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Sample records for implementing team software

  1. Implementing Extreme Programming in Distributed Software Project Teams: Strategies and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruping, Likoebe M.

    Agile software development methods and distributed forms of organizing teamwork are two team process innovations that are gaining prominence in today's demanding software development environment. Individually, each of these innovations has yielded gains in the practice of software development. Agile methods have enabled software project teams to meet the challenges of an ever turbulent business environment through enhanced flexibility and responsiveness to emergent customer needs. Distributed software project teams have enabled organizations to access highly specialized expertise across geographic locations. Although much progress has been made in understanding how to more effectively manage agile development teams and how to manage distributed software development teams, managers have little guidance on how to leverage these two potent innovations in combination. In this chapter, I outline some of the strategies and challenges associated with implementing agile methods in distributed software project teams. These are discussed in the context of a study of a large-scale software project in the United States that lasted four months.

  2. Team Collaboration Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  3. The Effects of Development Team Skill on Software Product Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Schiavone, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the effect of the skill/experience of the software development team on the quality of the final software product. A method for the assessment of software development team skill and experience is proposed, and was derived from a workforce management tool currently in use by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Using data from 26 smallscale software development projects, the team skill measures are correlated to 5 software product quality metrics from the ISO/IEC 9126 Software Engineering Product Quality standard. in the analysis of the results, development team skill is found to be a significant factor in the adequacy of the design and implementation. In addition, the results imply that inexperienced software developers are tasked with responsibilities ill-suited to their skill level, and thus have a significant adverse effect on the quality of the software product. Keywords: software quality, development skill, software metrics

  4. ERP Software Implementation Best Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Pollyanne S.; Southerland, Arthur R.; Johnson, James T.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the perceptions of chief financial and information officers of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software implementation best practices. Usable responses from 159 respondents show consensus for the most part between the perceptions of the two groups and describe some best practices that represent common ground. (SLD)

  5. Towards a balanced software team formation based on Belbin team role using fuzzy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Mazni; Hasan, Bikhtiyar; Ahmad, Mazida; Yasin, Azman; Baharom, Fauziah; Mohd, Haslina; Darus, Norida Muhd

    2016-08-01

    In software engineering (SE), team roles play significant impact in determining the project success. To ensure the optimal outcome of the project the team is working on, it is essential to ensure that the team members are assigned to the right role with the right characteristics. One of the prevalent team roles is Belbin team role. A successful team must have a balance of team roles. Thus, this study demonstrates steps taken to determine balance of software team formation based on Belbin team role using fuzzy technique. Fuzzy technique was chosen because it allows analyzing of imprecise data and classifying selected criteria. In this study, two roles in Belbin team role, which are Shaper (Sh) and Plant (Pl) were chosen to assign the specific role in software team. Results show that the technique is able to be used for determining the balance of team roles. Future works will focus on the validation of the proposed method by using empirical data in industrial setting.

  6. Roadmap for Peridynamic Software Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Littlewood, David John

    2015-10-01

    The application of peridynamics for engineering analysis requires an efficient and robust software implementation. Key elements include processing of the discretization, the proximity search for identification of pairwise interactions, evaluation of the con- stitutive model, application of a bond-damage law, and contact modeling. Additional requirements may arise from the choice of time integration scheme, for example esti- mation of the maximum stable time step for explicit schemes, and construction of the tangent stiffness matrix for many implicit approaches. This report summaries progress to date on the software implementation of the peridynamic theory of solid mechanics. Discussion is focused on parallel implementation of the meshfree discretization scheme of Silling and Askari [33] in three dimensions, although much of the discussion applies to computational peridynamics in general.

  7. A Team Building Model for Software Engineering Courses Term Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new model for team building, which enables teachers to build coherent teams rapidly and fairly for the term projects of software engineering courses. Moreover, the model can also be used to build teams for any type of project, if the team member candidates are students, or if they are inexperienced on a certain subject. The…

  8. Implementation of critical care response team.

    PubMed

    Al Shimemeri, Abdullah

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of hospital deaths have indicated that a significant proportion of the reported deaths might have been prevented had the patients received intensive level care early enough. Over the past few decades the critical care response team has become an important means of preventing these deaths. As the proactive arm of intensive care delivery, the critical care response team places emphasis on early identification of signs of clinical deterioration, which then prompts the mobilization of intensive care brought right to the patient's bedside. However, the setting up of a critical care response team is a difficult undertaking involving different levels of cooperation between all service stakeholders, and a bringing together of professional expertise and experience in its operations. The implementation of a critical care response team often involves a high-level restructuring of a hospital's service orientation. In the present work, the various factors and different models to be considered in implementing a critical care response team are addressed. PMID:25024943

  9. Performance of student software development teams: the influence of personality and identifying as team members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, Conal; Bizumic, Boris; Reynolds, Katherine; Smithson, Michael; Johns-Boast, Lynette; van Rooy, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    One prominent approach in the exploration of the variations in project team performance has been to study two components of the aggregate personalities of the team members: conscientiousness and agreeableness. A second line of research, known as self-categorisation theory, argues that identifying as team members and the team's performance norms should substantially influence the team's performance. This paper explores the influence of both these perspectives in university software engineering project teams. Eighty students worked to complete a piece of software in small project teams during 2007 or 2008. To reduce limitations in statistical analysis, Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed to extrapolate from the results of the original sample to a larger simulated sample (2043 cases, within 319 teams). The results emphasise the importance of taking into account personality (particularly conscientiousness), and both team identification and the team's norm of performance, in order to cultivate higher levels of performance in student software engineering project teams.

  10. Leader Delegation and Trust in Global Software Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Suling

    2008-01-01

    Virtual teams are an important work structure in global software development. The distributed team structure enables access to a diverse set of expertise which is often not available in one location, to a cheaper labor force, and to a potentially accelerated development process that uses a twenty-four hour work structure. Many software teams…

  11. WIPDash: Work Item and People Dashboard for Software Development Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Mikkel R.; Fernandez, Roland; Czerwinski, Mary; Inkpen, Kori; Kulyk, Olga; Robertson, George G.

    We present WIPDash, a visualization for software development teams designed to increase group awareness of work items and code base activity. WIPDash was iteratively designed by working with two development teams, using interviews, observations, and focus groups, as well as sketches of the prototype. Based on those observations and feedback, we prototyped WIPDash and deployed it with two software teams for a one week field study. We summarize the lessons learned, and include suggestions for a future version.

  12. Implementing Large Projects in Software Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppit, David

    2006-01-01

    In software engineering education, large projects are widely recognized as a useful way of exposing students to the real-world difficulties of team software development. But large projects are difficult to put into practice. First, educators rarely have additional time to manage software projects. Second, classrooms have inherent limitations that…

  13. Management Guidelines for Database Developers' Teams in Software Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Lazar; Lin, Yifeng; Hodosi, Georg

    Worldwide job market for database developers (DBDs) is continually increasing in last several years. In some companies, DBDs are organized as a special team (DBDs team) to support other projects and roles. As a new role, the DBDs team is facing a major problem that there are not any management guidelines for them. The team manager does not know which kinds of tasks should be assigned to this team and what practices should be used during DBDs work. Therefore in this paper we have developed a set of management guidelines, which includes 8 fundamental tasks and 17 practices from software development process, by using two methodologies Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and agile software development in particular Scrum in order to improve the DBDs team work. Moreover the management guidelines developed here has been complemented with practices from authors' experience in this area and has been evaluated in the case of a software company. The management guidelines for DBD teams presented in this paper could be very usefully for other companies too that are using a DBDs team and could contribute towards an increase of the efficiency of these teams in their work on software development projects.

  14. Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

  15. A Strategy for Implementing the School Management Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio School Boards Association, Columbus.

    To aid school administrators, this guidebook presents information on planning, implementing, and evaluating a school management team approach. The first section reviews the definition and philosophy of the management team, discusses propositions about and characteristics of management teams, and describes the application of team decision-making to…

  16. PPM Receiver Implemented in Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew; Kang, Edward; Lay, Norman; Vilnrotter, Victor; Srinivasan, Meera; Lee, Clement

    2010-01-01

    A computer program has been written as a tool for developing optical pulse-position- modulation (PPM) receivers in which photodetector outputs are fed to analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and all subsequent signal processing is performed digitally. The program can be used, for example, to simulate an all-digital version of the PPM receiver described in Parallel Processing of Broad-Band PPM Signals (NPO-40711), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The program can also be translated into a design for digital PPM receiver hardware. The most notable innovation embodied in the software and the underlying PPM-reception concept is a digital processing subsystem that performs synchronization of PPM time slots, even though the digital processing is, itself, asynchronous in the sense that no attempt is made to synchronize it with the incoming optical signal a priori and there is no feedback to analog signal processing subsystems or ADCs. Functions performed by the software receiver include time-slot synchronization, symbol synchronization, coding preprocessing, and diagnostic functions. The program is written in the MATLAB and Simulink software system. The software receiver is highly parameterized and, hence, programmable: for example, slot- and symbol-synchronization filters have programmable bandwidths.

  17. Using "Facebook" to Improve Communication in Undergraduate Software Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlton, Terence; Devlin, Marie; Drummond, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    As part of the CETL ALiC initiative (Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Active Learning in Computing), undergraduate computing science students at Newcastle and Durham universities participated in a cross-site team software development project. To ensure we offer adequate resources to support this collaboration, we conducted an…

  18. Measuring the effect of conflict on software engineering teams.

    PubMed

    Karn, J S; Cowling, A J

    2008-05-01

    This article describes a project that aimed to uncover the effects of different forms of conflict on team performance during the important feasibility, requirements analysis, and design phases of software engineering (SE) projects. The research subjects were master of science students who were working to produce software commissioned by real-world clients. A template was developed that allowed researchers to record details of any conflicts that occurred. It was found that some forms of conflict were more damaging than others and that the frequency and intensity of specific conflicts are important factors to consider. The experience of the researchers when using the final template suggests that it is a valuable weapon to have in one's arsenal if one is interested in observing and recording the details of conflict in either SE teams or teams in different contexts. PMID:18522070

  19. Intelligent robotic teams: ideas, issues, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Mohan M.

    1997-10-01

    Team robotics is slowly but surely emerging as a useful and effective solution to a number of practical problems. There are a number of important motivations for developing robotic teams of cooperating modules. Differences in task requirements, resources, and environments provide a very strong motivation not to attempt to develop a single complicated robotic system which performs all functions, in all conditions, poorly. Consideration of multiple cooperative robotic teams, provide an attractive, effective, and practical alternative. Individual robots in the team are typically simpler to design, enhancing the system reliability. Also, teams are more efficient and more fault tolerant. In our own research, we have investigated a number of important issues underlying the development of cooperative robotic teams. These research studies have emphasized experimental validation of the concepts. Highlights of these studies are presented below.

  20. Project SYNERGY: Software Support for Underprepared Students. Software Implementation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anandam, Kamala; And Others

    Miami-Dade Community College's (MDCC's) implementation and assessment of computer software as a part of Project SYNERGY, a multi-institutional project funded by the International Business Machines (IBM) Corporation designed to seek technological solutions for helping students underprepared in reading, writing and mathematics, is described in this…

  1. Team Software Development for Aerothermodynamic and Aerodynamic Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, N.; Atkins, H. L.; Bibb, K. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Carpenter, M. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Hammond, D. P.; Jones, W. T.; Kleb, W. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative approach to software development is described. The approach employs the agile development techniques: project retrospectives, Scrum status meetings, and elements of Extreme Programming to efficiently develop a cohesive and extensible software suite. The software product under development is a fluid dynamics simulator for performing aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis and design. The functionality of the software product is achieved both through the merging, with substantial rewrite, of separate legacy codes and the authorship of new routines. Examples of rapid implementation of new functionality demonstrate the benefits obtained with this agile software development process. The appendix contains a discussion of coding issues encountered while porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95, software design principles, and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  2. Implementing Rakim: Open Source Chat Reference Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, Shawn; Payne, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the conception, implementation, and current status of Rakim open source software at Midlands Technical college in Columbia, SC. Midlands Technical College (MTC) is a 2-year school in Columbia, S.C. It has two large campuses and three smaller campuses. Although the library functions as a single unit, there are separate…

  3. Tips for Ensuring Successful Software Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weathers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Implementing an enterprise-level, mission-critical software system is an infrastructure project akin to other sizable projects, such as building a school. It's costly and complex, takes a year or more to complete, requires the collaboration of many different parties, involves uncertainties, results in a long-lived asset requiring ongoing…

  4. Program for implementing software quality metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, H.P.; Riemer, C.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes a program by which the Veterans Benefit Administration (VBA) can implement metrics to measure the performance of automated data systems and demonstrate that they are improving over time. It provides a definition of quality, particularly with regard to software. Requirements for management and staff to achieve a successful metrics program are discussed. It lists the attributes of high-quality software, then describes the metrics or calculations that can be used to measure these attributes in a particular system. Case studies of some successful metrics programs used by business are presented. The report ends with suggestions on which metrics the VBA should use and the order in which they should be implemented.

  5. Small PACS implementation using publicly available software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passadore, Diego J.; Isoardi, Roberto A.; Gonzalez Nicolini, Federico J.; Ariza, P. P.; Novas, C. V.; Omati, S. A.

    1998-07-01

    Building cost effective PACS solutions is a main concern in developing countries. Hardware and software components are generally much more expensive than in developed countries and also more tightened financial constraints are the main reasons contributing to a slow rate of implementation of PACS. The extensive use of Internet for sharing resources and information has brought a broad number of freely available software packages to an ever-increasing number of users. In the field of medical imaging is possible to find image format conversion packages, DICOM compliant servers for all kinds of service classes, databases, web servers, image visualization, manipulation and analysis tools, etc. This paper describes a PACS implementation for review and storage built on freely available software. It currently integrates four diagnostic modalities (PET, CT, MR and NM), a Radiotherapy Treatment Planning workstation and several computers in a local area network, for image storage, database management and image review, processing and analysis. It also includes a web-based application that allows remote users to query the archive for studies from any workstation and to view the corresponding images and reports. We conclude that the advantage of using this approach is twofold. It allows a full understanding of all the issues involved in the implementation of a PACS and also contributes to keep costs down while enabling the development of a functional system for storage, distribution and review that can prove to be helpful for radiologists and referring physicians.

  6. Generalized implementation of software safety policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.; Wika, Kevin G.

    1994-01-01

    As part of a research program in the engineering of software for safety-critical systems, we are performing two case studies. The first case study, which is well underway, is a safety-critical medical application. The second, which is just starting, is a digital control system for a nuclear research reactor. Our goal is to use these case studies to permit us to obtain a better understanding of the issues facing developers of safety-critical systems, and to provide a vehicle for the assessment of research ideas. The case studies are not based on the analysis of existing software development by others. Instead, we are attempting to create software for new and novel systems in a process that ultimately will involve all phases of the software lifecycle. In this abstract, we summarize our results to date in a small part of this project, namely the determination and classification of policies related to software safety that must be enforced to ensure safe operation. We hypothesize that this classification will permit a general approach to the implementation of a policy enforcement mechanism.

  7. Implementation of TeamSTEPPS in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Turner, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Team training and practice is an essential part of emergency department workflow. TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety) is a teamwork and communication systems model that has the potential to improve patient safety while also addressing aspects of staff satisfaction and morale. This article describes the experience of one emergency department's implementation of TeamSTEPPS, with a focus on methods of training faculty and staff, progression of implementation over a period of time, and evaluation of the process with recommendations for future growth. Background, history, and specific tools used within the department are described, with an emphasis on "briefs," "huddles," and "debriefs" or team "wrap-ups." PMID:22668991

  8. Performance of Student Software Development Teams: The Influence of Personality and Identifying as Team Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Conal; Bizumic, Boris; Reynolds, Katherine; Smithson, Michael; Johns-Boast, Lynette; van Rooy, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    One prominent approach in the exploration of the variations in project team performance has been to study two components of the aggregate personalities of the team members: conscientiousness and agreeableness. A second line of research, known as self-categorisation theory, argues that identifying as team members and the team's performance…

  9. Implementing Software Safety in the NASA Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Martha S.; Radley, Charles F.

    1994-01-01

    Until recently, NASA did not consider allowing computers total control of flight systems. Human operators, via hardware, have constituted the ultimate safety control. In an attempt to reduce costs, NASA has come to rely more and more heavily on computers and software to control space missions. (For example. software is now planned to control most of the operational functions of the International Space Station.) Thus the need for systematic software safety programs has become crucial for mission success. Concurrent engineering principles dictate that safety should be designed into software up front, not tested into the software after the fact. 'Cost of Quality' studies have statistics and metrics to prove the value of building quality and safety into the development cycle. Unfortunately, most software engineers are not familiar with designing for safety, and most safety engineers are not software experts. Software written to specifications which have not been safety analyzed is a major source of computer related accidents. Safer software is achieved step by step throughout the system and software life cycle. It is a process that includes requirements definition, hazard analyses, formal software inspections, safety analyses, testing, and maintenance. The greatest emphasis is placed on clearly and completely defining system and software requirements, including safety and reliability requirements. Unfortunately, development and review of requirements are the weakest link in the process. While some of the more academic methods, e.g. mathematical models, may help bring about safer software, this paper proposes the use of currently approved software methodologies, and sound software and assurance practices to show how, to a large degree, safety can be designed into software from the start. NASA's approach today is to first conduct a preliminary system hazard analysis (PHA) during the concept and planning phase of a project. This determines the overall hazard potential of

  10. Implementing software safety in the NASA environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetherholt, Martha S.; Radley, Charles F.

    1994-05-01

    Until recently, NASA did not consider allowing computers total control of flight systems. Human operators, via hardware, have constituted the ultimate safety control. In an attempt to reduce costs, NASA has come to rely more and more heavily on computers and software to control space missions. (For example. software is now planned to control most of the operational functions of the International Space Station.) Thus the need for systematic software safety programs has become crucial for mission success. Concurrent engineering principles dictate that safety should be designed into software up front, not tested into the software after the fact. 'Cost of Quality' studies have statistics and metrics to prove the value of building quality and safety into the development cycle. Unfortunately, most software engineers are not familiar with designing for safety, and most safety engineers are not software experts. Software written to specifications which have not been safety analyzed is a major source of computer related accidents. Safer software is achieved step by step throughout the system and software life cycle. It is a process that includes requirements definition, hazard analyses, formal software inspections, safety analyses, testing, and maintenance. The greatest emphasis is placed on clearly and completely defining system and software requirements, including safety and reliability requirements. Unfortunately, development and review of requirements are the weakest link in the process. While some of the more academic methods, e.g. mathematical models, may help bring about safer software, this paper proposes the use of currently approved software methodologies, and sound software and assurance practices to show how, to a large degree, safety can be designed into software from the start. NASA's approach today is to first conduct a preliminary system hazard analysis (PHA) during the concept and planning phase of a project. This determines the overall hazard potential of

  11. Implementing context and team based access control in healthcare intranets.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Christos K; Mavridis, Ioannis K; Nikolakopoulou, Georgia; Pangalos, George I

    2002-09-01

    The establishment of an efficient access control system in healthcare intranets is a critical security issue directly related to the protection of patients' privacy. Our C-TMAC (Context and Team-based Access Control) model is an active security access control model that layers dynamic access control concepts on top of RBAC (Role-based) and TMAC (Team-based) access control models. It also extends them in the sense that contextual information concerning collaborative activities is associated with teams of users and user permissions are dynamically filtered during runtime. These features of C-TMAC meet the specific security requirements of healthcare applications. In this paper, an experimental implementation of the C-TMAC model is described. More specifically, we present the operational architecture of the system that is used to implement C-TMAC security components in a healthcare intranet. Based on the technological platform of an Oracle Data Base Management System and Application Server, the application logic is coded with stored PL/SQL procedures that include Dynamic SQL routines for runtime value binding purposes. The resulting active security system adapts to current need-to-know requirements of users during runtime and provides fine-grained permission granularity. Apart from identity certificates for authentication, it uses attribute certificates for communicating critical security metadata, such as role membership and team participation of users. PMID:12507264

  12. Practical Team-Based Learning from Planning to Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Edward; Eng, Marty; Fuentes, David G.; Helms, Kristen L.; Maki, Erik D.; Vyas, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) helps instructors develop an active teaching approach for the classroom through group work. The TBL infrastructure engages students in the learning process through the Readiness Assessment Process, problem-solving through team discussions, and peer feedback to ensure accountability. This manuscript describes the benefits and barriers of TBL, and the tools necessary for developing, implementing, and critically evaluating the technique within coursework in a user-friendly method. Specifically, the manuscript describes the processes underpinning effective TBL development, preparation, implementation, assessment, and evaluation, as well as practical techniques and advice from authors’ classroom experiences. The paper also highlights published articles in the area of TBL in education, with a focus on pharmacy education. PMID:26889061

  13. Practical Team-Based Learning from Planning to Implementation.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Heather P; Bell, Edward; Eng, Marty; Fuentes, David G; Helms, Kristen L; Maki, Erik D; Vyas, Deepti

    2015-12-25

    Team-based learning (TBL) helps instructors develop an active teaching approach for the classroom through group work. The TBL infrastructure engages students in the learning process through the Readiness Assessment Process, problem-solving through team discussions, and peer feedback to ensure accountability. This manuscript describes the benefits and barriers of TBL, and the tools necessary for developing, implementing, and critically evaluating the technique within coursework in a user-friendly method. Specifically, the manuscript describes the processes underpinning effective TBL development, preparation, implementation, assessment, and evaluation, as well as practical techniques and advice from authors' classroom experiences. The paper also highlights published articles in the area of TBL in education, with a focus on pharmacy education. PMID:26889061

  14. Practical Issues in Implementing Software Reliability Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen P.; Schneidewind, Norman F.; Everett, William W.; Munson, John C.; Vouk, Mladen A.; Musa, John D.

    1999-01-01

    Many ways of estimating software systems' reliability, or reliability-related quantities, have been developed over the past several years. Of particular interest are methods that can be used to estimate a software system's fault content prior to test, or to discriminate between components that are fault-prone and those that are not. The results of these methods can be used to: 1) More accurately focus scarce fault identification resources on those portions of a software system most in need of it. 2) Estimate and forecast the risk of exposure to residual faults in a software system during operation, and develop risk and safety criteria to guide the release of a software system to fielded use. 3) Estimate the efficiency of test suites in detecting residual faults. 4) Estimate the stability of the software maintenance process.

  15. Fault-tolerant software - Experiment with the sift operating system. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, J. E.; Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted in the NASA Avionics Integrated Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) to investigate the implementation of fault-tolerant software techniques on fault-tolerant computer architectures, in particular the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) computer. The N-version programming and recovery block techniques were implemented on a portion of the SIFT operating system. The results indicate that, to effectively implement fault-tolerant software design techniques, system requirements will be impacted and suggest that retrofitting fault-tolerant software on existing designs will be inefficient and may require system modification.

  16. Implementing team based learning in large classes: nurse educators' experiences.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Elizabeth Ann; Strumpel, Charlene; Fensom, Irene; Andrews, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an interactive teaching method promoted as an alternative to traditional lectures. TBL was implemented in four large second year classes in a baccalaureate nursing program but the implementation process was found to require much more effort than indicated in the literature. A predominant theme during the implementation phase was the importance of collegial support. Faculty workload increased significantly and they were challenged by occasional student confrontations and technological difficulties. The benefits for students included reduced attrition, reading workloads, and enhanced preparedness for classes, which allowed for more time to be spent in class discussing complex realistic nursing problems. Although TBL was not enthusiastically embraced by all of the students, the majority indicated that they liked and valued TBL, hence commitment to continuing to teach using the TBL method remains. PMID:22499709

  17. The Impact of Cultural Differences in Temporal Perception on Global Software Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Richard William

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation investigated the impact of cultural differences in temporal perception on globally dispersed software development teams. Literature and anecdotal evidence suggest that these temporal differences affect individual communication quality, which in turn will affect individual satisfaction and trust within global teams. Additionally,…

  18. Assessment Models and Software Support for Assistive Technology Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Len; Sanche, Bob

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews requirements for considering the need for assistive technology (AT) services within the Individualized Education Program process and highlights the importance of collaborative teamwork. Current AT models are described, along with the AT Co-Planner. The use of a software version of the model is discussed. (Contains references.)…

  19. A Botanical Garden Data Base Implemented in SAS Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Edward A.; Lewis, Bruce R.

    1985-01-01

    A database had been developed for the Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden's Living Plant Collection using Statistical Analysis System software. Implementation procedures, data dictionary maintenance, data entry, updating, and reporting are described. (JN)

  20. Panel: Practical Issues in Implementing Software Reliability Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, A.; Everett, B.; Munson, J.; Musa, J.; Schneidewind, N.; Vouk, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many ways of estimating software systems' reliability, or reliability-related quantities, have been developed over the past several years. In this panel, we discuss practical issues to be addressed in implementing software reliabilty measurement techniques in a production development environment.

  1. Implementing Wiki Software for Supplementing Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Sheung On; Ng, Kwok Chi

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which investigates the implementation of a wiki system as an additional tool to support student learning in an IT related course offered by the Open University of Hong Kong (OUHK). It focuses on a set of interview data related to the tutors' and students' views on and experience of their use or otherwise of the system…

  2. Proposed Department of Defense software metrics implementation plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fife, Dennis W.; Popelas, Judy M.; Springsteen, Beth

    1994-09-01

    This report presents a proposed plan for DOD implementation of software metrics in support of acquisition reform and improved software risk management. The report documents the concluding phase of a one-year task to assess software metrics and to determine how to improve their use in software acquisition, particularly of weapon system software. An earlier effort surveyed the state of development and use of software metrics in industry and defense organizations. This survey found (1) that industry is strongly committed to using software metrics in a corporate-wide approach to gain marketplace advantages, and (2) that defense contractors exhibit a state of evolution in metrics use that is comparable to that of strictly commercial companies, if not more mature. The overall vision of the proposed plan is to establish a department-wide, bottom-to-top corporate approach for collecting and using software metrics to improve analysis and decision-making in software acquisition and risk management. Acquisition reform and the need for improved risk management should provide more specific goals to address under this vision, comparable to industry's goals of marketplace benefits from using software metrics. The plan is framed as eight specific recommendations, including a list of future research and development work that would support their implementation.

  3. Designing and implementation of STB SOPCA's software modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yanjun; Zhong, Yuzhuo; Yang, Shi-Qiang

    2000-12-01

    The hardware resource limit and real time need have made it difficult to design embedded multimedia terminal's software. We have designed and implemented a device's software system. This device is a set-top box called SOPCA that can receive and play digital TV programs. In designing SOPCA's software modules, we bring forward a scheduling method based on tasks. Each self_governed function is implemented in one task. And all SOPCA's functions are achieved via these task cells' coordination. This method boosts up system's modularity, scalability and transplantability. It has some significance for other embedded systems' designing.

  4. Software-implemented fault insertion: An FTMP example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeck, Edward W.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.; Segall, Zary Z.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a model for fault insertion through software; describes its implementation on a fault-tolerant computer, FTMP; presents a summary of fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration data collected with software-implemented fault insertion; and compares the results to hardware fault insertion data. Experimental results show detection time to be a function of time of insertion and system workload. For the fault detection time, there is no correlation between software-inserted faults and hardware-inserted faults; this is because hardware-inserted faults must manifest as errors before detection, whereas software-inserted faults immediately exercise the error detection mechanisms. In summary, the software-implemented fault insertion is able to be used as an evaluation technique for the fault-handling capabilities of a system in fault detection, identification and recovery. Although the software-inserted faults do not map directly to hardware-inserted faults, experiments show software-implemented fault insertion is capable of emulating hardware fault insertion, with greater ease and automation.

  5. Lessons Learned Implementing Multi-Mission Sequencing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, Laura M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the software and its uses to provide context for its criticality. The different approaches that have been taken to implement the software in a multi-mission format will be outlined. The advantages and disadvantages as well as the lessons learned during development and maintenance of these different architectures will be discussed, Finally. the use of multi-mission software in operations and the lessons learned from using it will be discussed.This paper will provide valuable information to organizations exploring the use of multi-mission software. regardless of whether the change is to minimize spacecraft ground software development time or cost reduction. Similarly. the paper will provide insight into some of the steps that can be taken during software development and operational use that will minimize difficulty later.

  6. Implementing Interdisciplinary Teams Does Not Necessarily Improve Primary Care Practice Climate.

    PubMed

    Grace, Sherry M; Rich, Jeremy; Chin, William; Rodriguez, Hector P

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of successfully implementing interdisciplinary care team approaches in primary care has challenged many delivery system stakeholders. One-year changes in clinicians' and staff experiences of practice climate among 5 practices implementing interdisciplinary primary care teams and 28 other practices were compared. In adjusted analyses, practices implementing care teams reported improved team structure (78.0 in 2011 vs 79.3 in 2012), team functioning (75.7 vs 77.7), readiness for change (77.6 vs 77.7), and perceptions of skills and knowledge (48.0 vs 53.6) over time. However, the improvements were not significantly different from changes experienced by other practices. Achieving improvements in practice climate through care team redesign is challenging, even with structured learning opportunities for team members. Practice climate did not deteriorate over time, indicating that implementing a complex team redesign does not harm working relationships of frontline clinicians and staff. PMID:25214648

  7. Implementing personalisation in integrated mental health teams in England.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sarah; Manthorpe, Jill; Szymczynska, Paulina; Clewett, Naomi; Larsen, John; Pinfold, Vanessa; Tew, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how role boundaries and professional priorities in integrated mental health teams have impacted on the implementation of personalised approaches to social care support. We focus on the use of personal budgets to meet mental health-related social care needs as a key mechanism for personalised care. Drawing on 28 qualitative interviews with mental health practitioners from three local authorities in England undertaken in 2013, we report nurses', social workers', and occupational therapists' attitudes towards, and engagement with, personal budgets. Professional boundaries and competing priorities heavily influenced the extent to which personal budgets were perceived as a legitimate part of their roles. Across different professional groups, a sense emerged that personal budgets should be somebody else's job. A focus on attention to treatment, stability, and risk management often resulted in low prioritisation of personal budgets and led practitioners to avoid recommending them or to exclude service users from the process as a way to save time. Implications of the dominant medical model and the protection of traditional professional roles for the implementation of new, person-centred models of practice are discussed. PMID:26171867

  8. Implementation of team training in medical education in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, H T; Østergaard, D; Lippert, A

    2008-10-01

    In the field of medicine, team training aiming at improving team skills such as leadership, communication, co-operation, and followership at the individual and the team level seems to reduce risk of serious events and therefore increase patient safety. The preferred educational method for this type of training is simulation. Team training is not, however, used routinely in the hospital. In this paper, we describe a framework for the development of a team training course based on need assessment, learning objectives, educational methods including full-scale simulation and evaluations strategies. The use of this framework is illustrated by the present multiprofessional team training in advanced cardiac life support, trauma team training and neonatal resuscitation in Denmark. The challenges of addressing all aspects of team skills, the education of the facilitators, and establishment of evaluation strategies to document the effect of the different types of training on patient safety are discussed. PMID:19017834

  9. Implementation of team training in medical education in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, H T; Østergaard, D; Lippert, A

    2004-10-01

    In the field of medicine, team training aiming at improving team skills such as leadership, communication, co-operation, and followership at the individual and the team level seems to reduce risk of serious events and therefore increase patient safety. The preferred educational method for this type of training is simulation. Team training is not, however, used routinely in the hospital. In this paper, we describe a framework for the development of a team training course based on need assessment, learning objectives, educational methods including full-scale simulation and evaluations strategies. The use of this framework is illustrated by the present multiprofessional team training in advanced cardiac life support, trauma team training and neonatal resuscitation in Denmark. The challenges of addressing all aspects of team skills, the education of the facilitators, and establishment of evaluation strategies to document the effect of the different types of training on patient safety are discussed. PMID:15465962

  10. Improving Video Game Development: Facilitating Heterogeneous Team Collaboration through Flexible Software Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Juergen; Schweda, Angelika; Winkler, Dietmar; Biffl, Stefan

    Based on our observations of Austrian video game software development (VGSD) practices we identified a lack of systematic processes/method support and inefficient collaboration between various involved disciplines, i.e. engineers and artists. VGSD includes heterogeneous disciplines, e.g. creative arts, game/content design, and software. Nevertheless, improving team collaboration and process support is an ongoing challenge to enable a comprehensive view on game development projects. Lessons learned from software engineering practices can help game developers to increase game development processes within a heterogeneous environment. Based on a state of the practice survey in the Austrian games industry, this paper presents (a) first results with focus on process/method support and (b) suggests a candidate flexible process approach based on Scrum to improve VGSD and team collaboration. Results showed (a) a trend to highly flexible software processes involving various disciplines and (b) identified the suggested flexible process approach as feasible and useful for project application.

  11. Streamlining Software Aspects of Certification: Technical Team Report on the First Industry Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Holloway, C. Michael; Knight, John C.; Leveson, Nancy G.; Yang, Jeffrey C.; Dorsey, Cheryl A.; McCormick, G. Frank

    1998-01-01

    To address concerns about time and expense associated with software aspects of certification, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) began the Streamlining Software Aspects of Certification (SSAC) program. As part of this program, a Technical Team was established to determine whether the cost and time associated with certifying aircraft can be reduced while maintaining or improving safety, with the intent of impacting the FAA's Flight 2000 program. The Technical Team conducted a workshop to gain a better understanding of the major concerns in industry about software cost and schedule. Over 120 people attended the workshop, including representatives from the FAA,commercial transport and general aviation aircraft manufacturers and suppliers, and procurers and developers of non-airborne systems; and, more than 200 issues about software aspects of certification were recorded. This paper provides an overview of the SSAC program, motivation for the workshop, details of the workshop activities and outcomes, and recommendations for follow-on work.

  12. Simplifying applications software for vision guided robot implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncheon, Charlie

    1994-01-01

    A simple approach to robot applications software is described. The idea is to use commercially available software and hardware wherever possible to minimize system costs, schedules and risks. The U.S. has been slow in the adaptation of robots and flexible automation compared to the fluorishing growth of robot implementation in Japan. The U.S. can benefit from this approach because of a more flexible array of vision guided robot technologies.

  13. Implementation and Testing of VLBI Software Correlation at the USNO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fey, Alan; Ojha, Roopesh; Boboltz, Dave; Geiger, Nicole; Kingham, Kerry; Hall, David; Gaume, Ralph; Johnston, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The Washington Correlator (WACO) at the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) is a dedicated VLBI processor based on dedicated hardware of ASIC design. The WACO is currently over 10 years old and is nearing the end of its expected lifetime. Plans for implementation and testing of software correlation at the USNO are currently being considered. The VLBI correlation process is, by its very nature, well suited to a parallelized computing environment. Commercial off-the-shelf computer hardware has advanced in processing power to the point where software correlation is now both economically and technologically feasible. The advantages of software correlation are manifold but include flexibility, scalability, and easy adaptability to changing environments and requirements. We discuss our experience with and plans for use of software correlation at USNO with emphasis on the use of the DiFX software correlator.

  14. Software Implemented Fault-Tolerant (SIFT) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. F., Jr.; Palumbo, D. L.; Baltrus, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Program development for a Software Implemented Fault Tolerant (SIFT) computer system is accomplished in the NASA LaRC AIRLAB facility using a DEC VAX-11 to interface with eight Bendix BDX 930 flight control processors. The interface software which provides this SIFT program development capability was developed by AIRLAB personnel. This technical memorandum describes the application and design of this software in detail, and is intended to assist both the user in performance of SIFT research and the systems programmer responsible for maintaining and/or upgrading the SIFT programming environment.

  15. Effective organizational solutions for implementation of DBMS software packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D.

    1984-01-01

    The space telescope management information system development effort is a guideline for discussing effective organizational solutions used in implementing DBMS software. Focus is on the importance of strategic planning. The value of constructing an information system architecture to conform to the organization's managerial needs, the need for a senior decision maker, dealing with shifting user requirements, and the establishment of a reliable working relationship with the DBMS vendor are examined. Requirements for a schedule to demonstrate progress against a defined timeline and the importance of continued monitoring for production software control, production data control, and software enhancements are also discussed.

  16. Statistical Software Development as an Example of a Citizen Sky Participant Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, Arne A.; Benn, D.; Beck, S.; Price, A.; Turner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of authentic science by most people cannot be realized by simply posing a problem and collecting data. Communities of practice are an important element of modern science where discoveries are rarely the result of a single person experiencing an "Eureka!" moment. A core feature of the Citizen Sky project is the development and support of teams of participants with different, yet complimentary skill sets who work together towards a common goal. It is within these teams where the aspect of scientific inquiry really becomes accessible. By working with and debating with other team members (which remains consistent over time), a real community can form - much like those of a real, modern scientific project. Each team has a team leader and a professional assigned to act as an advisor. We present a short history, some early products and lessons learned from our first pilot team. This team is developing an open-source, high-end statistical analysis software package that will be used by other members of the Citizen Sky project. It will also be available to the general astronomical community interested in time series data analysis. Other team projects will also be described.

  17. Group Maintenance Behaviors of Core and Peripherial Members of Free/Libre Open Source Software Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scialdone, Michael J.; Li, Na; Heckman, Robert; Crowston, Kevin

    Group Maintenance is pro-social, discretionary, and relation-building behavior that occurs between members of groups in order to maintain reciprocal trust and cooperation. This paper considers how Free/libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) teams demonstrate such behaviors within the context of e-mail, as this is the primary medium through which such teams communicate. We compare group maintenance behaviors between both core and peripheral members of these groups, as well as behaviors between a group that remains producing software today and one which has since dissolved. Our findings indicate that negative politeness tactics (those which show respect for the autonomy of others) may be the most instrumental group maintenance behaviors that contribute to a FLOSS group’s ability to survive and continue software production.

  18. The Implementation of Computer Data Processing Software for EAST NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Chundong; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Yuanzhe; Wu, Deyun; Cui, Qinglong

    2014-10-01

    One of the most important project missions of neutral beam injectors is the implementation of 100 s neutral beam injection (NBI) with high power energy to the plasma of the EAST superconducting tokamak. Correspondingly, it's necessary to construct a high-speed and reliable computer data processing system for processing experimental data, such as data acquisition, data compression and storage, data decompression and query, as well as data analysis. The implementation of computer data processing application software (CDPS) for EAST NBI is presented in this paper in terms of its functional structure and system realization. The set of software is programmed in C language and runs on Linux operating system based on TCP network protocol and multi-threading technology. The hardware mainly includes industrial control computer (IPC), data server, PXI DAQ cards and so on. Now this software has been applied to EAST NBI system, and experimental results show that the CDPS can serve EAST NBI very well.

  19. Transitions in Classroom Technology: Instructor Implementation of Classroom Management Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, David; Chung, Christina; Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The authors look at how business instructor needs are fulfilled by classroom management software (CMS), such as Moodle, and why instructors are sometimes slow to implement it. Instructors at different universities provided both qualitative and quantitative responses regarding their use of CMS. The results indicate that the top needs fulfilled by…

  20. High-reliability teams and situation awareness: implementing a hospital emergency incident command system.

    PubMed

    Autrey, Pamela; Moss, Jacqueline

    2006-02-01

    To enhance disaster preparedness, hospitals are beginning to implement the Hospital Emergency Incident Command System. Although Hospital Emergency Incident Command System provides a template for disaster preparation, its successful implementation requires an understanding of situation awareness (SA) and high-reliability teams. The authors present the concept of SA and how this concept relates to team reliability in dynamic environments. Then strategies for increasing SA and team reliability through education, training, and improved communication systems are discussed. PMID:16528147

  1. Implementing the Team Approach in Higher Education: Important Questions and Advice for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, Tracy M.; Hughey, Aaron W.

    2008-01-01

    Many companies have implemented the team approach as a way to empower their employees in an effort to enhance productivity, quality and overall profitability. While application of the concept to higher education administration has been limited, colleges and universities could benefit from the team approach if implemented appropriately and…

  2. Case of the Mathematics Team: Implementing a Team Model for Simultaneous Renewal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.; Scott, Michael B.; Hancock, Melisa

    2007-01-01

    Simultaneous renewal in teacher education is based on the notion that improvement at 1 level requires improvement at all levels and that all stakeholders are responsible for such improvement. The authors discuss the creation and impact of a mathematics team as a vehicle for simultaneous renewal by using the team model for simultaneous renewal for…

  3. Implementing Kanban for agile process management within the ALMA Software Operations Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reveco, Johnny; Mora, Matias; Shen, Tzu-Chiang; Soto, Ruben; Sepulveda, Jorge; Ibsen, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    After the inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Software Operations Group in Chile has refocused its objectives to: (1) providing software support to tasks related to System Integration, Scientific Commissioning and Verification, as well as Early Science observations; (2) testing the remaining software features, still under development by the Integrated Computing Team across the world; and (3) designing and developing processes to optimize and increase the level of automation of operational tasks. Due to their different stakeholders, each of these tasks presents a wide diversity of importances, lifespans and complexities. Aiming to provide the proper priority and traceability for every task without stressing our engineers, we introduced the Kanban methodology in our processes in order to balance the demand on the team against the throughput of the delivered work. The aim of this paper is to share experiences gained during the implementation of Kanban in our processes, describing the difficulties we have found, solutions and adaptations that led us to our current but still evolving implementation, which has greatly improved our throughput, prioritization and problem traceability.

  4. Team Faces Tough Odds to Implement New Phone Network | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    It was a Saturday, in the final stretch of winter in late February, and the temperature peaked to a pleasant 66 degrees. Many people were outside enjoying the spring-like weather; however, the Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Deployment Team was hard at work at Industry Lane. The team of 10 was installing the new voice-only network, including deploying 145 phones, switching and testing the 911 feature, connecting wall mounts, and verifying each phone... Read more

  5. Team Faces Tough Odds to Implement New Phone Network | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    It was a Saturday, in the final stretch of winter in late February, and the temperature peaked to a pleasant 66 degrees. Many people were outside enjoying the spring-like weather; however, the Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Deployment Team was hard at work at Industry Lane. The team of 10 was installing the new voice-only network, including deploying 145 phones, switching and testing the 911 feature, connecting wall mounts, and verifying each phone... Read more

  6. Best Practices for Implementing Team-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Brigitte L.; Franks, Andrea S.; Pater, Karen S.; Medina, Melissa S.; Persky, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and schools of pharmacy are incorporating more team-based learning (TBL) into their curriculum. Published resources are available to assist instructors with implementing TBL and describing it in the health professions literature. The 7 core elements include: team formation, readiness assurance, immediate feedback, sequencing of in-class problem solving, the 4 “S” structure for developing team application exercises (significant problem, same problem, specific answer choice, simultaneous reporting), incentive structure, and peer evaluation. This paper summarizes best practices related to implementation of TBL in pharmacy education, including courses taught using teaching teams. PMID:24159218

  7. Design and implementation of the mobility assessment tool: software description

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In previous work, we described the development of an 81-item video-animated tool for assessing mobility. In response to criticism levied during a pilot study of this tool, we sought to develop a new version built upon a flexible framework for designing and administering the instrument. Results Rather than constructing a self-contained software application with a hard-coded instrument, we designed an XML schema capable of describing a variety of psychometric instruments. The new version of our video-animated assessment tool was then defined fully within the context of a compliant XML document. Two software applications—one built in Java, the other in Objective-C for the Apple iPad—were then built that could present the instrument described in the XML document and collect participants’ responses. Separating the instrument’s definition from the software application implementing it allowed for rapid iteration and easy, reliable definition of variations. Conclusions Defining instruments in a software-independent XML document simplifies the process of defining instruments and variations and allows a single instrument to be deployed on as many platforms as there are software applications capable of interpreting the instrument, thereby broadening the potential target audience for the instrument. Continued work will be done to further specify and refine this type of instrument specification with a focus on spurring adoption by researchers in gerontology and geriatric medicine. PMID:23879716

  8. Implementing Self-Directed Work Teams at a College Newspaper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pillis, Emmeline; Parsons, Blake

    2013-01-01

    The problem: Motivating and retaining staff had become an ongoing problem at the student newspaper. Student staffers would quit abruptly when overwhelmed or dissatisfied, leaving the newspaper with critical positions vacant. This affected the performance of the newspaper. Method: The newspaper was organized into self directed work teams (SDWTs).…

  9. Circles of Care: Implementation and Evaluation of Support Teams for African Americans with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Laura C.; Green, Melissa A.; Hayes, Michelle; Diehl, Sandra J.; Warnock, Steven; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Lin, Feng-Chang; Earp, Jo Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Community-based peer support may help meet the practical, emotional, and spiritual needs of African Americans with advanced cancer. Support teams are a unique model of peer support for persons facing serious illness, but research is rare. This study sought to (a) implement new volunteer support teams for African Americans with advanced…

  10. How team-based reflection affects quality improvement implementation: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Eric K; Howard, Jenna; Etz, Rebecca S; Hudson, Shawna V; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) interventions in health care organizations have produced mixed results with significant questions remaining about how QI interventions are implemented. Team-based reflection may be an important element for understanding QI implementation. Extensive research has focused on individual benefits of reflection including links between reflection, learning, and change. There are currently no published studies that explore how team-based reflection impact QI interventions. We selected 4 primary care practices participating in a QI trial that used a facilitated, team-based approach to improve colorectal cancer screening rates. Trained facilitators met with a team of practice members for up to eleven 1-hour meetings. Data include audio-recorded team meetings and associated fieldnotes. We used a template approach to code transcribed data and an immersion/crystallization technique to identify patterns and themes. Three types of team-based reflection and how each mattered for QI implementation were identified: organizational reflection promoted buy-in, motivation, and feelings of inspiration; process reflection enhanced team problem solving and change management; and relational reflection enhanced discussions of relational dynamics necessary to implement desired QI changes. If QI interventions seek to make changes where collaboration and coordination of care is required, then deliberately integrating team-based reflection into interventions can provide opportunities to facilitate change processes. PMID:22453821

  11. How Team-Based Reflection Affects Quality Improvement Implementation: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Eric K.; Howard, Jenna; Etz, Rebecca S.; Hudson, Shawna V.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) interventions in health care organizations have produced mixed results with significant questions remaining about how QI interventions are implemented. Team-based reflection may be an important element for understanding QI implementation. Extensive research has focused on individual benefits of reflection including links between reflection, learning, and change. There are currently no published studies that explore how team-based reflection impact QI interventions. We selected 4 primary care practices participating in a QI trial that used a facilitated, team-based approach to improve colorectal cancer screening rates. Trained facilitators met with a team of practice members for up to eleven 1-hour meetings. Data include audio-recorded team meetings and associated fieldnotes. We used a template approach to code transcribed data and an immersion/crystallization technique to identify patterns and themes. Three types of team-based reflection and how each mattered for QI implementation were identified: organizational reflection promoted buy-in, motivation, and feelings of inspiration; process reflection enhanced team problem solving and change management; and relational reflection enhanced discussions of relational dynamics necessary to implement desired QI changes. If QI interventions seek to make changes where collaboration and coordination of care is required, then deliberately integrating team-based reflection into interventions can provide opportunities to facilitate change processes. PMID:22453821

  12. Ripple Effect: Communication of Planning Team Decisions to Program Implementers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Roland K.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This paper explores how placement decisions are communicated to the teachers and support personnel who are responsible for implementing students' special education programs. The results are discussed in the context of whether the messages provided to program implementers were consistent and clear. (Author)

  13. Perspectives on a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Implementation of Planned Emergent Use Research

    PubMed Central

    Racedo Africano, Carlos J.; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Smischney, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the viewpoints of three members of a research team, on the approach to teamwork in the development of an emergent use clinical trial when dealing with diversity of opinions, in order to facilitate stakeholder buy-in. We also discuss a specific approach to the coordination of the team members, which in our opinion had a positive impact on the implementation of the project. We also comment on the influence of the team organization in the timeline and completion of a clinical trial. We hope to start a conversation on team dynamics in the design of clinical trials, especially in the context of emergent use research. PMID:26386913

  14. Relating Communications Mode Choice and Teamwork Quality: Conversational versus Textual Communication in IT System and Software Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James Robert

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explored how IT system and software development team members communicated in the workplace and whether teams that used more verbal communication (and less text-based communication) experienced higher levels of collaboration as measured using the Teamwork Quality (TWQ) scale. Although computer-mediated communication tools…

  15. Implementation of PMSM speed control software based on CAN bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenlun; Chen, Bei; He, Yuyao

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the driver's hardware structure based on TMS320F28335 is introduced, the control software flow of host computer based on CAN bus is designed, the rule of CAN communication protocol is fulfilled and accordingly the hybrid programming is realized in the background of low speed and large sinusoid operation. This system can realize the CAN communication setting, download the PID parameters to DSP, operate at constant rotate speed and at given large sinusoid rotate speed. Meanwhile the dynamical monitoring and alarm are implemented. Finally the real-time display and storage of measured current, voltage and rotate speed are completed well.

  16. Cognon Neural Model Software Verification and Hardware Implementation Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro Negre, Pau

    Little is known yet about how the brain can recognize arbitrary sensory patterns within milliseconds using neural spikes to communicate information between neurons. In a typical brain there are several layers of neurons, with each neuron axon connecting to ˜104 synapses of neurons in an adjacent layer. The information necessary for cognition is contained in theses synapses, which strengthen during the learning phase in response to newly presented spike patterns. Continuing on the model proposed in "Models for Neural Spike Computation and Cognition" by David H. Staelin and Carl H. Staelin, this study seeks to understand cognition from an information theoretic perspective and develop potential models for artificial implementation of cognition based on neuronal models. To do so we focus on the mathematical properties and limitations of spike-based cognition consistent with existing neurological observations. We validate the cognon model through software simulation and develop concepts for an optical hardware implementation of a network of artificial neural cognons.

  17. Media Implementation Through Teamed Supervision. Evaluation: Title Three, ESEA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman Local School District, Youngstown, OH.

    The procedures and techniques developed to evaluate a project to implement media in elementary schools are discussed. To describe the decision-making setting, two necessary conditions--understanding (high or low) and amount of change (large or small)--were paired against each other resulting in four possible evaluation settings. The situation in…

  18. Interactive multicentre teleconferences using open source software in a team of thoracic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Junichi; Katoh, Daishiro; Nishimura, Motohiro; Yanada, Masashi; Okada, Satoru; Ishihara, Shunta; Ichise, Kaori

    2012-12-01

    Real-time consultation between a team of thoracic surgeons is important for the management of difficult cases. We established a system for interactive teleconsultation between multiple sites, based on open-source software. The graphical desktop-sharing system VNC (virtual network computing) was used for remotely controlling another computer. An image-processing package (OsiriX) was installed on the server to share the medical images. We set up a voice communication system using Voice Chatter, a free, cross-platform voice communication application. Four hospitals participated in the trials. One was connected by gigabit ethernet, one by WiMAX and one by ADSL. Surgeons at three of the sites found that it was comfortable to view images and consult with each other using the teleconferencing system. However, it was not comfortable using the client that connected via WiMAX, because of dropped frames. Apart from the WiMAX connection, the VNC-based screen-sharing system transferred the clinical images efficiently and in real time. We found the screen-sharing software VNC to be a good application for medical image interpretation, especially for a team of thoracic surgeons using multislice CT scans. PMID:23209271

  19. Using Performance Feedback to Enhance Implementation Fidelity of the Problem-Solving Team Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Peters, Rebecca; Noell, George H.

    2008-01-01

    Implementation integrity is a potentially critical issue for problem-solving teams (PST) and most response-to-intervention models. The current study hypothesized that providing performance feedback, which has consistently been shown to increase implementation integrity, to PSTs would enhance the procedural integrity of the process. The PSTs for…

  20. Impact of School Based Leadership Teams for Implementing a Successful Professional Development Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Stuart; Yager, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the depth of implementation of a professional development initiative. In one group, the school based leadership team was provided specialized coaching to support and monitor the implementation of the initiative. In the other group, no assistance was provided. Results indicate that the coaching of a school-based leadership…

  1. Designing and implementing customer-focused functional support teams

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.O.; Cejka, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    The contract services department of a U.S. Department of Energy research laboratory is radically revising how it serves its primary customers--the laboratory research and development staff. The department provides services that include contract research initiation (proposal preparation and contract negotiation) and acquisition of goods and services to support specific research projects. It previously provided these services with approximately 170 staff in four centralized functional units. In reorganizing, the department used a structured analysis and design process to categorize internal customers according to their unique attributes and specific support needs. Concurrently, it identified a number of conceptually distinct customer-focused units that could accomplish the contract processes in different ways and then chose a preferred concept for each customer category. The organizational concepts were designed to enhance customer service and improve staff morale and development opportunities. The new organization will have a total of 10 customer support units as well as other centralized services and activities. It will flatten the organizational structures and encourage more cooperation among contracts staff to meet customer needs for improved timeliness, communication, and teaming with researchers.

  2. Deliberation Makes a Difference: Preparation Strategies for TeamSTEPPS Implementation in Small and Rural Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Baloh, Jure; Ward, Marcia M; Stewart, Greg L

    2016-06-01

    Small and rural hospitals face special challenges to implement and sustain organization-wide quality improvement (QI) initiatives due to limited resources and infrastructures. We studied the implementation of TeamSTEPPS, a national QI initiative, in 14 critical access hospitals. Drawing on QI and organization development theories, we propose five strategic preparation steps for TeamSTEPPS: assess needs, reflect on the context, set goals, develop a shared understanding, and select change agents. We explore how hospitals' practices correspond to suggested best practices by analyzing qualitative data collected through quarterly interviews with key informants. We find that the level of deliberation was a key factor that differentiated hospitals' practices. Hospitals that were more deliberate in preparing for the five strategic steps were more likely to experience engagement, perceive efficacy, foresee and manage barriers, and achieve progress during implementation. We discuss potential steps that hospitals may take to better prepare for TeamSTEPPS implementation. PMID:26429835

  3. Implementation of an OAIS Repository Using Free, Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flathers, E.; Gessler, P. E.; Seamon, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) is a regional data repository located at the University of Idaho that focuses on the collection, curation, and distribution of research data. To support our home institution and others in the region, we offer services to researchers at all stages of the data lifecycle—from grant application and data management planning to data distribution and archive. In this role, we recognize the need to work closely with other data management efforts at partner institutions and agencies, as well as with larger aggregation efforts such as our state geospatial data clearinghouses, data.gov, DataONE, and others. In the past, one of our challenges with monolithic, prepackaged data management solutions is that customization can be difficult to implement and maintain, especially as new versions of the software are released that are incompatible with our local codebase. Our solution is to break the monolith up into its constituent parts, which offers us several advantages. First, any customizations that we make are likely to fall into areas that can be accessed through Application Program Interfaces (API) that are likely to remain stable over time, so our code stays compatible. Second, as components become obsolete or insufficient to meet new demands that arise, we can replace the individual components with minimal effect on the rest of the infrastructure, causing less disruption to operations. Other advantages include increased system reliability, staggered rollout of new features, enhanced compatibility with legacy systems, reduced dependence on a single software company as a point of failure, and the separation of development into manageable tasks. In this presentation, we describe our application of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) design paradigm to assemble a data repository that conforms to the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model primarily using a collection of free and open-source software. We detail the design

  4. On software implementation of reliability of unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Arati M.; Saab, Kassem; Singh, Harpreet; Mustapha, Adam; Gerhart, Grant R.

    2009-05-01

    Critical role of unmanned intelligent ground vehicles is evident from variety of defense applications. Fuzzy Reliability predicts reliability of the convoy of unmanned vehicles represented as a communication network with nodes as vehicle station and branches as path between the stations. Fuzzy Reliability affirms the performance of the system. Fuzzy reliability of a convoy of vehicles is the result of Fuzzy and Boolean approaches. The node and branch reliability is calculated using the Fuzzy approach. The terminal reliability is calculated using Boolean algebra. Software implementation of the fuzzy reliability is successfully done. To improve the performance evaluation of the convoy, node failure i.e. failure of convoy station is also taken into consideration. Depending upon the reliability predicted a commander can take appropriate decision in the battlefield. Proposed algorithm determines all paths from source to destination and Boolean expressions are formed. A non-overlapping simplification is obtained and further transformed into mathematical expression, where reliability values are substituted. The results of design, implementation and simulation of the reliability of convoy of unmanned vehicles are given. It is hoped that the proposed algorithm and its implementation will be useful for sensor network in general and graph of unmanned vehicles in particular.

  5. [Practical aspects of implementation quality management system ISO 9001:2000 by hospital infection control team].

    PubMed

    Kuziemski, Arkadiusz; Czerniak, Beata; Frankowska, Krystyna; Gonia, Ewa; Salińska, Teresa; Motuk, Andrzej; Sobociński, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the Board of the Jan Biziel Hospital in Bydgoszcz decided to include procedures of health services in the implementation process within the confines of ISO 9001:2000 certification. The hospital infection control team that has operated in the hospital since 1989 performed the analysis of the forms of activities to date and on that basis the team prepared original plan of quality management. In April 2007, this plan was successfully accepted by the certifying team. The aim of this study is to present the aforementioned plan which is the result of 18 years experience of the team. At the same time, I hope that this study will be very helpful for all professionals interested in hospital epidemiology, especially in the context of implementing quality management systems. PMID:19899608

  6. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Angela L.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover rates did not change over time. Most ACT staff turnover rates were comparable or better than other turnover rates reported in the mental health and substance abuse literature. PMID:20012481

  7. MeqTrees: Software package for implementing Measurement Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordam, Jan E.; Smirnov, Oleg M.

    2012-09-01

    MeqTrees is a software package for implementing Measurement Equations. This makes it uniquely suited for simulation and calibration of radioastronomical data, especially that involving new radiotelescopes and observational regimes. MeqTrees is implemented as a Python-based front-end called the meqbrowser, and an efficient (C++-based) computational back-end called the meqserver. Numerical models are defined on the front-end via a Python-based Tree Definition Language (TDL), then rapidly executed on the back-end. The use of TDL facilitates an extremely short turn-around time for experimentation with new ideas. This is also helped by unprecedented visualization capabilities for all final and intermediate results. A flexible data model and a number of important optimizations in the back-end ensures that the numerical performance is comparable to that of hand-written code. MeqTrees includes a highly capable FITS viewer and sky model manager called Tigger, which can also work as a standalone tool.

  8. Spacelab user implementation assessment study. (Software requirements analysis). Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The engineering analyses and evaluation studies conducted for the Software Requirements Analysis are discussed. Included are the development of the study data base, synthesis of implementation approaches for software required by both mandatory onboard computer services and command/control functions, and identification and implementation of software for ground processing activities.

  9. Effective Team Support: From Task and Cognitive Modeling to Software Agents for Time-Critical Complex Work Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie E.; Sycara, Katia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in completing a system for empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support a team's tasks, and in running experiments for the collection of baseline data.

  10. Joint working in community mental health teams: implementation of an integrated care pathway.

    PubMed

    Rees, Gwyneth; Huby, Guro; McDade, Lian; McKechnie, L

    2004-11-01

    Abstract Integration of community mental health services is a key policy objective that aims to increase quality and efficiency of care. Integrated care pathways (ICPs) are a mechanism designed to formalise multi-agency working at an operational level and are currently being applied to mental health services. Evidence regarding the impact of this tool to support joint working is mixed, and there is limited evidence regarding the suitability of ICPs for complex, community-based services. The present study was set in one primary care trust (PCT) in Scotland that is currently implementing an ICP for community mental health teams (CMHTs) across the region. The aim of the study was to investigate professionals' experiences and views on the implementation of an ICP within adult CMHTs in order to generate learning points for other organisations which are considering developing and implementing such systems. The study used qualitative methods which comprised of individual interviews with three CMHT leaders and two service development managers, as well as group interviews with members of four adult CMHTs. Data was analysed using the constant comparison method. Participants reported positive views regarding joint working and the role of an ICP in theory. However, in practice, teams were not implementing the ICP. Lack of integration at higher organisational levels was found to create conflicts within the teams which became explicit in response to the ICP. Implementation was also hindered by lack of resources for ongoing support, team development and change management. In conclusion, the study suggests that operational systems such as ICPs do not address and cannot overcome wider organisational barriers to integration of mental health services. Integrated care pathways need to be developed with strategic input as well as practitioner involvement and ownership. Team development, education about integration and change management are essential if ICPs are to foster and support

  11. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) : appraisal method for the implementation of the ASC software quality engineering practices: Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Jennifer; Minana, Molly A.

    2008-02-01

    This document provides a guide to the process of conducting software appraisals under the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) ASC Program. The goal of this document is to describe a common methodology for planning, conducting, and reporting results of software appraisals thereby enabling: development of an objective baseline on implementation of the software quality engineering (SQE) practices identified in the ASC Software Quality Plan across the ASC Program; feedback from project teams on SQE opportunities for improvement; identification of strengths and opportunities for improvement for individual project teams; guidance to the ASC Program on the focus of future SQE activities Document contents include process descriptions, templates to promote consistent conduct of appraisals, and an explanation of the relationship of this procedure to the SNL ASC software program.

  12. SIFT - Multiprocessor architecture for Software Implemented Fault Tolerance flight control and avionics computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, P.; Moses, K.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of a SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) Flight Control Computer with emphasis on implementation is presented. A multiprocessor system that relies on software-implemented fault detection and reconfiguration algorithms is described. A high level reliability and fault tolerance is achieved by the replication of computing tasks among processing units.

  13. A supernova feedback implementation for the astrophysical simulation software Arepo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubel, André-Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Please see the current version (v2) on arXiv (https://arxiv.org/abs/1604.06071) This version is as submitted to the university for my master's degree. I might have worded my critique of Arepo a bit too harshly, and a significant amount of issues were already addressed since the original submission. I removed section 3.4 and most of the discussion in 4.1, as these sections may need rework and further objective underpinning. Supernova (SN) explosions play an important role in the development of galactic structures. The energy and momentum imparted on the interstellar medium (ISM) in so called "supernova feedback" drives turbulence, heats the gas, enriches it with heavy elements, can lead to the formation of new stars or even suppress star formation by disrupting stellar nurseries. In the numerical simulation at the sub-galactic level, not including the energy and momentum of supernovas in the physical description of the problem can also lead to several problems that might partially be resolved by including a description of supernovas. In this thesis such an implementation is attempted for the combined numerical hydrodynamics and N-body simulation software Arepo (Springel, 2010). In a stochastic process a large amount of thermal energy is imparted on a number of neighbouring cells, mimicking the effect of a supernova explosions. We test this approach by modelling the explosion of a single supernova in a uniform density medium and comparing the evolution of the resulting supernova remnant to the theoretically-predicted behaviour. We also run a simulation with our feedback code and a fixed supernova rate derived from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation (Kennicutt, 1998) for a duration of about 20 Myrs. We describe our method in detail in this text and discuss the properties of our implementation.

  14. Standard practices for the implementation of computer software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, A. P. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A standard approach to the development of computer program is provided that covers the file cycle of software development from the planning and requirements phase through the software acceptance testing phase. All documents necessary to provide the required visibility into the software life cycle process are discussed in detail.

  15. Implementing Team-Based Learning in Middle School Social Studies Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Kent, Shawn C.; Vaughn, Sharon; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Greg; Haynes, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of team-based learning (TBL) implemented in Grade 8 social studies classes on student content acquisition. Twenty-four classes were randomly assigned to treatment or comparison blocking on teacher. In the treatment classes teachers integrated TBL practices in the content instruction. The authors examined teacher…

  16. How Do Staff Perceive Schoolwide Positive Behavior Supports? Implications for Teams in Planning and Implementing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feuerborn, Laura L.; Tyre, Ashli D.

    2016-01-01

    Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) offers an alternative to reactive and exclusionary school discipline practices. However, the shift to SWPBS requires substantial change in the practices of staff, and many leadership teams struggle to rally staff support for implementation. With a more thorough understanding of staff perceptions, level…

  17. Implementing and Evaluating a Peer-Led Team Learning Approach in Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Kevin; Campisi, Jay

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how a Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) program was implemented in a first-year, undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology course sequence to examine the student perceptions of the program and determine the effects of PLTL on student performance.

  18. Software-Implemented Fault Tolerance in Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantenbein, Rex E.

    1994-01-01

    Software-implemented fault tolerance (SIFT) is used in many computer-based command, control, and communications (C(3)) systems to provide the nearly continuous availability that they require. In the communications subsystem of Space Station Alpha, SIFT algorithms are used to detect and recover from failures in the data and command link between the Station and its ground support. The paper presents a review of these algorithms and discusses how such techniques can be applied to similar systems found in applications such as manufacturing control, military communications, and programmable devices such as pacemakers. With support from the Tracking and Communication Division of NASA's Johnson Space Center, researchers at the University of Wyoming are developing a testbed for evaluating the effectiveness of these algorithms prior to their deployment. This testbed will be capable of simulating a variety of C(3) system failures and recording the response of the Space Station SIFT algorithms to these failures. The design of this testbed and the applicability of the approach in other environments is described.

  19. Design and implementation of embedded GPS navigation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhe; Li, Zhong-Hua; Zhu, Cai-Lian

    2004-06-01

    A navigation software, which provides positioning and navigation service based on GPS technique, is introduced. This software is designed and realized under the environment of the embedded operating system WindowsCE and can be widely applied to the systems such as ITS (intelligent transportation systems) and LBS (location based services).

  20. Evaluation of Multi-Age Team (MAT) Implementation at Crabapple Middle School: Report for 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Randy; Wisenbaker, Joseph

    In fall 1993, administrators and faculty at the Crabappple Middle School in Roswell, Georgia, implemented the Multi-Age Team (MAT) program, creating multi-age teams of sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students. The projects' main goal was to enhance self-esteem. Additional goals included implementation of interdisciplinary, thematic instruction;…

  1. Evaluation of Multi-Age Team (MAT): Implementation at Crabapple Middle School: Report for 1995-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Randy; Wisenbaker, Joseph

    In fall 1993, administrators and faculty at the Crabapple Middle School in Roswell, Georgia, implemented the Multi-Age Team (MAT) program, creating multiage teams of sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students. The project's main goal was to enhance self-esteem. Additional goals included implementation of interdisciplinary, thematic instruction;…

  2. A learning curve-based method to implement multifunctional work teams in the Brazilian footwear sector.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, L B de M; Anzanello, M J; Renner, J S

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a method for implementing multifunctional work teams in a footwear company that followed the Taylor/Ford system for decades. The suggested framework first applies a Learning Curve (LC) modeling to assess whether rotation between tasks of different complexities affects workers' learning rate and performance. Next, the Macroergonomic Work Analysis (MA) method (Guimarães, 1999, 2009) introduces multifunctional principles in work teams towards workers' training and resources improvement. When applied to a pilot line consisting of 100 workers, the intervention-reduced work related accidents in 80%, absenteeism in 45.65%, and eliminated work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), medical consultations, and turnover. Further, the output rate of the multifunctional team increased average 3% compared to the production rate of the regular lines following the Taylor/Ford system (with the same shoe model being manufactured), while the rework and spoilage rates were reduced 85% and 69%, respectively. PMID:21907970

  3. Implementation of the AES as a Hash Function for Confirming the Identity of Software on a Computer System

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Randy R.; Bass, Robert B.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Mileson, Nicholas D.

    2003-01-20

    This paper provides a brief overview of the implementation of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) as a hash function for confirming the identity of software resident on a computer system. The PNNL Software Authentication team chose to use a hash function to confirm software identity on a system for situations where: (1) there is limited time to perform the confirmation and (2) access to the system is restricted to keyboard or thumbwheel input and output can only be displayed on a monitor. PNNL reviewed three popular algorithms: the Secure Hash Algorithm - 1 (SHA-1), the Message Digest - 5 (MD-5), and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) and selected the AES to incorporate in software confirmation tool we developed. This paper gives a brief overview of the SHA-1, MD-5, and the AES and sites references for further detail. It then explains the overall processing steps of the AES to reduce a large amount of generic data-the plain text, such is present in memory and other data storage media in a computer system, to a small amount of data-the hash digest, which is a mathematically unique representation or signature of the former that could be displayed on a computer's monitor. This paper starts with a simple definition and example to illustrate the use of a hash function. It concludes with a description of how the software confirmation tool uses the hash function to confirm the identity of software on a computer system.

  4. Discovery Channel Telescope software component template and state design: principles and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Paul J.; Lacasse, Michael J.; Godwin, Ryan C.

    2012-09-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope is a 4.3m astronomical research telescope in northern Arizona constructed through a partnership between Discovery Communications and Lowell Observatory. The control software for the telescope and observatory systems consists of stand-alone, state-based components that respond to triggers (external signals or internal data changes). Component applications execute on Windows, real-time, and FPGA targets. The team has developed a template for a system component, the implementation of which has yielded large gains in productivity, robustness, and maintainability. These benefits follow from the dependence of the template on common, well-tested code, allowing a developer to focus on application-specific particulars unencumbered by details of infrastructure elements such as communication, and from the separation of concerns the architecture provides, ensuring that modifications are straightforward, separable, and consequently relatively safe. We describe a repeatable design process for developing a state machine design, and show how this translates directly into a concrete implementation utilizing several design patterns, illustrating this with examples from components of the functioning active optics system. We also present a refined top-level state machine design and rules for highly independent component interactions within and between hierarchies that we propose offer a general solution for large component-based control systems.

  5. Design study of Software-Implemented Fault-Tolerance (SIFT) computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wensley, J. H.; Goldberg, J.; Green, M. W.; Kutz, W. H.; Levitt, K. N.; Mills, M. E.; Shostak, R. E.; Whiting-Okeefe, P. M.; Zeidler, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    Software-implemented fault tolerant (SIFT) computer design for commercial aviation is reported. A SIFT design concept is addressed. Alternate strategies for physical implementation are considered. Hardware and software design correctness is addressed. System modeling and effectiveness evaluation are considered from a fault-tolerant point of view.

  6. Software environment for implementing engineering applications on MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, L. A.; Valimohamed, K. A.; Schiff, S.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the concept for a software environment for developing engineering application systems for multiprocessor hardware (MIMD) is presented. The philosophy employed is to solve the largest problems possible in a reasonable amount of time, rather than solve existing problems faster. In the proposed environment most of the problems concerning parallel computation and handling of large distributed data spaces are hidden from the application program developer, thereby facilitating the development of large-scale software applications. Applications developed under the environment can be executed on a variety of MIMD hardware; it protects the application software from the effects of a rapidly changing MIMD hardware technology.

  7. Executive system software design and expert system implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Cheryl L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: software requirements; design layout of the automated assembly system; menu display for automated composite command; expert system features; complete robot arm state diagram and logic; and expert system benefits.

  8. Implementation and Simulation Results using Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddock, Robert W.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Bowes, Angela; Prince, Jill L. H.; Powell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    An Autonomous Aerobraking software system is currently under development with support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) that would move typically ground-based operations functions to onboard an aerobraking spacecraft, reducing mission risk and mission cost. The suite of software that will enable autonomous aerobraking is the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) and consists of an ephemeris model, onboard atmosphere estimator, temperature and loads prediction, and a maneuver calculation. The software calculates the maneuver time, magnitude and direction commands to maintain the spacecraft periapsis parameters within design structural load and/or thermal constraints. The AADS is currently tested in simulations at Mars, with plans to also evaluate feasibility and performance at Venus and Titan.

  9. Development and implementation of software systems for imaging spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boardman, J.W.; Clark, R.N.; Mazer, A.S.; Biehl, L.L.; Kruse, F.A.; Torson, J.; Staenz, K.

    2006-01-01

    Specialized software systems have played a crucial role throughout the twenty-five year course of the development of the new technology of imaging spectroscopy, or hyperspectral remote sensing. By their very nature, hyperspectral data place unique and demanding requirements on the computer software used to visualize, analyze, process and interpret them. Often described as a marriage of the two technologies of reflectance spectroscopy and airborne/spaceborne remote sensing, imaging spectroscopy, in fact, produces data sets with unique qualities, unlike previous remote sensing or spectrometer data. Because of these unique spatial and spectral properties hyperspectral data are not readily processed or exploited with legacy software systems inherited from either of the two parent fields of study. This paper provides brief reviews of seven important software systems developed specifically for imaging spectroscopy.

  10. Multidisciplinary teams of case managers in the implementation of an innovative integrated services delivery for the elderly in France

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The case management process is now well defined, and teams of case managers have been implemented in integrated services delivery. However, little is known about the role played by the team of case managers and the value in having multidisciplinary case management teams. The objectives were to develop a fuller understanding of the role played by the case manager team and identify the value of inter-professional collaboration in multidisciplinary teams during the implementation of an innovative integrated service in France. Methods We conducted a qualitative study with focus groups comprising 14 multidisciplinary teams for a total of 59 case managers, six months after their recruitment to the MAIA program (Maison Autonomie Integration Alzheimer). Results Most of the case managers saw themselves as being part of a team of case managers (91.5%). Case management teams help case managers develop a comprehensive understanding of the integration concept, meet the complex needs of elderly people and change their professional practices. Multidisciplinary case management teams add value by helping case managers move from theory to practice, by encouraging them develop a comprehensive clinical vision, and by initiating the interdisciplinary approach. Conclusions The multidisciplinary team of case managers is central to the implementation of case management and helps case managers develop their new role and a core inter-professional competency. PMID:24708721

  11. A Software Implementation of a Satellite Interface Message Processor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastwood, Margaret A.; Eastwood, Lester F., Jr.

    A design for network control software for a computer network is described in which some nodes are linked by a communications satellite channel. It is assumed that the network has an ARPANET-like configuration; that is, that specialized processors at each node are responsible for message switching and network control. The purpose of the control…

  12. Outcomes of Patients with Intestinal Failure after the Development and Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Sabrina; Ahmed, Najma; Forget, Sylviane; Sant'Anna, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A multidisciplinary team was created in our institution to manage patients with intestinal failure (INFANT: INtestinal Failure Advanced Nutrition Team). We aimed to evaluate the impact of the implementation of the team on the outcomes of this patient population. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients with intestinal failure over a 6-year period was performed. Outcomes of patients followed up by INFANT (2010–2012) were compared to a historical cohort (2007–2009). Results. Twenty-eight patients with intestinal failure were followed up by INFANT while the historical cohort was formed by 27 patients. There was no difference between the groups regarding remaining length of small and large bowel, presence of ICV, or number of infants who reached full enteral feeds. Patients followed up by INFANT took longer to attain full enteral feeds and had longer duration of PN, probably reflecting more complex cases. Overall mortality (14.8%/7.1%) was lower than other centers, probably illustrating our population of “early” intestinal failure patients. Conclusions. Our data demonstrates that the creation and implementation of a multidisciplinary program in a tertiary center without an intestinal and liver transplant program can lead to improvement in many aspects of their care. PMID:27446876

  13. NSF Policies on Software and Data Sharing and their Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Since January 2011, the National Science Foundation has required a Data Management plan to be submitted with all proposals. This plan should include a description of how the proposers will share the products of the research (http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/dmp.jsp). What constitutes such data will be determined by the community of interest through the process of peer review and program management. This may include, but is not limited to: data, publications, samples, physical collections, software and models. In particular, “investigators and grantees are encouraged to share software and inventions created under an award or otherwise make them or their products widely available and usable.”

  14. Implementation of Altimetry Data in the GIPSY POD Software Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauch, Jason R.; Gold, Kenn; Born, George H.

    2001-01-01

    Altimetry data has been used extensively to acquire data about characteristics of the Earth, the Moon, and Mars. More recently, the idea of using altimetry for orbit determination has also been explored. This report discusses modifications to JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software to include altimetry data as an observation type for precise orbit determination. The mathematical foundation of using altimetry for the purpose of orbit determination is presented, along with results.

  15. The aerospace energy systems laboratory: Hardware and software implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Richard D.; Oneil-Rood, Nora

    1989-01-01

    For many years NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility has employed automation in the servicing of flight critical aircraft batteries. Recently a major upgrade to Dryden's computerized Battery Systems Laboratory was initiated to incorporate distributed processing and a centralized database. The new facility, called the Aerospace Energy Systems Laboratory (AESL), is being mechanized with iAPX86 and iAPX286 hardware running iRMX86. The hardware configuration and software structure for the AESL are described.

  16. Total Quality Management: Analysis, Evaluation and Implementation Within ACRV Project Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiman, Laura B.

    1991-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is a cooperative form of doing business that relies on the talents of everyone in an organization to continually improve quality and productivity, using teams and an assortment of statistical and measurement tools. The Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) Project Office was identified as an excellent project in which to demonstrate the applications and benefits of TQM processes. As the ACRV Program moves through its various stages of development, it is vital that effectiveness and efficiency be maintained in order to provide the Space Station Freedom (SSF) crew an affordable, on-time assured return to Earth. A critical factor for the success of the ACRV is attaining the maximum benefit from the resources applied to the program. Through a series of four tutorials on various quality improvement techniques, and numerous one-on-one sessions during the SSF's 10-week term in the project office, results were obtained which are aiding the ACRV Office in implementing a disciplined, ongoing process for generating fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide the organization. Significant advances were made in improving the processes for two particular groups - the correspondence distribution team and the WATER Test team. Numerous people from across JSC were a part of the various team activities including engineering, man systems, and safety. The work also included significant interaction with the support contractor to the ACRV Project. The results of the improvement activities can be used as models for other organizations desiring to operate under a system of continuous improvement. In particular, they have advanced the ACRV Project Teams further down the path of continuous improvement, in support of a working philosophy of TQM.

  17. Design and Implementation of Mapping Software: Developing Technology and Geography Skills in Two Different Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Robert S.; Drakes, Jerri; Deek, Fadi P.

    2002-01-01

    A software development collaboration project designed to maximize the skill sets and interests of school children and teachers, educational software technologists and researchers, and college undergraduates is presented. The work brings elementary school children with college seniors and technology consultants to implement a problem-solving…

  18. Design and implementation of an embedded software system for ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuehuan; Li, Shiyong

    2011-11-01

    This paper has designed and realized a coarse-grained, unbalanced, modularized parallel embedded software system for ATR. According to the characteristics of ATR algorithms, some control modules such as system monitoring, task assignment and hierarchical algorithm modules are realized in our system. There are different design principles for different modules. The task assignment module combines different modules into clusters based on mutually exclusive modules, and assigns them to different processors. The principle of combination is the minimum variance of load on different processors. The system satisfies the requirement of real-time performance due to this reasonable strategy for task assignment, with the flexibility and scalability significantly improved.

  19. Implementation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Software Quality Assurance Requirements for COMSOL 3.4

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D

    2008-01-01

    It is desirable for nuclear safety-related calculations to be performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using COMSOL. The Department of Energy (DOE) has mandated that ORNL will incorporate software quality assurance (SQA) with special attention to nuclear safety-related software applications. The author has developed a procedure for implementing these DOE-mandated SQA requirements on nuclear safety-related software applicable to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This paper will describe how this procedure will be implemented for COMSOL so that nuclear safety-related calculations may be performed.

  20. Software Implements a Space-Mission File-Transfer Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundstrom, Kathleen; Ho, Son Q.; Levesque, Michael; Sanders, Felicia; Burleigh, Scott; Veregge, John

    2004-01-01

    CFDP is a computer program that implements the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol, which is an international standard for automatic, reliable transfers of files of data between locations on Earth and in outer space. CFDP administers concurrent file transfers in both directions, delivery of data out of transmission order, reliable and unreliable transmission modes, and automatic retransmission of lost or corrupted data by use of one or more of several lost-segment-detection modes. The program also implements several data-integrity measures, including file checksums and optional cyclic redundancy checks for each protocol data unit. The metadata accompanying each file can include messages to users application programs and commands for operating on remote file systems.

  1. Implementing a regional anesthesia block nurse team in the perianesthesia care unit increases patient safety and perioperative efficiency.

    PubMed

    Russell, Rebecca Ann; Burke, Kimberly; Gattis, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    A lack of standardized nursing procedures regarding the management of patients receiving preoperative regional anesthesia in the perianesthesia setting raises a number of issues for perianesthesia nurses. In January 2010, Duke University Hospital's perianesthesia care unit implemented a regional anesthesia "block nurse" team in the preoperative holding area as a patient safety initiative. In January 2011, a retrospective data review was conducted. Results indicated that the implementation of the block nurse team not only increased patient safety but also increased perioperative efficiency and productivity, and decreased delays to operating room start times. This article describes the role of the regional anesthesia block nurse, the development of a block nurse team, and the early benefits of implementing a dedicated regional anesthesia block nurse team in the perianesthesia setting. PMID:23351242

  2. Technical Issues in Implementing DTN in a Flight Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyake, Amalaye

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the technical issues in implementing Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) in a enviornments that lack continuous network connectivity, such as spacecraft in deepspace or submarines. In a DTN, asynchronous variable-length messages (called bundles) are routed in a store and forward manner between participating nodes over a heterogeneous network. The review examines the enabling technologies, the porting steps and issues, operational scenarios for DTN. There is a review of the Licklider Transmission Protocol (LTP) aka Long-haul Transmission Protocol. Also included is a brief review of the current uses of DTN.

  3. Using performance feedback to enhance implementation fidelity of the problem-solving team process.

    PubMed

    Burns, Matthew K; Peters, Rebecca; Noell, George H

    2008-10-01

    Implementation integrity is a potentially critical issue for problem-solving teams (PST) and most response-to-intervention models. The current study hypothesized that providing performance feedback, which has consistently been shown to increase implementation integrity, to PSTs would enhance the procedural integrity of the process. The PSTs for three elementary schools were provided performance feedback with a 20-item checklist created from the literature. A multiple-baseline design across schools revealed an immediate change in level after providing performance feedback. The resulting percentages of non-overlapping data were 90.9%, 90.0%, and 100%. However, PSTs still did not monitor student progress, assess the effectiveness of the intervention, or measure the integrity with which the intervention was implemented even after receiving feedback. Thus, providing performance feedback could be a method to increase the fidelity with which critical components of data-based problem-solving are implemented, but these data suggest the need for additional research. PMID:19083371

  4. Determinants of treatment plan implementation in multidisciplinary team meetings for patients with chronic diseases: a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Rosalind; Xanthopoulou, Penny; Wallace, Isla; Nic a’ Bháird, Caoimhe; Lanceley, Anne; Clarke, Alex; Livingston, Gill; Prentice, Archie; Ardron, Dave; Harris, Miriam; King, Michael; Michie, Susan; Blazeby, Jane M; Austin-Parsons, Natalie; Gibbs, Simon; Barber, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are assumed to produce better decisions and are extensively used to manage chronic disease in the National Health Service (NHS). However, evidence for their effectiveness is mixed. Our objective was to investigate determinants of MDT effectiveness by examining factors influencing the implementation of MDT treatment plans. This is a proxy measure of effectiveness, because it lies on the pathway to improvements in health, and reflects team decision making which has taken account of clinical and non-clinical information. Additionally, this measure can be compared across MDTs for different conditions. Methods We undertook a prospective mixed-methods study of 12 MDTs in London and North Thames. Data were collected by observation of 370 MDT meetings, interviews with 53 MDT members, and from 2654 patient medical records. We examined the influence of patient-related factors (disease, age, sex, deprivation, whether their preferences and other clinical/health behaviours were mentioned) and MDT features (as measured using the ‘Team Climate Inventory’ and skill mix) on the implementation of MDT treatment plans. Results The adjusted odds (or likelihood) of implementation was reduced by 25% for each additional professional group represented at the MDT meeting. Implementation was more likely in MDTs with clear goals and processes and a good ‘Team Climate’ (adjusted OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.15 to 3.31 for a unit increase in Team Climate Inventory (TCI) score). Implementation varied by disease category, with the lowest adjusted odds of implementation in mental health teams. Implementation was also lower for patients living in more deprived areas (adjusted odds of implementation for patients in the most compared with least deprived areas was 0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.91). Conclusions Greater multidisciplinarity is not necessarily associated with more effective decision making. Explicit goals and procedures are also crucial. Decision

  5. A Scalable and Portable Structure for Conducting Successful Year-Long Undergraduate Software Team Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keogh, Kathleen; Sterling, Leon; Venables, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Year-long team projects with external clients provide a well recognized opportunity for students to gain industry experience, whilst being supported and guided by staff to minimize risks. Each group should be supervised to ensure that they have enough direction and confidence to approach a new problem of significant size, without being daunted. A…

  6. Developing the Green House Nursing Care Team: Variations on Development and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: A core component of the Green House nursing home model is an altered supervisory relationship between the nurse and direct care workers. Some have expressed concern that the Green House model might weaken professional nursing oversight, threatening the quality of clinical care. This qualitative research study explores the role of the nurse as implemented in the Green House model, focusing on how variations in the nursing team influence clinical care practices. Design and Methods: Dimensional analysis, a “second generation” grounded theory methodology, was used to conduct this study. Data were collected through observations and interviews with 37 nurses, 68 CNAs, and 11 Guides working at 11 Green House sites. Results: Implementation of the nursing role within the Green House model varied both within and across sites. Four nursing model types were identified: Traditional, Visitor, Parallel, and Integrated. Care processes, CNA/Shahbaz skill development, and worker stress varied with each nursing model. Implications: Government policies have been enacted to support culture change. However, there is currently little guidance for regulators, providers, or consumers regarding variability in how culture change practices are implemented and consequences of these variations. This article outlines the importance of understanding these practices at a level of detail that distinguishes and supports those that are most promising. PMID:24443606

  7. The use of hypermedia to increase the productivity of software development teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, L. Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Rapid progress in low-cost commercial PC-class multimedia workstation technology will potentially have a dramatic impact on the productivity of distributed work groups of 50-100 software developers. Hypermedia/multimedia involves the seamless integration in a graphical user interface (GUI) of a wide variety of data structures, including high-resolution graphics, maps, images, voice, and full-motion video. Hypermedia will normally require the manipulation of large dynamic files for which relational data base technology and SQL servers are essential. Basic machine architecture, special-purpose video boards, video equipment, optical memory, software needed for animation, network technology, and the anticipated increase in productivity that will result for the introduction of hypermedia technology are covered. It is suggested that the cost of the hardware and software to support an individual multimedia workstation will be on the order of $10,000.

  8. Focused fault injection testing of software implemented fault tolerance mechanisms of Voltan TMR nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, S.; Ezhilchelvan, P. D.; Shrivastava, S. K.

    1995-03-01

    One way of gaining confidence in the adequacy of fault tolerance mechanisms of a system is to test the system by injecting faults and see how the system performs under faulty conditions. This paper presents an application of the focused fault injection method that has been developed for testing software implemented fault tolerance mechanisms of distributed systems. The method exploits the object oriented approach of software implementation to support the injection of specific classes of faults. With the focused fault injection method, the system tester is able to inject specific classes of faults (including malicious ones) such that the fault tolerance mechanisms of a target system can be tested adequately. The method has been applied to test the design and implementation of voting, clock synchronization, and ordering modules of the Voltan TMR (triple modular redundant) node. The tests performed uncovered three flaws in the system software.

  9. Development and analysis of the Software Implemented Fault-Tolerance (SIFT) computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, J.; Kautz, W. H.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Green, M. W.; Levitt, K. N.; Schwartz, R. L.; Weinstock, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) is an experimental, fault-tolerant computer system designed to meet the extreme reliability requirements for safety-critical functions in advanced aircraft. Errors are masked by performing a majority voting operation over the results of identical computations, and faulty processors are removed from service by reassigning computations to the nonfaulty processors. This scheme has been implemented in a special architecture using a set of standard Bendix BDX930 processors, augmented by a special asynchronous-broadcast communication interface that provides direct, processor to processor communication among all processors. Fault isolation is accomplished in hardware; all other fault-tolerance functions, together with scheduling and synchronization are implemented exclusively by executive system software. The system reliability is predicted by a Markov model. Mathematical consistency of the system software with respect to the reliability model has been partially verified, using recently developed tools for machine-aided proof of program correctness.

  10. Supporting Trust in Globally Distributed Software Teams: The Impact of Visualized Collaborative Traces on Perceived Trustworthiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainer, Erik Harrison

    2012-01-01

    Trust plays an important role in collaborations because it creates an environment in which people can openly exchange ideas and information with one another and engineer innovative solutions together with less perceived risk. The rise in globally distributed software development has created an environment in which workers are likely to have less…

  11. Pipe Flow Simulation Software: A Team Approach to Solve an Engineering Education Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Renata S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation program for use in the study of fluid mechanics is described. The package is an interactive tool to explore the fluid flow characteristics of a pipe system by manipulating the physical construction of the system. The motivation, software design requirements, and specific details on how its objectives were met are presented.…

  12. An Implementation of Active Learning: Assessing the Effectiveness of the Team Infomercial Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matveev, Alexei V.; Milter, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of the team infomercial assignment as an active learning tool in undergraduate courses. The structure and three phases of the team infomercial assignment, as well as student evaluations and feedback, are presented. We investigated student experiences working on the team infomercial assignment, the common…

  13. LIBEFP: A new parallel implementation of the effective fragment potential method as a portable software library.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, Ilya A; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2013-10-01

    A new high performance parallel implementation of the general Effective Fragment Potential (EFP) method in a form of a portable software library called libefp is presented. The libefp library was designed to provide developers of various quantum chemistry software packages with an easy way to add EFP functionality to the program of their choice. The general overview of the library is presented and various aspects of interfacing the library with third party quantum chemistry packages are considered. The reference implementation of common methods of computational chemistry such as geometry optimization and molecular dynamics on top of libefp is delivered in the form of efpmd program. Results of molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water using the developed software are described. PMID:24159627

  14. The Implementation of Satellite Attitude Control System Software Using Object Oriented Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, W. Mark; Hansell, William; Phillips, Tom; Anderson, Mark O.; Drury, Derek

    1998-01-01

    NASA established the Small Explorer (SNMX) program in 1988 to provide frequent opportunities for highly focused and relatively inexpensive space science missions. The SMEX program has produced five satellites, three of which have been successfully launched. The remaining two spacecraft are scheduled for launch within the coming year. NASA has recently developed a prototype for the next generation Small Explorer spacecraft (SMEX-Lite). This paper describes the object-oriented design (OOD) of the SMEX-Lite Attitude Control System (ACS) software. The SMEX-Lite ACS is three-axis controlled and is capable of performing sub-arc-minute pointing. This paper first describes high level requirements governing the SMEX-Lite ACS software architecture. Next, the context in which the software resides is explained. The paper describes the principles of encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism with respect to the implementation of an ACS software system. This paper will also discuss the design of several ACS software components. Specifically, object-oriented designs are presented for sensor data processing, attitude determination, attitude control, and failure detection. Finally, this paper will address the establishment of the ACS Foundation Class (AFC) Library. The AFC is a large software repository, requiring a minimal amount of code modifications to produce ACS software for future projects.

  15. Simulation-based team training at the sharp end: A qualitative study of simulation-based team training design, implementation, and evaluation in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Sallie J; Salas, Eduardo; Lyons, Rebecca; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Rosen, Michael A; DiazGranados, Deborah; Grim, Julia G; Augenstein, Jeffery S; Birnbach, David J; King, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a qualitative review of the published literature dealing with the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based team training (SBTT) in healthcare with the purpose of providing synthesis of the present state of the science to guide practice and future research. A systematic literature review was conducted and produced 27 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. These articles were coded using a low-inference content analysis coding scheme designed to extract important information about the training program. Results are summarized in 10 themes describing important considerations for what occurs before, during, and after a training event. Both across disciplines and within Emergency Medicine (EM), SBTT has been shown to be an effective method for increasing teamwork skills. However, the literature to date has underspecified some of the fundamental features of the training programs, impeding the dissemination of lessons learned. Implications of this study are discussed for team training in EM. PMID:21063560

  16. Enhanced clarity and holism: the outcome of implementing the ICF with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team in England

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Priscilla; Kilbride, Cherry; De Souza, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although it is recommended that the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) should be implemented to aid communication within multidisciplinary stroke services, there is no empirical evidence to demonstrate the outcomes of such implementation. Working with one stroke service, this project aimed to address this gap and sought to evaluate the outcomes of implementing an ICF-based clinical tool into practice. Method: Using an action research framework with mixed methods, data were collected from individual interviews, a focus group, questionnaires, email communications, minutes from relevant meetings and field notes. Thematic analysis was undertaken, using immersion and crystallisation, to define overall themes. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data. Data from both sources were combined to create key findings. Results: Three findings were determined from the data analysis. The ICF (1) fosters communication within and beyond the multidisciplinary stroke team; (2) promotes holistic thinking; and (3) helps to clarify team roles. Conclusions: The ICF enhanced clarity of communication and team roles within the acute stroke multidisciplinary team as well as with other clinicians, patients and their relatives. In addition, the ICF challenged stroke clinicians to think holistically, thereby appropriately extending their domain of concern beyond their traditional remit. Implications for Rehabilitation The ICF is a globally accepted framework to describe functioning and is in use in a variety of clinical settings. Yet, the outcomes of using it in clinical practice have yet to be fully explored. This study found that the ICF enhanced clarity of communication and team roles within an acute stroke multidisciplinary team and to others beyond the team, including clinicians, patients and their relatives. Using the ICF also challenged clinicians to think holistically about patient needs following a stroke. PMID:23530624

  17. How to Implement Support Services for NonTraditional Students. Teams for NonTraditional. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Bettie

    Based on the experience of Teams of NonTraditionals Support Network at Jefferson State Vocational Technical School (Kentucky), this manual is designed to help teachers and administrators to implement a support system for nontraditional students (primarily females in traditional male fields) in vocational and technical education programs. The…

  18. Software engineering and Ada (Trademark) training: An implementation model for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legrand, Sue; Freedman, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The choice of Ada for software engineering for projects such as the Space Station has resulted in government and industrial groups considering training programs that help workers become familiar with both a software culture and the intricacies of a new computer language. The questions of how much time it takes to learn software engineering with Ada, how much an organization should invest in such training, and how the training should be structured are considered. Software engineering is an emerging, dynamic discipline. It is defined by the author as the establishment and application of sound engineering environments, tools, methods, models, principles, and concepts combined with appropriate standards, guidelines, and practices to support computing which is correct, modifiable, reliable and safe, efficient, and understandable throughout the life cycle of the application. Neither the training programs needed, nor the content of such programs, have been well established. This study addresses the requirements for training for NASA personnel and recommends an implementation plan. A curriculum and a means of delivery are recommended. It is further suggested that a knowledgeable programmer may be able to learn Ada in 5 days, but that it takes 6 to 9 months to evolve into a software engineer who uses the language correctly and effectively. The curriculum and implementation plan can be adapted for each NASA Center according to the needs dictated by each project.

  19. Challenges and Solutions in Implementing Hydrological Models within Scientific Workflow Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraud, J.; Fitch, P. G.; Bai, Q.

    2010-12-01

    The use of scientific workflow software in the hydrology domain appears to have gained traction in the past few years, to better handle data streams, pipelines of processing steps, QA/QC, metadata and provenance. The Hydrologists’ Workbench (HWB) is a software toolset building on the Trident scientific workflow software (http://tridentworkflow.codeplex.com/), adding data handling and processing activities that are primarily aimed at the hydrology domain. One important source of processing activities is found in several existing environmental modelling software systems. Making these components available through HWB brings several challenges. While many environmental modelling systems have conceptually similar characteristics at a high level, their implementation will naturally vary in many respects, bringing to HWB the traditional challenge of model and data interoperability between heterogeneous systems. The challenges fall arguably into two broad categories: data interoperability and model of execution. The former stems from wanting to seamlessly pass data between processing activities that may have very different back-end implementations. The latter arises with the possible incompatibilities, conceptual or technical, between the workflow execution engine and the way a model or modelling component needs to be executed. We illustrate these challenges and propose some solutions by reporting the findings of a case study incorporating a spatial-temporal surface runoff modelling toolset in HWB. We find notably two salient challenges, the definition of an appropriate granularity for the workflow activities wrapping the existing modelling components, and the need for a common, implementation-neutral scientific data model.

  20. Maximizing the Effectiveness of Building Teams in Response to Intervention Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nellis, Leah M.

    2012-01-01

    In the school setting, teams are abundant, often serving multiple purposes, having various titles, and consisting of diverse members. Teams are considered an essential component of Response to Intervention (RtI) and are the vehicle through which data-based decision making occurs at the school, grade, small-group, and individual student level.…

  1. [Design and implementation of virtual reality software with psychological treatment for drug-dependent patients].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zhao, Xu; Ou, Yalin; Zhang, Jingyu; Li, Qing; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-12-01

    High relapse rate of drug-dependent patients is a serious problem in the current situation. The present article describes how to design and implement virtual reality technology for drug-dependent patients with psychological treatment, with the aim at the addiction withdrawal. The software was developed based on open-source game engine for 2D models. The form of a game simulates the actual style in the day-to-day living environment of drug-dependent patients and the temptation of using drugs. The software helps the patients deal with different scenarios and different event handling, cause their own thinking, and response to the temptation from high-risk environment and from other drug-dependent patients. The function of the software is close to the real life of drug-dependent patients, and has a prospect to become a new treatment to reduce the relapse rate of drug-dependence. PMID:23469551

  2. Software Quality Assurance Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRae, Kalindra A.

    2004-01-01

    Software Quality Assurance (SQA) is a planned and systematic set of activities that ensures conformance of software life cycle processes and products conform to requirements, standards and procedures. In software development, software quality means meeting requirements and a degree of excellence and refinement of a project or product. Software Quality is a set of attributes of a software product by which its quality is described and evaluated. The set of attributes includes functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. Software Metrics help us understand the technical process that is used to develop a product. The process is measured to improve it and the product is measured to increase quality throughout the life cycle of software. Software Metrics are measurements of the quality of software. Software is measured to indicate the quality of the product, to assess the productivity of the people who produce the product, to assess the benefits derived from new software engineering methods and tools, to form a baseline for estimation, and to help justify requests for new tools or additional training. Any part of the software development can be measured. If Software Metrics are implemented in software development, it can save time, money, and allow the organization to identify the caused of defects which have the greatest effect on software development. The summer of 2004, I worked with Cynthia Calhoun and Frank Robinson in the Software Assurance/Risk Management department. My task was to research and collect, compile, and analyze SQA Metrics that have been used in other projects that are not currently being used by the SA team and report them to the Software Assurance team to see if any metrics can be implemented in their software assurance life cycle process.

  3. The implementation of mentalization-based treatment for adolescents: a case study from an organizational, team and therapist perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reports on problems encountered in the implementation of complex interventions are scarce in psychotherapy literature. This is remarkable given the inherent difficulties of such enterprises and the associated safety risks for patients involved. Case description A case study of the problematic implementation process of Mentalization- Based Treatment for Adolescents (MBT-A), a new therapy for 14 to 18 year old youngsters with severe personality disorders, is presented. The implementation process is described and analyzed at an organizational, team and therapist level. Discussion and evaluation Our analysis shows that problems at all three levels contributed and interacted to make the implementation cumbersome and hazardous. Conclusion The implementation of complex psychotherapeutic programs for difficult patients could benefit from a structured attention to processes at multiple levels. We therefore propose a new comprehensive heuristic model of treatment integrity. This new model includes organisational, team and therapist adherence to the treatment model as necessary components of treatment integrity in the implementation of complex interventions. The application of this new model of treatment integrity potentially increases the chance of successful implementations and reduces safety risks for first patients enrolling in a new program. PMID:22818166

  4. Spacelab user implementation assessment study (software requirements analysis). Volume 1: Executive study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop an integrated approach for the development, implementation, and utilization of all software that is required to efficiently and cost-effectively support advanced technology laboratory flight and ground operations. It was recognized that certain aspects of the operations would be mandatory computerized services; computerization of other aspects would be optional. Thus, the analyses encompassed not only alternate computer utilization and implementations but trade studies of the programmatic effects of non-computerized versus computerized approaches to the operations. A general overview of the study is presented.

  5. Implementing reusable software components for SNOMED CT diagram and expression concept representations.

    PubMed

    Bánfai, Balázs; Porció, Roland; Kovács, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    SNOMED CT is a vital component in the future of semantic interoperability in healthcare as it provides the meaning to EHRs via its semantically rich, controlled terminology. Communicating the concepts of this terminology to both humans and machines is crucial therefore formal guidelines for diagram and expression representations have been developed by the curators of SNOMED CT. This paper presents a novel, model-based approach to implementing these guidelines that allows simultaneous editing of a concept via both diagram and expression editors. The implemented extensible software component can be embedded both both desktop and web applications. PMID:25160344

  6. Design, Implementation, and Experiences of Third-Party Software Administration at the ORNL NCCS

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Nicholas A; Fahey, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    At the ORNL NCCS, the structure and policy surrounding how we install third-party applications. This change is most notable for its effect on our quad-core Cray XT4 (Jaguar) computer. Of particular interest is the addition of many scripts to automate installing and testing system software, as well as the addition of automated reporting mechanisms. We will present an overview of the design and implementation, and also present our experiences to date

  7. Software for implementing trigger algorithms on the upgraded CMS Global Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Takashi; Arnold, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of trigger objects. The conditions for trigger object selection, with possible topological requirements on multiobject triggers, are combined by simple combinatorial logic to form the algorithms. The LHC has resumed its operation in 2015, the collision-energy will be increased to 13 TeV with the luminosity expected to go up to 2x1034 cm-2s-1. The CMS Level-1 trigger system will be upgraded to improve its performance for selecting interesting physics events and to operate within the predefined data-acquisition rate in the challenging environment expected at LHC Run 2. The Global Trigger will be re-implemented on modern FPGAs on an Advanced Mezzanine Card in MicroTCA crate. The upgraded system will benefit from the ability to process complex algorithms with DSP slices and increased processing resources with optical links running at 10 Gbit/s, enabling more algorithms at a time than previously possible and allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the trigger bandwidth. In order to handle the increased complexity of the trigger menu implemented on the upgraded Global Trigger, a set of new software has been developed. The software allows a physicist to define a menu with analysis-like triggers using intuitive user interface. The menu is then realised on FPGAs with further software processing, instantiating predefined firmware blocks. The design and implementation of the software for preparing a menu for the upgraded CMS Global Trigger system are presented.

  8. Design and implementation of a compliant robot with force feedback and strategy planning software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.; Strempek, F. M.; Solis, L. A.; Brodd, S. S.; Cutler, E. P.; Purves, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    Force-feedback robotics techniques are being developed for automated precision assembly and servicing of NASA space flight equipment. Design and implementation of a prototype robot which provides compliance and monitors forces is in progress. Computer software to specify assembly steps and makes force feedback adjustments during assembly are coded and tested for three generically different precision mating problems. A model program demonstrates that a suitably autonomous robot can plan its own strategy.

  9. Sustainability of cross-functional teams for marketing strategy development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ken; Antonucci, Don

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a case study on a cross-functional team used for marketing strategy development and execution at a health insurance company. The study found a set of success factors that contributed to the initial success of the team, but the factors were not enough to maintain the team's high level of productivity over time. The study later identified a set of 8 factors that helped sustain the team's high-productivity level. The 2 sets (ie, success and its subsequent sustainability factors) are analyzed against a normative model of team effectiveness. All the factors are explained by the normative model except for 1 sustainability factor, "challenge motivator." In fact, the study found the "challenge motivator" to be the most critical factor to keep up the team's productivity over time. Apart from a performance crisis, the authors developed 3 "challenge motivators"--first, more granular market information that could unearth hidden performance issues; second, constant value creation to shareholders as the firm being publicly traded; and third, the firm's strategic mandate to meet and exceed customer expectations that puts ultimate performance pressure on the marketing strategy team. PMID:16905999

  10. Software-centered implementation of 128 channel huge speaker array with stock PC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yuki; Nagashima, Koichi; Kagami, Satoshi; Takano, Tachio; Nagashima, Koichi

    2003-10-01

    A huge speaker array system of 128 loudspeakers was constructed and experimented. It was implemented as ``software-centered'' style utilizing stock loudspeakers and a PC. No dedicated hardware nor DSP was utilized. Spot forming, instead of beam forming, could be realized by 32 by 4 square layout of the array. Spot means small area of higher sound pressure level. Number of the spot was not limited to one. In the experiment, within 3 m by 3 m area, four spots of different sounds could be simultaneously formed. This spot forming was confirmed by actually measured spatial distribution of sound pressure level. The effect of the spot was also confirmed auditorily. Since the system was software-centered, it was dynamic. By simply changing software parameters, location of the spot can be easily moved even while the system was running. This movability of the spot was intended to be basis for visual steering. To realize the system, a simultaneous 128 channel 14-bit DA converter PCI board was developed. 44.1 kHz sampling rate was achieved by 2.4-GHz Intel Xeon-based PC utilizing the DA board and a real-time OS, named ART-Linux. Approximately 23-μs loop could be realized by software. It was the world's fastest software loop.

  11. HAZARD ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, S; Tinh Tran, T

    2008-04-08

    Washington Safety Management Solutions, LLC developed web-based software to improve the efficiency and consistency of hazard identification and analysis, control selection and classification, and to standardize analysis reporting at Savannah River Site. In the new nuclear age, information technology provides methods to improve the efficiency of the documented safety analysis development process which includes hazard analysis activities. This software provides a web interface that interacts with a relational database to support analysis, record data, and to ensure reporting consistency. A team of subject matter experts participated in a series of meetings to review the associated processes and procedures for requirements and standard practices. Through these meetings, a set of software requirements were developed and compiled into a requirements traceability matrix from which software could be developed. The software was tested to ensure compliance with the requirements. Training was provided to the hazard analysis leads. Hazard analysis teams using the software have verified its operability. The software has been classified as NQA-1, Level D, as it supports the analysis team but does not perform the analysis. The software can be transported to other sites with alternate risk schemes. The software is being used to support the development of 14 hazard analyses. User responses have been positive with a number of suggestions for improvement which are being incorporated as time permits. The software has enforced a uniform implementation of the site procedures. The software has significantly improved the efficiency and standardization of the hazard analysis process.

  12. The Implementation of Satellite Control System Software Using Object Oriented Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark O.; Reid, Mark; Drury, Derek; Hansell, William; Phillips, Tom

    1998-01-01

    NASA established the Small Explorer (SMEX) program in 1988 to provide frequent opportunities for highly focused and relatively inexpensive space science missions that can be launched into low earth orbit by small expendable vehicles. The development schedule for each SMEX spacecraft was three years from start to launch. The SMEX program has produced five satellites; Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer (FAST), Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS), Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE). SAMPEX and FAST are on-orbit, TRACE is scheduled to be launched in April of 1998, WIRE is scheduled to be launched in September of 1998, and SWAS is scheduled to be launched in January of 1999. In each of these missions, the Attitude Control System (ACS) software was written using a modular procedural design. Current program goals require complete spacecraft development within 18 months. This requirement has increased pressure to write reusable flight software. Object-Oriented Design (OOD) offers the constructs for developing an application that only needs modification for mission unique requirements. This paper describes the OOD that was used to develop the SMEX-Lite ACS software. The SMEX-Lite ACS is three-axis controlled, momentum stabilized, and is capable of performing sub-arc-minute pointing. The paper first describes the high level requirements which governed the architecture of the SMEX-Lite ACS software. Next, the context in which the software resides is explained. The paper describes the benefits of encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism with respect to the implementation of an ACS software system. This paper will discuss the design of several software components that comprise the ACS software. Specifically, Object-Oriented designs are presented for sensor data processing, attitude control, attitude determination and failure detection. The paper addresses

  13. Requirements for guidelines systems: implementation challenges and lessons from existing software-engineering efforts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A large body of work in the clinical guidelines field has identified requirements for guideline systems, but there are formidable challenges in translating such requirements into production-quality systems that can be used in routine patient care. Detailed analysis of requirements from an implementation perspective can be useful in helping define sub-requirements to the point where they are implementable. Further, additional requirements emerge as a result of such analysis. During such an analysis, study of examples of existing, software-engineering efforts in non-biomedical fields can provide useful signposts to the implementer of a clinical guideline system. Methods In addition to requirements described by guideline-system authors, comparative reviews of such systems, and publications discussing information needs for guideline systems and clinical decision support systems in general, we have incorporated additional requirements related to production-system robustness and functionality from publications in the business workflow domain, in addition to drawing on our own experience in the development of the Proteus guideline system (http://proteme.org). Results The sub-requirements are discussed by conveniently grouping them into the categories used by the review of Isern and Moreno 2008. We cite previous work under each category and then provide sub-requirements under each category, and provide example of similar work in software-engineering efforts that have addressed a similar problem in a non-biomedical context. Conclusions When analyzing requirements from the implementation viewpoint, knowledge of successes and failures in related software-engineering efforts can guide implementers in the choice of effective design and development strategies. PMID:22405400

  14. Adopting Best Practices from Team Science in a Healthcare Improvement Research Network: The Impact on Dissemination and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kathleen R.; Patel, Darpan I.

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare is a complex adaptive system, and efforts to improve through the implementation of best practice are well served by various interacting disciplines within the system. As a transdisciplinary model is new to clinicians, an infrastructure that creates academic-practice partnerships and builds capacity for scientific collaboration is necessary to test, spread, and implement improvement strategies. This paper describes the adoption of best practices from the science of team science in a healthcare improvement research network and the impact on conducting a large-scale network study. Key components of the research network infrastructure were mapped to a team science framework and evaluated in terms of their effectiveness and impact on a national study of nursing operations. Results from this study revealed an effective integration of the team science principles which facilitated the rapid collection of a large dataset. Implications of this study support a collaborative model for improvement research and stress a need for future research and funding to further evaluate the impact on dissemination and implementation. PMID:23577246

  15. Norms for creativity and implementation in healthcare teams: testing the group innovation inventory

    PubMed Central

    Strating, Mathilde M.H.; Nieboer, Anna P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test to what extent the four-factor structure of the group innovation inventory (GII) is confirmed for improvement teams participating in a quality improvement collaborative. Design Quasi-experimental design with baseline and end-measurement after intervention. Setting This study included quality improvement teams participating in the Care for Better improvement programme for home care, care for the handicapped and the elderly in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2008. Participants As part of a larger evaluation study, 261 written questionnaires from team members were collected at baseline (pre-project sample) and 129 questionnaires at end-measurement (post-project sample). Main outcome measure Group innovation inventory. Results Confirmatory factor analyses revealed the expected four-factor structure and good fit indices. The subscales ‘group functioning’ and ‘speed of action’ showed acceptable Cronbach's alphas and high inter-item correlations. The subscales ‘support for risk taking’ and ‘tolerance of mistakes’ showed insufficient reliability and validity. Conclusions The group functioning and speed of action subscales of the GII showed acceptable psychometric properties and are applicable to quality improvement teams in health care. In order to understand how social expectations within teams working in health care organizations exert influence over attitudes and behaviours thought to stimulate creativity, further conceptualization of the norms for enhancing creativity within health care is needed. PMID:20538877

  16. Implementing reproducible research using the Madagascar open-source software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducible research is a concept pioneered by Jon Claerbout. It refers to the discipline of attaching software code and data to scientific publications, which enables the reader to reproduce, verify, and extend published computational experiments. The Madagascar open-source software package provides an example of implementing the reproducible research discipline in geophysical publications. The package contains not only software tools for making geophysical computations but also research papers complete with links to data and reproducible data-analysis workflows. When researchers discover a research paper published on the Madagascar website and install Madagascar, they are able to follow the links and replicate all computations to verify the published computational results. Of course, reproducibility is not the goal in itself. The goal is to be able to extend previously published research by, for example, trying new computations on previously used data or previously used computations on new data. The Madagscar collection currently contains about 150 research papers and book chapters and about 900 reproducible scripts. More than 80 people from different organizations around the world have contributed to the development. This experience shows that, instead of being the responsibility of an individual author, computational reproducibility can become the responsibility of open-source scientific-software communities. Our experience shows how a dedicated community effort can keep a body of computational research alive by actively maintaining its reproducibility.

  17. Integrated State Estimation and Contingency Analysis Software Implementation using High Performance Computing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yousu; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Rice, Mark J.; Huang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-31

    Power system simulation tools are traditionally developed in sequential mode and codes are optimized for single core computing only. However, the increasing complexity in the power grid models requires more intensive computation. The traditional simulation tools will soon not be able to meet the grid operation requirements. Therefore, power system simulation tools need to evolve accordingly to provide faster and better results for grid operations. This paper presents an integrated state estimation and contingency analysis software implementation using high performance computing techniques. The software is able to solve large size state estimation problems within one second and achieve a near-linear speedup of 9,800 with 10,000 cores for contingency analysis application. The performance evaluation is presented to show its effectiveness.

  18. ThermoData Engine (TDE) software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 7. Ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Muzny, Chris D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Frenkel, Michael

    2012-01-23

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for ternary chemical systems. The method involves construction of Redlich-Kister type equations for individual properties (excess volume, thermal conductivity, viscosity, surface tension, and excess enthalpy) and activity coefficient models for phase equilibrium properties (vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibrium). Constructed ternary models are based on those for the three pure component and three binary subsystems evaluated on demand through the TDE software algorithms. All models are described in detail, and extensions to the class structure of the program are provided. Reliable evaluation of properties for the binary subsystems is essential for successful property evaluations for ternary systems, and algorithms are described to aid appropriate parameter selection and fitting for the implemented activity coefficient models (NRTL, Wilson, Van Laar, Redlich-Kister, and UNIQUAC). Two activity coefficient models based on group contributions (original UNIFAC and NIST-KT-UNIFAC) are also implemented. Novel features of the user interface are shown, and directions for future enhancements are outlined. PMID:22107452

  19. Pre-Hardware Optimization of Spacecraft Image Processing Software Algorithms and Hardware Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Flatley, Thomas P.; Hestnes, Phyllis; Jentoft-Nilsen, Marit; Petrick, David J.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft telemetry rates have steadily increased over the last decade presenting a problem for real-time processing by ground facilities. This paper proposes a solution to a related problem for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Spacecraft (GOES-8) image processing application. Although large super-computer facilities are the obvious heritage solution, they are very costly, making it imperative to seek a feasible alternative engineering solution at a fraction of the cost. The solution is based on a Personal Computer (PC) platform and synergy of optimized software algorithms and re-configurable computing hardware technologies, such as Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) and Digital Signal Processing (DSP). It has been shown in [1] and [2] that this configuration can provide superior inexpensive performance for a chosen application on the ground station or on-board a spacecraft. However, since this technology is still maturing, intensive pre-hardware steps are necessary to achieve the benefits of hardware implementation. This paper describes these steps for the GOES-8 application, a software project developed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) (Trademark of Research Systems, Inc.) on a Workstation/UNIX platform. The solution involves converting the application to a PC/Windows/RC platform, selected mainly by the availability of low cost, adaptable high-speed RC hardware. In order for the hybrid system to run, the IDL software was modified to account for platform differences. It was interesting to examine the gains and losses in performance on the new platform, as well as unexpected observations before implementing hardware. After substantial pre-hardware optimization steps, the necessity of hardware implementation for bottleneck code in the PC environment became evident and solvable beginning with the methodology described in [1], [2], and implementing a novel methodology for this specific application [6]. The PC-RC interface bandwidth problem for the

  20. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 3. Binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Frenkel, Michael

    2009-02-01

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for binary chemical systems. Five activity-coefficient models have been implemented for representation of phase-equilibrium data (vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid equilibrium): NRTL, UNIQUAC, Van Laar, Margules/Redlich-Kister, and Wilson. Implementation of these models in TDE is fully described. Properties modeled individually are densities, surface tensions, critical temperatures, critical pressures, excess enthalpies, and the transport properties-viscosity and thermal conductivity. Extensions to the class structure of the program are described with emphasis on special features allowing close linkage between mixture and pure-component properties required for implementation of the models. Details of gas-phase models used in conjunction with the activity-coefficient models are shown. Initial implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept for reactions is demonstrated with evaluation of enthalpies of formation for compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. Directions for future enhancements are outlined. PMID:19434848

  1. When Leadership Matters: Perspectives from a Teacher Team Implementing Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Michele M.; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research investigating the effectiveness of response to intervention (RTI) has relied on post hoc data analyses and surveys, although few studies have explored interactions among teacher teams. Understanding the synergistic impact of teacher work within the RTI framework may have implications for how school leaders can support teacher…

  2. Planning and Implementing Shared Teaching: An MBA Team-Teaching Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Marilyn M.; Alvis, John M.; Willis, Marilyn

    2005-01-01

    Team teaching is a popular trend in business education. In an attempt to integrate seemingly disparate functional disciplines, a number of business programs have combined courses. Regardless of the courses combined (marketing and finance, management and accounting, economics and strategy, or production and cost accounting), the teaching pedagogy…

  3. The Effectiveness of Information Systems Teams as Change Agents in the Implementation of Business Process Reengineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    Changes to information systems and technology (IS/IT) are happening faster than ever before. A literature review suggested within business process reengineering (BPR) there is limited information on what an IS/IT team could do to reduce resistance to change and increase user acceptance. The purpose of this ethnographic case study was to explore…

  4. How One School District Implemented Site-Based School Improvement Planning Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBee, Maridyth M.; Fink, John S.

    Recent educational literature has stressed the benefits of site-based management and parental involvement in school programs. To capitalize on these benefits, site-based planning teams designed to involve perents, teachers, administrators, students, and community members were developed by the Institute for the Development of Educational Activities…

  5. Classroom Collaboration: Implementing Consultation-Based Intervention in Five Multidisciplinary Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuralt, Sally K.

    This study attempted system-wide institutionalization of a consultation-based ancillary service delivery model into the norms and work behaviors of the elementary school organization, through modifying the role and function of members of existent school-based multidisciplinary Child Study Teams (CSTs) and the demonstration of the potential of the…

  6. Principal Change Facilitator Styles and the Implementation of Instructional Support Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavan, Barbara Nelson; Entrekin, Kathy Metcalf

    Findings from a study that examined the role of the principal and effects of the principal's change facilitator style (CFS) on the institutionalization of intervention programs are presented in this paper. Subjects were 13 principals involved in Project Link, a Pennsylvania-granted collaborative project to train prereferral child study teams.…

  7. To adopt is to adapt: the process of implementing the ICF with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team in England

    PubMed Central

    Tempest, Stephanie; Harries, Priscilla; Kilbride, Cherry; De Souza, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The success of the International Classifcation of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) depends on its uptake in clinical practice. This project aimed to explore ways the ICF could be used with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team and identify key learning from the implementation process. Method: Using an action research approach, iterative cycles of observe, plan, act and evaluate were used within three phases: exploratory; innovatory and refective. Thematic analysis was undertaken, using a model of immersion and crystallisation, on data collected via interview and focus groups, e-mail communications, minutes from relevant meetings, feld notes and a refective diary. Results: Two overall themes were determined from the data analysis which enabled implementation. There is a need to: (1) adopt the ICF in ways that meet local service needs; and (2) adapt the ICF language and format. Conclusions: The empirical fndings demonstrate how to make the ICF classifcation a clinical reality. First, we need to adopt the ICF as a vehicle to implement local service priorities e.g. to structure a multidisciplinary team report, thus enabling ownership of the implementation process. Second, we need to adapt the ICF terminology and format to make it acceptable for use by clinicians. PMID:22372376

  8. AVR microcontroller simulator for software implemented hardware fault tolerance algorithms research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Adam; Tarnowski, Szymon; Napieralski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Reliability of new, advanced electronic systems becomes a serious problem especially in places like accelerators and synchrotrons, where sophisticated digital devices operate closely to radiation sources. One of the possible solutions to harden the microprocessor-based system is a strict programming approach known as the Software Implemented Hardware Fault Tolerance. Unfortunately, in real environments it is not possible to perform precise and accurate tests of the new algorithms due to hardware limitation. This paper highlights the AVR-family microcontroller simulator project equipped with an appropriate monitoring and the SEU injection systems.

  9. Design and implementation of software defined radio based multi-mode transceiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yixiang; Zhou, Jinhe

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we aim at the study on multi-mode transceiver based on software defined radio(SDR). Multi-rate signal processing and polyphase filtering technique are both applied in the design and implementation of the transceiver. Simplified FFT butterfly algorithm has been employed in the polyphase filter design as well. Simulation results illustrate that BER performance can be improved by adopting the SDR proposed in this paper. Especially, it has obvious advantages at low SNR. Meanwhile, improved filter design scheme has much more predominant in-band and out-ofband performance.

  10. The SIFT computer and its development. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerance for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) is an aircraft control computer designed to allow failure probability of less than 10 to the -10th/hour. The system is based on advanced fault-tolerance computing and validation methodology. Since confirmation of reliability by observation is essentially impossible, system reliability is estimated by a Markov model. A mathematical proof is used to justify the validity of the Markov model. System design is represented by a hierarchy of abstract models, and the design proof comprises mathematical proofs that each model is, in fact, an elaboration of the next more abstract model.

  11. A performance evaluation of the software-implemented fault-tolerance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, D. L.; Butler, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a performance evaluation of the Software-Implemented Fault-Tolerance (SIFT) computer system conducted in the NASA Avionics Integration Research Laboratory are presented. The essential system functions are described and compared to both earlier design proposals and subsequent design improvements. Using SIFT's specimen task load, the executive tasks, such as reconfiguration, clock synchronization, and interactive consistency, are found to consume significant computing resources. Together with other system overhead (e.g., voting and scheduling), the operating system overhead is in excess of 60 percent. The authors propose specific design changes that reduce this overhead burden significantly.

  12. Motivation and implementation of a software SVC real-time VGA encoder for mobile TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottreau, V.; Viellard, T.; Chevance, C.; Bureller, O.

    2008-08-01

    An encoding system was implemented purely in software for sending SVC video multicast to mobile devices. The SVC encoder is a multi-layer, multi-threaded parallel-GOP encoder. It is capable of running in real-time with an Intel® Xeon® 5160 Processor dual-core platform in Scalable Baseline profile (H.264/AVC Baseline QVGA@25fps at 250 kbps to SVC Scalable Baseline VGA@25fps resolution at 1 Mbps. Real-time video encoding is accomplished with aggressive Single Instruction Multiple Data assembly code optimizations and advanced algorithms.

  13. Maximizing the utilization and impact of medical educational software by designing for local area network (LAN) implementation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R.; Reber, E.

    1993-01-01

    The design, development and implementation of medical education software often occurs without sufficient consideration of the potential benefits that can be realized by making the software network aware. These benefits can be considerable and can greatly enhance the utilization and potential impact of the software. This article details how multiple aspects of the IMMEX problem solving project have benefited from taking maximum advantage of LAN resources. PMID:8130583

  14. Implementation of software-based sensor linearization algorithms on low-cost microcontrollers.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Hamit

    2010-10-01

    Nonlinear sensors and microcontrollers are used in many embedded system designs. As the input-output characteristic of most sensors is nonlinear in nature, obtaining data from a nonlinear sensor by using an integer microcontroller has always been a design challenge. This paper discusses the implementation of six software-based sensor linearization algorithms for low-cost microcontrollers. The comparative study of the linearization algorithms is performed by using a nonlinear optical distance-measuring sensor. The performance of the algorithms is examined with respect to memory space usage, linearization accuracy and algorithm execution time. The implementation and comparison results can be used for selection of a linearization algorithm based on the sensor transfer function, expected linearization accuracy and microcontroller capacity. PMID:20466366

  15. Software algorithm and hardware design for real-time implementation of new spectral estimator

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Real-time spectral analyzers can be difficult to implement for PC computer-based systems because of the potential for high computational cost, and algorithm complexity. In this work a new spectral estimator (NSE) is developed for real-time analysis, and compared with the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). Method Clinical data in the form of 216 fractionated atrial electrogram sequences were used as inputs. The sample rate for acquisition was 977 Hz, or approximately 1 millisecond between digital samples. Real-time NSE power spectra were generated for 16,384 consecutive data points. The same data sequences were used for spectral calculation using a radix-2 implementation of the DFT. The NSE algorithm was also developed for implementation as a real-time spectral analyzer electronic circuit board. Results The average interval for a single real-time spectral calculation in software was 3.29 μs for NSE versus 504.5 μs for DFT. Thus for real-time spectral analysis, the NSE algorithm is approximately 150× faster than the DFT. Over a 1 millisecond sampling period, the NSE algorithm had the capability to spectrally analyze a maximum of 303 data channels, while the DFT algorithm could only analyze a single channel. Moreover, for the 8 second sequences, the NSE spectral resolution in the 3-12 Hz range was 0.037 Hz while the DFT spectral resolution was only 0.122 Hz. The NSE was also found to be implementable as a standalone spectral analyzer board using approximately 26 integrated circuits at a cost of approximately $500. The software files used for analysis are included as a supplement, please see the Additional files 1 and 2. Conclusions The NSE real-time algorithm has low computational cost and complexity, and is implementable in both software and hardware for 1 millisecond updates of multichannel spectra. The algorithm may be helpful to guide radiofrequency catheter ablation in real time. PMID:24886214

  16. First experiences with the implementation of the European standard EN 62304 on medical device software for the quality assurance of a radiotherapy unit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background According to the latest amendment of the Medical Device Directive standalone software qualifies as a medical device when intended by the manufacturer to be used for medical purposes. In this context, the EN 62304 standard is applicable which defines the life-cycle requirements for the development and maintenance of medical device software. A pilot project was launched to acquire skills in implementing this standard in a hospital-based environment (in-house manufacture). Methods The EN 62304 standard outlines minimum requirements for each stage of the software life-cycle, defines the activities and tasks to be performed and scales documentation and testing according to its criticality. The required processes were established for the pre-existent decision-support software FlashDumpComparator (FDC) used during the quality assurance of treatment-relevant beam parameters. As the EN 62304 standard implicates compliance with the EN ISO 14971 standard on the application of risk management to medical devices, a risk analysis was carried out to identify potential hazards and reduce the associated risks to acceptable levels. Results The EN 62304 standard is difficult to implement without proper tools, thus open-source software was selected and integrated into a dedicated development platform. The control measures yielded by the risk analysis were independently implemented and verified, and a script-based test automation was retrofitted to reduce the associated test effort. After all documents facilitating the traceability of the specified requirements to the corresponding tests and of the control measures to the proof of execution were generated, the FDC was released as an accessory to the HIT facility. Conclusions The implementation of the EN 62304 standard was time-consuming, and a learning curve had to be overcome during the first iterations of the associated processes, but many process descriptions and all software tools can be re-utilized in follow-up projects

  17. Development and Implementation of Team-Based Panel Management Tools: Filling the Gap between Patient and Population Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Watts, Brook; Lawrence, Renée H; Drawz, Paul; Carter, Cameron; Shumaker, Amy Hirsch; Kern, Elizabeth F

    2016-08-01

    Effective team-based models of care, such as the Patient-Centered Medical Home, require electronic tools to support proactive population management strategies that emphasize care coordination and quality improvement. Despite the spread of electronic health records (EHRs) and vendors marketing population health tools, clinical practices still may lack the ability to have: (1) local control over types of data collected/reports generated, (2) timely data (eg, up-to-date data, not several months old), and accordingly (3) the ability to efficiently monitor and improve patient outcomes. This article describes a quality improvement project at the hospital system level to develop and implement a flexible panel management (PM) tool to improve care of subpopulations of patients (eg, panels of patients with diabetes) by clinical teams. An in-depth case analysis approach is used to explore barriers and facilitators in building a PM registry tool for team-based management needs using standard data elements (eg, laboratory values, pharmacy records) found in EHRs. Also described are factors that may contribute to sustainability; to date the tool has been adapted to 6 disease-focused subpopulations encompassing more than 200,000 patients. Two key lessons emerged from this initiative: (1) though challenging, team-based clinical end users and information technology needed to work together consistently to refine the product, and (2) locally developed population management tools can provide efficient data tracking for frontline clinical teams and leadership. The preliminary work identified critical gaps that were successfully addressed by building local PM registry tools from EHR-derived data and offers lessons learned for others engaged in similar work. (Population Health Management 2016;19:232-239). PMID:26440062

  18. Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries

    PubMed Central

    Silbermann, M.; Pitsillides, B.; Al-Alfi, N.; Omran, S.; Al-Jabri, K.; Elshamy, K.; Ghrayeb, I.; Livneh, J.; Daher, M.; Charalambous, H.; Jafferri, A.; Fink, R.; El-Shamy, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists. PMID:24001762

  19. Bridging the gap between PAT concepts and implementation: An integrated software platform for fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chopda, Viki R; Gomes, James; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-01-01

    Bioreactor control significantly impacts both the amount and quality of the product being manufactured. The complexity of the control strategy that is implemented increases with reactor size, which may vary from thousands to tens of thousands of litres in commercial manufacturing. The Process Analytical Technology (PAT) initiative has highlighted the need for having robust monitoring tools and effective control schemes that are capable of taking real time information about the critical quality attributes (CQA) and the critical process parameters (CPP) and executing immediate response as soon as a deviation occurs. However, the limited flexibility that present commercial software packages offer creates a hurdle. Visual programming environments have gradually emerged as potential alternatives to the available text based languages. This paper showcases development of an integrated programme using a visual programming environment for a Sartorius BIOSTAT® B Plus 5L bioreactor through which various peripheral devices are interfaced. The proposed programme facilitates real-time access to data and allows for execution of control actions to follow the desired trajectory. Major benefits of such integrated software system include: (i) improved real time monitoring and control; (ii) reduced variability; (iii) improved performance; (iv) reduced operator-training time; (v) enhanced knowledge management; and (vi) easier PAT implementation. PMID:26647285

  20. Long-Term Protective Factor Outcomes of Evidence-Based Interventions Implemented by Community Teams through a Community-University Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Cleve; Spoth, Richard L.; Shin, Chungyeol; Schainker, Lisa M.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Feinberg, Mark

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly common for community teams or coalitions to implement programming for children and families designed to promote positive youth development and prevent adolescent problem behaviors. However, there has been only limited rigorous study of the effectiveness of community teams' programming efforts to produce positive…

  1. Advancing the Interdisciplinary Collaborative Health Team Model: Applying Democratic Professionalism, Implementation Science, and Therapeutic Alliance to Enact Social Justice Practice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This essay reframes the interdisciplinary collaborative health team model by proposing the application of 3 foundational pillars-democratic professionalism, implementation science, and therapeutic alliance to advance this practice. The aim was to address challenges to the model, enhance their functional capacity, and explicate and enact social justice practices to affect individual health outcomes while simultaneously addressing health inequities. The pillars are described and examples from the author's dissertation research illustrate how the pillars were used to bring about action. Related theories, models, and frameworks that have negotiation, capacity building, collaboration, and knowledge/task/power sharing as central concepts are presented under each of the pillars. PMID:26244478

  2. [Perceptions of the multi-professional team on the implementation of palliative care in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ceci Figueredo; Souza, Dalila Melo; Pedreira, Larissa Chaves; dos Santos, Manuela Ribeiro; Faustino, Tássia Nery

    2013-09-01

    The scope of this paper was to analyze the perceptions of the multi-professional team on the implementation of palliative care in an adult intensive care unit. An exploratory-descriptive study using a qualitative approach was conducted with 14 health professionals from a public teaching hospital. The information was collected between February and April 2012, by means of semi-structured interviews and non-participatory observation interpreted using content analysis. Three thematic categories were identified: Care for terminal patients in an ICU fostering physical comfort; Lack of preparation of the team in dealing with terminal patients; and Challenges of palliative care practices in the intensive care environment. The interviewed parties reported having some knowledge of the proposal for palliative care though divergences were observed in the therapeutic conduct of the team in the care provided, demonstrating a lack of interaction and communication among the professionals. The drafting of a national policy to promote care for terminally ill patients is necessary, as well as ongoing training of professionals and the creation of care protocols for promoting the comfort of the patients and their families during the end of life phase. PMID:23989566

  3. Introductory Molecular Orbital Theory: An Honors General Chemistry Computational Lab as Implemented Using Three-Dimensional Modeling Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruddick, Kristie R.; Parrill, Abby L.; Petersen, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computational molecular orbital theory experiment was implemented in a first-semester honors general chemistry course. Students used the GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) quantum mechanical software (as implemented in ChemBio3D) to optimize the geometry for various small molecules. Extended Huckel…

  4. The design and implementation of a parallel unstructured Euler solver using software primitives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, R.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Saltz, J.; Gupta, S.; Ponnusamy, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the implementation of a three-dimensional unstructured grid Euler-solver on massively parallel distributed-memory computer architectures. The goal is to minimize solution time by achieving high computational rates with a numerically efficient algorithm. An unstructured multigrid algorithm with an edge-based data structure has been adopted, and a number of optimizations have been devised and implemented in order to accelerate the parallel communication rates. The implementation is carried out by creating a set of software tools, which provide an interface between the parallelization issues and the sequential code, while providing a basis for future automatic run-time compilation support. Large practical unstructured grid problems are solved on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube and Intel Touchstone Delta machine. The quantitative effect of the various optimizations are demonstrated, and we show that the combined effect of these optimizations leads to roughly a factor of three performance improvement. The overall solution efficiency is compared with that obtained on the CRAY-YMP vector supercomputer.

  5. A secure and easy-to-implement web-based communication framework for caregiving robot teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuna, G.; Daş, R.; Tuna, A.; Örenbaş, H.; Baykara, M.; Gülez, K.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, robots have started to become more commonplace in our lives, from factory floors to museums, festivals and shows. They have started to change how we work and play. With an increase in the population of the elderly, they have also been started to be used for caregiving services, and hence many countries have been investing in the robot development. The advancements in robotics and wireless communications has led to the emergence of autonomous caregiving robot teams which cooperate to accomplish a set of tasks assigned by human operators. Although wireless communications and devices are flexible and convenient, they are vulnerable to many risks compared to traditional wired networks. Since robots with wireless communication capability transmit all data types, including sensory, coordination, and control, through radio frequencies, they are open to intruders and attackers unless protected and their openness may lead to many security issues such as data theft, passive listening, and service interruption. In this paper, a secure web-based communication framework is proposed to address potential security threats due to wireless communication in robot-robot and human-robot interaction. The proposed framework is simple and practical, and can be used by caregiving robot teams in the exchange of sensory data as well as coordination and control data.

  6. 2p2 Team News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H.

    2000-06-01

    The 2p2 Team continued towards the implementation at the 2.2-m of the same BOB (Broker for Observation Blocks) observing interface as seen at other ESO telescopes. This requires an interface to be written between the existing BOB software and the non-VLT compatible control software for the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) and 2.2-m. Cristian Urrutia, Tatiana Paz and Eduardo Robledo are heading its development. With this software in place, observers can use the VLT Phase 2 Proposal Preparation System (P2PP) for definition of their exposures, whether they are for Visitor or Service Mode.

  7. Improving the safety of neonatal care through the development and implementation of a staff-focused delta team.

    PubMed

    Schwoebel, Ann; Creely, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety is one of the greatest imperatives in healthcare today, yet there are many obstacles that must be overcome to make healthcare delivery truly safe. Critically ill newborns are among the most medically fragile patients in hospitals today. Given their size and gestational age, the tolerance for error within this population is extremely small. Medical errors that may be less consequential in adults can be disastrous for infants. Developing a culture of safety demands a mind-set that continuously seeks out vulnerabilities and prospectively addresses them through systems-based rather than individual-based solutions. The complexities of clinical care and intricacies of human behavior may prevent total elimination of risk, but caregivers are in a position to develop a culture of safety that can minimize risks for adverse events in the neonatal intensive care unit. Specific strategies used to successfully implement a staff-focused patient safety program are described in this article. These strategies include the development of systemwide and unit-based interdisciplinary safety teams to proactively identify and address safety concerns, development of specific tools and techniques used for analysis and prioritization of risk, resources that teams used to support an environment of safety; and implementation of staff-driven solutions to address safety concerns. PMID:20147835

  8. SU-E-T-103: Development and Implementation of Web Based Quality Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Studinski, R; Taylor, R; Angers, C; La Russa, D; Clark, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Historically many radiation medicine programs have maintained their Quality Control (QC) test results in paper records or Microsoft Excel worksheets. Both these approaches represent significant logistical challenges, and are not predisposed to data review and approval. It has been our group's aim to develop and implement web based software designed not just to record and store QC data in a centralized database, but to provide scheduling and data review tools to help manage a radiation therapy clinics Equipment Quality control program. Methods: The software was written in the Python programming language using the Django web framework. In order to promote collaboration and validation from other centres the code was made open source and is freely available to the public via an online source code repository. The code was written to provide a common user interface for data entry, formalize the review and approval process, and offer automated data trending and process control analysis of test results. Results: As of February 2014, our installation of QAtrack+ has 180 tests defined in its database and has collected ∼22 000 test results, all of which have been reviewed and approved by a physicist via QATrack+'s review tools. These results include records for quality control of Elekta accelerators, CT simulators, our brachytherapy programme, TomoTherapy and Cyberknife units. Currently at least 5 other centres are known to be running QAtrack+ clinically, forming the start of an international user community. Conclusion: QAtrack+ has proven to be an effective tool for collecting radiation therapy QC data, allowing for rapid review and trending of data for a wide variety of treatment units. As free and open source software, all source code, documentation and a bug tracker are available to the public at https://bitbucket.org/tohccmedphys/qatrackplus/.

  9. Efficient hardware-software co-implementation of a digital dental x-ray system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong D.; Kim, Seo-Gyoo; Kim, Jongwon

    2001-05-01

    In this paper the design considerations for a digital dental x-ray system is discussed where a commercial CCD sensor is adopted. Especially the system should be able to work with several x-ray machines even with them for the classical film. The hardware-software co-design methodology is employed to optimize the system. The full digital implementation is assumed for the reliability of the system. The considered functions cover the pre-processing such as the exposure detection, clamping and the dark level correction and the post-processing such as gray level compensation. It is analyzed with some other constraints in order to make the final partition. The entire system based on the partition will be described.

  10. Implementation of a data management software system for SSME test history data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Kenneth

    1986-01-01

    The implementation of a software system for managing Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) test/flight historical data is presented. The software system uses the database management system RIM7 for primary data storage and routine data management, but includes several FORTRAN programs, described here, which provide customized access to the RIM7 database. The consolidation, modification, and transfer of data from the database THIST, to the RIM7 database THISRM is discussed. The RIM7 utility modules for generating some standard reports from THISRM and performing some routine updating and maintenance are briefly described. The FORTRAN accessing programs described include programs for initial loading of large data sets into the database, capturing data from files for database inclusion, and producing specialized statistical reports which cannot be provided by the RIM7 report generator utility. An expert system tutorial, constructed using the expert system shell product INSIGHT2, is described. Finally, a potential expert system, which would analyze data in the database, is outlined. This system could use INSIGHT2 as well and would take advantage of RIM7's compatibility with the microcomputer database system RBase 5000.

  11. Architecture and Implementation of OpenPET Firmware and Embedded Software

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Nimeh, Faisal T.; Ito, Jennifer; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2016-01-01

    OpenPET is an open source, modular, extendible, and high-performance platform suitable for multi-channel data acquisition and analysis. Due to the flexibility of the hardware, firmware, and software architectures, the platform is capable of interfacing with a wide variety of detector modules not only in medical imaging but also in homeland security applications. Analog signals from radiation detectors share similar characteristics – a pulse whose area is proportional to the deposited energy and whose leading edge is used to extract a timing signal. As a result, a generic design method of the platform is adopted for the hardware, firmware, and software architectures and implementations. The analog front-end is hosted on a module called a Detector Board, where each board can filter, combine, timestamp, and process multiple channels independently. The processed data is formatted and sent through a backplane bus to a module called Support Board, where 1 Support Board can host up to eight Detector Board modules. The data in the Support Board, coming from 8 Detector Board modules, can be aggregated or correlated (if needed) depending on the algorithm implemented or runtime mode selected. It is then sent out to a computer workstation for further processing. The number of channels (detector modules), to be processed, mandates the overall OpenPET System Configuration, which is designed to handle up to 1,024 channels using 16-channel Detector Boards in the Standard System Configuration and 16,384 channels using 32-channel Detector Boards in the Large System Configuration. PMID:27110034

  12. On the Characterization and Software Implementation of General Protein Lattice Models

    PubMed Central

    Bechini, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract models of proteins have been widely used as a practical means to computationally investigate general properties of the system. In lattice models any sterically feasible conformation is represented as a self-avoiding walk on a lattice, and residue types are limited in number. So far, only two- or three-dimensional lattices have been used. The inspection of the neighborhood of alpha carbons in the core of real proteins reveals that also lattices with higher coordination numbers, possibly in higher dimensional spaces, can be adopted. In this paper, a new general parametric lattice model for simplified protein conformations is proposed and investigated. It is shown how the supporting software can be consistently designed to let algorithms that operate on protein structures be implemented in a lattice-agnostic way. The necessary theoretical foundations are developed and organically presented, pinpointing the role of the concept of main directions in lattice-agnostic model handling. Subsequently, the model features across dimensions and lattice types are explored in tests performed on benchmark protein sequences, using a Python implementation. Simulations give insights on the use of square and triangular lattices in a range of dimensions. The trend of potential minimum for sequences of different lengths, varying the lattice dimension, is uncovered. Moreover, an extensive quantitative characterization of the usage of the so-called “move types” is reported for the first time. The proposed general framework for the development of lattice models is simple yet complete, and an object-oriented architecture can be proficiently employed for the supporting software, by designing ad-hoc classes. The proposed framework represents a new general viewpoint that potentially subsumes a number of solutions previously studied. The adoption of the described model pushes to look at protein structure issues from a more general and essential perspective, making computational

  13. Research and implementation of mining GIS software for unstratified mineral deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Liu, Yajing; Mao, Shanjun

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a professional mining GIS software called Geological and Surveying Spatial Management Information System (GSSMIS) was designed and implemented. Due to restriction of mine design and computerization level, geostatistics and 3D block model were not fully applied in metal mining. The geologists interpreted drill holes and delimit mineral boundaries on the 2D plane and section. Unlike other 3D mining software, a 2D & 3D integration technological architecture for unstratified mineral deposit was proposed considering the conventional exploration and exploitation approaches. The whole system contains 3 modules: geological and surveying database module, 2D MGIS module and 3D modeling and visualization module. Database module input, manage, store and extract all kinds of geological and surveying data. 2D MGIS module provide lots of toolbox for plotting all sorts of engineering maps and processing advance analysis such as geostatistical and uncertain analysis, reserve computation and mining economic estimation. GSSMIS has a typical COM GIS configuration with 5 different developing levels. The 5 level structure has advantage of less coding, easier maintenance and management, good ability of extension and secondary development, adding or subtracting the modules according to user's need. Also, 5 important system characters were introduced in the article, which were: 1) 2D auto-mapping; 2) interactive interpretation of geological boundaries; 3) mutual modifications of plane and section; 4) 3D solid modeling; 5) section profile cutting. Finally, the article presented the implement of GSSMIS in Laixin Iron, Shandong Province. The system changed traditional handcraft mapping mode thoroughly, relieved the heavy burden of engineers and promoted the process of computerization and informatization in China.

  14. Team assessment of behaviour: a high stakes assessment with potential for poor implementation and impaired validity.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Andrew; Higginbotham, Laura; Nathavitharana, Kamal; Singh, Baldev; Hassell, Andrew

    2015-02-01

    Team assessment of behaviour (TAB) is the multi-source feedback assessment of professional behaviours that all UK foundation doctors must engage in twice during their two-year programme. TAB can identify the few underperforming trainees and provide feedback to consolidate the good practice of most. For optimum validity, TAB must be undertaken by a range of assessors, as specified in the national UK Foundation Programme curriculum. This study reports an audit of invalid TAB submissions over a three-year cycle in the West Midlands' Foundation Programme. In 2010, large numbers of TABs were invalid, owing to an incorrect selection or number of assessors. Introduction of validity checking before sign-off greatly improved the numbers of valid assessments in 2011. This was partially sustained in 2012. Assurance of assessment validity is important to ensure delivery of appropriate constructive feedback and to allow early detection and remediation of signs of poor professional behaviours in foundation doctors. PMID:25650189

  15. Software Environment for the Implementation of Tomographic Reconstruction Algorithms Applied to Cases of Few Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, A. B.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H.

    2007-10-26

    Usually tomographic procedure requires a set of projections around the object under study and a mathematical processing of such projections through reconstruction algorithms. An accurate reconstruction requires a proper number of projections (angular sampling) and a proper number of elements in each projection (linear sampling). However in several practical cases it is not possible to fulfill these conditions leading to the so-called problem of few projections. In this case, iterative reconstruction algorithms are more suitable than analytic ones. In this work we present a program written in C++ that provides an environment for two iterative algorithm implementations, one algebraic and the other statistical. The software allows the user a full definition of the acquisition and reconstruction geometries used for the reconstruction algorithms but also to perform projection and backprojection operations. A set of analysis tools was implemented for the characterization of the convergence process. We analyze the performance of the algorithms on numerical phantoms and present the reconstruction of experimental data with few projections coming from transmission X-ray and micro PIXE (Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission) images.

  16. Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

    2010-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

  17. Woods Hole Image Processing System Software implementation; using NetCDF as a software interface for image processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1992-01-01

    The Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology has been involved in the collection, processing and digital mosaicking of high, medium and low-resolution side-scan sonar data during the past 6 years. In the past, processing and digital mosaicking has been accomplished with a dedicated, shore-based computer system. With the need to process sidescan data in the field with increased power and reduced cost of major workstations, a need to have an image processing package on a UNIX based computer system which could be utilized in the field as well as be more generally available to Branch personnel was identified. This report describes the initial development of that package referred to as the Woods Hole Image Processing System (WHIPS). The software was developed using the Unidata NetCDF software interface to allow data to be more readily portable between different computer operating systems.

  18. An SAS Macro for Implementing the Modified Bollen-Stine Bootstrap for Missing Data: Implementing the Bootstrap Using Existing Structural Equation Modeling Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Craig K.

    2005-01-01

    The Bollen-Stine bootstrap can be used to correct for standard error and fit statistic bias that occurs in structural equation modeling (SEM) applications due to nonnormal data. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the use of a custom SAS macro program that can be used to implement the Bollen-Stine bootstrap with existing SEM software.…

  19. A feasibility study of expert patient and community mental health team led bipolar psychoeducation groups: implementing an evidence based practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Group psychoeducation is a cost effective intervention which reduces relapse and improves functioning in bipolar disorder but is rarely implemented. The aim of this study was to identify the acceptability and feasibility of a group psychoeducation programme delivered by community mental health teams (CMHTs) and peer specialist (PS) facilitators. Organisational learning was used to identify and address systematically barriers and enablers, at organisational, health professional and patient levels, to its implementation into a routine service. Methods A systematic examination of barriers and enablers to a three day training process informed the delivery of a first treatment group and a similar process informed the delivery of the second treatment group. Triangulation of research methods improved its internal validity: direct observation of training, self-rated surveys of participant experiences, group discussion, and thematically analysed individual participant and facilitator interviews were employed. Results Barriers and enablers were identified at organisational, educational, treatment content, facilitator and patient levels. All barriers under the control of the research team were addressed with subsequent improvements in patient knowledge about the condition and about local service. In addition, self-management, agency and altruism were enhanced. Barriers that could not be addressed required senior clinical and education leadership outside the research team’s control. PS and professional facilitators were successfully trained and worked together to deliver groups which were generally reported as being beneficial. Conclusion Psychoeducation groups involving CMHT and PS facilitators is acceptable and feasible but their sustainment requires senior leadership within and outside the organisation that control finance and education services. PMID:24215655

  20. [The implementation of interdisciplinarity in the work routine of the family health care team].

    PubMed

    Scherer, Magda Duarte dos Anjos; de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Jean, Rémy

    2013-11-01

    Interdisciplinarity in the work routine of professionals of a Residency Course on Family Health in Southern Brazil was investigated in a qualitative study involving 11 residents and 5 supervisors of seven professions. Through interviews, observations and focal groups the existence of interdisciplinarity in practice was analyzed, duly identifying favorable and unfavorable aspects for its implementation. Interdisciplinarity was expressed as a complex process and concrete action, which occurs in the dramatic implications of its usage, in a dialectical relationship with the political and institutional context. The study revealed that working in family health care renders the work more complex and that the professionals experience difficulties in sharing knowledge and making the transition between multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity. The study concludes that interdisciplinarity requires the integrated use of knowledge in the multi-professional practice, the crossing of disciplinary boundaries, the development of competencies to address the challenges of the work environment and personal attitude as a basic component for professional action. PMID:24196886

  1. Implementation of the thermodynamic and phase transition equations of superfluid helium in CFD software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Pascali, S.; Vendramini, C.; Baudouy, B.

    2015-12-01

    The cryogenic design of the next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets depends on our ability to simulate the helium heat and mass transfer in the internal structure of these magnets. For that matter accurate tools must be developed such as numerical codes integrating the thermodynamic behavior and phase transition in superfluid helium. We have implemented in 2D and 3D, the He II conservation equations in Fluent© CFD software corresponding to a simplified two-fluid model. It consists of a conventional continuity equation, a modified momentum equation for the total fluid and an energy equation including the Gorter-Mellink internal convection term modeling the turbulence regime. The code is mainly suited to simulate transient and steady-state flow configurations. In addition, a new method has been developed to simulate the He II / He I transition in 2D based on a modified Volume Of Fluid method (VOF). The interface between the two states of liquid helium has been locally recreated in the corresponding cells to properly mimic the second order phase transition (no latent heat). Both steady and unsteady numerical simulation have been performed and compared with different experimental results.

  2. Development and Implementation of Software for Visualizing and Editing Multidimensional Flight Simulation Input Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, Todd Michael

    1996-01-01

    In a real-time or batch mode simulation that is designed to model aircraft dynamics over a wide range of flight conditions, a table look- up scheme is implemented to determine the forces and moments on the vehicle based upon the values of parameters such as angle of attack, altitude, Mach number, and control surface deflections. Simulation Aerodynamic Variable Interface (SAVI) is a graphical user interface to the flight simulation input data, designed to operate on workstations that support X Windows. The purpose of the application is to provide two and three dimensional visualization of the data, to allow an intuitive sense of the data set. SAVI also allows the user to manipulate the data, either to conduct an interactive study of the influence of changes on the vehicle dynamics, or to make revisions to data set based on new information such as flight test. This paper discusses the reasons for developing the application, provides an overview of its capabilities, and outlines the software architecture and operating environment.

  3. Designing and Implementing a Distributed System Architecture for the Mars Rover Mission Planning Software (Maestro)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldgof, Gregory M.

    2005-01-01

    Distributed systems allow scientists from around the world to plan missions concurrently, while being updated on the revisions of their colleagues in real time. However, permitting multiple clients to simultaneously modify a single data repository can quickly lead to data corruption or inconsistent states between users. Since our message broker, the Java Message Service, does not ensure that messages will be received in the order they were published, we must implement our own numbering scheme to guarantee that changes to mission plans are performed in the correct sequence. Furthermore, distributed architectures must ensure that as new users connect to the system, they synchronize with the database without missing any messages or falling into an inconsistent state. Robust systems must also guarantee that all clients will remain synchronized with the database even in the case of multiple client failure, which can occur at any time due to lost network connections or a user's own system instability. The final design for the distributed system behind the Mars rover mission planning software fulfills all of these requirements and upon completion will be deployed to MER at the end of 2005 as well as Phoenix (2007) and MSL (2009).

  4. Implementation of Physics Education in Nature; A Pioneer Rescue Team Study: An Explanation by Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürel, Zeynep; Ergen, Hüseyin; Gürel, Atilla

    2007-04-01

    Within this research, it is generally aimed at constituting a sample implementation which shapes the contents of physics course together with its social facet and at forming a platform and starting debates for the contents. Within that purpose, we have conglomerated the students, their professor and the volunteers from the public body responsible for civil services such as the protection and maintenance of factories, power plants, rescue of civilians, and etc. to call on duty in instances of war or extra-ordinary circumstances, named civilian defence. Two camping activities in which various performances were fulfilled were held together with the students. The study focuses on sampling one of the performances which is the crossing a steam and a pond by a rope tied to trees in each ends. The focused study neither orients for nor goals any inspiration for civilian defence purposes. Civilian defence purposes are side-products and they have not been covered in the study. The main aims of this study are monitoring the instances of critical awareness in the students and presenting the samples of the process as a case study.

  5. SOMARC teams with private distribution firm to implement CSM program in Ghana.

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    SOMARC, together with a private manufacturer and distributor of pharmaceutical products (Danafco, Limited), is launching a new contraceptive social marketing (CSM) program designed to make low cost, modern contraceptive products widely available in Ghana's cities. Danafco will directly implement the CSM program. Both the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and the government of Ghana will provide support to the program. James R. Kirland, USAID Population Officer, will assume overall responsibility for coordination and monitoring of CSM program activities. By a special amendment to the Pharmacy and Drug Act of 1961, the Ghanaian government has enabled the CSM program to conduct a demonstration project. Under the project, chemical sellers and retailers who successfully complete a special training session will be entitled to dispense oral contraceptives (OCs) without prescription. With the successful completion of this project, it is hoped that the Ghanaian government will further amend the Pharmacy Act to make contraceptives available nationwide on a nonprescription basis. Initially, the Ghana CSM program will market 3 products: a standard dosage OC; a foaming vaginal tablet; and an uncolored condom. Market research is now underway to determine product names for the OCs and vaginal tablets. The condom will be marketed under the name Panther. The project plans to conduct a retail audit to define current prices in the Ghanaian contraceptive market. Danafco will subcontract with Lintas Ghana Limited to provide advertising, package design, and promotion for the Ghana CSM program. Overall campaign efforts will focus on generating a positive climate for the program among influentials in government, religion, education, and health as well as consumers. The advertising campaign will include radio, television, print, and outdoor media. SOMARC, in collaboration with the USAID/Accra mission, hopes to establish an appropriate climate prior to the advertising launch

  6. Cost-Minimization Model of a Multidisciplinary Antibiotic Stewardship Team Based on a Successful Implementation on a Urology Ward of an Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alex W.; Luttjeboer, Jos; Nannan Panday, Prashant; Wilting, Kasper R.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Postma, Maarten J.; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to stimulate appropriate antimicrobial use and thereby lower the chances of resistance development, an Antibiotic Stewardship Team (A-Team) has been implemented at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Focus of the A-Team was a pro-active day 2 case-audit, which was financially evaluated here to calculate the return on investment from a hospital perspective. Methods Effects were evaluated by comparing audited patients with a historic cohort with the same diagnosis-related groups. Based upon this evaluation a cost-minimization model was created that can be used to predict the financial effects of a day 2 case-audit. Sensitivity analyses were performed to deal with uncertainties. Finally, the model was used to financially evaluate the A-Team. Results One whole year including 114 patients was evaluated. Implementation costs were calculated to be €17,732, which represent total costs spent to implement this A-Team. For this specific patient group admitted to a urology ward and consulted on day 2 by the A-Team, the model estimated total savings of €60,306 after one year for this single department, leading to a return on investment of 5.9. Conclusions The implemented multi-disciplinary A-Team performing a day 2 case-audit in the hospital had a positive return on investment caused by a reduced length of stay due to a more appropriate antibiotic therapy. Based on the extensive data analysis, a model of this intervention could be constructed. This model could be used by other institutions, using their own data to estimate the effects of a day 2 case-audit in their hospital. PMID:25955494

  7. The implementation of an elementary STEM learning team and the effect on teacher self-efficacy: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Jennifer F.

    Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education is part of a national movement to prepare students for the demands of a 21st century workforce. STEM uses an integrated, real-world problem solving approach to increase the levels of collaboration, communication, critical, and creative thinking in students. If expectations for students have increased to stay competitive in a global market, teachers must be equipped to meet the needs of the new 21st century learners in their classrooms. To that end, professional learning for educators is essential to ensure they are equipped with the tools necessary for success. While there are many approaches to teacher development, professional learning teams, based on the work of Garmston and Wellman, focus on teachers' instructional delivery, targeted student learning needs, planning, implementing new strategies, collaboration, and reflective dialogue. The purpose of the study is to improve instructional practice providing quality STEM instruction to students and increase teacher self-efficacy---a teachers' perception of his or her ability to instruct students in the STEM disciplines. Theoretical implications of a study on an elementary STEM learning team could affect the way schools deliver STEM professional learning opportunities to teachers and the way students are delivered a quality STEM education. Research has shown that Model I behavior would limit the change process of professional learning through a surface inspection of the issues; however model II behaviors would benefit the teachers, students and organization because teachers would be collaborating on specific objectives to develop a knowledge base and skill set to meet students' needs. Extending professional development by engaging stakeholders in a collaborative process to build model II behaviors will create an organizational structure that facilitates learning.

  8. The Role of Teams in Implementing School Improvement Plans. The School Improvement Leader: Four Perspectives on Change in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiseman, Jeffrey W.; And Others

    School improvement teams are assembled to share leadership responsibility with the principal. Differing from advisory councils in that they have more involvement in decision making, and differing from management teams in that they include role groups other than administrators, school improvement teams may be composed of teachers and the principal…

  9. Implementation of a real-time software-only image smoothing filter for a block-transform video codec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaw, Wesley F.; Rowe, Lawrence A.

    2003-05-01

    The JPEG compression standard is a popular image format. However, at high compression ratios JPEG compression, which uses block-transform coding, can produce blocking artifacts, or artificially introduced edges within the image. Several post-processing algorithms have been developed to remove these artifacts. This paper describes an implementation of a post-processing algorithm developed by Ramchandran, Chou, and Crouse (RCC) which is fast enough for real-time software-only video applications. The original implementation of the RCC algorithm involved calculating thresholds to identify artificial edges. These calculations proved too expensive for use in real-time software-only applications. We replaced these calculations with a linear scale approximating ideal threshold values based on a combination of peak signal-to-noise ratio calculations and subjective visual quality. The resulting filter implementation is available in the widely-deployed Open Mash streaming media toolkit.

  10. Design and implementation of real-time software radio for anti-interference GPS/WAAS sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Juang, Jyh-Ching; Seo, Jiwon; Lo, Sherman; Akos, Dennis M; De Lorenzo, David S; Enge, Per

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive antenna array processing is widely known to provide significant anti-interference capabilities within a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver. A main challenge in the quest for such receiver architecture has always been the computational/processing requirements. Even more demanding would be to try and incorporate the flexibility of the Software-Defined Radio (SDR) design philosophy in such an implementation. This paper documents a feasible approach to a real-time SDR implementation of a beam-steered GNSS receiver and validates its performance. This research implements a real-time software receiver on a widely-available x86-based multi-core microprocessor to process four-element antenna array data streams sampled with 16-bit resolution. The software receiver is capable of 12 channels all-in-view Controlled Reception Pattern Antenna (CRPA) array processing capable of rejecting multiple interferers. Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) instructions assembly coding and multithreaded programming, the key to such an implementation to reduce computational complexity, are fully documented within the paper. In conventional antenna array systems, receivers use the geometry of antennas and cable lengths known in advance. The documented CRPA implementation is architected to operate without extensive set-up and pre-calibration and leverages Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) to provide adaptation in both the frequency and space domains. The validation component of the paper demonstrates that the developed software receiver operates in real time with live Global Positioning System (GPS) and Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) L1 C/A code signal. Further, interference rejection capabilities of the implementation are also demonstrated using multiple synthetic interferers which are added to the live data stream. PMID:23202002

  11. Design and Implementation of Real-Time Software Radio for Anti-Interference GPS/WAAS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Juang, Jyh-Ching; Seo, Jiwon; Lo, Sherman; Akos, Dennis M.; De Lorenzo, David S.; Enge, Per

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive antenna array processing is widely known to provide significant anti-interference capabilities within a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver. A main challenge in the quest for such receiver architecture has always been the computational/processing requirements. Even more demanding would be to try and incorporate the flexibility of the Software-Defined Radio (SDR) design philosophy in such an implementation. This paper documents a feasible approach to a real-time SDR implementation of a beam-steered GNSS receiver and validates its performance. This research implements a real-time software receiver on a widely-available x86-based multi-core microprocessor to process four-element antenna array data streams sampled with 16-bit resolution. The software receiver is capable of 12 channels all-in-view Controlled Reception Pattern Antenna (CRPA) array processing capable of rejecting multiple interferers. Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) instructions assembly coding and multithreaded programming, the key to such an implementation to reduce computational complexity, are fully documented within the paper. In conventional antenna array systems, receivers use the geometry of antennas and cable lengths known in advance. The documented CRPA implementation is architected to operate without extensive set-up and pre-calibration and leverages Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) to provide adaptation in both the frequency and space domains. The validation component of the paper demonstrates that the developed software receiver operates in real time with live Global Positioning System (GPS) and Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) L1 C/A code signal. Further, interference rejection capabilities of the implementation are also demonstrated using multiple synthetic interferers which are added to the live data stream. PMID:23202002

  12. The SFXC software correlator for very long baseline interferometry: algorithms and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keimpema, A.; Kettenis, M. M.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Campbell, R. M.; Cimó, G.; Duev, D. A.; Eldering, B.; Kruithof, N.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Marchal, D.; Molera Calvés, G.; Ozdemir, H.; Paragi, Z.; Pidopryhora, Y.; Szomoru, A.; Yang, J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper a description is given of the SFXC software correlator, developed and maintained at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE). The software is designed to run on generic Linux-based computing clusters. The correlation algorithm is explained in detail, as are some of the novel modes that software correlation has enabled, such as wide-field VLBI imaging through the use of multiple phase centres and pulsar gating and binning. This is followed by an overview of the software architecture. Finally, the performance of the correlator as a function of number of CPU cores, telescopes and spectral channels is shown.

  13. Implementing Role-Changing Versus Time-Changing Innovations in Health Care: Differences in Helpfulness of Staff Improvement Teams, Management, and Network for Learning.

    PubMed

    Nembhard, Ingrid M; Morrow, Christopher T; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2015-12-01

    Health care organizations often fail in their effort to implement care-improving innovations. This article differentiates role-changing innovations, altering what workers do, from time-changing innovations, altering when tasks are performed or for how long. We examine our hypothesis that the degree to which access to groups that can alter organizational learning--staff, management, and external network--facilitates implementation depends on innovation type. Our longitudinal study using ordinal logistic regression and survey data on 517 hospitals' implementation of evidence-based practices for treating heart attack confirmed our thesis for factors granting access to each group: improvement team's representativeness (of affected staff), senior management engagement, and network membership. Although team representativeness and network membership were positively associated with implementing role-changing practices, senior management engagement was not. In contrast, senior management engagement was positively associated with implementing time-changing practices, whereas team representativeness was not, and network membership was not unless there was limited management engagement. These findings advance implementation science by explaining mixed results across past studies: Nature of change for workers alters potential facilitators' effects on implementation. PMID:26116611

  14. OFDMA-based network-coded cooperation: design and implementation using software-defined radio nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökceli, Selahattin; Alakoca, Hakan; Başaran, Semiha Tedik; Kurt, Güneş Karabulut

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of network coding towards enhancing communication quality, both in terms of robustness or data transmission rates, make it a significant candidate as a future networking technology. Conventionally, network coding is mostly used in wired infrastructures, where transmission errors between nodes are negligible. Capturing the provided benefits of network coding via straightforward extension from wired networks to wireless networks is not trivial. In addition to the challenges introduced through the wireless channel impairments, we can also capture the spatial diversity gain provided by the broadcast nature of the wireless channels. In this work, we design and implement a network-coded cooperation (NCC) system that operates in real time through the use of software-defined radio (SDR) nodes for the first time in the literature. We specifically target wireless networks. Our system is based on orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) that provides a practical means to enable high transmission rates through the use of narrowband subcarriers. The developed testbed is composed of three source nodes, a relay node and two destination nodes. The transmission of the proposed NCC-OFDMA system is completed in two phases; the broadcast and the relaying phases. Multiplexing of source nodes' signals is achieved through OFDMA technique. In the broadcast phase, an OFDMA signal is transmitted to relay and destination nodes. In the relaying phase, the relay node first detects the OFDMA signal, generates network-coded symbols, and then transmits these symbols to destination nodes. At the end of these two phases, the destination nodes determine the source nodes' signals by using network decoders. The destination nodes make use of both the uncoded and network-coded symbols, which are received in broadcast and relaying phases, respectively. Destination nodes then perform network decoding. Through real-time bit error rate and error vector magnitude measurements, we show

  15. Multithreaded real-time 3D image processing software architecture and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Vikas; Atanassov, Kalin; Aleksic, Milivoje; Goma, Sergio R.

    2011-03-01

    Recently, 3D displays and videos have generated a lot of interest in the consumer electronics industry. To make 3D capture and playback popular and practical, a user friendly playback interface is desirable. Towards this end, we built a real time software 3D video player. The 3D video player displays user captured 3D videos, provides for various 3D specific image processing functions and ensures a pleasant viewing experience. Moreover, the player enables user interactivity by providing digital zoom and pan functionalities. This real time 3D player was implemented on the GPU using CUDA and OpenGL. The player provides user interactive 3D video playback. Stereo images are first read by the player from a fast drive and rectified. Further processing of the images determines the optimal convergence point in the 3D scene to reduce eye strain. The rationale for this convergence point selection takes into account scene depth and display geometry. The first step in this processing chain is identifying keypoints by detecting vertical edges within the left image. Regions surrounding reliable keypoints are then located on the right image through the use of block matching. The difference in the positions between the corresponding regions in the left and right images are then used to calculate disparity. The extrema of the disparity histogram gives the scene disparity range. The left and right images are shifted based upon the calculated range, in order to place the desired region of the 3D scene at convergence. All the above computations are performed on one CPU thread which calls CUDA functions. Image upsampling and shifting is performed in response to user zoom and pan. The player also consists of a CPU display thread, which uses OpenGL rendering (quad buffers). This also gathers user input for digital zoom and pan and sends them to the processing thread.

  16. The astrometric core solution for the Gaia mission. Overview of models, algorithms, and software implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindegren, L.; Lammers, U.; Hobbs, D.; O'Mullane, W.; Bastian, U.; Hernández, J.

    2012-02-01

    Context. The Gaia satellite will observe about one billion stars and other point-like sources. The astrometric core solution will determine the astrometric parameters (position, parallax, and proper motion) for a subset of these sources, using a global solution approach which must also include a large number of parameters for the satellite attitude and optical instrument. The accurate and efficient implementation of this solution is an extremely demanding task, but crucial for the outcome of the mission. Aims: We aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the mathematical and physical models applicable to this solution, as well as its numerical and algorithmic framework. Methods: The astrometric core solution is a simultaneous least-squares estimation of about half a billion parameters, including the astrometric parameters for some 100 million well-behaved so-called primary sources. The global nature of the solution requires an iterative approach, which can be broken down into a small number of distinct processing blocks (source, attitude, calibration and global updating) and auxiliary processes (including the frame rotator and selection of primary sources). We describe each of these processes in some detail, formulate the underlying models, from which the observation equations are derived, and outline the adopted numerical solution methods with due consideration of robustness and the structure of the resulting system of equations. Appendices provide brief introductions to some important mathematical tools (quaternions and B-splines for the attitude representation, and a modified Cholesky algorithm for positive semidefinite problems) and discuss some complications expected in the real mission data. Results: A complete software system called AGIS (Astrometric Global Iterative Solution) is being built according to the methods described in the paper. Based on simulated data for 2 million primary sources we present some initial results, demonstrating the basic

  17. Geoscience data standards, software implementations, and the Internet. Where we came from and where we might be going.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Geographic information science and the coupled database and software systems that have grown from it have been evolving since the early 1990s. The multi-file shapefile package, invented early in this evolution, is an example of a highly generalized file format that can be used as an archival, interchange, and format for program execution. There are other formats, such as GeoTIFF and NetCDF that have similar characteristics. These de-facto standard (in contrast to the formally defined and published standards) formats, while not initially designed for machine-readable web-services, are used in them extensively. Relying on these formats allows legacy software to be adapted to web-services, but may require complicate software development to handle dynamic introspection of these legacy file formats' metadata. A generalized system of web-service types that offer archive, interchange, and run-time capabilities based on commonly implemented file formats and established web-service specifications has emerged from exemplar implementations. For example, an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Feature Service is used to serve sites or model polygons and an OGC Sensor Observation Service provides time series data for the sites. The broad system of data formats, web-service types, and freely available software that implements the system will be described. The presentation will include a perspective on the future of this basic system and how it relates to scientific domain specific information models such as the Open Geospatial Consortium standards for geographic, hydrologic, and hydrogeologic data.

  18. Outcomes of a science teacher development program for middle-level interdisciplinary teams: Relationships among teachers' beliefs, school contexts, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkin, Arlene H.

    Project Alliance, a teacher development program conducted by George Mason University and the American Association for the Advancement of Science with National Science Foundation funding (ESI-9355753) from 1994 to 1998, provided professional development for interdisciplinary teaching teams to enhance middle-level science instruction. Teachers experienced the same kinds of constructivist, hands-on, inquiry-based learning environments that they were expected to create for their students. The purposes of this study of 48 participants are (a) to assess the effectiveness of Project Alliance, and (b) to investigate relationships among teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning, school contexts, and individual teachers' implementation of the program's goals. Two cohorts of interdisciplinary teams from the mid-Atlantic region volunteered for two years each. During the first of two summer institutes, teachers engaged in graduate studies of environmental science, geology, technology, pedagogical content knowledge, and team teaching methods and designed integrated environmental science curriculum units to implement in their schools during the following academic year. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to investigate individual teachers' implementation of the curriculum units. Data sources included surveys, videotaped presentations, interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations. Quantitative analyses employed exploratory correlation and regression procedures. Qualitative analyses followed a constant comparative process. Predictor variables were (1) teachers' personal epistemologies, measured by the Attitudes about Reality Scale; (2) certainty of practice, assessed with the Expert Science Teaching Evaluation Model, Teaching Practices Assessment Inventory; (3) school organizational structure; and (4) administrator involvement. Results showed that more than half of the teachers successfully implemented their units and all implemented unit-related activities

  19. Does the implementation of hardware need software? A longitudinal study on fluoride-removal filter use in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sonego, Ina L; Huber, Alexandra C; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2013-11-19

    Evidence suggests that the effectiveness of technology designed to provide safe and healthy water is dependent on the degree of its use. In addition to providing safe water "hardware" (i.e., new infrastructure or equipment) to populations at risk, it might be necessary to also provide suitable "software" programs (behavior change strategies) to support use. A longitudinal survey was conducted in rural Ethiopia following the distribution of fluoride-removal household filters. Three intervention groups were evaluated. Group 1 only received the hardware, i.e., the fluoride-removal filter. Groups 2 and 3 also received software in the form of two evidence-based psychological interventions: a planning and social prompts intervention and an educational workshop with pledging. Group 2 received both software interventions, and Group 3 only received the educational workshop. The effects of the hardware and software on behavior and thus filter use were analyzed along with specific psychological factors. The results showed that the provision of the hardware alone (the fluoride-removal filter) was not enough to ensure sufficient use of the equipment. The addition of a software component in the form of psychological interventions increased filter use up to 80%. An increase in filter use was measured following each intervention resulting in the health-risk being minimized. We conclude that it is necessary that the implementation of hardware of this nature is accompanied by evidence-based intervention software. PMID:24117367

  20. Teachers' Critical Evaluations of Dynamic Geometry Software Implementation in 1:1 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Jennifer; Stein, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Although the use of dynamic software in high school mathematics in the United States has emerged as a research topic, little research has been conducted on how teachers integrate new software in relation to at-home technology networks. Interviews with eight mathematics teachers from four North Carolina counties participating in 1:1 laptop…

  1. Teacher Design Teams (TDTs)--Building Capacity for Innovation, Learning and Curriculum Implementation in the Continuing Professional Development of In-Career Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmie, Geraldine Mooney

    2007-01-01

    From October to December 2005, six biology associates were employed to progress the connection between curriculum implementation and the continuing professional development of teachers at regional level. The associates worked with one hundred biology teachers in Teacher Design Teams (TDTs) and together they produced eighteen innovative classroom…

  2. The Contribution of the Self-Efficacy of Curriculum Development Team and Curriculum Document Quality to the Implementation of Diversified Curriculum in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susilana, Rudi; Asra; Herlina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe how the self-efficacy of curriculum development team (CDT) and curriculum document quality contributed to the implementation of diversified curriculum in elementary schools. This research is a survey study using descriptive method. Schools were the unit of analysis while respondents selected from the schools…

  3. The Talent Development Middle School. Creating a Motivational Climate Conducive to Talent Development in Middle Schools: Implementation and Effects of Student Team Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Douglas J.; Plank, Stephen B.

    Central East Middle School in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), an urban school with about 45% Hispanic enrollment, and the Center for Research on the Education of Children Placed at Risk are working together to implement a Talent Development Middle School model of schooling. Part of this effort includes use of the Student Team Reading (STR) Program,…

  4. Coordinated Community Efforts to Respond to Sexual Assault: A National Study of Sexual Assault Response Team Implementation.

    PubMed

    Greeson, Megan R; Campbell, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) bring together sexual assault responders (e.g., police, prosecutors, medical/forensic examiners, rape victim advocates) to coordinate and improve the response to sexual assault. Ultimately, SARTs seek to improve sexual assault victims' experiences of seeking help and sexual assault case outcomes in the criminal justice system. To date, there are hundreds of SARTs across the United States and yet, there has been no nationally representative study of how SARTs are implemented. Therefore, the current study used a multistep process to create the first sampling frame of SARTs and then studied how SARTs are structured and function within a random sample of SARTs. Findings reveal commonalities as well as variation across SARTs. Most SARTs rated improving legal outcomes, improving victims' help-seeking experiences, and prevention/education as important goals, yet most prioritized their time and energy toward victims' experiences. SARTs' membership varied, with an average of 12 organizations involved in the SART, and 75% of SARTs having active membership from police, prosecutors, rape victim advocates, and medical/forensic examiners. SARTs were moderately formalized and most SARTs engaged in most collaborative processes (e.g., multidisciplinary cross-training, case review, policy/protocol development, and review) on an as needed basis. Finally, results revealed that some types of cross-system coordination in responding to victims/cases were quite frequent, whereas other types of coordination were quite infrequent. Implications for future research and supporting the development and sustainability of SARTs are discussed. PMID:25315485

  5. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students’ engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge problems. During the eight semesters assessed in this study, URM students and those with less preparation attended SGMs with equal or greater frequency than their counterparts. Most agreed that SGMs enhanced their comprehension of biology and ability to articulate solutions. The historical grade gap between URM and non-URM students narrowed slightly in Biology 2, but not in other biology and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Nonetheless, URM students taking introductory biology after program implementation have graduated with biology majors or minors at the same rates as non-URM students, and have enrolled in postcollege degree programs at equal or greater rates. These results suggest that improved performance as measured by science grade point average may not be necessary to improve the persistence of students from underrepresented groups as life sciences majors. PMID:27496361

  6. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology.

    PubMed

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A; Siwicki, Kathleen K

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge problems. During the eight semesters assessed in this study, URM students and those with less preparation attended SGMs with equal or greater frequency than their counterparts. Most agreed that SGMs enhanced their comprehension of biology and ability to articulate solutions. The historical grade gap between URM and non-URM students narrowed slightly in Biology 2, but not in other biology and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Nonetheless, URM students taking introductory biology after program implementation have graduated with biology majors or minors at the same rates as non-URM students, and have enrolled in postcollege degree programs at equal or greater rates. These results suggest that improved performance as measured by science grade point average may not be necessary to improve the persistence of students from underrepresented groups as life sciences majors. PMID:27496361

  7. Speeding Up Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

  8. Validation of mission critical software design and implementation using model checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, P. J.; Mikk, E.; Holzmann, G.; Smith, M.; Dams, D.

    2002-01-01

    Model Checking conducts an exhaustive exploration of all possible behaviors of a software system design and as such can be used to detect defects in designs that are typically difficult to discover with conventional testing approaches.

  9. Neuromorphic implementation of a software-defined camera that can see through fire and smoke in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jae H.; Abbott, A. Lynn; Szu, Harold H.; Willey, Jefferson; Landa, Joseph; Krapels, Keith A.

    2014-05-01

    Software-defined Cameras (SDC) based on Boltzmann's molecular thermodynamics can "see" through visually-degraded fields such as fire, fog, and dust in some situations. This capability is possible by means of unsupervised learning implemented on a neuromorphic algo-tecture. This paper describes the SDC algorithm design strategy with respect to nontrivial solutions, stability, and accuracy. An example neuromorphic learning algorithm is presented along with unsupervised learning stopping criteria.

  10. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 5. Experiment planning and product design.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Frenkel, Michael

    2011-01-24

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. In the present paper, we describe development of an algorithmic approach to assist experiment planning through assessment of the existing body of knowledge, including availability of experimental thermophysical property data, variable ranges studied, associated uncertainties, state of prediction methods, and parameters for deployment of prediction methods and how these parameters can be obtained using targeted measurements, etc., and, indeed, how the intended measurement may address the underlying scientific or engineering problem under consideration. A second new feature described here is the application of the software capabilities for aid in the design of chemical products through identification of chemical systems possessing desired values of thermophysical properties within defined ranges of tolerance. The algorithms and their software implementation to achieve this are described. Finally, implementation of a new data validation and weighting system is described for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data, and directions for future enhancements are outlined. PMID:21166466

  11. Implementation of Motion Simulation Software and Visual-Auditory Electronics for Use in a Low Gravity Robotic Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, William Campbell

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) to assist in manned space missions. One of the proposed targets for this robotic vehicle is a near-Earth asteroid (NEA), which typically exhibit a surface gravity of only a few micro-g. In order to properly test ATHLETE in such an environment, the development team has constructed an inverted Stewart platform testbed that acts as a robotic motion simulator. This project focused on creating physical simulation software that is able to predict how ATHLETE will function on and around a NEA. The corresponding platform configurations are calculated and then passed to the testbed to control ATHLETE's motion. In addition, imitation attitude, imitation attitude control thrusters were designed and fabricated for use on ATHLETE. These utilize a combination of high power LEDs and audio amplifiers to provide visual and auditory cues that correspond to the physics simulation.

  12. Software Program: Software Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Software Management Guidebook is twofold. First, this document defines the core products and activities required of NASA software projects. It defines life-cycle models and activity-related methods but acknowledges that no single life-cycle model is appropriate for all NASA software projects. It also acknowledges that the appropriate method for accomplishing a required activity depends on characteristics of the software project. Second, this guidebook provides specific guidance to software project managers and team leaders in selecting appropriate life cycles and methods to develop a tailored plan for a software engineering project.

  13. A Genuine TEAM Player

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Qualtech Systems, Inc. developed a complete software system with capabilities of multisignal modeling, diagnostic analysis, run-time diagnostic operations, and intelligent interactive reasoners. Commercially available as the TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System) tool set, the software can be used to reveal unanticipated system failures. The TEAMS software package is broken down into four companion tools: TEAMS-RT, TEAMATE, TEAMS-KB, and TEAMS-RDS. TEAMS-RT identifies good, bad, and suspect components in the system in real-time. It reports system health results from onboard tests, and detects and isolates failures within the system, allowing for rapid fault isolation. TEAMATE takes over from where TEAMS-RT left off by intelligently guiding the maintenance technician through the troubleshooting procedure, repair actions, and operational checkout. TEAMS-KB serves as a model management and collection tool. TEAMS-RDS (TEAMS-Remote Diagnostic Server) has the ability to continuously assess a system and isolate any failure in that system or its components, in real time. RDS incorporates TEAMS-RT, TEAMATE, and TEAMS-KB in a large-scale server architecture capable of providing advanced diagnostic and maintenance functions over a network, such as the Internet, with a web browser user interface.

  14. SDA 7: A modular and parallel implementation of the simulation of diffusional association software

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Michael; Romanowska, Julia; Kokh, Daria B.; Ozboyaci, Musa; Yu, Xiaofeng; Öztürk, Mehmet Ali; Richter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of diffusional association (SDA) Brownian dynamics software package has been widely used in the study of biomacromolecular association. Initially developed to calculate bimolecular protein–protein association rate constants, it has since been extended to study electron transfer rates, to predict the structures of biomacromolecular complexes, to investigate the adsorption of proteins to inorganic surfaces, and to simulate the dynamics of large systems containing many biomacromolecular solutes, allowing the study of concentration‐dependent effects. These extensions have led to a number of divergent versions of the software. In this article, we report the development of the latest version of the software (SDA 7). This release was developed to consolidate the existing codes into a single framework, while improving the parallelization of the code to better exploit modern multicore shared memory computer architectures. It is built using a modular object‐oriented programming scheme, to allow for easy maintenance and extension of the software, and includes new features, such as adding flexible solute representations. We discuss a number of application examples, which describe some of the methods available in the release, and provide benchmarking data to demonstrate the parallel performance. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26123630

  15. SDA 7: A modular and parallel implementation of the simulation of diffusional association software.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Michael; Bruce, Neil J; Romanowska, Julia; Kokh, Daria B; Ozboyaci, Musa; Yu, Xiaofeng; Öztürk, Mehmet Ali; Richter, Stefan; Wade, Rebecca C

    2015-08-01

    The simulation of diffusional association (SDA) Brownian dynamics software package has been widely used in the study of biomacromolecular association. Initially developed to calculate bimolecular protein-protein association rate constants, it has since been extended to study electron transfer rates, to predict the structures of biomacromolecular complexes, to investigate the adsorption of proteins to inorganic surfaces, and to simulate the dynamics of large systems containing many biomacromolecular solutes, allowing the study of concentration-dependent effects. These extensions have led to a number of divergent versions of the software. In this article, we report the development of the latest version of the software (SDA 7). This release was developed to consolidate the existing codes into a single framework, while improving the parallelization of the code to better exploit modern multicore shared memory computer architectures. It is built using a modular object-oriented programming scheme, to allow for easy maintenance and extension of the software, and includes new features, such as adding flexible solute representations. We discuss a number of application examples, which describe some of the methods available in the release, and provide benchmarking data to demonstrate the parallel performance. PMID:26123630

  16. Improvement of CSCW Software Implementation in NPD: The CAM Mechanism for a Better Adoption by Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Restrepo, Tomas; Arbelaez, Natalia; Millet, Dominique; Gidel, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Cooperation between disseminated actors is a key factor in improving new product development (NPD) performance. In the last years, numerous CSCW software applications have been introduced in the industry to support NPD with a low success rate. This is partly due to the limited insight of the organisational and human factors influencing user…

  17. Implementing Quality Assurance for the Numerical Research Software Dune / PDELab / DuMux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemisch, B.; Bastian, P.; Kempf, D.; Koch, T.; Helmig, R.

    2015-12-01

    Quality assurance and, in particular, automated testing, should be one of the key elements of modern software development. However, applying common techniques from software engineering to numerical frameworks, such as Dune, may be challenging since the requirements for a test might be very different to standard software. This talk gives an overview of our work in describing system tests for numerical software and developing test tools to ensure that qualitative and quantitative properties of PDE discretizations are preserved. The developed tools are employed in the Dune discretization module Dune-PDELab and the porous-media simulator DuMux.The newly developed module dune-testtools provides the following components: A domain specific language for feature modelling, which is naturally integrated into the workflow of numerical simulation. Tools to test whether a given PDE discretization does still yield the correct result without performance (or scalability) regressions. Integration of the above tools into a CMake based build system. Extensions to the Dune core modules to support the development of system tests.

  18. Designing, Developing and Implementing a Software Tool for Scenario Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Geoff; Taylor, Mathew; Stewart, Terry; Blackburn, Greg; Jinks, Audrey; Razdar, Bahareh; Holmes, Paul; Marastoni, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The pedagogical value of problem-based and inquiry-based learning activities has led to increased use of this approach in many courses. While scenarios or case studies were initially presented to learners as text-based material, the development of modern software technology provides the opportunity to deliver scenarios as e-learning modules,…

  19. Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND): Implementation of a Software Framework for Facilitated Community Website Creation by Nontechnical Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Tuhina; Lee, Cheryl E; Chen, Shirley Yu; Herman, Adam; Sharma, Balraj; Johal, Gurinder; Gu, Bobby

    2013-01-01

    Background The Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND) provides a structured Internet interface for the sharing of information with individuals struggling with the consequences of rare developmental disorders. Large disease-impacted communities can support fundraising organizations that disseminate Web-based information through elegant websites run by professional staff. Such quality resources for families challenged by rare disorders are infrequently produced and, when available, are often dependent upon the continued efforts of a single individual. Objective The project endeavors to create an intuitive Web-based software system that allows a volunteer with limited technical computer skills to produce a useful rare disease website in a short time period. Such a system should provide access to emerging news and research findings, facilitate community participation, present summary information about the disorder, and allow for transient management by volunteers who are likely to change periodically. Methods The prototype portal was implemented using the WordPress software system with both existing and customized supplementary plug-in software modules. Gamification scoring features were implemented in a module, allowing editors to measure progress. The system was installed on a Linux-based computer server, accessible across the Internet through standard Web browsers. Results A prototype PFOND system was implemented and tested. The prototype system features a structured organization with distinct partitions for background information, recent publications, and community discussions. The software design allows volunteer editors to create a themed website, implement a limited set of topic pages, and connect the software to dynamic RSS feeds providing information about recent news or advances. The prototype was assessed by a fraction of the disease sites developed (8 out of 27), including Aarskog-Scott syndrome, Aniridia, Adams-Oliver syndrome

  20. An implementation of Software Defined Radios for federated aerospace networks: Informing satellite implementations using an inter-balloon communications experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtyamov, Rustam; Cruz, Ignasi Lluch i.; Matevosyan, Hripsime; Knoll, Dominik; Pica, Udrivolf; Lisi, Marco; Golkar, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Novel space mission concepts such as Federated Satellite Systems promise to enhance sustainability, robustness, and reliability of current missions by means of in-orbit sharing of space assets. This new paradigm requires the utilization of several technologies in order to confer flexibility and re-configurability to communications systems among heterogeneous spacecrafts. This paper illustrates the results of the experimental demonstration of the value proposition of federated satellites through two stratospheric balloons interoperating with a tracking ground station through Commercial Off-The-Shelf Software Defined Radios (SDRs). The paper reports telemetry analysis and characterizes the communications network that was realized in-flight. Furthermore, it provides details on an in-flight anomaly experienced by one of the balloons, which was recovered through the use of the federated technology that has been developed. The anomaly experienced led to the early loss of the directional link from the ground station to the affected stratospheric balloon node after 15 min in flight. Nevertheless, thanks to the federated approach among the systems, the ground station was still able to retrieve the balloon's data in real time through the network system, for which the other balloon operated as a federated relay for 45 min in flight, uninterrupted. In other words, the federated approach to the system allowed triplicating the useful lifetime of the defective system, which would have not been possible to realize otherwise. Such anomaly coincidentally demonstrated the value of the federated approach to space systems design. The paper paves the way for future tests on space assets.

  1. Optimal parameters for clinical implementation of breast cancer patient setup using Varian DTS software.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sook Kien; Zygmanski, Piotr; Jeung, Andrew; Mostafavi, Hassan; Hesser, Juergen; Bellon, Jennifer R; Wong, Julia S; Lyatskaya, Yulia

    2012-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) was evaluated as an alternative to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for patient setup. DTS is preferable when there are constraints with setup time, gantry-couch clearance, and imaging dose using CBCT. This study characterizes DTS data acquisition and registration parameters for the setup of breast cancer patients using nonclinical Varian DTS software. DTS images were reconstructed from CBCT projections acquired on phantoms and patients with surgical clips in the target volume. A shift-and-add algorithm was used for DTS volume reconstructions, while automated cross-correlation matches were performed within Varian DTS software. Triangulation on two short DTS arcs separated by various angular spread was done to improve 3D registration accuracy. Software performance was evaluated on two phantoms and ten breast cancer patients using the registration result as an accuracy measure; investigated parameters included arc lengths, arc orientations, angular separation between two arcs, reconstruction slice spacing, and number of arcs. The shifts determined from DTS-to-CT registration were compared to the shifts based on CBCT-to-CT registration. The difference between these shifts was used to evaluate the software accuracy. After findings were quantified, optimal parameters for the clinical use of DTS technique were determined. It was determined that at least two arcs were necessary for accurate 3D registration for patient setup. Registration accuracy of 2 mm was achieved when the reconstruction arc length was > 5° for clips with HU ≥ 1000; larger arc length (≥ 8°) was required for very low HU clips. An optimal arc separation was found to be ≥ 20° and optimal arc length was 10°. Registration accuracy did not depend on DTS slice spacing. DTS image reconstruction took 10-30 seconds and registration took less than 20 seconds. The performance of Varian DTS software was found suitable for the accurate setup of breast cancer patients

  2. SIFT - Design and analysis of a fault-tolerant computer for aircraft control. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wensley, J. H.; Lamport, L.; Goldberg, J.; Green, M. W.; Levitt, K. N.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Shostak, R. E.; Weinstock, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) is an ultrareliable computer for critical aircraft control applications that achieves fault tolerance by the replication of tasks among processing units. The main processing units are off-the-shelf minicomputers, with standard microcomputers serving as the interface to the I/O system. Fault isolation is achieved by using a specially designed redundant bus system to interconnect the processing units. Error detection and analysis and system reconfiguration are performed by software. Iterative tasks are redundantly executed, and the results of each iteration are voted upon before being used. Thus, any single failure in a processing unit or bus can be tolerated with triplication of tasks, and subsequent failures can be tolerated after reconfiguration. Independent execution by separate processors means that the processors need only be loosely synchronized, and a novel fault-tolerant synchronization method is described.

  3. Software engineering risk factors in the implementation of a small electronic medical record system: the problem of scalability.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Michael F; Starren, Justin B

    2002-01-01

    The successful implementation of clinical information systems is difficult. In examining the reasons and potential solutions for this problem, the medical informatics community may benefit from the lessons of a rich body of software engineering and management literature about the failure of software projects. Based on previous studies, we present a conceptual framework for understanding the risk factors associated with large-scale projects. However, the vast majority of existing literature is based on large, enterprise-wide systems, and it unclear whether those results may be scaled down and applied to smaller projects such as departmental medical information systems. To examine this issue, we discuss the case study of a delayed electronic medical record implementation project in a small specialty practice at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. While the factors contributing to the delay of this small project share some attributes with those found in larger organizations, there are important differences. The significance of these differences for groups implementing small medical information systems is discussed. PMID:12463804

  4. A Capstone Course on Agile Software Development Using Scrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahnic, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an undergraduate capstone course in software engineering is described that not only exposes students to agile software development, but also makes it possible to observe the behavior of developers using Scrum for the first time. The course requires students to work as Scrum Teams, responsible for the implementation of a set of user…

  5. Installing and Managing PC Time-Control Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Employees of a West Virginia library system were tired of intervening in frequent patron fights over the public access PCs. In this article, the author discusses how the implementation of time-control software for an automated session reservation/management service reduced the conflict. A team was assigned to investigate PC management software.…

  6. Citizenship behavior at the team level of analysis: the effects of team leadership, team commitment, perceived team support, and team size.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Craig L; Herbik, Pamela A

    2004-06-01

    The authors investigated citizenship behavior at the team level of analysis by examining 71 change management teams, teams that are responsible for implementing organizational change. The authors collected data at an automotive-industry firm in the mid-Atlantic United States using a questionnaire methodology and an examination of company records. Team leader behavior, team commitment, and perceived team support all had large effects on team citizenship behavior, whereas team size had a small-to-negligible effect. PMID:15168430

  7. Proposed powered explicit guidance thrust integrals derivation/implementation. Mission planning, mission analysis and software formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggers, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    A new exoatmospheric, powered explicit guidance (PEG) thrust integral formulation and a simple method of implementation are presented. The new thrust integral formulation is significantly simpler than that currently used in PEG. Preliminary estimates indicate a computer storage savings of 220 words, which is approximately 10 percent of the current PEG ascent program. Alternate methods of implementation that could produce even more savings are noted.

  8. The fuzzy control policy implementation of software and hardware adopted in automatically changing receiver system of 25m radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Feng; Zhang, Jin; Aili, Yu

    2005-09-01

    It is difficult to control a system based only on its precise mathematic model by classical control policy in the condition that their precise mathematic models can not be found and their parameters are variable in outer environment. With the rapid development in software and hardware, a system using the fuzzy control policy can get very good effects in some conditions. According to the system environment, fuzzy control policy is selected to implement automatically changing receivers in the base of PC hardwares and Windows2000/XP operation system.

  9. A study on implementing a multithreaded version of the SIRENE detector simulation software for high energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakopoulos, Petros; Gkoumas, Michail; Diplas, Ioannis; Voularinos, Georgios; Vlachos, Theofanis; Balasi, Konstantia; Tzamariudaki, Ekaterini; Filippidis, Christos; Cotronis, Yiannis; Markou, Christos

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of SIRENE is to simulate the response to neutrino events of any type of high energy neutrino telescope. Additionally, it implements different geometries for a neutrino detector and different configurations and characteristics of photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs) inside the optical modules of the detector through a library of C+ + classes. This could be considered a massive statistical analysis of photo-electrons. Aim of this work is the development of a multithreaded version of the SIRENE detector simulation software for high energy neutrinos. This approach allows utilization of multiple CPU cores leading to a potentially significant decrease in the required execution time compared to the sequential code. We are making use of the OpenMP framework for the production of multithreaded code running on the CPU. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of a GPU-accelerated implementation.

  10. Implementation of electronic medical records requires more than new software: Lessons on integrating and managing health technologies from Mbarara, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Madore, Amy; Rosenberg, Julie; Muyindike, Winnie R; Bangsberg, David R; Bwana, Mwebesa B; Martin, Jeffrey N; Kanyesigye, Michael; Weintraub, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    Implementation lessons: • Technology alone does not necessarily lead to improvement in health service delivery, in contrast to the common assumption that advanced technology goes hand in hand with progress. • Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems is a complex, resource-intensive process that, in addition to software, hardware, and human resource investments, requires careful planning, change management skills, adaptability, and continuous engagement of stakeholders. • Research requirements and goals must be balanced with service delivery needs when determining how much information is essential to collect and who should be interfacing with the EMR system. • EMR systems require ongoing monitoring and regular updates to ensure they are responsive to evolving clinical use cases and research questions. • High-quality data and analyses are essential for EMRs to deliver value to providers, researchers, and patients. PMID:26699355