Science.gov

Sample records for implementation research selecting

  1. Qualitative Research Designs: Selection and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creswell, John W.; Hanson, William E.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; Morales, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Counseling psychologists face many approaches from which to choose when they conduct a qualitative research study. This article focuses on the processes of selecting, contrasting, and implementing five different qualitative approaches. Based on an extended example related to test interpretation by counselors, clients, and communities, this article…

  2. Selection and Implementation of the ISO9001 Standard to Support Biobanking Research Infrastructure Development.

    PubMed

    Davis, Emma; Hampson, Katie; Bray, Christopher; Dixon, Kate; Ollier, William; Yuille, Martin

    2012-04-01

    The UK DNA Banking Network (UDBN) undertakes biobanking for genetic epidemiology research projects. A task assigned to it is the addition of scientific value to the resources under its management. This task is implemented by enabling appropriate access to the resources. We reasoned that access requires not only a fair access policy but also a quality policy implemented via a Quality Management System (QMS). UDBN decided to achieve consistency in sample management by identifying and implementing a suitable QMS with external certification. UDBN selected ISO9001 as a QMS. It was soon recognized that the QMS needed to encompass not only UDBN but also the academic department in which UDBN sits. An external certification body was selected and a post was dedicated to the role of QMS-Management Representative. Specialized software was acquired. A Quality Manual, individual training files and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) were prepared. QMS training was provided. These actions led to the approval of the ISO9001:2000 standard. This is the first report of an academic genetic epidemiology research laboratory receiving approval of the ISO9001 standard to validate the consistency of its operations. ISO9001 was selected because of its greater breadth of scope compared with other QMSs. We found that while laboratory protocols are transferable between labs, QMS SOPs are not transferable. This has consequences for efforts to ensure consistency across a biobank network: joint adoption of one multiparty QMS is probably required. We found that it was not possible to implement a QMS for biobanking in isolation: its host university department needed to be included. We have found that ISO9001 helps enable longitudinal accrual of data on the use of biobanking methods. Thus ISO9001 is not only a management tool to improve access to a biobanking research infrastructure but also a research tool for research infrastructure development. PMID:24844905

  3. Challenges and Practices in Building and Implementing Biosafety and Biosecurity Programs to Enable Basic and Translational Research with Select Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Colleen B.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Roy, Chad J.; Perlin, David S.; Byrne, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Select agent research in the United States must meet federally-mandated biological surety guidelines and rules which are comprised of two main components: biosecurity and biosafety. Biosecurity is the process employed for ensuring biological agents are properly safeguarded against theft, loss, diversion, unauthorized access or use/release. Biosafety is those processes that ensure that operations with such agents are conducted in a safe, secure and reliable manner. As such, a biological surety program is generally concerned with biological agents that present high risk for adverse medical and/or agricultural consequences upon release outside of proper containment. The U.S. Regional and National Biocontainment Laboratories (RBL, NBL) represent expertise in this type of research, and are actively engaged in the development of programs to address these critical needs and federal requirements. While this comprises an ongoing activity for the RBLs, NBLs and other facilities that handle select agents as new guidelines and regulations are implemented, the present article is written with the goal of presenting a simplified yet comprehensive review of these requirements. Herein, we discuss the requirements and the various activities that the RBL/NBL programs have implemented to achieve these metrics set forth by various agencies within the U.S. Federal government. PMID:24900945

  4. Implementing Research Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Calvin

    2006-01-01

    Special education research has undergone one of the most significant developments in the history of education during the past two decades (Gersten, Vaughn, Deshler, & Schiller, 1997). These developments can be related to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 and the resulting knowledge about teaching individuals with…

  5. Life Review: Implementation, Theory, Research, and Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2006-01-01

    A selective literature review of publications on life review generated ideas on implementation, theory, research, and therapy. The review begins by differentiating life review from reminiscence, and summarizing ways to conduct a life review. A dozen theories that have been influenced by the life review technique are presented, with a focus placed…

  6. Analysis of Selected Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmick, Aileen

    1994-01-01

    Analyzes selected research articles published in 1993 that address issues affecting school library media centers. Highlights include collection of circulation statistics, staffing patterns, challenges to library materials, technology utilization, library automation, access to children's literature by Spanish-speaking children, library networks,…

  7. Action Research and ICT Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumsvik, Rune

    2012-01-01

    This emancipatory action research study investigates implementation of information and communication technology (ICT) in schools. The case study examined retrospectively was part of a Norwegian ICT project called PILOT, the focus of which concerns the impact on school development of a locally developed Internet subject portal and study periods.…

  8. Never the twain shall meet? - a comparison of implementation science and policy implementation research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many of society’s health problems require research-based knowledge acted on by healthcare practitioners together with implementation of political measures from governmental agencies. However, there has been limited knowledge exchange between implementation science and policy implementation research, which has been conducted since the early 1970s. Based on a narrative review of selective literature on implementation science and policy implementation research, the aim of this paper is to describe the characteristics of policy implementation research, analyze key similarities and differences between this field and implementation science, and discuss how knowledge assembled in policy implementation research could inform implementation science. Discussion Following a brief overview of policy implementation research, several aspects of the two fields were described and compared: the purpose and origins of the research; the characteristics of the research; the development and use of theory; determinants of change (independent variables); and the impact of implementation (dependent variables). The comparative analysis showed that there are many similarities between the two fields, yet there are also profound differences. Still, important learning may be derived from several aspects of policy implementation research, including issues related to the influence of the context of implementation and the values and norms of the implementers (the healthcare practitioners) on implementation processes. Relevant research on various associated policy topics, including The Advocacy Coalition Framework, Governance Theory, and Institutional Theory, may also contribute to improved understanding of the difficulties of implementing evidence in healthcare. Implementation science is at a relatively early stage of development, and advancement of the field would benefit from accounting for knowledge beyond the parameters of the immediate implementation science literature. Summary

  9. Research on Curriculum and Instruction Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael; Pomfret, Alan

    1977-01-01

    The definition of implementation, its potential determinants and evaluation methods are explained by reviewing research on the process of curriculum and organizational implementation in the schools. (Author/MV)

  10. Selected considerations of implementation of the GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwiklak, Janusz; Fellner, Andrzej; Fellner, Radoslaw; Jafernik, Henryk; Sledzinski, Janusz

    2014-05-01

    The article describes analysis of the safety and risk for the implementation of precise approach procedures (Localizer Performance and Vertical Guidance - LPV) with GNSS sensor at airports in Warsaw and Katowice. There were used some techniques of the identification of threats (inducing controlled flight into terrain, landing accident, mid-air collision) and evaluations methods based on Fault Tree Analysis, probability of the risk, safety risk evaluation matrix and Functional Hazard Assesment. Also safety goals were determined. Research led to determine probabilities of appearing of threats, as well as allow compare them with regard to the ILS. As a result of conducting the Preliminary System Safety Assessment (PSSA), there were defined requirements essential to reach the required level of the safety. It is worth to underline, that quantitative requirements were defined using FTA.

  11. Implementation Research and Wraparound Literature: Building a Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Rosalyn M.; Suter, Jesse C.; Bruns, Eric J.; O'Rourke, Koren E.

    2011-01-01

    We used the framework identified by the National Implementation Research Network's (NIRN) analysis of 35 years of implementation outcomes literature from diverse fields of endeavor to review the current state of wraparound implementation research. Model definition, model fidelity and intervention outcomes were areas of relatively greater…

  12. Design and Implementation of Collaborative Research Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venti, Mike W.; Berger, David E.

    2009-01-01

    This poster reviews the collarborative research approaches that NASA has been designing and implementing for the Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project. The inputs for the technical plan are reviewed, the Research Test and Integration Plan (RTIP) WIKI, is used to create and propose a multi-themed and multi-partner research testing opportunities. The outputs are testing opportunities.

  13. Implementing the Astronomy Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucili, Leonarda

    My research and teaching are founded on the belief that the understanding and effective learning of astronomical concepts are strongly related to the perception of phenomena and to emotions that nature and sky bring out in us. Students must be guided to find in the sky the same fascination and wish of knowledge that has always led mankind to observe astronomical phenomena and organise space and time. The main points of my method are: 1. inducing students to take an interest in the content to see something meaningful and become engaged in the search for it 2. investigating students’ pre-knowledge making explicit the presence of misconceptions and conceptual gaps and turning them into a problem students want to work on 3. focusing in “concept maps” the essentials of the discipline and the connections between concepts goals and topics 4. spending long time in the outdoors observing measuring constructing instruments before developing models and theoretical explanations 5. improving an inquiring attitude giving preference to questions over answers 6. seeing connections between the scientific disciplines and the humanities 7. making students aware of the path they are following. My work will be supplied with documentary evidence during the presentation.

  14. Advanced aerodynamics. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This Conference Publication contains selected NASA papers that were presented at the Fifth Annual Status Review of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Program held at Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, California on September 14 to 15, 1981. These papers describe the status of several NASA in-house research activities in the areas of advanced turboprops, natural laminar flow, oscillating control surfaces, high-Reynolds-number airfoil tests, high-lift technology, and theoretical design techniques.

  15. Media Selection during the Implementation of Planned Organizational Change: A Predictive Framework Based on Implementation Approach and Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, C. Erik

    2003-01-01

    Integrates literature that addresses implementation approaches and phases with media selection research to provide a descriptive framework for understanding and predicting media use during planned change implementation. Concludes by synthesizing the findings that emerge from the integration of these bodies of literature and describing implications…

  16. Implementing STAR: Sensible Technology Assessment/Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.; Herman, Joan L.

    A plan for evaluating the Apple Classroom of Tomorrow (ACOT) is presented, which implements the model for Sensible Technology Assessment/Research (STAR). STAR involves interactive participation in the evaluation study by ACOT participants, collateral university researchers, and University of California (Los Angeles) staff to develop a credible,…

  17. Selected Technology Lab Activities Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    These materials supplement state guides for junior high or middle school technology education programs. The materials show instructors how to implement 81 hours of new technology-related activities into existing programs. Introductory materials include a rationale, philosophy, and goals for technology education. Areas of instruction are as…

  18. Selecting and Implementing a Word Processor in the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Sarah Hendrickson

    1983-01-01

    Relates experiences in selecting and implementing a word processor in Technical Information Services Office of Institute for Defense Analyses. Highlights include needs assessment; selecting the system (system functions, vendor reputation); recommendation and justification; implementation plan (training, developing procedures, catalog cards,…

  19. Research Implementation and Quality Assurance Project Plan: An Evaluation of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technologies for the Detection of Fugitive Contamination at Selected Superfund Hazardous Waste Sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    This project is a research collaboration between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC), for the purpose of evaluating the utility of hyperspectral remote sensing technology for post-closure monitoring of residual contamination at delisted and closed hazardous waste sites as defined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act [CERCLA (also known as 'Superfund')] of 1980 and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986.

  20. Perioperative Research Fellowship: Planning, Implementation, Experience

    PubMed Central

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Mazumdar, Madhu; Stundner, Ottokar; Hargett, Mary J.

    2014-01-01

    Perioperative outcomes research has gained widespread interest and is viewed as increasingly important among different specialties, including anesthesiology. Outcome research studies serve to help in the adjustment of risk, allocation of resources, and formulation of hypotheses to guide future research. Pursuing high quality research projects requires familiarity with a wide range of research methodologies, and concepts are ideally learned in a dedicated setting. Skills associated with the use of these methodologies as well as with scientific publishing in general, however, are increasingly challenging to acquire. This article is intended to describe the curriculum and implementation of the Perioperative Medicine and Regional Anesthesia Research Fellowship at the Hospital for Special Surgery. We also propose a methodology to evaluate the success of a research fellowship curriculum. PMID:24942850

  1. Implementing Vision Research in Special Needs Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsen, Gunvor Birkeland; Aanstad, Monica L.; Leirvik, Eva Iren B.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents experiences from vision research implemented in education and argues for the need for teachers with visual competence and insight into suitable methods for stimulation and learning. A new type of continuing professional development (CPD) focuses on the role of vision in children's learning and development, the consequences of…

  2. Research without borders: fostering innovative clinical research and implementation.

    PubMed

    Xian, Ying; Peterson, Eric D

    2015-09-01

    Stroke remains one of the major killers worldwide. Addressing this epidemic will require combined efforts of researchers (bench, translational, clinical, epidemiologists, outcomes, and implementation scientists) as well as all forms of health care workers and policy experts. However, the translation of bench findings into bedside has been a challenge. Improved strategies for clinical research are needed to shorten the time required to translate bench findings into patient care. Large national or even globe stroke registries are uniquely positioned to advance the science by providing a rich data source for disease and post marketing surveillance, comparative effectiveness and safety research, and ultimately dissemination of clinical trials findings to routine clinical practice. Fostering innovative clinical research and implementation through international collaborations provides an unprecedented opportunity to tackle the globe of stroke. PMID:25973646

  3. Collaborative action research: implementation of cooperative learning.

    PubMed

    Smith-Stoner, Marilyn; Molle, Mary E

    2010-06-01

    Nurse educators must continually improve their teaching skills through innovation. However, research about the process used by faculty members to transform their teaching methods is limited. This collaborative study uses classroom action research to describe, analyze, and address problems encountered in implementing cooperative learning in two undergraduate nursing courses. After four rounds of action and reflection, the following themes emerged: students did not understand the need for structured cooperative learning; classroom structure and seating arrangement influenced the effectiveness of activities; highly structured activities engaged the students; and short, targeted activities that involved novel content were most effective. These findings indicate that designing specific activities to prepare students for class is critical to cooperative learning. PMID:20210268

  4. Dryden Flight Research Center Critical Chain Project Management Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Dennis O.

    2012-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 2011 Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) implemented a new project management system called Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM). Recent NASA audits have found that the Dryden workforce is strained under increasing project demand and that multi-tasking has been carried to a whole new level at Dryden. It is very common to have an individual work on 10 different projects during a single pay period. Employee surveys taken at Dryden have identified work/life balance as the number one issue concerning employees. Further feedback from the employees indicated that project planning is the area needing the most improvement. In addition, employees have been encouraged to become more innovative, improve job skills, and seek ways to improve overall job efficiency. In order to deal with these challenges, DFRC management decided to adopt the CCPM system that is specifically designed to operate in a resource constrained multi-project environment. This paper will discuss in detail the rationale behind the selection of CCPM and the goals that will be achieved through this implementation. The paper will show how DFRC is tailoring the CCPM system to the flight research environment as well as laying out the implementation strategy. Results of the ongoing implementation will be discussed as well as change management challenges and organizational cultural changes. Finally this paper will present some recommendations on how this system could be used by selected NASA projects or centers.

  5. Tool for evaluating research implementation challenges: A sense-making protocol for addressing implementation challenges in complex research settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many challenges arise in complex organizational interventions that threaten research integrity. This article describes a Tool for Evaluating Research Implementation Challenges (TECH), developed using a complexity science framework to assist research teams in assessing and managing these challenges. Methods During the implementation of a multi-site, randomized controlled trial (RCT) of organizational interventions to reduce resident falls in eight nursing homes, we inductively developed, and later codified the TECH. The TECH was developed through processes that emerged from interactions among research team members and nursing home staff participants, including a purposive use of complexity science principles. Results The TECH provided a structure to assess challenges systematically, consider their potential impact on intervention feasibility and fidelity, and determine actions to take. We codified the process into an algorithm that can be adopted or adapted for other research projects. We present selected examples of the use of the TECH that are relevant to many complex interventions. Conclusions Complexity theory provides a useful lens through which research procedures can be developed to address implementation challenges that emerge from complex organizations and research designs. Sense-making is a group process in which diverse members interpret challenges when available information is ambiguous; the groups’ interpretations provide cues for taking action. Sense-making facilitates the creation of safe environments for generating innovative solutions that balance research integrity and practical issues. The challenges encountered during implementation of complex interventions are often unpredictable; however, adoption of a systematic process will allow investigators to address them in a consistent yet flexible manner, protecting fidelity. Research integrity is also protected by allowing for appropriate adaptations to intervention protocols that

  6. Implementation Practice and Implementation Research: A Report from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, John S.; Phillips, Elizabeth; Pancake, Laura; O, Anne; Lewis, Jenebah; Duke, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    The Interventions and Practice Research Infrastructure Program (IPRISP) funding mechanism was introduced by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to bridge the gap between the worlds of services research and the usual care practice in the community. The goal was to build infrastructure that would provide a platform for research to…

  7. HSI in NASA: From Research to Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Plaga, John A.

    2016-01-01

    As NASA plans to send human explorers beyond low Earth orbit, onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system, there will be new challenges to address in terms of HSI. These exploration missions will be quite different from the current and past missions such as Apollo, Shuttle, and International Space Station. The exploration crew will be more autonomous from ground mission control with delayed, and at times, no communication. They will have limited to no resupply for much longer mission durations. Systems to deliver and support extended human habitation at these destinations are extremely complex and unique, presenting new opportunities to employ HSI practices. In order to have an effective and affordable HSI implementation, both research and programmatic efforts are required. Currently, the HSI-related research at NASA is primarily in the area of space human factors and habitability. The purpose is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit, and update standards, requirements, and processes to verify and validate these requirements. In addition, HSI teams are actively engaged in technology development and demonstration efforts to influence the mission architecture and next-generation vehicle design. Finally, appropriate HSI references have been added to NASA' s systems engineering documentation, and an HSI Practitioner's Guide has been published to help design engineers consider HSI early and continuously in the acquisition process. These current and planned HSI-related activities at NASA will be discussed in this panel.

  8. SELECTED WATER DECONTAMINATION RESEARCH PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Federation (WEF), through funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Agency's Office of Research and Development (ORD), will host the first of three regional water sector stakeholder workshops March 15-17, 2005 at the Phoenix Marriot...

  9. Selecting Research Collections for Digitization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Dan; Horrell, Jeffrey; Merrill-Oldham, Jan

    This document proposes a model of the decision making process required of research libraries when they embark on digital conversion projects. A series of questions are offered that focus on facilitating the decision making process for library managers. Questions of what and how to digitize are placed in the larger framework of collection building…

  10. Implementing Authentic Astronomy Research in the Classroom: The TLRBSE Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Croft, S. K.; Walker, C. E.; Lockwood, J.; McCarthy, D.; Rector, T.; Howell, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is an NSF-funded program which has as one of its primary goals the implementation of authentic research in the classroom. To achieve this goal, TLRBSE provides an in-depth professional development experience for teachers which includes a semester-long on-line course on research pedagogy, research tools (such as image processing), and astronomy content knowledge. Participants come to the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) in Tucson in the summer for two weeks in order to hone their skills and interact with scientists. They also pursue research projects led by a TLRBSE leader in one of several astronomy areas including novae, active galactic nuclei, solar magnetic fields, and spectroscopy of variable stars using research telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory. The teachers have access to the data they have taken at the telescope as well as to extensive archival data sets taken by previous TLRBSE teachers. These ongoing research projects are then brought back to the classroom where teachers and students can continue their research in these areas. The student research results are then submitted for review and publication in NOAO's Research Based Science Education Journal. The TLRBSE model is being extended by providing a variety of additional research experiences for teachers and students during the school year, using the same telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory used in the summer program. Teachers and students from the program apply for additional research time during the school year and can come to the observatory to make observations for new or continuing projects. As remote telescopes become more widely available, the teachers and students will be able to observe from their home locations and access their observations directly over the internet. Some of the key issues in our program are teacher selection, organization and logistics of the distance learning course, workshop

  11. An Overview of Evaluation Research on Selected Educational Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resources Group, Inc.

    This paper reviews selected literature on education/business partnerships (EBPs), highlighting the status of partnership evaluations and current methodologies. Research by S. Otterbourg and D. Adams (1989), which surveyed about 24 EBPs to ascertain planning, implementation, and evaluation priorities, showed that only 25% of the programs used…

  12. Guidance for Schools Selecting Antibullying Approaches: Translating Evidence-Based Strategies to Contemporary Implementation Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansary, Nadia S.; Elias, Maurice J.; Greene, Michael B.; Green, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This article synthesizes the current research on bullying prevention and intervention in order to provide guidance to schools seeking to select and implement antibullying strategies. Evidence-based best practices that are shared across generally effective antibullying approaches are elucidated, and these strategies are grounded in examples…

  13. Optimizing Clinical Research Participant Selection with Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Clinical research participants are often not reflective of the real-world patients due to overly restrictive eligibility criteria. Meanwhile, unselected participants introduce confounding factors and reduce research efficiency. Biomedical Informatics, especially Big Data increasingly made available from electronic health records, offers promising aids to optimize research participant selection through data-driven transparency. PMID:26549161

  14. Distributed models for operational river forecasting: research, development, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.

    2003-04-01

    Model Intercomparison Project- DMIP) in order to identify which model or process algorithms would benefit the NWS mission. DMIP has also been designed to understand issues such as the use of operational data, the amount of calibration required, and methods of deriving initial parameter estimates. DMIP has garnered participation from 12 research institutions in the US and abroad, including China, Canada, and Denmark. Simultaneously, HL has developed a flexible modeling system that can be used to develop and evaluate various rainfall runoff models and modeling approaches (gridded distributed, semi distributed, and lumped). HL has successfully participated in DMIP with a gridded distributed model consisting of the SAC-SMA and kinematic routing in each computational element. As a result of DMIP, the NWS has decided to move ahead with the implementation of the HL distributed model. As with the research effort, a specific implementation plan is being followed. First, a prototype version of the research distributed model is being run at the one RFC for real time operations. Short term software development is being conducted to make this research version more user friendly. Long term software development is planned to derive a system to efficiently support operational distributed modeling. Long term research will also continue into new rainfall/runoff/routing models and well as parameter estimation, calibration and state updating issues. Formal implementation includes a transition phase in which the new distributed model will be run parallel to the current lumped model in selected basins, providing the forecaster with two simulations for decision making. Moreover, such a transition period will provide much needed exposure and training. Problems identified to date with the deployment of distributed models include the addition of a snow model, issues relating to the quality of the NEXRAD data, methods of parameterizing and calibrating a distributed model, methods of state

  15. Bridging the Gap between Research and Practice: Implementation Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olswang, Lesley B.; Prelock, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article introduces implementation science, which focuses on research methods that promote the systematic application of research findings to practice. Method: The narrative defines implementation science and highlights the importance of moving research along the pipeline from basic science to practice as one way to facilitate…

  16. Clinical governance implementation in a selected teaching emergency department: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance (CG) is among the different frameworks proposed to improve the quality of healthcare. Iran, like many other countries, has put healthcare quality improvement in its top health policy priorities. In November 2009, implementation of CG became a task for all hospitals across the country. However, it has been a challenge to clarify the notion of CG and the way to implement it in Iran. The purpose of this action research study is to understand how CG can be defined and implemented in a selected teaching emergency department (ED). Methods/design We will use Soft Systems Methodology for both designing the study and inquiring into its content. As we considered a complex problem situation regarding the quality of care in the selected ED, we initially conceptualized CG as a cyclic set of purposeful activities designed to explore the situation and find relevant changes to improve the quality of care. Then, implementation of CG will conceptually be to carry out that set of purposeful activities. The activities will be about: understanding the situation and finding out relevant issues concerning the quality of care; exploring different stakeholders’ views and ideas about the situation and how it can be improved; and defining actions to improve the quality of care through structured debates and development of accommodations among stakeholders. We will flexibly use qualitative methods of data collection and analysis in the course of the study. To ensure the study rigor, we will use different strategies. Discussion Successful implementation of CG, like other quality improvement frameworks, requires special consideration of underlying complexities. We believe that addressing the complex situation and reflections on involvement in this action research will make it possible to understand the concept of CG and its implementation in the selected setting. By describing the context and executed flexible methods of implementation, the results of this study

  17. flankr: An R package implementing computational models of attentional selectivity.

    PubMed

    Grange, James A

    2016-06-01

    The Eriksen flanker task (Eriksen and Eriksen, Perception & Psychophysics, 16, 143-149, 1974) is a classic test in cognitive psychology of visual selective attention. Two recent computational models have formalised the dynamics of the apparent increasing attentional selectivity during stimulus processing, but with very different theoretical underpinnings: The shrinking spotlight (SSP) model (White et al., Cognitive Psychology, 210-238, 2011) assumes attentional selectivity improves in a gradual, continuous manner; the dual stage two phase (DSTP) model (Hübner et al., Psychological Review, 759-784, 2010) assumes attentional selectivity changes from a low- to a high-mode of selectivity at a discrete time-point. This paper presents an R package-flankr-that instantiates both computational models. flankr allows the user to simulate data from both models, and to fit each model to human data. flankr provides statistics of the goodness-of-fit to human data, allowing users to engage in competitive model comparison of the DSTP and the SSP models on their own data. It is hoped that the utility of flankr lies in allowing more researchers to engage in the important issue of the dynamics of attentional selectivity. PMID:26174713

  18. Implementing DSpace at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Greta

    2007-01-01

    This presentation looks at the implementation of the DSpace institutional repository system at the NASA Langley Technical Library. NASA Langley Technical Library implemented DSpace software as a replacement for the Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS). DSpace was also used to develop the Langley Technical Library Digital Repository (LTLDR). LTLDR contains archival copies of core technical reports in the aeronautics area dating back to the NACA era and other specialized collections relevant to the NASA Langley community. Extensive metadata crosswalks were created to facilitate moving data from various systems and formats to DSpace. The Dublin Core metadata screens were also customized. The OpenURL standard and Ex Libris Metalib are being used in this environment to assist our customers with either discovering full-text content or with initiating a request for the item.

  19. Next Steps in Implementing Kaput's Research Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyles, Celia; Noss, Richard

    2008-01-01

    We explore some key constructs and research themes initiated by Jim Kaput, and attempt to illuminate them further with reference to our own research. These "design principles" focus on the evolution of digital representations since the early 1990s, and we attempt to take forward our collective understanding of the cognitive and cultural…

  20. Selection bias in rheumatic disease research

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyon K.; Nguyen, Uyen-Sa; Niu, Jingbo; Danaei, Goodarz; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable risk factors for the development of rheumatic conditions and their sequelae is crucial for reducing the substantial worldwide burden of these diseases. However, the validity of such research can be threatened by sources of bias, including confounding, measurement and selection biases. In this Review, we discuss potentially major issues of selection bias—a type of bias frequently overshadowed by other bias and feasibility issues, despite being equally or more problematic—in key areas of rheumatic disease research. We present index event bias (a type of selection bias) as one of the potentially unifying reasons behind some unexpected findings, such as the ‘risk factor paradox’—a phenomenon exemplified by the discrepant effects of certain risk factors on the development versus the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We also discuss potential selection biases owing to differential loss to follow-up in RA and OA research, as well as those due to the depletion of susceptibles (prevalent user bias) and immortal time bias. The lesson remains that selection bias can be ubiquitous and, therefore, has the potential to lead the field astray. Thus, we conclude with suggestions to help investigators avoid such issues and limit the impact on future rheumatology research. PMID:24686510

  1. Implementation of Treatments in Research and Practice: Commentary on the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noell, George H.

    2014-01-01

    The articles presented in this special issue both advance what is currently known about treatment implementation in research and practice and illuminate what remains unknown. This article provides a commentary selectively linking current findings to prior research to make arguments regarding those facts that are well established and the gaps in…

  2. Science Selections. Accounts of Ongoing Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornberg, Warren, Ed.

    This publication is intended to present science teachers with an opportunity to communicate to students the idea that science is an ongoing and never-ending process. The booklet contains supplemental materials, valuable as enrichment materials. A selection of ongoing research in the biological sciences, physics and astronomy, oceanography,…

  3. The Research Implementation Process: Some Reflections and Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.

    1970-01-01

    Barriers to an understanding of the research implementation process are discussed. The purposes of the research utilization conference, a new element in this process, include intensive study of specific results to determine implications of the research for practice and future examination. (Author)

  4. Research and Implementation of Heart Sound Denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yutai; Wang, Yanxiang

    Heart sound is one of the most important signals. However, the process of getting heart sound signal can be interfered with many factors outside. Heart sound is weak electric signal and even weak external noise may lead to the misjudgment of pathological and physiological information in this signal, thus causing the misjudgment of disease diagnosis. As a result, it is a key to remove the noise which is mixed with heart sound. In this paper, a more systematic research and analysis which is involved in heart sound denoising based on matlab has been made. The study of heart sound denoising based on matlab firstly use the powerful image processing function of matlab to transform heart sound signals with noise into the wavelet domain through wavelet transform and decomposition these signals in muli-level. Then for the detail coefficient, soft thresholding is made using wavelet transform thresholding to eliminate noise, so that a signal denoising is significantly improved. The reconstructed signals are gained with stepwise coefficient reconstruction for the processed detail coefficient. Lastly, 50HZ power frequency and 35 Hz mechanical and electrical interference signals are eliminated using a notch filter.

  5. Implementing stationary-phase optimized selectivity in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Delahaye, Sander; Lynen, Frédéric

    2014-12-16

    The performance of stationary-phase optimized selectivity liquid chromatography (SOS-LC) for improved separation of complex mixtures has been demonstrated before. A dedicated kit containing column segments of different lengths and packed with different stationary phases is commercially available together with algorithms capable of predicting and ranking isocratic and gradient separations over vast amounts of possible column combinations. Implementation in chromatographic separations involving compressible fluids, as is the case in supercritical fluid chromatography, had thus far not been attempted. The challenge of this approach is the dependency of solute retention with the mobile-phase density, complicating linear extrapolation of retention over longer or shorter columns segments, as is the case in conventional SOS-LC. In this study, the possibilities of performing stationary-phase optimized selectivity supercritical fluid chromatography (SOS-SFC) are demonstrated with typical low density mobile phases (94% CO2). The procedure is optimized with the commercially available column kit and with the classical isocratic SOS-LC algorithm. SOS-SFC appears possible without any density correction, although optimal correspondence between prediction and experiment is obtained when isopycnic conditions are maintained. As also the influence of the segment order appears significantly less relevant than expected, the use of the approach in SFC appears as promising as is the case in HPLC. Next to the classical use of SOS for faster baseline separation of all solutes in a mixture, the benefits of the approach for predicting as wide as possible separation windows around to-be-purified solutes in semipreparative SFC are illustrated, leading to significant production rate improvements in (semi)preparative SFC. PMID:25393519

  6. Patterns in Implementing Comprehensive School Reform: What the Researchers Say. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzbeck, Terri Duggan

    Implementation of school reform is a much-studied and often-discussed topic among researchers and educators alike. To hear what researchers have to say about this issue, questions were put to the Network of Researchers about what trends and patterns they see in schools implementing comprehensive school reform. Researchers agree that it is…

  7. Comparative Effectiveness and Implementation Research: Directions for Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Vickrey, Barbara G.; Hirtz, Deborah; Waddy, Salina; Cheng, Eric M.; Johnston, S. Claiborne

    2013-01-01

    There is an enormous unmet need for knowledge about how new insights from discovery and translational research can yield measurable, population-level improvements in health and reduction in mortality among those having or at risk for neurological disease. Once several, well-conducted randomized controlled trials establish the efficacy of a given therapy, implementation research can generate new knowledge about barriers to uptake of the therapy into widespread clinical care, and what strategies are effective in overcoming those barriers and in addressing health disparities. Comparative effectiveness research aims to elucidate the relative value (including clinical benefit, clinical harms, and/or costs) of alternative efficacious management approaches to a neurological disorder, generally through direct comparisons, and may include comparisons of methodologies for implementation. Congress has recently appropriated resources and established an institute to prioritize funding for such research. Neurologists and neuroscientists should understand the scope and objectives of comparative effectiveness and implementation research, their range of methodological approaches (formal literature syntheses, randomized trials, observational studies, modeling), and existing research resources (centers for literature synthesis, registries, practice networks) relevant to research for neurological conditions, in order to close the well-documented “evidence-to-practice gap.” Future directions include building this research resource capacity, producing scientists trained to conduct rigorous comparative effectiveness and implementation research, and embracing innovative strategies to set research priorities in these areas. PMID:22718542

  8. Writing implementation research grant proposals: ten key ingredients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background All investigators seeking funding to conduct implementation research face the challenges of preparing a high-quality proposal and demonstrating their capacity to conduct the proposed study. Applicants need to demonstrate the progressive nature of their research agenda and their ability to build cumulatively upon the literature and their own preliminary studies. Because implementation science is an emerging field involving complex and multilevel processes, many investigators may not feel equipped to write competitive proposals, and this concern is pronounced among early stage implementation researchers. Discussion This article addresses the challenges of preparing grant applications that succeed in the emerging field of dissemination and implementation. We summarize ten ingredients that are important in implementation research grants. For each, we provide examples of how preliminary data, background literature, and narrative detail in the application can strengthen the application. Summary Every investigator struggles with the challenge of fitting into a page-limited application the research background, methodological detail, and information that can convey the project’s feasibility and likelihood of success. While no application can include a high level of detail about every ingredient, addressing the ten ingredients summarized in this article can help assure reviewers of the significance, feasibility, and impact of the proposed research. PMID:23062065

  9. Comprehensive School Reform: The Implementation Gap. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Does Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) work? Research results have been mixed. Some studies have measured a modest improvement in student achievement; others have found no effect. A team of RAND researchers has approached the question of CSR's effectiveness by first focusing on an even more basic question: Has CSR been implemented? A shortcoming…

  10. Challenges and Dilemmas in Implementing Random Assignment in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong-Dean, Colin; Hofstetter, Carolyn Huie; Strick, Betsy R.

    2011-01-01

    In the contentious debate over the use of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in education research, little attention has been given to how methodological issues arise and/or are resolved in the implementation of random assignment. Following a review of the methodological-theoretical literature on RCTs and alternative research designs, this article…

  11. Research-Based Implementation of Peer Instruction: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vickrey, Trisha; Rosploch, Kaitlyn; Rahmanian, Reihaneh; Pilarz, Matthew; Stains, Marilyne

    2015-01-01

    Current instructional reforms in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses have focused on enhancing adoption of evidence-based instructional practices among STEM faculty members. These practices have been empirically demonstrated to enhance student learning and attitudes. However, research indicates that instructors often adapt rather than adopt practices, unknowingly compromising their effectiveness. Thus, there is a need to raise awareness of the research-based implementation of these practices, develop fidelity of implementation protocols to understand adaptations being made, and ultimately characterize the true impact of reform efforts based on these practices. Peer instruction (PI) is an example of an evidence-based instructional practice that consists of asking students conceptual questions during class time and collecting their answers via clickers or response cards. Extensive research has been conducted by physics and biology education researchers to evaluate the effectiveness of this practice and to better understand the intricacies of its implementation. PI has also been investigated in other disciplines, such as chemistry and computer science. This article reviews and summarizes these various bodies of research and provides instructors and researchers with a research-based model for the effective implementation of PI. Limitations of current studies and recommendations for future empirical inquiries are also provided. PMID:25713095

  12. Breeding schemes for the implementation of genomic selection in wheat (Triticum spp.).

    PubMed

    Bassi, Filippo M; Bentley, Alison R; Charmet, Gilles; Ortiz, Rodomiro; Crossa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade the breeding technology referred to as 'genomic selection' (GS) has been implemented in a variety of species, with particular success in animal breeding. Recent research shows the potential of GS to reshape wheat breeding. Many authors have concluded that the estimated genetic gain per year applying GS is several times that of conventional breeding. GS is, however, a new technology for wheat breeding and many programs worldwide are still struggling to identify the best strategy for its implementation. This article provides practical guidelines on the key considerations when implementing GS. A review of the existing GS literature for a range of species is provided and used to prime breeder-oriented considerations on the practical applications of GS. Furthermore, this article discusses potential breeding schemes for GS, genotyping considerations, and methods for effective training population design. The components of selection intensity, progress toward inbreeding in half- or full-sibs recurrent schemes, and the generation of selection are also presented. PMID:26566822

  13. Implementation of biosurety systems in a Department of Defense medical research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Carr, Kathleen; Henchal, Erik A; Wilhelmsen, Catherine; Carr, Bridget

    2004-01-01

    New biosurety regulations and guidelines were implemented in 2003 because of increased concern for the safety and security of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) that may be used as weapons of mass destruction. Biosurety is defined as the combination of security, biosafety, agent accountability, and personnel reliability needed to prevent unauthorized access to select agents of bioterrorism. These new regulations will lead to increased scrutiny of the use of select biological agents in registered research laboratories, but the regulations may have unintended effects on cost, progress, and perceptions in programs previously considered part of the academic research community. We review the history of biosurety, evolving guidelines, implementation of the regulations, and impacts at the lead research laboratory for medical biological defense for the Department of Defense. PMID:15068675

  14. Multilevel Research and the Challenges of Implementing Genomic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Ralph J.; Fennell, Mary L.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Scheuner, Maren T.; Schully, Sheri D.; Williams, Marc S.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in genomics and related fields promise a new era of personalized medicine in the cancer care continuum. Nevertheless, there are fundamental challenges in integrating genomic medicine into cancer practice. We explore how multilevel research can contribute to implementation of genomic medicine. We first review the rapidly developing scientific discoveries in this field and the paucity of current applications that are ready for implementation in clinical and public health programs. We then define a multidisciplinary translational research agenda for successful integration of genomic medicine into policy and practice and consider challenges for successful implementation. We illustrate the agenda using the example of Lynch syndrome testing in newly diagnosed cases of colorectal cancer and cascade testing in relatives. We synthesize existing information in a framework for future multilevel research for integrating genomic medicine into the cancer care continuum. PMID:22623603

  15. Developing and implementing the community nursing research strategy for Wales.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, Joyce; Wallace, Carolyn; Davies, Robyn; Bale, Sue; Thomas, Sue

    2013-11-01

    In order to obtain the best patient outcomes in community nursing, practice needs to be underpinned by robust research-based evidence. This article describes a Community Nursing Research Strategy developed and implemented in Wales to provide the nursing profession with the evidence to support future organisational and professional change in achieving excellence in the community. This was developed in partnership with education, research, health services, workforce planning and Government using consensus methodology (specifically, a nominal group technique). Consequently, the process was inclusive and included three steps: escalating presentation of ideas, topic debate and topic rating. The result was a strategy with four implementation strands, including a virtual network, research portfolio, application to practice and leadership. PMID:24471230

  16. Implementing No Child Left Behind in Three States. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stecher, Brian M.; Epstein, Scott; Hamilton, Laura S.; Marsh, Julie A.; Robyn, Abby; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Russell, Jennifer; Naftel, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This research brief describes work done for RAND Education and documented in "Pain and Gain: Implementing No Child Left Behind in Three States, 2004-2006", Brian M. Stecher, Scott Epstein, Laura S. Hamilton, Julie A. Marsh, Abby Robyn, Jennifer Sloan McCombs, Jennifer Russell, and Scott Naftel." The three states discussed are: California, Georgia,…

  17. Empowering Design-Based Implementation Research: The Need for Infrastructure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabelli, Nora; Dede, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses frameworks and conceptual lenses that help orient design-based implementation research (DBIR) work to the types of infrastructure required for success, while contributing to theories about the processes of educational improvement. Such infrastructures can be conceived as a framework: a set of interconnected elements that…

  18. E-Consult Implementation: Lessons Learned Using Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research

    PubMed Central

    Haverhals, Leah M.; Sayre, George; Helfrich, Christian D.; Battaglia, Catherine; Aron, David; Stevenson, Lauren D.; Kirsh, Susan; Ho, P. Michael; Lowery, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In 2011, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) implemented electronic consults (e-consults) as an alternative to in-person specialty visits to improve access and reduce travel for veterans. We conducted an evaluation to understand variation in the use of the new e-consult mechanism and the causes of variable implementation, guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Study Design Qualitative case studies of 3 high- and 5 low-implementation e-consult pilot sites. Participants included e-consult site leaders, primary care providers, specialists, and support staff identified using a modified snowball sample. Methods We used a 3-step approach, with a structured survey of e-consult site leaders to identify key constructs, based on the CFIR. We then conducted open-ended interviews, focused on key constructs, with all participants. Finally, we produced structured, site-level ratings of CFIR constructs and compared them between high- and low-implementation sites. Results Site leaders identified 14 initial constructs. We conducted 37 interviews, from which 4 CFIR constructs distinguished high implementation e-consult sites: compatibility, networks and communications, training, and access to knowledge and information. For example, illustrating compatibility, a specialist at a high-implementation site reported that the site changed the order of consult options so that all specialties listed e-consults first to maintain consistency. High-implementation sites also exhibited greater agreement on constructs. Conclusions By using the CFIR to analyze results, we facilitate future synthesis with other findings, and we better identify common patterns of implementation determinants common across settings. PMID:26760426

  19. Between and within-site variation in qualitative implementation research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multisite qualitative studies are challenging in part because decisions regarding within-site and between-site sampling must be made to reduce the complexity of data collection, but these decisions may have serious implications for analyses. There is not yet consensus on how to account for within-site and between-site variations in qualitative perceptions of the organizational context of interventions. The purpose of this study was to analyze variation in perceptions among key informants in order to demonstrate the importance of broad sampling for identifying both within-site and between-site implementation themes. Methods Case studies of four sites were compared to identify differences in how Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers implemented a Primary Care/Mental Health Integration (PC/MHI) intervention. Qualitative analyses focused on between-profession variation in reported referral and implementation processes within and between sites. Results Key informants identified co-location, the consultation-liaison service, space, access, and referral processes as important topics. Within-site themes revealed the importance of coordination, communication, and collaboration for implementing PC/MHI. The between-site theme indicated that the preexisting structure of mental healthcare influenced how PC/MHI was implemented at each site and that collaboration among both leaders and providers was critical to overcoming structural barriers. Conclusions Within- and between-site variation in perceptions among key informants within different professions revealed barriers and facilitators to the implementation not available from a single source. Examples provide insight into implementation barriers for PC/MHI. Multisite implementation studies may benefit from intentionally eliciting and analyzing variation within and between sites. Suggestions for implementation research design are presented. PMID:23286552

  20. Gas Hydrate Research Site Selection and Operational Research Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.; Boswell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years it has become generally accepted that gas hydrates represent a potential important future energy resource, a significant drilling and production hazard, a potential contributor to global climate change, and a controlling factor in seafloor stability and landslides. Research drilling and coring programs carried out by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), government agencies, and several consortia have contributed greatly to our understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates in marine and permafrost environments. For the most part, each of these field projects were built on the lessons learned from the projects that have gone before them. One of the most important factors contributing to the success of some of the more notable gas hydrate field projects has been the close alignment of project goals with the processes used to select the drill sites and to develop the project’s operational research plans. For example, IODP Expedition 311 used a transect approach to successfully constrain the overall occurrence of gas hydrate within the range of geologic environments within a marine accretionary complex. Earlier gas hydrate research drilling, including IODP Leg 164, were designed primarily to assess the occurrence and nature of marine gas hydrate systems, and relied largely on the presence of anomalous seismic features, including bottom-simulating reflectors and “blanking zones”. While these projects were extremely successful, expeditions today are being increasingly mounted with the primary goal of prospecting for potential gas hydrate production targets, and site selection processes designed to specifically seek out anomalously high-concentrations of gas hydrate are needed. This approach was best demonstrated in a recently completed energy resource focused project, the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II), which featured the collection of a

  1. Selecting the best theory to implement planned change.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary

    2013-04-01

    Planned change in nursing practice is necessary for a wide range of reasons, but it can be challenging to implement. Understanding and using a change theory framework can help managers or other change agents to increase the likelihood of success. This article considers three change theories and discusses how one in particular can be used in practice. PMID:23705547

  2. How to successfully select and implement electronic health records (EHR) in small ambulatory practice settings

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Adoption of EHRs by U.S. ambulatory practices has been slow despite the perceived benefits of their use. Most evaluations of EHR implementations in the literature apply to large practice settings. While there are similarities relating to EHR implementation in large and small practice settings, the authors argue that scale is an important differentiator. Focusing on small ambulatory practices, this paper outlines the benefits and barriers to EHR use in this setting, and provides a "field guide" for these practices to facilitate successful EHR implementation. Discussion The benefits of EHRs in ambulatory practices include improved patient care and office efficiency, and potential financial benefits. Barriers to EHRs include costs; lack of standardization of EHR products and the design of vendor systems for large practice environments; resistance to change; initial difficulty of system use leading to productivity reduction; and perceived accrual of benefits to society and payers rather than providers. The authors stress the need for developing a flexible change management strategy when introducing EHRs that is relevant to the small practice environment; the strategy should acknowledge the importance of relationship management and the role of individual staff members in helping the entire staff to manage change. Practice staff must create an actionable vision outlining realistic goals for the implementation, and all staff must buy into the project. The authors detail the process of implementing EHRs through several stages: decision, selection, pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. They stress the importance of identifying a champion to serve as an advocate of the value of EHRs and provide direction and encouragement for the project. Other key activities include assessing and redesigning workflow; understanding financial issues; conducting training that is well-timed and meets the needs of practice staff; and evaluating the

  3. Parent-Implemented Procedural Modification of Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Food Selectivity in a Young Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarbox, Jonathan; Schiff, Averil; Najdowski, Adel C.

    2010-01-01

    Fool selectivity is characterized by the consumption of an inadequate variety of foods. The effectiveness of behavioral treatment procedures, particularly nonremoval of the spoon, is well validated by research. The role of parents in the treatment of feeding disorders and the feasibility of behavioral procedures for parent implementation in the…

  4. Design-Based Implementation Research: An Emerging Model for Transforming the Relationship of Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Barry J.; Penuel, William R.; Allen, Anna-Ruth; Cheng, Britte Haugan; Sabelli, Nora

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to design-based implementation research (DBIR). We describe the need for DBIR as a research approach that challenges educational researchers and practitioners to transcend traditional research/practice barriers to facilitate the design of educational interventions that are effective, sustainable, and scalable.…

  5. Fostering implementation of health services research findings into practice: a consolidated framework for advancing implementation science

    PubMed Central

    Damschroder, Laura J; Aron, David C; Keith, Rosalind E; Kirsh, Susan R; Alexander, Jeffery A; Lowery, Julie C

    2009-01-01

    Background Many interventions found to be effective in health services research studies fail to translate into meaningful patient care outcomes across multiple contexts. Health services researchers recognize the need to evaluate not only summative outcomes but also formative outcomes to assess the extent to which implementation is effective in a specific setting, prolongs sustainability, and promotes dissemination into other settings. Many implementation theories have been published to help promote effective implementation. However, they overlap considerably in the constructs included in individual theories, and a comparison of theories reveals that each is missing important constructs included in other theories. In addition, terminology and definitions are not consistent across theories. We describe the Consolidated Framework For Implementation Research (CFIR) that offers an overarching typology to promote implementation theory development and verification about what works where and why across multiple contexts. Methods We used a snowball sampling approach to identify published theories that were evaluated to identify constructs based on strength of conceptual or empirical support for influence on implementation, consistency in definitions, alignment with our own findings, and potential for measurement. We combined constructs across published theories that had different labels but were redundant or overlapping in definition, and we parsed apart constructs that conflated underlying concepts. Results The CFIR is composed of five major domains: intervention characteristics, outer setting, inner setting, characteristics of the individuals involved, and the process of implementation. Eight constructs were identified related to the intervention (e.g., evidence strength and quality), four constructs were identified related to outer setting (e.g., patient needs and resources), 12 constructs were identified related to inner setting (e.g., culture, leadership engagement

  6. Achieving standardized medication data in clinical research studies: two approaches and applications for implementing RxNorm.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel L; Smith, Susan B; Malloy, Jamie; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2010-08-01

    The National Institutes of Health has proposed a roadmap for clinical research. Test projects of this roadmap include centralized data management for distributed research, the harmonization of clinical and research data, and the use of data standards throughout the research process. In 2003, RxNorm was named as a standard for codifying clinical drugs. Clinical researchers looking to implement RxNorm have few template implementation plans. Epidemiological studies and clinical trials (types of clinical research) have different requirements for model standards and best implementation tools. This paper highlights two different (epidemiological and intervention) clinical research projects, their unique requirements for a medication standard, the suitability of RxNorm as a standard for each, and application and process requirements for implementation. It is hoped that our experience of selecting and implementing the RxNorm standard to address varying study requirements in both domestic and international settings will be of value to other efforts. PMID:20703919

  7. Enhancing Dissemination and Implementation Research Using Systems Science Methods

    PubMed Central

    Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Neal, Jennifer Watling; Meissner, Helen I.; Yonas, Michael; Mabry, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Dissemination and implementation (D&I) research seeks to understand and overcome barriers to adoption of behavioral interventions that address complex problems; specifically interventions that arise from multiple interacting influences crossing socio-ecological levels. It is often difficult for research to accurately represent and address the complexities of the real world, and traditional methodological approaches are generally inadequate for this task. Systems science methods, expressly designed to study complex systems, can be effectively employed for an improved understanding about dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions. METHODS Case examples of three systems science methods – system dynamics modeling, agent-based modeling, and network analysis – are used to illustrate how each method can be used to address D&I challenges. RESULTS The case studies feature relevant behavioral topical areas: chronic disease prevention, community violence prevention, and educational intervention. To emphasize consistency with D&I priorities, the discussion of the value of each method is framed around the elements of the established Reach Effectiveness Adoption Implementation Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. CONCLUSIONS Systems science methods can help researchers, public health decision makers and program implementers to understand the complex factors influencing successful D&I of programs in community settings, and to identify D&I challenges imposed by system complexity. PMID:24852184

  8. Final report on implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report on the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments represents an initiative of the Research and Education Division, Office of Minority Economic Impact, US Department of Energy. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was created by Congress in 1979, within the US Department of Energy, to afford the Secretary advice on the effect policies, regulations and other actions of DOE respecting minority participation in energy programs. The Director of MI is responsible for the conduct of ongoing research into the effects, including socio-economic and environmental, of national energy programs, policies, and regulations of the Department of minorities. Public housing in the United States is dominated by minorities, public housing is a large consumer of residential energy. Consequently, this project is a logical merging of these two factors and an attempt to somehow influence energy savings through improving public housing residents` energy-consumption practices. This final report attempts to capture the results of this current demonstration, and incorporate the historical basis for today`s results by renewing the efforts that preceded the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments.

  9. Final report on implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report on the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments represents an initiative of the Research and Education Division, Office of Minority Economic Impact, US Department of Energy. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was created by Congress in 1979, within the US Department of Energy, to afford the Secretary advice on the effect policies, regulations and other actions of DOE respecting minority participation in energy programs. The Director of MI is responsible for the conduct of ongoing research into the effects, including socio-economic and environmental, of national energy programs, policies, and regulations of the Department of minorities. Public housing in the United States is dominated by minorities, public housing is a large consumer of residential energy. Consequently, this project is a logical merging of these two factors and an attempt to somehow influence energy savings through improving public housing residents' energy-consumption practices. This final report attempts to capture the results of this current demonstration, and incorporate the historical basis for today's results by renewing the efforts that preceded the implementation of energy conservation practices training in selected public housing developments.

  10. Research, Perspectives, and Recommendations on Implementing the Flipped Classroom.

    PubMed

    Rotellar, Cristina; Cain, Jeff

    2016-03-25

    Flipped or inverted classrooms have become increasingly popular, and sometimes controversial, within higher education. Many educators have touted the potential benefits of this model and initial research regarding implementation has been primarily positive. The rationale behind the flipped classroom methodology is to increase student engagement with content, increase and improve faculty contact time with students, and enhance learning. This paper presents a summary of primary literature regarding flipped classrooms, discusses concerns and unanswered questions from both a student and faculty member perspective, and offers recommendations regarding implementation. PMID:27073287

  11. Research, Perspectives, and Recommendations on Implementing the Flipped Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Rotellar, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Flipped or inverted classrooms have become increasingly popular, and sometimes controversial, within higher education. Many educators have touted the potential benefits of this model and initial research regarding implementation has been primarily positive. The rationale behind the flipped classroom methodology is to increase student engagement with content, increase and improve faculty contact time with students, and enhance learning. This paper presents a summary of primary literature regarding flipped classrooms, discusses concerns and unanswered questions from both a student and faculty member perspective, and offers recommendations regarding implementation. PMID:27073287

  12. A bibliographic review of public health dissemination and implementation research output and citation rates.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Luke; Milat, Andrew J; Lecathelinais, Christophe; Skelton, Eliza; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Williams, Christopher; Wiggers, John; Chai, Li Kheng; Yoong, Sze Lin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research according to research design and study type. A cross sectional bibliographic study was undertaken in 2013. All original data-based studies and review articles focusing on dissemination and implementation research that had been published in 10 randomly selected public health journals in 2008 were audited. The electronic database 'Scopus' was used to calculate 5-year citation rates for all included publications. Of the 1648 publications examined, 216 were original data-based research or literature reviews focusing on dissemination and implementation research. Of these 72% were classified as descriptive/epidemiological, 26% were intervention and just 1.9% were measurement research. Cross-sectional studies were the most common study design (47%). Reviews, randomized trials, non-randomized trials and decision/cost-effectiveness studies each represented between 6 and 10% of all output. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and cohort studies were the most frequently cited study designs. The study suggests that publications that had the greatest academic impact (highest citation rates) made up only a small proportion of overall public health dissemination and implementation research output. PMID:27583203

  13. Practice-based Research Networks (PBRNs) Are Promising Laboratories for Conducting Dissemination and Implementation Research

    PubMed Central

    Heintzman, John; Gold, Rachel; Krist, Alexander; Crosson, Jay; Likumahuwa, Sonja; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Dissemination and implementation science addresses the application of research findings in varied health care settings. Despite the potential benefit of dissemination and implementation work to primary care, ideal laboratories for this science have been elusive. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) have a long history of conducting research in community clinical settings, demonstrating an approach that could be used to execute multiple research projects over time in broad and varied settings. PBRNs also are uniquely structured and increasingly involved in pragmatic trials, a research design central to dissemination and implementation science. We argue that PBRNs and dissemination and implementation scientists are ideally suited to work together and that the collaboration of these 2 groups will yield great value for the future of primary care and the delivery of evidence-based health care. PMID:25381072

  14. Multisystemic Therapy(®) : Clinical Overview, Outcomes, and Implementation Research.

    PubMed

    Henggeler, Scott W; Schaeffer, Cindy M

    2016-09-01

    Multisystemic therapy (MST) is an evidence-based treatment originally developed for youth with serious antisocial behavior who are at high risk for out-of-home placement and their families; and subsequently adapted to address other challenging clinical problems experience by youths and their families. The social-ecological theoretical framework of MST is presented as well as its home-based model of treatment delivery, defining clinical intervention strategies, and ongoing quality assurance/quality improvement system. With more than 100 peer-reviewed outcome and implementation journal articles published as of January 2016, the majority by independent investigators, MST is one of the most extensively evaluated family based treatments. Outcome research has yielded almost uniformly favorable results for youths and families, and implementation research has demonstrated the importance of treatment and program fidelity in achieving such outcomes. PMID:27370172

  15. Selection and implementation of a laboratory computer system.

    PubMed

    Moritz, V A; McMaster, R; Dillon, T; Mayall, B

    1995-07-01

    The process of selection of a pathology computer system has become increasingly complex as there are an increasing number of facilities that must be provided and stringent performance requirements under heavy computing loads from both human users and machine inputs. Furthermore, the continuing advances in software and hardware technology provide more options and innovative new ways of tackling problems. These factors taken together pose a difficult and complex set of decisions and choices for the system analyst and designer. The selection process followed by the Microbiology Department at Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital included examination of existing systems, development of a functional specification followed by a formal tender process. The successful tenderer was then selected using predefined evaluation criteria. The successful tenderer was a software development company that developed and supplied a system based on a distributed network using a SUN computer as the main processor. The software was written using Informix running on the UNIX operating system. This represents one of the first microbiology systems developed using a commercial relational database and fourth generation language. The advantages of this approach are discussed. PMID:8532393

  16. Theories and Research Methodologies for Design-Based Implementation Research: Examples from Four Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jennifer Lin; Jackson, Kara; Krumm, Andrew E.; Frank, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Design-Based Implementation Research is the process of engaging "learning scientists, policy researchers, and practitioners in a model of collaborative, iterative, and systematic research and development" designed to address persistent problems of teaching and learning. Addressing persistent problems of teaching and learning requires…

  17. The Importance of Quality Implementation for Research, Practice, and Policy. ASPE Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durlak, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Sometimes, program evaluations report no difference in outcomes between persons given a program and those not given the program. Is this because the program does not work, or because it was poorly implemented? Achieving high quality program implementation is critical to achieving anticipated outcomes, and researchers have made considerable…

  18. GPS time transfer with implementation of selective availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, David W.; Granveaud, Michel P.; Klepczynski, William J.; Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.

    1990-05-01

    The international community of time metrology is facing a major challenge with the Selective Availability (SA) degradation of GPS satellite signals. At present there are 6 Block 1 satellites and 8 Block 2 satellites operating. According to the policy of the U.S. Department of Defence the Block 1 satellite signals will not be degraded, but these satellites are old with a finite life. The Block 2 satellites, which have all been launched since 1988, were subject to Selective Availability from March 25, 1990. The effect of SA should be to limit precision to about 100 meters for navigation and 167 ns for timing. A study was conducted in order to understand the nature of the actual introduced degradation, and to elaborate the means of removing the effects of this degradation on time transfer. This study concerns the time extraction from GPS satellites at NIST, USNO and Paris Observatory, and the comparison of atomic clocks between these laboratories by common view approach. The results show that when using the data taken over several days the time extraction can be achieved with uncertainty of a few tens of nanoseconds, while strict common-view has removed entirely the effects of SA during the periods under study.

  19. GPS time transfer with implementation of selective availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, David W.; Granveaud, Michel P.; Klepczynski, William J.; Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.

    1990-01-01

    The international community of time metrology is facing a major challenge with the Selective Availability (SA) degradation of GPS satellite signals. At present there are 6 Block 1 satellites and 8 Block 2 satellites operating. According to the policy of the U.S. Department of Defence the Block 1 satellite signals will not be degraded, but these satellites are old with a finite life. The Block 2 satellites, which have all been launched since 1988, were subject to Selective Availability from March 25, 1990. The effect of SA should be to limit precision to about 100 meters for navigation and 167 ns for timing. A study was conducted in order to understand the nature of the actual introduced degradation, and to elaborate the means of removing the effects of this degradation on time transfer. This study concerns the time extraction from GPS satellites at NIST, USNO and Paris Observatory, and the comparison of atomic clocks between these laboratories by common view approach. The results show that when using the data taken over several days the time extraction can be achieved with uncertainty of a few tens of nanoseconds, while strict common-view has removed entirely the effects of SA during the periods under study.

  20. Natural Selection, Nutrition Research, and Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Darby

    1980-01-01

    Provides examples of the teaching of hypothesis generation and scientific inquiry in biology. Specifically, the author applies the selection paradigm to considerations of the human nutrient-handling apparatus, finally suggesting a model of the selective forces that may have operated on the human genome since hunting-gathering and primitive…

  1. The implementation of intentional rounding using participatory action research.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Ann; Bradley, Sandra; Jeffers, Lesley; Linedale, Ecushla; Kelman, Sue; Killington, Geoffrey

    2013-10-01

    'Intentional'/'hourly rounding' is defined as regular checks of individual patients carried out by health professionals at set intervals rather than a response to a summons via a call bell. Intentional rounding places patients at the heart of the ward routine including the acknowledgement of patient preferences and in anticipation of their needs. The aim of this study was to implement intentional rounding using participatory action research to increase patient care, increase staff productivity and the satisfaction of care provision from both patients and staff. Outcomes of the study revealed a drop in call bell use, no observable threats to patient safety, nursing staff and patient satisfaction with care provision. However, any future studies should consider staff skill mix issues including the needs of newly graduated nursing staff as well as the cognitive status of patients when implementing intentional rounding on acute care wards. PMID:24093744

  2. Designing and implementing full immersion simulation as a research tool.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Belinda; Buckley, Thomas; Curtis, Kate; Morris, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Simulation is a valuable research tool used to evaluate the clinical performance of devices, people and systems. The simulated setting may address concerns unique to complex clinical environments such as the Emergency Department, which make the conduct of research challenging. There is limited evidence available to inform the development of simulated clinical scenarios for the purpose of evaluating practice in research studies, with the majority of literature focused on designing simulated clinical scenarios for education and training. Distinct differences exist in scenario design when implemented in education compared with use in clinical research studies. Simulated scenarios used to assess practice in clinical research must not comprise of any purposeful or planned teaching and be developed with a high degree of validity and reliability. A new scenario design template was devised to develop two standardised simulated clinical scenarios for the evaluation of a new assessment framework for emergency nurses. The scenario development and validation processes undertaken are described and provide an evidence-informed guide to scenario development for future clinical research studies. PMID:26917415

  3. Implementing Common Data Elements Across Studies to Advance Research

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marlene Z.; Thompson, Cheryl Bagley; Yates, Bernice; Zimmerman, Lani; Pullen, Carol H.

    2014-01-01

    Challenges arise in building the knowledge needed for evidence based practice partially because obtaining clinical research data is expensive and complicated, and many studies have small sample sizes. Combining data from several studies may have the advantage of increasing the impact of the findings, or expanding the population to which findings may be generalized. The use of common data elements will allow this combining and, in turn, create big data, which is an important approach that may accelerate knowledge development. This article discusses the philosophy of using common data elements across research studies and illustrates their use by the processes in a Developmental Center grant funded by the National Institutes of Health. The researchers identified a set of data elements and used them across several pilot studies. Issues that need to be considered in the adoption and implementation of common data elements across pilot studies include theoretical framework, purpose of the common measures, respondent burden, team work, managing large data sets, grant writing, and unintended consequences. We describe these challenges and solutions that can be implemented to manage them. PMID:25771192

  4. Select Novice Elementary Teachers' Perceived Knowledge and Implementation of High-Quality Reading Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumstead, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to examine select novice teachers' perceived knowledge of high-quality reading instruction, explore the extent that select novice teachers implemented high-quality reading instruction into their own classrooms, and to investigate any factors that explain the similarities and differences between…

  5. Research Mathematicians' Practices in Selecting Mathematical Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misfeldt, Morten; Johansen, Mikkel Willum

    2015-01-01

    Developing abilities to create, inquire into, qualify, and choose among mathematical problems is an important educational goal. In this paper, we elucidate how mathematicians work with mathematical problems in order to understand this mathematical process. More specifically, we investigate how mathematicians select and pose problems and discuss to…

  6. SELECT RESEARCH GROUP IN AIR POLLUTION METEOROLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six individual investigators, who have conducted different but related meteorological research, present in-depth technical reviews of their work. Prime conclusions are that (1) a scale analysis shows that different models are necessary for meteorological processes on urban, regio...

  7. Barriers in implementing research findings in cancer care: the Greek registered nurses perceptions.

    PubMed

    Patiraki, Elisabeth; Karlou, Chrysoula; Papadopoulou, Despina; Spyridou, Ageliki; Kouloukoura, Chrysoula; Bare, Elpida; Merkouris, Anastasios

    2004-09-01

    This study explored Greek nurses' perceptions of the barriers to research utilization faced in every day practice. The barriers between nurses working in cancer and general hospitals, as well as between those employed at central and provincial hospitals were compared. The study used a cross-sectional design and data were collected using the "Barriers Scale" (Funk et al., 1991a, Applied Nursing Research, 4, 39-45). A convenience sample of 301 nurses was randomly selected from 12 hospitals in Greece. The two key barriers identified were related to the 'availability of research findings'. English language was perceived to range between moderate and major barrier for the vast majority of participants (n = 231, 78%). Nurses surveyed indicated the presentation of research findings as the greatest barrier while the characteristics of nurses themselves were perceived as the least important one. No significant differences were found between types of hospitals (cancer/general) and geographical areas (central/provincial). Some differences, however, were observed in relation to specific items of the scale such as feeling isolated from 'research-knowledgeable' colleagues and having insufficient time to implement new ideas. The observations reported here appear to agree with the findings in mainstream literature. The results suggest that more emphasis should be given in research methodology, statistics and critical appraisal skills at all levels of nursing education, and that efforts should be made towards increasing research availability and creating supportive environments for implementation of research findings. PMID:15304232

  8. Integrated obesity care management system -implementation and research protocol

    PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Carpentier, André; Donovan, Denise; Fortin, Martin; Grant, Andrew; Simoneau-Roy, Judith; St-Cyr-Tribble, Denise; Xhignesse, Mariane; Langlois, Marie-France

    2007-01-01

    Background Nearly 50% of Canadians are overweight and their number is increasing rapidly. The majority of obese subjects are treated by primary care physicians (PCPs) who often feel uncomfortable with the management of obesity. The current research proposal is aimed at the development and implementation of an innovative, integrated, interdisciplinary obesity care management system involving both primary and secondary care professionals. Methods We will use both action and evaluative research in order to achieve the following specific objectives. The first one is to develop and implement a preceptorship-based continuing medical education (CME) program complemented by a web site for physicians and nurses working in Family Medicine Groups (FMGs). This CME will be based on needs assessment and will be validated by one FMG using questionnaires and semi structured interviews. Also, references and teaching tools will be available for participants on the web site. Our second objective is to establish a collaborative intra and inter-regional interdisciplinary network to enable on-going expertise update and networking for FMG teams. This tool consists of a discussion forum and monthly virtual meetings of all participants. Our third objective is to evaluate the implementation of our program for its ability to train 8 FMGs per year, the access and utilization of electronic tools and the participants' satisfaction. This will be measured with questionnaires, web logging tools and group interviews. Our fourth objective is to determine the impact for the participants regarding knowledge and expertise, attitudes and perceptions, self-efficacy for the management of obesity, and changes in FMG organization for obesity management. Questionnaires and interviews will be used for this purpose. Our fifth objective is to deliver transferable knowledge for health professionals and decision-makers. Strategies and pitfalls of setting up this program will also be identified. Conclusion This

  9. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  10. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nealy, Jennifer; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  11. Selected Styles in Web-Based Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Bruce, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Selected Styles in Web-Based Educational Research" is concerned with the most common research styles in Web-based teaching or learning. It is intended for practitioners, educators and students, who wish to learn how to conduct research in online teaching and learning, and helps define style in educational research methodology. To enhance…

  12. Research ethics committees in Europe: implementing the directive, respecting diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hedgecoe, A; Carvalho, F; Lobmayer, P; Raka, F

    2006-01-01

    With the recent Clinical Trials Directive, a degree of harmonisation into research ethics committees (RECs) across Europe, including the time taken to assess a trial proposal and the kinds of issues a committee should take into account, has been introduced by the European Union (EU). How four different member states—Hungary, Portugal, Sweden and the UK—have chosen to implement the directive is shown. Although this has resulted in four very different ways of structuring RECs, similar themes are present in all four cases, such as centralisation of control over RECs within member states, harmonisation of REC procedures across the EU and increased role of political decision making with regard to such committees. PMID:16877630

  13. Research and Energy Efficiency: Selected Success Stories

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Garland, P. W.; Garland, R. W.

    1997-06-26

    Energy use and energy technology play critical roles in the U.S. economy and modern society. The Department of Energy (DOE) conducts civilian energy research and development (R&D) programs for the purpose of identifying promising technologies that promote energy security, energy efficiency, and renewable energy use. DOE-sponsored research ranges from basic investigation of phenomena all the way through development of applied technology in partnership with industry. DOE`s research programs are conducted in support of national strategic energy objectives, however austere financial times have dictated that R&D programs be measured in terms of cost vs. benefit. In some cases it is difficult to measure the return on investment for the basic "curiosity-driven" research, however many applied technology development programs have resulted in measurable commercial successes. The DOE has published summaries of their most successful applied technology energy R&D programs. In this paper, we will discuss five examples from the Building Technologies area of the DOE Energy Efficiency program. Each story will describe the technology, discuss the level of federal funding, and discuss the returns in terms of energy savings, cost savings, or national economic impacts.

  14. The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ``demonstration technologies.`` Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria.

  15. Implementation of Evidence-Based Adolescent Literacy Practices by Select Secondary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergele, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to investigate how evidence-based adolescent literacy practices are implemented by secondary teachers in the classroom or what the reasons might be for these practices not being implemented. Three secondary English teachers of three different types of classes, comprising Intensive, Project-based…

  16. Analysis and selection of optimal function implementations in massively parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Peters, Amanda; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2011-05-31

    An apparatus, program product and method optimize the operation of a parallel computer system by, in part, collecting performance data for a set of implementations of a function capable of being executed on the parallel computer system based upon the execution of the set of implementations under varying input parameters in a plurality of input dimensions. The collected performance data may be used to generate selection program code that is configured to call selected implementations of the function in response to a call to the function under varying input parameters. The collected performance data may be used to perform more detailed analysis to ascertain the comparative performance of the set of implementations of the function under the varying input parameters.

  17. Research-based recommendations for implementing international service-learning.

    PubMed

    Amerson, Roxanne

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of schools of nursing are incorporating international service-learning and/or immersion experiences into their curriculum to promote cultural competence. The purpose of this paper is to identify research-based recommendations for implementing an international service-learning program. A review of literature was conducted in the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature database using the keywords international, immersion, cultural competence, nursing, and international service-learning. Additional references were located from the reference lists of related articles. Planning of international or immersion experiences requires consideration of the type of country, the length of time, and design of the program; the use of a service-learning framework; opportunities that require the student to live and work in the community, provide hands-on care, participate in unstructured activities, and make home visits; and a method of reflection. Increasing cultural competence does not require foreign travel, but it does necessitate that students are challenged to move outside their comfort zone and work directly with diverse populations. These research-based recommendations may be used either internationally or locally to promote the most effective service-learning opportunities for nursing students. PMID:24720947

  18. Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.J.

    1993-03-01

    Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

  19. Factors Influencing the Selection of the Systems Integration Organizational Model Type for Planning and Implementing Government High-Technology Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Leann; Utley, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    While there has been extensive research in defining project organizational structures for traditional projects, little research exists to support high technology government project s organizational structure definition. High-Technology Government projects differ from traditional projects in that they are non-profit, span across Government-Industry organizations, typically require significant integration effort, and are strongly susceptible to a volatile external environment. Systems Integration implementation has been identified as a major contributor to both project success and failure. The literature research bridges program management organizational planning, systems integration, organizational theory, and independent project reports, in order to assess Systems Integration (SI) organizational structure selection for improving the high-technology government project s probability of success. This paper will describe the methodology used to 1) Identify and assess SI organizational structures and their success rate, and 2) Identify key factors to be used in the selection of these SI organizational structures during the acquisition strategy process.

  20. [Selected research problems of anthrax vaccine development].

    PubMed

    Zakowska, Dorota; Kocik, Janusz; Bartoszcze, Michał

    2009-01-01

    The threat of bioterrorism with B. anthracis against civilian population is one of major concern. After successful bioterroristic attack in 2001 in US renewed research interest has prompted in the development of new and more effective vaccine against anthrax. There are two licensed vaccines against anthrax--AVA-Bio-Thrax US and UK--sterile culture filtrate prepared by alum precipitation. Both vaccines are based on PA antigen. There are several concerns regarding PA based vaccines. They require six sc injections and yearly booster, high rates of local reaction after vaccination is observed, the immunity is not long lasting, vaccination do not protect animals against different strains of B. anthracis. New strategies in the development of anthrax vaccines have been presented (recombinant PA, subunits vaccine, mutants, conjugated). Using proteomic approaches new antigens have been also identified as candidates for future vaccines. More effective and easy to perform methods of vaccination have been reviewed. PMID:20120948

  1. Sample Identification at Scale - Implementing IGSN in a Research Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J. F.; Golodoniuc, P.; Wyborn, L. A.; Devaraju, A.; Fraser, R.

    2015-12-01

    Earth sciences are largely observational and rely on natural samples, types of which vary significantly between science disciplines. Sharing and referencing of samples in scientific literature and across the Web requires the use of globally unique identifiers essential for disambiguation. This practice is very common in other fields, e.g. ISBN in publishing, doi in scientific literature, etc. In Earth sciences however, this is still often done in an ad-hoc manner without the use of unique identifiers. The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) system provides a persistent, globally unique label for identifying environmental samples. As an IGSN allocating agency, CSIRO implements the IGSN registration service at the organisational scale with contributions from multiple research groups. Capricorn Distal Footprints project is one of the first pioneers and early adopters of the technology in Australia. For this project, IGSN provides a mechanism for identification of new and legacy samples, as well as derived sub-samples. It will ensure transparency and reproducibility in various geochemical sampling campaigns that will involve a diversity of sampling methods. Hence, diverse geochemical and isotopic results can be linked back to the parent sample, particularly where multiple children of that sample have also been analysed. The IGSN integration for this project is still in early stages and requires further consultations on the governance mechanisms that we need to put in place to allow efficient collaboration within CSIRO and collaborating partners on the project including naming conventions, service interfaces, etc. In this work, we present the results of the initial implementation of IGSN in the context of the Capricorn Distal Footprints project. This study has so far demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach, while maintaining the flexibility to adapt to various media types, which is critical in the context of a multi-disciplinary project.

  2. Implementation research design: integrating participatory action research into randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Leykum, Luci K; Pugh, Jacqueline A; Lanham, Holly J; Harmon, Joel; McDaniel, Reuben R

    2009-01-01

    Background A gap continues to exist between what is known to be effective and what is actually delivered in the usual course of medical care. The goal of implementation research is to reduce this gap. However, a tension exists between the need to obtain generalizeable knowledge through implementation trials, and the inherent differences between healthcare organizations that make standard interventional approaches less likely to succeed. The purpose of this paper is to explore the integration of participatory action research and randomized controlled trial (RCT) study designs to suggest a new approach for studying interventions in healthcare settings. Discussion We summarize key elements of participatory action research, with particular attention to its collaborative, reflective approach. Elements of participatory action research and RCT study designs are discussed and contrasted, with a complex adaptive systems approach used to frame their integration. Summary The integration of participatory action research and RCT design results in a new approach that reflects not only the complex nature of healthcare organizations, but also the need to obtain generalizeable knowledge regarding the implementation process. PMID:19852784

  3. A GPU-Based Implementation of the Firefly Algorithm for Variable Selection in Multivariate Calibration Problems

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Lauro C. M.; Soares, Anderson S.; de Lima, Telma W.; Delbem, Alexandre C. B.; Coelho, Clarimar J.; Filho, Arlindo R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Several variable selection algorithms in multivariate calibration can be accelerated using Graphics Processing Units (GPU). Among these algorithms, the Firefly Algorithm (FA) is a recent proposed metaheuristic that may be used for variable selection. This paper presents a GPU-based FA (FA-MLR) with multiobjective formulation for variable selection in multivariate calibration problems and compares it with some traditional sequential algorithms in the literature. The advantage of the proposed implementation is demonstrated in an example involving a relatively large number of variables. The results showed that the FA-MLR, in comparison with the traditional algorithms is a more suitable choice and a relevant contribution for the variable selection problem. Additionally, the results also demonstrated that the FA-MLR performed in a GPU can be five times faster than its sequential implementation. PMID:25493625

  4. Document Selection and Relevance Assessments during a Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas; Wang, Peiling

    User's information needs and the tasks they face change over the stages of a research project. In previous research by Peiling Wang, a cognitive model of users' document selection behavior for their research projects was developed. This study looks at the general applicability of Wang's model to subsequent decision-making about items selected…

  5. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    PubMed Central

    Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D.; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility. PMID:27232234

  6. Load research manual. Volume 2. Fundamentals of implementing load research procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. In Volumes 1 and 2, procedures are suggested for determining data requirements for load research, establishing the size and customer composition of a load survey sample, selecting and using equipment to record customer electricity usage, processing data tapes from the recording equipment, and analyzing the data. Statistical techniques used in customer sampling are discussed in detail. The costs of load research also are estimated, and ongoing load research programs at three utilities are described. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms.

  7. Selected Examples of NACA/NASA Supersonic Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Edwin J.; Ayers, Theodore G.

    1995-01-01

    The present Dryden Flight Research Center, a part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, has a flight research history that extends back to the mid-1940's. The parent organization was a part of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and was formed in 1946 as the Muroc Flight Test Unit. This document describes 13 selected examples of important supersonic flight research conducted from the Mojave Desert location of the Dryden Flight Research Center over a 4 decade period beginning in 1946. The research described herein was either obtained at supersonic speeds or enabled subsequent aircraft to penetrate or traverse the supersonic region. In some instances there accrued from these research efforts benefits which are also applicable at lower or higher speed regions. A major consideration in the selection of the various research topics was the lasting impact they have had, or will have, on subsequent supersonic flight vehicle design, efficiency, safety, and performance or upon improved supersonic research techniques.

  8. Leading the Way to Appropriate Selection, Implementation, and Evaluation of the Read-Aloud Accommodation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlow, Martha L.; Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Hodgson, Jennifer R.

    2012-01-01

    The read-aloud accommodation is one of the most frequently used accommodations. Many educators need training to more confidently select, implement, and evaluate the use of the read-aloud accommodation. Planning by special education leaders can help ensure that test day goes smoothly for students who need the read-aloud accommodation.

  9. Helping Traditional Teachers To Plan and Implement Student Centered Classrooms; Selected Classroom Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Gerald F. J.; Page, William C.

    The Selected Classroom Project was planned, implemented, evaluated, and disseminated between October 1970 and June 1971. It narrowed the focus of Project COD to helping teachers in specific classroom develop a practical approach to the transition from traditional to "open" classrooms. The 21 participating teachers in grades 4 through 8 were…

  10. Selecting and Creating Mathematical Tasks: From Research To Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Margaret Schwan; Stein, Mary Kay

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on the selection and creation of mathematical tasks, drawing on QUASAR's research on mathematical tasks and experiences with teachers and teacher educators. Presents examples of task analysis and issues that teachers should reflect on. (ASK)

  11. Improved implementation and application of the individually selecting configuration interaction method.

    PubMed

    Stampfuss, P; Wenzel, W

    2005-01-01

    We report on the progress of our implementation of the configuration-selecting multireference configuration interaction method on massively parallel architectures with distributed memory, which now permits the treatment of Hilbert spaces of dimension O(10(12)). Of these about 50,000,000 can be selected in the variational subspace. We provide scaling data for the running time of the code for the IBM/SP3 and the CRAY-T3E. We present benchmark results for two selected applications: the energetics of the isomers of dinitrosoethylene and the benchmark results for the ring closure reaction of enediyene. PMID:15638575

  12. Selected issues of the universal communication environment implementation for CII standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Drabik, Paweł K.

    2011-10-01

    In the contemporary FPGA market there is the wide assortment of structures, integrated development environments, and boards of different producers. The variety allows to fit resources to requirements of the individual designer. There is the need of standardization of the projects to make it useful in research laboratories equipped with different producers tools. Proposed solution is CII standardization of VHDL components. This paper contains specification of the universal communication environment for CII standard. The link can be used in different FPGA structures. Implementation of the link enables object oriented VHDL programming with the use of CII standardization. The whole environment contains FPGA environment and PC software. The paper contains description of the selected issues of FPGA environment. There is description of some specific solutions that enables environment usage in structures of different producers. The flexibility of different size data transmissions with the use of CII is presented. The specified tool gives the opportunity to use FPGA structures variety fully and design faster and more effectively.

  13. Approaches to Mixed Methods Dissemination and Implementation Research: Methods, Strengths, Caveats, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Green, Carla A.; Duan, Naihua; Gibbons, Robert D.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Wisdom, Jennifer P.

    2015-01-01

    Limited translation of research into practice has prompted study of diffusion and implementation, and development of effective methods of encouraging adoption, dissemination and implementation. Mixed methods techniques offer approaches for assessing and addressing processes affecting implementation of evidence-based interventions. We describe common mixed methods approaches used in dissemination and implementation research, discuss strengths and limitations of mixed methods approaches to data collection, and suggest promising methods not yet widely used in implementation research. We review qualitative, quantitative, and hybrid approaches to mixed methods dissemination and implementation studies, and describe methods for integrating multiple methods to increase depth of understanding while improving reliability and validity of findings. PMID:24722814

  14. Challenges of implementation and implementation research: Learning from an intervention study designed to improve tumor registry reporting

    PubMed Central

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Walker, Daniel M; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Parides, Michael; Bickell, Nina A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Implementation of interventions designed to improve the quality of medical care often proceeds differently from what is planned. Improving existing conceptual models to better understand the sources of these differences can help future projects avoid these pitfalls and achieve desired effectiveness. To inform an adaptation of an existing theoretical model, we examined unanticipated changes that occurred in an intervention designed to improve reporting of adjuvant therapies for breast cancer patients at a large, urban academic medical center. Methods: Guided by the complex innovation implementation conceptual framework, our study team observed and evaluated the implementation of an intervention designed to improve reporting to a tumor registry. Findings were assessed against the conceptual framework to identify boundary conditions and modifications that could improve implementation effectiveness. Results: The intervention successfully increased identification of the managing medical oncologist and treatment reporting. During implementation, however, unexpected external challenges including hospital acquisitions of community practices and practices’ responses to government incentives to purchase electronic medical record systems led to unanticipated changes and associated threats to implementation. We present a revised conceptual model that incorporates the sources of these unanticipated challenges. Conclusion: This report of our experience highlights the importance of monitoring implementation over time and accounting for changes that affect both implementation and measurement of intervention impact. In this article, we use our study to examine the challenges of implementation research in health care, and our experience can help future implementation efforts.

  15. Prevalence and Implementation Fidelity of Research-Based Prevention Programs in Public Schools. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosse, Scott; Williams, Barbara; Hagen, Carol A.; Harmon, Michele; Ristow, Liam; DiGaetano, Ralph; Broene, Pamela; Alexander, Debbie; Tseng, Margaret; Derzon, James H.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents descriptive information about the prevalence and quality of implementation of research-based programs from the Study of the Implementation of Research-Based Programs to Prevent Youth Substance Abuse and School Crime. The study found that, while schools reported implementing a large number of prevention programs during the…

  16. Research on Routing Selection Algorithm Based on Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guohong; Zhang, Baojian; Li, Xueyong; Lv, Jinna

    The hereditary algorithm is a kind of random searching and method of optimizing based on living beings natural selection and hereditary mechanism. In recent years, because of the potentiality in solving complicate problems and the successful application in the fields of industrial project, hereditary algorithm has been widely concerned by the domestic and international scholar. Routing Selection communication has been defined a standard communication model of IP version 6.This paper proposes a service model of Routing Selection communication, and designs and implements a new Routing Selection algorithm based on genetic algorithm.The experimental simulation results show that this algorithm can get more resolution at less time and more balanced network load, which enhances search ratio and the availability of network resource, and improves the quality of service.

  17. Social Research and the Black Community: Selected Issues and Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Lawrence E., Ed.

    This volume is comprised of selected papers which were presented at a workshop sponsored by the Institute for Urban Affairs and Research, Howard University, Washington, D.C. Part 1 of the volume presents an overview of the functional significance of social research in the black community. The four papers in this section deal with issues such as…

  18. Perspectives for genomic selection applications and research in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection (GS) has created a lot of excitement and expectations in the animal and plant breeding research communities. In this review, we briefly describe how genomic prediction can be integrated into breeding efforts and point out achievements and areas where more research is needed. GS pro...

  19. Implementation Plans for a Systems Microbiology and Extremophile Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2009-04-20

    Introduction Biological organisms long ago solved many problems for which scientists and engineers seek solutions. Microbes in particular offer an astonishingly diverse set of capabilities that can help revolutionize our approach to solving many important DOE problems. For example, photosynthetic organisms can generate hydrogen from light while simultaneously sequestering carbon. Others can produce enzymes that break down cellulose and other biomass to produce liquid fuels. Microbes in water and soil can capture carbon and store it in the earth and ocean depths. Understanding the dynamic interaction between living organisms and the environment is critical to predicting and mitigating the impacts of energy-production-related activities on the environment and human health. Collectively, microorganisms contain most of the biochemical diversity on Earth and they comprise nearly one-half of its biomass. They primary impact the planet by acting as catalysts of biogeochemical cycles; they capture light energy and fix CO2 in the worlds oceans, they degrade plant polymers and convert them to humus in soils, they weather rocks and facilitate mineral precipitation. Although the ability of selected microorganisms to participate in these processes is known, they rarely live in monoculture but rather function within communities. In spite of this, little is known about the composition of microbial communities and how individual species function within them. We lack an understanding of the nature of the individual organisms and their genes, how they interact to perform complex functions such as energy and materials exchange, how they sense and respond to their environment and how they evolve and adapt to environmental change. Understanding these aspects of microbes and their communities would be transformational with far-reaching impacts on climate, energy and human health. This knowledge would create a foundation for predicting their behavior and, ultimately, manipulating them to

  20. Strengthening implementation and utilization of nutrition interventions through research: a framework and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Menon, Purnima; Covic, Namukolo M; Harrigan, Paige B; Horton, Susan E; Kazi, Nabeeha M; Lamstein, Sascha; Neufeld, Lynnette; Oakley, Erica; Pelletier, David

    2014-12-01

    Undernutrition among women and children contributes to almost half the global burden of child mortality in developing countries. The impact of nutrition on economic development has highlighted the need for evidence-based solutions and yielded substantial global momentum. However, it is now recognized that the impact of evidence-based interventions is limited by the lack of evidence on the best operational strategies for scaling up nutrition interventions. With the goal of encouraging greater engagement in implementation research in nutrition and generating evidence on implementation and utilization of nutrition interventions, this paper brings together a framework and a broad analysis of literature to frame and highlight the crucial importance of research on the delivery and utilization of nutrition interventions. The paper draws on the deliberations of a high-level working group, an e-consultation, a conference, and the published literature. It proposes a framework and areas of research that have been quite neglected, and yet are critical to better understanding through careful research to enable better translation of global and national political momentum for nutrition into public health impact. PMID:24934307

  1. An Implementation Research Approach to Evaluating Health Insurance Programs: Insights from India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna D.; Nagulapalli, Srikant; Arora, Radhika; Madhavi, Mallela; Andersson, Elin; Ingabire, Marie-Gloriose

    2016-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of implementation research is the importance given to involve implementers in all aspects of research, and as users of research. We report on a recent implementation research effort in India, in which researchers worked together with program implementers from one of the longest serving government funded insurance schemes in India, the Rajiv Aarogyasri Scheme (RAS) in the state of undivided Andhra Pradesh, that covers around 70 million people. This paper aims to both inform on the process of the collaborative research, as well as, how the nature of questions that emerged out of the collaborative exercise differed in scope from those typically asked of insurance program evaluations. Starting in 2012, and over the course of a year, staff from the Aarogyasri Health Care Trust (AHCT), and researchers held a series of meetings to identify research questions that could serve as a guide for an evaluation of the RAS. The research questions were derived from the application of a Logical Framework Approach ("log frame") to the RAS. The types of questions that emerged from this collaborative effort were compared with those seen in the published literature on evaluations of insurance programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In the published literature, 60% of the questions pertained to output/outcome of the program and the remaining 40%, relate to processes and inputs. In contrast, questions generated from the RAS participatory research process between implementers and researchers had a remarkably different distribution – 81% of questions looked at program input/processes, and 19% on outputs and outcomes. An implementation research approach can lead to a substantively different emphasis of research questions. While there are several challenges in collaborative research between implementers and researchers, an implementation research approach can lead to incorporating tacit knowledge of program implementers into the research

  2. An Implementation Research Approach to Evaluating Health Insurance Programs: Insights from India.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna D; Nagulapalli, Srikant; Arora, Radhika; Madhavi, Mallela; Andersson, Elin; Ingabire, Marie-Gloriose

    2016-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of implementation research is the importance given to involve implementers in all aspects of research, and as users of research. We report on a recent implementation research effort in India, in which researchers worked together with program implementers from one of the longest serving government funded insurance schemes in India, the Rajiv Aarogyasri Scheme (RAS) in the state of undivided Andhra Pradesh, that covers around 70 million people. This paper aims to both inform on the process of the collaborative research, as well as, how the nature of questions that emerged out of the collaborative exercise differed in scope from those typically asked of insurance program evaluations. Starting in 2012, and over the course of a year, staff from the Aarogyasri Health Care Trust (AHCT), and researchers held a series of meetings to identify research questions that could serve as a guide for an evaluation of the RAS. The research questions were derived from the application of a Logical Framework Approach ("log frame") to the RAS. The types of questions that emerged from this collaborative effort were compared with those seen in the published literature on evaluations of insurance programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In the published literature, 60% of the questions pertained to output/outcome of the program and the remaining 40%, relate to processes and inputs. In contrast, questions generated from the RAS participatory research process between implementers and researchers had a remarkably different distribution - 81% of questions looked at program input/processes, and 19% on outputs and outcomes. An implementation research approach can lead to a substantively different emphasis of research questions. While there are several challenges in collaborative research between implementers and researchers, an implementation research approach can lead to incorporating tacit knowledge of program implementers into the research

  3. A neuromorphic VLSI device for implementing 2-D selective attention systems.

    PubMed

    Indiveri, G

    2001-01-01

    Selective attention is a mechanism used to sequentially select and process salient subregions of the input space, while suppressing inputs arriving from nonsalient regions. By processing small amounts of sensory information in a serial fashion, rather than attempting to process all the sensory data in parallel, this mechanism overcomes the problem of flooding limited processing capacity systems with sensory inputs. It is found in many biological systems and can be a useful engineering tool for developing artificial systems that need to process in real-time sensory data. In this paper we present a neuromorphic hardware model of a selective attention mechanism implemented on a very large scale integration (VLSI) chip, using analog circuits. The chip makes use of a spike-based representation for receiving input signals, transmitting output signals and for shifting the selection of the attended input stimulus over time. It can be interfaced to neuromorphic sensors and actuators, for implementing multichip selective attention systems. We describe the characteristics of the circuits used in the architecture and present experimental data measured from the system. PMID:18249973

  4. The use of selected interventions in monitoring primary health care implementation in rural Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Egwu, I N

    1992-03-01

    Nigeria's Primary Health Care (PHC)-based health system development aims to strengthen PHC in the local government areas (LGA) through technical planning and implementation that emphasize maternal and child health services. Convenient variables, including expanded programme on immunization (EPI), antenatal care (ANC) utilization and attended births, were selected as interventions to monitor the progress of implementation of PHC activities during 1985-90 in Odukpani LGA. Analysis of available data at the LGA showed that immunization coverage for most EPI antigens increased; ANC services showed increased utilization; health worker-attended births increased as traditional birth deliveries declined during the period. Some of the increases were modest but are considered important. The study offers a pilot approach to monitoring implementation of PHC activities in Odukpani LGA. The implications of the findings for similar studies are discussed. PMID:1589661

  5. Selecting and implementing scientific objectives. [for Voyager 1 and 2 planetary encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. D.; Stembridge, C. H.; Doms, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    The procedures used to select and implement scientific objectives for the Voyager 1 and 2 planetary encounters are described. Attention is given to the scientific tradeoffs and engineering considerations must be addressed at various stages in the mission planning process, including: the limitations of ground and spacecraft communications systems, ageing of instruments in flight, and instrument calibration over long distances. The contribution of planetary science workshops to the definition of scientific objectives for deep space missions is emphasized.

  6. Research on implementation of proxy Arp in IP DSLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuanqing; Wang, Li; Huang, Qiugen

    2005-02-01

    While the ethernet is applied more and more in public network environment and xdsl service become the most common access mode ,IP kenel DSLAM undertakes some functions such as service distribution and convergence ,security management and customer management.Facing the contradiction of the need of port isolation and the shortage of ip address,VLAN aggregation technology is applied in DSLAM.How to implement the communicatio between the two vlan but share the same ip subnet,proxy arp does this. This paper introduces how to implement proxy arp in the DSLAM. TCP/IP communication detail procedure betweent two host ,the relation of VLAN and network segment are discussed. The proxy arp model and its implementation in IP DSLAM is also expatiated in this paper and a conformance tesing is given.

  7. Depression Prevention Research: Design, Implementation, and Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Ricardo F.; And Others

    This document contains three papers concerned with prevention intervention research, a new area of depression research which has shown great promise for contributing new knowledge to the understanding of depression. The first paper, "Clinical Trials vs. Prevention Trials: Methodological Issues in Depression Research" (Ricardo F. Munoz), emphasizes…

  8. Educational Research and Useful Knowledge: Production, Dissemination, Reception, Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoveid, Marit Honerod

    2012-01-01

    What the author has argued in this talk is that the answers to the question posed to this panel--"what counts as useful knowledge in educational research?"--are something which will be framed by what researchers care about as researchers. It requires a collective undertaking where a space in between them is cherished for the sake of the many…

  9. Intervention for Food Selectivity in a Specialized School Setting: Teacher Implemented Prompting, Reinforcement, and Demand Fading for an Adolescent Student with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Maria; Rue, Hanna C.; Wildenger, Leah; Lamb, Kara; Luiselli, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Food selectivity is a common problem among children and youth who have intellectual and developmental disabilities or autism spectrum disorders. Whereas most intervention research has been conducted under simulated conditions in clinic and hospital settings, this study evaluated teacher implemented procedures at a specialized school. The…

  10. Staff Selection: What's Important for Out-Of-School Time Programs? Part 1 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Frontline Staff. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Bandy, Tawana; Burkhauser, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Research on successful out-of-school time programs repeatedly has found that the caliber of a program's staff is a critical feature of high-quality programs that achieve positive outcomes. Therefore, attracting, selecting, and retaining high-quality staff has become a major objective of out-of-school time programs. To expand what is known about…

  11. Programme Implementation in Social and Emotional Learning: Basic Issues and Research Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durlak, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental importance of achieving quality implementation when assessing the impact of social and emotional learning interventions. Recent findings in implementation science are reviewed that include a definition of implementation, its relation to programme outcomes, current research on the factors that affect…

  12. Three Decades of Implementation Research in Higher Education: Limitations and Prospects of Theory Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohoutek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The article adopts a comparative approach to review three periods of theory development in research into higher education policy implementation. Given the conceptual affinity between Cerych and Sabatier's 1986 seminal study into higher education policy implementation and public policy implementation theory, the field of public policy is chosen for…

  13. Implementation of the FAA research and development electromagnetic database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdowall, R. L.; Grush, D. J.; Cook, D. M.; Glynn, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been assisting the FAA in developing a database of information about lightning. The FAA Research and Development Electromagnetic Database (FRED) will ultimately contain data from a variety of airborne and ground-based lightning research projects. An outline of the data currently available in FRED is presented. The data sources which the FAA intends to incorporate into FRED are listed. In addition, it describes how the researchers may access and use the FRED menu system.

  14. Research and embedded implementation of Layer 3 switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jin; Cheng, Zijing

    2009-12-01

    In the internetworking world, switches and routers have been deployed for workgroup and enterprise connectivity. In the past, switches mainly operated at Layer 2 (they were extensions of bridges), while routers were clearly Layer3 devices. Recently, the line has blurred and switches operating at Layer 3 are becoming more popular. This paper explains the Linux Bridge, Layer 2 Switches, Virtual LAN (VLAN) and Layer 3 Switches. The flow chart of Layer 3 switches and working routine related to Layer 3 switch technology were investigated in detail. This paper presents a new method to implement layer 3 switching that is entirely accomplished in software and is embedded implemented by code transplanting based on PowerPC 460GT platform.

  15. Selection of Research Mentors for K Funded Scholars

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Ellen L.; Fleming, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring is an important element in the training of new investigators, particularly for KL2, K12, K08, and K23 funded scholars who are often physicians or other clinicians with limited prior research experience. Matching K scholars with appropriate mentors who have the mentoring skills and available time is an ongoing challenge for most universities. The goal of this paper is to present a variety of strategies used to select mentors for K awardees. The information presented in this special communication is derived from the literature, a national survey of CTSA leaders, as well as K scholar and K mentor focus groups. Some of the mentor selection methods discussed in this paper include a) having the scholar find a mentor as part of the application process for the award, b) selecting mentors post award, c) expecting the chair of the department to identify a mentor(s), d) using a committee to match the scholar and a mentor based on a pool of approved mentors e) selecting additional mentors as the scholar’s research program develops. The paper concludes that mentor selection requires an ongoing programmatic approach with the active participation of K scholars, CTSA program leaders, center directors, research deans and chairs. PMID:21463493

  16. Retinoblastoma genetics in India: From research to implementation.

    PubMed

    Dimaras, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Retinoblastoma is the prototypic genetic cancer. India carries the biggest burden of retinoblastoma globally, with an estimated 1500 new cases annually. Recent advances in retinoblastoma genetics are reviewed, focusing specifically on information with clinical significance to patients. The Indian literature on retinoblastoma clinical genetics is also highlighted, with a comment on challenges and future directions. The review concludes with recommendations to help clinicians implement and translate retinoblastoma genetics to their practice. PMID:25971166

  17. Corticostriatal circuit mechanisms of value-based action selection: Implementation of reinforcement learning algorithms and beyond.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kenji; Jitsev, Jenia; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-09-15

    Value-based action selection has been suggested to be realized in the corticostriatal local circuits through competition among neural populations. In this article, we review theoretical and experimental studies that have constructed and verified this notion, and provide new perspectives on how the local-circuit selection mechanisms implement reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms and computations beyond them. The striatal neurons are mostly inhibitory, and lateral inhibition among them has been classically proposed to realize "Winner-Take-All (WTA)" selection of the maximum-valued action (i.e., 'max' operation). Although this view has been challenged by the revealed weakness, sparseness, and asymmetry of lateral inhibition, which suggest more complex dynamics, WTA-like competition could still occur on short time scales. Unlike the striatal circuit, the cortical circuit contains recurrent excitation, which may enable retention or temporal integration of information and probabilistic "soft-max" selection. The striatal "max" circuit and the cortical "soft-max" circuit might co-implement an RL algorithm called Q-learning; the cortical circuit might also similarly serve for other algorithms such as SARSA. In these implementations, the cortical circuit presumably sustains activity representing the executed action, which negatively impacts dopamine neurons so that they can calculate reward-prediction-error. Regarding the suggested more complex dynamics of striatal, as well as cortical, circuits on long time scales, which could be viewed as a sequence of short WTA fragments, computational roles remain open: such a sequence might represent (1) sequential state-action-state transitions, constituting replay or simulation of the internal model, (2) a single state/action by the whole trajectory, or (3) probabilistic sampling of state/action. PMID:27173430

  18. 77 FR 43416 - ITS Industry Forum on Connected Vehicles: Moving From Research Towards Implementation; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ITS Industry Forum on Connected Vehicles: Moving From Research Towards Implementation; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: ITS Joint Program Office, Research and Innovative Technology Administration,...

  19. Selecting Research Collections for Digitization: Applying the Harvard Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brancolini, Kristine R.

    2000-01-01

    Librarians at Harvard University have written the most comprehensive guide to selecting research collections for digitization. This article applies the Harvard Model to a digitization project at Indiana University in order to evaluate the appropriateness of the model for use at another institution and to adapt the model to local needs. (Contains 7…

  20. Music Teacher Effectiveness: Selected Historical and Contemporary Research Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Manny

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews and analyzes selected past and current research approaches in the study of music teacher effectiveness. Early "teacher characteristic studies" are discussed along with the role of these first-generation studies in attempting to identify personal qualities and characteristics of apparently effective or ineffective teachers.…

  1. Developing, Approving and Maintaining Qualifications: Selected International Approaches. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misko, Josie

    2015-01-01

    There are lessons for Australia in the key approaches to the development, approval, maintenance and quality assurance of qualifications adopted in countries overseas. This research takes into account a range of approaches used in selected European Union (EU) member states (Germany, Finland and Sweden), the United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland…

  2. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  3. Implementing Change in Secondary Schools Using Effective Schools Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamburg, Jerry D.; Andrews, Richard L.

    This paper describes research based on the Effective Schools Project, a collaborative project between the University of Washington and the Seattle School District. The research was undertaken to determine the amount of change that took place in two rural high schools over two years and to analyze the factors that contributed to those changes based…

  4. [Polish legal terms of animal-based research - selected aspects].

    PubMed

    Poznański, Paweł; Niedźwiecki, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Animal-based models used in biomedical sciences allow to perform research that, conducted on humans, would be highly problematic because of bioethical and technical issues. Contemporary researchers race can lead to abuse, hence the need for special law regulations regarding this subject. This necessity reflected both in the EU and Polish legislation, and is rooted in the philosophical and moral achievements of Europe. EU legislation in this case takes the form of directives implemented in the legal systems of the member states. Polish tradition of legislative approach to animal-based research is long. In 1959 the wide attempt to regulate this matter was undertaken. Until 2005, the nature of the matter had been regulated by the Polish animal protection law. Currently, details concerning animal-based-research are regulated by the animal experiments law (2005). The elapsed time since enactment allowed doctrine and judicature to reveal capabilities and vulnerabilities of the law. PMID:25932901

  5. Implementing Scientific-Based Research: Learning from the History of the Reading First Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Shereeza; Walker, David A.; Conderman, Greg; Pasapia, John

    2016-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act requires that educators at all grade levels use Scientifically Based Research (SBR) instructional practices. Researchers constructed a literature-based model to examine the predictive relationship between a state's comprehensiveness of planned implementation and its capacity to implement the plan. An approach comprised…

  6. Ethical issues in implementation research: a discussion of the problems in achieving informed consent

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Jane L; Eccles, Martin P; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2008-01-01

    Background Improved quality of care is a policy objective of health care systems around the world. Implementation research is the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of clinical research findings into routine clinical practice, and hence to reduce inappropriate care. It includes the study of influences on healthcare professionals' behaviour and methods to enable them to use research findings more effectively. Cluster randomized trials represent the optimal design for evaluating the effectiveness of implementation strategies. Various codes of medical ethics, such as the Nuremberg Code and the Declaration of Helsinki inform medical research, but their relevance to cluster randomised trials in implementation research is unclear. This paper discusses the applicability of various ethical codes to obtaining consent in cluster trials in implementation research. Discussion The appropriate application of biomedical codes to implementation research is not obvious. Discussion of the nature and practice of informed consent in implementation research cluster trials must consider the levels at which consent can be sought, and for what purpose it can be sought. The level at which an intervention is delivered can render the idea of patient level consent meaningless. Careful consideration of the ownership of information, and rights of access to and exploitation of data is required. For health care professionals and organizations, there is a balance between clinical freedom and responsibility to participate in research. Summary While ethical justification for clinical trials relies heavily on individual consent, for implementation research aspects of distributive justice, economics, and political philosophy underlie the debate. Societies may need to trade off decisions on the choice between individualized consent and valid implementation research. We suggest that social sciences codes could usefully inform the consideration of implementation research by

  7. Bibliometrics: tracking research impact by selecting the appropriate metrics.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Esteves, Sandro C; Harlev, Avi; Henkel, Ralf; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Homa, Sheryl; Puchalt, Nicolás Garrido; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Majzoub, Ahmad; Ly, Kim Dao; Tvrda, Eva; Assidi, Mourad; Kesari, Kavindra; Sharma, Reecha; Banihani, Saleem; Ko, Edmund; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Gosalvez, Jaime; Bashiri, Asher

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the success of a researcher is assessed by the number of publications he or she publishes in peer-reviewed, indexed, high impact journals. This essential yardstick, often referred to as the impact of a specific researcher, is assessed through the use of various metrics. While researchers may be acquainted with such matrices, many do not know how to use them to enhance their careers. In addition to these metrics, a number of other factors should be taken into consideration to objectively evaluate a scientist's profile as a researcher and academician. Moreover, each metric has its own limitations that need to be considered when selecting an appropriate metric for evaluation. This paper provides a broad overview of the wide array of metrics currently in use in academia and research. Popular metrics are discussed and defined, including traditional metrics and article-level metrics, some of which are applied to researchers for a greater understanding of a particular concept, including varicocele that is the thematic area of this Special Issue of Asian Journal of Andrology. We recommend the combined use of quantitative and qualitative evaluation using judiciously selected metrics for a more objective assessment of scholarly output and research impact. PMID:26806079

  8. Bibliometrics: tracking research impact by selecting the appropriate metrics

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ashok; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Esteves, Sandro C; Harlev, Avi; Henkel, Ralf; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Homa, Sheryl; Puchalt, Nicolás Garrido; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Majzoub, Ahmad; Ly, Kim Dao; Tvrda, Eva; Assidi, Mourad; Kesari, Kavindra; Sharma, Reecha; Banihani, Saleem; Ko, Edmund; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Gosalvez, Jaime; Bashiri, Asher

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the success of a researcher is assessed by the number of publications he or she publishes in peer-reviewed, indexed, high impact journals. This essential yardstick, often referred to as the impact of a specific researcher, is assessed through the use of various metrics. While researchers may be acquainted with such matrices, many do not know how to use them to enhance their careers. In addition to these metrics, a number of other factors should be taken into consideration to objectively evaluate a scientist's profile as a researcher and academician. Moreover, each metric has its own limitations that need to be considered when selecting an appropriate metric for evaluation. This paper provides a broad overview of the wide array of metrics currently in use in academia and research. Popular metrics are discussed and defined, including traditional metrics and article-level metrics, some of which are applied to researchers for a greater understanding of a particular concept, including varicocele that is the thematic area of this Special Issue of Asian Journal of Andrology. We recommend the combined use of quantitative and qualitative evaluation using judiciously selected metrics for a more objective assessment of scholarly output and research impact. PMID:26806079

  9. Four challenges in selecting and implementing methods to monitor and evaluate participatory processes: Example from the Rwenzori region, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Hassenforder, Emeline; Ducrot, Raphaëlle; Ferrand, Nils; Barreteau, Olivier; Anne Daniell, Katherine; Pittock, Jamie

    2016-09-15

    Participatory approaches are now increasingly recognized and used as an essential element of policies and programs, especially in regards to natural resource management (NRM). Most practitioners, decision-makers and researchers having adopted participatory approaches also acknowledge the need to monitor and evaluate such approaches in order to audit their effectiveness, support decision-making or improve learning. Many manuals and frameworks exist on how to carry out monitoring and evaluation (M&E) for participatory processes. However, few provide guidelines on the selection and implementation of M&E methods, an aspect which is also often obscure in published studies, at the expense of the transparency, reliability and validity of the study. In this paper, we argue that the selection and implementation of M&E methods are particularly strategic when monitoring and evaluating a participatory process. We demonstrate that evaluators of participatory processes have to tackle a quadruple challenge when selecting and implementing methods: using mixed-methods, both qualitative and quantitative; assessing the participatory process, its outcomes, and its context; taking into account both the theory and participants' views; and being both rigorous and adaptive. The M&E of a participatory planning process in the Rwenzori Region, Uganda, is used as an example to show how these challenges unfold on the ground and how they can be tackled. Based on this example, we conclude by providing tools and strategies that can be used by evaluators to ensure that they make utile, feasible, coherent, transparent and adaptive methodological choices when monitoring and evaluating participatory processes for NRM. PMID:27288554

  10. Implementation Science in School Mental Health: Key Constructs in a Developing Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Brandt, Nicole Evangelista; Warner, Carrie Masia; Nadeem, Erum; Spiel, Craig; Wagner, Mary

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an implementation science research agenda as it applies to school mental health (SMH). First, we provide an overview of important contextual issues to be considered when addressing research questions pertinent to the implementation of mental health interventions in schools. Next, we critically review three core implementation components: (a) professional development and coaching for school professionals regarding evidence-based practices (EBPs); (b) the integrity of EBPs implemented in schools; and (c) EBP sustainment under typical school conditions. We articulate research questions central to the next generation of research in each of these areas as well as methods to address such questions. Our intent in doing so is to contribute to a developing blueprint to guide community-research partnerships as well as funding agencies in their efforts to advance implementation science in SMH. PMID:26413173

  11. Establishing a framework to implement 4D XCAT Phantom for 4D radiotherapy research

    PubMed Central

    Panta, Raj K.; Segars, Paul; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Aims To establish a framework to implement the 4D integrated extended cardiac torso (XCAT) digital phantom for 4D radiotherapy (RT) research. Materials and Methods A computer program was developed to facilitate the characterization and implementation of the 4D XCAT phantom. The program can (1) generate 4D XCAT images with customized parameter files; (2) review 4D XCAT images; (3) generate composite images from 4D XCAT images; (4) track motion of selected region-of-interested (ROI); (5) convert XCAT raw binary images into DICOM format; (6) analyse clinically acquired 4DCT images and real-time position management (RPM) respiratory signal. Motion tracking algorithm was validated by comparing with manual method. Major characteristics of the 4D XCAT phantom were studied. Results The comparison between motion tracking and manual measurements of lesion motion trajectory showed a small difference between them (mean difference in motion amplitude: 1.2 mm). The maximum lesion motion decreased nearly linearly (R2 = 0.97) as its distance to the diaphragm (DD) increased. At any given DD, lesion motion amplitude increased nearly linearly (R 2 range: 0.89 to 0.95) as the inputted diaphragm motion increased. For a given diaphragm motion, the lesion motion is independent of the lesion size at any given DD. The 4D XCAT phantom can closely reproduce irregular breathing profile. The end-to-end test showed that clinically comparable treatment plans can be generated successfully based on 4D XCAT images. Conclusions An integrated computer program has been developed to generate, review, analyse, process, and export the 4D XCAT images. A framework has been established to implement the 4D XCAT phantom for 4D RT research. PMID:23361276

  12. Implementation of R & QA practices in Research and Development programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    1983-01-01

    DOE has established a number of broad programs aimed at reducing fuel consumption. Several programs address the R&D of ground transportation propulsion alternatives to the conventional spark-ignition engine. NASA Lewis is responsible for managing the effort between the Government and industry teams involving American and foreign companies. Thus, existing NASA SR&QA procedure were modified/adapted to these R&D programs and implemented to assure that the test hardware design intent was met, the hardware was not hazardous to personnel, it would demonstrate reliable operation, and it would help establish the future R&D quality assurance and maintainability requirements. This successful low-cost approach might be applicable to other similar projects.

  13. Research and implementation of object model in HLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Shabai

    2004-03-01

    High Level Architecture (HLA) is a new architecture for distributed simulation. Its purpose is to facilitate interoperability among the simulation applications and to promote reuse of simulations and their components. Object Model is important to implement purpose of HLA. OM provides a standard template to describe the abilities of simulations joining federate and the demands of outer systems. This paper introduces the basic content of HLA and describes the components of OM. Based on the authors' comprehend and practice, the paper analyzes the object-oriented characteristic of OM and the ability to support interoperability and reuse of OM. With the primary practice of navy slavage drilling simulation system, the authors give the designing of OM with an example acccording to the designing principle of OM.

  14. Motivating an Action Design Research Approach to Implementing Online Training in an Organisational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogerson, Christine; Scott, Elsje

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of Action Design Research (ADR), a combination of Action Research and Design Science Research, as a methodology to examine how the implementation of e-learning will affect the learning outcomes for staff training in an organisational context. The research involves an intervention in the…

  15. Selecting and implementing an interactive Computer Aided Design Drafting/Manufacturing (CADD/M) system

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1980-09-23

    Success with Interactive Computer-Aided Design Drafting/Manufacturing (CADD/M) depends upon management, users, and the system itself. If you are in a design and drafting environment, the thought of acquiring a CADD/M system will probably occur to you sometime in the very near future - if it hasn't already. Convincing yourself and your management of the benefits of such systems is but the first step. Evaluating and selecting one particular type of CADD/M system can turn out to be a complicated undertaking - not to mention somewhat frustrating. Procedures for selecting and successfully implementing a CADD/M system are outlined. INITIAL PREPARATION examines the techniques used to evaluate CADD/M systems including formation of an evaluation team, and application analysis. GRAPHICS EVALUATION describes the methods that can be used to test a CADD/M system, including benchmark drawings and specifications, human engineering considerations, and other evaluation criteria and general system configurations are also discussed. COMPUTER SYSTEM EVALUATION examines other factors in systems selection: programming, communications, documentation, and service. SYSTEM STARTUP addresses site preparation, people preparation, system acceptance, and operator, designer/drafter selection. Finally, operator, designer/drafter TRAINING and SYSTEM MANAGEMENT are discussed. This systematic approach wil help those contemplating the acquisition of CADD/M systems for their activities and will help minimize unplanned events and problem areas.Advanced planning in these areas is needed to ensure successful implementation of a CADD/M system. This in turn will lead to considerable cost savings and schedule improvements for an entire project, from initial design to final production. These are ambitious goals but easily realized if a logical and rational plan is adopted in the same manner as that used in a typical development program.

  16. National Risk Management Research Laboratory Strategic plan and Implementation - Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication provides an overview of the strategic plan recently developed by the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL). It includes a description of NRMRL's mission and goals and their alignment with Agency goals. Additionally, the overview contains a brief se...

  17. Decision Support Framework (DSF) Team Research Implementation Plan

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of ORD's Ecosystem Services Research Program (ESRP) is to provide the information and methods needed by decision-makers to assess the benefits of ecosystem goods and services to human well-being for inclusion in management alternatives. The Decision Support Framework...

  18. Implementing a Research-Based Model of Cooperative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The author used qualitative research methods to explore an 8th-grade mathematics teacher's personal definition of cooperative learning and the enactment of cooperative learning in his classroom according to that definition. Data collection involved interviews and classroom observations. The author used coding schemes and descriptive statistics for…

  19. Ozone Research with Advanced Cooperative Lidar Experiment (ORACLE) Implementation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, John H.; Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Ball, Donald J.

    1998-01-01

    New technological advances have made possible new active remote sensing capabilities from space. Utilizing these technologies, the Ozone Research with Advanced Cooperative Lidar Experiment (ORACLE) will provide high spatial resolution measurements of ozone, clouds and aerosols in the stratosphere and lower troposphere. Simultaneous measurements of ozone, clouds and aerosols will assist in the understanding of global change, atmospheric chemistry and meteorology.

  20. NHEERL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT RESEARCH MULTI-YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (2005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORD has developed a multi-year plan (MYP) called the Contaminated Sites MYP to address the research needs of EPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). One of the long-term goals of the Contaminated Sites MYP relates to contaminated sediments, and t...

  1. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Beard, T. Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.; McIntyre, Peter B.; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin; Cowx, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social–ecological system dynamics. PMID:21325307

  2. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, T. Douglas, Jr.; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.; McIntyre, Peter B.; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin M.; Cowx, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social–ecological system dynamics.

  3. Amphibian research and monitoring initiative: Concepts and implementation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, P.S.; Adams, M.J.; Battaglin, W.A.; Gallant, A.L.; James, D.L.; Knutson, M.; Langtimm, C.A.; Sauer, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides the basis for discussion and subsequent articulation of a national plan for the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI). The authors were members of a task force formed from within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that included scientists with expertise in biology, cartography, hydrology, and statistics. The assignment of the task force was to extend work begun by the National Amphibian Leadership Group. This group, composed of senior USGS scientists, managers, and external authorities, met in Gainesville, Florida, in February 20001. The product of this meeting was a document outlining the framework for a national program to monitor amphibian populations and to conduct research into the causes of declines.

  4. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: Research needs and implementation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, T.D., Jr.; Arlinghaus, R.; Cooke, S.J.; McIntyre, P.B.; De Silva, S.; Bartley, D.; Cowx, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social-ecological system dynamics. ?? 2010 The Royal Society.

  5. Sampling: how to select participants in my research study?*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mesa, Jeovany; González-Chica, David Alejandro; Duquia, Rodrigo Pereira; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; Bastos, João Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Background In this paper, the basic elements related to the selection of participants for a health research are discussed. Sample representativeness, sample frame, types of sampling, as well as the impact that non-respondents may have on results of a study are described. The whole discussion is supported by practical examples to facilitate the reader's understanding. Objective To introduce readers to issues related to sampling. PMID:27438200

  6. Implementation of proteomics for cancer research: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Parisa; Shahrokni, Armin; Ranjbar, Mohammad R Nezami

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of the death, accounts for about 13% of all annual deaths worldwide. Many different fields of science are collaborating together studying cancer to improve our knowledge of this lethal disease, and find better solutions for diagnosis and treatment. Proteomics is one of the most recent and rapidly growing areas in molecular biology that helps understanding cancer from an omics data analysis point of view. The human proteome project was officially initiated in 2008. Proteomics enables the scientists to interrogate a variety of biospecimens for their protein contents and measure the concentrations of these proteins. Current necessary equipment and technologies for cancer proteomics are mass spectrometry, protein microarrays, nanotechnology and bioinformatics. In this paper, we provide a brief review on proteomics and its application in cancer research. After a brief introduction including its definition, we summarize the history of major previous work conducted by researchers, followed by an overview on the role of proteomics in cancer studies. We also provide a list of different utilities in cancer proteomics and investigate their advantages and shortcomings from theoretical and practical angles. Finally, we explore some of the main challenges and conclude the paper with future directions in this field. PMID:24761843

  7. Assessing implementation mechanisms for an international agreement on research and development for health products.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Steven J; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2012-11-01

    The Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) are currently debating the substance and form of an international agreement to improve the financing and coordination of research and development (R&D) for health products that meet the needs of developing countries. In addition to considering the content of any possible legal or political agreement, Member States may find it helpful to reflect on the full range of implementation mechanisms available to bring any agreement into effect. These include mechanisms for states to make commitments, administer activities, manage financial contributions, make subsequent decisions, monitor each other's performance and promote compliance. States can make binding or non-binding commitments through conventions, contracts, declarations or institutional reforms. States can administer activities to implement their agreements through international organizations, sub-agencies, joint ventures or self-organizing processes. Finances can be managed through specialized multilateral funds, financial institutions, membership organizations or coordinated self-management. Decisions can be made through unanimity, consensus, equal voting, modified voting or delegation. Oversight can be provided by peer review, expert review, self-reports or civil society. Together, states should select their preferred options across categories of implementation mechanisms, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. The challenge lies in choosing the most effective combinations of mechanisms for supporting an international agreement (or set of agreements) that achieves collective aspirations in a way and at a cost that are both sustainable and acceptable to those involved. In making these decisions, WHO's Member States can benefit from years of experience with these different mechanisms in health and its related sectors. PMID:23226898

  8. Assessing implementation mechanisms for an international agreement on research and development for health products

    PubMed Central

    Røttingen, John-Arne

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) are currently debating the substance and form of an international agreement to improve the financing and coordination of research and development (R&D) for health products that meet the needs of developing countries. In addition to considering the content of any possible legal or political agreement, Member States may find it helpful to reflect on the full range of implementation mechanisms available to bring any agreement into effect. These include mechanisms for states to make commitments, administer activities, manage financial contributions, make subsequent decisions, monitor each other’s performance and promote compliance. States can make binding or non-binding commitments through conventions, contracts, declarations or institutional reforms. States can administer activities to implement their agreements through international organizations, sub-agencies, joint ventures or self-organizing processes. Finances can be managed through specialized multilateral funds, financial institutions, membership organizations or coordinated self-management. Decisions can be made through unanimity, consensus, equal voting, modified voting or delegation. Oversight can be provided by peer review, expert review, self-reports or civil society. Together, states should select their preferred options across categories of implementation mechanisms, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. The challenge lies in choosing the most effective combinations of mechanisms for supporting an international agreement (or set of agreements) that achieves collective aspirations in a way and at a cost that are both sustainable and acceptable to those involved. In making these decisions, WHO’s Member States can benefit from years of experience with these different mechanisms in health and its related sectors. PMID:23226898

  9. Developing and implementing an integrated delirium prevention system of care: a theory driven, participatory research study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is a common complication for older people in hospital. Evidence suggests that delirium incidence in hospital may be reduced by about a third through a multi-component intervention targeted at known modifiable risk factors. We describe the research design and conceptual framework underpinning it that informed the development of a novel delirium prevention system of care for acute hospital wards. Particular focus of the study was on developing an implementation process aimed at embedding practice change within routine care delivery. Methods We adopted a participatory action research approach involving staff, volunteers, and patient and carer representatives in three northern NHS Trusts in England. We employed Normalization Process Theory to explore knowledge and ward practices on delirium and delirium prevention. We established a Development Team in each Trust comprising senior and frontline staff from selected wards, and others with a potential role or interest in delirium prevention. Data collection included facilitated workshops, relevant documents/records, qualitative one-to-one interviews and focus groups with multiple stakeholders and observation of ward practices. We used grounded theory strategies in analysing and synthesising data. Results Awareness of delirium was variable among staff with no attention on delirium prevention at any level; delirium prevention was typically neither understood nor perceived as meaningful. The busy, chaotic and challenging ward life rhythm focused primarily on diagnostics, clinical observations and treatment. Ward practices pertinent to delirium prevention were undertaken inconsistently. Staff welcomed the possibility of volunteers being engaged in delirium prevention work, but existing systems for volunteer support were viewed as a barrier. Our evolving conception of an integrated model of delirium prevention presented major implementation challenges flowing from minimal understanding of delirium prevention

  10. Gas Research Institute`s appalachian basin research: Selected bibliography. Topical report, July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Picciano, L.

    1995-07-01

    The Appalachian Basin citations listed in this bibliography present select research reports that provide an overview of research and development (R&D) efforts related to the basin. The bibliography is organized in three sections, one for each of the following unconventional gas resources: coalbed methane, gas shales, and tight gas sands. Citations are further divided into geology and engineering subsections. The citations are only for those reports resulting directly from GRI`s research investment or reviews that extensively used GRI results.

  11. Organizing Research and Development at the Intersection of Learning, Implementation, and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Fishman, Barry J.; Cheng, Britte Haugan; Sabelli, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This article describes elements of an approach to research and development called "design-based implementation research." The approach represents an expansion of design research, which typically focuses on classrooms, to include development and testing of innovations that foster alignment and coordination of supports for improving…

  12. Literacy in the History Classroom: A Cross Case Analysis of Teacher Implemented Participatory Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'warte, Jacqueline Ann

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study researches a participatory action research project undertaken by 12 history teachers in two urban school districts. In this project middle and high school teachers were engaged in a yearlong action research project that involved them in implementing literacy strategies within their classrooms and reflecting on the use and…

  13. Customizing a Research-Based Reading Practice: Balancing the Importance of Implementation Fidelity with Professional Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMaster, Kristen L.; Jung, Pyung-Gang; Brandes, Dana; Pinto, Viveca; Fuchs, Douglas; Kearns, Devin; Lemons, Christopher; Sáenz, Laura; Yen, Loulee

    2014-01-01

    Teachers are often asked to implement research-based instructional programs with fidelity and to ensure that all students reach high academic standards. These requests sometimes conflict when teachers find that not all their students are benefiting from the research-backed programs. In this article, we suggest that researchers and teachers can…

  14. Implementation of a Program of Outcomes Research in Residential Care Settings: Outcomes for Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portwood, Sharon G.; Boyd, A. Suzanne; Murdock, Tamera B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a need to examine behavioral and mental health outcomes for children in out-of-home care across settings. Objective: Using a participatory research approach, researchers and agency personnel aimed to implement a program of scientific outcomes research in residential care settings. Data were used to examine children's…

  15. Organizing Research and Development at the Intersection of Learning, Implementation, and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Fishman, Barry J.; Cheng, Britte Haugan; Sabelli, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This article describes elements of an approach to research and development called "design-based implementation research." The approach represents an expansion of design research, which typically focuses on classrooms, to include development and testing of innovations that foster alignment and coordination of supports for improving teaching and…

  16. Implementing a Service Learning Model for Teaching Research Methods and Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patrick; Kim, Wooksoo; Robinson, Adjoa

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to teach students the basic knowledge of research methods and the realities of conducting research in the context of agencies in the community, faculty developed and implemented a service learning model for teaching research and program evaluation to foundation-year MSW students. A year-long foundation course was designed in which one…

  17. Continued research on selected parameters to minimize community annoyance from airplane noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frair, L.

    1981-01-01

    Results from continued research on selected parameters to minimize community annoyance from airport noise are reported. First, a review of the initial work on this problem is presented. Then the research focus is expanded by considering multiobjective optimization approaches for this problem. A multiobjective optimization algorithm review from the open literature is presented. This is followed by the multiobjective mathematical formulation for the problem of interest. A discussion of the appropriate solution algorithm for the multiobjective formulation is conducted. Alternate formulations and associated solution algorithms are discussed and evaluated for this airport noise problem. Selected solution algorithms that have been implemented are then used to produce computational results for example airports. These computations involved finding the optimal operating scenario for a moderate size airport and a series of sensitivity analyses for a smaller example airport.

  18. DMPwerkzeug - A tool to support the planning, implementation, and organization of research data management.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klar, Jochen; Engelhardt, Claudia; Neuroth, Heike; Enke, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Following the call to make the results of publicly funded research openly accessible, more and more funding agencies demand the submission of a data management plan (DMP) as part of the application process. These documents specify, how the data management of the project is organized and what datasets will be published when. Of particular importance for European researchers is the Open Data Research Pilot of Horizon 2020 which requires data management plans for a set of 9 selected research fields from social sciences to nanotechnology. In order to assist the researchers creating these documents, several institutions developed dedicated software tools. The most well-known are DMPonline by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and DMPtool by the California Digital Library (CDL) - both extensive and well received web applications. The core functionality of these tools is the assisted editing of the DMP templates provided by the particular funding agency.While this is certainly helpful, especially in an environment with a plethora of different funding agencies like the UK or the USA, these tools are somewhat limited to this particular task and don't utilise the full potential of DMP. Beyond the purpose of fulfilling funder requirements, DMP can be useful for a number of additional tasks. In the initial conception phase of a project, they can be used as a planning tool to determine which date management activities and measures are necessary throughout the research process, to assess which resources are needed, and which institutions (computing centers, libraries, data centers) should be involved. During the project, they can act as a constant reference or guideline for the handling of research data. They also determine where the data will be stored after the project has ended and whether it can be accessed by the public, helping to take into account resulting requirements of the data center or actions necessary to ensure re-usability by others from early on. Ideally, a DMP

  19. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice: A Review of the Empirical Research Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Mel; Joy, Elyssa; Plath, Debbie; Webb, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The article reports on the findings of a review of empirical studies examining the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the human services. Eleven studies were located that defined EBP as a research-informed, clinical decision-making process and identified barriers and facilitators to EBP implementation. A thematic analysis of the…

  20. Performance-Based Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis (OABA). Implementation and Supporting Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.; And Others

    This document contains two sections: implementation of the performance-based Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis (OABA), and supporting research. Section 1 presents OABA, an analytic procedure designed to identify those affective behaviors important to success in an occupation, and gives directions on how to implement the procedure. The…

  1. When Does Consultation Lead to Intervention Implementation?: Critical Issues for Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noell, George H.; Witt, Joseph C.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that, in applying the consultation model to the special educational needs of students in regular classes, little is known about the extent to which regular teachers actually implement recommended interventions following consultation. Proposes research on the relationship between consultation and intervention implementation and addresses…

  2. State Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice for Youths, Part II: Recommendations for Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruns, Eric J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Rivard, Jeanne C.; Wotring, Jim; Marsenich, Lynne; Carter, Bill

    2008-01-01

    The article surveys the various state-level evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation challenges and strategies adopted for children, youths, and families. The federal government also supports EBP through development and intervention research, training and technical assistance, and evaluation of different planning and implementation strategies.…

  3. Examining Different Forms of Implementation and in Early Childhood Curriculum Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L.; Fleming, Kandace; Diamond, Karen; Lieber, Joan; Hanson, Marci; Butera, Gretchen; Horn, Eva; Palmer, Susan; Marquis, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine different approaches to assessing implementation in an early childhood curriculum research study. Early childhood teachers in 51 preschool classes located at nationally dispersed sites implemented the Children's School Success curriculum for a school year. Structural (proportion of curriculum delivered) and…

  4. Optimizing State Policy Implementation: The Case of the Scientific Based Research Components of the NCLB Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Shereeza; Pisapia, John; Walker, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A hypothesized model of state implementation of federal policy was extracted from empirical studies to discover the strategies states can use to gain compliance more cost effectively. Sixteen factors were identified and applied to the implementation of the Scientific Based Research provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act. Data collected from…

  5. 78 FR 52777 - Implementation of the Revised International Guiding Principles for Biomedical Research Involving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Implementation of the Revised International Guiding Principles for Biomedical Research Involving Animals SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health (NIH)...

  6. IMPLEMENTING AND AUDITING ELECTRONIC RECORDKEEPING SYSTEMS USED IN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electronic recordkeeping is increasingly replacing hadwritten records in the course of "normal business." As this trend continues, it is important that organizations develop and implement electronic recordkeeping policies and procedures. This is especially true for Research and...

  7. An Examination of Selected Datacom Options for the Near-Term Implementation of Trajectory Based Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Lachter, Joel B.; Battiste, Vernol; Lim, Veranika; Brandt, Summer L.; Koteskey, Robert W.; Dao, Arik-Quang V.; Ligda, Sarah V.; Wu, Shu-Chieh

    2011-01-01

    A primary feature of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is trajectory based operations (TBO). Under TBO, aircraft flight plans are known to computer systems on the ground that aid in scheduling and separation. The Future Air Navigation System (FANS) was developed to support TBO, but relatively few aircraft in the US are FANSequipped. Thus, any near-term implementation must provide TBO procedures for non-FANS aircraft. Previous research has explored controller clearances, but any implementation must also provide procedures for aircraft requests. The work presented here aims to surface issues surrounding TBO communication procedures for non-FANS aircraft and for aircraft requesting deviations around weather. Three types of communication were explored: Voice, FANS, and ACARS,(Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System). ACARS and FANS are datacom systems that differ in that FANS allows uplinked flight plans to be loaded into the Flight Management System (FMS), while ACARS delivers flight plans as text that must be entered manually via the Control Display Unit (CDU). Sixteen pilots (eight two-person flight decks) and four controllers participated in 32 20-minute scenarios that required the flight decks to navigate through convective weather as they approached their top of descents (TODs). Findings: The rate of non-conformance was higher than anticipated, with aircraft off path more than 20% of the time. Controllers did not differentiate between the ACARS and FANS datacom, and were mixed in their preference for Voice vs. datacom (ACARS and FANS). Pilots uniformly preferred Voice to datacom, particularly ACARS. Much of their dislike appears to result from the slow response times in the datacom conditions. As a result, participants frequently resorted to voice communication. These results imply that, before implementing TBO in environments where pilots make weather deviation requests, further research is needed to develop communication

  8. Deriving Implementation Strategies for Outcome Monitoring Feedback from Theory, Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Kim

    2016-05-01

    Outcome monitoring feedback is a promising intervention to enhance outcomes of clinical practice. However, effective implementation can be tough and research suggests that feedback is not equally effective under all circumstances. In this article, feedback theory, research and experience from clinical practice is used to provide implementation strategies. Factors that moderate the effectiveness of outcome monitoring feedback, including feedback, recipient and organization characteristics are discussed. It is important to pay attention to implementation processes, such as providing sufficient training for clinicians, in order for feedback to be capable of enhancing outcomes. PMID:25208490

  9. Science Research 4: Results of Implementation of Student-Facilitated Teacher Training and Student Mentorship Programs Promoting Original Scientific Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danch, J. M.; Aker, K.

    2014-12-01

    A high school curriculum allowing students previously involved in a 3-year Science Research Program to continue into a 4th year was developed in 2013 and implemented in 2014. The goals of this curriculum were to allow 3-year students to utilize their expertise in research methods and data acquisition technology to mentor both incoming research students and their teachers in the development and implementation of original scientific research. Student responsibilities involved the mentorship of both 8th Grade Honors Geoscience students and 9th grade Science Research students during the development and implementation of original research. Science Research 4 students also conducted teacher training sessions facilitating the use of electronic sensors and data acquisition devices in the classroom for general education and scientific research applications. The development, testing and presentation via teacher workshops, of the utilization of the Daily Inquiry method of promoting original scientific research in the middle school and high school classroom were also undertaken. Mentored students successfully completed and presented original research projects and teachers involved in training sessions reported increased and effective utilization of data acquisition technology and Daily Inquiry methods in the classroom.

  10. Interactions of selected policy-stakeholder groups implementing middle school science standards-based systemic reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boydston, Theodore Lewis, III

    1999-12-01

    This research is an interpretive inquiry into the views and interactions of stakeholders in a district office of a large school system responsible for implementing science systemic reform. Three major sources of data were used in this research: surveys, stakeholder interviews, and autobiographical reflection on experiences as part of the reform initiative. This is an emergent research that is evident in the shift in the focus of research questions and their supporting assumptions during the research. The literature review describes standards-based reform, arguments about reform, and the major dimensions of reform research. The results of the survey of stakeholders revealed that the views among the stakeholder groups followed the system hierarchy and could be separated into two large groups; staff responsible for implementing the reform initiative and the other stakeholder groups. Each of these groups was composed of identifiable subgroups. The interviews with stakeholders revealed how their different attitudes, values, and beliefs frame the context of stakeholder interactions. An over reliance on an authoritarian view of decision-making leaves many stakeholders feeling disempowered and critical of others. This atmosphere promotes blaming, which inhibits collegial interaction. Work experiences in the district office revealed how stakeholders' unaddressed assumptions, attitudes, and beliefs promote fragmentation and competition rather than cooperation. Hidden assumptions about management by control and mandate, competition, and teaching and learning appear to restrain the interactions of stakeholders. Support of the National Science Education Standards was identified as a unifying view among the stakeholders, yet the professional development program focused on content and pedagogical knowledge without addressing stakeholder concerns and beliefs about the intended constructivist framework of the program. Stakeholders' attitudes about the issue of equity demonstrated

  11. A review of research on fidelity of implementation: implications for drug abuse prevention in school settings.

    PubMed

    Dusenbury, Linda; Brannigan, Rosalind; Falco, Mathea; Hansen, William B

    2003-04-01

    To help inform drug abuse prevention research in school settings about the issues surrounding implementation, we conducted a review of the fidelity of implementation research literature spanning a 25-year period. Fidelity has been measured in five ways: (1) adherence, (2) dose, (3) quality of program delivery, (4) participant responsiveness and (5) program differentiation. Definitions and measures of fidelity were found not to be consistent across studies, and new definitions are proposed. While there has been limited research on fidelity of implementation in the social sciences, research in drug abuse prevention provides evidence that poor implementation is likely to result in a loss of program effectiveness. Studies indicate that most teachers do not cover everything in a curriculum, they are likely to teach less over time and training alone is not sufficient to ensure fidelity of implementation. Key elements of high fidelity include teacher training, program characteristics, teacher characteristics and organizational characteristics. The review concludes with a discussion of the tension between fidelity and reinvention/adaptation, and ways of resolving this tension. Recommendations are made for developing a consistent methodology for measuring and analyzing fidelity of implementation. Further, researchers and providers should collaborate to develop ways of introducing flexibility into prevention programs. PMID:12729182

  12. The promise and challenge of practice-research collaborations: Guiding principles and strategies for initiating, designing, and implementing program evaluation research.

    PubMed

    Secret, Mary; Abell, Melissa L; Berlin, Trey

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a set of guiding principles and strategies to facilitate the collaborative efforts of social work researchers and practitioners as they initiate, design, and implement outcome evaluations of human service interventions and programs. Beginning with an exploration of the interpersonal barriers to practice-research collaborations, and building on their experiences in successfully completing a community-based research evaluation, the authors identify specific relationship-focused principles and strategies and illustrate how these approaches can guide practice-research teams through the various sequential activities of the evaluation research process. In particular, it is suggested that practice-research collaborations can be formed, strengthened, and sustained by emphasis on a spirit of discovery and shared leadership at the start of the relationship, use of a comprehensive evaluation model to clarify and frame the evaluation and program goals, beginning where the client is when selecting research methodology and measurement tools, commitment to keeping the program first and recording everything during the implementation and data-collection stages, discussion of emerging findings and presentation of findings in graphic format at the data-analysis stage, and a total team approach at the dissemination stage. PMID:21314067

  13. Model Selection in Historical Research Using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Campillo, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Formal Models and History Computational models are increasingly being used to study historical dynamics. This new trend, which could be named Model-Based History, makes use of recently published datasets and innovative quantitative methods to improve our understanding of past societies based on their written sources. The extensive use of formal models allows historians to re-evaluate hypotheses formulated decades ago and still subject to debate due to the lack of an adequate quantitative framework. The initiative has the potential to transform the discipline if it solves the challenges posed by the study of historical dynamics. These difficulties are based on the complexities of modelling social interaction, and the methodological issues raised by the evaluation of formal models against data with low sample size, high variance and strong fragmentation. Case Study This work examines an alternate approach to this evaluation based on a Bayesian-inspired model selection method. The validity of the classical Lanchester’s laws of combat is examined against a dataset comprising over a thousand battles spanning 300 years. Four variations of the basic equations are discussed, including the three most common formulations (linear, squared, and logarithmic) and a new variant introducing fatigue. Approximate Bayesian Computation is then used to infer both parameter values and model selection via Bayes Factors. Impact Results indicate decisive evidence favouring the new fatigue model. The interpretation of both parameter estimations and model selection provides new insights into the factors guiding the evolution of warfare. At a methodological level, the case study shows how model selection methods can be used to guide historical research through the comparison between existing hypotheses and empirical evidence. PMID:26730953

  14. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH IMPLEMENTATION PLAN, NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD), is responsible for conducting research to improve the risk assessment of chemicals for potential effects ...

  15. Mixed Methods for Implementation Research: Application to Evidence-Based Practice Implementation and Staff Turnover in Community Based Organizations Providing Child Welfare Services

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Fettes, Danielle L.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Palinkas, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Many public sector services systems and provider organizations are in some phase of learning about or implementing evidence-based interventions. Child welfare service systems represent a context where implementation spans system, management, and organizational concerns. Research utilizing mixed methods that combine qualitative and quantitative design, data collection, and analytic approaches are particularly well-suited to understanding both the process and outcomes of dissemination and implementation efforts in child welfare systems. This paper describes the process of using mixed methods in implementation research and provides an applied example of an examination of factors impacting staff retention during an evidence-based intervention implementation in a statewide child welfare system. We integrate qualitative data with previously published quantitative analyses of job autonomy and staff turnover during this statewide implementation project in order to illustrate the utility of mixed method approaches in providing a more comprehensive understanding of opportunities and challenges in implementation research. PMID:22146861

  16. Multivariate Analysis for Animal Selection in Experimental Research

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Renan Mercuri; de Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Several researchers seek methods for the selection of homogeneous groups of animals in experimental studies, a fact justified because homogeneity is an indispensable prerequisite for casualization of treatments. The lack of robust methods that comply with statistical and biological principles is the reason why researchers use empirical or subjective methods, influencing their results. Objective To develop a multivariate statistical model for the selection of a homogeneous group of animals for experimental research and to elaborate a computational package to use it. Methods The set of echocardiographic data of 115 male Wistar rats with supravalvular aortic stenosis (AoS) was used as an example of model development. Initially, the data were standardized, and became dimensionless. Then, the variance matrix of the set was submitted to principal components analysis (PCA), aiming at reducing the parametric space and at retaining the relevant variability. That technique established a new Cartesian system into which the animals were allocated, and finally the confidence region (ellipsoid) was built for the profile of the animals’ homogeneous responses. The animals located inside the ellipsoid were considered as belonging to the homogeneous batch; those outside the ellipsoid were considered spurious. Results The PCA established eight descriptive axes that represented the accumulated variance of the data set in 88.71%. The allocation of the animals in the new system and the construction of the confidence region revealed six spurious animals as compared to the homogeneous batch of 109 animals. Conclusion The biometric criterion presented proved to be effective, because it considers the animal as a whole, analyzing jointly all parameters measured, in addition to having a small discard rate. PMID:25651342

  17. Implementation of Systems to Support the Management of Research: Commentary from a UK University Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Scott; Langley, David

    2007-01-01

    The increasing complexity and diversity of a typical portfolio of research awards coupled with advancing technology makes successful implementation and delivery of system benefits more challenging than ever. Moreover, the role of systems in knowledge management is a fundamental issue faced by all research active organizations. One of the principal…

  18. A District's Use of Data and Research to Inform Policy Formation and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Andrew; Madura, John P.; Cox, Joshua; Carey, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive study of a change initiative by the Syracuse (NY) City School District informs the question, "How do school boards and districts better use research and data to inform policy decisions?" Researchers used interviews and artifacts to describe how the district developed and implemented a new discipline policy, the Syracuse…

  19. Redefining Authentic Research Experiences in Introductory Biology Laboratories and Barriers to Their Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spell, Rachelle M.; Guinan, Judith A.; Miller, Kristen R.; Beck, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating authentic research experiences in introductory biology laboratory classes would greatly expand the number of students exposed to the excitement of discovery and the rigor of the scientific process. However, the essential components of an authentic research experience and the barriers to their implementation in laboratory classes are…

  20. A research-based child welfare employee selection protocol: strengthening retention of the workforce.

    PubMed

    Ellett, Alberta J; Ellett, Chad D; Ellis, Jacquelyn; Lerner, Betsy

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development and initial implementation of a new employee selection protocol (ESP) for child welfare grounded in the results of recent large-scale employee retention studies and a set of research-based, minimally essential knowledge, skills, abilities, and values. The complete ESP consists of a sequenced set of Web- and site-based assessment processes and procedures for potential applicants. Using the ESP, applicants and employers make informed decisions about the goodness of fit between the applicant and the demands of a career in child welfare. To date, the new ESP has been piloted in three Georgia Division of Family and Children Services (DFCS) regions and implemented by all nine colleges and universities participating in IV-E child welfare education programs. Evaluation data collected from students and new employees in one DFCS region strongly support the value of the ESP Web-based activities to make a more informed decision about whether to apply for the IV-E stipends and child welfare positions. Feedback from trained ESP assessors supports the value of various ESP activities. A major goal of implementing the ESP is to select more professionally committed and highly qualified applicants to strengthen employee retention and outcomes for children and families. PMID:20187562

  1. A selective review of advances in coccidiosis research.

    PubMed

    Chapman, H David; Barta, John R; Blake, Damer; Gruber, Arthur; Jenkins, Mark; Smith, Nicholas C; Suo, Xun; Tomley, Fiona M

    2013-01-01

    Coccidiosis is a widespread and economically significant disease of livestock caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria. This disease is worldwide in occurrence and costs the animal agricultural industry many millions of dollars to control. In recent years, the modern tools of molecular biology, biochemistry, cell biology and immunology have been used to expand greatly our knowledge of these parasites and the disease they cause. Such studies are essential if we are to develop new means for the control of coccidiosis. In this chapter, selective aspects of the biology of these organisms, with emphasis on recent research in poultry, are reviewed. Topics considered include taxonomy, systematics, genetics, genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, transfection, oocyst biogenesis, host cell invasion, immunobiology, diagnostics and control. PMID:23876872

  2. Implementing community-based provider participation in research: an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since 2003, the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) has sought to restructure the clinical research enterprise in the United States by promoting collaborative research partnerships between academically-based investigators and community-based physicians. By increasing community-based provider participation in research (CBPPR), the NIH seeks to advance the science of discovery by conducting research in clinical settings where most people get their care, and accelerate the translation of research results into everyday clinical practice. Although CBPPR is seen as a promising strategy for promoting the use of evidence-based clinical services in community practice settings, few empirical studies have examined the organizational factors that facilitate or hinder the implementation of CBPPR. The purpose of this study is to explore the organizational start-up and early implementation of CBPPR in community-based practice. Methods We used longitudinal, case study research methods and an organizational model of innovation implementation to theoretically guide our study. Our sample consisted of three community practice settings that recently joined the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) in the United States. Data were gathered through site visits, telephone interviews, and archival documents from January 2008 to May 2011. Results The organizational model for innovation implementation was useful in identifying and investigating the organizational factors influencing start-up and early implementation of CBPPR in CCOP organizations. In general, the three CCOP organizations varied in the extent to which they achieved consistency in CBPPR over time and across physicians. All three CCOP organizations demonstrated mixed levels of organizational readiness for change. Hospital management support and resource availability were limited across CCOP organizations early on, although they improved in one CCOP organization

  3. Implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes: a protocol for mixed methods research

    PubMed Central

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien Ger; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Johannes Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 has achieved good results in terms of intermediate clinical and process outcomes, the evidence-based knowledge on its implementation is scarce, and insights generalisable to other settings therefore remain limited. Objective This study protocol provides a description of the design and methodology of a mixed methods study on the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes. The aim of the proposed research is to investigate the mechanisms by which and the context in which integrated care for type 2 diabetes has been implemented, which outcomes have been achieved and how the context and mechanisms have affected the outcomes. Methods This article describes a convergent parallel mixed methods research design, including a systematic literature review on the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes as well as a case study on two Dutch best practices on integrated care for type 2 diabetes. Discussion The implementation of integrated care for diabetes type 2 is an under-researched area. Insights from this study could be applied to other settings as well as other chronic conditions to strengthen the evidence on the implementation of integrated care. PMID:25550689

  4. Implementing Research in the Science Classroom: Students and Teachers as Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, C. Bobbi

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of having students do research with other students and having teachers do research with other teachers. Recommends connecting topics for the investigative process with issues from students' real life experiences. (DDR)

  5. Exploring the barriers to and facilitators of implementing research into practice.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Bridget; Coole, Carol; Narayanasamy, Melanie; Feakes, Ruth; Whitworth, Gillian; Tyrell, Tracy; Hardy, Beth

    2016-08-01

    District and community nursing roles have changed rapidly in recent years. Community nurses are increasingly being tasked with carrying out multiple roles, which require them to put research into practice and use evidence-based tools and interventions. The implementation of interventions and tools needs to be developed from empirical research, requiring evidence, to be translated into practice. However, this process may be compromised or enhanced by a number of factors. This exploratory, descriptive qualitative study sought to identify barriers and facilitators to community nurses implementing research into practice. Four focus groups were conducted with registered community nurses and district nurses (n=22). Analysis identified four main themes: keeping up to date with evidence; using a clinical tool; education/training and implementation. Findings suggest that there are barriers at a personal, professional and organisational level. Strategies are suggested to overcome these obstacles. PMID:27479853

  6. Techniques for selecting topology and implementing the distributed control system network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyi, S.

    2016-04-01

    On grounds of reviews devoted to flows analysis methods in the data processing networks within the automated control systems for the technological process and assessment of these methods by the selected set of requirements, one may make conclusion about expediency of using the combination of graph flow algorithms and the queuing theory. The outputs of the research concerning the impact of network dynamics on the drilling platform distributed system control quality prove the fact that the quality of the transient depends upon the frequency of discretization and intensity of flows. With increasing the intensity of flows, the static error of the control enlarges. It was concluded that in order to control the automation objects in the real-time mode it is required to minimize the delays in transmitting packets in the network.

  7. Implementing and auditing electronic recordkeeping systems used in scientific research and development.

    PubMed

    Brilis, George M; Lyon, John G; Worthington, Jeffrey C; Lysakowski, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Electronic recordkeeping is increasingly replacing handwritten records in the course of "normal business." As this trend continues, it is important that organizations develop and implement electronic recordkeeping policies and procedures. This is especially true for research and development organizations because of the potential to transform a discovery into a patent, and at times patent application contests are resolved in litigation. This paper provides a basis for the development, implementation, and subsequent assessment of a research and development recordkeeping policy. The approach described in this paper should be tailored by the organization adopting this approach to meet the needs of their organization. PMID:16044560

  8. Implementation of evidence-based health care using action research: An emancipatory approach.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Luciana; Soares, Cassia Baldini

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study is to discuss the emancipatory approach to action research as an appropriate methodology for workers' meaningful implementation of evidence-based health care. Implementation of evidence-based health care using action research is well supported by the literature. There are various approaches to action research, and they are coherent with the objectives and methods elected to develop the investigation. It is not clear which approach of action research is responsible for meaningful worker engagement in changing praxis. This is a discussion paper based on our experiences and supported by literature on collective health. Health care is defined as a social praxis, dependent upon the capitalist mode of production in which health workers engage themselves in a labour process that has negative (as alienation) as well as positive (as creativity) meanings. Emancipatory changes of social praxis through implementation of evidence-based health care require that participants understand the positive and negative meanings of their work and engage health workers in a conscious and intentional collaborative educational process. Implementation of evidence-based health care through emancipatory action research is capable of overcoming alienation and changing social practice through a participatory meaningful process of knowledge translation. PMID:27562664

  9. A review of diabetes prevention program translations: use of cultural adaptation and implementation research.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Rachel G; Sinclair, Kàimi A; Baumann, Ana A; Racette, Susan B; Sebert Kuhlmann, Anne; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle D; Brownson, Ross C

    2015-12-01

    The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) has been shown to prevent type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modification. The purpose of this study was to describe the literature on DPP translation, synthesizing studies using cultural adaptation and implementation research. A systematic search was conducted. Original studies evaluating DPP implementation and/or cultural adaptation were included. Data about cultural adaptation, implementation outcomes, and translation strategies was abstracted. A total of 44 were included, of which 15 reported cultural adaptations and 38 explored implementation. Many studies shortened the program length and reported a group format. The most commonly reported cultural adaptation (13 of 15) was with content. At the individual level, the most frequently assessed implementation outcome (n = 30) was adoption. Feasibility was most common (n = 32) at the organization level. The DPP is being tested in a variety of settings and populations, using numerous translational strategies and cultural adaptations. Implementation research that identifies, evaluates, and reports efforts to translate the DPP into practice is crucial. PMID:26622913

  10. Focus on Cultural Issues in Research: Developing and Implementing Native American Postcolonial Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Joseph B.

    Indian country presents even the most seasoned and careful researcher with numerous methodological issues. Two of the most salient of these are appropriate understanding of postcolonial stress in tribal communities, and the use of participatory action research methods and models in a culturally sensitive manner. This paper explains postcolonial…

  11. Insights into Implementing Research Collaborations between Research-Intensive Universities and Minority-Serving Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thao, Mao; Lawrenz, Frances; Brakke, Mary; Sherman, Jamie; Matute, Martin

    2016-01-01

    With the high demand to build the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce and the disparity of underrepresented minorities in STEM fields, there have been increased educational efforts to diversify STEM fields. This article describes what works in research collaborations between research-intensive universities (RIUs) and…

  12. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  13. Implementing the foundations of learning project: considerations for preschool intervention research.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Chrishana M; Morris, Pamela A; Portilla, Ximena A

    2014-01-01

    While studies have documented the importance of strong implementation in intervention studies (e.g., see Durlak & Dupre, 2008 ), more information is needed about how to ensure strong fidelity and quality of program implementation when delivering interventions under "real world conditions" and on a large scale. In this article, key lessons in implementing a demonstration and evaluation project known as the Foundations of Learning (FOL) demonstration are presented. Our discussion highlights several key components to the success of the project, including the building of effective coalitions before, and during, the delivery of the intervention to support the implementation process, as well as intensive, collaborative, and multilayered technical assistance provided as the intervention was delivered. Key lessons learned over the course of this project represent some that are highly consistent with prior research on this topic, as well as some that are unique, thus representing new areas for exploration in this burgeoning area of study. PMID:25321642

  14. Medication Assisted Treatment Research with Criminal Justice Populations: Challenges of Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Miller, Patrice M.

    2011-01-01

    Creating, implementing and evaluating substance abuse interventions, especially medication-assisted treatments, for prisoners, parolees, and probationers with histories of heroin addiction is an especially challenging endeavor because of the difficulty in coordinating and achieving cooperation among diverse criminal justice, substance abuse treatment, research, and social service agencies, each with its own priorities and agenda. In addition, there are special rules that must be followed when conducting research with criminal justice-involved populations, particularly prisoners. The following case studies will explore the authors’ experience of over 10 years conducting pharmacotherapy research using methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone with criminal justice populations. The major obstacles and how they were overcome are presented. Finally, recommendations are provided with regard to implementing and conducting research with criminal justice populations. PMID:22086665

  15. Medication-assisted treatment research with criminal justice populations: challenges of implementation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Miller, Patrice M

    2011-01-01

    Creating, implementing and evaluating substance abuse interventions, especially medication-assisted treatments, for prisoners, parolees, and probationers with histories of heroin addiction is an especially challenging endeavor because of the difficulty in coordinating and achieving cooperation among diverse criminal justice, substance abuse treatment, research, and social service agencies, each with its own priorities and agenda. In addition, there are special rules that must be followed when conducting research with criminal justice-involved populations, particularly prisoners. The following case studies will explore the authors' experience of over 10 years conducting pharmacotherapy research using methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone with criminal justice populations. The major obstacles and how they were overcome are presented. Finally, recommendations are provided with regard to implementing and conducting research with criminal justice populations. PMID:22086665

  16. Implementing Effective Substance Abuse Treatments in General Medical Settings: Mapping the Research Terrain.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Lori J; Chandler, Redonna K; Harris, Alex H S

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and Veterans Health Administration (VHA) share an interest in promoting high quality, rigorous health services research to improve the availability and utilization of evidence-based treatment for substance use disorders (SUD). Recent and continuing changes in the healthcare policy and funding environments prioritize the integration of evidence-based substance abuse treatments into primary care and general medical settings. This area is a prime candidate for implementation research. Recent and ongoing implementation projects funded by these agencies are reviewed. Research in five areas is highlighted: screening and brief intervention for risky drinking; screening and brief intervention for tobacco use; uptake of FDA-approved addiction pharmacotherapies; safe opioid prescribing; and disease management. Gaps in the portfolios, and priorities for future research, are described. PMID:26233697

  17. Fidelity of Implementation of Research Experience for Teachers in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Tapati

    In this study, the Arizona State University Mathematics and Science Teaching Fellows 2010 program was analyzed qualitatively from start to finish to determine the impact of the research experience on teachers in the classroom. The sample for the study was the 2010 cohort of eight high school science teachers. Erickson’s (1986) interpretive, participant observational fieldwork method was used to report data by means of detailed descriptions of the research experience and classroom implementation. Data was collected from teacher documents, interviews, and observations. The findings revealed various factors that were responsible for an ineffective implementation of the research experience in the classroom such as research experience, curriculum support, availability of resources, and school curriculum. Implications and recommendations for future programs are discussed in the study.

  18. Using ethnography in implementation research to improve nutrition interventions in populations.

    PubMed

    Tumilowicz, Alison; Neufeld, Lynnette M; Pelto, Gretel H

    2015-12-01

    'Implementation research in nutrition' is an emerging area of study aimed at building evidence-based knowledge and sound theory to design and implement programs that will effectively deliver nutrition interventions. This paper describes some of the basic features of ethnography and illustrates its applications in components of the implementation process. We review the central purpose of ethnography, which is to obtain the emic view--the insider's perspective--and how ethnography has historically interfaced with nutrition. We present examples of ethnographic studies in relation to an analytic framework of the implementation process, situating them with respect to landscape analysis, formative research, process evaluation and impact evaluation. These examples, conducted in various parts of the world by different investigators, demonstrate how ethnography provided important, often essential, insights that influenced programming decisions or explained programme outcomes. Key messages Designing, implementing and evaluating interventions requires knowledge about the populations and communities in which interventions are situated, including knowledge from the 'emic' (insider's) perspective. Obtaining emic perspectives and analysing them in relation to cultural, economic and structural features of social organisation in societies is a central purpose of ethnography. Ethnography is an essential aspect of implementation research in nutrition, as it provides important insights for making decisions about appropriate interventions and delivery platforms; determining how best to fit aspects of programme design and implementation into different environmental and cultural contexts; opening the 'black box' in interventions to understand how delivery and utilisation processes affect programme outcomes or impacts; and understanding how programme impacts were achieved, or not. PMID:26778802

  19. Implementation and Effects of One-to-One Computing Initiatives: A Research Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.

    2006-01-01

    There are now a large number of initiatives designed to make laptops with wireless connectivity available to all students in schools. This paper synthesizes findings from research and evaluation studies that analyzed implementation and effects of one-to-one initiatives from a range of countries. Factors related to successful implementation…

  20. Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Guidelines for Research Mentorship: Development and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, L. DiAnne; Wester, Kelly L.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Chang, Catherine Y.; Hays, Danica G.; Pepperell, Jennifer; Spurgeon, Shawn L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe guidelines endorsed by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision for research mentorship, including characteristics of mentors and mentees. Suggestions for implementing the guidelines at the individual, program, institution, and professional levels are focused on enhancing mentoring relationships as well as…

  1. Teacher Competencies for the Implementation of Collaborative Learning in the Classroom: A Framework and Research Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaendler, Celia; Wiedmann, Michael; Rummel, Nikol; Spada, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This article describes teacher competencies for implementing collaborative learning in the classroom. Research has shown that the effectiveness of collaborative learning largely depends on the quality of student interaction. We therefore focus on what a "teacher" can do to foster student interaction. First, we present a framework that…

  2. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perepletchikova, Francheska; Hilt, Lori M.; Chereji, Elizabeth; Kazdin, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment integrity refers to implementing interventions as intended. Treatment integrity is critically important for experimental validity and for drawing valid inferences regarding the relationship between treatment and outcome. Yet, it is rarely adequately addressed in psychotherapy research. The authors examined barriers to treatment integrity…

  3. Fidelity of Implementation and Instructional Alignment in Response to Intervention Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, David R.; King, Seth A.; Lemons, Christopher J.; Partanen, Jane N.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we explore the extent to which researchers evaluating the efficacy of Tier 2 elementary reading interventions within the framework of Response to Intervention reported on fidelity of implementation and alignment of instruction between tiers. A literature search identified 22 empirical studies from which conclusions were drawn.…

  4. Educating Students in Real-World Sustainability Research: Vision and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundiers, Katja; Wiek, Arnim

    2011-01-01

    Readers are invited to imagine students helping to solve real-world sustainability problems brought to them by societal stakeholders and simultaneously learning about and contributing to sustainable changes in society. Effective sustainability research education engages students in just that. Higher education institutions are implementing this…

  5. Implementing an Action Research Project: A Case Study in Making Decisions and Managing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbank, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the challenges involved in implementing an action research project. It discusses a project which uses a series of interventions (unfreezing techniques, cases studies in conjunction with analogical encoding and lecturer input) to encourage students to critically reflect on their approach to career decision-making. This paper…

  6. Offender Research Project. A Handbook for Designing and Implementing Offender Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol S.; And Others

    A product of the Offender Research Project, this handbook is intended for use in designing and implementing offender programs. The first of six chapters explains the necessity and techniques for developing community and financial support for offender programs. Chapter 2 is a synopsis of the twelve model projects developed as a part of the research…

  7. Design and Implementation of a Research-Informed Water Conservation Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ruthanne; Coe, Alice; Klaver, Irene; Dickson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Informed by the results of a baseline research study of regional citizen knowledge and understanding concerning watershed issues, a team of university faculty and classroom teachers designed and implemented a water conservation education program to address lacking areas of watershed knowledge. The authors developed age-appropriate, hands-on…

  8. Establishing an implementation network: lessons learned from community-based participatory research

    PubMed Central

    Lindamer, Laurie A; Lebowitz, Barry; Hough, Richard L; Garcia, Piedad; Aguirre, Alfredo; Halpain, Maureen C; Depp, Colin; Jeste, Dilip V

    2009-01-01

    Background Implementation of evidence-based mental health assessment and intervention in community public health practice is a high priority for multiple stakeholders. Academic-community partnerships can assist in the implementation of efficacious treatments in community settings; yet, little is known about the processes by which these collaborations are developed. In this paper, we discuss our application of community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to implementation, and we present six lessons we have learned from the establishment of an academic-community partnership. Methods With older adults with psychosis as a focus, we have developed a partnership between a university research center and a public mental health service system based on CBPR. The long-term goal of the partnership is to collaboratively establish an evidence-based implementation network that is sustainable within the public mental healthcare system. Results In building a sustainable partnership, we found that the following lessons were instrumental: changing attitudes; sharing staff; expecting obstacles and formalizing solutions; monitoring and evaluating; adapting and adjusting; and taking advantage of emerging opportunities. Some of these lessons were previously known principles that were modified as the result of the CBPR process, while some lessons derived directly from the interactive process of forming the partnership. Conclusion The process of forming of academic-public partnerships is challenging and time consuming, yet crucial for the development and implementation of state-of-the-art approaches to assessment and interventions to improve the functioning and quality of life for persons with serious mental illnesses. These partnerships provide necessary organizational support to facilitate the implementation of clinical research findings in community practice benefiting consumers, researchers, and providers. PMID:19335915

  9. The Adaptation and Implementation of a Community-Based Participatory Research Curriculum to Build Tribal Research Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Tvli; Styne, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    We studied community-based participatory research in American Indian/Alaska Native communities. We have presented a case study describing a community–clinic–academic partnership with the goal of building tribal capacity and infrastructure to conduct health disparities research. The 2-year intensive training was guided by the framework of an evidence- and community-based participatory research curriculum, adapted and implemented with practice-based data collection activities and seminars to address issues specific to community-based participatory research with sovereign tribal nations. The initiative highlighted important challenges and opportunities in transdisciplinary partnerships; identified gaps in conducting health disparities research at the tribal, clinical, and university levels; and led to important policy change initiatives in all the partner settings. PMID:25905848

  10. Recruiting post-doctoral fellows into global health research: selecting NIH Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Douglas C; Warner, Tokesha L; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Blevins, Meridith; Thomas, Yolanda; Gardner, Pierce; Primack, Aron; Vermund, Sten H

    2014-08-01

    From 2008 to 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program (FICRF) provided 1-year mentored research training at low- and middle-income country sites for American and international post-doctoral health professionals. We examined the FICRF applicant pool, proposed research topics, selection process, and characteristics of enrollees to assess trends in global health research interest and factors associated with applicant competitiveness. The majority (58%) of 67 US and 57 international Fellows were women, and 83% of Fellows had medical degrees. Most applicants were in clinical fellowships (41%) or residencies (24%). More applicants proposing infectious disease projects were supported (59%) than applicants proposing non-communicable disease (NCD) projects (41%), although projects that combined both topic areas were most successful (69%). The numbers of applicants proposing research on NCDs and the numbers of these applicants awarded fellowships rose dramatically over time. Funding provided to the FICRF varied significantly among NIH Institutes and Centers and was strongly associated with the research topics awarded. PMID:24865678

  11. Recruiting Post-Doctoral Fellows into Global Health Research: Selecting NIH Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Heimburger, Douglas C.; Warner, Tokesha L.; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Blevins, Meridith; Thomas, Yolanda; Gardner, Pierce; Primack, Aron; Vermund, Sten H.

    2014-01-01

    From 2008 to 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program (FICRF) provided 1-year mentored research training at low- and middle-income country sites for American and international post-doctoral health professionals. We examined the FICRF applicant pool, proposed research topics, selection process, and characteristics of enrollees to assess trends in global health research interest and factors associated with applicant competitiveness. The majority (58%) of 67 US and 57 international Fellows were women, and 83% of Fellows had medical degrees. Most applicants were in clinical fellowships (41%) or residencies (24%). More applicants proposing infectious disease projects were supported (59%) than applicants proposing non-communicable disease (NCD) projects (41%), although projects that combined both topic areas were most successful (69%). The numbers of applicants proposing research on NCDs and the numbers of these applicants awarded fellowships rose dramatically over time. Funding provided to the FICRF varied significantly among NIH Institutes and Centers and was strongly associated with the research topics awarded. PMID:24865678

  12. Practical recommendations to help students bridge the research-implementation gap and promote conservation.

    PubMed

    Pietri, Diana M; Gurney, Georgina G; Benitez-Vina, Nancy; Kuklok, Audrey; Maxwell, Sara M; Whiting, Libby; Vina, Michael A; Jenkins, Lekelia D

    2013-10-01

    Seasoned conservation researchers often struggle to bridge the research-implementation gap and promote the translation of their work into meaningful conservation actions. Graduate students face the same problems and must contend with obstacles such as limited opportunities for relevant interdisciplinary training and a lack of institutional support for application of research results. However, students also have a crucial set of opportunities (e.g., access to academic resources outside their degree programs and opportunities to design research projects promoting collaboration with stakeholders) at their disposal to address these problems. On the basis of results of breakout discussions at a symposium on the human dimensions of the ocean, a review of the literature, and our own experiences, we devised recommendations on how graduate students can create resources within their academic institutions, institutionalize resources, and engage with stakeholders to promote real-world conservation outcomes. Within their academic institutions, graduate students should foster links to practitioners and promote knowledge and skill sharing among students. To institutionalize resources, students should cultivate student leaders and faculty sponsors, systematically document their program activities, and engage in strategic planning to promote the sustainability of their efforts. While conducting research, students should create connections to and engage actively with stakeholders in their relevant study areas and disseminate research results both to stakeholders and the broader public. Our recommendations can serve as a template for graduate students wishing to bridge the research-implementation gap, both during their current studies and in their future careers as conservation researchers and practitioners. PMID:23869527

  13. Selecting and Implementing an ERMS at Wayne State University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    The successful development and implementation of an electronic resources management (ERM) system depends on an undertaking that includes many key factors. Some of these key factors include determining user groups and their needs, evaluating implementation and technical issues, testing the system, exploring how the system will be used, setting…

  14. Mobile-Assisted Language Learning: A Selected Annotated Bibliography of Implementation Studies 1994-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burston, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, project implementation descriptions have accounted for the majority of Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL) publications, some 345 in total. Those interested in MALL applications thus need to read widely to acquire an adequate perspective of MALL implementations. The intent of this bibliography is to facilitate this…

  15. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Practical guidance for selection, calibration, and implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Upal; Driscoll, Susan Kane; Burgess, Robert M; Jonker, Michiel To; Reible, Danny; Gobas, Frank; Choi, Yongju; Apitz, Sabine E; Maruya, Keith A; Gala, William R; Mortimer, Munro; Beegan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article provides practical guidance on the use of passive sampling methods (PSMs) that target the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) for improved exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments. Primary considerations for selecting a PSM for a specific application include clear delineation of measurement goals for Cfree, whether laboratory-based “ex situ” and/or field-based “in situ” application is desired, and ultimately which PSM is best-suited to fulfill the measurement objectives. Guidelines for proper calibration and validation of PSMs, including use of provisional values for polymer–water partition coefficients, determination of equilibrium status, and confirmation of nondepletive measurement conditions are defined. A hypothetical example is described to illustrate how the measurement of Cfree afforded by PSMs reduces uncertainty in assessing narcotic toxicity for sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The article concludes with a discussion of future research that will improve the quality and robustness of Cfree measurements using PSMs, providing a sound scientific basis to support risk assessment and contaminated sediment management decisions. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:210–223. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:24288273

  16. From Research to Flight: Thinking About Implementation While Performing Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation calls for a strategy to implement new technologies. Such a strategy would allow advanced space transportation technologies to mature for exploration beyond Earth orbit. It discusses the difference between technology push versus technology pull. It also reviews the three basic technology readiness levels (TRL). The presentation traces examples of technology development to flight application: the Space Shuttle Main Engine Advanced Health Management System, the Friction Stir Welding technology the (auto-adjustable pin tool). A couple of technologies currently not in flight, but are being reviewed for potential use are: cryogenic fluid management (CFM), and solar sail propulsion. There is also an attempt to explain why new technologies are so difficult to field.

  17. Integrating addiction treatment into primary care using mobile health technology: protocol for an implementation research study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare reform in the United States is encouraging Federally Qualified Health Centers and other primary-care practices to integrate treatment for addiction and other behavioral health conditions into their practices. The potential of mobile health technologies to manage addiction and comorbidities such as HIV in these settings is substantial but largely untested. This paper describes a protocol to evaluate the implementation of an E-Health integrated communication technology delivered via mobile phones, called Seva, into primary-care settings. Seva is an evidence-based system of addiction treatment and recovery support for patients and real-time caseload monitoring for clinicians. Methods/Design Our implementation strategy uses three models of organizational change: the Program Planning Model to promote acceptance and sustainability, the NIATx quality improvement model to create a welcoming environment for change, and Rogers’s diffusion of innovations research, which facilitates adaptations of innovations to maximize their adoption potential. We will implement Seva and conduct an intensive, mixed-methods assessment at three diverse Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers in the United States. Our non-concurrent multiple-baseline design includes three periods — pretest (ending in four months of implementation preparation), active Seva implementation, and maintenance — with implementation staggered at six-month intervals across sites. The first site will serve as a pilot clinic. We will track the timing of intervention elements and assess study outcomes within each dimension of the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance framework, including effects on clinicians, patients, and practices. Our mixed-methods approach will include quantitative (e.g., interrupted time-series analysis of treatment attendance, with clinics as the unit of analysis) and qualitative (e.g., staff interviews regarding adaptations to implementation

  18. Ames Research Center FY 2000 Implementation Plan: Leading Technology into the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This document presents the implementation plan for Ames Research Center (ARC) within the overall framework of the NASA Strategic Plan. It describes how ARC intends to implement its Center of Excellence responsibilities, Agency assigned missions, Agency and Enterprise lead programs, and other roles in support of NASA's vision and mission. All Federal agencies are required by the 1993 Government Performance and Results Act to implement a long-term strategic planning process that includes measurable outcomes and strict accountability. At NASA, this planning process is shaped by the Space Act of 1958, annual appropriations, and other external mandates, as well as by customer requirements. The resulting Strategic Plan sets the overall architecture for what we do, identifies who our customers are, and directs where we are going and why. The Strategic Plan is the basis upon which decisions regarding program implementation and resource deployment are made. Whereas the strategic planning process examines the long-term direction of the organization and identifies a specific set of goals, the implementation planning process examines the detailed performance of the organization and allocates resources toward meeting these goals. It is the purpose of this implementation document to provide the connection between the NASA Strategic Plan and the specific programs and support functions that ARC employees perform. This connection flows from the NASA Strategic Plan, through the various Strategic Enterprise plans to the ARC Center of Excellence, primary missions, Lead Center programs, program support responsibilities, and ultimately, to the role of the individual ARC employee.

  19. Implementation of the Immersed Boundary Method in the Weather Research and Forecasting model

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A

    2006-12-07

    Accurate simulations of atmospheric boundary layer flow are vital for predicting dispersion of contaminant releases, particularly in densely populated urban regions where first responders must react within minutes and the consequences of forecast errors are potentially disastrous. Current mesoscale models do not account for urban effects, and conversely urban scale models do not account for mesoscale weather features or atmospheric physics. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop and implement an immersed boundary method (IBM) along with a surface roughness parameterization into the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. IBM will be used in WRF to represent the complex boundary conditions imposed by urban landscapes, while still including forcing from regional weather patterns and atmospheric physics. This document details preliminary results of this research, including the details of three distinct implementations of the immersed boundary method. Results for the three methods are presented for the case of a rotation influenced neutral atmospheric boundary layer over flat terrain.

  20. Indoor air pollution in developing countries: research and implementation needs for improvements in global public health.

    PubMed

    Gall, Elliott T; Carter, Ellison M; Earnest, C Matt; Stephens, Brent

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP) from the burning of solid fuels for cooking, heating, and lighting accounts for a significant portion of the global burden of death and disease, and disproportionately affects women and children in developing regions. Clean cookstove campaigns recently received more attention and investment, but their successes might hinge on greater integration of the public health community with a variety of other disciplines. To help guide public health research in alleviating this important global environmental health burden, we synthesized previous research on IAP in developing countries, summarized successes and challenges of previous cookstove implementation programs, and provided key research and implementation needs from structured discussions at a recent symposium. PMID:23409891

  1. University of Chicago Center for Personalized Therapeutics: research, education and implementation science

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, M Eileen; Maitland, Michael L; O’Donnell, Peter H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Cox, Nancy J; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is aimed at advancing our knowledge of the genetic basis of variable drug response. The Center for Personalized Therapeutics within the University of Chicago comprises basic, translational and clinical research as well as education including undergraduate, graduate, medical students, clinical/postdoctoral fellows and faculty. The Committee on Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics is the educational arm of the Center aimed at training clinical and postdoctoral fellows in translational pharmacology and pharmacogenomics. Research runs the gamut from basic discovery and functional studies to pharmacogenomic implementation studies to evaluate physician adoption of genetic medicine. The mission of the Center is to facilitate research, education and implementation of pharmacogenomics to realize the true potential of personalized medicine and improve the lives of patients. PMID:24024891

  2. Moving comparative effectiveness research into practice: implementation science and the role of academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C; Solomon, Mildred Z

    2010-10-01

    The success of the federal investment in comparative effectiveness research will hinge on using the power of science to guide reforms in health care delivery and improve patient-centered outcomes. Translating the results of comparative effectiveness research into practice calls for the rigors of implementation science to ensure the efficient and systematic uptake, dissemination, and endurance of these innovations. Academic medicine can help answer the call by thoroughly integrating its research and training missions with clinical care that is focused on patient-centered outcomes; building multidisciplinary teams that include a wide range of experts such as clinicians, clinical and implementation scientists, systems engineers, behavioral economists, and social scientists; and training future care providers, scientists, and educators to carry innovations forward. PMID:20921492

  3. Indoor Air Pollution in Developing Countries: Research and Implementation Needs for Improvements in Global Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Elliott T.; Carter, Ellison M.; Matt Earnest, C.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP) from the burning of solid fuels for cooking, heating, and lighting accounts for a significant portion of the global burden of death and disease, and disproportionately affects women and children in developing regions. Clean cookstove campaigns recently received more attention and investment, but their successes might hinge on greater integration of the public health community with a variety of other disciplines. To help guide public health research in alleviating this important global environmental health burden, we synthesized previous research on IAP in developing countries, summarized successes and challenges of previous cookstove implementation programs, and provided key research and implementation needs from structured discussions at a recent symposium. PMID:23409891

  4. Implementation of a research prototype onboard fault monitoring and diagnosis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Michael T.; Abbott, Kathy H.; Schutte, Paul C.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the dynamic and complex nature of in-flight fault monitoring and diagnosis, a research effort was undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate the application of artificial intelligence techniques for improved situational awareness. Under this research effort, concepts were developed and a software architecture was designed to address the complexities of onboard monitoring and diagnosis. This paper describes the implementation of these concepts in a computer program called FaultFinder. The implementation of the monitoring, diagnosis, and interface functions as separate modules is discussed, as well as the blackboard designed for the communication of these modules. Some related issues concerning the future installation of FaultFinder in an aircraft are also discussed.

  5. Assessing Autonomous Learning in Research Methods Courses: Implementing the Student-Driven Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandiver, Donna M.; Walsh, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    As empirical assessments of teaching strategies increase in many disciplines and across many different courses, a paucity of such assessment seems to exist in courses devoted to social science research methods. This lack of assessment and evaluation impedes progress in developing successful teaching pedagogy. The teaching-learning issue addressed…

  6. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  7. Implementation challenges in end-of-life research with adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Savage, Teresa A; Moro, Teresa Thalia; Boyden, Jackelyn Y; Brown, Allison A; Kavanaugh, Karen L

    2015-05-01

    Although the 4 million+people in the U.S. with an intellectual or developmental disability (I/DD) experience the same life expectancy as those in the general population, end-of-life research including these individuals is lacking and can be difficult to implement. As will be described in this paper, it is possible to overcome barriers to successfully include people with I/DD in end-of-life research. In this paper, the implementation challenges, feasibility, and implications for successful end-of-life research with individuals with I/DD using focus groups are described. Individuals with I/DD were able to discuss their experiences and views about end-of-life care. However, while people with I/DD made valuable contributions to the focus groups, there were several modifications needed in order to execute this study. In order to gain a complete picture of end-of-life care for people with I/DD, it is imperative to include them in research to the best of their ability. By anticipating issues related to recruitment, the consent process, setting, and support needs of participants, focus groups can be successfully implemented. PMID:25457272

  8. Changes in foods selected and consumed after implementation of the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns in southeast Texas

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Karen W.; Chen, Tzu-An; Dave, Jayna M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We compared elementary students' school lunches selected and consumed before (Spring, 2011) and after (Spring, 2013) implementation of the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns in the fall of 2012. Method Students in eight elementary schools in one Southeast Texas school district were observed during lunch: foods selected/consumed were recorded. The percentage of students who selected each food group was compared between years, as were the differences in the consumption and the percent of food consumed by year, for students who selected the food group. All analyses controlled for student gender and grade and school free/reduced price meal status. Results Observations were conducted for 472 (2011) and 573 (2013) students. Significantly more 2013 students selected fruit, 100% juice, total fruit + 100% juice, other vegetables, whole grains, protein foods and milk, but fewer selected starchy vegetables. For those students selecting them, significantly more total fruit + 100% juice and red–orange vegetables, but significantly less other vegetables, legumes, and protein foods were consumed. There were no differences in waste of fruit, whole grains, or vegetables, with the exception of legumes. More legumes were wasted in 2013 than 2011. Conclusion The findings that students had similar consumption rates for fruit, whole grains, and most vegetables in this study are encouraging. Regular monitoring of student food selection and consumption at school is needed to assess whether the new meal patterns improve intake at school. PMID:26101737

  9. Teacher change in implementing a research-developed representation construction pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubber, Peter; Chittleborough, Gail

    2016-05-01

    The Representations in Learning Science (RiLS) project developed a representation construction approach to teaching and learning in science, which has successfully demonstrated enhanced student learning through sustained engagement with ideas, and enhancement of teachers' pedagogical knowledge and understandings of how knowledge in science is developed and communicated. The current Constructing Representations in Science Pedagogy (CRISP) project aims at wider scale implementation of the representation construction approach. This paper explores a range of issues that confronted four Year-8 teachers in implementing this research-developed approach, such as: preparedness of the teacher in terms of epistemological positioning and positioning as a learner, significant support for planning and modelling by the university expert, and a team ethos where teachers share ideas and plan jointly. The Year-8 teachers implemented a representation construction approach to the teaching of the topic of astronomy. The Interconnected Model of Teacher Growth (IMTG) (Clarke and Hollingworth, Teach. Educ., 18 (2001) 947) was used to analyse the teachers' experience in planning and delivering the teaching sequence. This model was found to be flexible in identifying the experiences of teachers in different situations and useful in identifying issues for implementation of a research-developed pedagogy.

  10. Advances in Applying Treatment Integrity Research for Dissemination and Implementation Science: Introduction to Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; McLeod, Bryce D.

    2013-01-01

    This special series focuses upon the ways in which research on treatment integrity, a multidimensional construct including assessment of the content and quality of a psychosocial treatment delivered to a client as well as relational elements, can inform dissemination and implementation science. The five articles for this special series illustrate how treatment integrity concepts and methods can be applied across different levels of the mental health service system to advance dissemination and implementation science. In this introductory article, we provide an overview of treatment integrity research and describe three broad conceptual models that are relevant to the articles in the series. We conclude with a brief description of each of the five articles in the series. PMID:23970819