K, and M-type stars, which comprise 4954 individual Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurements with a median internal uncertainty of 1.35 ms-1. We find a strong, expected correlation between the number of photons accumulated in the 5000 to 6200 Å iodine region of the spectrum and the resulting internal uncertainty estimates. Additionally, we find an offset between the population of G and K stars and the M stars within the dataset when comparing these parameters. As a consequence of their increased spectral line densities, M-type stars permit the same level of internal uncertainty with 2× fewer photons than G-type and K-type stars. When observing M stars, we show that the APF/Levy has essentially the same speed-on-sky as Keck/high resolution echelle spectrometer (HIRES) for precision RVs. In the interest of using the APF for long-duration RV surveys, we have designed and implemented a dynamic scheduling algorithm. We discuss the operation of the scheduler, which monitors ambient conditions and combines on-sky information with a database of survey targets to make intelligent, real-time targeting decisions.

  4. Using System Dynamics to Define, Study, and Implement Smart Control Strategies on the Electric Power Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle G. Roybal; Robert F Jeffers

    2013-07-01

    The United States electric power grid is the most complex and expansive control system in the world. Local generation control occurs at individual units based on response time and unit economics, larger regional control coordinates unit response to error conditions, and high level large-area regional control is ultimately administered by a network of humans guided by economic and resiliency related factors. Under normal operating conditions, the grid is a relatively slow moving entity that exhibits high inertia to outside stimuli, and behaves along repeatable diurnal and seasonal patterns. However, that paradigm is quickly changing because of the increasing implementation of renewable generation sources. Renewable generators by nature cannot be tightly controlled or scheduled. They appear like a negative load to the system with all of the variability associated with load on a larger scale. Also, grid-reactive loads (i.e. smart devices) can alter their consumption based on price or demand rules adding more variability to system behavior. This paper demonstrates how a systems dynamic modeling approach capable of operating over multiple time scales, can provide valuable insight into developing new “smart-grid” control strategies and devices needed to accommodate renewable generation and regulate the frequency of the grid.

  5. A Dynamic Era-Based Time-Symmetric Block Time-Step Algorithm with Parallel Implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Murat; Saygin, Hasan

    2012-06-01

    The time-symmetric block time-step (TSBTS) algorithm is a newly developed efficient scheme for N-body integrations. It is constructed on an era-based iteration. In this work, we re-designed the TSBTS integration scheme with a dynamically changing era size. A number of numerical tests were performed to show the importance of choosing the size of the era, especially for long-time integrations. Our second aim was to show that the TSBTS scheme is as suitable as previously known schemes for developing parallel N-body codes. In this work, we relied on a parallel scheme using the copy algorithm for the time-symmetric scheme. We implemented a hybrid of data and task parallelization for force calculation to handle load balancing problems that can appear in practice. Using the Plummer model initial conditions for different numbers of particles, we obtained the expected efficiency and speedup for a small number of particles. Although parallelization of the direct N-body codes is negatively affected by the communication/calculation ratios, we obtained good load-balanced results. Moreover, we were able to conserve the advantages of the algorithm (e.g., energy conservation for long-term simulations).

  6. Using Sociocultural Perspectives: The Dynamic Process of Designing and Implementing Class Activities in an Online Japanese Language Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibakawa, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    The study documented the dynamic process of designing and implementing instructional interventions in an online course of Japanese language and culture at a two-year college. The results have impact in three distinct areas: pedagogical, theoretical, and methodological. First, the interventions that encouraged student agency with rich…

  7. Implementation of a Research-Based Lab Module in a High School Chemistry Curriculum: A Study of Classroom Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilarz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    For this study, a research-based lab module was implemented in two high school chemistry classes for the purpose of examining classroom dynamics throughout the process of students completing the module. A research-based lab module developed for use in undergraduate laboratories by the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) was…

  8. Implementation of window shading models into dynamic whole-building simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomanowski, Bartosz Aleksander

    resistances of sealed cavities between glazing/shading layers are calculated at each time-step for various fill gases and mixtures. In addition to modeling glazing/shading layer combinations, the CFC type also provides an alternate method of modeling unshaded windows without relying on third party software to supply the solar optics and cavity resistances. To build confidence in the CFC code implementation, two comparison studies were carried out to compare the CFC type against other models. The first study compared the CFC models for unshaded windows with the standard ESP-r transparent multi-layer construction (TMC) models. The second study compared the CFC slat-type blind models with EnergyPlus 2.0. Good agreement was seen in the simulation results in both studies. The successful implementation of the Complex Fenestration Construction within ESP-r has been demonstrated in the current research. In order for ESP-r users to fully exploit the capabilities of the CFC framework, it is recommended that the current models be extended to include a facility for dynamic shading control as well as the treatment of other types of shading layers. The coupling of daylighting models with the CFC type would provide a useful tool for modeling luminance control in combination with shading control strategies. With these enhancements, it is anticipated that the CFC implementation will be of significant value to practitioners.

  9. Photolithography diagnostic expert systems: a systematic approach to problem solving in a wafer fabrication facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherwax Scott, Caroline; Tsareff, Christopher R.

    1990-06-01

    One of the main goals of process engineering in the semiconductor industry is to improve wafer fabrication productivity and throughput. Engineers must work continuously toward this goal in addition to performing sustaining and development tasks. To accomplish these objectives, managers must make efficient use of engineering resources. One of the tools being used to improve efficiency is the diagnostic expert system. Expert systems are knowledge based computer programs designed to lead the user through the analysis and solution of a problem. Several photolithography diagnostic expert systems have been implemented at the Hughes Technology Center to provide a systematic approach to process problem solving. This systematic approach was achieved by documenting cause and effect analyses for a wide variety of processing problems. This knowledge was organized in the form of IF-THEN rules, a common structure for knowledge representation in expert system technology. These rules form the knowledge base of the expert system which is stored in the computer. The systems also include the problem solving methodology used by the expert when addressing a problem in his area of expertise. Operators now use the expert systems to solve many process problems without engineering assistance. The systems also facilitate the collection of appropriate data to assist engineering in solving unanticipated problems. Currently, several expert systems have been implemented to cover all aspects of the photolithography process. The systems, which have been in use for over a year, include wafer surface preparation (HMDS), photoresist coat and softbake, align and expose on a wafer stepper, and develop inspection. These systems are part of a plan to implement an expert system diagnostic environment throughout the wafer fabrication facility. In this paper, the systems' construction is described, including knowledge acquisition, rule construction, knowledge refinement, testing, and evaluation. The roles

  10. 1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Adam

    2013-08-30

    The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer™ is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer™ to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV – a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the

  11. A molecular dynamics implementation of the 3D Mercedes-Benz water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynninen, T.; Dias, C. L.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Heinonen, V.; Karttunen, M.; Foster, A. S.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2012-02-01

    The three-dimensional Mercedes-Benz model was recently introduced to account for the structural and thermodynamic properties of water. It treats water molecules as point-like particles with four dangling bonds in tetrahedral coordination, representing H-bonds of water. Its conceptual simplicity renders the model attractive in studies where complex behaviors emerge from H-bond interactions in water, e.g., the hydrophobic effect. A molecular dynamics (MD) implementation of the model is non-trivial and we outline here the mathematical framework of its force-field. Useful routines written in modern Fortran are also provided. This open source code is free and can easily be modified to account for different physical context. The provided code allows both serial and MPI-parallelized execution. Program summaryProgram title: CASHEW (Coarse Approach Simulator for Hydrogen-bonding Effects in Water) Catalogue identifier: AEKM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 20 501 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 551 044 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Program has been tested on desktop workstations and a Cray XT4/XT5 supercomputer. Operating system: Linux, Unix, OS X Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: The code has been parallelized using MPI. RAM: Depends on size of system, about 5 MB for 1500 molecules. Classification: 7.7 External routines: A random number generator, Mersenne Twister ( http://www.math.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/m-mat/MT/VERSIONS/FORTRAN/mt95.f90), is used. A copy of the code is included in the distribution. Nature of problem: Molecular dynamics simulation of a new geometric water model. Solution method: New force-field for

  12. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer's position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates.

  13. Eutectic bonds on wafer scale by thin film multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Carsten; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1996-09-01

    The use of gold based thin film multilayer systems for forming eutectic bonds on wafer scale is investigated and preliminary results will be presented. On polished 4 inch wafers different multilayer systems are developed using thin film techniques and bonded afterwards under reactive atmospheres and different bonding temperatures and forces. Pull tests are performed to extract the bonding strengths.

  14. Fabrication of Uniform Nanoscale Cavities via Silicon Direct Wafer Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Stephen R. D.; Perron, Justin K.; Kimball, Mark O.; Mehta, Sarabjit; Gasparini, Francis M.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the heat capacity and superfluid fraction of confined 4He have been performed near the lambda transition using lithographically patterned and bonded silicon wafers. Unlike confinements in porous materials often used for these types of experiments3, bonded wafers provide predesigned uniform spaces for confinement. The geometry of each cell is well known, which removes a large source of ambiguity in the interpretation of data. Exceptionally flat, 5 cm diameter, 375 µm thick Si wafers with about 1 µm variation over the entire wafer can be obtained commercially (from Semiconductor Processing Company, for example). Thermal oxide is grown on the wafers to define the confinement dimension in the z-direction. A pattern is then etched in the oxide using lithographic techniques so as to create a desired enclosure upon bonding. A hole is drilled in one of the wafers (the top) to allow for the introduction of the liquid to be measured. The wafers are cleaned2 in RCA solutions and then put in a microclean chamber where they are rinsed with deionized water4. The wafers are bonded at RT and then annealed at ~1,100 °C. This forms a strong and permanent bond. This process can be used to make uniform enclosures for measuring thermal and hydrodynamic properties of confined liquids from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. PMID:24457563

  15. Analysis of wafer heating in 14nm DUV layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, Woong Jae; Samudrala, Pavan; Gao, Haiyong; Aung, Nyan; Gomez, Juan Manuel; Minghetti, Blandine; Lee, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    To further shrink the contact and trench dimensions, Negative Tone Development (NTD) has become the de facto process at these layers. The NTD process uses a positive tone resist and an organic solvent-based negative tone developer which leads to improved image contrast, larger process window and smaller Mask Error Enhancement Factor (MEEF)[1]. The NTD masks have high transmission values leading to lens heating and as observed here wafer heating as well. Both lens and wafer heating will contribute to overlay error, however the effects of lens heating can be mitigated by applying lens heating corrections while no such corrections exist for wafer heating yet. Although the magnitude of overlay error due to wafer heating is low relative to lens heating; ever tightening overlay requirements imply that the distortions due to wafer heating will quickly become a significant part of the overlay budget. In this work the effects, analysis and observations of wafer heating on contact and metal layers of the 14nm node are presented. On product wafers it manifests as a difference in the scan up and scan down signatures between layers. An experiment to further understand wafer heating is performed with a test reticle that is used to monitor scanner performance.

  16. Piezoresistive stress sensors on (110) silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Y. L.; Suhling, J. C.; Jaeger, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Structural reliability of electronic packages has become an increasing concern for a variety of reasons including the advent of higher integrated circuit densities, power density levels, and operating temperatures. A powerful method for experimental evaluation of die stress distributions is the use of test chips incorporating integral piezoresistive sensors. In this paper, the basic equations needed for the design of stress sensors fabricated on the surface of (110) oriented silicon wafers have been presented. Several sensor rosette configurations have been explored, including the familiar three-element 0-45-90 rosette. Rosette designs have been found which minimize the necessary calibration procedures and permit more stress components to be measured. It has been established that stress sensors on the surface of (110) test chips are sensitive to four out of the six stress components at a point.

  17. Wafer Mapping Using Deuterium Enhanced Defect Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, K.; Holland, O. W.; Hellmer, R.; Vanmil, B.; Bubulac, L. O.; Golding, T. D.

    2010-07-01

    Deuterium (as well as other hydrogen isotopes) binds with a wide range of morphological defects in semiconductors and, as such, becomes distributed similarly to those defects. Thus, the deuterium profile within the sample serves as the basis of a technique for defect mapping known as amethyst wafer mapping (AWM). The efficiency of this technique has been demonstrated by evaluation of ion-induced damage in implanted Si, as well as as-grown defects in HgCdTe (MCT) epilayers. The defect tagging or decoration capability of deuterium is largely material independent and applicable to a wide range of defect morphologies. A number of analytical techniques including ion channeling and etch pit density measurements were used to evaluate the AWM results.

  18. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two.

  19. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two

  20. Electron arc therapy: design, implementation and evaluation of a dynamic multi-vane collimator system.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, D D; Stewart, J R; Moeller, J H; Lee, W L; Takach, G A

    1989-11-01

    Innovative techniques in motion control technology have been applied to the design and implementation of a portable computer-controlled multi-vane collimator for use in electron arc therapy. The collimator, consisting of 18 independently controlled vanes, is inserted into the standard accessory mount assembly of a linear accelerator, in the same fashion as standard field shaping blocks. Power is supplied to the collimator vane motors via a self-contained battery system. The range of motion of the vanes, symmetrically mounted nine on each side, provides a variable aperture width projected to isocenter of 2 cm minimum to 8 cm maximum. The projected length of the aperture at isocenter is 38 cm. The transition time between vane positions is less than 1 second, corresponding to gantry movement of less than 1 degree. The movement of each of the 18 vanes is monitored and controlled by six individually addressed three axis processors that are shielded from the electron beam. A table of collimator vane positions versus gantry angle, as determined by dose optimization calculations, is stored in a data file. The desired collimator vane position corresponding to the current arc segment is conveyed from the control console to each vane controller via packets within a token passing network. Communication between the computer in the console area and the vane controllers is accomplished through encoded infra-red pulse transmission, eliminating the need for additional communication lines between the console and the accelerator. This dynamic collimator offers improved dose uniformity while simplifying the delivery of electron arc therapy. PMID:2808043

  1. Overlay Tolerances For VLSI Using Wafer Steppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.; Rice, Rory

    1988-01-01

    In order for VLSI circuits to function properly, the masking layers used in the fabrication of those devices must overlay each other to within the manufacturing tolerance incorporated in the circuit design. The capabilities of the alignment tools used in the masking process determine the overlay tolerances to which circuits can be designed. It is therefore of considerable importance that these capabilities be well characterized. Underestimation of the overlay accuracy results in unnecessarily large devices, resulting in poor utilization of wafer area and possible degradation of device performance. Overestimation will result in significant yield loss because of the failure to conform to the tolerances of the design rules. The proper methodology for determining the overlay capabilities of wafer steppers, the most commonly used alignment tool for the production of VLSI circuits, is the subject of this paper. Because cost-effective manufacturing process technology has been the driving force of VLSI, the impact on productivity is a primary consideration in all discussions. Manufacturers of alignment tools advertise the capabilities of their equipment. It is notable that no manufacturer currently characterizes his aligners in a manner consistent with the requirements of producing very large integrated circuits, as will be discussed. This has resulted in the situation in which the evaluation and comparison of the capabilities of alignment tools require the attention of a lithography specialist. Unfortunately, lithographic capabilities must be known by many other people, particularly the circuit designers and the managers responsible for the financial consequences of the high prices of modern alignment tools. All too frequently, the designer or manager is confronted with contradictory data, one set coming from his lithography specialist, and the other coming from a sales representative of an equipment manufacturer. Since the latter generally attempts to make his

  2. Multiagent Systems Based Modeling and Implementation of Dynamic Energy Management of Smart Microgrid Using MACSimJX

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Leo; Milton, R. S.; Mahadevan, Senthilkumaran

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is implementation of multiagent system (MAS) for the advanced distributed energy management and demand side management of a solar microgrid. Initially, Java agent development environment (JADE) frame work is used to implement MAS based dynamic energy management of solar microgrid. Due to unstable nature of MATLAB, when dealing with multithreading environment, MAS operating in JADE is linked with the MATLAB using a middle ware called Multiagent Control Using Simulink with Jade Extension (MACSimJX). MACSimJX allows the solar microgrid components designed with MATLAB to be controlled by the corresponding agents of MAS. The microgrid environment variables are captured through sensors and given to agents through MATLAB/Simulink and after the agent operations in JADE, the results are given to the actuators through MATLAB for the implementation of dynamic operation in solar microgrid. MAS operating in JADE maximizes operational efficiency of solar microgrid by decentralized approach and increase in runtime efficiency due to JADE. Autonomous demand side management is implemented for optimizing the power exchange between main grid and microgrid with intermittent nature of solar power, randomness of load, and variation of noncritical load and grid price. These dynamics are considered for every time step and complex environment simulation is designed to emulate the distributed microgrid operations and evaluate the impact of agent operations. PMID:27127802

  3. Multiagent Systems Based Modeling and Implementation of Dynamic Energy Management of Smart Microgrid Using MACSimJX.

    PubMed

    Raju, Leo; Milton, R S; Mahadevan, Senthilkumaran

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is implementation of multiagent system (MAS) for the advanced distributed energy management and demand side management of a solar microgrid. Initially, Java agent development environment (JADE) frame work is used to implement MAS based dynamic energy management of solar microgrid. Due to unstable nature of MATLAB, when dealing with multithreading environment, MAS operating in JADE is linked with the MATLAB using a middle ware called Multiagent Control Using Simulink with Jade Extension (MACSimJX). MACSimJX allows the solar microgrid components designed with MATLAB to be controlled by the corresponding agents of MAS. The microgrid environment variables are captured through sensors and given to agents through MATLAB/Simulink and after the agent operations in JADE, the results are given to the actuators through MATLAB for the implementation of dynamic operation in solar microgrid. MAS operating in JADE maximizes operational efficiency of solar microgrid by decentralized approach and increase in runtime efficiency due to JADE. Autonomous demand side management is implemented for optimizing the power exchange between main grid and microgrid with intermittent nature of solar power, randomness of load, and variation of noncritical load and grid price. These dynamics are considered for every time step and complex environment simulation is designed to emulate the distributed microgrid operations and evaluate the impact of agent operations. PMID:27127802

  4. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunning, Benjamin V.; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Ranjbar Kermany, Atieh; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  5. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers.

    PubMed

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-15

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices. PMID:25053702

  6. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity in Wafer-Bonded Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    ZL Liau; LR Danielson; PM Fourspring; L Hu; G Chen; GW Turner

    2006-11-27

    Blocks of silicon up to 3-mm thick have been formed by directly bonding stacks of thin wafer chips. These stacks showed significant reductions in the thermal conductivity in the bonding direction. In each sample, the wafer chips were obtained by polishing a commercial wafer to as thin as 36 {micro}m, followed by dicing. Stacks whose starting wafers were patterned with shallow dots showed greater reductions in thermal conductivity. Diluted-HF treatment of wafer chips prior to bonding led to the largest reduction of the effective thermal conductivity, by approximately a factor of 50. Theoretical modeling based on restricted conduction through the contacting dots and some conduction across the planar nanometer air gaps yielded fair agreement for samples fabricated without the HF treatment.

  7. Backside EBR process performance with various wafer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Vangheluwe, Rik; Erich, Daub; Sanada, Masakazu

    2009-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary to avoid top coat film peeling. To achieve suitable stacking architecture for immersion lithography process, an EBR process that delivers tightly controlled film edge position and good uniformity around the wafer circumference is needed. We demonstrated a new bevel rinse system on a SOKUDO RF3 coat-and-develop track for immersion lithography. The performance of the new bevel rinse system for various wafer properties was evaluated. It was found that the bevel rinse system has a good controllability of film edge position and good uniformity around the wafer circumference. The results indicate that the bevel rinse system has a large margin for wafer centering accuracy, back side particles, wafer shape and substrates with good film edge position controllability, uniformity and clean apex. The system has been demonstrated to provide a suitable film stacking architecture for immersion lithography mass production process.

  8. Interferometric metrology of wafer nanotopography for advanced CMOS process integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John F.; Koliopoulos, Chris L.; Tang, Shouhong

    2001-12-01

    According to industry standards (SEMI M43, Guide for Reporting Wafer Nanotopography), Nanotopography is the non- planar deviation of the whole front wafer surface within a spatial wavelength range of approximately 0.2 to 20 mm and within the fixed quality area (FQA). The need for precision metrology of wafer nanotopography is being actively addressed by interferometric technology. In this paper we present an approach to mapping the whole wafer front surface nanotopography using an engineered coherence interferometer. The interferometer acquires a whole wafer raw topography map. The raw map is then filtered to remove the long spatial wavelength, high amplitude shape contributions and reveal the nanotopography in the filtered map. Filtered maps can be quantitatively analyzed in a variety of ways to enable statistical process control (SPC) of nanotopography parameters. The importance of tracking these parameters for CMOS gate level processes at 180-nm critical dimension, and below, is examined.

  9. Rapid defect detections of bonded wafer using near infrared polariscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chi Seng; Asundi, Anand K.

    2011-10-01

    In modern field of microelectronics and MEMS, wafer bonding has emerged as an important processing step in wide range of manufacturing applications. During the manufacturing process, even in the modern clean room, small defects result from trapped particles and gas bubbles exist at bonded interface. Defects and trapped particles may exist on the top and bottom of the wafers, or at the interface of bonded wafer pair. These inclusions will generate high stress around debond region at the wafers bonded interface. In this paper, inspection at the bonded interface will be the interest of investigation. Since silicon wafer is opaque to visible light, defect detection at the bonded interface of silicon wafer is not possible. Due to the fact that silicon wafer is transparent to wavelength greater than 1150nm, an Near Infrared Polariscope which has showed some promises on residual stress measurement on silicon devices has been adapted and developed. This method is based on the well known photoelastic principles, where the stress variations are measured based on the changes of light propagation velocity in birefringence material. The results are compared and contrast with conventional Infrared Transmission Imaging tool (IRT) which is widely used to inspect the bonded silicon wafer. In this research, the trapped particles that are not visible via conventional infrared transmission method are identified via the generated residual stress pattern. The magnitude of the residual stress fields associated with each defect is examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The stress field generated at the wafers bonded interface will looks like a 'butterfly' pattern. Wafer pairs Pyrex-Si and Si-Si bonded interface will be examined.

  10. Implementation of the SCC-DFTB Method for Hybrid QM/MM Simulations within the Amber Molecular Dynamics Package

    PubMed Central

    de M. Seabra, Gustavo; Walker, Ross C.; Elstner, Marcus; Case, David A.; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2011-01-01

    Self-Consistent Charge Density Functional Tight Binding (SCC-DFTB) is a semi-empirical method based on Density Functional Theory, and has in many cases been shown to provide relative energies and geometries comparable in accuracy to full DFT or ab-initio MP2 calculations using large basis sets. This article shows an implementation of the SCC-DFTB method as part of the new QM/MM support in the AMBER 9 molecular dynamics program suite. Details of the implementation and examples of applications are shown. PMID:17521173

  11. Recent progress in wafer-fused VECSELs emitting in the 1310nm waveband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbu, A.; Rantamaki, A.; Iakovlev, V.; Mereuta, A.; Caliman, A.; Volet, N.; Lyytikäinen, J.; Okhotnikov, O.; Kapon, E.

    2015-03-01

    Over the last years we have continuously improved the performance of 1300 nm band VECSELs with wafer fused gain mirrors in the intra-cavity diamond and the flip-chip heat dissipation configurations. In this work we present recent results for gain mirrors that implement both heat-dissipation schemes applied to the same fused gain mirror structure. We demonstrate record high output powers of 7.1 W in the intra-cavity diamond heat-spreader configuration and 6.5 W in the flip-chip heat dissipation scheme. These improvements are achieved due to optimization of the wafer fused gain mirror structure based on AlGaInAs/InP-active region fused to AlAs-GaAs distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and application of efficient methods of bonding semiconductor gain mirror chips to diamond heatspreaders.

  12. Measurement of small angle based on a (1 0 0) silicon wafer and heterodyne interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Meng-Chang; Lin, Jiun-You; Chen, Yu-Fong; Chang, Chia-Ou

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new optical material application and a heterodyne interferometer are proposed for measuring small angles. In the proposed interferometer, the optical material is a (1 0 0) silicon wafer applied to compose a new architecture of small angle sensor. The small angle measurement used the phase difference which is dependent on the incident angle at the silicon wafer surface to deduce the angular variation. The proposed architecture is simple and uses the common path method to compare test and reference signals; thus, small angles can be easily and accurately measured by estimating the phase difference. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this method. The angular resolution and sensitivity levels superior to 7 × 10-5° (1.3 × 10-6 rad) and 150 (deg/deg), respectively, were attainable in a dynamic range of 0.45°.

  13. The Dynamics of Implementing and Sustaining Standards-Based Mathematics Curricula in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Jennifer M.

    This study examined both district-level and teacher-level considerations in the implementation of standards-based middle school mathematics curriculum. In particular, the following questions were addressed: (1) What district-level constraints and considerations impact decisions regarding implementation of a standards-based middle school…

  14. Multifunctional medicated lyophilised wafer dressing for effective chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Harshavardhan V; Boateng, Joshua S; Ayensu, Isaac; Tetteh, John

    2014-06-01

    Wafers combining weight ratios of Polyox with carrageenan (75/25) or sodium alginate (50/50) containing streptomycin and diclofenac were prepared to improve chronic wound healing. Gels were freeze-dried using a lyophilisation cycle incorporating an annealing step. Wafers were characterised for morphology, mechanical and in vitro functional (swelling, adhesion, drug release in the presence of simulated wound fluid) characteristics. Both blank (BLK) and drug-loaded (DL) wafers were soft, flexible, elegant in appearance and non-brittle in nature. Annealing helped to improve porous nature of wafers but was affected by the addition of drugs. Mechanical characterisation demonstrated that the wafers were strong enough to withstand normal stresses but also flexible to prevent damage to newly formed skin tissue. Differences in swelling, adhesion and drug release characteristics could be attributed to differences in pore size and sodium sulphate formed because of the salt forms of the two drugs. BLK wafers showed relatively higher swelling and adhesion than DL wafers with the latter showing controlled release of streptomycin and diclofenac. The optimised dressing has the potential to reduce bacterial infection and can also help to reduce swelling and pain associated with injury due to the anti-inflammatory action of diclofenac and help to achieve more rapid wound healing. PMID:24700434

  15. Development of optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Chuen-Lin; Lai, Qun-Huang; Lin, Chern-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The data of a wafer with defects can provide engineers with very important information and clues to improve the yield rate and quality in manufacturing. This paper presents a microscope automatic positioning and wafer detection system with human-machine interface based on image processing and fuzzy inference algorithms. In the proposed system, a XY table is used to move the position of each die on 6 inch or 8 inch wafers. Then, a high-resolution CCD and one set of two-axis optical linear encoder are used to accurately measure the position on the wafer. Finally, the developed human-machine interface is used to display the current position of an actual wafer in order to complete automatic positioning, and a wafer map database can be created. In the process of defect detection, CCD is used for image processing, and during preprocessing, it is required to filter noise, acquire the defect characteristics, define the defective template, and then take the characteristic points of the defective template as the reference input for fuzzy inference. A high-accuracy optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system is thus constructed. This study focused on automatic detection of spots, scratches, and bruises, and attempted to reduce the time to detect defective die and improve the accuracy of determining the defects of semiconductor devices.

  16. Techniques for the evaluation of outgassing from polymeric wafer pods

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.C.; Liang, A.; Thornberg, S.M.; Bender, S.F.; Lujan, R.D.; Blewer, R.S.; Bowers, W.D.

    1994-03-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in using wafer-level isolation environments or pods (microenvironments) to provide a more controllable, cleaner wafer environment during wafer processing. It has been shown that pods can be effective in reducing the amount of particulate contamination on wafers during manufacturing. However, there have also been studies that indicate that pods and wafer boxes can be the source of condensible, molecular organic contamination. This paper summarizes the work that has been performed during the past year at Sandia National Laboratories` Contamination Free Manufacturing Research Center (CFMRC) on (1) devising standard, low-temperature, high sensitivity techniques to detect outgassing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from polymers used to construct wafer pods and (2) development of a technique that can be used to continuously measure the condensible contamination within pods so that the pod environment can be monitored during manufacturing. Although these techniques have been developed specifically for assessing contamination threats from wafer pods, they can be used to evaluate other potential contamination sources. The high sensitivity outgassing techniques can be used to evaluate outgassing of volatiles from other clean-room materials and the real-time outgassing sensor can be used to monitor contamination condensation in non-pod environments such as ballroom-type cleanrooms and minienvironments.

  17. A study on wafer level vacuum packaging for MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeungleul; Seok, Seonho; Chun, Kukjin

    2003-09-01

    A new vacuum packaging process at the wafer level is developed for the surface micromachining devices using glass-silicon anodic bonding technology. The rim for the glass-silicon bonding process which is needed to prevent vacuum leakage is built up simultaneously as the structure is being etched. The mechanical resonator is used as a tool for evaluating the vacuum level of the packaging. The inside pressure of the packaged device was measured indirectly by measuring the quality factor of the mechanical resonator. The measured Q factor was about 5 × 104 and the estimated inner pressure was about 1 mTorr. It is also possible to change the inside pressure of the packaged devices from 2 Torr to 1 mTorr by varying the amount of Ti getter material. The yield of the vacuum packaging process is about 80% and vacuum degradation was not observed after 1000 h had passed. The developed vacuum packaging process is also applied to resonant accelerometers which need a high vacuum environment to implement higher performance.

  18. Surface quality of silicon wafer improved by hydrodynamic effect polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wenqiang; Guan, Chaoliang; Li, Shengyi

    2014-08-01

    Differing from the traditional pad polishing, hydrodynamic effect polishing (HEP) is non-contact polishing with the wheel floated on the workpiece. A hydrodynamic lubricated film is established between the wheel and the workpiece when the wheel rotates at a certain speed in HEP. Nanoparticles mixed with deionized water are employed as the polishing slurry, and with action of the dynamic pressure, nanoparticles with high chemisorption due to the high specific surface area can easily reacted with the surface atoms forming a linkage with workpiece surface. The surface atoms are dragged away when nanoparticles are transported to separate by the flow shear stress. The development of grand scale integration put extremely high requirements on the surface quality on the silicon wafer with surface roughness at subnanometer and extremely low surface damage. In our experiment a silicon sample was processed by HEP, and the surface topography before and after polishing was observed by the atomic force microscopy. Experiment results show that plastic pits and bumpy structures on the initial surface have been removed away clearly with the removal depth of 140nm by HEP process. The processed surface roughness has been improved from 0.737nm RMS to 0.175nm RMS(10μm×10μm) and the section profile shows peaks of the process surface are almost at the same height. However, the machining ripples on the wheel surface will duplicate on the silicon surface under the action of the hydrodynamic effect. Fluid dynamic simulation demonstrated that the coarse surface on the wheel has greatly influence on the distribution of shear stress and dynamic pressure on the workpiece surface.

  19. The uses of Man-Made diamond in wafering applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fallon, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    The continuing, rapid growth of the semiconductor industry requires the involvement of several specialized industries in the development of special products geared toward the unique requirements of this new industry. A specialized manufactured diamond to meet various material removal needs was discussed. The area of silicon wafer slicing has presented yet anothr challenge and it is met most effectively. The history, operation, and performance of Man-Made diamond and particularly as applied to silicon wafer slicing is discussed. Product development is underway to come up with a diamond specifically for sawing silicon wafers on an electroplated blade.

  20. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: Ulnar Shortening vs. Arthroscopic Wafer Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Luc De; Vandenberghe, Lore; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of ulnar shortenings was compared with that of arthroscopic wafer resections for ulnar impaction (or abutment) syndrome in patients with a positive ulnar variance. The outcome was measured by DASH score, visual analog scale for pain, and working incapacity. The mean DASH score in the ulnar shortening group was 26; in the wafer group it was 36. The VAS scores were respectively 4.4 and 4.6. The working incapacity was 7?months in the ulnar shortening group and 6.1 months in the wafer group. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. PMID:25032075

  1. Wafer warpage characterization measurement with modified fringe reflection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Yi; Ku, Yi-Sha

    2015-05-01

    We have demonstrated a modified fringe reflection method to compensate the warpage measurement errors caused by the height difference between optical reference mirror and wafer sample surface. We have used a linearity analysis approach to obtain the parabolic height errors for a 4-inch sapphire wafer warpage measurement, which is around 1.48 μm of 100 μm height difference. The experimental results shows the warp discrepancy of 6-inch sapphire wafer is less than 1 μm compared with the reference Tropel instrument.

  2. Identification of continuous-time dynamical systems: Neural network based algorithms and parallel implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, R.M.; Lapedes, A.S.; Rico-Martinez, R.; Kevrekidis, I.G.

    1993-06-01

    Time-delay mappings constructed using neural networks have proven successful performing nonlinear system identification; however, because of their discrete nature, their use in bifurcation analysis of continuous-tune systems is limited. This shortcoming can be avoided by embedding the neural networks in a training algorithm that mimics a numerical integrator. Both explicit and implicit integrators can be used. The former case is based on repeated evaluations of the network in a feedforward implementation; the latter relies on a recurrent network implementation. Here the algorithms and their implementation on parallel machines (SIMD and MIMD architectures) are discussed.

  3. Identification of continuous-time dynamical systems: Neural network based algorithms and parallel implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, R.M.; Lapedes, A.S. ); Rico-Martinez, R.; Kevrekidis, I.G. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Time-delay mappings constructed using neural networks have proven successful performing nonlinear system identification; however, because of their discrete nature, their use in bifurcation analysis of continuous-tune systems is limited. This shortcoming can be avoided by embedding the neural networks in a training algorithm that mimics a numerical integrator. Both explicit and implicit integrators can be used. The former case is based on repeated evaluations of the network in a feedforward implementation; the latter relies on a recurrent network implementation. Here the algorithms and their implementation on parallel machines (SIMD and MIMD architectures) are discussed.

  4. Use of dMLC for implementation of dynamic respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To simulate and evaluate the use of dynamic multileaf collimators (dMLC) in respiratory gating to compensate for baseline drift.Methods: Tumor motion tracking data from 30 lung tumors over 322 treatment fractions was analyzed with the finite state model. A dynamic respiratory gating window was established in real-time by determining the average positions during the previous two end-of-expiration breathing phases and centering the dMLC aperture on a weighted average of these positions. A simulated dMLC with physical motion constraints was used in dynamic gating treatment simulations. Fluence maps were created to provide a statistical description of radiation delivery for each fraction. Duty cycle was also calculated for each fraction.Results: The average duty cycle was 2.3% greater under dynamic gating conditions. Dynamic gating also showed higher fluences and less tumor obstruction. Additionally, dynamic gating required fewer beam toggles and each delivery period was longer on average than with static gating.Conclusions: The use of dynamic gating showed better performance than static gating and the physical constraints of a dMLC were shown to not be an impediment to dynamic gating.

  5. Low-temperature full wafer adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklaus, Frank; Enoksson, Peter; Kälvesten, Edvard; Stemme, Göran

    2001-03-01

    We have systematically investigated the influence of different bonding parameters on void formation in a low-temperature adhesive bonding process. As a result of these studies we present guidelines for void free adhesive bonding of 10 cm diameter wafers. We have focused on polymer coatings with layer thicknesses between 1 µm and 18 µm. The tested polymer materials were benzocyclobutene (BCB) from Dow Chemical, a negative photoresist (ULTRA-i 300) and a positive photoresist (S1818) from Shipley, a polyimide (HTR3) from Arch Chemical and two different polyimides (PI2555 and PI2610) from DuPont. The polymer material, the bonding pressure and the pre-curing time and temperature for the polymer significantly influence void formation at the bond interface. High bonding pressure and optimum pre-curing times/temperatures counteract void formation. We present the process parameters to achieve void-free bonding with the BCB coating and with the ULTRA-i 300 photoresist coating as adhesive materials. Excellent void-free and strong bonds have been achieved by using BCB as the bonding material which requires a minimum bonding temperature of 180 °C.

  6. Efficient data transmission from silicon wafer strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Lackner, K.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sharp, D.H.; Winter, L.; Ziock, H.J.

    1991-12-31

    An architecture for on-wafer processing is proposed for central silicon-strip tracker systems as they are currently designed for high energy physics experiments at the SSC, and for heavy ion experiments at RHIC. The data compression achievable with on-wafer processing would make it possible to transmit all data generated to the outside of the detector system. A set of data which completely describes the state of the wafer for low occupancy events and which contains important statistical information for more complex events can be transmitted immediately. This information could be used in early trigger decisions. Additional data packages which complete the description of the state of the wafer vary in size and are sent through a second channel. By buffering this channel the required bandwidth can be kept far below the peak data rates which occur in rate but interesting events. 18 refs.

  7. Proceedings of the Low-Cost Solar Array Wafering Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    The technology and economics of silicon ingot wafering for low cost solar arrays were discussed. Fixed and free abrasive sawing wire, ID, and multiblade sawing, materials, mechanisms, characterization, and innovative concepts were considered.

  8. Surface defects in GaAs wafer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, H.; Ishida, M.; Kikawa, J.

    1990-06-01

    The causes of micro- and macro-irregularities observed on GaAs(100) polished wafers were investigated. From the results, the wafer processes were improved so that a high-quality surface was obtained without orange peel, haze, or pits. For 3-inch wafers the flatness was improved to less than 2 μm in TTV and the warp to less than 5 μm. Improvements in the wafer processes were: development of a better polishing solution, filtering of this solution with maintenance of the pad conditions, thereby eliminating scratches, annealing at high temperature to eliminate pits, advances in slicing and lapping to reduce warp, and three-stage double-sided polishing to eliminate dimples and to improve TTV.

  9. Particle-wafer interactions in semiaqueous silicon cleaning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupka, Lukasz

    During the semiconductor chip manufacturing process, a silicon wafer goes through a number of cycles in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments. As silicon chips become more sophisticated, the manufacturing process becomes more involved and new challenges are imposed by size reduction, increase in the aspect ratio and the formation of multilayer structures. Wafer cleaning processes emerge several times in one manufacturing cycle. By rule of thumb, it is necessary to remove wafer contamination by particles which are half of a feature size. This is an enormous challenge, keeping in mind that currently wafer structures are of nanometer size. The cleaning procedures which worked for the last 40 years are becoming ineffective and obsolete. The industry calls for more efficient cleaning procedures in terms of particle contamination removal, and at the same time less aggressive procedures to prevent damage/dissolution of the fragile and narrow wafer structures. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), besides being an imaging tool with nano resolution, proves to be an indispensable instrument to characterize interaction forces, lateral forces, and adhesion between micron and submicron contaminant particles and the wafer surfaces both in air and liquid. Using the AFM colloidal probe technique interaction forces were measured between a contaminant particle and a wafer surface. These measurements were done for the silica---silica hydrophilic system and for the silanated silica---silanated silica hydrophobic system. The influence of the nonaqueous component in semiconductor wafer cleaning solution on interaction forces was also investigated under both hydrophilic and hydrophobic conditions. In addition the effect of particle size on the interaction forces as well as particle removal rate under both conditions is addressed. While force/radius normalization of measured interaction forces works great for hydrophilic systems, it was found to significantly underestimate the influence

  10. Development of Megasonic cleaning for silicon wafers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1980-09-01

    The major goals to develop a cleaning and drying system for processing at least 2500 three-in.-diameter wafers per hour and to reduce the process cost were achieved. The new system consists of an ammonia-hydrogen peroxide bath in which both surfaces of 3/32-in.-spaced, ion-implanted wafers are cleaned in quartz carriers moved on a belt past two pairs of Megasonic transducers. The wafers are dried in the novel room-temperature, high-velocity air dryer in the same carriers used for annealing. A new laser scanner was used effectively to monitor the cleaning ability on a sampling basis. The following factors contribute to the improved effectiveness of the process: (1) recirculation and filtration of the cleaning solution permit it to be used for at least 100,000 wafers with only a relatively small amount of chemical make-up before discarding; (2) uniform cleanliness is achieved because both sides of the wafer are Megasonically scrubbed to remove particulate impurities; (3) the novel dryer permits wafers to be dried in a high-velocity room-temperature air stream on a moving belt in their quartz carriers; and (4) the personnel safety of such a system is excellent and waste disposal has no adverse ecological impact. With the addition of mechanical transfer arms, two systems like the one developed will produce enough cleaned wafers for a 30-MW/year production facility. A projected scale-up well within the existing technology would permit a system to be assembled that produces about 12,745 wafers per hour; about 11 such systems, each occupying about 110 square feet, would be needed for each cleaning stage of a 500-MW/year production facility.

  11. Dynamic partial reconfiguration implementation of the SVM/KNN multi-classifier on FPGA for bioinformatics application.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hanaa M; Benkrid, Khaled; Seker, Huseyin

    2015-08-01

    Bioinformatics data tend to be highly dimensional in nature thus impose significant computational demands. To resolve limitations of conventional computing methods, several alternative high performance computing solutions have been proposed by scientists such as Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The latter have shown to be efficient and high in performance. In recent years, FPGAs have been benefiting from dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR) feature for adding flexibility to alter specific regions within the chip. This work proposes combing the use of FPGAs and DPR to build a dynamic multi-classifier architecture that can be used in processing bioinformatics data. In bioinformatics, applying different classification algorithms to the same dataset is desirable in order to obtain comparable, more reliable and consensus decision, but it can consume long time when performed on conventional PC. The DPR implementation of two common classifiers, namely support vector machines (SVMs) and K-nearest neighbor (KNN) are combined together to form a multi-classifier FPGA architecture which can utilize specific region of the FPGA to work as either SVM or KNN classifier. This multi-classifier DPR implementation achieved at least ~8x reduction in reconfiguration time over the single non-DPR classifier implementation, and occupied less space and hardware resources than having both classifiers. The proposed architecture can be extended to work as an ensemble classifier. PMID:26738068

  12. Thermomechanical global response of the EUVL wafer during exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jaehyuk; Martin, Carl J.; Engelstad, Roxann L.; Lovell, Edward G.

    2002-07-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is one of the leading technologies for Next-Generation Lithography. Continued progress in its development will be facilitated by characterizing all sources of distortion in the chip fabrication process. These include the thermal distortions of the wafer caused by deposited EUVL energy during scanning exposure. Absorbed energy from the beam produces temperature increases and structural displacements in the wafer, which directly contribute to pattern placement errors and image blur. Because of the vacuum conditions of EUVL systems, wafer chucking will be electrostatic, which has a number of advantages over mechanical clamping systems. The goals of this research are to predict the transient temperature increases and corresponding displacements (locally and globally) consistent with the thermomechanical boundary conditions of the wafer. Both thermal and structural finite element models were constructed to numerically simulate wafer exposure. The response of the wafer is relatively sensitive to the interface conditions between the substrate and electrostatic chuck. Thus, parametric studies of the response to changes in the contact conductance and the friction coefficient were performed and are presented in this paper.

  13. Further investigation of EUV process sensitivities for wafer track processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradon, Neil; Nafus, K.; Shite, H.; Kitano, J.; Kosugi, H.; Goethals, M.; Cheng, S.; Hermans, J.; Hendrickx, E.; Baudemprez, B.; Van Den Heuvel, D.

    2010-04-01

    As Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography technology shows promising results below 40nm feature sizes, TOKYO ELECTRON LTD.(TEL) is committed to understanding the fundamentals needed to improve our technology, thereby enabling customers to meet roadmap expectations. TEL continues collaboration with imec for evaluation of Coater/Developer processing sensitivities using the ASML Alpha Demo Tool for EUV exposures. The results from the collaboration help develop the necessary hardware for EUV Coater/Developer processing. In previous work, processing sensitivities of the resist materials were investigated to determine the impact on critical dimension (CD) uniformity and defectivity. In this work, new promising resist materials have been studied and more information pertaining to EUV exposures was obtained. Specifically, post exposure bake (PEB) impact to CD is studied in addition to dissolution characteristics and resist material hydrophobicity. Additionally, initial results show the current status of CDU and defectivity with the ADT/CLEAN TRACK ACTTM 12 lithocluster. Analysis of a five wafer batch of CDU wafers shows within wafer and wafer to wafer contribution from track processing. A pareto of a patterned wafer defectivity test gives initial insight into the process defects with the current processing conditions. From analysis of these data, it's shown that while improvements in processing are certainly possible, the initial results indicate a manufacturable process for EUV.

  14. Development of a Whole-Wafer, Macroscale Inspection Software Method for Semiconductor Wafer Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W.

    2003-05-22

    This report describes the non CRADA-protected results of the project performed between Nova Measuring Systems, Ltd., and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to test and prototype defect signature analysis method for potential incorporation into an in-situ wafer inspection microscope. ORNL's role in this activity was to collaborate with Nova on the analysis and software side of the effort, wile Nova's role was to build the physical microscope and provide data to ORNL for test and evaluation. The objective of this project was to adapt and integrate ORNL's SSA and ADC methods and technologies in the Nova imaging environment. ORNL accomplished this objective by modifying the existing SSA technology for use as a wide-area signature analyzer/classifier on the Nova macro inspection tool (whole-wafer analysis). During this effort ORNL also developed a strategy and methodology for integrating and presenting the results of SSA/ADC analysis to the tool operator and/or data management system (DMS) used by the semiconductor manufacturer (i.e., the end-user).

  15. Electrochemical method for defect delineation in silicon-on-insulator wafers

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Kelly, Michael J.; Medernach, John W.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical method for defect delineation in thin-film SOI or SOS wafers in which a surface of a silicon wafer is electrically connected so as to control the voltage of the surface within a specified range, the silicon wafer is then contacted with an electrolyte, and, after removing the electrolyte, defects and metal contamination in the silicon wafer are identified.

  16. Real-time direct and diffraction X-ray imaging of irregular silicon wafer breakage

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Danilewsky, Andreas N.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture and breakage of single crystals, particularly of silicon wafers, are multi-scale problems: the crack tip starts propagating on an atomic scale with the breaking of chemical bonds, forms crack fronts through the crystal on the micrometre scale and ends macroscopically in catastrophic wafer shattering. Total wafer breakage is a severe problem for the semiconductor industry, not only during handling but also during temperature treatments, leading to million-dollar costs per annum in a device production line. Knowledge of the relevant dynamics governing perfect cleavage along the {111} or {110} faces, and of the deflection into higher indexed {hkl} faces of higher energy, is scarce due to the high velocity of the process. Imaging techniques are commonly limited to depicting only the state of a wafer before the crack and in the final state. This paper presents, for the first time, in situ high-speed crack propagation under thermal stress, imaged simultaneously in direct transmission and diffraction X-ray imaging. It shows how the propagating crack tip and the related strain field can be tracked in the phase-contrast and diffracted images, respectively. Movies with a time resolution of microseconds per frame reveal that the strain and crack tip do not propagate continuously or at a constant speed. Jumps in the crack tip position indicate pinning of the crack tip for about 1–2 ms followed by jumps faster than 2–6 m s−1, leading to a macroscopically observed average velocity of 0.028–0.055 m s−1. The presented results also give a proof of concept that the described X-ray technique is compatible with studying ultra-fast cracks up to the speed of sound. PMID:27006774

  17. Real-time direct and diffraction X-ray imaging of irregular silicon wafer breakage.

    PubMed

    Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Danilewsky, Andreas N

    2016-03-01

    Fracture and breakage of single crystals, particularly of silicon wafers, are multi-scale problems: the crack tip starts propagating on an atomic scale with the breaking of chemical bonds, forms crack fronts through the crystal on the micrometre scale and ends macroscopically in catastrophic wafer shattering. Total wafer breakage is a severe problem for the semiconductor industry, not only during handling but also during temperature treatments, leading to million-dollar costs per annum in a device production line. Knowledge of the relevant dynamics governing perfect cleavage along the {111} or {110} faces, and of the deflection into higher indexed {hkl} faces of higher energy, is scarce due to the high velocity of the process. Imaging techniques are commonly limited to depicting only the state of a wafer before the crack and in the final state. This paper presents, for the first time, in situ high-speed crack propagation under thermal stress, imaged simultaneously in direct transmission and diffraction X-ray imaging. It shows how the propagating crack tip and the related strain field can be tracked in the phase-contrast and diffracted images, respectively. Movies with a time resolution of microseconds per frame reveal that the strain and crack tip do not propagate continuously or at a constant speed. Jumps in the crack tip position indicate pinning of the crack tip for about 1-2 ms followed by jumps faster than 2-6 m s(-1), leading to a macroscopically observed average velocity of 0.028-0.055 m s(-1). The presented results also give a proof of concept that the described X-ray technique is compatible with studying ultra-fast cracks up to the speed of sound. PMID:27006774

  18. A wafer-level vacuum package using glass-reflowed silicon through-wafer interconnection for nano/micro devices.

    PubMed

    Jin, Joo-Young; Yoo, Seung-Hyun; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2012-07-01

    We propose a vacuum wafer-level packaging (WLP) process using glass-reflowed silicon via for nano/micro devices (NMDs). A through-wafer interconnection (TWIn) substrate with silicon vias and reflowed glass is introduced to accomplish a vertical feed-through of device. NMDs are fabricated in the single crystal silicon (SCS) layer which is formed on the TWIn substrate by Au eutectic bonding including Cr adhesion layer. The WLPof the devices is achieved with the capping glass wafer anodically bonded to the SCS layer. In order to demonstrate the successful hermetic packaging, we fabricated the micro-Pirani gauge in the SCS layer, and packaged it in the wafer-level. The vacuum level inside the packaging was measured to be 3.1 Torr with +/- 0.12 Torr uncertainty, and the packaging leakage was not detected during 24 hour after the packaging. PMID:22966554

  19. Implementation and Test of the Automatic Flight Dynamics Operations for Geostationary Satellite Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Lee, Young-Ran; Hwang, Yoola; Javier Santiago Noguero Galilea

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes the Flight Dynamics Automation (FDA) system for COMS Flight Dynamics System (FDS) and its test result in terms of the performance of the automation jobs. FDA controls the flight dynamics functions such as orbit determination, orbit prediction, event prediction, and fuel accounting. The designed FDA is independent from the specific characteristics which are defined by spacecraft manufacturer or specific satellite missions. Therefore, FDA could easily links its autonomous job control functions to any satellite mission control system with some interface modification. By adding autonomous system along with flight dynamics system, it decreases the operator’s tedious and repeated jobs but increase the usability and reliability of the system. Therefore, FDA is used to improve the completeness of whole mission control system’s quality. The FDA is applied to the real flight dynamics system of a geostationary satellite, COMS and the experimental test is performed. The experimental result shows the stability and reliability of the mission control operations through the automatic job control.

  20. Organizational Strategies for Promoting Instructional Change: Implementation Dynamics in Schools Working with Comprehensive School Reform Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, Brian; Miller, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    This article develops a conceptual framework for studying how three comprehensive school reform (CSR) programs organized schools for instructional change and how the distinctive strategies they pursued affected implementation outcomes. The conceptual model views the Accelerated Schools Project as using a system of cultural control to produce…

  1. Using Dynamic Value Stream Mapping and Lean Accounting Box Scores to Support Lean Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woehrle, Stephen L.; Abou-Shady, Louay

    2010-01-01

    Lean has proven to be an effective management philosophy for improving businesses in a competitive market by eliminating waste and improving operations. An impact of implementing lean projects is the rapid reduction in inventory levels, which gives management the false impression that profits are decreasing while workers on the shop floor observe…

  2. Dynamic Sustainability: Practitioners' Perspectives on Housing First Implementation Challenges and Model Fidelity Over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Zerger, Suzanne; Jeyaratnam, Jeyagobi; Connelly, Jolynn; Kruk, Katherine; O'Campo, Patricia; Hwang, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although Housing First (HF) is a popular evidence-based intervention for persons experiencing homelessness and mental illness, research exploring its sustainability over time is scant. This mixed methods study captures practitioners' perspectives on key shifts in implementation of Housing First in a large urban center, and factors…

  3. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 6. Dynamic web-based data dissemination through the NIST Web Thermo Tables.

    PubMed

    Kroenlein, Kenneth; Muzny, Chris D; Diky, Vladimir; Kazakov, Andrei F; Chirico, Robert D; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Frenkel, Michael

    2011-06-27

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. In the present paper, we describe the development of a World Wide Web-based interface to TDE evaluations of pure compound properties, including critical properties, phase boundary equilibria (vapor pressures, sublimation pressures, and crystal-liquid boundary pressures), densities, energetic properties, and transport properties. This includes development of a system for caching evaluation results to maintain high availability and an advanced window-in-window interface that leverages modern Web-browser technologies. Challenges associated with bringing the principal advantages of the TDE technology to the Web are described, as are compromises to maintain general access and speed of interaction while remaining true to the tenets of dynamic data evaluation. Future extensions of the interface and associated Web-services are outlined. PMID:21517125

  4. Implementation of malaria dynamic models in municipality level early warning systems in Colombia. Part I: description of study sites.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Daniel; Cerón, Viviana; Molina, Adriana M; Quiñónes, Martha L; Jiménez, Mónica M; Ahumada, Martha; Gutiérrez, Patricia; Osorio, Salua; Mantilla, Gilma; Connor, Stephen J; Thomson, Madeleine C

    2014-07-01

    As part of the Integrated National Adaptation Pilot project and the Integrated Surveillance and Control System, the Colombian National Institute of Health is working on the design and implementation of a Malaria Early Warning System framework, supported by seasonal climate forecasting capabilities, weather and environmental monitoring, and malaria statistical and dynamic models. In this report, we provide an overview of the local ecoepidemiologic settings where four malaria process-based mathematical models are currently being implemented at a municipal level. The description includes general characteristics, malaria situation (predominant type of infection, malaria-positive cases data, malaria incidence, and seasonality), entomologic conditions (primary and secondary vectors, mosquito densities, and feeding frequencies), climatic conditions (climatology and long-term trends), key drivers of epidemic outbreaks, and non-climatic factors (populations at risk, control campaigns, and socioeconomic conditions). Selected pilot sites exhibit different ecoepidemiologic settings that must be taken into account in the development of the integrated surveillance and control system. PMID:24891460

  5. Implementation of Malaria Dynamic Models in Municipality Level Early Warning Systems in Colombia. Part I: Description of Study Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Daniel; Cerón, Viviana; Molina, Adriana M.; Quiñónes, Martha L.; Jiménez, Mónica M.; Ahumada, Martha; Gutiérrez, Patricia; Osorio, Salua; Mantilla, Gilma; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Integrated National Adaptation Pilot project and the Integrated Surveillance and Control System, the Colombian National Institute of Health is working on the design and implementation of a Malaria Early Warning System framework, supported by seasonal climate forecasting capabilities, weather and environmental monitoring, and malaria statistical and dynamic models. In this report, we provide an overview of the local ecoepidemiologic settings where four malaria process-based mathematical models are currently being implemented at a municipal level. The description includes general characteristics, malaria situation (predominant type of infection, malaria-positive cases data, malaria incidence, and seasonality), entomologic conditions (primary and secondary vectors, mosquito densities, and feeding frequencies), climatic conditions (climatology and long-term trends), key drivers of epidemic outbreaks, and non-climatic factors (populations at risk, control campaigns, and socioeconomic conditions). Selected pilot sites exhibit different ecoepidemiologic settings that must be taken into account in the development of the integrated surveillance and control system. PMID:24891460

  6. High performance wafer-fused semiconductor disk lasers emitting in the 1300 nm waveband.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Alexei; Rantamäki, Antti; Saarinen, Esa J; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Mereuta, Alexandru; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Caliman, Andrei; Volet, Nicolas; Okhotnikov, Oleg G; Kapon, Eli

    2014-12-01

    We report for the first time on the performance of 1300 nm waveband semiconductor disc lasers (SDLs) with wafer fused gain mirrors that implement intracavity diamond and flip-chip heat dissipation schemes based on the same gain material. With a new type of gain mirror structure, maximum output power values reach 7.1 W with intracavity diamond gain mirrors and 5.6 W with flip-chip gain mirrors, using a pump spot diameter of 300 µm, exhibiting a beam quality factor M(2)< 1.25 in the full operation range. These results confirm previously published theoretical modeling of these types of SDLs. PMID:25606874

  7. Development of a wafer positioning system for the Sandia extreme ultraviolet lithography tool

    SciTech Connect

    Wronosky, J.B.; Smith, T.G.; Darnold, J.R.

    1995-12-01

    A wafer positioning system was recently developed by Sandia National Laboratories for an Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) tool. The system, which utilizes a magnetically levitated fine stage to provide ultra-precise positioning in all six degrees of freedom, incorporates technological improvements resulting from four years of prototype development. This paper describes the design, implementation, and functional capability of the system. Specifics regarding control system electronics, including software and control algorithm structure, as well as performance design goals and test results are presented. Potential system enhancements, some of which are in process, are also discussed.

  8. Development of a Wafer Positioning System for the Sandia Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronosky, John B.; Smith, Tony G.; Darnold, Joel R.

    1996-01-01

    A wafer positioning system was recently developed by Sandia National Laboratories for an Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) tool. The system, which utilizes a magnetically levitated fine stage to provide ultra-precise positioning in all six degrees of freedom, incorporates technological improvements resulting from four years of prototype development. This paper describes the design, implementation, and functional capability of the system. Specifics regarding control system electronics, including software and control algorithm structure, as well as performance design goals and test results are presented. Potential system enhancements, some of which are in process, are also discussed.

  9. Implementation and characterisation of new neutron imaging system for dynamic processes investigation at the Es-Salam research reactor.

    PubMed

    Kharfi, F; Denden, O; Abdelkader, A

    2011-10-01

    Neutron imaging is a powerful method for non-destructive investigations where high penetration through metals and in particular high contrast for hydrogenous materials maybe exploited. Due to the complexity of digital neutron static or video image formation, image capture conditions and parameters must be accurately selected. In this work, implementation of a new neutron imaging system based on CCD camera and LiF-ZnS scintillator is presented. The image characteristics in terms of contrast, noise and dynamic range and investigation limits of this new imaging system were studied as a function of the neutron source properties. PMID:21640596

  10. One-step implementation of the 1->3 orbital state quantum cloning machine via quantum Zeno dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Xiaoqiang; Wang Hongfu; Zhang Shou; Chen Li; Zhao Yongfang; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang

    2009-12-15

    We present an approach for implementation of a 1->3 orbital state quantum cloning machine based on the quantum Zeno dynamics via manipulating three rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits to resonantly interact with a superconducting cavity assisted by classical fields. Through appropriate modulation of the coupling constants between rf SQUIDs and classical fields, the quantum cloning machine can be realized within one step. We also discuss the effects of decoherence such as spontaneous emission and the loss of cavity in virtue of master equation. The numerical simulation result reveals that the quantum cloning machine is especially robust against the cavity decay, since all qubits evolve in the decoherence-free subspace with respect to cavity decay due to the quantum Zeno dynamics.