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  1. Contribution of temperament to eating disorder symptoms in emerging adulthood: Additive and interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Burt, Nicole M; Boddy, Lauren E; Bridgett, David J

    2015-08-01

    Temperament characteristics, such as higher negative emotionality (NE) and lower effortful control (EC), are individual difference risk factors for developmental psychopathology. Research has also noted relations between temperament and more specific manifestations of psychopathology, such as eating disorders (EDs). Although work is emerging that indicates that NE and EC may additively contribute to risk for ED symptoms, no studies have considered the interactive effects of NE and EC in relation to ED symptoms. In the current investigation, we hypothesized that (1) low EC would be associated with increased ED symptoms, (2) high NE would be associated with increased ED symptoms, and (3) these temperament traits would interact, such that the relationship between NE and ED symptoms would be strongest in the presence of low EC. After controlling for gender and child trauma history, emerging adults' (N=160) lower EC (i.e., more difficulties with self-regulation) was associated with more ED symptoms. NE did not emerge as a direct predictor of ED symptoms. However, the anticipated interaction of these temperament characteristics on ED symptoms was found. The association between NE and ED symptoms was only significant in the context of low EC. These findings provide evidence that elevated NE may only be a risk factor for the development of eating disorders when individuals also have self-regulation difficulties. The implications of these findings for research and interventions are discussed. PMID:25875113

  2. Additive genetic contribution to symptom dimensions in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Rahel; Palmer, Rohan H C; Brick, Leslie A; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S; Beevers, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder with a complex genetic architecture. In this study, genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum-likelihood analysis (GREML) was used to investigate the extent to which variance in depression symptoms/symptom dimensions can be explained by variation in common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of individuals with MDD (N = 1,558) who participated in the National Institute of Mental Health Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. A principal components analysis of items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) obtained prior to treatment revealed 4 depression symptom components: (a) appetite, (b) core depression symptoms (e.g., depressed mood, anhedonia), (c) insomnia, and (d) anxiety. These symptom dimensions were associated with SNP-based heritability (hSNP2) estimates of 30%, 14%, 30%, and 5%, respectively. Results indicated that the genetic contribution of common SNPs to depression symptom dimensions were not uniform. Appetite and insomnia symptoms in MDD had a relatively strong genetic contribution whereas the genetic contribution was relatively small for core depression and anxiety symptoms. While in need of replication, these results suggest that future gene discovery efforts may strongly benefit from parsing depression into its constituent parts. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27124715

  3. Mental health symptoms and patient-reported diabetes symptom burden: implications for medication regimen changes

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Dara H.; Billimek, John; August, Kristin J.; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Kaplan, Sherrie H.; Reikes, Andrew R.; Greenfield, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To examine the relative contribution of glycaemic control (HbA1C) and depressive symptoms on diabetes-related symptom burden (hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia) in order to guide medication modification. Methods. Secondary analysis of medical records data and questionnaires collected from a racially/ethnically diverse sample of adult patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 710) from seven outpatient clinics affiliated with an academic medical centre over a 1-year period as part of the Reducing Racial Disparities in Diabetes: Coached Care (R2D2C2) study. Results. Results from linear regression analysis revealed that patients with high levels of depressive symptoms had more diabetes-related symptom burden (both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia) than patients with low levels of depressive symptoms (βs = 0.09–0.17, Ps < 0.02). Furthermore, results from two logistic regression analyses suggested that the odds of regimen intensification at 1-year follow-up was marginally associated with patient-reported symptoms of hypoglycaemia [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.98–1.58; P = 0.08] and hyperglycaemia (aOR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.00–1.46; P = 0.05), after controlling for patients’ HbA1C, comorbidity, insulin use and demographics. These associations, however, were diminished for patients with high self-reported hypoglycaemia and high levels of depressive symptoms, but not low depressive symptoms (interaction terms for hypoglycaemia by depressive symptoms, aOR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97–0.99; P = 0.03). Conclusions. Mental health symptoms are associated with higher levels of patient-reported of diabetes-related symptoms, but the association between diabetes-related symptoms and subsequent regimen modifications is diminished in patients with greater depressive symptoms. Clinicians should focus attention on identifying and treating patients’ mental health concerns in order to address the role of diabetes-related symptom burden in guiding physician medication

  4. Japanese Americans' health concerns and depressive symptoms: implications for disaster counseling.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Monit; Leung, Patrick; Tsui, Venus

    2013-07-01

    This study examined factors contributing to depressive symptoms among Japanese Americans. Data were collected in Houston, Texas, in 2008, before the March 2011 Japan earthquake, through a community survey including demographic and mental health questions and the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist. Among 43 Japanese American respondents in this convenience sample, the depression prevalence was 11.6 percent. Chi-square results found that having anxiety symptoms and holding a master's degree had statistically significant relationships with depressive symptoms. An independent sample t test found that those having depressive symptoms experienced significantly more health issues than those without depressive symptoms. When these statistically significant variables were entered into a logistic regression model, the overall effect of having health issues, anxiety symptoms, and a master's degree collectively predicted depressive symptoms. It was also found that Japanese Americans rarely consult mental health professionals; in particular, female Japanese American respondents tend to seek help from religious leaders. As implied by these findings, the reluctance of Japanese Americans to seek formal help can be explained by social stigma, a health-oriented approach to treatment, and other cultural considerations. Practice implications focus on disaster counseling with a connection between mental health needs and health care support. PMID:24032301

  5. Psychological Symptoms and Concerns Experienced by International Students: Outreach Implications for Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poyrazli, Senel

    2015-01-01

    This study examines psychological symptoms and concerns experienced by international students. Participants identified with a variety of psychological symptoms and concerns. The top three were related to academics (71%), career (60%), and stress (43%). In addition, 34% of the participants indicated being concerned about depression and/or anxiety.…

  6. Research on the Premotor Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical and Etiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Edward A.; Ross, G. Webster; Huang, Xuemei; Savica, Rodolfo; Abbott, Robert D.; Ascherio, Alberto; Caviness, John N.; Gao, Xiang; Gray, Kimberly A.; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Kamel, Freya; Jennings, Danna; Kirshner, Annette; Lawler, Cindy; Liu, Rui; Miller, Gary W.; Nussbaum, Robert; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Rick, Amy Comstock; Ritz, Beate; Siderowf, Andrew D.; Tanner, Caroline M.; Tröster, Alexander I.; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Background: The etiology and natural history of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are not well understood. Some non-motor symptoms such as hyposmia, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and constipation may develop during the prodromal stage of PD and precede PD diagnosis by years. Objectives: We examined the promise and pitfalls of research on premotor symptoms of PD and developed priorities and strategies to understand their clinical and etiological implications. Methods: This review was based on a workshop, Parkinson’s Disease Premotor Symptom Symposium, held 7–8 June 2012 at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Discussion: Research on premotor symptoms of PD may offer an excellent opportunity to characterize high-risk populations and to better understand PD etiology. Such research may lead to evaluation of novel etiological hypotheses such as the possibility that environmental toxicants or viruses may initiate PD pathogenesis in the gastrointestinal tract or olfactory bulb. At present, our understanding of premotor symptoms of PD is in its infancy and faces many obstacles. These symptoms are often not specific to PD and have low positive predictive value for early PD diagnosis. Further, the pathological bases and biological mechanisms of these premotor symptoms and their relevance to PD pathogenesis are poorly understood. Conclusion: This is an emerging research area with important data gaps to be filled. Future research is needed to understand the prevalence of multiple premotor symptoms and their etiological relevance to PD. Animal experiments and mechanistic studies will further understanding of the biology of these premotor symptoms and test novel etiological hypothesis. Citation: Chen H, Burton EA, Ross GW, Huang X, Savica R, Abbott RD, Ascherio A, Caviness JN, Gao X, Gray KA, Hong JS, Kamel F, Jennings D, Kirshner A, Lawler C, Liu R, Miller GW, Nussbaum R, Peddada SD, Comstock Rick A, Ritz

  7. Identifying Shared Latent Dimensions of Psychological Symptoms: Implications for the Psychological Correlates of Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Ameringer, Katherine J.; Chou, Chih-Ping; Sussman, Steve; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2015-01-01

    Shared latent dimensions may account for the co-occurrence of multiple forms of psychological dysfunction. However, this conceptualization has rarely been integrated into the smoking literature, despite high levels of psychological symptoms in smokers. In this study, we used confirmatory factor analysis to compare three models (1-factor, 2-factor [internalizing-externalizing], and 3-factor [low positive affect-negative affect-disinhibition]) of relations among nine measures of affective and behavioral symptoms implicated in smoking spanning depression, anxiety, happiness, anhedonia, ADHD, aggression, and alcohol use disorder symptoms. We then examined associations of scores from each of the manifest scales and the latent factors from the best-fitting model to several smoking characteristics (i.e., experimentation, lifetime established smoking [≥100 cigarettes lifetime], age of smoking onset, cigarettes/day, nicotine dependence, and past nicotine withdrawal). We used two samples: (1) College Students (N =288; mean age =20; 75 % female) and (2) Adult Daily Smokers (N=338; mean age=44; 32 % female). In both samples, the 3-factor model separating latent dimensions of deficient positive affect, negative affect, and disinhibition fit best. In the college students, the disinhibition factor and its respective indicators significantly associated with lifetime smoking. In the daily smokers, low positive and high negative affect factors and their respective indicators positively associated with cigarettes/day and nicotine withdrawal symptom severity. These findings suggest that shared features of psychological symptoms may be parsimonious explanations of how multiple manifestations of psychological dysfunction play a role in smoking. Implications for research and treatment of co-occurring psychological symptoms and smoking are discussed. PMID:26478654

  8. Paranoid symptoms in patients on a general hospital psychiatric unit. Implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Schwab, P J

    1978-03-01

    Paranoid symptoms were found in 40% of patients admitted to a university general hospital psychiatric unit during a ten-month period. Fifty-eight percent of this group had frank paranoid delusions, while the rest had ideas of reference or generalized suspiciousness. Only one half of those who had paranoid delusions had paranoid schizophrenia. A significant number had affective disorders or organic brain disorder. Ideas of reference and suspiciousness were found in many patients who were not psychotic. The therapeutic implications of these findings are reported in three patients who were inadequately treated for affective disorders because the presence of paranoid symptomatology had led to an incorrect diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:727891

  9. Mother and Child Depressive Symptoms in Youth with Spina Bifida: Additive, Moderator, and Mediator Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellinger, Kriston B.; Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Essner, Bonnie S.; Alvarez, Renae

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which parenting behaviors influence the relation between maternal and child depressive symptoms in youth with spina bifida and a comparison sample. Previous research has found that maternal depression not only negatively impacts the mother-child relationship, but also places the child at risk…

  10. Embracing additive manufacture: implications for foot and ankle orthosis design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The design of foot and ankle orthoses is currently limited by the methods used to fabricate the devices, particularly in terms of geometric freedom and potential to include innovative new features. Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, where objects are constructed via a series of sub-millimetre layers of a substrate material, may present the opportunity to overcome these limitations and allow novel devices to be produced that are highly personalised for the individual, both in terms of fit and functionality. Two novel devices, a foot orthosis (FO) designed to include adjustable elements to relieve pressure at the metatarsal heads, and an ankle foot orthosis (AFO) designed to have adjustable stiffness levels in the sagittal plane, were developed and fabricated using AM. The devices were then tested on a healthy participant to determine if the intended biomechanical modes of action were achieved. Results The adjustable, pressure relieving FO was found to be able to significantly reduce pressure under the targeted metatarsal heads. The AFO was shown to have distinct effects on ankle kinematics which could be varied by adjusting the stiffness level of the device. Conclusions The results presented here demonstrate the potential design freedom made available by AM, and suggest that it may allow novel personalised orthotic devices to be produced which are beyond the current state of the art. PMID:22642941

  11. Performance of the American Urological Association Symptom Index With and Without an Additional Urge Incontinence Item

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Michael J.; Avins, Andrew L.; Meleth, Sreelatha

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine the value of adding an urge incontinence question to the AUA Symptom Index (AUASI) among men in the Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) trial. Materials and Methods CAMUS is a randomized trial of Saw palmetto fruit extract versus placebo among men ≥ 45 years old with an AUASI score ≥ 8 and ≤ 24. Baseline measurements included the AUASI, a question about urge incontinence (UI), the International Prostate Symptom Score Quality of Life (IPSS QOL) question, and the BPH Impact Index (BII). We correlated the items and scales, and examined whether adding the UI question resulted in better prediction of disease-specific health status. Results Mean age of the 369 men in CAMUS was 61 and mean baseline AUASI score was 14.6. UI was reported infrequently; about 82% of respondents answered the question “not at all” or “less than 1 time in 5.” UI was significantly correlated with all other AUASI items except for weak stream; the strongest correlation was to urgency (R=0.51, P<.0001). The correlation between AUASI and the AUASI+UI was 0.98 (P<0.0001). In a logistic regression predicting IPSS QOL, adding UI to the AUASI slightly increased discriminating ability (c statistic increased from 0.77 to 0.78, P<0.0001). Similarly, in a linear regression predicting BII scores, adding UI to the AUASI slightly increased predictive ability (R2 statistic increased from 0.22 to 0.26, P<0.0001). Conclusion Based on our analysis in the CAMUS population, the value of adding a UI question to the AUASI in terms of predicting bother seemed small at best. PMID:21741692

  12. PTSD symptoms as a consequence of breast cancer diagnosis: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Arnaboldi, Paola; Lucchiari, Claudio; Santoro, Luigi; Sangalli, Claudia; Luini, Alberto; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    It is a well-established multidisciplinary practice at the European Institute of Oncology, that nurses and physicians often report their difficulties to clinical psychologists regarding adherence to hospital scheduling and procedures, when faced with women who, having been diagnosed with cancer, may be too overwhelmed to understand medical advice. We thus undertook an observational-prospective-cohort study, to investigate the prevalence and variation of PTSD symptomatology in women awaiting a mastectomy at a mean of 30 days after diagnosis and up to 2 years after discharge from hospital. The presence of any correlations between PTSD symptoms and medical and psycho-social variables was also investigated. Between March 2011 and June 2012, 150 women entered the study and were evaluated at four points in time: pre-hospital admission, admission for surgery, hospital discharge and two years later. The prevalence of distress at pre-hospital admission was 20% for intrusion symptoms, 19.1% for avoidance symptoms and 70.7% for state anxiety. Intrusion was negatively correlated with time from diagnosis independently of tumor dimensions, i.e. independently of the perceived seriousness of the illness. Even though at two-year follow up the prevalence of intrusion and avoidance is similar to that in the general population, patients with high levels of intrusion and avoidance at pre-hospital admission will maintain these levels, showing difficulties in adjusting to illness even two years later. As for psycho-social factors, the presence of a positive cancer family and relational history is associated with high levels of distress, in particular with intrusive thinking. Proper interventions aimed at the management of these issues and at their implications in clinical practice is clearly warranted. PMID:25105089

  13. Talking with Others About Stigmatized Health Conditions: Implications for Managing Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Courtney B.; Botelho, Elizabeth M.; Welch, Lisa C.; Joseph, Journel; Tennstedt, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of social ties on symptom management and help seeking, using urinary symptoms as a case study. Talking with others about these symptoms was common and both facilitated and hindered symptom management and help seeking. In some cases, talking with others resulted in gaining a sense of identification with others suffering the same symptoms, receiving assistance to ease the burden of symptoms, obtaining suggestions to help manage symptoms, and learning information about available treatments. In other cases, talking with others served to normalize symptoms to such an extent that individuals saw no need to manage their symptoms differently. PMID:22785624

  14. Gonadal steroids and affective symptoms during in vitro fertilization: implication for reproductive mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Miki; Aharonov, Inbar; Ben Avi, Irit; Schreiber, Shaul; Amit, Ami; Weizman, Abraham; Azem, Foad

    2011-07-01

    Gonadal steroids (GSs) have been associated with the onset of a number of reproductive-related mood disorders in women, in which fluctuating or unstable hormonal levels are postulated to act as the trigger for the destabilization of mood. There is, however, rather limited direct clinical evidence that can link rapidly changing GS levels with the induction of mood symptoms. We aimed to study the effect of controlled and rapid GS fluctuations on mood in an in vivo model. Women undergoing in vitro fertilization (n=108) were assessed for depression and anxiety levels on 3 time points: during a low estradiol and progesterone baseline, during a gonadotropin stimulated estradiol-dominant phase, and after embryo transfer, during a progesterone-dominant low estrogen phase. Plasma levels for estrogen and progesterone were drawn on these time points. Symptoms of depression and anxiety significantly increased from baseline to the high estradiol levels but were not correlated with estrogen. The sharp drop from high estradiol levels at the estradiol-dominant phase to low levels at the progesterone-dominant phase was significantly correlated with rising depression scores. The rise in progesterone levels from low levels at the estradiol-dominant phase to high levels at the progesterone-dominant phase was significantly and inversely correlated with depression scores. This study suggests that the mechanism underlying the role of estrogen in reproductive-related mood disorders involves an abrupt and precipitous drop in its plasma level that can precipitate negative mood states. This finding has implications on the treatment of GS-related mood disorders. PMID:21106297

  15. Microbiota-gut-brain signalling in Parkinson's disease: Implications for non-motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Felice, Valeria D; Quigley, Eamonn M; Sullivan, Aideen M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; O'Mahony, Siobhain M

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1-2% of the population over 65 years of age. The primary neuropathology is the loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, resulting in characteristic motor deficits, upon which the clinical diagnosis is based. However, a number of significant non-motor symptoms (NMS) are also evident that appear to have a greater impact on the quality of life of these patients. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that neurobiological processes can be modified by the bi-directional communication that occurs along the brain-gut axis. The microbiota plays a key role in this communication throughout different routes in both physiological and pathological conditions. Thus, there has been an increasing interest in investigating how microbiota changes within the gastrointestinal tract may be implicated in health and disease including PD. Interestingly α-synuclein-aggregates, the cardinal neuropathological feature in PD, are present in both the submucosal and myenteric plexuses of the enteric nervous system, prior to their appearance in the brain, indicating a possible gut to brain route of "prion-like" spread. In this review we highlight the potential importance of gut to brain signalling in PD with particular focus on the role of the microbiota as major player in this communication. PMID:27013171

  16. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  17. State of Oral Mucosa as an Additional Symptom in the Course of Primary Amyloidosis and Multiple Myeloma Disease

    PubMed Central

    Czerniuk, Maciej R.; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Charlinski, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (myeloma multiplex (MM)) is a malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma derived from B cell. Its essence is a malignant clone of plasma cells synthesizing growth of monoclonal immunoglobulin, which infiltrate the bone marrow, destroy the bone structure, and prevent the proper production of blood cells components. The paper presents a case of 62-year-old patient who developed symptoms in addition to neurological and haematological changes in the oral mucosa in the course of multiple myeloma. The treatment resulted in partial improvement. The authors wish to draw attention not only to nonspecificity and rarity of changes in the mouth which can meet the dentist but also to the complexity of the multidisciplinary therapy patients diagnosed with MM. PMID:25013412

  18. Homelessness among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally…

  19. Association of Depressive Symptoms and Disease Activity in Children with Asthma: Methodological and Clinical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxmonsky, James; Wood, Beatrice L.; Stern, Trudy; Ballow, Mark; Lillis, Kathleen; Cramer-Benjamin, Darci; Mador, Jeffrey; Miller, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms in children with asthma and the association between depression and asthma activity. Method: Children ages 7 to 17 (n = 129) were recruited from a hospital emergency department after presenting for asthma symptoms. The majority of subjects were from disadvantaged,…

  20. Overlapping Symptoms of Substance Abuse and Learning Handicaps: Implications for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, C. Lynn; Forbing, Shirley E.

    1991-01-01

    The article examines the following issues: (1) overlapping symptoms of chemical impairment and learning handicap that may result in misdiagnosis; (2) student populations at high risk for chemical abuse; (3) preventive measures; and (4) intervention and treatment for chemically impaired students. A table of drug symptoms and a behavioral checklist…

  1. Assessing traumatic experiences in screening for PTSD in substance use disorder patients: what is the gain in addition to PTSD symptoms?

    PubMed

    Kok, Tim; de Haan, Hein; van der Meer, Margreet; Najavits, Lisa; de Jong, Cor

    2015-03-30

    Traumatic experiences have been linked with substance use disorders (SUD) and may be an important factor in the perpetuation of SUD, even in the absence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between childhood trauma and substance use severity in 192 SUD inpatients. Childhood trauma was assessed using the Traumatic Experiences Checklist (TEC). With variables derived from this measure in addition to PTSD symptoms, two regression models were created with alcohol use or drug use severity as dependent variables. Alcohol severity was explained by PTSD symptoms as well as the age of trauma. Drug severity was explained solely by PTSD symptoms. The clinical value of assessing childhood trauma in determining the addiction severity appears to be limited in comparison with PTSD symptoms. PMID:25687377

  2. Avolition and expressive deficits capture negative symptom phenomenology: Implications for DSM-5 and schizophrenia research

    PubMed Central

    Messinger, Julie W; Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Mendelsohn, Erika; Prudent, Vasthie; Stanford, Arielle D; Malaspina, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    The DSM-5 formulation presents an opportunity to refine the negative symptom assessments that are crucial for a schizophrenia diagnosis. This review traces the history of negative symptom constructs in neuropsychiatry from their earliest conceptualizations in the 19th century. It presents the relevant literature for distinguishing between different types of negative symptoms. Although a National Institute of Mental Health consensus initiative proposed that there are five separate negative symptom domains, our review of the individual items demonstrates no more than three negative symptom domains. Indeed, numerous factor analyses of separate negative symptom scales routinely identify only two domains: 1) expressive deficits, which include affective, linguistic and paralinguistic expressions, and 2) avolition for daily-life and social activities. We propose that a focus on expressive deficits and avolition will be of optimum utility for diagnosis, treatment-considerations, and research purposes compared to other negative symptom constructs. We recommend that these two domains should be assessed as separate dimensions in the DSM-5 criteria. PMID:20889248

  3. Transcriptome analysis of Fusarium virguliforme provides additional evidence of toxins that contribute to foliar symptoms of soybean sudden death syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxins produced by the soil-borne fungus, Fusarium virguliforme, cause foliar symptoms in soybean. The disease in soybean is referred to as soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS). Three toxins produced by the fungus were reported to be associated with SDS foliar symptoms, but none produced identical S...

  4. Unexpected benefit of sorbitol placebo in Mg intervention study of premenstrual symptoms: implications for choice of placebo in RCTs.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ann F; De Souza, M C; Marakis, G; Robinson, P A; Morris, A P; Bolland, K M

    2002-03-01

    We carried out a randomized, double-blind, crossover study of 85 women, designed to investigate the dose-response of daily Mg supplementation on premenstrual symptoms. Each woman took one of four treatments: Mg (200, 350 or 500 mg/day) or sorbitol (placebo) for 2 months. This was followed by a washout of 1 month, and then each woman received one of the three remaining treatments for a further 2 months. Unexpectedly, sorbitol (1305 mg) reduced anxiety-related and total premenstrual symptoms after 2 months compared with Mg treatments (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). We conclude that low-dose sorbitol reduces premenstrual symptoms beyond that expected of a placebo. After 2 months of treatment, sorbitol also reduced urinary Mg excretion compared to baseline (no intervention) and Mg treatments (P=0.005). A follow-up study on 17 healthy volunteers confirmed lack of effect on urinary Mg output of a similar sorbitol intervention regime compared with either baseline or cellulose placebo. It appears that sorbitol may influence Mg homeostasis in women suffering premenstrual symptoms, but not in healthy individuals. Implications for placebo choice in RCTs are discussed. PMID:12018972

  5. Can we improve pollen season definitions by using the symptom load index in addition to pollen counts?

    PubMed

    Bastl, Katharina; Kmenta, Maximilian; Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Berger, Uwe; Jäger, Siegfried

    2015-09-01

    Airborne pollen measurements are the foundation of aerobiological research and provide essential raw data for various disciplines. Pollen itself should be considered a relevant factor in air quality. Symptom data shed light on the relationship of pollen allergy and pollination. The aim of this study is to assess the spatial variation of local, regional and national symptom datasets. Ten pollen season definitions are used to calculate the symptom load index for the birch and grass pollen seasons (2013-2014) in Austria. (1) Local, (2) regional and (3) national symptom datasets are used to examine spatial variations and a consistent pattern was found. In conclusion, national datasets are suitable for first insights where no sufficient local or regional dataset is available and season definitions based on percentages provide a practical solution, as they can be applied in regions with different pollen loads and produce more constant results. PMID:25935611

  6. Prodromal Symptoms and Atypical Affectivity as Predictors of Major Depression in Juveniles: Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Maria; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Background: Given the long-term morbidity of juvenile-onset major depressive disorder (MDD), it is timely to consider whether more effort should be dedicated to its primary and secondary prevention. Methods: We reviewed studies of prodromal symptoms that may herald a first episode pediatric MDD and considered whether that literature has made an…

  7. Implications of Timing of Maternal Depressive Symptoms for Early Cognitive and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Scaramella, Laura V.

    2006-01-01

    Statistically, women, particularly pregnant women and new mothers, are at heightened risk for depression. The present review describes the current state of the research linking maternal depressed mood and children's cognitive and language development. Exposure to maternal depressive symptoms, whether during the prenatal period, postpartum period,…

  8. Decision Making Correlates of Depressive Symptoms among African-American Adolescents: Implications for Prevention Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okwumabua, Jebose O.; Duryea, Elias J.; Wong, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and decision making among a non-clinical sample of low-income African American adolescents. Data from the Children's Depression Inventory and Flinders Adolescent Decision Making Questionnaire indicated that there was a significant correlation between adolescents' self-reported depressive…

  9. Searching for additional endocrine functions of the skeleton: genetic approaches and implications for therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jianwen; Flaherty, Stephen; Karsenty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of whole organism physiology has greatly advanced in the past decades through mouse genetics. In particular, genetic studies have revealed that most organs interact with one another through hormones in order to maintain normal physiological functions and the homeostasis of the entire organism. Remarkably, through these studies many unexpected novel endocrine means to regulate physiological functions have been uncovered. The skeletal system is one example. In this article, we review a series of studies that over the years have identified bone as an endocrine organ. The mechanism of action, pathological relevance, and therapeutic implications of the functions of the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin are discussed. In the last part of this review we discuss the possibility that additional endocrine functions of the skeleton may exist.

  10. Intergenerational Ambivalence in Adolescence and Early Adulthood: Implications for Depressive Symptoms over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tighe, Lauren A.; Birditt, Kira S.; Antonucci, Toni C.

    2016-01-01

    The parent-child relationship is often characterized by ambivalence, defined as the simultaneous experience of positive and negative relationship quality. This study examines reports of intergenerational ambivalence in 3 developmental periods: adolescence, emerging adulthood, and young adulthood, as well as its implications for depressive symptoms…

  11. Musculoskeletal symptoms amongst clinical radiologists and the implications of reporting environment ergonomics--a multicentre questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C L; Morgan, Steven; Augustine, Katharine; Clague, Gavin; Pearce, Tim; Pollentine, Adrian; Wallis, Adam; Wilson, David; McCoubrie, Paul

    2014-04-01

    This multicentre study aimed to assess compliance of the reporting environment with best ergonomic practice and to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms related to working as a radiologist. All 148 radiology trainees and consultants in 10 hospitals across the region were invited to complete a musculoskeletal symptoms and reporting ergonomics questionnaire. Best ergonomic reporting practice was defined, following literature review, as being able to alter the following: monitor, desk, chair and armrest height, chair back support, ambient light, and temperature. The frequency that these facilities were available and how often they were used was determined. One hundred and twenty-three out of 148 (83%) radiologists responded, and 38% reported radiology-associated occupational injury. Lower back discomfort was the commonest radiology associated musculoskeletal symptom (41%). Only 13% of those with occupational injury sought the advice of occupational health. No reporting environments conformed completely to best ergonomic practice. Where certain facilities were available, less than a third of radiologists made personal ergonomic adjustments prior to starting a reporting session. Radiologists who had good self-assessed knowledge of best ergonomic practice had significantly less back discomfort than those with poor self-assessed knowledge (P < 0.005). We demonstrated high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms amongst radiologists. Poor compliance of the reporting environment with best ergonomic practice, in combination with our other findings of a low level of ergonomic awareness, low rates of making ergonomic adjustments and seeking appropriate help, may be implicated. We hope this study raises awareness of this issue and helps prevent long-term occupational injury amongst radiologists from poor ergonomic practice. PMID:24113846

  12. PRODROMAL SYMPTOMS AND ATYPICAL AFFECTIVITY AS PREDICTORS OF MAJOR DEPRESSION IN JUVENILES: IMPLICATIONS FOR PREVENTION

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Maria; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Background Given the long-term morbidity of juvenile-onset major depressive disorder (MDD), it is timely to consider whether more effort should be dedicated to its primary and secondary prevention. Methods We reviewed studies of prodromal symptoms that may herald a first episode pediatric MDD and considered whether that literature has made an impact on secondary prevention (efforts to prevent progression from symptoms to full disorder). We also reviewed studies of children at familial risk for MDD that addressed atypical affectivity and the regulation of sad, dysphoric affect (mood repair) and related physiological systems, and considered whether research in those areas has made an impact on primary prevention of pediatric MDD (efforts to prevent the disorder). Results A compelling body of literature indicates that depressive symptoms in youngsters predict subsequent MDD across the juvenile (and early adult) years and that any combination of several symptoms for at least one week is informative in that regard. These findings are echoed in the case selection criteria used by many secondary prevention programs. Convergent findings also indicate that (compared to typical peers) young offspring at familial-risk for depression manifest low positive affectivity and compromised mood repair, along with signs of dysfunction in three intertwined physiological systems that contribute to affectivity and mood repair (the HPA axis, cerebral hemispheric asymmetry, and cardiac vagal control). While all these affect-related parameters are suitable for case selection and as intervention targets, they have not yet made an impact on primary prevention programs. Conclusions According to recent meta-analyses, attempts to prevent pediatric depression have not lived up to expectations. Based on our review, possible reasons for this include: (a) the use of case selection criteria that yield samples heterogeneous with regard to whether the symptoms are truly prodromal to an episode of MDD

  13. Primary hyperhidrosis: Implications on symptoms, daily life, health and alcohol consumption when treated with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Alexander; Boman, Jens; Janlert, Urban; Brulin, Christine; Nylander, Elisabet

    2016-08-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis affects approximately 3% of the population and reduces quality of life in affected persons. Few studies have investigated the symptoms of anxiety, depression and hazardous alcohol consumption among those with hyperhidrosis and the effect of treatment with botulinum toxin. The first aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary hyperhidrosis on mental and physical health, and alcohol consumption. Our second aim was to study whether and how treatment with botulinum toxin changed these effects. One hundred and fourteen patients answered questionnaires regarding hyperhidrosis and symptoms, including hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS), visual analog scale (VAS) 10-point scale for hyperhidrosis symptoms, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT) and short-form health survey (SF-36) before treatment with botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after. The age of onset of hyperhidrosis was on average 13.4 years and 48% described heredity for hyperhidrosis. Significant improvements were noted in patients with axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis regarding mean HDSS, VAS 10-point scale, HADS, SF-36 and sweat-related health problems 2 weeks after treatment with botulinum toxin. Changes in mean AUDIT for all participants were not significant. Primary hyperhidrosis mainly impairs mental rather than physical aspects of life and also interferes with specific daily activities of the affected individuals. Despite this, our patients did not show signs of anxiety, depression or hazardous alcohol consumption. Treatment with botulinum toxin reduced sweat-related problems and led to significant improvements in HDSS, VAS, HADS and SF-36 in our patients. PMID:26875781

  14. Depression in acute and chronic aphasia: symptoms, pathoanatomical-clinical correlations and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, M; Bartels, C; Wallesch, C W

    1993-01-01

    Depressive alterations were investigated in 21 acute and 21 chronic aphasic patients with single left sided strokes. The assessment of depression was based on a psychometrically evaluated German version of the Cornell Scale for Depression (CDS) and the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC). No significant difference was found concerning depression sum-scores between the two aphasic groups. The acute group, however, exhibited significantly higher ratings in items related to physical signs of depression and disturbances of cyclic functions. Patients corresponding to the RDC-syndrome of major depression were only found in the acute group. Neither age, sex nor degree of hemiparesis discriminated the patients on the severity of depressive symptoms. In the acute patient group, nonfluency of aphasia was the only parameter that could be identified which had an effect on the mood symptom scores. A CT scan analysis in the acute patient group showed an association between the severity of depression and anterior lesions. A significant correlation was found between CDS sum-scores and the proximity of the anterior border of the lesion to the frontal pole of the hemisphere whereas the volume of lesions seemed to have no effect on depressive alterations in acute aphasic patients. Superimposition of the lesions of the aphasic patients with major depressive disorders showed a common subcortical lesion area involving putaminal and external pallidal structures. Images PMID:8509782

  15. HIV-Related Stigma: Implications for Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression among Malawian Women

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, Charles; Arganbright, Jill; Kienitz, Eliza; Weller, Melissa; Khaylis, Anna; Shenkman, Tammy; Smith, Sarah; Koopman, Cheryl; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 11% of the adult population in Malawi, Africa, is living with HIV/AIDS. The disease has taken a toll on communities, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Malawian women carry the burden of being caretakers for individuals infected with HIV while also worrying about their own health; however, little is known about how HIV/AIDS affects psychological functioning among Malawian women in areas hit hardest by the epidemic. To that end, this paper examined the influence of HIV-related stigma on symptoms of anxiety and depression among 59 women 17-46 years old who were recruited from the Namitete area of Malawi. Women who reported greater worry about being infected with HIV and greater HIV-related stigma were significantly more likely to report greater symptoms of anxiety and depression. These findings suggest that interventions that reduce HIV-related stigma are likely to enhance psychological functioning among Malawian women, which in turn will improve the women's quality of life and well-being. PMID:25920985

  16. Cognitive and affective empathy in children with conduct problems: additive and interactive effects of callous-unemotional traits and autism spectrum disorders symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasalich, Dave S; Dadds, Mark R; Hawes, David J

    2014-11-30

    Callous-unemotional (CU) traits and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) symptoms are characterized by problems in empathy; however, these behavioral features are rarely examined together in children with conduct problems. This study investigated additive and interactive effects of CU traits and ASD symptoms in relation to cognitive and affective empathy in a non-ASD clinic-referred sample. Participants were 134 children aged 3 to 9 years (M=5.60; 79% boys) with oppositional defiant/conduct disorder, and their parents. Clinicians, teachers, and parents reported on dimensions of child behavior, and parental reports of family dysfunction and direct observations of parental warmth/responsiveness assessed quality of family relationships. Results from multiple regression analysis showed that, over and above the effects of child conduct problem severity and quality of family relationships, both ASD symptoms and CU traits were uniquely associated with deficits in cognitive empathy. Moreover, CU traits demonstrated an independent association with affective empathy, and this relationship was moderated by ASD symptoms. That is, there was a stronger negative association between CU traits and affective empathy at higher versus lower levels of ASD symptoms. These findings suggest including both CU traits and ASD-related social impairments in models delineating the atypical development of empathy in children with conduct problems. PMID:25015711

  17. Genome Size Variation in the Genus Carthamus (Asteraceae, Cardueae): Systematic Implications and Additive Changes During Allopolyploidization

    PubMed Central

    GARNATJE, TERESA; GARCIA, SÒNIA; VILATERSANA, ROSER; VALLÈS, JOAN

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plant genome size is an important biological characteristic, with relationships to systematics, ecology and distribution. Currently, there is no information regarding nuclear DNA content for any Carthamus species. In addition to improving the knowledge base, this research focuses on interspecific variation and its implications for the infrageneric classification of this genus. Genome size variation in the process of allopolyploid formation is also addressed. • Methods Nuclear DNA samples from 34 populations of 16 species of the genus Carthamus were assessed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide. • Key Results The 2C values ranged from 2·26 pg for C. leucocaulos to 7·46 pg for C. turkestanicus, and monoploid genome size (1Cx-value) ranged from 1·13 pg in C. leucocaulos to 1·53 pg in C. alexandrinus. Mean genome sizes differed significantly, based on sectional classification. Both allopolyploid species (C. creticus and C. turkestanicus) exhibited nuclear DNA contents in accordance with the sum of the putative parental C-values (in one case with a slight reduction, frequent in polyploids), supporting their hybrid origin. • Conclusions Genome size represents a useful tool in elucidating systematic relationships between closely related species. A considerable reduction in monoploid genome size, possibly due to the hybrid formation, is also reported within these taxa. PMID:16390843

  18. Consequences of cancer treatments on adult hippocampal neurogenesis: implications for cognitive function and depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Dias, Gisele; Hollywood, Ronan; Bevilaqua, Mário Cesar do Nascimento; da Silveira da Luz, Anna Claudia Domingos; Hindges, Robert; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Thuret, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is capable of generating new functional neurons throughout life, a phenomenon known as adult neurogenesis. The generation of new neurons is sustained throughout adulthood due to the proliferation and differentiation of adult neural stem cells. This process in humans is uniquely located in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is thought to play a major role in hippocampus-dependent functions, such as spatial awareness, long-term memory, emotionality, and mood. The overall aim of current treatments for cancer (such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy) is to prevent aberrant cell division of cell populations associated with malignancy. However, the treatments in question are absolutist in nature and hence inhibit all cell division. An unintended consequence of this cessation of cell division is the impairment of adult neural stem cell proliferation and AHN. Patients undergoing treatment for cancerous malignancies often display specific forms of memory deficits, as well as depressive symptoms. This review aims to discuss the effects of cancer treatments on AHN and propose a link between the inhibition of the neurogenetic process in the hippocampus and the advent of the cognitive and mood-based deficits observed in patients and animal models undergoing cancer therapies. Possible evidence for coadjuvant interventions aiming to protect neural cells, and subsequently the mood and cognitive functions they regulate, from the ablative effects of cancer treatment are discussed as potential clinical tools to improve mental health among cancer patients. PMID:24470543

  19. Pathological basis of symptoms and crises in sickle cell disorder: implications for counseling and psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ilesanmi, Oluwatoyin Olatundun

    2010-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disorder (SCD) is a congenital hemoglobinopathy. There is little in literature regarding the psychological variables affecting individuals living with SCD and all of the significant people around them. There are also limited numbers of trained clinical psychologists and genetic counselors to cater for the psychotherapeutic needs of individuals living with SCD. Even among those who have been trained, only a few might have fully grasped the complexities of the disease pathology. Early understanding of its pathological nature, sources, types, complications, pathophysiological basis, and clinical severity of symptoms among clinical psychologists, genetic counselors and psychotherapists, as well as general medical practitioners, could guide them in providing holistic care for dealing with and reducing pain among individuals living with SCD. It could allow risk-based counseling for families and individuals. It could also justify the early use of disease-modifying or curative interventions, such as hydroxyurea (HU), chronic transfusions (CTs), or stem-cell transplantation (SCT) by general medical practitioners. Hence, the need for this paper on the pathophysiology of SCD. PMID:22184515

  20. The implications of symptom validity test failure for ability-based test performance in a pediatric sample.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Michael W; Yeates, Keith Owen; Randolph, Christopher; Kirk, John W

    2012-03-01

    If an examinee exerts inadequate effort to perform well during a psychological or neuropsychological exam, the resulting data will represent an inaccurate representation of the individual's true abilities and difficulties. In adult populations, methodologies to identify noncredible effort have grown exponentially in the last 2 decades. Though a comparatively modest amount of work has focused on tools to identify noncredible effort in pediatric populations, recent research has demonstrated that children can consistently pass several stand-alone symptom validity tests (SVTs) using cutoffs established with adults. However, no identified studies have examined the implications of pediatric SVT failure for ability-based test performance. The current sample consisted of 276 children aged 8-16 years referred consecutively for outpatient clinical neuropsychological consultation following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). An earlier subgroup of this same case series that also included 17-year-olds was presented in Kirkwood and Kirk (2010). Nineteen percent of the current sample performed below the actuarial cutoff on the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT). No background or injury-related variable differentiated those who passed from those who failed the MSVT. Performance on the MSVT was correlated significantly with performance on all ability-based tests and explained 38% of the total ability-based test variance. Participants failing the MSVT performed significantly worse on nearly all neuropsychological tests, with large effect sizes apparent across most tests. The results provide compelling evidence that practitioners should add objective SVTs to the evaluation of school-aged youth, even when secondary gain issues might not be readily apparent and particularly following mild TBI. PMID:21767023

  1. Marital Conflict in the Context of Parental Depressive Symptoms: Implications for the Development of Children’s Adjustment Problems

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Peggy S.; Cummings, E. Mark; Peterson, Kristina M.; Davies, Patrick T.

    2008-01-01

    Relations among parental depressive symptoms, overt and covert marital conflict, and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms were examined in a community sample of 235 couples and their children. Families were assessed once yearly for three years, starting when children were in kindergarten. Parents completed measures of depressive symptoms and children’s internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Behavioral observations of marital conflict behaviors (insult, threat, pursuit, and defensiveness) and self-report of covert negativity (feeling worry, sorry, worthless, and helpless) were assessed based on problem solving interactions. Results indicated that fathers’ greater covert negativity and mothers’ overt destructive conflict behaviors served as intervening variables in the link between fathers’ depressive symptoms and child internalizing symptoms, with modest support for the pathway through fathers’ covert negativity found even after controlling for earlier levels of constructs. These findings support the role of marital conflict in the impact of fathers’ depressive symptoms on child internalizing symptoms. PMID:20161202

  2. Turbulent Flow Enhancement by Polyelectrolyte Additives: Mechanistic Implications for Drag Reduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagger, David Leonard

    1992-01-01

    The drag reduction phenomenon was experimentally studied in two pipes, of diameters 1.46 and 1.02 cm, using seven polyelectrolytic HPAM additives, with molecular weights from 1 to 20 times 10^6 g/mole and degree of backbone hydrolysis from 8 to 60%, at concentrations from 1 to 1000 wppm, in saline solutions containing from 0.3 to 0.00001 N NaCl. Both laminar and turbulent flow behavior were greatly influenced by salinity-induced changes in the initial conformation of the HPAM additives. Initially collapsed, random-coiling conformations exhibited Newtonian laminar flow and Type-A turbulent drag reduction, while initially extended conformations exhibited shear-thinning in laminar flow and Type-B turbulent drag reduction. The gross-flow physics of Type-B drag reduction were delineated. A characteristic "ladder" structure prevailed, with polymeric regime segments that were roughly parallel to, but shifted upward from, the Prandtl-Karman line. In the polymeric regime, both Type-A fan and Type -B ladder structures were essentially independent of pipe diameter, and were scaled by the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress also scaled degradation during drag reduction. New onset and slope increment correlations were presented for Type-A drag reduction by HPAM additives. In Type-B drag reduction, flow enhancement was found proportional to additive concentration, and the intrinsic slip, Sigma = S^'/(c/M _{rm w}), varied roughly as the third power of backbone chain links N_ {rm bb}. New intrinsic slip and retro-onset correlations were presented for Type-B drag reduction by HPAM additives. Analysis of Type-B literature revealed a wide range of additive efficacies, with specific slips S^'/c from 0.0001 to 4. For the most effective additives, HPAM and asbestos fibers, the additive-pervaded volume fraction per unit flow enhancement, X_{rm v} /S^' ~ 3000, implied that these additives align during drag reduction. The slip ratio R_{rm sc}, which is the relative flow enhancement

  3. Marital Conflict in the Context of Parental Depressive Symptoms: Implications for the Development of Children's Adjustment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Peggy S.; Cummings, E. Mark; Peterson, Kristina M.; Davies, Patrick T.

    2009-01-01

    Relations among parental depressive symptoms, overt and covert marital conflict, and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms were examined in a community sample of 235 couples and their children. Families were assessed once yearly for three years, starting when children were in kindergarten. Parents completed measures of depressive symptoms…

  4. Turbulence induced additional deceleration in relativistic shock wave propagation: implications for gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Wen

    2012-11-01

    The late afterglow of gamma-ray burst is believed to be due to progressive deceleration of the forward shock wave driven by the gamma-ray burst ejecta propagating in the interstellar medium. We study the dynamic effect of interstellar turbulence on shock wave propagation. It is shown that the shock wave decelerates more quickly than previously assumed without the turbulence. As an observational consequence, an earlier jet break will appear in the light curve of the forward shock wave. The scatter of the jet-corrected energy release for gamma-ray burst, inferred from the jet-break, may be partly due to the physical uncertainties in the turbulence/shock wave interaction. This uncertainties also exist in two shell collisions in the well-known internal shock model proposed for gamma-ray burst prompt emission. The large scatters of known luminosity relations of gamma-ray burst may be intrinsic and thus gamma-ray burst is not a good standard candle. We also discuss the other implications.

  5. Molecular aspects of aromatic C additions to soils: Implications of biochar quality for ecosystem functionality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid residues of incomplete combustion (biochar or char) are continuously being added to soils due to natural vegetation fires in many ecosystems. However, new strategies for carbon sequestration in soils are likely to include the active addition of biochar to soils. Since bioc...

  6. Gypsum addition to soils contaminated by red mud: implications for aluminium, arsenic, molybdenum and vanadium solubility.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Lockwood, Cindy L; Mayes, William M; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Gruiz, Katalin; Burke, Ian T

    2013-10-01

    Red mud is highly alkaline (pH 13), saline and can contain elevated concentrations of several potentially toxic elements (e.g. Al, As, Mo and V). Release of up to 1 million m(3) of bauxite residue (red mud) suspension from the Ajka repository, western Hungary, caused large-scale contamination of downstream rivers and floodplains. There is now concern about the potential leaching of toxic metal(loid)s from the red mud as some have enhanced solubility at high pH. This study investigated the impact of red mud addition to three different Hungarian soils with respect to trace element solubility and soil geochemistry. The effectiveness of gypsum amendment for the rehabilitation of red mud-contaminated soils was also examined. Red mud addition to soils caused a pH increase, proportional to red mud addition, of up to 4 pH units (e.g. pH 7 → 11). Increasing red mud addition also led to significant increases in salinity, dissolved organic carbon and aqueous trace element concentrations. However, the response was highly soil specific and one of the soils tested buffered pH to around pH 8.5 even with the highest red mud loading tested (33 % w/w); experiments using this soil also had much lower aqueous Al, As and V concentrations. Gypsum addition to soil/red mud mixtures, even at relatively low concentrations (1 % w/w), was sufficient to buffer experimental pH to 7.5-8.5. This effect was attributed to the reaction of Ca(2+) supplied by the gypsum with OH(-) and carbonate from the red mud to precipitate calcite. The lowered pH enhanced trace element sorption and largely inhibited the release of Al, As and V. Mo concentrations, however, were largely unaffected by gypsum induced pH buffering due to the greater solubility of Mo (as molybdate) at circumneutral pH. Gypsum addition also leads to significantly higher porewater salinities, and column experiments demonstrated that this increase in total dissolved solids persisted even after 25 pore volume replacements. Gypsum

  7. Antipsychotic, antidepressant, and cognitive-impairment properties of antipsychotics: rat profile and implications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Wesołowska, Anna; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), including psychosis and depression. Although antipsychotics are frequently prescribed off-label, they can have marked side effects. In addition, comparative preclinical studies of their effects are surprisingly scarce, and strategies for discovery of novel pharmacotherapeutics are lacking. We therefore compared eight antipsychotics in rat behavioral tests of psychosis, antidepressant-like activity, and cognitive impairment as a basis for preclinical evaluation of new drug candidates. The methods used in this study include inhibition of MK-801-induced hyperactivity, forced swim test (FST), passive avoidance (PA), spontaneous locomotor activity, and catalepsy. The drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like activity in the MK-801 test but with diverse profiles in the other models. Risperidone impaired PA performance, but with some dose separation versus its actions in the MK-801 test. In contrast, clozapine, olanzapine, lurasidone, and asenapine showed little or no dose separation in these tests. Aripiprazole did not impair PA performance but was poorly active in the MK-801 test. Diverse effects were also observed in the FST: chlorpromazine was inactive and most other drugs reduced immobility over narrow dose ranges, whereas clozapine reduced immobility over a wider dose range, overlapping with antipsychotic activity. Although the propensity of second-generation antipsychotics to produce catalepsy was lower, they all elicited pronounced sedation. Consistent with clinical data, most currently available second-generation antipsychotics induced cognitive and motor side effects with little separation from therapeutic-like doses. This study provides a uniform in vivo comparative basis on which to evaluate future early-stage drug candidates intended for potential pharmacotherapy of BPSD. PMID:24599316

  8. Impact of ADHD symptoms on autism spectrum disorder symptom severity.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Linda; Bühler, Eva; Poustka, Luise; Bach, Christiane; Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Monika; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Bachmann, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Despite the official exclusion criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the DSM-IV and ICD-10, patients with ASD often show ADHD symptoms. We aimed to examine the potential influence of ADHD symptoms on autistic psychopathology in a large sample of patients with ASD. We tested the hypothesis that patients with ASD and an additional ADHD (ASD+) would show a higher severity of autistic symptoms than those with ASD only (ASD-). We measured autistic symptoms using the autism diagnostic observation schedule (ADOS-G), the autism diagnostic interview (ADI-R), and the social responsiveness scale (SRS). To measure overall psychopathology and ADHD symptoms, we used the child behavior checklist (CBCL) and the ADHD rating scale (FBB-ADHS), respectively. Group differences between the ASD+ and the ASD- group (group division was conducted according to the results of the FBB-ADHS) were calculated using a univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA). The ASD+ group showed a greater severity of autistic symptoms than the ASD- group, measured by the SRS and the ADI-R. Especially in the social interaction subscale (ADI-R), a significantly higher symptom severity was found in the ASD+ group. No significant group differences were found regarding autistic symptoms measured by the ADOS-G. Patients with ASD and an additional ADHD expressed a stronger severity of autistic symptoms than patients with ASD only. According to our results, the possibility of a co-diagnosis of ADS and ADHD, as is being planned in the DSM-5, is in line with earlier studies, is highly reasonable, will simplify research, and have therapeutic implications. PMID:23973801

  9. Beyond Mutations: Additional Mechanisms and Implications of SWI/SNF Complex Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Stefanie B.; Thompson, Kenneth W.; Lu, Li; Reisman, David

    2015-01-01

    SWI/SNF is a major regulator of gene expression. Its role is to facilitate the shifting and exposure of DNA segments within the promoter and other key domains to transcription factors and other essential cellular proteins. This complex interacts with a wide range of proteins and does not function within a single, specific pathway; thus, it is involved in a multitude of cellular processes, including DNA repair, differentiation, development, cell adhesion, and growth control. Given SWI/SNF’s prominent role in these processes, many of which are important for blocking cancer development, it is not surprising that the SWI/SNF complex is targeted during cancer initiation and progression both by mutations and by non-mutational mechanisms. Currently, the understanding of the types of alterations, their frequency, and their impact on the SWI/SNF subunits is an area of intense research that has been bolstered by a recent cadre of NextGen sequencing studies. These studies have revealed mutations in SWI/SNF subunits, indicating that this complex is thus important for cancer development. The purpose of this review is to put into perspective the role of mutations versus other mechanisms in the silencing of SWI/SNF subunits, in particular, BRG1 and BRM. In addition, this review explores the recent development of synthetic lethality and how it applies to this complex, as well as how BRM polymorphisms are becoming recognized as potential clinical biomarkers for cancer risk. Significance: Recent reviews have detailed the occurrence of mutations in nearly all SWI/SNF subunits, which indicates that this complex is an important target for cancer. However, when the frequency of mutations in a given tumor type is compared to the frequency of subunit loss, it becomes clear that other non-mutational mechanisms must play a role in the inactivation of SWI/SNF subunits. Such data indicate that epigenetic mechanisms that are known to regulate BRM may also be involved in the loss of

  10. Psychosocial Symptoms and Poor Insight as Predictors of Homicidality among Clients with Psychosis: Implications for Counseling Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether psychological symptoms, negative social events, treatment-related information, and degree of insight into one's illness predicted current homicidality in a population of clients with psychosis (N = 170). Multiple regression analyses revealed that homicidality can be reliably predicted when clients…

  11. Effects of additional repeated sprint training during preseason on performance, heart rate variability, and stress symptoms in futsal players: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Soares-Caldeira, Lúcio F; de Souza, Eberton A; de Freitas, Victor H; de Moraes, Solange M F; Leicht, Anthony S; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether supplementing regular preseason futsal training with weekly sessions of repeated sprints (RS) training would have positive effects on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and field test performance. Thirteen players from a professional futsal team (22.6 ± 6.7 years, 72.8 ± 8.7 kg, 173.2 ± 6.2 cm) were divided randomly into 2 groups (AddT: n = 6 and normal training group: n = 7). Both groups performed a RSA test, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYo IR1), squat (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ), body composition, and heart rate variability (HRV) measures at rest before and after 4 weeks of preseason training. Athletes weekly stress symptoms were recorded by psychometric responses using the Daily Analysis of Life Demands for Athletes questionnaire and subjective ratings of well-being scale, respectively. The daily training load (arbitrary units) was assessed using the session of rating perceived exertion method. After the preseason training, there were no significant changes for body composition, SJ, CMJ, and RSAbest. The YoYo IR1, RSAmean, RSAworst, and RSAdecreament were significantly improved for both groups (p ≤ 0.05). The HRV parameters improved significantly within both groups (p ≤ 0.05) except for high frequency (HF, absolute and normalized units, [n.u.]), low frequency (LF) (n.u.), and the LF/HF ratio. A moderate effect size for the AddT group was observed for resting heart rate and several HRV measures. Training load and psychometric responses were similar between both groups. Additional RS training resulted in slightly greater positive changes for vagal-related HRV with similar improvements in performance and training stress during the preseason training in futsal players. PMID:24662230

  12. Broad implications for respiratory sinus arrhythmia development: Associations with childhood symptoms of psychopathology in a community sample

    PubMed Central

    Patriquin, Michelle A.; Lorenzi, Jill; Scarpa, Angela; Calkins, Susan D.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2015-01-01

    Replicating the group-based developmental trajectory methodology from our prior study (Patriquin, Lorenzi, Scarpa, & Bell, 2014), the current study examines the development of baseline respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) across a new, larger cohort of typically developing children at 5, 10, 24, 36, and 48 months of age and examines the trajectory relationship with symptoms of childhood psychopathology. Group-based developmental trajectory modeling replicated our prior findings of a two-group model fit: a “High RSA” and “Low RSA” group. The “Low RSA” group, which demonstrated lower baseline RSA across all time points, had significantly more childhood problems at 48 months, namely increased withdrawal, aggressive behavior, pervasive developmental problems, and oppositional defiant problems. All participants for whom there were developmental or autism spectrum concerns (n = 6; based on maternal report at 48 months) were allocated to the Low RSA trajectory group. These results suggest that consistent developmental trajectories of RSA may point to protective factors (i.e., high RSA) against developing symptoms of childhood psychopathology. PMID:25503815

  13. Gender and factor-level interactions in psychopathy: implications for self-directed violence risk and borderline personality disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn; Sprague, Jenessa; Javdani, Shabnam

    2012-07-01

    Women with antisocial and psychopathic traits have a more extensive history of self-directed violence, as well as borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, than their male counterparts (Chapman, Specht, & Cellucci, 2005; Warren et al., 2003). To inform this area of research, we examined gender differences in the relationship between psychopathy factors and risk for self-directed violence, as measured by a history of suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempts, across 2 studies. In both studies, we found that the interaction of the interpersonal-affective (Factor 1) and impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy, a combination considered to exemplify high psychopathy, was associated with ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt histories specifically in women. In men, Factor 2 traits were associated with these risk indices for self-directed violence, regardless of Factor 1. In Study 2, we extended our analysis to examine whether BPD accounted for the relationship between psychopathy and self-directed violence differentially in women and men. Results suggested that BPD symptoms partially accounted for the effects of Factor 2 on self-directed violence (both self-harm and attempts) in both genders but fully accounted for Factor 1 protective effects only in men. These findings underscore the notion that the same psychopathic trait liabilities, at least as they are currently assessed, may confer risk for different forms of behavioral maladjustment in women versus men. PMID:22452771

  14. Clinical implications of the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation: inter-relationships between symptoms, psychosocial factors and cardiovascular outcomes.

    PubMed

    Handberg, Eileen M; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Johnson, B Delia; Krantz, David S; Thompson, Diane V; Vaccarino, Viola; Bittner, Vera; Sopko, George; Pepine, Carl J; Merz, Noel Bairey; Rutledge, Thomas R

    2013-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA and is associated with several modifiable (hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, tobacco use, physical inactivity, obesity and unhealthy diet) and nonmodifiable (age, gender and family history) risk factors. The role of psychosocial risk factors in the development of cardiovascular disease has a growing body of literature, and differences in men and women have been identified. The Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation provides insight into psychosocial risk factors in a cohort of women presenting with chest pain who had a comprehensive battery of psychosocial assessments and long-term follow-up. This review focuses on symptom presentation for chest pain and its relationship to cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality, quality of life, healthcare costs and psychosocial predictor variables, including anxiety, depression, hostility and social networks. In the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation, persistent chest pain was associated with an increased rate of adverse events and relatively high rates of depression and anxiety, with reduced functional capacity and impaired quality of life, over a median of 6 years of follow-up. More research is needed to better understand the relationships between symptoms and negative emotions and to determine whether psychological (pharmacologic and/or cognitive) interventions might impact both psychological and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:24007253

  15. Young child with severe brain volume loss easily passes the word memory test and medical symptom validity test: implications for mild TBI.

    PubMed

    Carone, Dominic A

    2014-01-01

    The Word Memory Test (WMT) and Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT) are two commonly used free-standing measures of test-taking effort. The use of any test as a measure of effort is enhanced when evidence shows that it can be easily passed by patients with severe neurological conditions. The opportunity arose to administer the WMT and MSVT to a 9-year-old girl (referred to as CJ) with severe congenital bilateral brain tissue loss (shown via a compelling brain MRI image), chronic epilepsy, an extremely low Full Scale IQ, extremely low adaptive functioning, developmental delays, numerous severe cognitive impairments, and treatment with multiple high-dose benzodiazepines. She received extensive early intervention services and numerous academic accommodations. Despite this set of problems, CJ passed the WMT and MSVT at perfect to near perfect levels. Implications for failure on these tests among patients with known or alleged mild traumatic brain injury are discussed. PMID:24266623

  16. Meta-Analysis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Restriction Diet, and Synthetic Food Color Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Method: Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases…

  17. Non-Additive Voltametric Currents From a Mixture of Two, Three and Four Redox-Active Compounds and Electroanalytical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dass, Amala; Oh, Woon Su; Gao, Xue-Rong; Rawashdeh, Abdel M.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    We have published recently the effect of dissimilar diffusion coefficients on the size of the voltammetric waves from a mixture of two redox-active compounds. Similarly, at the potential range where three redox-active species, decamethylferrocene (dMeFc), ferrocene (Fc) and N-methylphenothiazine (MePTZ), are oxidized simultaneously with rates controlled by linear diffusion, electrogenerated radicals diffusing outwards from the electrode react with the original species diffusing towards the electrode from the bulk; thus, Fc(+) reacts with dMeFc producing Fc and dMeFc(+), while MePTZ(+) reacts both with dMeFc producing MePTZ and dMeFc(+), and with Fc producing MePTZ and Fc(+). These reactions replace dMeFc with Fc at the second plateau, and both dMeFc and Fc with MePTZ at the third plateau. Since the diffusion coefficients of the three species are not equal, the mass-transfer limited currents of the second and the third oxidation wave plateaus change by approx. 10%. Numerical simulations of the experimental voltamograms support this mechanism. Similar results were also obtained for a mixture of four redoxactive compounds. The implications of this non-additive nature of currents on: (a) the use of internal voltammetric standards for quantitative analysis of a mixture of redox-active compounds; and, (b) the half wave potentials (E1/2) of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th waves for qualitative analysis, will be discussed.

  18. Anthrax: Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... hands Inhalation anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Chest Discomfort Shortness of breath Confusion or dizziness ... aches Gastrointestinal anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Swelling of neck or neck glands Sore throat ...

  19. The role of trauma symptoms in nonsuicidal self-injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Noelle B; Kouros, Chrystyna D; Meuret, Alicia E

    2014-01-01

    Reports of traumatic events by individuals who engage in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) are common; yet, evidence for the relation between traumatic events and NSSI is inconclusive. This review explores the thesis that trauma symptoms, rather than the experience of a traumatic event per se, underlie this relation, specifically suggesting that trauma symptoms might serve as a mediator. The literature indicates that self-injury plays an important functional role in coping with trauma symptoms such that self-injury can provide an escape from intrusive thoughts and aversive emotional states, as well as end dissociation and periods of numbness through the generation of feelings. Additionally, trauma symptoms have been shown to mediate the relation between the occurrence of traumatic events and NSSI. Taken together, trauma symptoms may play an important role in the development and maintenance of NSSI. The review concludes with treatment implications and future directions for research. PMID:23878145

  20. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

    2001-02-20

    The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  1. Identification of Students' Intuitive Mental Computational Strategies for 1, 2 and 3 Digits Addition and Subtraction: Pedagogical and Curricular Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazali, Munirah; Alias, Rohana; Ariffin, Noor Asrul Anuar; Ayub, Ayminsyadora

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to examine mental computation strategies used by Year 1, Year 2, and Year 3 students to solve addition and subtraction problems. The participants in this study were twenty five 7 to 9 year-old students identified as excellent, good and satisfactory in their mathematics performance from a school in Penang, Malaysia.…

  2. Sex and Age Differences in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Diagnoses: Implications for DSM-V and ICD-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramtekkar, Ujjwal P.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Todd, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender and age differences in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom endorsement in a large community-based sample. Method: Families with four or more full siblings ascertained from Missouri birth records completed telephone interviews regarding lifetime DSM-IV ADHD symptoms and the Strengths and Weaknesses…

  3. Symptoms of Mental Health Problems: Children's and Adolescents' Understandings and Implications for Gender Differences in Help Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Alice; Hunt, Kate; Sweeting, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Amidst concerns that young people's mental health is deteriorating, it is important to explore their understandings of symptoms of mental health problems and beliefs around help seeking. Drawing on focus group data from Scottish school pupils, we demonstrate how they understood symptoms of mental health problems and how their…

  4. Menopausal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, Janice; Morris, Edward P

    2000-01-01

    Definition Menopause begins one year after the last menstrual period. Symptoms often begin in the perimenopausal years. Incidence/prevalence In the United Kingdom the mean age for the menopause is 50 years 9 months. The median onset of the perimenopause is between 45.5 and 47.5 years. One Scottish survey (of 6096 women aged 45 to 54 years) found that 84% had experienced at least one of the classic menopausal symptoms, with 45% finding one or more symptoms a problem.1 InterventionsBeneficial:OestrogensTiboloneLikely to be beneficial:ProgestogensClonidineUnknown effectiveness:Phyto-oestrogensTestosteroneAntidepressants Aetiology/risk factors Urogenital symptoms of menopause are caused by decreased oestrogen concentrations, but the cause of vasomotor symptoms and psychological effects is complex and remains unclear. Prognosis Menopause is a physiological event. Its timing may be genetically determined. Although endocrine changes are permanent, menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, which are experienced by about 70% of women, usually resolve with time.2 However, some symptoms, such as genital atrophy, may remain the same or worsen. Aims To reduce or prevent menopausal symptoms, and to improve quality of life with minimum adverse effects. Outcomes Frequency and severity of vasomotor, urogenital, and psychological symptoms; quality of life. Methods Clinical Evidence search and appraisal December 1999. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews that met Clinical Evidence quality criteria. PMID:11118182

  5. Symptom Cluster Analyses Based on Symptom Occurrence and Severity Ratings Among Pediatric Oncology Patients During Myelosuppressive Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Baggott, Christina; Cooper, Bruce A.; Marina, Neyssa; Matthay, Katherine K.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background Symptom cluster research is an emerging field in symptom management. The ability to identify symptom clusters that are specific to pediatric oncology patients may lead to improved understanding of symptoms’ underlying mechanisms among patients of all ages. Objective The purpose of this study, in a sample of children and adolescents with cancer who underwent a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, was to compare the number and types of symptom clusters identified using patients’ ratings of symptom occurrence and symptom severity. Interventions/Methods Children and adolescents with cancer (10 to 18 years of age; N=131) completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale 10–18 on the day they started a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, using a one week recall of experiences. Symptom data based on occurrence and severity ratings were examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA). The defined measurement model suggested by the best EFA model was then examined with a latent variable analysis. Results Three clusters were identified when symptom occurrence ratings were evaluated which were classified as a chemotherapy sequelae cluster, mood disturbance cluster, and a neuropsychological discomforts cluster. Analysis of symptom severity ratings yielded similar cluster configurations. Conclusions Cluster configurations remained relatively stable between symptom occurrence and severity ratings. The evaluation of patients at a common point in the chemotherapy cycle may have contributed to these findings. Implications for Practice Additional uniformity in symptom clusters investigations is needed to allow appropriate comparisons among studies. The dissemination of symptom clusters research methodology through publication and presentation may promote uniformity in this field. PMID:21921793

  6. Alteration of extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance by biochar addition: Implication for carbon sequestration in subtropical mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ling; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Biochar has attracted more and more attention due to its essential role in adsorbing pollutants, improving soil fertility, and modifying greenhouse gas emission. However, the influences of biochar on extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance are still lack and debatable. Currently, there is no information about the impact of biochar on the function of mangrove ecosystems. Therefore, we explored the effects of biochar on extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance in subtropical mangrove sediment, and further estimated the contribution of biochar to C sequestration. In this study, sediments were amended with 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0% of biochar and incubated at 25 °C for 90 days. After incubation, enzyme activities, microbial abundance and the increased percentage of sediment organic C content were determined. Both increase (phenol oxidase and β-glucosidase) and decrease (peroxidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and acid phosphatase) of enzyme activities were observed in biochar treatments, but only peroxidase activity showed statistical significance (at least p < 0.01) compared to the control. Moreover, the activities of all enzymes tested were significantly related to the content of biochar addition (at least p < 0.05). On the other hand, bacterial and fungal abundance in biochar treatments were remarkably lower than control (p < 0.001), and the significantly negative relationship (p < 0.05) between bacterial abundance and the content of biochar was found. Additionally, the increased percentage of organic C gradually increased with biochar addition rate, which provided evidence for applying biochar to mitigate climate change. Given the importance of microorganisms and enzyme activities in sediment organic matter decomposition, the increased C sequestration might be explained by the large decrease of microbial abundance and enzyme activity after biochar intervention. PMID:27454094

  7. Effect of water treatment additives on lime softening residual trace chemical composition--implications for disposal and reuse.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weizhi; Roessler, Justin; Blaisi, Nawaf I; Townsend, Timothy G

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water treatment residues (WTR) offer potential benefits when recycled through land application. The current guidance in Florida, US allows for unrestricted land application of lime softening WTR; alum and ferric WTR require additional evaluation of total and leachable concentrations of select trace metals prior to land application. In some cases a mixed WTR is produced when lime softening is accompanied by the addition of a coagulant or other treatment chemical; applicability of the current guidance is unclear. The objective of this research was to characterize the total and leachable chemical content of WTR from Florida facilities that utilize multiple treatment chemicals. Lime and mixed lime WTR samples were collected from 18 water treatment facilities in Florida. Total and leachable concentrations of the WTR were measured. To assess the potential for disposal of mixed WTR as clean fill below the water table, leaching tests were conducted at multiple liquid to solid ratios and under reducing conditions. The results were compared to risk-based soil and groundwater contamination thresholds. Total metal concentrations of WTR were found to be below Florida soil contaminant thresholds with Fe found in the highest abundance at a concentration of 3600 mg/kg-dry. Aluminum was the only element that exceeded the Florida groundwater contaminant thresholds using SPLP (95% UCL = 0.23 mg/L; risk threshold = 0.2 mg/L). Tests under reducing conditions showed elevated concentrations of Fe and Mn, ranging from 1 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than SPLP leachates. Mixed lime WTR concentrations (total and leachable) were lower than the ferric and alum WTR concentrations, supporting that mixed WTR are appropriately represented as lime WTR. Testing of WTR under reducing conditions demonstrated the potential for release of certain trace metals (Fe, Al, Mn) above applicable regulatory thresholds; additional evaluation is needed to assess management options where

  8. Spermine metabolism and radiation-derived reactive oxygen species for future therapeutic implications in cancer: an additive or adaptive response.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Roberto; Cervelli, Manuela; Tempera, Giampiero; Fratini, Emiliano; Varesio, Luigi; Mariottini, Paolo; Agostinelli, Enzo

    2014-03-01

    Destruction of cells by irradiation-induced radical formation is one of the most frequent interventions in cancer therapy. An alternative to irradiation-induced radical formation is in principle drug-induced formation of radicals, and the formation of toxic metabolites by enzyme catalyzed reactions. Thus, combination therapy targeting polyamine metabolism could represent a promising strategy to fight hyper-proliferative disease. The aim of this work is to discuss and evaluate whether the presence of a DNA damage provoked by enzymatic ROS overproduction may act as an additive or adaptive response upon radiation and combination of hyperthermia with lysosomotropic compounds may improve the cytocidal effect of polyamines oxidation metabolites. Low level of X-irradiations delivers challenging dose of damage and an additive or adaptive response with the chronic damage induced by spermine oxidase overexpression depending on the deficiency of the DNA repair mechanisms. Since reactive oxygen species lead to membrane destabilization and cell death, we discuss the effects of BSAO and spermine association in multidrug resistant cells that resulted more sensitive to spermine metabolites than their wild-type counterparts, due to an increased mitochondrial activity. Since mammal spermine oxidase is differentially activated in a tissue specific manner, and cancer cells can differ in term of DNA repair capability, it could be of interest to open a scientific debate to use combinatory treatments to alter spermine metabolism and deliver differential response. PMID:23999645

  9. Maternal depressive symptoms and low literacy as potential barriers to employment in a sample of families receiving welfare: are there two-generational implications?

    PubMed

    Zaslow, M J; Hair, E C; Dion, M R; Ahluwalia, S K; Sargent, J

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the role of maternal depressive symptoms and low maternal literacy in predicting outcomes in two generations in families receiving welfare: mothers' employment and children's development. The sample consists of 351 African-American families, each with a preschool-age child, in which the mother had applied for or was receiving welfare. Close to the start of the study, 52.6 percent of the mothers in the sample had scores indicating lower literacy, 39.5 percent reported moderate to high levels of depressive symptoms, and 24.6 percent had a co-occurrence of these. Using continuous scores, in multivariate analyses of variance, neither level of literacy, extent of depressive symptoms, nor the interaction of these, were found to predict two measures of subsequent employment (any employment across the two year follow-up period, and current employment at the time of the follow-up). However, when cut points were used (low literacy; moderate to high depressive symptoms), mothers with low literacy were found less often to be employed approximately two years later. Multivariate analyses of variance examining the set of child outcomes (cognitive school readiness and behavior problems) in light of mothers' depressive symptoms and literacy level found a statistically significant interaction of literacy level and extent of depressive symptoms: children of mothers with more depressive symptoms had less favorable developmental outcomes only in the presence of low maternal literacy. Structural equation models provide evidence that parenting behavior mediates the relationship between the predictor variables and child outcomes, and that the pathways from depressive symptoms through parenting to child outcomes are stronger when maternal depressive symptoms co-occur with low maternal literacy. PMID:11480894

  10. HIV Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov More information ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

  11. Advancing Symptom Science Through Use of Common Data Elements

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Nancy S.; Anderson, Ruth; Bakken, Suzanne; Corwin, Elizabeth; Docherty, Sharron; Dorsey, Susan G.; Heitkemper, Margaret; McCloskey, Donna Jo; Moore, Shirley; Pullen, Carol; Rapkin, Bruce; Schiffman, Rachel; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Grady, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of common data elements (CDEs), conceptually defined as variables that are operationalized and measured in identical ways across studies, enables comparison of data across studies in ways that would otherwise be impossible. Although healthcare researchers are increasingly using CDEs, there has been little systematic use of CDEs for symptom science. CDEs are especially important in symptom science because people experience common symptoms across a broad range of health and developmental states, and symptom management interventions may have common outcomes across populations. Purposes The purposes of this article are to (a) recommend best practices for the use of CDEs for symptom science within and across centers; (b) evaluate the benefits and challenges associated with the use of CDEs for symptom science; (c) propose CDEs to be used in symptom science to serve as the basis for this emerging science; and (d) suggest implications and recommendations for future research and dissemination of CDEs for symptom science. Design The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)-supported P20 and P30 Center directors applied published best practices, expert advice, and the literature to identify CDEs to be used across the centers to measure pain, sleep, fatigue, and affective and cognitive symptoms. Findings We generated a minimum set of CDEs to measure symptoms. Conclusions The CDEs identified through this process will be used across the NINR Centers and will facilitate comparison of symptoms across studies. We expect that additional symptom CDEs will be added and the list will be refined in future work. Clinical Relevance Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 47:5, ©2015 Sigma Theta Tau International. PMID:26250061

  12. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8–24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12–24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  13. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor.

    PubMed

    Cedergreen, Nina; Nørhave, Nils Jakob; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8-24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12-24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  14. Plague Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  15. Multiple perspectives on symptom interpretation in primary care research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Assessment and management of symptoms is a main task in primary care. Symptoms may be defined as 'any subjective evidence of a health problem as perceived by the patient’. In other words, symptoms do not appear as such; symptoms are rather the result of an interpretation process. We aim to discuss different perspectives on symptom interpretation as presented in the disciplines of biomedicine, psychology and anthropology and the possible implications for our understanding of research on symptoms in relation to prevalence and diagnosis in the general population and in primary care. Discussion Symptom experiences are embedded in a complex interplay between biological, psychological and cultural factors. From a biomedical perspective, symptoms are seen as possible indicators of disease and are characterized by parameters related to seriousness (e.g. appearance, severity, impact and temporal aspects). However, such symptom characteristics are rarely unambiguous, but merely indicate disease probability. In addition, the GP’s interpretation of presenting symptoms will also be influenced by other factors. From a psychological perspective, factors affecting interpretation are in focus (e.g. internal frame of reference, attention to sensations, illness perception and susceptibility to suggestion). These individual factors cannot stand alone either, but are influenced by the surroundings. Anthropological research suggests that personal experiences and culture form a continuous feedback relationship which influence when and how sensations are understood as symptoms of disease and acted upon. Summary The different approaches to symptom interpretation imply that we need to be cautious and conscious when interpreting survey findings that are based on symptom prevalence in the general population or in primary care. These findings will reflect a variety of interpretations of sensations, which are not equivalent to expressions of underlying disease. Furthermore, if

  16. Review: In vivo and postmortem effects of feed antioxidants in livestock: a review of the implications on authorization of antioxidant feed additives.

    PubMed

    Salami, S A; Guinguina, A; Agboola, J O; Omede, A A; Agbonlahor, E M; Tayyab, U

    2016-08-01

    The pivotal roles of regulatory jurisdictions in the feed additive sector cannot be over-emphasized. In the European Union (EU), antioxidant substances are authorized as feed additives for prolonging the shelf life of feedstuffs based on their effect for preventing lipid peroxidation. However, the efficacy of antioxidants transcends their functional use as technological additives in animal feeds. Promising research results have revealed the in vivo efficacy of dietary antioxidants for combating oxidative stress in production animals. The in vivo effect of antioxidants is significant for enhancing animal health and welfare. Similarly, postmortem effect of dietary antioxidants has been demonstrated to improve the nutritional, organoleptic and shelf-life qualities of animal products. In practice, dietary antioxidants have been traditionally used by farmers for these benefits in livestock production. However, some antioxidants particularly when supplemented in excess could act as prooxidants and exert detrimental effects on animal well-being and product quality. Presently, there is no exclusive legislation in the EU to justify the authorization of antioxidant products for these in vivo and postmortem efficacy claims. To indicate these efficacy claims and appropriate dosage on product labels, it is important to broaden the authorization status of antioxidants through the appraisal of existing EU legislations on feed additives. Such regulatory review will have major impact on the legislative categorization of antioxidants and the efficacy assessment in the technical dossier application. The present review harnesses the scientific investigations of these efficacy claims in production animals and, proposes potential categorization and appraisal of in vivo methodologies for efficacy assessment of antioxidants. This review further elucidates the implication of such regulatory review on the practical application of antioxidants as feed additives in livestock production

  17. Bullying and PTSD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

    2012-08-01

    PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that boys were 2.27 times more likely to be exposed to frequent bullying than girls. A latent variable second-order model demonstrated an association between frequency of bullying exposure and PTSD symptoms (beta = 0.49). This relationship was not moderated by gender. However, the average levels of PTSD symptoms as well as clinical range symptoms were higher for girls. For all bullied students, 27.6% of the boys and 40.5% of the girls had scores within the clinical range. A mimic model showed that youth who identify as being both a bully and a victim of bullying were more troubled than those who were victims only. Our findings support the idea that exposure to bullying is a potential risk factor for PTSD symptoms among students. Future research could investigate whether the same holds for PTSD through diagnostic procedures, but this will depend on whether or not bullying is decided to comply with the DSM-IV classification of trauma required for diagnosis. Results are discussed with regard to their implications for school interventions. PMID:22391775

  18. The impact of parenting on the associations between child aggression subtypes and oppositional defiant disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Fite, Paula J

    2014-12-01

    The current study evaluated parenting behaviors (i.e., parental monitoring, inconsistent discipline, parental involvement, positive parenting, and corporal punishment) as moderators of the link between proactive and reactive aggression and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms in a community sample of 89 children ranging from 9 to 12 years of age (M = 10.44, SD = 1.14; 56 % male). Reactive, but not proactive, aggression was uniquely positively associated with ODD symptoms. Additionally, inconsistent discipline moderated the association between proactive, but not reactive, aggression and ODD symptoms, such that proactive aggression was associated with ODD symptoms only when levels of inconsistent discipline were high. Findings appear to suggest that associations between these aggression subtypes and ODD symptoms are influenced by different factors, with inconsistent discipline indicated in the association between proactively aggressive behavior and ODD symptoms. Implications for intervention are discussed. PMID:24500326

  19. The Relationship between Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms and Substance Use among Adolescents Involved with Child Welfare: Implications for Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Abby L.; Wekerle, Christine; Tonmyr, Lil; Thornton, Tiffany; Waechter, Randall; Pereira, Jessica; Chung, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in predicting substance use and substance-related problems in a sample of older youth and emerging adults involved with child welfare. The sample was drawn from the Maltreatment and Adolescent Pathways (MAP) longitudinal study (Wekerle et al. 2009).…

  20. Childhood Trauma Exposure in Iraq and Afghanistan War Era Veterans: Implications for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Adult Functional Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E.; Dedert, Eric A.; Calhoun, Patrick S.; Brancu, Mira; Runnals, Jennifer; Beckham, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship among childhood trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and adult social support in a large sample of veterans who served in the military after 09/11/2001, with a specific focus on the potential role of the PTSD avoidance and numbing cluster as intervening in the association between…

  1. Understanding the explanatory model of the patient on their medically unexplained symptoms and its implication on treatment development research: a Sri Lanka Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumathipala, Athula; Siribaddana, Sisira; Hewege, Suwin; Sumathipala, Kethaki; Prince, Martin; Mann, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are often distressed, disabled and dissatisfied with the care they receive. Illness beliefs held by patients have a major influence on the decision to consult, persistence of symptoms and the degree of disability. Illness perception models consist of frameworks to organise information from multiple sources into distinct but interrelated dimensions: identity (the illness label), cause, consequences, emotional representations perceived control and timeline. Our aim was to elicit the illness perceptions of patients with MUS in Sri Lankan primary care to modify and improve a CBT intervention. Method An intervention study was conducted in a hospital primary care clinic in Colombo, Sri Lanka using CBT for MUS. As a part of the baseline assessment, qualitative data was collected using; the Short Explanatory Model Interview (SEMI), from 68 patients (16–65 years) with MUS. We categorised the qualitative data in to key components of the illness perception model, to refine CBT intervention for a subsequent larger trial study. Results The cohort was chronically ill and 87% of the patients were ill for more than six months (range six months to 20 years) with 5 or more symptoms and 6 or more visits over preceding six months. A majority were unable to offer an explanation on identity (59%) or the cause (56%), but in the consequence domain 95% expressed significant illness worries; 37% believed their symptoms indicated moderately serious illness and 58% very serious illness. Reflecting emotional representation, 33% reported fear of death, 20% fear of paralysis, 13% fear of developing cancer and the rest unspecified incurable illness. Consequence and emotional domains were significant determinants of distress and consultations. Their repeated visits were to seek help to alleviate symptoms. Only a minority expected investigations (8.8 %) or diagnosis (8.8%). However, the doctors who had previously treated them allegedly

  2. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  3. Norovirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Español: SÃntomas Prevent Dehydration Drink plenty of liquids to replace fluids that ...

  4. Pain Symptoms Associated with Opioid Use among Vulnerable Persons with HIV: An exploratory study with implications for palliative care and opioid abuse prevention.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Amy R; Nguyen, Trang Q; Robinson, Allysha C; Harrell, Paul T; Mitchell, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Current or former injection drug users with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at high risk for pain, which adversely affects their quality of life and may increase their risk for illicit drug use or relapse. We explored associations between pain symptoms and substance use among injection-drug-using study participants with HIV who had histories of heroin use. Using generalized estimating equations and controlling for prior substance use, we found that pain in each six-month period was associated with the use of heroin and prescription opioids, but not the use of nonopioid drugs or alcohol. Routine clinical assessment and improved management of pain symptoms may be needed for persons with HIV and a history of injection drug use, particularly those with chronic pain, for whom there is increased risk for heroin use. PMID:26856123

  5. Depressive Symptoms in Adults with Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Dicianno, Brad E.; Kinback, Nicholas; Bellin, Melissa; Chaikind, Laurie; Buhari, Alhaji; Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Zabel, Andy; Donlan, Robert M.; Collins, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective To examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in adults with spina bifida and identify contributing factors for depressive symptomatology. Research Method/Design Retrospective Cohort Study. Data collection was conducted at a regional adult spina bifida clinic. A total of 190 charts from adult patients with spina bifida were included. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the mobility domain of the Craig Handicap Assessment Reporting Technique Short Form (CHART-SF). Results Of the 190 participants, 49 (25.8%) had BDI-II scores (14+) indicative of depressive symptomatology. Sixty-nine (36.3%) of all participants were on antidepressants for the purpose of treating depressive symptoms, and 31 (63.3%) of those with clinical symptoms of depression were on antidepressants. The total number of participants with a history of depressive symptoms may be as high as 45.7% if both participants with BDI-II scores 14+ and those with antidepressant use specifically for the purposes of depression treatment are combined. In this population, lower CHART-SF mobility score, expressing “emotional concerns” as a reason for the visit on an intake sheet, and use of antidepressant medications were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Conclusions/Implications Depressive symptomatology appears to be common and undertreated in this cohort of adults with spina bifida, which may warrant screening for emotional concerns in routine clinic appointments. Significant depressive symptoms are associated with fewer hours out of bed and fewer days leaving the house. Additional research is needed to assess the impact of interventions directed towards mobility on depression and in the treatment of depression in this patient population. PMID:26147238

  6. P3N-PIPO of Clover yellow vein virus exacerbates symptoms in pea infected with white clover mosaic virus and is implicated in viral synergism.

    PubMed

    Hisa, Yusuke; Suzuki, Haruka; Atsumi, Go; Choi, Sun Hee; Nakahara, Kenji S; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2014-01-20

    Mixed infection of pea (Pisum sativum) with Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) and White clover mosaic virus (WClMV) led to more severe disease symptoms (a phenomenon called viral synergism). Similar to the mixed ClYVV/WClMV infection, a WClMV-based vector encoding P3N-PIPO of ClYVV exacerbated the disease symptoms. Infection with the WClMV vector encoding ClYVV HC-Pro (a suppressor of RNA silencing involved in potyviral synergisms), also resulted in more severe symptoms, although to a lesser extent than infection with the vector encoding P3N-PIPO. Viral genomic RNA accumulated soon after inoculation (at 2 and 4 days) at higher levels in leaves inoculated with WClMV encoding HC-Pro but at lower levels in leaves inoculated with WClMV encoding P3N-PIPO than in peas infected with WClMV encoding GFP. Our results suggest that ClYVV P3N-PIPO is involved in the synergism between ClYVV and WClMV during pea infection through an unknown mechanism different from suppression of RNA silencing. PMID:24418553

  7. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  8. Eating disorder symptoms and parenting styles.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, Emma; Blissett, Jackie

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to examine associations between symptoms of eating disorders and parenting style, in a non-clinical sample. One hundred and five mothers completed self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms and parenting style. Higher levels of eating disorder symptoms were associated with more authoritarian and permissive parenting styles. Authoritative parenting was not significantly related to eating disorder symptoms. The findings demonstrate that eating disorder symptoms in non-clinical individuals are related to less adaptive parenting styles. These findings have potential implications for clinicians working with mothers with eating disorders. PMID:19932143

  9. Emotional Awareness: A Transdiagnostic Risk Factor for Internalizing Symptoms in Children and Adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Kranzler, Amy; Young, Jami F.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Abela, John R. Z.; Elias, Maurice J.; Selby, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study used longitudinal data to examine the role of emotional awareness as a transdiagnostic risk factor for internalizing symptoms. Participants were 204 youth, ages 7 to 16, who completed assessments every three months for a year. Results from hierarchical mixed effects modeling indicated that low emotional awareness predicted both depressive and anxiety symptoms for up to one year follow-up. In addition, emotional awareness predicted which youth went on to experience subsequent increases in depressive and anxiety symptoms over the course of the year. Emotional awareness also mediated both the cross-sectional and the longitudinal associations between anxiety and depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that emotional awareness may constitute a transdiagnostic risk factor for the development and/or maintenance of symptoms of depression and anxiety, which has important implications for youth treatment and prevention programs. PMID:25658297

  10. Blockade of uptake for dopamine, but not norepinephrine or 5-HT, increases selection of high effort instrumental activity: Implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Yohn, Samantha E; Errante, Emily E; Rosenbloom-Snow, Aaron; Somerville, Matthew; Rowland, Margaret; Tokarski, Kristin; Zafar, Nadia; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-10-01

    Deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational symptoms are frequently seen in people with depression and other disorders. Depressed people show a decision bias towards selection of low effort activities, and animal tests of effort-related decision making are being used as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. The present studies investigated the ability of drugs that block dopamine transport (DAT), norepinephrine transport (NET), and serotonin transport (SERT) to modulate work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision making (i.e., a progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats choose between working for a preferred food (high carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a PROG schedule vs. obtaining a less preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. The present studies focused on the effects of the selective DAT inhibitor GBR12909, the selective SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, and the selective NET inhibitors desipramine and atomoxetine. Acute and repeated administration of GBR12909 shifted choice behavior, increasing measures of PROG lever pressing but decreasing chow intake. In contrast, fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine failed to increase lever pressing output, and actually decreased it at higher doses. In the behaviorally effective dose range, GBR12909 elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis, but fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine decreased extracellular dopamine. Thus, blockade of DAT increases selection of the high effort instrumental activity, while inhibition of SERT or NET does not. These results have implications for the use of monoamine uptake inhibitors for the treatment of effort-related psychiatric symptoms in humans. PMID:27329556

  11. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:25797499

  12. PERSONALITY PREDISPOSITIONS IN CHINESE ADOLESCENTS: THE RELATION BETWEEN SELF-CRITICISM, DEPENDENCY, AND PROSPECTIVE INTERNALIZING SYMPTOMS

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joseph R.; Young, Jami F.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Yao, Shuqiao; Zhu, Xiong Zhao; Abela, John R.Z.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the prospective relation between two personality predispositions, self-criticism and dependency, and internalizing symptoms. Specifically, it was examined whether self-criticism and dependency predicted symptoms of depression and social anxiety, and if a moderation (e.g. diathesis-stress) or mediation model best explained the relation between the personality predispositions and emotional distress in Chinese adolescents. Participants included 1,150 adolescents (597 females and 553 males) from mainland China. Participants completed self-report measures of self-criticism, dependency, and neuroticism at baseline, and self-report measures of negative events, depressive symptoms, and social anxiety symptoms once a month for six months. Findings showed that self-criticism predicted depressive symptoms, while dependency predicted social anxiety symptoms. In addition, support was found for a mediation model, as opposed to a moderation model, with achievement stressors mediating the relation between self-criticism and depressive symptoms. Overall, these findings highlight new developmental pathways for the development of depression and social anxiety symptoms in mainland Chinese adolescents. Implications for cross-cultural developmental psychopathology research are discussed. PMID:25798026

  13. The Utility of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring for Detecting Silent Arrhythmias and Clarifying Symptom Mechanism in an Urban Elderly Population with Heart Failure and Hypertension: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Kathleen T; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial and ventriclar tachyarrhythmias, as well as bradyarrhythmias, in the elderly with heart failure (HF) and/or hypertension (HTN) have been well documented. However, the frequency of these arrhythmias, whether silent or symptomatic, and their association with subsequent cardiac events has not been well defined in patients 65 years or older with HF and other cardiovascular risk factors. OBJECTIVE: To assess the value of 2 weeks of remote, transtelephonic cardiac monitoring for detecting arrhythmias in an elderly, urban population living with HF. METHODS: Fifty-four patients with a history of systolic HF and/or HTN were consented and enrolled. All wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor for 2 weeks that captures EKG data and both silent and symptomatic arrhythmias were recorded. RESULTS: Mean age was 73 ± 6 years with 59% of subjects were females, 74% Hispanic, 22% black, and 4% white/other. All patients had HF and 94% had HTN. From the cardiac monitoring, 72% demonstrated ectopic atrial and ventricular activity, and 1 paroxysmal episode of atrial fibrillation was documented. In addition, 3 subjects had significant non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and 4 individuals had severe bradycardia recorded on cardiac monitoring. These 7 individuals underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker based on the documented arrhythmias which may have otherwise gone undetected. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of patients exhibited cardiac arrhythmias. Future morbidity was prevented because of the detection of arrhythmias on monitoring that led to specific therapies such as pacemaker or ICD implantation which otherwise may not have been implemented. PMID:20798788

  14. The Utility of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring for Detecting Silent Arrhythmias and Clarifying Symptom Mechanism in an Urban Elderly Population with Heart Failure and Hypertension: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathleen T.; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R.; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Background Atrial and ventriclar tachyarrhythmias, as well as bradyarrhythmias, in the elderly with heart failure (HF) and/or hypertension (HTN) have been well documented. However, the frequency of these arrhythmias, whether silent or symptomatic, and their association with subsequent cardiac events has not been well defined in patients 65 years or older with HF and other cardiovascular risk factors. Objective To assess the value of 2 weeks of remote, transtelephonic cardiac monitoring for detecting arrhythmias in an elderly, urban population living with HF. Methods Fifty-four patients with a history of systolic HF and/or HTN were consented and enrolled. All wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor for 2 weeks that captures EKG data and both silent and symptomatic arrhythmias were recorded. Results Mean age was 73 ± 6 years with 59% of subjects were females, 74% Hispanic, 22% black, and 4% white/other. All patients had HF and 94% had HTN. From the cardiac monitoring, 72% demonstrated ectopic atrial and ventricular activity, and 1 paroxysmal episode of atrial fibrillation was documented. In addition, 3 subjects had significant non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and 4 individuals had severe bradycardia recorded on cardiac monitoring. These 7 individuals underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker based on the documented arrhythmias which may have otherwise gone undetected. Conclusion A substantial proportion of patients exhibited cardiac arrhythmias. Future morbidity was prevented because of the detection of arrhythmias on monitoring that led to specific therapies such as pacemaker or ICD implantation which otherwise may not have been implemented. PMID:20798788

  15. Role and clinical implications of atypical antipsychotics in anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, trauma-related, and somatic symptom disorders: a systematized review.

    PubMed

    Albert, Umberto; Carmassi, Claudia; Cosci, Fiammetta; De Cori, David; Di Nicola, Marco; Ferrari, Silvia; Poloni, Nicola; Tarricone, Ilaria; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAs) may play a role in the treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and trauma-related disorders. No reviews on their differential use in these different disorders have been performed recently. The aim of this systematized review was to obtain data on efficacy and comparative effectiveness of AAs as a treatment of anxiety disorders, OCD, and trauma-related disorders to provide guidance for clinicians on when and which AA to use. We searched on PubMed, Psychnet, and Cochrane Libraries from inception to July 2015. Search results were limited to randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adult patients. Evidence of efficacy was considered the presence of positive results in two or more double-blind placebo-controlled studies. Our systematized search identified 1298 papers, of which 191 were subjected to a full-text review and 56 were included. Quetiapine extended-release showed a role in both acute and maintenance treatment of uncomplicated generalized anxiety disorder, whereas more studies are needed before drawing practical recommendations on the use of olanzapine and risperidone; aripiprazole and risperidone are effective in resistant OCD as augmentation treatments. Risperidone and olanzapine add-on may have a role in resistant or chronic post-traumatic stress disorder patients, although only risperidone addition can be recommended on the basis of the criterion of two or more positive placebo-controlled trials. This systematized review supports the evidence that only a few AAs are effective in only a minority of the off-label conditions in which they are currently used and confirms that AAs are not all the same. Their use should be on the basis of a balance between efficacy and side effects, and the characteristics as well as the preference of the patient. PMID:26974213

  16. Increased ventricular lactate in chronic fatigue syndrome. III. Relationships to cortical glutathione and clinical symptoms implicate oxidative stress in disorder pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Shungu, Dikoma C.; Weiduschat, Nora; Murrough, James W.; Mao, Xiangling; Pillemer, Sarah; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Medow, Marvin S.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Stewart, Julian M.; Mathew, Sanjay J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex illness, which is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric illness. In two previous reports, using 1H MRSI, we found significantly higher levels of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate in patients with CFS relative to those with generalized anxiety disorder and healthy volunteers (HV), but not relative to those with major depressive disorder (MDD). In this third independent cross-sectional neuroimaging study, we investigated a pathophysiological model which postulated that elevations of CSF lactate in patients with CFS might be caused by increased oxidative stress, cerebral hypoperfusion and/or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Fifteen patients with CFS, 15 with MDD and 13 HVs were studied using the following modalities: (i) 1H MRSI to measure CSF lactate; (ii) single-voxel 1H MRS to measure levels of cortical glutathione (GSH) as a marker of antioxidant capacity; (iii) arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF); and (iv) 31P MRSI to measure brain high-energy phosphates as objective indices of mitochondrial dysfunction. We found elevated ventricular lactate and decreased GSH in patients with CFS and MDD relative to HVs. GSH did not differ significantly between the two patient groups. In addition, we found lower rCBF in the left anterior cingulate cortex and the right lingual gyrus in patients with CFS relative to HVs, but rCBF did not differ between those with CFS and MDD. We found no differences between the three groups in terms of any high-energy phosphate metabolites. In exploratory correlation analyses, we found that levels of ventricular lactate and cortical GSH were inversely correlated, and significantly associated with several key indices of physical health and disability. Collectively, the results of this third independent study support a pathophysiological model of CFS in which increased oxidative stress may play a key role in CFS etiopathophysiology. PMID:22281935

  17. Premenstrual symptoms and smoking-related expectancies.

    PubMed

    Pang, Raina D; Bello, Mariel S; Stone, Matthew D; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Huh, Jimi; Monterosso, John; Haselton, Martie G; Fales, Melissa R; Leventhal, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Given that prior research implicates smoking abstinence in increased premenstrual symptoms, tobacco withdrawal, and smoking behaviors, it is possible that women with more severe premenstrual symptoms have stronger expectancies about the effects of smoking and abstaining from smoking on mood and withdrawal. However, such relations have not been previously explored. This study examined relations between premenstrual symptoms experienced in the last month and expectancies that abstaining from smoking results in withdrawal (i.e., smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies), that smoking is pleasurable (i.e., positive reinforcement smoking expectancies), and smoking relieves negative mood (i.e., negative reinforcement smoking expectancies). In a cross-sectional design, 97 non-treatment seeking women daily smokers completed self-report measures of smoking reinforcement expectancies, smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, premenstrual symptoms, mood symptoms, and nicotine dependence. Affect premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased negative reinforcement smoking expectancies, but not over and above covariates. Affect and pain premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased positive reinforcement smoking expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Affect, pain, and water retention premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Findings from this study suggest that addressing concerns about withdrawal and alternatives to smoking may be particularly important in women who experience more severe premenstrual symptoms, especially affect-related changes. PMID:26869196

  18. PTSD: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature PTSD Symptoms, Diagnosis , Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... Symptoms As with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), PTSD symptoms can be very subtle. "For example, some ...

  19. Effects of nitrogen addition on soil microbes and their implications for soil C emission in the Gurbantunggut Desert, center of the Eurasian Continent.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Cao, Yan Feng; Wang, Bin; Li, Yan

    2015-05-15

    Nitrogen (N) deposition can influence carbon cycling of terrestrial ecosystems. However, a general recognition of how soil microorganisms respond to increasing N deposition is not yet reached. We explored soil microbial responses to two levels of N addition (2.5 and 5 gN m(-2) yr(-1)) in interplant soil and beneath shrubs of Haloxylon ammodendron and their consequences to soil respiration in the Gurbantunggut Desert, northwestern China from 2011 to 2013. Microbial biomass and respiration were significantly higher beneath H. ammodendron than in interplant soil. The responses of microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial respiration (MR) showed opposite responses to N addition in interplant and beneath H. ammodendron. N addition slightly increased MBC and MR in interplant soil and decreased them beneath H. ammodendron, with a significant inhibition only in 2012. N addition had no impacts on the total microbial physiological activity, but N addition decreased the labile carbon substrate utilization beneath H. ammodendron when N addition level was high. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis showed that N addition did not alter the soil microbial community structure as evidenced by the similar ratios of fungal to bacterial PLFAs and gram-negative to gram-positive bacterial PLFAs. Microbial biomass and respiration showed close correlations with soil water content and dissolved carbon, and they were independent of soil inorganic nitrogen across three years. Our study suggests that N addition effects on soil microorganisms and carbon emission are dependent on the respiratory substrates and water availability in the desert ecosystem. PMID:25686661

  20. Schemas and Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms in incarcerated women.

    PubMed

    Specht, Matt W; Chapman, Alex; Cellucci, Tony

    2009-06-01

    There is increasing interest regarding the role of maladaptive cognition in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The current study examined the relationship between early maladaptive schema (EMS) domains and BPD symptoms as well as whether schema domains account for the relationship between childhood maltreatment and BPD severity. Incarcerated women (N=105) were assessed for BPD symptoms via semi-structured diagnostic interview. Disconnection/Rejection and Impaired Limits were associated with BPD pathology although these domains shared variance with depression and antisocial personality disorder pathology, respectively. In addition, the relationship between childhood abuse and BPD severity was non-significant after controlling for schema domains. Related findings and the implications for cognitive treatment of BPD are discussed. PMID:19159865

  1. Tools to assess negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kane, John M

    2013-06-01

    Although effective treatments for negative symptoms are currently limited, clinicians still need to assess and monitor them because of their impact on patient functioning. Further, documenting patients' negative symptoms provides a complete clinical record that the clinician can use to make systematic and careful treatment decisions. Several tools for assessing negative symptoms in schizophrenia are available, including the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the 16-item Negative Symptoms Assessment (NSA-16), and the Schedule for Deficit Syndrome (SDS). Additionally, newer instruments are in development-the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptoms Scale (BNSS)-and are yielding promising results. This overview outlines these assessment tools so that clinicians can measure negative symptom severity and track treatment response for their patients with schizophrenia. PMID:23842020

  2. Parent ratings of ADHD symptoms: differential symptom functioning across Malaysian Malay and Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair

    2008-08-01

    This study examined differential symptom functioning (DSF) in ADHD symptoms across Malay and Chinese children in Malaysia. Malay (N=571) and Chinese (N=254) parents completed the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, which lists the DSM-IV ADHD symptoms. DSF was examined using the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) structural equation modeling procedure. Although DSF was found for a single inattention (IA) symptom and three hyperactivity-impulsivity (HI) symptoms, all these differences had low effect sizes. Controlling for these DSF, Chinese children had higher IA and HI latent factor scores. However the effect sizes were small. Together, these findings suggest adequate support for invariance of the ADHD symptoms across these ethno-cultural groups. The implications of the findings for cross-cultural invariance of the ADHD symptoms are discussed. PMID:18317918

  3. Rejection sensitivity and depressive symptoms: Longitudinal actor-partner effects in adolescent romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Norona, Jerika C; Roberson, Patricia N E; Welsh, Deborah P

    2016-08-01

    The present study utilizes the actor-partner interdependence model to examine the longitudinal relationship between rejection sensitivity and one's own and one's partner's depressive symptoms. The sample included adolescent romantic couples from the U.S. (N = 198 adolescents; 50% girls; 90.2% Caucasian) whose rejection sensitivity at Time 1 and depressive symptoms approximately one year later (Time 2) were assessed. Additionally, aggressive behaviors and maintenance behaviors that commonly associated with rejection sensitivity (e.g., self-silencing) are explored as mediators. Results indicate that boyfriends' rejection sensitivity at Time 1 predicted girlfriends' depressive symptoms at Time 2. Additionally, girls' rejection sensitivity predicted their own and their boyfriends' self-silencing. Developmental and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:27254083

  4. Gender differences in symptom predictors associated with acute coronary syndrome: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Asgar Pour, Hossein; Norouzzadeh, Reza; Heidari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-03-01

    Signs and symptoms (typical and atypical symptoms) of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) differ between men and women. Identification of gender differences has implications for both health care providers and the general public. The aim of this study was to determine the symptom predictors of the acute coronary syndromes in men and women. In this prospective study, nurse data collectors directly observed 256 men and 182 women (N = 438) with symptoms suggestive of ACS in the Emergency Departments of eight hospitals in Tehran. ACS was eventually diagnosed in 183 (57.2%) men and 137 (42.8%) women on the basis of standard electrocardiogram and cardiac enzyme (CPK-MB) level. In men, chest symptoms (OR = 3.22, CI = 0.137-0.756, P = 0.009), dyspnea (OR = 2.65, CI = 1.78-4.123 P = 0.001) and diaphoresis (OR = 2.175, CI = 1.020-4.639, P = 0.044) were significantly associated with the diagnosis of ACS 3.78, 2.72 and 1.87 times more than in women having these symptoms, respectively. These results indicated that chest symptoms, diaphoresis and dyspnea were the more pronounced typical symptoms of ACS in men compared to women. Additionally, the numbers of typical symptoms can be considered as more predictive of ACS in men (OR = 1.673, CI = 1.211-2.224, P < 0.001) than women (OR = 1.271, CI = 1.157-2.331, P = 0.212). Therefore, clinicians need to take men showing typical symptoms into consideration carefully. PMID:26216449

  5. Evolution of the Dynamic Symptoms Model.

    PubMed

    Brant, Jeannine M; Dudley, William N; Beck, Susan; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Theories and conceptual models can be thought of as broad nets that attempt to rationalize, explain, and master a phenomenon within clinical nursing and interdisciplinary care. They can be used to guide a review of the literature and to formulate and organize research variables and relationships. Gaps in the literature can be identified and opportunities for additional research revealed (Fawcett, 2005). A variety of symptom models or theories exist, including the Theory of Symptom Management (Dodd et al., 2001), Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (Lenz, Pugh, Milligan, Gift, & Suppe, 1997), Symptoms Experience Model (Armstrong, 2003), and Symptom Experiences in Time Theory (Henly, Kallas, Klatt, & Swenson, 2003). Most recently, the National Institute of Nursing Research identified a new National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model to guide symptom science research (Cashion & Grady, 2015).
. PMID:27541557

  6. Theoretical characterization of the minimum energy path for hydrogen atom addition to N2 - Implications for the unimolecular lifetime of HN2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Duchovic, Ronald J.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from CASSCF externally contracted CI ab initio computations of the minimum-energy path for the addition of H to N2. The theoretical basis and numerical implementation of the computations are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The zero-point-corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation is estimated as 8.5 kcal/mol, and the lifetime of the lowest-lying quasi-bound vibrational state of HN2 is found to be between 88 psec and 5.8 nsec (making experimental observation of this species very difficult).

  7. [Depressive symptoms and negative symptoms during schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Dollfus, S; Langlois, S; Assouly-Besse, F; Petit, M

    1995-06-01

    Taking into account the wellknown frequency of depressive and extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia and the rare studies about their evolution, several questions can be raised: How do these different symptoms move? Are there specific characters of each of them? First, stability of negative symptoms evaluated by the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) was studied among 57 schizophrenic patients at admission and at discharge. The course of negative symptoms was compared to that of depressive MADRS (Montgomery et Asberg Depression Rating Scale) and akinetic symptoms (Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale). All the subscores of the SANS decreased significantly but 4 items belonging to the affective flattening subscale and one item belonging to the alogia subscale did not vary significantly, showing the necessity of taking into account the individual items of the SANS rather than the subscale scores to evaluate the course of negative symptoms. Changes in all the SANS subscores except the alogia and anhedonia subscores were associated with variations in scores of other scales. Correlations between the changes of negative symptoms and the changes of depressive symptoms showed the necessity to do more specific scales, for example, scales for depression in schizophrenia. Langlois-Théry et al. (1994) evaluated among 53 schizophrenic patients stabilized with neuroleptic treatment, depressive symptomatology with Echelle de Ralentissement Dépressif (ERD, Widlöcher, 1983) and MADRS, negative symptomatology (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) and akinesia (ESRS), to determinate whether ERD composed of 3 subscores (motor, ideic and subjective) could be able to evaluate the depressive symptomatology, independently of the measures of negative and akinetic symptomatology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7628337

  8. Implications of estimated magmatic additions and recycling losses at the subduction zones of accretionary (non-collisional) and collisional (suturing) orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, D. W.; Von Huene, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arc magmatism at subduction zones (SZs) most voluminously supplies juvenile igneous material to build rafts of continental and intra-oceanic or island arc (CIA) crust. Return or recycling of accumulated CIA material to the mantle is also most vigorous at SZs. Recycling is effected by the processes of sediment subduction, subduction erosion, and detachment and sinking of deeply underthrust sectors of CIA crust. Long-term (>10-20 Ma) rates of additions and losses can be estimated from observational data gathered where oceanic crust underruns modern, long-running (Cenozoic to mid-Mesozoic) ocean-margin subduction zones (OMSZs, e.g. Aleutian and South America SZs). Long-term rates can also be observationally assessed at Mesozoic and older crust-suturing subduction zone (CSSZs) where thick bodies of CIA crust collided in tectonic contact (e.g. Wopmay and Appalachian orogens, India and SE Asia). At modern OMSZs arc magmatic additions at intra-oceanic arcs and at continental margins are globally estimated at c. 1.5 AU and c. 1.0 AU, respectively (1 AU, or Armstrong Unit,= 1 km3 a-1 of solid material). During collisional suturing at fossil CSSZs, global arc magmatic addition is estimated at 0.2 AU. This assessment presumes that in the past the global length of crustal collision zones averaged c. 6000 km, which is one-half that under way since the early Tertiary. The average long-term rate of arc magmatic additions extracted from modern OMSZs and older CSSZs is thus evaluated at 2.7 AU. Crustal recycling at Mesozoic and younger OMSZs is assessed at c. 60 km3 Ma-1 km-1 (c. 60% by subduction erosion). The corresponding global recycling rate is c. 2.5 AU. At CSSZs of Mesozoic, Palaeozoic and Proterozoic age, the combined upper and lower plate losses of CIA crust via subduction erosion, sediment subduction, and lower plate crustal detachment and sinking are assessed far less securely at c. 115 km3 Ma-1 km-1. At a global length of 6000 km, recycling at CSSZs is accordingly c. 0

  9. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  10. Subthreshold Symptoms of Depression in Preadolescent Girls Are Stable and Predictive of Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Kate; Hipwell, Alsion; Feng, Xin; Babinski, Dara; Hinze, Amanda; Rischall, Michal; Henneberger, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of depression are investigated among 232 preadolescent girls to study if they were predictive and stable of depression. Findings show that early symptoms of depression among preadolescent girls predict depressive disorders. Implications for preventive measures are discussed.

  11. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  12. Longitudinal Associations between Parental and Children’s Depressive Symptoms in the Context of Interparental Relationship Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Papp, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal, multi-informant data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the present study tested associations between trajectories of parental and child depressive symptoms from ages 11 to 15 years. Consistent with predictions, changes in mothers’ and fathers’ depressive symptoms were positively associated with change in children’s depressive symptoms over time. In addition, youth characteristics of sex and pubertal development moderated the trajectories, with children more advanced on pubertal development showing higher initial levels of depressive symptoms, and girls demonstrating steeper slopes of depressive symptoms over time. The context of interparental relationship functioning (i.e., marital conflict, marital conflict resolution) moderated both the trajectories of child depressive symptoms and the interplay between parental and child depressive symptoms in ways largely consistent with hypotheses. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of treating youth depressive symptoms with a consideration of the broader family context, including parental and interparental functioning. PMID:22844187

  13. Heart attack symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some people (the elderly, people with diabetes, and women) may have little or no chest pain. Or, they may experience unusual symptoms (shortness of breath, fatigue, weakness). Women are more likely than men to have symptoms ...

  14. Symptoms of Aspergillosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Types of Fungal Diseases Aspergillosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Healthcare Professionals Statistics More Resources Blastomycosis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes ...

  15. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  16. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms ... Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Diagnosis Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Symptoms Reviewed by: Philip R Rizzuto, MD FACS ...

  17. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Signs and Symptoms Partly because there are different types ... This section presents a general picture of CMT signs and symptoms. Contractures and bone deformities Many people ...

  18. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? ... be damaged as a result. About Dermatomyositis (DM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research ...

  19. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Symptoms and Complications Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle tightening ...

  20. The Relationship Between Optimism, Coping, and Depressive Symptoms in Hispanic Mothers and Fathers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Willis, Kelcie; Timmons, Lisa; Pruitt, Megan; Schneider, Hoa Lam; Alessandri, Michael; Ekas, Naomi V

    2016-07-01

    This study examined gender differences in the relationship between dispositional optimism, coping, and depressive symptoms of Hispanic mothers (n = 46) and fathers (n = 43) of children with autism spectrum disorder. Coping was hypothesized to mediate the relationship between optimism and depressive symptoms. The results revealed that mothers reported greater depressive symptoms and greater use of positive and support coping than fathers; however, both mothers and fathers reported similar levels of optimism and use of avoidant coping. In addition, positive and avoidant coping strategies mediated the association between optimism and depressive symptoms for both mothers and fathers. Clinical implications for this study include interventions for improving optimistic outlooks as well as interventions that improve parents' coping skills and therefore reduce negative outcomes. PMID:27017210

  1. Expanding Mg-Zn hybrid chemistry: inorganic salt effects in addition reactions of organozinc reagents to trifluoroacetophenone and the implications for a synergistic lithium-magnesium-zinc activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; McCall, Matthew D; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-07-18

    Numerous organic transformations rely on organozinc compounds made through salt-metathesis (exchange) reactions from organolithium or Grignard reagents with a suitable zinc precursor. By combining X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this study sheds new light on the constitution of the organometallic species involved in this important synthetic tool. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of equimolar amounts of Grignard reagents (RMgX) and ZnCl(2) in THF led to the isolation of novel magnesium-zinc hybrids, [{(thf)(2)Mg(μ-Cl)(3)ZnR}(2)] (R=Et, tBu, nBu or o-OMe-C(6)H(4)), which exhibit an unprecedented structural motif in mixed magnesium-zinc chemistry. Furthermore, theoretical modelling of the reaction of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) reveals that formation of the mixed-metal compound is thermodynamically preferred to that of the expected homometallic products, RZnCl and MgCl(2). This study also assesses the alkylating ability of hybrid 3 towards the sensitive ketone trifluoroacetophenone, revealing a dramatic increase in the chemoselectivity of the reaction when LiCl is introduced as an additive. This observation, combined with recent related breakthroughs in synthesis, points towards the existence of a trilateral Li/Mg/Zn synergistic effect. PMID:21656589

  2. [Negative symptoms: which antipsychotics?].

    PubMed

    Maurel, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    Treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia is a major issue and a challenge for the functional and social prognosis of the disease, to which they are closely linked. First- and second-generation antipsychotics allow a reduction of all negative symptoms. The hope of acting directly on primary negative symptoms with any antipsychotic is not supported by the literature. However, the effectiveness of first- and second-generation antipsychotics is demonstrated on secondary negative symptoms. PMID:26776390

  3. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in College Students: The Complex Interplay between Alexithymia, Emotional Dysregulation and Rumination

    PubMed Central

    Reupert, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Both Emotional Cascade Theory and Linehan’s Biosocial Theory suggest dysregulated behaviors associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) emerge, in part, because of cycles of rumination, poor emotional recognition and poor emotion regulation. In this study we examined relationships between rumination, alexithymia, and emotion regulation in predicting dysregulated behaviors associated with BPD (e.g. self-harm, substance use, aggression), and explored both indirect and moderating effects among these variables. The sample comprised 2261 college students who completed self-report measures of the aforementioned constructs. BPD symptoms, stress, family psychological illness, and alexithymia exerted direct effects on behaviors. Symptoms had an indirect effect on behaviors through rumination, alexithymia and emotional dysregulation. In addition, the relationship between symptoms and dysregulated behaviors was conditional on level of rumination and alexithymia. Implications for early identification and treatment of BPD and related behaviors in college settings are discussed. PMID:27348858

  4. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in College Students: The Complex Interplay between Alexithymia, Emotional Dysregulation and Rumination.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Rebecca; Hasking, Penelope; Reupert, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Both Emotional Cascade Theory and Linehan's Biosocial Theory suggest dysregulated behaviors associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) emerge, in part, because of cycles of rumination, poor emotional recognition and poor emotion regulation. In this study we examined relationships between rumination, alexithymia, and emotion regulation in predicting dysregulated behaviors associated with BPD (e.g. self-harm, substance use, aggression), and explored both indirect and moderating effects among these variables. The sample comprised 2261 college students who completed self-report measures of the aforementioned constructs. BPD symptoms, stress, family psychological illness, and alexithymia exerted direct effects on behaviors. Symptoms had an indirect effect on behaviors through rumination, alexithymia and emotional dysregulation. In addition, the relationship between symptoms and dysregulated behaviors was conditional on level of rumination and alexithymia. Implications for early identification and treatment of BPD and related behaviors in college settings are discussed. PMID:27348858

  5. Negative symptoms in psychometrically defined schizotypy: The role of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Campellone, Timothy R; Elis, Ori; Mote, Jasmine; Sanchez, Amy H; Kring, Ann M

    2016-06-30

    People high in schizotypy, a risk factor for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, can have negative symptoms, including diminished experience of motivation/pleasure (MAP) and emotional expressivity (EXP). Additionally, people high in schizotypy often report elevated depressive symptoms, which are also associated with diminished MAP and EXP. In this study, we examined whether negative symptoms were related to schizotypy above and beyond the presence of depressive symptoms. Thirty-one people high in schizotypy and 24 people low in schizotypy were administered the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS), an interview-based measure of MAP and EXP negative symptoms and completed a self-report measure of cognitive and somatic-affective depressive symptoms. People high in schizotypy had more MAP negative symptoms than people low in schizotypy, but we found no group differences in EXP negative symptoms. Importantly, the relationship between MAP negative symptoms and schizotypy was fully mediated by cognitive depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that depressive symptoms, specifically cognitive depressive symptoms, may be a pathway for motivation and pleasure impairment, in people at elevated risk for developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. PMID:27111211

  6. [Cutaneous symptoms of various vasculitides].

    PubMed

    Sunderkötter, C; Pappelbaum, K I; Ehrchen, J

    2015-08-01

    The skin is one of the organs most frequently involved in vasculitides. Cutaneous vasculitis may present (1) part of a systemic vasculitis (e.g., IgA vasculitis), (2) a skin-restricted or skin-dominant variant of the corresponding systemic vasculitis without clinically apparent visceral involvement (e.g., cutaneous IgA vasculitis), or (3) a vasculitis occurring exclusively in the skin (e.g., erythema elevatun diutinum). The clinical symptoms of vasculitides are markedly determined by the size of the predominantly affected blood vessels. Systemic polyarteritis nodosa is regarded as a medium vessel vasculitis and is associated with multiple skin symptoms: (1) vasculitis of digital arteries with ensuing digital infarction, (2) livedo racemosa and subcutaneous nodules, and (3) in some patients even purpura and hemorrhagic macules due to additional small vessel vasculitis. In contrast, in its skin-restricted entity (i.e., cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), the predominant symptoms are subcutaneous nodules surrounded by livedo racemosa, often on the lower legs. Among small-vessel vasculitides palpable purpura with predilection for the legs is a nearly pathognomonic feature of immune complex vasculitis. Variations in clinical symptoms indicate additional pathophysiological mechanisms or different vascultides: (1) ANCA-associated vasculitides often also entail nodules or sometimes livedo, (2) cryoglobulinemic vasculitis additionally may present with necrosis at cold exposed areas and involvement of vessels of various size, (3) small vessel vasculitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis shows predilection for additional sites (e.g., nailfolds) and also involvement of vessels beyond postcapillary venules, (4) recurrent macular vasculitis in hypergammaglobulinemia also occurs on dependent parts, but shows numerous small hemorrhagic macules instead of palpable purpura, (5) erythema elevatum diutinum begins with brightly red to violaceous plaques

  7. Associations between signs and symptoms of dry eye disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jimmy D; Keith, Michael S; Sudharshan, Lavanya; Snedecor, Sonya J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The accurate diagnosis and classification of dry eye disease (DED) is challenging owing to wide variations in symptoms and lack of a single reliable clinical assessment. In addition, changes and severity of clinical signs often do not correspond to patient-reported symptoms. To better understand the inconsistencies observed between signs and symptoms, we conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate published studies reporting associations between patient-reported symptoms and clinical signs of DED. Methods PubMed and Embase were searched for English-language articles on the association between clinical signs and symptoms of DED up to February 2014 (no lower limit was set). Results Thirty-four articles were identified that assessed associations between signs and symptoms, among which 33 unique studies were reported. These included 175 individual sign–symptom association analyses. Statistical significance was reported for associations between sign and symptom measures in 21 of 33 (64%) studies, but for only 42 of 175 (24%) individual analyses. Of 175 individual analyses, 148 reported correlation coefficients, of which the majority (129/148; 87%) were between −0.4 and 0.4, indicating low-to-moderate correlation. Of all individual analyses that demonstrated a statistically significant association, one-half (56%) of reported correlation coefficients were in this range. No clear trends were observed in relation to the strength of associations relative to study size, statistical methods, or study region, although results from three studies did suggest that disease severity may be a factor. Conclusion Associations between DED signs and symptoms are low and inconsistent, which may have implications for monitoring the response to treatment, both in the clinic and in clinical trials. Further studies to increase understanding of the etiopathogenesis of DED and to identify the most reliable and relevant measures of disease are needed to enhance clinical

  8. Discovery of a Plains Caldera Complex and Extinct Lava Lake in Arabia Terra, Mars: Implications for the Discovery of Additional Highland Volcanic Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob; Michalski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped topographic depressions occur near the dichotomy boundary in northern Arabia Terra, Mars. The geomorphology of these features suggests that they formed by collapse, opposed to meteor impact. At least one depression (approx.55 by 85 km) displays geologic features indicating a complex, multi-stage collapse history. Features within and around the collapse structure indicate volcanic processes. The complex occurs within Hesperian ridged plains of likely volcanic origin and displays no crater rim or evidence for ejecta. Instead the depression consists of a series of circumferential graben and down-dropped blocks which also display upper surfaces similar to ridged plain lavas. Large blocks within the depression are tilted towards the crater center, and display graben that appear to have originally been linked with circumferential graben outside of the complex related to earlier collapse events. A nearly 700 m high mound exists along a graben within the complex that might be a vent. The deepest depression displays two sets of nearly continuous terraces, which we interpret as high-stands of a drained lava lake. These features appear similar to the black ledge described during the Kilauea Iki eruption in 1959. A lacustrine origin for the terraces seems unlikely because of the paucity of channels found in or around the depression that could be linked to aqueous surface processes. In addition, there is no obvious evidence for lacustrine sediments within the basin. Together with the presence of significant faulting that is indicative of collapse we conclude that this crater complex represents a large caldera formed in the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian. Other linear and irregular depressions in the region also might be linked to ancient volcanism. If that hypothesis is correct, it suggests that northern Arabia Terra could contain a large, previously unrecognized highland igneous province. Evacuation of magma via explosive and effusive activity

  9. Delayed bedtimes and obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Coles, Meredith E; Schubert, Jessica R; Sharkey, Katherine M

    2012-10-01

    There is increasing recognition of an important interplay between psychiatric disorders and sleep. Clinical observations and several empirical studies have shown that later bedtimes are associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the relation of delayed bedtimes (DBs) and symptoms of OCD. Two hundred and sixty-six undergraduates completed a battery of questionnaires assessing sleep patterns, mood, and obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms. Results showed that participants with DBs reported increased rates of OC symptoms, as compared with non-DB participants. Further, this relation remained significant when controlling for negative affect. Additional work examining the interplay between sleep and OC symptoms is warranted. PMID:22946735

  10. Demographic correlates of attenuated positive psychotic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Waford, Rachel N.; MacDonald, Allison; Goines, Katrina; Novacek, Derek M.; Trotman, Hanan D.; Walker, Elaine F.; Addington, Jean; Bearden, Carrie E.; Cadenhead, Kristin S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.; Heinssen, Robert; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Perkins, Diana O.; Seidman, Larry J.; Woods, Scott W.; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that the utilization of standardized clinical criteria can enhance prediction of psychosis. These criteria are primarily concerned with the presence and severity of attenuated positive symptoms. Because these symptom criteria are used to derive algorithms for designating clinical high risk (CHR) status and for maximizing prediction of psychosis risk, it is important to know whether the symptom ratings vary as a function of demographic factors that have previously been linked with symptoms in diagnosed psychotic patients. Using a sample of 356 CHR individuals from the NAPLS-II multi-site study, we examined the relation of three sex, age, and educational level, with the severity of attenuated positive symptom scores from the Scale of Prodromal Symptoms (SOPS). Demographic factors accounted for little of the variance in symptom ratings (5–6%). Older CHR individuals manifested more severe suspiciousness, and female CHR participants reported more unusual perceptual experiences than male participants. Contrary to prediction, higher educational level was associated with more severe ratings of unusual thought content, but less severe perceptual abnormalities. Overall, sex, age and education were modestly related to unusual thought content and perceptual abnormalities, only, suggesting minimal implication for designating CHR status and predicting psychosis-risk. PMID:25999040

  11. Interpretation of symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dendy, C; Cooper, M; Sharpe, M

    2001-11-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is an illness characterised by fatigue and other symptoms. Both psychological and biological aetiological factors have been proposed, but the disorder is of uncertain origin. The aetiology of the symptoms is therefore ambiguous. It has been suggested (a) that patients with CFS tend to interpret their symptoms as indicating physical illness and (b) they tend not to interpret these symptoms in terms of negative emotion. In order to test these hypotheses we developed a self-report questionnaire to assess the interpretation of symptoms in patients with CFS. It was administered to patients with CFS, patients with depression, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and normal controls. Preliminary results suggest that the measure has acceptable psychometric properties. Patients with CFS were more likely than either depressed patients or normal controls to interpret symptoms (characteristic of CFS) in terms of physical illness, but did not differ in this from the MS patients. When compared with all three other groups (including the MS patients), the patients with CFS were least likely to interpret symptoms in terms of negative emotional states. The theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:11686271

  12. Medications for Ataxia Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ropinirole (Requip) Rigidity : Pramipexole (Mirapex), Ropinirole (Requip) Sleep Disorders/Parasomnias (vivid dreams, nightmares, acting out dreams, sleepwalking) : Clonazepam. Sleep apnea symptoms must be evaluated with ...

  13. Caregiver Person-Centeredness and Behavioral Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia: A Timed-Event Sequential Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea L.; Roberts, Tonya J.; Bowers, Barbara J.; Brown, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests that person-centered caregiving approaches may reduce dementia-related behavioral symptoms; however, little is known about the sequential and temporal associations between specific caregiver actions and behavioral symptoms. The aim of this study was to identify sequential associations between caregiver person-centered actions, task-centered actions, and resident behavioral symptoms and the temporal variation within these associations. Design and Methods: Videorecorded observations of naturally occurring interactions (N = 33; 724min) between 12 nursing home (NH) residents with dementia and eight certified nursing assistants were coded for caregiver person-centered actions, task-centered actions, and resident behavioral symptoms and analyzed using timed-event sequential analysis. Results: Although caregiver actions were predominantly person-centered, we found that resident behavioral symptoms were significantly more likely to occur following task-centered caregiver actions than person-centered actions. Implications: Findings suggest that the person-centeredness of caregivers is sequentially and temporally related to behavioral symptoms in individuals with dementia. Additional research examining the temporal structure of these relationships may offer valuable insights into the utility of caregiver person-centeredness as a low-cost strategy for improving behavioral symptom management in the NH setting. PMID:26055782

  14. Symptom perceptions and help-seeking behaviour prior to lung and colorectal cancer diagnoses: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Sarah; Mansell, Gemma; Sanders, Tom; Yardley, Sarah; van der Windt, Daniëlle; Brindle, Lucy; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lung and colorectal cancer are common and have high UK mortality rates. Early diagnosis is important in reducing cancer mortality, but the literature on lung and colorectal cancers suggests many people wait for a considerable time before presenting symptoms. Objective. To gain in-depth understanding of patients’ interpretations of symptoms of lung and colorectal cancer prior to diagnosis, and to explore processes leading to help-seeking. Methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients diagnosed with lung (N = 9) or colorectal (N = 20) cancer within the previous 12 months. Patients were asked about symptoms experienced in the period preceding diagnosis, their interpretations of symptoms, and decision making for help-seeking. Thematic analysis was conducted and comparisons drawn within and across the patient groups. Results. Patients were proactive and rational in addressing symptoms; many developed alternative, non-cancer explanations based on their knowledge and experience. Discussions with important others frequently provided the impetus to consult, but paradoxically others often initially reinforced alternative explanations. Fear and denial did not emerge as barriers to help-seeking, but help-seeking was triggered when patients’ alternative explanations could no longer be maintained, for instance due to persistence or progression of symptoms. Conclusion. Patients’ reasoning, decision making and interpersonal interactions prior to diagnosis were complex. Prompting patients for additional detail on symptoms within consultations could elicit critical contextual information to aid referral decisions. Findings also have implications for the design of public health campaigns. PMID:26099812

  15. Dopamine Receptor Autoantibodies Correlate with Symptoms in Sydenham's Chorea

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Pazi, Hilla; Stoner, Julie A.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sydenham chorea (SC), a neuropsychiatric sequela of group-A streptococcal infection, is associated with basal ganglia autoantibodies. Although autoantibodies have been proposed in neuropsychiatric disorders, little evidence has been shown to link autoimmunity and clinical symptoms. We hypothesized that dopamine receptor-autoantibody interactions may be the basis of neuropsychiatric symptoms in SC. Methods Sera from 22 children with SC (age 10.7±4.5 years) and 22 age-matched controls were studied. Clinical neuropsychiatric symptoms were measured in SC at sample collection using the UFMG-Sydenham's-Chorea-Rating-Scale (USCRS). Anti-dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and anti-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) autoantibodies were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and were correlated with clinical symptoms. Results Anti-D1R and anti-D2R autoantibodies were significantly higher in SC compared to controls (n = 44; p = 0.010 and p = 0.017, respectively). We found that the ratio (anti-D2R/D1R) of the two anti-dopaminergic receptor antibodies correlated with neuropsychiatric symptoms as determined by USCRS measurements (n = 18; r = 0.53, p = 0.024). In addition, anti-D2R titers correlated with antistreptolysin-O titers (n = 43; r = 0.49, p = 0.0008). Interpretation Our report linked, for the first time, autoimmunity with neuropsychiatric symptoms. The significant correlation was found using ratios of autoantibodies against dopamine receptors (anti-D2R/D1R) rather than the absolute elevated individual anti-D1R or anti-D2R titers. We suggest that autoantibodies may lead to a receptor imbalance and induce greater sensitivity to dopamine signaling potentially leading to neuropsychiatric symptoms in SC. Our novel findings suggesting altered balance in the dopaminergic system may provide a new approach in understanding autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders with possible implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24073196

  16. Panic attack symptom dimensions and their relationship to illness characteristics in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Meuret, Alicia E; White, Kamila S; Ritz, Thomas; Roth, Walton T; Hofmann, Stefan G; Brown, Timothy A

    2006-09-01

    Subtyping panic disorder by predominant symptom constellations, such as cognitive or respiratory, has been done for some time, but criteria have varied considerably between studies. We sought to identify statistically symptom dimensions from intensity ratings of 13 DSM-IV panic symptoms in 343 panic patients interviewed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV Lifetime Version. We then explored the relation of symptom dimensions to selected illness characteristics. Ratings were submitted to exploratory maximum likelihood factor analysis with a Promax rotation. A three-factor solution was found to account best for the variance. Symptoms loading highest on the first factor were palpitations, shortness of breath, choking, chest pain, and numbness, which define a cardio-respiratory type (with fear of dying). Symptoms loading highest on the second factor were sweating, trembling, nausea, chills/hot flashes, and dizziness, which defines a mixed somatic subtype. Symptoms loading highest on the third factor were feeling of unreality, fear of going crazy, and fear of losing control, which defines a cognitive subtype. Subscales based on these factors showed moderate intercorrelations. In a series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses, the cardio-respiratory subscale was a strong predictor of panic severity, frequency of panic attacks, and agoraphobic avoidance, while the cognitive subscale mostly predicted worry due to panic. In addition, patients with comorbid asthma had higher scores on the cardio-respiratory subscale. We conclude that partly independent panic symptom dimensions can be identified that have different implications for severity and control of panic disorder. PMID:16293263

  17. [Medically unexplained symptoms].

    PubMed

    Sayar, Kemal

    2002-01-01

    Patients with physical symptoms for which no medical explanation can be found are relatively common in general practice. Patients with medically unexplained symptoms are frequently frustrating to physicians both in primary and secondary care and utilize health sources disproportionately. They frequently attend both primary care units and hospitals and are usually not satisfied with the care they receive. Medically unexplained symptoms in patient populations are strongly associated with psychiatric pathology and with anxiety and depression in particular. They are also linked to personality pathology, childhood adversity, adult trauma or medically unexplained symptoms in childhood. The predictive value of alexithymia in determining these symptoms is controversial. Patients who have high negative affectivity or neuroticism tend to score high on measures of physical symptoms. These symptoms have a high degree of co-occurrence. The same person may meet the diagnostic criteria for several functional somatic syndromes simultaneously. The clinician should be aware of the cultural and social shaping of the bodily experience of these patients and hence acknowledge the somatic nature and reality of the symptoms. The clinician should make the person feel understood and establish a positive collaborative relationship. This would enable him/her to correct misconceptions about the disease and give a positive explanation of symptoms. Antidepressant therapy and cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy have been proved to be moderately effective in this group of patients. Because of the high disability that might be caused by these symptoms, psychiatrists and primary and secondary care physicians should pay careful attention to this clinical condition. These symptoms may also aid us in challenging the long-held idea of mind-body dualism which is inherent in Western biomedicine. PMID:12794657

  18. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  19. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  20. Platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Vjekoslav; Vidrih, Branka; Karlović, Zoran; Getaldić, Biserka; Peitl, Milena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2016-05-30

    Depressive symptoms seem to be frequent in schizophrenia, but so far they have received less attention than other symptom domains. Impaired serotonergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to investigate platelet serotonin concentrations in schizophrenic patients with and without depressive symptoms, and to investigate the association between platelet serotonin concentrations and symptoms of schizophrenia, mostly depressive symptoms. A total of 364 patients were included in the study, 237 of which had significant depressive symptoms. Significant depressive symptoms were defined by the cut-off score of 7 or more on Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDSS). Platelet serotonin concentrations were assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prevalence of depression in patients with schizophrenia was 65.1%. Schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms showed lower platelet serotonin concentrations (mean±SD; 490.6±401.2) compared to schizophrenic patients without depressive symptoms (mean±SD; 660.9±471.5). An inverse correlation was established between platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms, with more severe symptoms being associated with lower platelet serotonin concentrations. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may be associated with reduced concentrations of platelet serotonin. PMID:27137969

  1. The familiality of specific symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Brakoulias, Vlasios; Starcevic, Vladan; Martin, Andrew; Berle, David; Milicevic, Denise; Viswasam, Kirupamani

    2016-05-30

    This study aimed to assess whether a family history of specific OCD symptoms was associated with the same OCD symptoms in study participants. Participants were sampled from the Nepean OCD study (N=206) and were assessed with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Symptom Checklist (YBOCS-SC) and the Vancouver Obsessional Compulsive Inventory (VOCI) in order to determine their OCD symptoms. A family history screen was used to determine whether participants had a first-degree relative with a history of any of the following specific symptoms: hoarding, contamination/cleaning, symmetry/ordering, doubt/checking and/or other OCD symptoms. The characteristics of participants with a family history of a specific OCD symptom were compared to those of participants with a family history of any other OCD symptom. This was repeated for each specific OCD symptom. The roles of co-occurring tics and age of onset of OCD were also assessed. Distinct familial associations were detected for the symptoms of hoarding and contamination/cleaning. Age of onset of OCD was significantly younger in participants who reported a family history of "other" symptoms. These findings suggest that certain OCD symptom dimensions are more familial than others, which has significant implications for aetiology of OCD. PMID:27058157

  2. Daily Shame and Hostile Irritability in Adolescent Girls with Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Lori N.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Whalen, Diana J.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulty regulating both shame and anger, and that these emotions may be functionally related in clinically relevant ways (e.g., Schoenleber & Berenbaum, 2012b). The covariation of shame with anger-related emotions has important clinical implications for interventions targeting shame and uncontrolled anger in BPD. However, no studies have examined shame, anger, and their covariation in adolescents who may be at risk for developing BPD. Therefore, this study focuses on associations between BPD symptoms and patterns of covariation between daily experiences of shame and anger-related affects (i.e., hostile irritability) in a community sample of adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment. Multilevel models revealed that girls with greater BPD symptoms who reported greater mean levels of shame across the week also tended to report more hostile irritability, even after controlling for guilt. Additionally, examination of within-person variability showed that girls with greater BPD symptoms reported more hostile irritability on occasions when they also reported greater concurrent shame, but this was only the case in girls of average socioeconomic status (i.e., those not receiving public assistance). Unlike shame, guilt was not associated with hostile irritability in girls with greater BPD symptoms. Results suggest that shame may be a key clinical target in the treatment of anger-related difficulties among adolescent girls with BPD symptoms. PMID:25580673

  3. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease: the relative importance of the symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shibley; Griffin, Harry J; Quinn, Niall P; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2008-07-30

    A body of literature now exists, which demonstrates that idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) has a major negative impact on quality of life (QoL), and that depression and cognitive impairment are among the main predictors of poor QoL in this disorder. Relatively little work has been done to assess the differential contribution of the specific symptoms of PD to QoL, which was the aim of this study. One hundred thirty patients with PD completed a booklet of questionnaires, which included the PDQ39 as a disease-specific measure of QoL, a symptom checklist, a mobility checklist, as well as patient ratings of disease stage and disability. The results indicated that the contribution of physical, medication-related, and cognitive/psychiatric symptoms to QoL can be significant. Sudden unpredictable on/off states, difficulty in dressing, difficulty in walking, falls, depression, and confusion were PD symptoms, which significantly influenced QoL scores. Among the mobility problems associated with PD, start hesitation, shuffling gait, freezing, festination, propulsion, and difficulty in turning had a significant effect on QoL scores. In addition to depression and anxiety, the major predictors of QoL were shuffling, difficulty turning, falls, difficulty in dressing, fatigue, confusion, autonomic disturbance particularly urinary incontinence, unpredictable on/off fluctuations, and sensory symptoms such as pain. The implications of these results for the medical management of PD are discussed. PMID:18543333

  4. THE STABILITY OF SYMPTOMS AND SYNDROMES IN CHRONIC SCHIZOPHRENIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Milind; Davis, Elizabeth J.B.; Sharma, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    36 chronic schizophrenic patients meeting D.S.M. III - R criteria were assessed by a single rater using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Ratings were repeated 9 months later by the same rater. Negative symptoms and syndromes were much more stable over time than positive symptoms and syndromes. Only hallucinations had stability comparable to the negative symptoms. Positive and negative subtypes of schizophrenia based on the composite score were very stable. Relatively few symptoms from the general psychopathology subscale were stable over time. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21776113

  5. Help-seeking behaviors among Chinese Americans with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Leung, Patrick; Cheung, Monit; Tsui, Venus

    2012-01-01

    An exploratory survey indicated that the depression prevalence among Chinese Americans is 17.4 percent. Of 516 respondents, 34.9 percent preferred seeking advice from friends or relatives, followed by 30.2 percent not showing any preference when facing a mental health problem. Logistic regression results pointed to three contributing factors: anxiety problems, acculturation concerns, and domestic violence. Learning from these factors, the authors conducted additional analyses to connect depressive symptoms with demographics to explain the underutilization of mental health services. Significant results showed that male Chinese Americans were more likely than female Chinese Americans to seek help from physicians but less likely to seek help from friends. Those who were not employed were more likely than those who were employed to think that a family problem would take care of itself or to seek help from herbalists, from physicians, or from friends. Implications for social work practice are discussed and address risk factors and multicultural considerations. PMID:22768629

  6. Beyond “somatization” and “psychologization”: symptom-level variation in depressed Han Chinese and Euro-Canadian outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Dere, Jessica; Sun, Jiahong; Zhao, Yue; Persson, Tonje J.; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Yao, Shuqiao; Bagby, R. Michael; Ryder, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    The finding that people of Chinese heritage tend to emphasize somatic rather than psychological symptoms of depression has frequently been discussed in the culture and mental health literature since the 1970s. Recent studies have confirmed that Chinese samples report more somatic and fewer psychological depression symptoms compared to “Western” samples. The question remains, however, as to whether or not these effects are attributable to variation in all the constituent symptoms or to a subset. If the latter, there is the additional possibility that some symptoms might show a divergent pattern. Such findings would have implications for how cultural variations in symptom presentation are interpreted, and would also inform the cultural study of affective experiences more broadly. The current study addressed these issues in Chinese (n = 175) and Euro-Canadian (n = 107) psychiatric outpatients originally described by Ryder et al. (2008). Differential item functioning (DIF) was used to examine whether specific somatic and psychological symptoms diverged from the overall patterns of cultural variation. Chi-square analyses were used to examine atypical somatic symptoms (e.g., hypersomnia), previously neglected in this literature. No DIF was observed for the typical somatic symptoms, but Euro-Canadians reported greater levels of atypical somatic symptoms, and showed higher rates of atypical depression. DIF was observed for psychological symptoms—the Chinese reported high levels of “suppressed emotions” and “depressed mood,” relative to their overall psychological symptom reporting. Chinese outpatients also spontaneously reported “depressed mood” at similar levels as the Euro-Canadians, contrary to prevailing ideas about Chinese unwillingness to discuss depression. Overall, the findings provide a more nuanced picture of how culture shapes symptom presentation and point toward future studies designed to unpack cultural variation in narrower subsets of

  7. Common Versus Specific Correlates of Fifth-Grade Conduct Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms: Comparison of Three Racial/Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Banspach, Stephen W.; Tortolero, Susan; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which risk profiles or correlates of conduct disorder (CD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms overlap among youth continues to be debated. Cross-sectional data from a large, representative community sample (N=4,705) of African-American, Latino, and White fifth graders were used to examine overlap in correlates of CD and ODD symptoms. About 49 % of the children were boys. Analyses were conducted using negative binomial regression models, accounting for several confounding factors (e.g., attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms), sampling weights, stratification, and clustering. Results indicated that CD and ODD symptoms had very similar correlates. In addition to previously established correlates, several social skills dimensions were significantly related to ODD and CD symptoms, even after controlling for other correlates. In contrast, temperamental dimensions were not significantly related to CD and ODD symptoms, possibly because more proximal correlates (e.g., social skills) were also taken into account. Only two factors (gender and household income) were found to be specific correlates of CD, but not ODD, symptoms. The pattern of common and specific correlates of CD and ODD symptoms was replicated fairly consistently across the three racial/ethnic subgroups. Implications of these findings for further research and intervention efforts are discussed. PMID:25411125

  8. Family context, victimization, and child trauma symptoms: variations in safe, stable, and nurturing relationships during early and middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Turner, Heather A; Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard; Hamby, Sherry; Leeb, Rebecca T; Mercy, James A; Holt, Melissa

    2012-04-01

    Based on a nationally representative sample of 2,017 children age 2-9 years, this study examines variations in "safe, stable, and nurturing" relationships (SSNRs), including several forms of family perpetrated victimization, and documents associations between these factors and child trauma symptoms. Findings show that many children were exposed to multiple forms of victimization within the family (such as physical or sexual abuse, emotional maltreatment, child neglect, sibling victimization, and witnessing family violence), as evidenced by substantial intercorrelations among the different forms of victimization. Moreover, victimization exposure was significantly associated with several indices of parental dysfunction, family adversity, residential instability, and problematic parenting practices. Of all SSNR variables considered, emotional abuse and inconsistent or hostile parenting emerged as having the most powerful independent effects on child trauma symptoms. Also, findings supported a cumulative risk model, whereby trauma symptom levels increased with each additional SSNR risk factor to which children were exposed. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:22506523

  9. Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... type "leukemia" or "lymphoma" in the search box) Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Symptoms Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, ... A lymph node biopsy is used to diagnose non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Sometimes the diagnosis may be delayed because enlarged ...

  10. Symptoms of Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Educational Materials Do you need to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  11. Dyslexia: Causes, Symptoms, Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Albert J.

    1986-01-01

    The article reviews proposed causes and observable symptoms that characterize dyslexia, concluding that individualized analysis and specialized treatments are required and that, until an operational definition can be agreed upon, use of the label "dyslexia" is counterproductive. (DB)

  12. Throat Problems (Symptom Checker)

    MedlinePlus

    ... See complete list of charts. Throat pain and mouth sores, along with other cold and flu symptoms, are ... or on the sides or back of your mouth? Yes These sores are called CANKER SORES. They usually occur by ...

  13. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    WRIISC War Related Illness and Injury Study Center Office of Public Health Department of Veterans Affairs MEDICALLY UNEXPLAINED SYMPTOMS ... showed that CFS was more common in Gulf War Veterans than non- Gulf War Veterans ( Kang et ...

  14. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  15. Symptoms of Tickborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) , ehrlichiosis , and tularemia can result ... or neurologic symptoms. The rash seen with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) varies greatly from person to ...

  16. About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... as word-finding, vision/spatial issues, and impaired reasoning or judgment, may signal the very early stages ... in areas of the brain that control language, reasoning, sensory processing, and conscious thought. Symptoms may include: ...

  17. Listeriosis: Definition and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Listeria (Listeriosis) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Listeria (Listeriosis) Definition & Symptoms Outbreaks Listeriosis Linked to Frozen ...

  18. Checking the Symptom Checkers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Native Americans Featured Website: Body Weight Planner Past Issues Most Viewed ... the Symptom Checkers When something’s ailing you, do you turn to the Internet or an app on your phone to help ...

  19. Reducing Internalizing Symptoms among High-Risk, Hispanic Adolescents: Mediators of a Preventive Family Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Perrino, Tatiana; Brincks, Ahnalee; Howe, George; Brown, C. Hendricks; Prado, Guillermo; Pantin, Hilda

    2016-01-01

    Familias Unidas is a family-focused preventive intervention that has been found to reduce drug use and sexual risk behaviors among Hispanic adolescents. In some trials, Familias Unidas has also been found to be efficacious in reducing adolescent internalizing symptoms (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms), even though the intervention did not specifically target internalizing symptoms. This study examines potential mediators or mechanisms by which Familias Unidas influences internalizing symptoms, specifically the role of intervention-targeted improvements in parent-adolescent communication and reductions in youth externalizing behaviors. A total of 213 Hispanic eighth grade students with a history of externalizing behavior problems and their primary caregivers were recruited from the public school system. Participants, with a mean age of 13.8 years, were randomized into the Familias Unidas intervention or community practice control condition, and assessed at baseline, 6-months, 18-months, and 30-months post-baseline. A cascading mediation model was tested in which the Familias Unidas intervention was hypothesized to decrease adolescent internalizing symptoms through two mediators: improvements in parent-adolescent communication leading to decreases in externalizing behaviors. Findings show that the intervention had significant direct effects on youth internalizing symptoms at 30-months post-baseline. In addition, the cascading mediation model was supported in which the Familias Unidas intervention predicted significant improvements in parent-adolescent communication at 6-months, subsequently decreasing externalizing behaviors at 18-months, and ultimately reducing youth internalizing symptoms at 30-months post-baseline. Implications for prevention interventions are discussed. PMID:27154768

  20. Reducing Internalizing Symptoms Among High-Risk, Hispanic Adolescents: Mediators of a Preventive Family Intervention.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Tatiana; Brincks, Ahnalee; Howe, George; Brown, C Hendricks; Prado, Guillermo; Pantin, Hilda

    2016-07-01

    Familias Unidas is a family-focused preventive intervention that has been found to reduce drug use and sexual risk behaviors among Hispanic adolescents. In some trials, Familias Unidas has also been found to be efficacious in reducing adolescent internalizing symptoms (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms), even though the intervention did not specifically target internalizing symptoms. This study examines potential mediators or mechanisms by which Familias Unidas influences internalizing symptoms, specifically the role of intervention-targeted improvements in parent-adolescent communication and reductions in youth externalizing behaviors. A total of 213 Hispanic eighth grade students with a history of externalizing behavior problems and their primary caregivers were recruited from the public school system. Participants, with a mean age of 13.8 years, were randomized into the Familias Unidas intervention or community practice control condition and assessed at baseline, 6, 18, and 30 months post-baseline. A cascading mediation model was tested in which the Familias Unidas intervention was hypothesized to decrease adolescent internalizing symptoms through two mediators: improvements in parent-adolescent communication leading to decreases in externalizing behaviors. Findings show that the intervention had significant direct effects on youth internalizing symptoms at 30 months post-baseline. In addition, the cascading mediation model was supported in which the Familias Unidas intervention predicted significant improvements in parent-adolescent communication at 6 months, subsequently decreasing externalizing behaviors at 18 months, and ultimately reducing youth internalizing symptoms at 30 months post-baseline. Implications for prevention interventions are discussed. PMID:27154768

  1. Psychological symptoms, smoking lapse behavior, and the mediating effects of nicotine withdrawal symptoms: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Katherine J; Leventhal, Adam M

    2015-03-01

    The influence of psychological symptoms on smoking-lapse behavior is critical to understand. However, this relationship is obscured by comorbidity across multiple forms of psychological symptoms and their overlap with nicotine withdrawal. To address these challenges, we constructed a structural model of latent factors underlying 9 manifest scales of affective and behavioral symptoms and tested relations between latent factors and manifest scale residuals with nicotine withdrawal and smoking lapse in a laboratory analog task. Adult daily smokers (N = 286) completed a baseline session at which several forms of affective and behavioral symptoms were assessed and 2 experimental sessions (i.e., following 16 hr of smoking abstinence and following regular smoking), during which withdrawal symptoms and delay of smoking in exchange for monetary reinforcement, as an analogue for lapse propensity, were measured. A single second-order factor of general psychological maladjustment associated with more severe withdrawal-like symptoms, which in turn associated with shorter delay of smoking. The first-order factors, which tapped qualitatively unique domains of psychological symptoms (low positive affect, negative affect, disinhibition), and the manifest scale residuals provided little predictive power beyond the second-order factor with regard to lapse behavior. Relations among general psychological maladjustment, withdrawal-like symptoms, and lapse were significant in both abstinent and nonabstinent conditions, suggesting that psychological maladjustment, and not nicotine withdrawal per se, accounted for the relation with lapse. These results highlight the potential for smoking-cessation strategies that target general psychological maladjustment processes and have implications for addressing withdrawal-like symptoms among individuals with psychological symptoms. PMID:25243836

  2. Psychological Symptoms, Smoking Lapse Behavior, and the Mediating Effects of Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms: A Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Ameringer, Katherine J.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of psychological symptoms on smoking-lapse behavior is critical to understand. However, this relationship is obscured by comorbidity across multiple forms of psychological symptoms and their overlap with nicotine withdrawal. To address these challenges, we constructed a structural model of latent factors underlying 9 manifest scales of affective and behavioral symptoms and tested relations between latent factors and manifest scale residuals with nicotine withdrawal and smoking lapse in a laboratory analog task. Adult daily smokers (N = 286) completed a baseline session at which several forms of affective and behavioral symptoms were assessed and 2 experimental sessions (i.e., following 16 hr of smoking abstinence and following regular smoking), during which withdrawal symptoms and delay of smoking in exchange for monetary reinforcement, as an analogue for lapse propensity, were measured. A single second-order factor of general psychological maladjustment associated with more severe withdrawal-like symptoms, which in turn associated with shorter delay of smoking. The first-order factors, which tapped qualitatively unique domains of psychological symptoms (low positive affect, negative affect, disinhibition), and the manifest scale residuals provided little predictive power beyond the second-order factor with regard to lapse behavior. Relations among general psychological maladjustment, withdrawal-like symptoms, and lapse were significant in both abstinent and nonabstinent conditions, suggesting that psychological maladjustment, and not nicotine withdrawal per se, accounted for the relation with lapse. These results highlight the potential for smoking-cessation strategies that target general psychological maladjustment processes and have implications for addressing withdrawal-like symptoms among individuals with psychological symptoms. PMID:25243836

  3. Somatic symptoms in depression

    PubMed Central

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    Both painful and nonpainful somatic symptoms essentially characterize clinical states of depressive mood. So far, this well-established psychopathological knowledge has been appreciated only insufficiently by the official diagnostic sys-terms of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text Revision (DSM-IVTR) and the ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders. Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines (ICD-10). From a perspective of primary care services, this unmet diagnostic need is deplorable, as the main mode of presenting a depression is by reporting somatic symptoms. This somatic form of presentation, however, significantly contributes to low rates of recognition in primary care. A diagnostic challenge may be seen in the differentiation of a depression with prevailing somatic symptoms from anxiety, somatoform disorders, and medical conditions. When somatic symptoms, particularly painful physical conditions, accompany the already debilitating psychiatric and behavioral symptoms of depression, the course of the illness may be more severe, implying a higher risk of early relapse, chronicity suicide, or mortality due to other natural causes, the economic burden increases considerably, the functional status may be hampered heavily, and health-related quality of life may be lowered dramatically. The neurobiological underpinnings of somatic symptoms in depression may guide more promising treatment approaches. PMID:16889108

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  5. Energy barriers for the addition of H, *CH3, and *C2H5 to *CH2=CHX [X = H, CH3, OH] and for H-atom addition to RCH=O [R = H, CH3, *C2H5, n-C3H7]: implications for the gas-phase chemistry of enols.

    PubMed

    Simmie, John M; Curran, Henry J

    2009-07-01

    Although enols have been identified in alcohol and other flames and in interstellar space and have been implicated in the formation of carboxylic acids in the urban troposphere in the past few years, the reactions that give rise to them are virtually unknown. To address this data deficit, particularly with regard to biobutanol combustion, we have carried out a number of ab initio calculations with the multilevel methods CBS-QB3 and CBS-APNO to determine the activation enthalpies for methyl addition to the CH(2) group of CH(2)=CHX where X = H, OH, and CH(3). These average at 26.3 +/- 1.0 kJ mol(-1) and are not influenced by the nature of X; addition to the CHX end is energetically costlier and does show the influence of group X = OH and CH(3). Replacing the attacking methyl radical by ethyl makes very little difference to addition at CH(2) and follows the same trend of a higher barrier for addition to the CH(OH) end. In the case of H-addition it is more problematic to draw general conclusions since the DFT-based methodology, CBS-QB3, struggles to locate transition states for some reactions. However, the increase in barrier heights in reaction at the CHX end in comparison to addition at the methylene end is evident. For hydrogen atom reaction with the carbonyl group in the compounds methanal, ethanal, propanal, and butanal we see that for addition at the O-center the barrier heights of ca. 38 kJ mol(-1) are not influenced by the nature of the alkyl group whereas addition at the C-center is different on going from H --> alkyl but seems to be invariant at 20 kJ mol(-1) once alkylated. Rate constants for H-atom elimination from 1-hydroxyethyl, 1-hydroxypropyl, and 1-hydroxybutyl radicals, valid over the range 800-2000 K, are reported. These demonstrate that enols are more prevalent than previously suspected and that 1-buten-1-ol should be almost as abundant as its isomeric aldehyde 1-butanal during the combustion of 1-butanol and that this will also be the case for

  6. Longitudinal Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms Among Male and Female Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Katie L; Wu, Qi; Smokowski, Paul R

    2016-06-01

    Using ecological theory and the peer socialization model, the current study identified risk and protective factors associated with internalizing and externalizing symptoms across ecological domains. It was hypothesized that the constellation of risk and protective factors within the peer microsystem would vary by gender: future optimism and negative peer influence were expected to be significant risk/protective factors for males, whereas peer victimization was expected to be significant risk factors among females. Using four waves of data, three-level hierarchical linear models were estimated for males and females. Results revealed that negative peer influence was a particularly salient risk factor for both internalizing and externalizing behaviors among males, although future optimism did not emerge as a significant protective factor. In addition, as hypothesized, peer victimization indicators were significant risk factors for females. Parent-child conflict was also significantly and positively associated with both internalizing and externalizing symptoms for males and females. Implications are discussed. PMID:26341092

  7. Hysterical symptoms in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Weller, M; Wiedemann, P

    1989-09-01

    Ophthalmologic symptoms are often not sufficiently accounted for by organic pathology. The complaints of these patients have been labeled hysterical, psychogenic, non-organic, or functional. The psychiatric nosology in this area may be the most confusing in the whole field of clinical medicine. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III-R) offers a classification designed to reduce non-empirical concepts and ideology to a minimum. On this background, we discuss the hysterical symptoms encountered in clinical ophthalmology with special emphasis on psychogenic amblyopia and blepharospasm. Motor symptoms are commonly not of psychogenic origin. It is suggested that ophthalmologists are most likely to treat patients with psychogenic symptoms, using suggestion, patience, and reassurance. Few patients require psychiatric consultation and a specific psychiatric therapy. The association of hysteria with organic brain disease and the issue of symptom lateralization are briefly discussed. Eventually, we reject the psychoanalytic approach and suggest that the concept of abnormal illness behavior and the neurobiological models involving corticofugal inhibition, primitive reflex mechanisms, and an attention disturbance, serve best to understand the nature of the phenomenon hysteria. PMID:2698334

  8. Diagnostic criteria for psychosomatic research and somatic symptom disorders.

    PubMed

    Sirri, Laura; Fava, Giovanni A

    2013-02-01

    The Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) were introduced in 1995 by an international group of investigators to expand the traditional domains of the disease model. The DCPR are a set of 12 'psychosomatic syndromes' which provide operational tools for psychosocial variables with prognostic and therapeutic implications in clinical settings. Eight syndromes concern the main manifestations of abnormal illness behaviour: somatization, hypochondriacal fears and beliefs, and illness denial. The other four syndromes (alexithymia, type A behaviour, demoralization and irritable mood) refer to the domain of psychological factors affecting medical conditions. This review describes the conceptual bases of the DCPR and the main findings concerning their application, with particular reference to the incremental information they added to the customary psychiatric classification. The DCPR were also compared with the provisional DSM-5 somatic symptom disorders. The DCPR were found to be more sensitive than DSM-IV in identifying subthreshold psychological distress and characterizing patients' psychological response to medical illness. DSM-5 somatic symptom disorders seem to neglect important clinical phenomena, such as illness denial, resulting in a narrow view of patients' functioning. The additional information provided by the DCPR may enhance the decision-making process. PMID:23383664

  9. Somatic symptom disorders and illness behaviour: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Prior, Kirsty N; Bond, Malcolm J

    2013-02-01

    The behavioural aspects of somatic symptom disorders have received minimal research attention to date. The first section of this paper identifies key theoretical perspectives relevant to behavioural responses to illness. Specifically, the sociological concept of illness behaviour is offered as a general framework in which to consider the range of psychosocial factors associated with responses to perceived illness. Further, the potential relevance of the construct of abnormal illness behaviour and the cognitive behavioural conceptualization of health anxiety is explored. The second part of the paper describes various approaches to the operationalization of illness behaviour, with particular emphasis on the Illness Behaviour Questionnaire, an instrument with a rich history of application. Additional insight is provided into two contemporary instruments which aim to measure overt behavioural aspects of illness more specifically. The third and final section of the paper makes recommendations for how future research may advance the understanding of state- versus trait-based characteristics of illness behaviour. Suggestions are made for how adaptive forms of behaviour (e.g. self-management, appropriate coping) may reduce the risk of developing a somatic symptom disorder or alternatively, minimizing the potentially negative psychosocial implications of such a presentation. PMID:23383663

  10. Asthma Outcomes: Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Elward, Kurtis S.; Kattan, Meyer; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Herman; Sutherland, E. Rand; Minnicozzi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory symptoms are commonly used to assess the impact of patient-centered interventions. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to propose which measurements of asthma symptoms should be used as a standardized measure in future clinical research studies. Methods Asthma symptom instruments were classified as daily diaries (prospectively recording symptoms between research visits) or retrospective questionnaires (completed at research visits). We conducted a systematic search in PubMed and a search for articles that cited key studies describing development of instruments. We classified outcome instruments as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Four instruments (3 daily diaries, 1 for adults and 2 for children; and 1 retrospective questionnaire for adults) were identified. Minimal clinically important differences have not been established for these instruments, and validation studies were only conducted in a limited number of patient populations. Validity of existing instruments may not be generalizable across racial-ethnic or other subgroups. Conclusions An evaluation of symptoms should be a core asthma outcome measure in clinical research. However, available instruments have limitations that preclude selection of a core instrument. The working group participants propose validation studies in diverse populations, comparisons of diaries versus retrospective questionnaires, and evaluations of symptom assessment alone versus composite scores of asthma control. PMID:22386505

  11. Symptom perception in CHF: (why mind matters).

    PubMed

    Skotzko, Christine E

    2009-03-01

    Symptoms utilized in the clinical care of heart failure as markers of disease severity include, dyspnea, insomnia, low energy, fatigue, poor appetite, and diminished memory. This is despite the fact that physiologic variables such as cardiac ejection fraction and oxygen consumption do not accurately predict functional state in individuals with congestive heart failure (CHF). Distress (anxiety and depression) may amplify symptom complaints without associated physiologic aberration. Personality traits and psychiatric illness, such as mood, anxiety, and psychotic illnesses may also alter perception of somatic symptoms that are associated with this chronic illness. The impact of distress and its treatment on functional performance and CHF symptom reporting deserve additional attention. The need to screen for distress in all with serious symptomatic heart failure is certain. PMID:18071897

  12. Cognitive Function in Heart Failure is Associated with Nonsomatic Symptoms of Depression but Not Somatic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A. W.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Schaefer, Julie T.; Fulcher, Michael J.; Gunstad, John; Redle, Joseph D.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have high rates of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms have been associated with greater cognitive impairments in HF; however, it is not known whether particular clusters of depressive symptoms are more detrimental to cognition than others. Objective To identify whether somatic and/or nonsomatic depressive symptom clusters were associated with cognitive function in persons with HF. Methods Participants were 326 HF patients (40.5% female, 26.7% race-ethnicity, aged 68.6±9.7 years). Depressive symptoms were measured using a depression questionnaire commonly used in medical populations: the Patient Health Questionnatire-9 (PHQ-9). Somatic and Nonsomatic subscales scores were created using previous factor analytic results. A neuropsychological battery tested attention, executive function, and memory. Composites were created using averages of age-adjusted scaled scores. Regressions adjusting for demographic and clinical factors were conducted. Results Regressions revealed that PHQ-9 Total was associated with Attention (β=−.14, p=.008) and Executive Function (β=−.17, p=.001). When analyzed separately, the Nonsomatic subscale – but not the Somatic symptoms subscale (ps ≥.092) – was associated with Attention scores (β=−.15, p=.004) and Memory (β=−.11, p=.044). Both Nonsomatic (β=−.18, p<.001) and Somatic symptoms (β=−.11, p=.048) were related to Executive Function. When included together, only the Nonsomatic symptom cluster was associated with Attention (β=−.15, p=.020) and Executive Function (β=−.19, p=.003). Conclusions Greater overall depressive symptom severity was associated with poorer performance on multiple cognitive domains, an effect driven primarily by the nonsomatic symptoms of depression. Clinical Implications These findings suggest that screening explicitly for nonsomatic depressive symptoms may be warranted and that the mechanisms underlying the

  13. Risk factors for DSM 5 PTSD symptoms in Israeli civilians during the Gaza war

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Sharon; Weinberg, Michael; Or-Chen, Keren; Harel, Hila

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the current modifications presented in the diagnostic criteria of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the DSM 5, this study aimed at revalidating well-known PTSD risk factors, including gender, peritraumatic dissociation, social support, level of threat, and trait tendency for forgiveness. Method Five hundred and one Israeli civilians were assessed during real-time exposure to missile and rocket fire at the eruption of the Gaza war. Assessments took place approximately one to 2 weeks after the beginning of this military operation, relying on web administration of the study, which allowed simultaneous data collection from respondents in the three regions in Israel that were under attack. Results A structural equation model design revealed that higher levels of forgiveness toward situations were associated with fewer PTSD symptoms, whereas peritraumatic dissociation and high levels of objective and subjective threat were positively associated with PTSD symptoms. Additionally, females were at higher risk for PTSD symptoms than males. Conclusions The findings of this study provide further evidence for the importance of directing preventive attention to those vulnerable to the development of elevated levels of PTSD symptoms. Theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25905028

  14. Symptom Management of Bulimia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a treatment approach for the symptom management of bulimia that is a synthesis of various techniques, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, response prevention, relapse training, and psychodynamic therapy. The model has been a useful teaching tool for staff and patients in both group and individual formats. Addresses the challenges of…

  15. Teacher Testing: A Symptom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaker, Paul

    Current teacher testing is a symptom of what is wrong with American public education, rooted in invalid generalizations of method from one discipline to another. America's top educational policymakers are rarely educators, instead tending to be political leaders. The Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) has produced a…

  16. Bullying and PTSD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

    2012-01-01

    PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

  17. Relative Influence of Genetics and Shared Environment on Child Mental Health Symptoms Depends on Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Van Hulle, Carol A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Maier, Rose; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Background Comorbidity among childhood mental health symptoms is common in clinical and community samples and should be accounted for when investigating etiology. We therefore aimed to uncover latent classes of mental health symptoms in middle childhood in a community sample, and to determine the latent genetic and environmental influences on those classes. Methods The sample comprised representative cohorts of twins. A questionnaire-based assessment of mental health symptoms was used in latent class analyses. Data on 3223 twins (1578 boys and 1645 girls) with a mean age of 7.5 years were analyzed. The sample was predominantly non-Hispanic Caucasian (92.1%). Results Latent class models delineated groups of children according to symptom profiles–not necessarily clinical groups but groups representing the general population, most with scores in the normative range. The best-fitting models suggested 9 classes for both girls and boys. Eight of the classes were very similar across sexes; these classes ranged from a “Low Symptom” class to a “Moderately Internalizing & Severely Externalizing” class. In addition, a “Moderately Anxious” class was identified for girls but not boys, and a “Severely Impulsive & Inattentive” class was identified for boys but not girls. Sex-combined analyses implicated moderate genetic influences for all classes. Shared environmental influences were moderate for the “Low Symptom” and “Moderately Internalizing & Severely Externalizing” classes, and small to zero for other classes. Conclusions We conclude that symptom classes are largely similar across sexes in middle childhood. Heritability was moderate for all classes, but shared environment played a greater role for classes in which no one type of symptom predominated. PMID:25077799

  18. Adverse Symptom Event Reporting by Patients vs Clinicians: Relationships With Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Heller, Glenn; Barz, Allison; Sit, Laura; Fruscione, Michael; Appawu, Mark; Iasonos, Alexia; Atkinson, Thomas; Goldfarb, Shari; Culkin, Ann; Kris, Mark G.; Schrag, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Background In cancer treatment trials, the standard source of adverse symptom data is clinician reporting by use of items from the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient self-reporting has been proposed as an additional data source, but the implications of such a shift are not understood. Methods Patients with lung cancer receiving chemotherapy and their clinicians independently reported six CTCAE symptoms and Karnofsky Performance Status longitudinally at sequential office visits. To compare how patient's vs clinician's reports relate to sentinel clinical events, a time-dependent Cox regression model was used to measure associations between reaching particular CTCAE grade severity thresholds with the risk of death and emergency room visits. To measure concordance of CTCAE reports with indices of daily health status, Kendall tau rank correlation coefficients were calculated for each symptom with EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire and global question scores. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results A total of 163 patients were enrolled for an average of 12 months (range = 1–28 months), with a mean of 11 visits and 67 (41%) deaths. CTCAE reports were submitted by clinicians at 95% of visits and by patients at 80% of visits. Patients generally reported symptoms earlier and more frequently than clinicians. Statistically significant associations with death and emergency room admissions were seen for clinician reports of fatigue (P < .001), nausea (P = .01), constipation (P = .038), and Karnofsky Performance Status (P < .001) but not for patient reports of these items. Higher concordance with EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire and global question scores was observed for patient-reported symptoms than for clinician-reported symptoms. Conclusions Longitudinally collected clinician CTCAE assessments better predict unfavorable clinical events, whereas patient reports better reflect daily health status. These perspectives are

  19. Relationships between Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, Dissociative Symptoms, and Lifetime Heroin Use among Individuals Who Abuse Substances in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, E. Gail; Diaz, Naelys; Peluso, Paul R.; Mullaney, Donald; Weiner, Michael; McIlveen, John W.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, dissociation, and lifetime heroin use among inpatient clients who abused substances. Results indicate important implications for practice and directions for future research. (Contains 1 figure and 1 table.)

  20. Older breast cancer survivors’ symptom beliefs: A content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Heather Rhea; Phelan, Cynthia H.; Heidrich, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this investigation was to use Leventhal’s Common Sense Model (CSM) to describe older breast cancer survivors’ symptom representations, symptom management strategies, and perceived barriers to symptom management. Design A secondary analysis was conducted using data from three pilot studies testing a theory-based intervention to improve symptom management in older breast cancer survivors. Setting Advanced practice nurses conducted open-ended interviews among older breast survivors either in the women’s home or via telephone. Sample The women were recruited from the community, an oncology clinic, and a state tumor registry. The women (n = 61, mean age = 69.5) were an average of 4.7 years post-breast cancer diagnosis and reported an average of 17 symptoms. Methods Content analysis was conducted of field notes taken during baseline interviews. Two coders independently coded responses. Inter-rater reliability was 82.3%. Main Research Variables Symptom representations, symptom management strategies, and perceived barriers to symptom management. Findings Women described their symptoms as chronic, with multiple causes (but rarely due to aging), with numerous negative consequences, and not curable or controllable. Women described an average of six symptom management strategies, most typically self-care. The most frequent barrier to symptom management was problems communicating with health care providers. Conclusions The CSM is a useful framework for understanding the symptom beliefs of older breast cancer survivors. Implications for Nursing Addressing women’s beliefs and barriers may result in better communication with health care providers and more effective interventions for symptom management. PMID:19581237

  1. Experimental investigation of the effects of naturalistic dieting on bulimic symptoms: moderating effects of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Presnell, Katherine; Stice, Eric; Tristan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Prospective studies suggest that dieting increases risk for bulimic symptoms, but experimental trials indicate dieting reduces bulimic symptoms. However, these experiments may be unrepresentative of real-world weight loss dieting. In addition, the fact that most dieters do not develop eating disorders suggests moderating factors may be important. Accordingly, we randomly assigned 157 female intermittent dieters to either diet as they usually do for weight loss or eat as they normally do when not dieting for 4 weeks. Naturalistic dieting halted the weight gain shown by controls, but did not result in significant weight loss. Although there was no main effect of the dieting manipulation on bulimic symptoms, moderation analyses indicated that naturalistic dieting decreased bulimic symptoms among participants with initially low depressive symptoms. Results suggest that self-initiated weight loss dieting is not particularly effective, which appears to explain several discrepancies in the literature. Additionally, depressive symptoms may be an important determinant of bulimic symptoms that eclipses the effects of naturalistic dieting on this outcome. PMID:17662503

  2. DO SYMPTOMS OF ILLNESS SERVE SIGNALING FUNCTIONS? (HINT: YES).

    PubMed

    Tiokhin, Leonid

    2016-06-01

    Symptoms of illness provide information about an organism's underlying state. This notion has inspired a burgeoning body of research on organisms' adaptations for detecting and changing behavior toward ill individuals. However, little attention has been paid to a likely outcome of these dynamics. Once an organism's fitness is affected by others' responses to symptoms of illness, natural selection can favor individuals who alter symptom expression to influence the behavior of others. That is, many symptoms may originate as cues, but will evolve into signals. In this paper, I develop the hypothesis that symptoms of illness serve signaling functions, and provide a comprehensive review of relevant evidence from diverse disciplines. I also develop novel empirical predictions generated by this hypothesis and discuss its implications for public health. Signaling provides an ultimate explanation for otherwise opaque aspects of symptom expression, such as why symptoms fluctuate in social contexts, and can exist without underlying pathology, and why individuals deliberately generate symptoms of illness. This analysis suggests that signaling theory is a major organizing framework for understanding symptom etiology. PMID:27405223

  3. Obsessive and compulsive symptoms in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Berman, I; Kalinowski, A; Berman, S M; Lengua, J; Green, A I

    1995-01-01

    The goals of the study were to determine the prevalence of obsessive or compulsive (OC) symptoms among chronic schizophrenic patients, and to elucidate the level of function and course of illness in chronic schizophrenic patients with and without such symptoms. Therapists of 102 patients with DSM-III-R diagnoses of chronic schizophrenia reported on their patients' OC symptoms, level of function, and course of illness. Twenty-five percent of the chronic schizophrenic patients presented with significant OC symptoms. The OC schizophrenics had significantly earlier onsets of their illnesses, had spent more time in the hospital in the previous 5 years, and were judged by their therapists to have a lower level of capacity for age-appropriate function. In addition, such patients had been less often employed and less often married, and were more dependent on others. The poorer prognosis for schizophrenic patients with OC symptoms than for those without these symptoms suggests the need for new therapeutic strategies for such patients. PMID:7705089

  4. Usefulness of additional measurements of the median nerve with ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Claes, F; Meulstee, J; Claessen-Oude Luttikhuis, T T M; Huygen, P L M; Verhagen, W I M

    2010-12-01

    High resolution sonography is a relatively new diagnostic technique in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Normal values in different studies, however, vary and this makes their practical use difficult. The aim of this study was to establish normal values for the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) and to investigate the value of measuring additional parameters. Ninety-eight wrists of 29 women and 25 men without signs or symptoms of CTS were included. Width and circumference of the wrist were measured. The CSA of the median nerve at the level of the pisiform bone was measured using ultrasonography. We found a significant correlation between the CSA of the median nerve at the wrist and wrist circumference. Measuring wrist circumference will establish the upper level of normal more accurately compared to predictions solely based upon gender. This has important implications in diagnosing CTS with ultrasonography. PMID:20429021

  5. Depressive symptoms among women receiving welfare.

    PubMed

    Coiro, M J

    2001-01-01

    Using data from an ongoing study of welfare recipients and their preschool-aged children, this study examined levels and correlates of self-reported depressive symptoms, and factors predicting transition off welfare assistance, among 173 low-income, single, African American mothers. Forty percent reported symptom levels that are likely to indicate a diagnosis of clinical depression, and very few had received any mental health services. Mothers who had lived as children in households that received AFDC, who had received AFDC themselves for more than five years, who perceived less social support to be available to them, and who reported more life stressors, had significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms. Controlling for these factors associated with depression, women with higher symptom levels were slightly less likely to stop receiving AFDC tor some period of time over the two years of the study, but were no less likely to work or attend school. Implications of these findings for the development of programs and services for families on welfare are discussed. PMID:11459364

  6. Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: A unified framework.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed A; Chakravarthy, Srinivasa; Phillips, Joseph R; Gupta, Ankur; Keri, Szabolcs; Polner, Bertalan; Frank, Michael J; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2016-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a range of motor symptoms. Besides the cardinal symptoms (akinesia and bradykinesia, tremor and rigidity), PD patients show additional motor deficits, including: gait disturbance, impaired handwriting, grip force and speech deficits, among others. Some of these motor symptoms (e.g., deficits of gait, speech, and handwriting) have similar clinical profiles, neural substrates, and respond similarly to dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation (DBS). Here, we provide an extensive review of the clinical characteristics and neural substrates of each of these motor symptoms, to highlight precisely how PD and its medical and surgical treatments impact motor symptoms. In conclusion, we offer a unified framework for understanding the range of motor symptoms in PD. We argue that various motor symptoms in PD reflect dysfunction of neural structures responsible for action selection, motor sequencing, and coordination and execution of movement. PMID:27422450

  7. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Symptoms and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jasona, Leonard A.; Zinn, Marcie L.; Zinn, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide with an estimated one million cases in the United States. Hurdles to establishing consensus to achieve accurate evaluation of patients with ME continue, fueled by poor agreement about case definitions, slow progress in development of standardized diagnostic approaches, and issues surrounding research priorities. Because there are other medical problems, such as early MS and Parkinson’s Disease, which have some similar clinical presentations, it is critical to accurately diagnose ME to make a differential diagnosis. In this article, we explore and summarize advances in the physiological and neurological approaches to understanding, diagnosing, and treating ME. We identify key areas and approaches to elucidate the core and secondary symptom clusters in ME so as to provide some practical suggestions in evaluation of ME for clinicians and researchers. This review, therefore, represents a synthesis of key discussions in the literature, and has important implications for a better understanding of ME, its biological markers, and diagnostic criteria. There is a clear need for more longitudinal studies in this area with larger data sets, which correct for multiple testing. PMID:26411464

  8. Interrelations between executive function and symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention in preschoolers: a two year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Brocki, Karin C; Eninger, Lilianne; Thorell, Lisa B; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2010-02-01

    The present study, including children at risk for developing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), examined the idea that complex executive functions (EFs) build upon more simple ones. This notion was applied in the study of longitudinal interrelations between core EF components - simple and complex inhibition, selective attention, and working memory (WM) - at age 5 and 6 as well as their predictive relations to ADHD symptoms at age 7. The results showed that simple inhibition and selective attention at age 5 independently predicted complex inhibition and WM at age 6. In addition, EFs primarily predicted symptoms of inattention rather than hyperactivity/impulsivity even at this young age. Finally, age 6 complex inhibition was shown to act as a mediator in the relations between simple inhibition and selective attention at age 5 and symptoms of inattention at age 7. These findings provide novel longitudinal support for the theory that fundamental EF components show a progression with age toward more complex executive control (see Garon et al. Psychological Bulletin 134(1):31-60 2008). Further, complex inhibition, implicating both inhibition and WM, seems to be a particularly strong correlate of ADHD symptoms in young children and should as such be the focus of future studies examining the relation between cognitive function and ADHD symptoms from a developmental perspective. PMID:19763816

  9. The role of collective self-esteem on anxious-depressed symptoms for Asian and Latino children of immigrants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Taveeshi; Rogers-Sirin, Lauren; Okazaki, Sumie; Ryce, Patrice; Sirin, Selcuk R

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a 3-wave, longitudinal study to examine the role of ethnic collective self-esteem and United States (U.S.) collective self-esteem on anxious-depressed symptoms over time among Asian and Latino immigrant-origin adolescents (n = 171). Growth curve analysis revealed that anxious-depressed symptoms first decreased between 10th and 11th grade and then increased over time for both groups. Additionally higher levels of ethnic collective self-esteem were associated with lower levels of anxious-depressed symptoms only for Asian adolescents. There was a differing pattern for U.S. collective self-esteem such that for Latino adolescents, higher U.S. collective self-esteem was associated with higher anxious-depressed symptoms, whereas for Asian adolescents there was an inverse relationship with anxious-depressed symptoms. The results expand the literature on ethnic and U.S. collective self-esteem and their link to mental health. Implications of the findings for research in general, and for counseling immigrant youth and families in particular, are discussed. PMID:24773006

  10. Hearing symptoms personal stereos

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Tiara Santos; Borja, Ana Lúcia Vieira de Freitas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Practical and portable the personal stereos if had become almost indispensable accessories in the day the day. Studies disclose that the portable players of music can cause auditory damages in the long run for who hear music in high volume for a drawn out time. Objective: to verify the prevalence of auditory symptoms in users of amplified players and to know its habits of use Method: Observational prospective study of transversal cut carried through in three institutions of education of the city of Salvador BA, being two of public net and one of the private net. 400 students had answered to the questionnaire, of both the sex, between 14 and 30 years that had related the habit to use personal stereos. Results: The symptoms most prevalent had been hyperacusis (43.5%), auricular fullness (30.5%) and humming (27.5), being that the humming is the symptom most present in the population youngest. How much to the daily habits: 62.3% frequent use, 57% in raised intensities, 34% in drawn out periods. An inverse relation between exposition time was verified and the band of age (p = 0,000) and direct with the prevalence of the humming. Conclusion: Although to admit to have knowledge on the damages that the exposition the sound of high intensity can cause the hearing, the daily habits of the young evidence the inadequate use of the portable stereos characterized by long periods of exposition, raised intensities, frequent use and preference for the insertion phones. The high prevalence of symptoms after the use suggests a bigger risk for the hearing of these young. PMID:25991931

  11. ADHD Symptoms and Subtypes: Relationship between Childhood and Adolescent Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Taanila, Anja; Miettunen, Jouko; Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Moilanen, Irma K.

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) symptoms and subtypes in childhood and adolescence. The results conclude the persistence of ADHD from childhood to adolescence with specific symptoms contributing to persistent ADHD.

  12. Development and persistence of depressive symptoms in adolescents with CHD.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, Koen; Rassart, Jessica; Goossens, Eva; Apers, Silke; Oris, Leen; Moons, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Patients with CHD are vulnerable to psychiatric disorders. The present study compared baseline depressive symptoms between adolescents with CHD and community adolescents, and also assessed the development and persistence of depressive symptoms in patients. We examined the implications of persistent depressive symptoms towards quality of life and patient-reported health. In total, 296 adolescents with CHD participated in a four-wave longitudinal study, with 9-month intervals, and completed measures of depressive symptoms - Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) - at time points one to four and of quality of life - linear analogue scale (LAS) - and patient-reported health - LAS and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory - at T (time) 4. Information about diagnosis, disease complexity, and previous heart surgery was collected from medical records. At T1, 278 patients were matched 1:1 with community adolescents, based on sex and age. The findings of this study indicate that patients scored significantly lower on depressive symptoms compared with community adolescents. Depressive symptoms in the total patient sample were stable over time and were unrelated to disease complexity. Based on conventional cut-off scores of the CES-D, substantial individual differences existed in the extent to which depressive symptoms persisted over time: 12.2% of the patients reported elevated depressive symptoms at minimally three out of the four time points. Especially physical functioning, cardiac symptoms, and patient-reported health at T4 were predicted by persistent depressive symptoms, even when controlling for the level of depressive symptoms at T4. Our findings indicate that those involved in the care of adolescents with CHD should remain vigilant to persistent depressive symptoms and arrange timely referral to mental healthcare services. PMID:27365113

  13. An exploration of comorbid symptoms and clinical correlates of clinically significant hoarding symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Brian J.; Tolin, David F.; Frost, Randy O.; Steketee, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Background Hoarding Disorder is currently being considered for inclusion in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, yet remains poorly understood. Consensus is building that hoarding may constitute a separate disorder, although comorbidity remains high and complicates the diagnostic picture. The purpose of this investigation was to explore patterns of comorbidity among people who engage in hoarding behavior in order to better understand its clinical presentation and phenomenology. Methods Data were collected from a large internet sample (N = 363) of people who self-identified as having hoarding problems, met criteria for clinically significant hoarding, and completed all measures for this study. Participants self-reported their symptoms of disorders commonly co-occurring with hoarding (obsessive compulsive disorder [OCD], depression, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD]), along with other clinical problems. Results: Latent class analysis results indicated that the participants were grouped into three classes: “non-comorbid” hoarding (42%), hoarding with depression (42%), and hoarding with depression and inattention (16%). Conclusions Depression symptoms were the most commonly co-occurring symptom in this sample. Contrary to previous theory relating to hoarding etiology, OCD symptoms were not significantly co-occurring and a large percentage of the study participants were free from comorbid symptoms of OCD, depression, and ADHD. This suggests that hoarding disorder is not primarily the consequence of other psychiatric conditions. Implications for DSM-5, clinical treatment, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:23213052

  14. Prevalence of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Related Symptoms among Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome among 1,474 nurses was addressed through a mailed questionnaire (202 respondents). Demographic characteristics, symptoms, and possible prevalence rates are presented and discussed. Implications of these findings are considered, and the methodology used is analyzed. Suggestions are made for conducting…

  15. Symptoms of Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Types of Fungal Diseases Aspergillosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Healthcare Professionals Statistics More Resources Blastomycosis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes ...

  16. Acute Pain and Depressive Symptoms: Independent Predictors of Insomnia Symptoms among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn; Kozachik, Sharon; Smith, Michael T; Budhathoki, Chakra; Haywood, Carlton

    2016-02-01

    No studies to date have systematically investigated insomnia symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to (1) describe the prevalence of insomnia symptoms and (2) identify biopsychosocial predictors in community-dwelling adults with SCD. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 263 African American adults with SCD (aged 18 years or older). Measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies in Depression scale, Urban Life Stress Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and a chronic pain item. SCD genotype was extracted from the medical record. A slight majority (55%) of the sample reported clinically significant insomnia symptomatology (ISI ≥ 10), which suggests that insomnia symptoms are prevalent among community-dwelling African American adults with SCD. While insomnia symptoms were associated with a number of biopsychosocial characteristics, depressive symptoms and acute pain were the only independent predictors. Given the high number of participants reporting clinically significant insomnia symptoms, nurses should screen for insomnia symptoms and explore interventions to promote better sleep among adults with SCD, with an emphasis on recommending treatment for pain and depression. In addition, current pain and depression interventions in this population could add insomnia measures and assess the effect of the intervention on insomnia symptomatology as a secondary outcome. PMID:26673730

  17. Depressive symptoms in the second trimester relate to low oxytocin levels in African-American women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Lindsey; Giurgescu, Carmen; Carter, C Sue; Holditch-Davis, Diane; McFarlin, Barbara L; Schwertz, Dorie; Seng, Julia S; White-Traut, Rosemary

    2015-02-01

    Low-income African-American women report elevated prenatal depressive symptoms more often (42 %) than the national average (20 %). In the USA in 2012, 16.5 % of African-American women experienced a premature birth (less than 36 completed gestational weeks) compared to 10.3 % of white women. In addition, 13 % of African-American women had a low-birth weight infant (less than 2,500 g) compared to 7 % of white women. Variation in the neuropeptide, oxytocin has been implicated in perinatal depression, maternal behavior, regulation of stress responses, and may be associated with this health disparity. The purpose of this investigation was to examine factors associated with prenatal depressive symptoms, including plasma oxytocin levels and birth weight, in a sample of urban African-American women. Pregnant African-American women (N = 57) completed surveys and had blood drawn twice during pregnancy at 15-22 weeks and 25-37 weeks. In addition, birth data were collected from medical records. A large number of participants reported elevated prenatal depressive symptoms at the first (n = 20, 35 %) and the second (n = 19, 33 %) data points. Depressive symptoms were higher in multigravidas (t(51) = -2.374, p = 0.02), women with higher anxiety (r(47) = 0.71, p = 0.001), women who delivered their infants at an earlier gestational age (r(51) = -0.285, p = 0.04), and those without the support of the infant's father (F(4, 48) = 2.676, p = 0.04). Depressive symptoms were also higher in women with low oxytocin levels than in women with high oxytocin levels (F(2, 47) = 3.3, p = 0.05). In addition, women who had low oxytocin tended to have infants with lower birth weights (F(2, 47) = 2.9, p = 0.06). Neither prenatal depressive symptoms nor prenatal oxytocin levels were associated with premature birth. Pregnant multigravida African-American women with increased levels of anxiety and lacking the baby's father's support during the

  18. Dissociation and psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Steingard, S; Frankel, F H

    1985-08-01

    The literature on hysterical or brief reactive psychosis reflects great diversity both in clinical description and theoretical formulation. The authors describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with a diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder, rapid cycling type, but who, in fact, was experiencing dissociative episodes manifested as psychotic states. The patient's successful treatment with hypnosis is described, along with the clinical and theoretical implications of the case. PMID:4025593

  19. Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms a person feels are related to psychological factors. These symptoms can't be traced to a specific physical cause. In people who have a somatic symptom and related disorder, medical test results are either normal or don't explain ...

  20. Sub-Ethnic Differences in the Menopausal Symptom Experience: Asian American Midlife Women

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lee, Seung Hee; Chee, Wonshik

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare the menopausal symptom experiences of sub-ethnic groups of Asian American midlife women. Design A cross-sectional study among 91 Asian American women online. Questions about background characteristics, ethnic identity, and health and menopausal status, and the Midlife Women’s Symptom Index were used. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Findings The most frequently reported and the most severe symptoms differed by sub-ethnicity. The total number of symptoms differed by sub-ethnicity, as did total severity scores for the symptoms. Discussion, Conclusion, and Implications for Practice Researchers and clinicians should be aware of sub-ethnic differences. PMID:20220032

  1. Boredom proneness: its relationship to psychological- and physical-health symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sommers, J; Vodanovich, S J

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between boredom proneness and health-symptom reporting was examined. Undergraduate students (N = 200) completed the Boredom Proneness Scale and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. A multiple analysis of covariance indicated that individuals with high boredom-proneness total scores reported significantly higher ratings on all five subscales of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (Obsessive-Compulsive, Somatization, Anxiety, Interpersonal Sensitivity, and Depression). The results suggest that boredom proneness may be an important element to consider when assessing symptom reporting. Implications for determining the effects of boredom proneness on psychological- and physical-health symptoms. as well as the application in clinical settings, are discussed. PMID:10661377

  2. Menstrual cycle effects on psychological symptoms in women with PTSD.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Yael I; Pineles, Suzanne L; Patton, Samantha C; Rouse, Matthew H; Sawyer, Alice T; Rasmusson, Ann M

    2015-02-01

    The menstrual cycle has been implicated as a sex-specific biological process influencing psychological symptoms across a variety of disorders. Limited research exists regarding the role of the menstrual cycle in psychological symptoms among women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study examined the severity of a broad range of psychological symptoms in both the early follicular (Days 2-6) and midluteal (6-10 days postlutenizing hormone surge) phases of the menstrual cycle in a sample of trauma-exposed women with and without PTSD (N = 49). In the sample overall, total psychological symptoms (d = 0.63), as well as depression (d = 0.81) and phobic anxiety (d = 0.81) symptoms, specifically, were increased in the early follicular compared to midluteal phase. The impact of menstrual cycle phase on phobic anxiety was modified by a significant PTSD × Menstrual Phase interaction (d = 0.63). Women with PTSD reported more severe phobic anxiety during the early follicular versus midluteal phase, whereas phobic anxiety did not differ across the menstrual cycle in women without PTSD. Thus, the menstrual cycle appears to impact fear-related symptoms in women with PTSD. The clinical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed. PMID:25613589

  3. Marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms in China.

    PubMed

    Miller, Richard B; Mason, Tiffany M; Canlas, Jerevie M; Wang, Dahua; Nelson, David A; Hart, Craig H

    2013-08-01

    Although there is substantial evidence that low marital satisfaction is a significant risk factor for depression, little research has examined this relationship in cultures outside of the U.S. and Europe. The validity of the marital discord model of depression in Chinese culture was tested by studying 391 couples living in Beijing and Hangzhou, China. Results of structural equation modeling using an actor-partner interdependence model strategy indicated that husbands' and wives' marital satisfaction was significantly predictive of their own depressive symptoms. In addition, wives' marital satisfaction significantly predicted husbands' depressive symptoms. These results provide evidence that the marital discord model of depression is useful in understanding the role of marital dissatisfaction as a risk factor for depressive symptoms in collectivistic societies, such as China. PMID:23834363

  4. Prenatal and Postpartum Evening Salivary Cortisol Levels in Association with Peripartum Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Stavros I.; Comasco, Erika; Sylvén, Sara; Hellgren, Charlotte; Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2015-01-01

    Background The biology of peripartum depression remains unclear, with altered stress and the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal axis response having been implicated in its pathophysiology. Methods The current study was undertaken as a part of the BASIC project (Biology, Affect, Stress, Imaging, Cognition), a population-based longitudinal study of psychological wellbeing during pregnancy and the postpartum period in Uppsala County, Sweden, in order to assess the association between evening salivary cortisol levels and depressive symptoms in the peripartum period. Three hundred and sixty-five pregnant women from the BASIC cohort were recruited at pregnancy week 18 and instructed to complete a Swedish validated version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at the 36th week of pregnancy as well as the sixth week after delivery. At both times, they were also asked to provide evening salivary samples for cortisol analysis. A comprehensive review of the relevant literature is also provided. Results Women with postpartum EPDS score ≥ 10 had higher salivary evening cortisol at six weeks postpartum compared to healthy controls (median cortisol 1.19 vs 0.89 nmol/L). A logistic regression model showed a positive association between cortisol levels and depressive symptoms postpartum (OR = 4.1; 95% CI 1.7–9.7). This association remained significant even after controlling for history of depression, use of tobacco, partner support, breastfeeding, stressful life events, and sleep problems, as possible confounders (aOR = 4.5; 95% CI 1.5–14.1). Additionally, women with postpartum depressive symptoms had higher postpartum cortisol levels compared to both women with depressive symptoms antenatally and controls (p = 0.019 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions Women with depressive symptoms postpartum had higher postpartum cortisol levels, indicating an altered response of the HPA-axis in postpartum depression. PMID:26322643

  5. Acculturative stress negatively impacts maternal depressive symptoms in Mexican-American women during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    D’Anna-Hernandez, Kimberly L.; Aleman, Brenda; Flores, Ana-Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Background Mexican-American women exhibit high rates of prenatal maternal depressive symptoms relative to the general population. Though pregnant acculturated Mexican-American women experience cultural stressors such as acculturation, acculturative stress and discrimination that may contribute to elevated depressive symptoms, the contribution of these socio-cultural correlates to depressive symptomology is unknown. Method Ninety-eight pregnant women of Mexican descent were recruited from a community hospital clinic during their first trimester. Women completed surveys about acculturation, acculturative stress, perceived discrimination, general perceived stress, and maternal depressive symptoms as well as the potential protective factor of Mexican cultural values. Results Women who experienced greater acculturative and perceived stress, but not perceived discrimination or acculturation, reported significantly elevated depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Also, women who experienced greater acculturative stress identified with a mixture of Mexican and American cultural values. However, only the Mexican cultural value of respect was protective against maternal depressive symptoms while adhering to the Anglo value of independence and self-reliance was a risk factor. Limitations A limitation in the study is the cross-sectional and descriptive self-report nature of the work, underscoring the need for additional research. Moreover, physiological measures of stress were not analyzed in the current study. Conclusions Results point to acculturative stress, above other cultural stressors, as a potential intervention target in culturally competent obstetric care. These findings have implications for maternal mental health treatment during pregnancy, which likely affects maternal-fetal programming and may favorably affect perinatal outcomes in the vulnerable Mexican-American population. PMID:25699668

  6. Unhealthy Substance Use Behaviors as Symptom-Related Self-Care in HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Brion, John M.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Sloane, Rick; Voss, Joachim G.; Corless, Inge B.; Lindgren, Teri G.; Wantland, Dean J.; Kemppainen, Jeanne K.; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Nokes, Kathleen M.; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M.; Moezzi, Shanaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P.; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M.; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of symptoms in HIV disease can be associated with HIV disease itself, comorbid illness, and/or antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy substance use behaviors, particularly substance-use behaviors including heavy alcohol intake, marijuana use, other illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage disease-related symptoms. This study is a secondary data analysis of baseline data from a larger randomized-controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual. In the present study, the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy substance use behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms are examined. Subjects were recruited from a variety of settings which provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment. The mean age of the sample (n=775) was 42.8 years (SD=9.6) and nearly thirty-nine percent (38.5%) of the sample was female. The racial demographics of the sample were: 28% African American, 28% Hispanic, 21% White/Caucasian, 16% African from Kenya or South Africa, 1% Asian, and 5% self-described as “Other.” The mean number of years living with HIV was reported to be 9.1 years (SD=6.6).Specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were use of marijuana (n= 111; 14.3%), cigarette smoking (n=355; 45.8%), heavy alcohol use (n= 66; 8.5%), and illicit drugs (n= 98; 12.6%). A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance use behaviors including amphetamine and injection drug use in addition to heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. Implications for clinical practice include assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons related to self-management across the trajectory of HIV disease. PMID:21352430

  7. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Maulik P.; Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Zafonte, Ross D.; Davis, Roger B.; Phillips, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by U.S. adults reporting neuropsychiatric symptoms and whether this prevalence changes based on the number of symptoms reported. Additional objectives include identifying patterns of CAM use, reasons for use, and disclosure of use with conventional providers in U.S. adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Design Secondary database analysis of a prospective survey. Participants A total of 23,393 U.S. adults from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Methods We compared CAM use between adults with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms. Symptoms included self-reported anxiety, depression, insomnia, headaches, memory deficits, attention deficits, and excessive sleepiness. CAM use was defined as use of mind—body therapies (eg, meditation), biological therapies (eg, herbs), or manipulation therapies (eg, massage) or alternative medical systems (eg, Ayurveda). Statistical analysis included bivariable comparisons and multivariable logistical regression analyses. Main Outcome Measures The prevalence of CAM use among adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms within the previous 12 months and the comparison of CAM use between those with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms. Results Adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms had a greater prevalence of CAM use compared with adults who did not have neuropsychiatric symptoms (43.8% versus 29.7%, P < .001); this prevalence increased with an increasing number of symptoms (trend, P < .001). Differences in the likelihood of CAM use as determined by the number of symptoms persisted after we adjusted for covariates. Twenty percent of patients used CAM because standard treatments were either too expensive or ineffective, and 25% used CAM because it was recommended by a conventional provider. Adults with at least one neuropsychiatric symptom were more likely to disclose the use of CAM to a conventional provider (47.9% versus 39.0%, P < .001

  8. Symptoms of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Fotherby, K J; Hunter, J O

    1985-07-01

    Adverse reactions to foods can be due to many causes, but only those involving an immunological mechanism can be defined as food allergic disease. An increasing number of gastrointestinal and other diseases are being shown to involve food intolerances. Immediate reactions with symptoms within hours of eating a particular food are most readily shown to be due to food allergy and are often associated with the presence of food-specific IgE as shown by skin prick tests and RASTs. When reactions are delayed for 24 to 48 hours or more, underlying food intolerance is harder to recognize and much less often shown to be due to allergy. At present, diagnosis and management depends on dietary manipulation, showing that symptoms improve on food avoidance and are reproduced by food challenge (preferably double-blind). Further understanding of the mechanisms involved in food allergy, in Crohn's disease and irritable bowel syndrome may allow the development of simple tests to identify the foods concerned and perhaps, in the case of allergic disease, cure by the induction of tolerance. PMID:4064357

  9. Neurological Symptoms of Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a bone metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPL), which encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). This disease is characterized by disrupted bone and tooth mineralization, and reduced serum AP activity. Along with bone and tooth symptoms, many neurological symptoms, seizure, encephalopathy, intracranial hypertension, mental retardation, deafness, and growth hormone deficiency (GHD), are frequently found in HPP patients. Seizure occurs in severe HPP types soon after birth, and responds to pyridoxine, but is an indicator of lethal prognosis. Encephalopathy rarely presents in severe HPP types, but has severe sequelae. Intracranial hypertension complicated in mild HPP types develops after the age of 1 year and sometimes need neurosurgical intervention. Mental retardation, deafness and GHD are more frequently found in Japanese HPP patients. Mental retardation occurs in all HPP types. Deafness in perinatal lethal type is both conductive and sensorineural. GHD develops in all but perinatal lethal type and the diagnosis tends to delay. The pathogenesis of these neural features of HPP might be due to impairment of both vitamin B6 metabolism and central nervous system development by ALPL mutations. PMID:26219717

  10. Medically unexplained symptoms.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Margaret L; Paauw, Douglas S

    2014-05-01

    In summary, caring for patients with MUS is challenging for health care providers. Even defining somatization syndromes is complex and controversial, reflecting the medical community’s limited understanding of the pathophysiology for this group of disorders. Although risk factors for MUS have been described and are well understood, little is known about how MUS can be prevented. Uncertainty in medicine, as in any human enterprise, is a given, but the difficulties in identification and treatment of patients with MUS highlight the limitations in understanding the intersection between physical and mental health. Patients come to their physician looking for clarity, understanding, and relief of debilitating symptoms. The understanding of MUS will evolve, and perhaps an organic cause not yet understood or described may emerge to lend clarity and therapeutic opportunities to some patients with somatic disorders. In the meantime, the most powerful tools available are the ability to communicate the limits of current understanding, acknowledge the difficulties faced by patients with this disorder, and reinforce the willingness and desire of clinicians to partner with patients as the focus shifts from diagnosis to symptom management. Thus, the physician-patient relationship, still in its rightful place at the heart of the practice of medicine, lies at the center of effective treatment of patients with MUS. PMID:24758967

  11. The Relation between Insomnia Symptoms, Mood, and Rumination about Insomnia Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Colleen E.; Harris, Andrea L.; Falco, Ashley; Edinger, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Research suggests that rumination may play an important role in insomnia. Whereas some have suggested that rumination mainly relates to depression, the evidence suggests that there may be insomnia-specific rumination. This paper explores insomnia symptom rumination across two distinct samples of varying levels of depressed mood and insomnia symptom severity. Methods: The first sample consisted of nonclinical participants (N = 327) with a range of insomnia and depressed mood symptoms, and the second sample consisted of those who met both Major Depressive Disorder and Insomnia diagnoses (N = 66). Rather than relying on a measure developed for those with depression, we developed and tested an insomnia-specific measurement scale based on items from previous rumination studies and the addition of items derived from common daytime insomnia symptoms. Results: Internal consistency was highly acceptable across the two samples for the new insomnia-specific rumination measure (Cronbach α was 0.93 and 0.94). In the first study, poor sleepers reported significantly higher levels of daytime symptom rumination than did good sleepers. Across both studies, rumination about daytime insomnia symptoms and depression were signifi-cantly correlated; however, insomnia rumination scores predicted insomnia even after controlling for depression. Moreover, in Study 2, insomnia-specific rumination was related to insomnia, but general depressive rumination was not predictive of insomnia. Conclusions: The findings provide support for the use of this insomnia-specific rumination scale; moreover the findings support previous observances regarding rumination about daytime insomnia symptoms that are not exclusive to depression. Citation: Carney CE; Harris AL; Falco A; Edinger JD. The relation between insomnia symptoms, mood, and rumination about insomnia symptoms. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(6):567-575. PMID:23772190

  12. Distress related to subclinical negative symptoms in a non-clinical sample: Role of dysfunctional attitudes.

    PubMed

    Fervaha, Gagan; Zakzanis, Konstantine K; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2015-12-15

    Negative symptoms are a prominent feature of schizophrenia that are intimately linked to poor outcomes characterizing the illness. One mechanistic model suggests that these symptoms are produced and maintained, at least in part, through maladaptive attitudes. Beyond mechanisms, it remains phenomenologically unclear if these symptoms are particularly distressing. In the present study we examined whether subclinical negative symptoms evaluated in a non-clinical sample of young adults (N=370) were distressful or bothersome to participants and, further, whether these symptoms were associated with dysfunctional attitudes. We found that greater severity of subclinical negative symptoms such as amotivation and anhedonia were associated with higher ratings of distress specifically attributable to these symptoms. This relationship held even after controlling for severity of depressive symptoms. Moreover, greater negative symptom burden was associated with greater endorsement of defeatist performance beliefs. Negative symptoms expressed in the general population were found to be particularly distressing. Maladaptive cognitive schemas are implicated in the expression of these symptoms, as well as the amount of distress these symptoms instil. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying negative symptoms, including both neurobiological and cognitive, is needed in order to effectively develop treatment strategies for these disabling symptoms. PMID:26365687

  13. Symptoms of transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong S

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a cerebrovascular disease with temporary (<24 h) neurological symptoms. The symptoms of TIA patients are largely similar to those of ischemic stroke patients and include unilateral limb weakness, speech disturbances, sensory symptoms, visual disturbances, and gait difficulties. As these symptoms are transient, they are frequently evaluated based on patients' subjective reports, which are less precise than those of patients with stroke whose longer-lasting symptoms and signs can be reliably assessed by physicians. Some symptoms, such as monocular blindness, are much more common in TIA than in stroke, and limb shaking occurs almost exclusively in TIA patients. On the other hand, symptoms like hemivisual field defects or limb ataxia are underappreciated in TIA patients. These transient neurological symptoms are not necessarily caused by cerebrovascular diseases, but can be produced by a variety of non-vascular diseases. Careful history taking, examination, and appropriate imaging tests are needed to differentiate these TIA mimics from TIA. Each TIA symptom has a different specificity and sensitivity, and there has been an effort to assess the outcome of the patients through the use of specific clinical features. On top of this, recent developments in imaging techniques have greatly enhanced our ability to predict the outcomes of TIA patients. Perception or recognition of TIA symptoms may differ according to the race, sex, education, and specialty of physicians. Appropriate education of both the general population and physicians with regard to TIA symptoms is important as TIAs need emergent evaluation and treatment. PMID:24157558

  14. Alexithymia and posttraumatic stress: subscales and symptom clusters.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Frédéric; Vanheule, Stijn; Deheegher, John

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between the emotion-regulating factor alexithymia and the occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after critical incidents in a nonclinical sample of 136 nurses and ambulance personnel working in military facilities. The results showed that alexythima accounts for variance in PTSD symptoms. Breaking PTSD into its 4 symptom clusters, alexithymia was found to predict numbing and hyperarousal symptoms but not avoidance or reexperiencing symptoms. Finally, the rarely investigated, but clinically relevant, distinctive subdimensions of alexithymia were examined in relation to the 4 PTSD clusters. The difficulty identifying feelings subscale contributed most to the numbing and hyperarousal PTSD subscales. Clinical implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:20564753

  15. Depressive Symptoms among College Students: An Assessment of the Influence of Environmental Factors on Retention Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudric, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Depressive symptoms among college students have major implications for higher education institutions across the country. First-year college students are particularly susceptible to the various impacts that the college experience may produce during the transitional first year of college. The effects of depressive symptoms among college students in…

  16. Latent Classes of Psychiatric Symptoms among Chinese Children Living in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Keith C.; Bi, Yu; Borden, Lindsay A.; Reinke, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Describing co-occurring symptom patterns among children in nonwestern contexts may have important implications for how emotional and behavior problems are defined, conceptualized, studied, and ultimately prevented. A latent profile analysis (LPA) was conducted on the co-occurring psychiatric symptoms of 196 Chinese children living in poverty.…

  17. Psychosomatic symptoms, stress, and modernization: a model.

    PubMed

    Dressler, W W

    1985-09-01

    The quantity of research on the effects of stress on disease has increased substantially in recent years, but little effort has been devoted to examining the effects of cultural influences in the stress process. A model is proposed in this paper in which cultural context exerts a modifying influence on the relationship between sociocultural stressors and psychosomatic symptoms, specifically in the context of modernization. In change situations involving increasing modernization there is increased differentiation in systems of social stratification within a community, due to increased potential for upward social mobility. The individuals who are upwardly mobile adopt a particular style of life, involving the acquisition of western consumer goods, as symbolic of their success. Lower class individuals strive to attain this same style of life as a claim to a higher status social identity, but their lower economic condition results in stressful incongruities and higher psychosomatic symptoms. Individuals who are successful in upward mobility are confronted by a different set of stressors that are primarily intrapsychic in nature. Events and circumstances perceived as threats to their self-identity are related to more psychosomatic symptoms. Thus, the meaning of specific stressors changes depending on the sociocultural context of the individual, and this meaning serves as a bridge between environmental circumstances and physiological outcomes. This model receives substantial empirical support in two field studies. Limitations of the model and implications for future research are discussed. PMID:4028786

  18. Co-Occurring ODD and GAD Symptom Groups: Source-Specific Syndromes and Cross-Informant Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.; Loney, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Despite important clinical and nosological implications, the comorbidity of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has received little attention. A clinic-based sample of 243 boys (ages 6–10 years), their parents, and teachers participated in an evaluation that involved assessments of behavioral, academic, and family functioning. ODD and GAD symptom groups were defined using various combinations of mother and teacher reports. ODD symptom groups were associated with conduct disorder symptoms, and GAD symptom groups with major depressive disorder symptoms, regardless of rater. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms were associated with ODD and GAD symptom groups; however, covarying ADHD symptoms altered few findings. The ODD+GAD symptom groups were associated with higher rates of co-occurring symptoms and risk factors within (source-specific syndromes) and across (cross-informant comorbidity) informants. PMID:18470769

  19. Cryptorchidism --disease or symptom?

    PubMed

    Toppari, Jorma; Rodprasert, Wiwat; Virtanen, Helena E

    2014-05-01

    Testes descend to the scrotum normally before birth. When they fail to do so, the boy is cryptorchid and has an increased risk for testicular germ cell cancer and subfertility later in life. Early correction of maldescent by orchiopexy operation improves the spermatogenetic capacity of the testis but does not return the testicular cancer risk to the control level. Testicular descent is regulated by testis-derived hormones testosterone and insulin-like peptide 3. Cryptorchidism can therefore be considered a symptom of impaired testicular function that may also be linked to other testicular diseases, such as germ cell cancer and subfertility. Early orchiopexy can alleviate the effects of cryptorchidism on spermatogenesis, but alertness for testicular cancer should be maintained. In searching the genetic and environmental reasons for these diseases, it is useful to consider their connection with each other. PMID:24786701

  20. NMDA hypofunction as a convergence point for progression and symptoms of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Melissa A.; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disabling mental illness that is now recognized as a neurodevelopmental disorder. It is likely that genetic risk factors interact with environmental perturbations to affect normal brain development and that this altered trajectory results in a combination of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms. Although the exact pathophysiology of schizophrenia is unknown, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a major glutamate receptor subtype, has received great attention. Proper expression and regulation of NMDARs in the brain is critical for learning and memory processes as well as cortical plasticity and maturation. Evidence from both animal models and human studies implicates a dysfunction of NMDARs both in disease progression and symptoms of schizophrenia. Furthermore, mutations in many of the known genetic risk factors for schizophrenia suggest that NMDAR hypofunction is a convergence point for schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss how disrupted NMDAR function leads to altered neurodevelopment that may contribute to the progression and development of symptoms for schizophrenia, particularly cognitive deficits. We review the shared signaling pathways among the schizophrenia susceptibility genes DISC1, neuregulin1, and dysbindin, focusing on the AKT/GSK3β pathway, and how their mutations and interactions can lead to NMDAR dysfunction during development. Additionally, we explore what open questions remain and suggest where schizophrenia research needs to move in order to provide mechanistic insight into the cause of NMDAR dysfunction, as well as generate possible new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23543703

  1. The Moderation of an Early Intervention Program for Anxiety and Depression by Specific Psychological Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Smith, Phillip N.; Hohmeister, Holly C.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the influence of a number of psychological factors on the effectiveness of an early intervention program targeting anxiety and depression in a non-clinical sample of college students. The program was influenced by the Cognitive-Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (McCullough, 2000) delivered in a two-hour computer-based educational program. Participants completed measures of depression, anxiety, and general distress prior to the prevention program and then again eight weeks later. Additionally, participants were assessed for past Major Depression, sleep related difficulties, a number of Anxiety Disorders, and suicide ideation. Moderation of the effectiveness of the early intervention program by these factors depended on the dependent variable of interest. Specifically, the effectiveness of the intervention program on symptoms of depression was moderated by insomnia; symptoms of anxiety by past Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Specific Phobia as well as sleep problems related to nightmares; and symptoms of general negative affect by Social Phobia and suicide ideation. Implications are discussed. PMID:19229947

  2. A neuropsychological comparison of siblings with neurological versus hepatic symptoms of Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arguedas, Deborah; Stewart, Jeanette; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Batchelor, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's Disease (WD) (also known as hepatolenticular degeneration) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder of abnormal copper metabolism, with an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 30,000. The clinical features associated with WD are highly varied. However, subtypes generally reflect neurological, hepatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The present case study reports two brothers with a recent diagnosis of WD. Neurological symptoms and cognitive deficits were exhibited in one brother (BL) in the form of extrapyramidal features, while the other brother (AL) only exhibited hepatic symptoms. Extensive neuropsychological testing was conducted on both siblings to compare cognitive profiles. Results for BL indicated significantly impaired motor functioning and information processing speed, which impacted him significantly at school. Aspects of executive dysfunction were also apparent in addition to reduced visual and verbal memory, working memory, and attention. Results for AL revealed evidence of verbal memory difficulties and aspects of executive dysfunction. Comparison is made of the distinct and common cognitive characteristics of the cases presented in terms of implications for early intervention and management of cognitive difficulties. PMID:24499483

  3. The moderation of an early intervention program for anxiety and depression by specific psychological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C; Smith, Phillip N; Hohmeister, Holly C; Joiner, Thomas E

    2009-04-01

    The current study examined the influence of a number of psychological factors on the effectiveness of an early intervention program targeting anxiety and depression in a non-clinical sample of college students. The early intervention program comprised elements of the cognitive-behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (McCullough, 2000) delivered in a 2-hour computer-based educational program. Participants completed measures of depression, anxiety, and general distress prior to the intervention program and then again 8 weeks later. Additionally, participants were assessed for past major depression, sleep related difficulties, a number of anxiety disorders, and suicide ideation. Moderation of the effectiveness of the early intervention program by these factors depended on the dependent variable of interest, specifically: the effectiveness of the intervention program on symptoms of depression was moderated by insomnia; symptoms of anxiety by past post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and specific phobia as well as sleep problems related to nightmares; and symptoms of general negative affect by social phobia and suicide ideation. Implications are discussed. PMID:19229947

  4. [Psychotherapy of positive symptoms in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia psychosis].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, G; Klingberg, S

    2003-01-01

    While the treatment of positive symptoms of patients with schizophrenic psychosis appeared until recently to be solely pharmacotherapeutic, new research findings show the efficacy of cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy (CBT) on positive symptoms in chronic psychotic patients. In addition, the effectiveness even in acute and recent-onset psychosis could be shown in some studies. The effects of CBT and standard care in psychosis compared to standard care alone and to other psychosocial interventions plus standard care are reviewed. The results of several studies and one meta-analysis show that CBT in schizophrenia patients has a direct effect on psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations as well as on relapse prevention. In routine settings,however,CBT has until now only rarely been delivered to these patients. In so-called large pragmatic trials, which might be subsumed as phase IIIb studies, the effects are tested. The therapeutic approach with the components of CBT for psychosis are described: building a therapeutic relationship, cognitive-behavioural coping strategies, developing an understanding of the experience of psychosis,working on hallucinations and delusions, addressing negative self-evaluations, anxiety, and depression,managing risk of relapse and social disability. Further clinical implications are described (capability of learning the therapeutic strategies, deliverability in broader clinical settings, acceptability by patients, combination with atypical neuroleptic drugs,and treatment of choice in risk populations). PMID:12596031

  5. Distinct symptom experiences in subgroups of patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Vivi L; Rustøen, Tone; Cooper, Bruce A; Miaskowski, Christine; Henriksen, Anne H; Bentsen, Signe B; Holm, Are M

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to their respiratory symptoms, patients with COPD experience multiple, co-occurring symptoms. Objectives The aims of this study were to identify subgroups of COPD patients based on their distinct experiences with 14 symptoms and to determine how these subgroups differed in demographic and clinical characteristics and disease-specific quality of life. Patients and methods Patients with moderate, severe, and very severe COPD (n=267) completed a number of self-report questionnaires. Latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups of patients with distinct symptom experiences based on the occurrence of self-reported symptoms using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Results Based on the probability of occurrence of a number of physical and psychological symptoms, three subgroups of patients (ie, latent classes) were identified and named “high”, “intermediate”, and “low”. Across the three latent classes, the pairwise comparisons for the classification of airflow limitation in COPD were not significantly different, which suggests that measurements of respiratory function are not associated with COPD patients’ symptom burden and their specific needs for symptom management. While patients in both the “high” and “intermediate” classes had high occurrence rates for respiratory symptoms, patients in the “high” class had the highest occurrence rates for psychological symptoms. Compared with the “intermediate” class, patients in the “high” class were younger, more likely to be women, had significantly more acute exacerbations in the past year, and reported significantly worse disease-specific quality of life scores. Conclusion These findings suggest that subgroups of COPD patients with distinct symptom experiences can be identified. Patients with a higher symptom burden warrant more detailed assessments and may have therapeutic needs that would not be identified using current classifications based only on

  6. Altered functional connectivity links in neuroleptic-naïve and neuroleptic-treated patients with schizophrenia, and their relation to symptoms including volition

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Weidan; Rolls, Edmund T.; Guo, Shuixia; Liu, Haihong; Yu, Yun; Xue, Zhimin; Feng, Jianfeng; Liu, Zhening

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze functional connectivity in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia, resting-state fMRI data were obtained for whole-brain functional connectivity analysis from 22 first-episode neuroleptic-naïve schizophrenia (NNS), 61 first-episode neuroleptic-treated schizophrenia (NTS) patients, and 60 healthy controls (HC). Reductions were found in untreated and treated patients in the functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus, and this was correlated with the reduction in volition from the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), that is in the willful initiation, sustenance, and control of thoughts, behavior, movements, and speech, and with the general and negative symptoms. In addition in both patient groups interhemispheric functional connectivity was weaker between the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and temporal pole. These functional connectivity changes and the related symptoms were not treated by the neuroleptics. Differences between the patient groups were that there were more strong functional connectivity links in the NNS patients (including in hippocampal, frontal, and striatal circuits) than in the NTS patients. These findings with a whole brain analysis in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia provide evidence on some of the brain regions implicated in the volitional, other general, and negative symptoms, of schizophrenia that are not treated by neuroleptics so have implications for the development of other treatments; and provide evidence on some brain systems in which neuroleptics do alter the functional connectivity. PMID:25389520

  7. Childhood psychological maltreatment subtypes and adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Paul, Elise; Eckenrode, John

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how subtypes and the timing of psychological maltreatment contribute to adolescent depressive symptoms at age 14. The sample included 638 youth from the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN). At age 12, youth reported experiences of psychological maltreatment (degradation, isolating, and terrorizing), physical abuse (endangerment and physical injury), and sexual abuse that occurred before and during elementary school/last year. Multivariable regression models were conducted separately for females and males at each of the two time periods and accounted for demographics, primary caregiver depressive symptoms, other maltreatment subtypes, and youth-reported age 12 depressive symptoms. For girls, caregiver degradation was the only maltreatment subtype that contributed unique variance to depressive symptoms. Degradation before elementary school and chronic degradation had a stronger impact on depression symptoms. Only caregiver isolating behaviors during elementary school/last year and chronic isolation predicted depressive symptoms in boys. These results suggest that childhood psychological maltreatment is multi-dimensional and is implicated in the etiology of adolescent depressive symptoms. Future prevention efforts should consider parental psychological maltreatment in reducing risk for adolescent depression. PMID:26105164

  8. Illness Attitudes Associated with Seasonal Depressive Symptoms: An Examination Using a Newly Developed Implicit Measure

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The Dual Vulnerability Model of seasonal depression posits that seasonal vegetative symptoms are due to a physiological vulnerability, but cognitive and mood symptoms are the result of negative appraisal of vegetative changes. In addition, rumination may be associated with stronger negative attitudes toward vegetative symptoms. This is the first study to examine implicit attitudes toward vegetative symptoms. We hypothesized that illness attitudes about fatigue moderate the relationship between the severity of vegetative symptoms and the severity of cognitive symptoms and that the illness attitudes are associated with rumination. This study also developed an implicit method to assess the appraisal of fatigue as indicating illness. Results supported both hypotheses. Illness attitudes toward fatigue moderated the relationship between vegetative symptoms and cognitive symptoms. Ruminative response style was positively associated with implicit illness attitudes towards fatigue. The study provides support for the role of negative appraisals of vegetative symptoms in the development of cognitive and mood seasonal depressive symptoms. PMID:26783456

  9. Symptom variability in COPD: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Calero, Carmen; Quintana-Gallego, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has traditionally been considered an inexorably progressive disease, associated with a constant increase of symptoms that occur as the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) worsens, only intermittently interrupted by exacerbations. However, this paradigm has been challenged in recent decades by the available evidence. Recent studies have pointed out that COPD-related symptoms are not consistently perceived by patients in the same way, showing not only seasonal variation, but also changes in symptom perception during a week or even within a single day. According to the available data, patients experience the biggest increase in respiratory symptoms during the first hours of the early morning, followed by the nighttime. This variation over time is of considerable importance, since it impacts on daily life activities and health-related quality of life, as measured by a recently developed ad hoc questionnaire. Additionally, recent clinical trials have suggested that the use of rapid-onset long-acting bronchodilators may have an impact on morning symptoms, despite their current use as maintenance treatment for a determined period. Although this hypothesis is to be validated in future long-term clinical trials comparing fast-onset versus slow-onset inhaled drugs in COPD, it may bring forward a new concept of long-term bronchodilator therapy. At the present time, the two available long-acting, fast-onset bronchodilators used in the treatment of COPD are formoterol and the recently marketed indacaterol. Newer drugs have also been shown to have a rapid onset of action in preclinical studies. Health care professionals caring for COPD patients should consider this variation in the perception of symptoms during their clinical interview as a potential new target in the long-term treatment plan. PMID:23687444

  10. Symptom variability in COPD: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Calero, Carmen; Quintana-Gallego, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has traditionally been considered an inexorably progressive disease, associated with a constant increase of symptoms that occur as the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) worsens, only intermittently interrupted by exacerbations. However, this paradigm has been challenged in recent decades by the available evidence. Recent studies have pointed out that COPD-related symptoms are not consistently perceived by patients in the same way, showing not only seasonal variation, but also changes in symptom perception during a week or even within a single day. According to the available data, patients experience the biggest increase in respiratory symptoms during the first hours of the early morning, followed by the nighttime. This variation over time is of considerable importance, since it impacts on daily life activities and health-related quality of life, as measured by a recently developed ad hoc questionnaire. Additionally, recent clinical trials have suggested that the use of rapid-onset long-acting bronchodilators may have an impact on morning symptoms, despite their current use as maintenance treatment for a determined period. Although this hypothesis is to be validated in future long-term clinical trials comparing fast-onset versus slow-onset inhaled drugs in COPD, it may bring forward a new concept of long-term bronchodilator therapy. At the present time, the two available long-acting, fast-onset bronchodilators used in the treatment of COPD are formoterol and the recently marketed indacaterol. Newer drugs have also been shown to have a rapid onset of action in preclinical studies. Health care professionals caring for COPD patients should consider this variation in the perception of symptoms during their clinical interview as a potential new target in the long-term treatment plan. PMID:23687444

  11. The Association between Depressive Symptoms and Physical Diseases in Switzerland: A Cross-Sectional General Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodic, Donja; Meyer, Andrea Hans; Meinlschmidt, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the association between depressive symptoms and physical diseases in Switzerland, as respective findings might inform about future estimates of mental and physical health care costs. Methods: A population-based study, using data from the Swiss Health Survey collected by computer-assisted telephone interviews and additional written questionnaires during the year 2007 (n = 18,760) in Switzerland. The multistage stratified random sample included subjects aged 15 years and older, living in a private Swiss household with a telephone connection. Complete data were available for 14,348 subjects (51% of all subjects reached by telephone). Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the associations between depressive symptoms and any physical disease, or a specific physical disease out of 13 non-communicable physical diseases assessed with a self-report checklist on common physical diseases. Analyses were adjusted for sex, age, education, occupation, and household income. Results: In the adjusted models, depressive symptoms were associated with arthrosis and arthritis [Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.28-2.50] and any physical disease (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.33-2.10) after controlling for multiple testing. Conclusion: Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the comorbidity of depressive symptoms and arthrosis and arthritis in Switzerland and might have implications for more precise future estimates of mental and physical health care costs. PMID:25853116

  12. Correlates of Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, LaRita C.; Clay, Olivio J.; Ovalle, Fernando; Cherrington, Andrea; Crowe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Investigators examined correlates of depressive symptoms within a sample of older adults with diabetes. Participants completed a structured telephone interview with measures including depressive symptoms, health conditions, cognitive function, and diabetes distress. Correlations and hierarchical linear regression models were utilized to examine bivariate and covariate-adjusted correlates of depressive symptoms. The sample included 246 community-dwelling adults with diabetes (≥65 years old). In bivariate analyses, African Americans, individuals with specific health issues (neuropathy, stroke, respiratory issues, arthritis, and cardiac issues), and those with higher levels of diabetes distress reported more depressive symptoms. Older age, higher education, more income, and better cognitive function were inversely associated with depressive symptoms. In the final covariate-adjusted regression model, stroke (B = .22, p < .001), cognitive function (B = −.14, p < .01), and higher levels of diabetes-related distress (B = .49, p < .001) each were uniquely associated with more depressive symptoms. Diabetes distress partially mediated the associations between cardiac issues and depressive symptoms and between cognitive function and depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that interventions targeted at helping older adults manage their diabetes-related distress and reducing the likelihood of experiencing additional health complications may reduce depressive symptoms within this population. PMID:26682235

  13. Depressive Symptoms, Drinking Problems, and Smoking Cessation in Older Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Brent A.; Holahan, Charles J.; Holahan, Carole K.; Brennan, Penny L.; Schutte, Kathleen K.; Moos, Rudolf H.

    2009-01-01

    This study modeled the predictive association between depressive symptoms and smoking cessation in a sample of 442 late-middle-aged smokers; assessments occurred at four time-points across a 10-year period. In addition, the study examined the role of baseline drinking problems in moderating the relationship between depressive symptoms and smoking cessation. Findings supported hypotheses. More depressive symptoms prospectively predicted a lower likelihood of smoking cessation. In addition, the presence of baseline drinking problems strengthened the relationship between depressive symptoms and a lower likelihood of smoking cessation. Understanding the mechanisms underlying depression and cigarette smoking among older adults is applicable to secondary prevention and treatment and suggests additional public health benefits from treating depression in older persons. PMID:19372009

  14. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions like Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  15. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-08-16

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer's disease and related conditions like Parkinson's disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  16. Management of refractory typical GERD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, Emidio; Ang, Daphne; Pauwels, Ans; De Santis, Adriano; Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with refractory GERD (rGERD) is a major clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. In up to 30% of patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or regurgitation), acid-suppressive therapy does not provide clinical benefit. In this Review, we discuss the current management algorithm for GERD and the features and management of patients who do not respond to treatment (such as those individuals with an incorrect diagnosis of GERD, inadequate PPI intake, persisting acid reflux and persisting weakly acidic reflux). Symptom response to existing surgical techniques, novel antireflux procedures, and the value of add-on medical therapies (including prokinetics and reflux inhibitors) for rGERD symptoms are discussed. Pharmaceutical agents targeting oesophageal sensitivity, a condition that can contribute to symptom generation in rGERD, are also discussed. Finally, on the basis of available published data and our expert opinion, we present an outline of a current, usable algorithm for management of patients with rGERD that considers the timing and diagnostic use of pH-impedance monitoring on or off PPI, additional diagnostic tests, the clinical use of baclofen and the use of add-on neuromodulators (tricyclic agents and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). PMID:27075264

  17. Remedies for Common Cold Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Penny F.

    1991-01-01

    Individuals suffering from intolerable symptoms of the common cold can now be advised of safe and effective products for symptomatic relief. This article describes and discusses four categories of drugs used to treat the common cold. To simplify the product selection process for family physicians, suggestions are included for possible ingredients for treatments of specific cold symptoms. PMID:21234087

  18. Guidance on managing menopausal symptoms.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    The menopause affects all women, and nurses in any role will come across women who have menopausal symptoms. Some women will need more help than others to manage their symptoms. In 2015, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) produced guidelines for its management. PMID:27581917

  19. Menopause. How Exercise Mitigates Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargarten, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    During menopause and the climacteric, women experience many changes that can affect nearly every organ system and cause psychological symptoms. This article reviews the specific changes and explains how exercise can address each symptom; outlines a practical approach physicians can use to help menopausal patients improve their quality of life. (SM)

  20. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  1. Traumatic Symptoms in Sexually Abused Children: Implications for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sarah D.; Brack, Greg; Mullis, Frances Y.

    2008-01-01

    School counselors have a duty to formulate strategies that aid in the detection and prevention of child sexual abuse (American School Counselor Association, 2003). School counselors are charged with helping sexually abused children by recognizing sexual abuse indicators based on a child's symptomatology and/or behavior, and understanding how this…

  2. Metacognitive functioning predicts positive and negative symptoms over 12 months in first episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Hamish J; Gumley, Andrew I; Macbeth, Angus; Schwannauer, Matthias; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-07-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia are a major source of impairment and distress but both pharmacological and psychological treatment options provide only modest benefit. Developing more effective psychological treatments for negative symptoms will require a more sophisticated understanding of the psychological processes that are implicated in their development and maintenance. We extended previous work by demonstrating that metacognitive functioning is related to negative symptom expression across the first 12 months of first episode psychosis (FEP). Previous studies in this area have either been cross-sectional or have used much older participants with long-standing symptoms. In this study, forty-five FEP participants were assessed three times over 12 months and provided data on PANSS rated symptoms, premorbid adjustment, metacognitive functioning, and DUP. Step-wise linear regression showed that adding metacognition scores to known predictors of negative symptoms (baseline symptom severity, gender, DUP, and premorbid academic and social adjustment) accounted for 62% of the variance in PANSS negative symptom scores at six months and 38% at 12 months. The same predictors also explained 47% of the variance in positive symptoms at both six and 12 months. However, exploration of the simple correlations between PANSS symptom scores and metacognition suggests a stronger univariate relationship between metacognition and negative symptoms. Overall, the results indicate that problems with mental state processing may be important determinants of negative symptom expression from the very early stages of psychosis. These results provide further evidence that metacognitive functioning is a potentially relevant target for psychological interventions. PMID:24725651

  3. Fear Conditioned Responses and PTSD Symptoms in Children: Sex Differences in Fear-Related Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gamwell, Kaitlyn; Nylocks, Maria; Cross, Dorthie; Bradley, Bekh; Norrholm, Seth D.

    2016-01-01

    Fear conditioning studies in adults have found that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with heightened fear responses and impaired discrimination. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between PTSD symptoms and fear conditioned responses in children from a highly traumatized urban population. Children between 8 and 13 years old participated in a fear conditioning study in addition to providing information about their trauma history and PTSD symptoms. Results showed that females showed less discrimination between danger and safety signals during conditioning compared to age-matched males. In boys, intrusive symptoms were predictive of fear responses, even after controlling for trauma exposure. However, in girls, conditioned fear to the danger cue was predictive of self-blame and fear of repeated trauma. This study suggests there are early sex differences in the patterns of fear conditioning and that these sex differences may translate to differential risk for trauma-related psychopathology. PMID:26011240

  4. Fear conditioned responses and PTSD symptoms in children: Sex differences in fear-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gamwell, Kaitlyn; Nylocks, Maria; Cross, Dorthie; Bradley, Bekh; Norrholm, Seth D; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2015-11-01

    Fear conditioning studies in adults have found that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with heightened fear responses and impaired discrimination. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between PTSD symptoms and fear conditioned responses in children from a highly traumatized urban population. Children between 8 and 13 years old participated in a fear conditioning study in addition to providing information about their trauma history and PTSD symptoms. Results showed that females showed less discrimination between danger and safety signals during conditioning compared to age-matched males. In boys, intrusive symptoms were predictive of fear responses, even after controlling for trauma exposure. However, in girls, conditioned fear to the danger cue was predictive of self-blame and fear of repeated trauma. This study suggests there are early sex differences in the patterns of fear conditioning and that these sex differences may translate to differential risk for trauma-related psychopathology. PMID:26011240

  5. Regional grey matter volume and concentration in at-risk adolescents: Untangling associations with callous-unemotional traits and conduct disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Moran D; Viding, Essi; McCrory, Eamon; Pape, Louise; van den Brink, Wim; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Veltman, Dick J; Popma, Arne

    2016-08-30

    Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies have reported volume reductions in several brain regions implicated in social cognition and emotion recognition in juvenile antisocial populations. However, it is unclear whether these structural abnormalities are specifically related to antisocial features, or to co-occurring callous-unemotional (CU) traits. The present study employed voxel-based morphometry to assess both grey matter volume (GMV) and grey matter concentration (GMC) in a large representative at-risk sample of adolescents (n=134; mean age 17.7yr), characterized by a broad range of CU trait and conduct disorder (CD) symptom scores. There was a significant interaction between CD symptom and CU trait scores in the prediction of GMV in the anterior insula, with a significant positive association between CU traits and GMV in youth low on CD symptoms only. In addition, we found a significant unique positive association between CD symptoms and GMC in the amygdala, and unique negative associations between CU traits and GMC in the amygdala and insula. These findings are in line with accumulating evidence of distinct associations of CD symptoms and CU traits with amygdala and insula GMC in juvenile antisocial populations. PMID:27479922

  6. Parental Anxiety and Child Symptomatology: An Examination of Additive and Interactive Effects of Parent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents…

  7. Tourette Syndrome: Classroom Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaturvedi, Amrita; Gartin, Barbara C.; Murdick, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurobiological disorder characterized by various involuntary motor movements and vocal tics. Symptoms of TS emerge between the ages of 3 to 8 years old, are most severe when an individual reaches puberty, and decrease by the time a person is 20 years old. Additionally, persons with TS may have secondary disabilities of…

  8. Sensory and motor secondary symptoms as indicators of brain vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the primary symptoms that distinguish one disorder from the next, clinicians have identified, yet largely overlooked, another set of symptoms that appear across many disorders, termed secondary symptoms. In the emerging era of systems neuroscience, which highlights that many disorders share common deficits in global network features, the nonspecific nature of secondary symptoms should attract attention. Herein we provide a scholarly review of the literature on a subset of secondary symptoms––sensory and motor. We demonstrate that their pattern of appearance––across a wide range of psychopathologies, much before the full-blown disorder appears, and in healthy individuals who display a variety of negative symptoms––resembles the pattern of appearance of network abnormalities. We propose that sensory and motor secondary symptoms can be important indicators of underlying network aberrations and thus of vulnerable brain states putting individuals at risk for psychopathology following extreme circumstances. PMID:24063566

  9. Emotional dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, and self-injurious and suicidal behavior: Structural equation modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Kranzler, Amy; Fehling, Kara B; Anestis, Michael D; Selby, Edward A

    2016-07-01

    This study used structural equation modeling to examine the relationships between emotion dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), and suicide. One hundred forty-eight undergraduates completed a brief structured interview and self-report measures of emotion dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, and NSSI and suicidal behaviors. Results indicated a significant indirect effect of emotion dysregulation on NSSI via internalizing symptoms and on suicide attempts via NSSI. Findings provide a more nuanced understanding of the indirect association between emotion dysregulation and NSSI and suicidal behaviors. Implications for the potential utility of targeting internalizing symptoms as well as emotion dysregulation in interventions addressing NSSI and suicidal behaviors are discussed. PMID:26808092

  10. The role of religious orientations in youth's posttraumatic symptoms after exposure to terror.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Avital; Solomon, Zahava

    2011-09-01

    This study examined the effect of religiosity on youth's posttraumatic symptoms resulting from exposure to terror. Participants consisted of 1,973 Israeli high school students. Objective and subjective exposure (fear) to terror were positively associated with posttraumatic symptoms. Intrinsic religiosity was negatively associated with posttraumatic symptoms and found to decrease the effects of objective exposure. Personal extrinsic orientation and social extrinsic orientation were positively associated with posttraumatic symptoms, having no mediating effect. Theoretical implications regarding religiosity as a coping mechanism in light of exposure to terror are discussed. PMID:19672716

  11. Beyond frequency: who is most bothered by vasomotor symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Joffe, Hadine; Avis, Nancy E.; Hess, Rachel; Crandall, Carolyn J.; Chang, Yuefang; Green, Robin; Matthews, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Most menopausal women report vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats). However, not all women with vasomotor symptoms, including frequent symptoms, are bothered by them. The primary aim was to identify correlates of vasomotor symptom bother beyond symptom frequency. Design The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation participants reporting vasomotor symptoms at annual visit 7 comprised the sample (N = 1,042). Assessments included hot flash and night sweats frequency (number per week) and bother (1, not at all– 4, very much). Negative affect (index of depressive symptoms, anxiety, perceived stress, negative mood), symptom sensitivity, sleep problems, and vasomotor symptom duration (number of years) were examined cross-sectionally in relation to bother in ordinal logistic regression models with symptom frequency and covariates. Hot flashes and night sweats were considered separately. Results In multivariable models controlling for hot flash frequency, negative affect (odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.08–1.51), symptom sensitivity (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03–1.37), sleep problems (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.04–1.85), poorer health (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.03–1.48), duration of hot flashes (OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.06–1.23), younger age (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89–0.99), and African American race (vs white, OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.12–2.26) were associated with hot flash bother. After controlling for night sweats frequency and covariates, sleep problems (OR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.33–2.55) and night sweats duration (OR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02–1.20) were associated with night sweats bother. Conclusions Beyond frequency, factors associated with bothersome hot flashes include mood, symptom sensitivity, symptom duration, sleep problems, age, and race. Correlates of bothersome night sweats include sleep problems and symptom duration. In addition to reducing frequency, interventions for vasomotor symptoms might consider addressing modifiable factors related to

  12. Executive Function Moderates the Relation between Coping and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Evans, Lindsay D.; Rao, Uma; Garber, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Identifying risk factors early in the course of depression has important implications for prevention, given that the likelihood of recurrence increases with each successive episode. Design This study examined relations among coping, executive functioning, and depressive symptom trajectories in a sample of remitted-depressed (n = 32) and never-depressed (n = 36) young adults (ages 18 to 31). Methods Participants completed a clinical interview, a measure of coping, and tasks assessing two components of executive function -- inhibition and cognitive flexibility. Participants were re-assessed regarding the timing and severity of depressive symptoms that had occurred during the interval period (mean = 35.16 weeks, SD = 9.03). Results Among never-depressed individuals, less primary control coping (e.g., problem-solving) and greater disengagement coping (e.g., avoidance) predicted increases in depressive symptoms. Greater secondary control coping (e.g., acceptance) predicted decreases in depressive symptoms and was unrelated to depression history. Higher inhibition scores predicted less increase in depressive symptoms for individuals reporting less primary control coping or more disengagement coping. Higher cognitive flexibility scores predicted less increase in depressive symptoms among individuals reporting less secondary control coping. Conclusions Interventions aiming to enhance either coping strategies or executive functions may reduce risk for depression recurrence. PMID:24866556

  13. Acute posttraumatic stress symptoms but not generalized anxiety symptoms are associated with severity of exposure to war trauma: A study of civilians under fire.

    PubMed

    Helpman, Liat; Besser, Avi; Neria, Yuval

    2015-10-01

    Posttraumatic stress (PTSS) and generalized anxiety symptoms (GAS) may ensue following trauma. While they are now thought to represent different psychopathological entities, it is not clear whether both GAS and PTSS show a dose-response to trauma exposure. The current study aimed to address this gap in knowledge and to investigate the moderating role of subjects' demographics in the exposure-outcome associations. The sample included 249 civilian adults, assessed during the 2014 Israel-Gaza military conflict. The survey probed demographic information, trauma exposure, and symptoms. PTSS but not GAS was associated with exposure severity. Women were at higher risk for both PTSS and GAS than men. In addition, several demographic variables were only associated with PTSS levels. PTSS dose-response effect was moderated by education. These findings are in line with emerging neurobiological and cognitive research, suggesting that although PTSS and GAS have shared risk factors they represent two different psychopathological entities. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:26343559

  14. [Symptoms diagnosis and treatment of dyscalulia].

    PubMed

    Ise, Elena; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2013-07-01

    Children with dyscalculia show deficits in basic numerical processing which cause difficulties in the acquisition of mathematical skills. This article provides an overview of current research findings regarding the symptoms, cause, and prognosis of dyscalculia, and it summarizes recent developments in the diagnosis, early intervention, and treatment thereof. Diagnosis has improved recently because newly developed tests focus not only on the math curriculum, but also on basic skills found to be impaired in dyscalculia. A controversial debate continues with regard to IQ achievement discrepancy. International studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of specialized interventions. This article summarizes the research findings from intervention studies, describes different treatment approaches, and discusses implications for clinical practice. PMID:23782565

  15. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Huseini, Mustafa; Wood, G. Craig; Seiler, Jamie; Argyropoulos, George; Irving, Brian A.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Benotti, Peter; Still, Christopher; Rolston, David D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several reports have shown an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in obese subjects in community-based studies. To better understand the role of the GI tract in obesity, and because there are limited clinic-based studies, we documented the prevalence of upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a clinic setting. Objective: The aim of our study was to compare the prevalence of GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a weight management clinic with non-obese individuals with similar comorbidities as morbidly obese individuals in an Internal Medicine clinic. Methods: Class II and III obese patients BMI >35 kg/m2 (N = 114) and 182 non-obese patients (BMI <25 kg/m2) completed the GI symptoms survey between August 2011 and April 2012 were included in this study. The survey included 24 items pertaining to upper and lower GI symptoms. The participants rated the frequency of symptoms as absent (never, rarely) or present (occasionally, frequently). The symptoms were clustered into five categories: oral symptoms, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, and bowel habits. Responses to each symptom cluster were compared between obese group and normal weight groups using logistic regression. Results: Of the 24 items, 18 had a higher frequency in the obese group (p < 0.005 for each). After adjusting for age and gender, the obese patients were more likely to have upper GI symptoms: any oral symptom (OR = 2.3, p = 0.0013), dysphagia (OR 2.9, p = 0.0006), and any gastroesophageal reflux (OR 3.8, p < 0.0001). Similarly, the obese patients were more likely to have lower GI symptoms: any abdominal pain (OR = 1.7, p = 0.042) and altered bowel habits (OR = 2.8, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: These observations suggest a statistically significant increase in frequency of both upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese patients when compared to non-obese subjects. PMID:25593922

  16. Predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following childbirth has gained growing attention in the recent years. Although a number of predictors for PTSD following childbirth have been identified (e.g., history of sexual trauma, emergency caesarean section, low social support), only very few studies have tested predictors derived from current theoretical models of the disorder. This study first aimed to replicate the association of PTSD symptoms after childbirth with predictors identified in earlier research. Second, cognitive predictors derived from Ehlers and Clark’s (2000) model of PTSD were examined. Methods N = 224 women who had recently given birth completed an online survey. In addition to computing single correlations between PTSD symptom severities and variables of interest, in a hierarchical multiple regression analyses posttraumatic stress symptoms were predicted by (1) prenatal variables, (2) birth-related variables, (3) postnatal social support, and (4) cognitive variables. Results Wellbeing during pregnancy and age were the only prenatal variables contributing significantly to the explanation of PTSD symptoms in the first step of the regression analysis. In the second step, the birth-related variables peritraumatic emotions and wellbeing during childbed significantly increased the explanation of variance. Despite showing significant bivariate correlations, social support entered in the third step did not predict PTSD symptom severities over and above the variables included in the first two steps. However, with the exception of peritraumatic dissociation all cognitive variables emerged as powerful predictors and increased the amount of variance explained from 43% to a total amount of 68%. Conclusions The findings suggest that the prediction of PTSD following childbirth can be improved by focusing on variables derived from a current theoretical model of the disorder. PMID:25026966

  17. Short-term adverse effects in humans of ingested mineral oils, their additives and possible contaminants--a review.

    PubMed

    Hard, G C

    2000-03-01

    The toxicological databases for petroleum refinery products such as mineral oils, as well as for their potential contaminants and additives, were reviewed for human cases of poisoning by the oral route. The aim was to determine whether any overlooked adulterant in the oil implicated as the cause of the 1981 outbreak of Toxic Oil Syndrome (TOS) in Spain, may have been responsible for the unusual symptomatology characterizing this disease. The essential features of TOS were peripheral eosinophilia, pulmonary oedema and endothelial damage in the acute phase; myalgia, sensory neuropathy, hepatic injury, skin oedema and sicca in the intermediate phase; and peripheral neuropathy, muscle wasting, scleroderma and hepatopathy in the chronic phase. Of the more than 70 chemical entities and mixtures reviewed here, none had been reported as producing adverse toxic effects upon ingestion resembling the specific set of symptoms and progression that characterized TOS. Because of their viscosity, the most commonly recorded disease process associated with oral ingestion of petroleum refinery products was lipid pneumonia, implicating lung exposure via aspiration. The mineral oil additives and contaminants comprised a highly diverse range of chemical entities, producing a variety of symptoms in instances of poisoning. Specifically, no chemical entity amongst the refinery products, additives or contaminants was described as inducing a syndrome involving vasculitis accompanied by thrombotic events, along with immunological consequences (such as T-lymphocyte activation and cytokine release), as is considered to be the cellular basis of TOS. PMID:10889514

  18. Symptom-Specific or Holistic”: Menopausal Symptom Management

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ko, Young; Hwang, Hyenam; Chee, Wonshik

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to identify differences in menopausal symptom management among four major ethnic groups in the U.S. This was a secondary analysis of the qualitative data from a larger Internet-based study. We analyzed data from 90 middle-aged women in the U.S using thematic analysis. We extracted four themes during the data analysis process: (a) “seeking formal or informal advice,” (b) “medication as the first or final choice,” (c) “symptom-specific or holistic,” and (d) “avoiding or pursuing specific foods.” Health care providers need to develop menopausal symptom management programs while considering ethnic differences in menopausal symptom management. PMID:22577743

  19. Safinamide for symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, T

    2015-11-01

    Chronic and slow progression of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is responsible for an altered neurotransmission of various biogenic amines, such as dopamine. Therefore, an individually different pronounced heterogeneity of motor and nonmotor symptoms characterizes each Parkinson's disease patient. Ideal candidates for the balance of these neurotransmitter deficits are compounds like safinamide with broad mechanisms of action such as reversible monoamine oxidase type B inhibition, blockage of voltage-dependent sodium channels, modulation of calcium channels and of glutamate release. Safinamide is administered one time daily with oral doses ranging from 50 to 100 mg. Safinamide was well tolerated and safe, ameliorated motor symptoms when combined with dopamine agonist only or additional levodopa in clinical trials. Safinamide is a novel instrument for the drug therapy of Parkinson's disease with better safety and tolerability particularly concerning diarrhea than inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase, like entacapone, according to an indirect comparison within a meta-analysis with entacapone. PMID:26744740

  20. Late-life Depressive Symptoms: Prediction Models of Change

    PubMed Central

    García-Peña, Carmen; Wagner, Fernando A.; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Espinel-Bermúdez, Claudia; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Pérez-Zepeda, Mario; Arango-Lopera, Victoria; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Ramírez-Aldana, Ricardo; Gallo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a well-recognised problem in the elderly. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with predictors of change in depressive symptoms, both in subjects with and without baseline significant depressive symptoms. Methods Longitudinal study of community-dwelling elderly people (>60 years or older), baseline evaluations, and two additional evaluations were reported. Depressive symptoms were measured using a 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale, and a score of 11 was used as cutoff point for significant depressive symptoms in order to stratify the analyses in two groups: with significant depressive symptoms and without significant depressive symptoms. Sociodemographic data, social support, anxiety, cognition, positive affect, control locus, activities of daily living, recent traumatic life events, physical activity, comorbidities, and quality of life were evaluated. Multi-level generalised estimating equation model was used to assess the impact on the trajectory of depressive symptoms. Results 7,882 subjects were assessed, with 29.42% attrition. At baseline assessment, mean age was 70.96 years, 61.15% were women. Trajectories of depressive symptoms had a decreasing trend. Stronger associations in those with significant depressive symptoms, were social support (OR .971, p<.001), chronic pain (OR 2.277, p<.001) and higher locus of control (OR .581, p<.001). In contrast for those without baseline significant depressive symptoms anxiety and a higher locus of control were the strongest associations. Conclusions New insights into late-life depression are provided, with special emphasis in differentiated factors influencing the trajectory when stratifying regarding basal status of significant depressive symptoms. Limitations The study has not included clinical evaluations and nutritional assessments PMID:23731940

  1. Symptom severity of depressive symptoms impacts on social cognition performance in current but not remitted major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Air, Tracy; Weightman, Michael J.; Baune, Bernhard T.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the social cognitive functioning of participants with depression when compared with healthy controls, and to assess the impact of symptom severity. One hundred and eight patients with depression (66 remitted and 42 current) and 52 healthy controls were assessed using the Wechsler Advanced Clinical Solutions: Social Perception Subtest, measuring facial affect recognition in isolation and in combination with prosody and body language interpretation. When healthy controls, remitted depression and currently depressed groups were compared, no associations were found on any of the social cognition subscales. Severity of depressive and anxious symptoms predicted performance on all social cognition subscales in currently depressed participants, controlling for age, gender, education and psychotropic medication. Affective depressive symptoms were inversely related to ACS Pairs and Prosody subscales, while somatic symptoms were inversely related to the ACS Affect Recognition and Total scores. There was no association between severity and the WAIS ACS in remitted depression participants. People with MDD exhibiting more severe depressive and anxious symptoms and a cluster of affective symptoms have greater difficulty undertaking complex social cognitive tasks. Given the state like nature to these deficits, these impairments may cause problems with day to day functioning and have implications in targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:26300814

  2. [Symptom relief in terminal illness].

    PubMed

    Gleim, Martin; Schulzeck, Sabine; Siebrecht, Dieter

    2007-04-01

    It is the goal of palliative care to provide as large a relief of the disease symptoms as possible for patients, who are incurably sick, in order to improve the quality of the remaining life. Some of the symptoms can hardly be treated; others like pain, dyspnea, gastrointestinal complaints or sweating can usually be well alleviated. The condition for this is a careful evaluation of the clinical status before the treatment, in order to reach symptom relief by purposeful actions without new side effects. PMID:17457778

  3. Disasters and Depressive Symptoms in Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Betty S.; Auslander, Beth A.; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.; Podkowirow, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Background Disasters are destructive, potentially traumatic events that affect millions of youth each year. Objective The purpose of this paper was to review the literature on depressive symptoms among youth after disasters. Specifically, we examined the prevalence of depression, risk factors associated with depressive symptoms, and theories utilized in this research area. Methods We searched MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and PubMed electronic databases for English language articles published up to May 1, 2013. Reference lists from included studies were reviewed to capture additional studies. Only quantitative, peer reviewed studies, conducted with youth under the age of 18 years, that examined postdisaster depressive symptoms were included. Seventy-two studies met inclusion criteria. Prevalence of depressive symptoms, disaster type, correlates of depressive symptoms, and theories of depressive symptoms were reviewed. Results Only 27 studies (38%) reported on prevalence rates among youth in their sample. Prevalence rates of depression among youth postdisaster ranged from 2% to 69%. Potential risk factors were identified (e.g., female gender, exposure stressors, posttraumatic stress symptoms). Theories were examined in less than one-third of studies (k = 21). Conclusions Given the variability in prevalence rates, difficulty identifying a single profile of youth at risk for developing depressive symptoms, and lack of a unifying theory emerging from the studies, recommendations for future research are discussed. Use of established batteries of assessments could enable comparisons across studies. Merging existing theories from children’s postdisaster and depression literatures could aid in the identification of risk factors and causal pathways. PMID:25067897

  4. Triptans and chest symptoms: the role of pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Dodick, D W

    2004-04-01

    Triptans are effective and well tolerated in the treatment of acute migraine. Chest symptoms are a common adverse effect unrelated to coronary vasoconstriction in most patients. Although the aetiology of chest symptoms remains to be fully defined, pulmonary vasoconstriction is a possible underlying mechanism. Pre-clinical studies of isolated human blood vessels were used to identify the cerebral selectivity of triptans and ascertain if selectivity vs the pulmonary vasculature predicts a lower rate of chest symptoms. Controlled clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance studies were reviewed to document the incidence of chest symptoms after triptan therapy. In clinical trials, the incidence of chest symptoms at usual therapeutic doses ranged from 1 to 4% depending on the triptan and study design, whereas in post-marketing surveillance studies, up to 41% of patients specifically asked about chest symptoms reported them. A comparative clinical trial showed that almotriptan was associated with lower incidence of chest symptoms than sumatriptan (0.3 vs 2.2%). The intrinsic activity of almotriptan, a second-generation triptan, on human pulmonary arteries and veins was lower than that of sumatriptan. Pre-clinical studies of isolated pulmonary blood vessels may predict the clinical likelihood of chest symptoms; however, additional comparisons are needed. PMID:15030540

  5. Corporate instability is related to airline pilots' stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Little, L F; Gaffney, I C; Rosen, K H; Bender, M M

    1990-11-01

    The Symptoms of Stress questionnaire was administered to three random samples of commercial airline pilots. Respondents included 1 group of 212 pilots who were employed by an airline company with a history of corporate instability; and 2 groups, totalling 220 pilots, who were employed by 2 airline carriers with histories of corporate stability. The pilot group employed by the airline with a history of corporate instability reported significantly more stress and depression symptoms and a greater accumulation of symptoms than did the pilot groups employed by the stable airlines. With the advent of airline deregulation and its concomitant changes in the airline industry, including corporate instability, we conclude that the relationship between corporate instability within the aviation environment and the subjective distress reported by pilots suggests the need for further investigation into implications for health and safety. PMID:2256885

  6. Disgust sensitivity and psychopathological symptoms in non-clinical children.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; van der Heiden, Simone; Rassin, Eric

    2008-06-01

    There is clear evidence in the adult literature that disgust sensitivity is implicated in various psychopathological syndromes. The current study examined the link between disgust sensitivity and psychopathological symptoms in youths. In a sample of non-clinical children aged 9-13 years, disgust sensitivity was assessed by two self-report questionnaires (i.e., the Disgust Scale and the Disgust Sensitivity Questionnaire) and a behavioural test. Furthermore, children completed scales for measuring the personality trait of neuroticism and various types of psychopathological symptoms. Results showed that disgust measures had sufficient to good convergent validity. Further, significant positive correlations were found between disgust sensitivity and symptoms of specific phobias (i.e., spider phobia, blood-injection phobia, small-animal phobia), social phobia, agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and eating problems, and these links were not attenuated when controlling for neuroticism. The possible role of disgust sensitivity in the aetiology of child psychopathology is discussed. PMID:17433251

  7. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Adulthood: Concordance and Differences between Self- and Informant Perspectives on Symptoms and Functional Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Mörstedt, Beatrice; Corbisiero, Salvatore; Bitto, Hannes; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a severe mental illness, associated with major impairment and a high comorbidity rate. Particularly undiagnosed ADHD in adulthood has serious consequences. Thus, a valid diagnosis is important. In adulthood, the diagnostic process for ADHD is complicated: symptoms may overlap with comorbid disorders, and the onset and progression of the disorder must be reconstructed retrospectively. Guidelines for the diagnostic process recommend the inclusion of additional informant ratings. Research into the relation between self- and informant ratings shows extremely heterogeneous results. The levels of agreement range from low to high. The focus of this study is the concordance and differences between self- and informant ratings on ADHD symptoms and impairments. In this regard, two possible influencing factors (gender and relationship type) are also examined. 114 people participated in this study, 77 with an ADHD diagnosis and 37 without a diagnosis. For all participants, either parents or partners also rated ADHD symptoms and impairments. Small to moderate concordance was found between self- and informant ratings, with females being slightly more concordant than males, particularly for ratings of problems with self-concept. Examination of the consistency within a particular perspective showed that people with ADHD seemed to be unaware of the causal relation between ADHD symptoms and their impairments. A close investigation found almost no influence of gender and relationship type on differences within perspectives. Based on these results, the implications for the diagnostic process are that additional informant information is clearly necessary and helpful. PMID:26529403

  8. Early Prodromal Symptoms Can Predict Future Psychosis in Familial High-Risk Youth

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Neeraj; Montrose, Debra; Shah, Jai; Rajarethinam, RP; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Efforts to predict psychosis in individuals at high risk for schizophrenia have focused on the identification of sub-threshold clinical criteria and neurobiological markers, including neuropsychological assessment, structural and functional brain imaging, and psychophysiological testing. We sought to evaluate the relative utility of psychosis proneness measures for prospective prediction of psychotic disorders in a group of young relatives at familial risk for schizophrenia. Methods We examined the receiver operating characteristics of sub-threshold symptoms in predicting conversion to psychosis in a group of 97 young first- and second-degree relatives of persons with schizophrenia over a 2-year period. Towards this end, we utilized the Structured Interview of Prodromal Symptoms to derive measures of two of the four Scale of Prodromal Symptoms subscales (positive and disorganized) and the Chapman Magical Ideation and Perceptual Aberration scales. These four measures were, together, taken to reflect a putative index of psychosis proneness. Results Eleven of the 97 subjects developed a psychotic disorder over 2 years of follow-up. Seventeen of the 97 subjects tested positive on this index of psychosis proneness at baseline and of these 10 converted to psychosis. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were 91 percent and 92 percent respectively. The positive predictive value of the test was 59 percent and its negative predictive value was 99 percent. Addition of measures of cognitive or social function to the index decreased its predictive ability, reducing its specificity and/or sensitivity. Conclusions A relatively simple set of clinical measures can be utilized to prospectively identify familial high-risk individuals who convert to psychosis with high specificity and sensitivity. Implications for the proposed addition of an “Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome” in DSM-5 are discussed. PMID:22056319

  9. Low blood sugar symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... nervousness and irritability are signs that a person's blood sugar is getting dangerously low. A person showing any of these symptoms should check their blood sugar. If the level is low (70 mg/dl), ...

  10. Understanding ADHD: Symptoms in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding ADHD Symptoms In Children Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... hyperactivity, and impulsivity are the key behaviors of ADHD. It is normal for all children to be ...

  11. Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective if given quickly. Every minute counts! "Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms", NINDS. June 1, 2008. Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  12. Medications for Heart Valve Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Medications for Heart Valve Symptoms Updated:Aug 26,2015 How do medications ... was last reviewed on 03/26/14. Heart Valves Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart ...

  13. Measles (Rubeola): Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Initiative World Health Organization Pan American Health Organization Signs and Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... of a patient with Koplik spots, an early sign of measles infection. Three to five days after ...

  14. TBI Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury TBI Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... of coordination, and increased confusion, restlessness or agitation. Diagnosis Imaging tests, including X-rays of the head ...

  15. Symptoms of discoid lateral menisci

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Serhat; Mutlu, Harun; Mutlu, Burcu; Guler, Olcay; Duymus, Tahir Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to determine the symptoms of the patients with discoid lateral meniscus. Methods We prospectively collected cases of the knees with discoid lateral meniscus. Twenty patients (7 female, 13 male) admitted between January 2012 and February 2014 were enrolled in this study. The mean age of the patients was 34 years (range 28–40). Results The identified symptoms of a discoid lateral meniscus were “pain, stiffness, popping of the knee, feeling that the knee is “giving way”, inability to fully extend (straighten) the knee”. Thirteen patients (65%) had pain, 11 (55%) had popping of the knee, 4 (20%) had stiffness, 2 (10%) had “giving way” feeling, and 1 (5%) had inability to fully extend the knee. These symptoms did not prevent any patient's daily activities. No patients required surgical treatment. Conclusions Pain and popping of the knee were the most common symptoms in patients with a discoid lateral meniscus. The other symptoms were stiffness, feeling that the knee is “giving way”, and inability to fully extend the knee, respectively. No symptoms had been required surgical treatment. PMID:25561753

  16. Depressive Symptoms in 3rd Grade Teachers: Relations to Classroom Quality and Student Achievement

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Leigh; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated associations among third grade teachers’ (n = 27) symptoms of depression, quality of the classroom-learning environment (CLE), and students’ (n = 523, mean age 8.6 years) math and literacy performance. Teachers’ depressive symptoms in the winter negatively predicted students’ spring mathematics achievement. This depended on students’ fall mathematics scores; students who began the year with weaker math skills and were in classrooms where teachers reported more depressive symptoms achieved smaller gains than did peers whose teachers reported fewer symptoms. Teachers’ depressive symptoms were negatively associated with quality of CLE, and quality of CLE mediated the association between depressive symptoms and student achievement. Findings point to the importance of teachers’ mental health, with implications for policy and practice. PMID:25676719

  17. Depressive symptoms in third-grade teachers: relations to classroom quality and student achievement.

    PubMed

    McLean, Leigh; McDonald Connor, Carol

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated associations among third-grade teachers' (N = 27) symptoms of depression, quality of the classroom-learning environment (CLE), and students' (N = 523, Mage  = 8.6 years) math and literacy performance. teachers' depressive symptoms in the winter negatively predicted students' spring mathematics achievement. This depended on students' fall mathematics scores; students who began the year with weaker math skills and were in classrooms where teachers reported more depressive symptoms achieved smaller gains than did peers whose teachers reported fewer symptoms. teachers' depressive symptoms were negatively associated with quality of CLE, and quality of CLE mediated the association between depressive symptoms and student achievement. The findings point to the importance of teachers' mental health, with implications for policy and practice. PMID:25676719

  18. Marital and Cohabitation Dissolution and Parental Depressive Symptoms in Fragile Families.

    PubMed

    Kamp Dush, Claire M

    2013-02-01

    The consequences of divorce are pronounced for parents of young children, and cohabitation dissolution is increasing in this population and has important implications. The mental health consequences of union dissolution were examined, by union type and parental gender, using the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (n = 1,998 for mothers and 1,764 for fathers). Overall, cohabitation and marital dissolution were both associated with increased maternal and paternal depressive symptoms, though for married mothers, depressive symptoms returned to predissolution levels with time. Difference-in-difference estimates indicated no differences in the magnitude of the increase in depressive symptoms by type of dissolution, though pooled difference models suggested that married fathers increased in depressive symptoms more than cohabiting fathers. Potential time-variant mediators did not account for these associations, though greater family chaos was associated with increased maternal depressive symptoms, and decreased social support and father - child contact were associated with increased paternal depressive symptoms. PMID:23671351

  19. Incidence and trends in psychopathology symptoms over time in adults with severe to profound intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L; Sipes, Megan; Shoemaker, Mary; Belva, Brian; Bamburg, Jay W

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have a high risk for developing comorbid psychopathology. While researchers have shown that symptoms of psychopathology remain relatively stable in children with ID over time, little research has been conducted to demonstrate symptom stability for adults with ID. Incidence of psychopathology symptoms was examined in 124 adults with severe to profound ID. Then, trends in symptoms of psychopathology over time were studied in 74 of those individuals who had data collected quarterly over the span of one year. Data from the Diagnostic Assessment for the Severely Handicapped-Second Edition (DASH-II) were evaluated for each of the 13 subscales, as well as the total DASH-II score. For all of the scales except PDD/Autism, symptoms did not fluctuate significantly over the one year period. The PDD/Autism scale revealed a significant change in symptoms from Time 1 to Time 3. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:21144701

  20. Marital and Cohabitation Dissolution and Parental Depressive Symptoms in Fragile Families

    PubMed Central

    Kamp Dush, Claire M.

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of divorce are pronounced for parents of young children, and cohabitation dissolution is increasing in this population and has important implications. The mental health consequences of union dissolution were examined, by union type and parental gender, using the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (n = 1,998 for mothers and 1,764 for fathers). Overall, cohabitation and marital dissolution were both associated with increased maternal and paternal depressive symptoms, though for married mothers, depressive symptoms returned to predissolution levels with time. Difference-in-difference estimates indicated no differences in the magnitude of the increase in depressive symptoms by type of dissolution, though pooled difference models suggested that married fathers increased in depressive symptoms more than cohabiting fathers. Potential time-variant mediators did not account for these associations, though greater family chaos was associated with increased maternal depressive symptoms, and decreased social support and father – child contact were associated with increased paternal depressive symptoms. PMID:23671351

  1. Self-Evaluation of Negative Symptoms: A Novel Tool to Assess Negative Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Dollfus, Sonia; Mach, Cyril; Morello, Rémy

    2016-05-01

    Many patients with schizophrenia have negative symptoms, but their evaluation is a challenge. Thus, standardized assessments are needed to facilitate identification of these symptoms. Many tools have been developed, but most are based on observer ratings. Self-evaluation can provide an additional outcome measure and allow patients to be more engaged in their treatment. The aim of this study was to present a novel tool, Self-evaluation of Negative Symptoms (SNS), and demonstrate its validity. Forty-nine patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders according to DSM-5 were evaluated. Cronbach's coefficient (α = 0.867) showed good internal consistency. Factor analysis extracted 2 factors (apathy and emotional) that accounted for 75.2% of the variance. The SNS significantly correlated with the Scale of Assessment of Negative Symptoms (r= 0.628) and the Clinician Global Impression on the severity of negative symptoms (r= 0.599), supporting good convergent validity. SNS scores did not correlate with level of insight (r= 0.008), Parkinsonism (r= 0.175) or Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale positive subscores (r= 0.253), which indicates good discriminant validity. The intrasubject reliability of the SNS revealed excellent intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC = 0.942). Taken together, the results show that the SNS has good psychometric properties and satisfactory acceptance by patients. The study also demonstrates the ability of patients with schizophrenia to accurately report their own experiences. Self-assessments of negative symptoms should be more widely employed in clinical practice because they may allow patients with schizophrenia to develop appropriate coping strategies. PMID:26564898

  2. What Are the Symptoms of Endometriosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the symptoms of endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... symptoms, may cause these endometriosis symptoms to continue. Endometriosis-Related Pain Researchers know that pain is a ...

  3. Sleep Duration and Depressive Symptoms: A Gene-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Harden, Kathryn Paige; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Pack, Allan I.; Strachan, Eric; Goldberg, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used quantitative genetic models to assess whether sleep duration modifies genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms. Method: Participants were 1,788 adult twins from 894 same-sex twin pairs (192 male and 412 female monozygotic [MZ] pairs, and 81 male and 209 female dizygotic [DZ] pairs] from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants self-reported habitual sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed using quantitative genetic interaction models, which allowed the magnitude of additive genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental influences on depressive symptoms to vary with sleep duration. Results: Within MZ twin pairs, the twin who reported longer sleep duration reported fewer depressive symptoms (ec = -0.17, SE = 0.06, P < 0.05). There was a significant gene × sleep duration interaction effect on depressive symptoms (a'c = 0.23, SE = 0.08, P < 0.05), with the interaction occurring on genetic influences that are common to both sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Among individuals with sleep duration within the normal range (7-8.9 h/night), the total heritability (h2) of depressive symptoms was approximately 27%. However, among individuals with sleep duration within the low (< 7 h/night) or high (≥ 9 h/night) range, increased genetic influence on depressive symptoms was observed, particularly at sleep duration extremes (5 h/night: h2 = 53%; 10 h/night: h2 = 49%). Conclusion: Genetic contributions to depressive symptoms increase at both short and long sleep durations. Citation: Watson NF; Harden KP; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Pack AI; Stachan E; Goldberg J. Sleep duration and depressive symptoms: a gene-environment interaction. SLEEP 2014;37(2):351-358. PMID:24497663

  4. [Severe diving accidents: physiopathology, symptoms, therapy].

    PubMed

    Muth, C M; Shank, E S; Larsen, B

    2000-04-01

    Decompression injuries are potentially life-threatening incidents, generated by a rapid decline in ambient pressure. Although typically seen in divers, they may be observed in compressed air workers and others exposed to hyperbaric environments. Decompression illness (DCI) results from liberation of gas bubbles in the blood and tissues. DCI may be classified as decompression sickness (DCS) or arterial gas embolism (AGE), depending on where the gas bubbles lodge. DCS occurs after longer exposures to a hyperbaric environment with correspondingly larger up-take of inert gas. DCS may be classified into type 1 with cutaneous symptoms and musculoskeletal pain only or type 2 with neurologic and/or pulmonary symptoms as well. AGE usually results from a pulmonary barotrauma, and with cerebral arterial involvement, the symptoms are similar to a stroke. The most important therapy, in the field, is oxygen resuscitation with the highest possible concentration and volume delivered. The definitive treatment is rapid recompression with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Additional therapeutic measures are discussed. PMID:10840540

  5. Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Brumm, V L; Bilder, D; Waisbren, S E

    2010-01-01

    Psychological and psychiatric problems are well documented across the lifespan of individuals with early-treated phenylketonuria (PKU). Early-treated children and adolescents tend to display attentional problems, school problems, lower achievement motivation, decreased social competence, decreased autonomy, and low-self-esteem. As they enter adulthood, early-treated individuals may carry forward low self-esteem and lack of autonomy but also tend to develop depressed mood, generalized anxiety, phobias, decreased positive emotions, social maturity deficits, and social isolation. The correlation between level of metabolic control and severity of symptoms suggests a biological basis of psychiatric dysfunction. Additionally, psychosocial factors such as the burden of living with a chronic illness may contribute to psychological and psychiatric outcomes in PKU. The lack of a PKU-specific psychiatric phenotype combined with the observation that not everyone with PKU is affected highlights the complexity of the problem. More research on psychiatric and psychological outcomes in PKU is required. Of particular importance is the routine monitoring of emotional, behavioral, and psychosocial symptoms in individuals with this metabolic disorder. Longitudinal studies are required to evaluate the impact of new and emerging therapies on psychiatric and psychosocial functioning in PKU. Unidentified or untreated emotional and behavioral symptoms may have a significant, lifelong impact on the quality of life and social status of patients. PMID:20123472

  6. Reliability of anxiety assessment. II. Symptom agreement.

    PubMed

    Fyer, A J; Mannuzza, S; Martin, L Y; Gallops, M S; Endicott, J; Schleyer, B; Gorman, J M; Liebowitz, M R; Klein, D F

    1989-12-01

    Accurate assessment of "subdisorder" anxiety symptoms, ie, anxiety symptoms central to DSM-III-R-diagnosed anxiety disorders but not meeting disorder criteria because of insufficient frequency, duration, or accompanying subjective distress or impairment, may be critical to case identification in genetic, epidemiologic, and high-risk studies. However, concerns that the mild and often transient nature of these phenomena will foster unreliability have discouraged their use. We assessed the test-retest reliability of "subdisorder" anxiety symptoms in 104 outpatients with anxiety. Good to excellent agreement was found for lifetime occurrence of any panic attack, the spontaneous and situationally predisposed subtypes of panic, and five nonsocial irrational fears (public transportation, driving oneself, crowds, situations associated with death [eg, dead bodies and funerals], and cats and dogs). Four social and three additional nonsocial fears were considered to have adequate reliability. However, agreement on stimulus-bound panic, "near" panic attacks, persistent generalized anxiety, and the remaining nine nonsocial and six social irrational fears was only fair to poor. The major source of unreliability was variation in information reported by the subject to the rater. PMID:2589924

  7. Identifying early pathways of risk and resilience: The codevelopment of internalizing and externalizing symptoms and the role of harsh parenting.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Mitchell, Colter; Hyde, Luke W; Monk, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    Psychological disorders co-occur often in children, but little has been done to document the types of conjoint pathways internalizing and externalizing symptoms may take from the crucial early period of toddlerhood or how harsh parenting may overlap with early symptom codevelopment. To examine symptom codevelopment trajectories, we identified latent classes of individuals based on internalizing and externalizing symptoms across ages 3-9 and found three symptom codevelopment classes: normative symptoms (low), severe-decreasing symptoms (initially high but rapidly declining), and severe symptoms (high) trajectories. Next, joint models examined how parenting trajectories overlapped with internalizing and externalizing symptom trajectories. These trajectory classes demonstrated that, normatively, harsh parenting increased after toddlerhood, but the severe symptoms class was characterized by a higher level and a steeper increase in harsh parenting and the severe-decreasing class by high, stable harsh parenting. In addition, a transactional model examined the bidirectional relationships among internalizing and externalizing symptoms and harsh parenting because they may cascade over time in this early period. Harsh parenting uniquely contributed to externalizing symptoms, controlling for internalizing symptoms, but not vice versa. In addition, internalizing symptoms appeared to be a mechanism by which externalizing symptoms increase. Results highlight the importance of accounting for both internalizing and externalizing symptoms from an early age to understand risk for developing psychopathology and the role harsh parenting plays in influencing these trajectories. PMID:26439075

  8. The supra-additive hyperactivity caused by an amphetamine-chlordiazepoxide mixture exhibits an inverted-U dose response: negative implications for the use of a model in screening for mood stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michele P; Logue, Sheree F; Dwyer, Jason M; Beyer, Chad E; Majchrowski, Heather; Cai, Zhang; Liu, Zhi; Adedoyin, Adedayo; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon; Comery, Thomas A

    2009-06-01

    One of the few preclinical models used to identify mood stabilizers is an assay in which amphetamine-induced hyperactivity (AMPH) is potentiated by the benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide (CDP), an effect purportedly blocked by mood stabilizers. Our data here challenge this standard interpretation of the AMPH-CDP model. We show that the potentiating effects of AMPH-CDP are not explained by a pharmacokinetic interaction as both drugs have similar brain and plasma exposures whether administered alone or in combination. Of concern, however, we find that combining CDP (1-12 mg/kg) with AMPH (3 mg/kg) results in an inverted-U dose response in outbred CD-1 as well as inbred C57Bl/6N and 129S6 mice (peak hyperactivity at 3 mg/kg CDP+3 mg/kg AMPH). Such an inverted-U dose response complicates interpreting whether a reduction in hyperactivity produced by a mood stabilizer reflects a "blockade" or a "potentiation" of the mixture. In fact, we show that the prototypical mood stabilizer valproic acid augments the effects of CDP on hypolocomotion and anxiolytic-like behavior (increases punished crossings by Swiss-Webster mice in the four-plate test). We argue that these data, in addition to other practical and theoretical concerns surrounding the model, limit the utility of the AMPH-CDP mixture model in drug discovery. PMID:19303035

  9. The Relationships between Workaholism and Symptoms of Psychiatric Disorders: A Large-Scale Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Mark D.; Sinha, Rajita; Hetland, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Despite the many number of studies examining workaholism, large-scale studies have been lacking. The present study utilized an open web-based cross-sectional survey assessing symptoms of psychiatric disorders and workaholism among 16,426 workers (Mage = 37.3 years, SD = 11.4, range = 16–75 years). Participants were administered the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale, the Obsession-Compulsive Inventory-Revised, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Bergen Work Addiction Scale, along with additional questions examining demographic and work-related variables. Correlations between workaholism and all psychiatric disorder symptoms were positive and significant. Workaholism comprised the dependent variable in a three-step linear multiple hierarchical regression analysis. Basic demographics (age, gender, relationship status, and education) explained 1.2% of the variance in workaholism, whereas work demographics (work status, position, sector, and annual income) explained an additional 5.4% of the variance. Age (inversely) and managerial positions (positively) were of most importance. The psychiatric symptoms (ADHD, OCD, anxiety, and depression) explained 17.0% of the variance. ADHD and anxiety contributed considerably. The prevalence rate of workaholism status was 7.8% of the present sample. In an adjusted logistic regression analysis, all psychiatric symptoms were positively associated with being a workaholic. The independent variables explained between 6.1% and 14.4% in total of the variance in workaholism cases. Although most effect sizes were relatively small, the study’s findings expand our understanding of possible psychiatric predictors of workaholism, and particularly shed new insight into the reality of adult ADHD in work life. The study’s implications, strengths, and shortcomings are also discussed. PMID:27192149

  10. The Relationships between Workaholism and Symptoms of Psychiatric Disorders: A Large-Scale Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Cecilie Schou; Griffiths, Mark D; Sinha, Rajita; Hetland, Jørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2016-01-01

    Despite the many number of studies examining workaholism, large-scale studies have been lacking. The present study utilized an open web-based cross-sectional survey assessing symptoms of psychiatric disorders and workaholism among 16,426 workers (Mage = 37.3 years, SD = 11.4, range = 16-75 years). Participants were administered the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale, the Obsession-Compulsive Inventory-Revised, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Bergen Work Addiction Scale, along with additional questions examining demographic and work-related variables. Correlations between workaholism and all psychiatric disorder symptoms were positive and significant. Workaholism comprised the dependent variable in a three-step linear multiple hierarchical regression analysis. Basic demographics (age, gender, relationship status, and education) explained 1.2% of the variance in workaholism, whereas work demographics (work status, position, sector, and annual income) explained an additional 5.4% of the variance. Age (inversely) and managerial positions (positively) were of most importance. The psychiatric symptoms (ADHD, OCD, anxiety, and depression) explained 17.0% of the variance. ADHD and anxiety contributed considerably. The prevalence rate of workaholism status was 7.8% of the present sample. In an adjusted logistic regression analysis, all psychiatric symptoms were positively associated with being a workaholic. The independent variables explained between 6.1% and 14.4% in total of the variance in workaholism cases. Although most effect sizes were relatively small, the study's findings expand our understanding of possible psychiatric predictors of workaholism, and particularly shed new insight into the reality of adult ADHD in work life. The study's implications, strengths, and shortcomings are also discussed. PMID:27192149

  11. Neurovestibular symptoms following space flight.

    PubMed

    Bacal, Kira; Billica, Roger; Bishop, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    Neurovestibular symptoms experienced by astronauts in the post-flight period were examined using data from medical debriefs contained in the NASA Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health database. Ten symptoms were identified (clumsiness, difficulty concentrating, persisting sensation aftereffects, nausea, vomiting, vertigo while walking, vertigo while standing, difficulty walking a straight line, blurred vision, and dry heaves), of which eight were crossed with twelve demographic parameters (mission duration, astronaut gender, age, one-g piloting experience, previous space flight experience, g-suit inflation, g-suit deflation, in-flight space motion sickness, in-flight exercise, post-flight exercise, mission role, fluid loading). Three symptoms were experienced by a majority of subjects, and another two by more than a quarter of the subjects. Intensity of the symptoms was mild, suggesting that they are unlikely to pose a risk to the crew during landing and the post-flight period. Seven of the symptoms and eight of the parameters under study were found to be significantly associated with each other. PMID:14757912

  12. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. PMID:26776387

  13. Automated Tracking and Quantification of Autistic Behavioral Symptoms Using Microsoft Kinect.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joon Young; Kim, Ryunhyung; Kim, Hyunsun; Kang, Yeonjune; Hahn, Susan; Fu, Zhengrui; Khalid, Mamoon I; Schenck, Enja; Thesen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has risen significantly in the last ten years, and today, roughly 1 in 68 children has been diagnosed. One hallmark set of symptoms in this disorder are stereotypical motor movements. These repetitive movements may include spinning, body-rocking, or hand-flapping, amongst others. Despite the growing number of individuals affected by autism, an effective, accurate method of automatically quantifying such movements remains unavailable. This has negative implications for assessing the outcome of ASD intervention and drug studies. Here we present a novel approach to detecting autistic symptoms using the Microsoft Kinect v.2 to objectively and automatically quantify autistic body movements. The Kinect camera was used to film 12 actors performing three separate stereotypical motor movements each. Visual Gesture Builder (VGB) was implemented to analyze the skeletal structures in these recordings using a machine learning approach. In addition, movement detection was hard-coded in Matlab. Manual grading was used to confirm the validity and reliability of VGB and Matlab analysis. We found that both methods were able to detect autistic body movements with high probability. The machine learning approach yielded highest detection rates, supporting its use in automatically quantifying complex autistic behaviors with multi-dimensional input. PMID:27046572

  14. A longitudinal study of the relationship between work engagement and symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik

    2012-02-01

    This longitudinal study examined the dynamic relationship between work engagement (vigour and dedication) and symptoms of anxiety and depression. A sample of 3475 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, physicians, nurses, teachers, church ministers, bus drivers, people working in advertising and people working in information technology) in Norway supplied data at two points in time with a 2-year time interval. The advantages of longitudinal design were utilized, including testing of reversed causation and controlling for unmeasured third variables. In general, the results showed that the hypothesized normal causal relationship was superior to a reversed causation model. In other words, this study supported the assumption that work engagement is more likely to be the antecedent for symptoms of depression and anxiety than the outcome. In particular, the vigour facet of work engagement provides lower levels of depression and anxiety 2 years later. However, additional analyses modelling unmeasured third variables indicate that unknown third variables may have created some spurious effects on the pattern of the observed relationship. Implications of the findings are discussed in the paper. PMID:22259153

  15. A Prospective Study of Fitness, Fatness, and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Becofsky, Katie M.; Sui, Xuemei; Lee, Duck-chul; Wilcox, Sara; Zhang, Jiajia; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Being overweight or obese might be a risk factor for developing depression. It is also possible that low cardiorespiratory fitness, rather than overweight or obesity, is the better predictor of depressive symptom onset. Adults in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (Dallas, Texas) underwent fitness and fatness assessments between 1979 and 1998 and later completed a questionnaire about depressive symptoms in 1990, 1995, or 1999. Separate logistic regression models were used to test the associations between 3 fatness measures (body mass index, waist circumference, and percentage of body fat) and the onset of depressive symptoms. Analyses were repeated using fitness as the predictor variable. Additional analyses were performed to study the joint association of fatness and fitness with the onset of depressive symptoms. After controlling for fitness, no measure of fatness was associated with the onset of depressive symptoms. In joint analyses, low fitness was more strongly associated with the onset of elevated depressive symptoms than was fatness, regardless of the measure of fatness used. Overall, results from the present study suggest that low fitness is more strongly associated with the onset of elevated depressive symptoms than is fatness. To reduce the risk of developing depression, individuals should be encouraged to improve their fitness regardless of body fatness. PMID:25693775

  16. Can personality traits predict increases in manic and depressive symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Brian E.; Johnson, Sheri L.

    2010-01-01

    Background There has been limited research investigating personality traits as predictors of manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar individuals. The present study investigated the relation between personality traits and the course of bipolar disorder. The purpose of this study was to identify specific personality traits that predict the course of manic and depressive symptoms experienced by bipolar individuals. Methods The sample consisted of 39 participants with bipolar I disorder assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Personality was assessed using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. The Modified Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Bech–Rafaelsen Mania Rating Scale were used to assess symptom severity on a monthly basis. Results Consistent with previous research on unipolar depression, high Neuroticism predicted increases in depressive symptoms across time while controlling for baseline symptoms. Additionally, high Conscientiousness, particularly the Achievement Striving facet, predicted increases in manic symptoms across time. Limitations The current study was limited by the small number of participants, the reliance on a shortened version of a self-report personality measure, and the potential state-dependency of the personality measures. Conclusions Specific personality traits may assist in predicting bipolar symptoms across time. Further studies are needed to tease apart the state-dependency of personality. PMID:11246086

  17. Complicated grief symptoms in caregivers of persons with lung cancer: the role of family conflict, intrapsychic strains, and hospice utilization.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Betty J; Kavanaugh, Melinda; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Walsh, Matthew; Yonker, James A

    Guided by a stress process conceptual model, this study examines social and psychological determinants of complicated grief symptoms focusing on family conflict, intrapsychic strains, and the potential moderating effect of care quality and hospice utilization. Relying on data from 152 spouse and adult child lung cancer caregiver survey respondents, drawn from an ancillary study of the Assessment of Cancer CarE and SatiSfaction (ACCESS) in Wisconsin, hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to examine determinants of complicated grief. After controlling for contextual factors and time since death, complicated grief symptoms were higher among caregivers with less education, among families with lower prior conflict but higher conflict at the end-of-life, who had family members who had difficulty accepting the illness, and who were caring for patients with greater fear of death. Additionally, hospice utilization moderated the effect of fear of death on complicated grief. Findings suggest that family conflict, intrapsychic strains, and hospice utilization may help to explain the variability found in complicated grief symptoms among bereaved caregivers. Implications for enhancing complicated grief assessment tools and preventative interventions across the continuum of cancer care are highlighted. PMID:21495532

  18. Attributions of Cancer ‘Alarm’ Symptoms in a Community Sample

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Katriina L.; Scott, Suzanne E.; Winstanley, Kelly; Macleod, Una; Wardle, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background Attribution of early cancer symptoms to a non-serious cause may lead to longer diagnostic intervals. We investigated attributions of potential cancer ‘alarm’ and non-alarm symptoms experienced in everyday life in a community sample of adults, without mention of a cancer context. Methods A questionnaire was mailed to 4858 adults (≥50 years old, no cancer diagnosis) through primary care, asking about symptom experiences in the past 3 months. The word cancer was not mentioned. Target 'alarm' symptoms, publicised by Cancer Research UK, were embedded in a longer symptom list. For each symptom experienced, respondents were asked for their attribution (‘what do you think caused it'), concern about seriousness (‘not at all’ to ‘extremely’), and help-seeking (‘did you contact a doctor about it’: Yes/No). Results The response rate was 35% (n = 1724). Over half the respondents (915/1724; 53%) had experienced an ‘alarm’ symptom, and 20 (2%) cited cancer as a possible cause. Cancer attributions were highest for ‘unexplained lump’; 7% (6/87). Cancer attributions were lowest for ‘unexplained weight loss’ (0/47). A higher proportion (375/1638; 23%) were concerned their symptom might be ‘serious’, ranging from 12% (13/112) for change in a mole to 41% (100/247) for unexplained pain. Just over half had contacted their doctor about their symptom (59%), although this varied by symptom. Alarm symptoms were appraised as more serious than non-alarm symptoms, and were more likely to trigger help-seeking. Conclusions Consistent with retrospective reports from cancer patients, ‘alarm’ symptoms experienced in daily life were rarely attributed to cancer. These results have implications for understanding how people appraise and act on symptoms that could be early warning signs of cancer. PMID:25461959

  19. Pharmacological and Chemical Effects of Cigarette Additives

    PubMed Central

    Rabinoff, Michael; Caskey, Nicholas; Rissling, Anthony; Park, Candice

    2007-01-01

    We investigated tobacco industry documents and other sources for evidence of possible pharmacological and chemical effects of tobacco additives. Our findings indicated that more than 100 of 599 documented cigarette additives have pharmacological actions that camouflage the odor of environmental tobacco smoke emitted from cigarettes, enhance or maintain nicotine delivery, could increase the addictiveness of cigarettes, and mask symptoms and illnesses associated with smoking behaviors. Whether such uses were specifically intended for these agents is unknown. Our results provide a clear rationale for regulatory control of tobacco additives. PMID:17666709

  20. Do Close Supportive Relationships Moderate the Effect of Depressive Symptoms on Suicidal Ideation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Aja L.; McKenzie, Karen; Murray, Kara R.; Richelieu, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms, a lack of close supportive relationships and suicidal ideation are important risk factors for suicidal acts. Previous studies have primarily focused on the additive effects of close relationships and depressive symptoms on suicide risk. Here we explored whether, in addition, close relationships moderated the impact of…

  1. The relation between eating disorder symptoms and impairment.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Paul E; Rienecke, Renee D; Conley, Colleen S; Meyer, Caroline; Blissett, Jacqueline M

    2015-06-01

    Although a number of studies have looked at what factors might mediate the relationship between symptoms and quality of life (QoL) in a number of psychiatric disorders, little research has addressed this issue in eating disorders. In the current study, female undergraduates (N = 339) completed questionnaires assessing eating disorder symptoms, social support, coping, QoL, and psychosocial impairment. Perceived family support and levels of substance misuse as a way of coping were identified as mediators of the symptom-impairment relationship and, in addition, maladaptive coping also mediated the relationship with QoL. These results highlight the role of coping and social support in impairment resulting from eating disorder symptoms. PMID:25974054

  2. Three Diagnostic Approaches to Asperger Syndrome: Implications for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klin, Ami; Pauls, David; Schultz, Robert; Volkmar, Fred

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the implications for research of the use of three alternative definitions for Asperger syndrome (AS). Differences across the three nosologic systems were examined in terms of diagnostic assignment, IQ profiles, comorbid symptoms, and familial aggregation of social and other psychiatric symptoms. Method: Standard data on…

  3. Metamorphopsia: An Overlooked Visual Symptom.

    PubMed

    Midena, Edoardo; Vujosevic, Stela

    2015-01-01

    Metamorphopsia is a common symptom in different macular disorders. Micropsia and macropsia are special types of metamorphopsia. Recent theories suggest that both retinal and cortical mechanisms are involved in the development and changes of metamorphopsia. Different functional tests have been proposed for the evaluation of metamorphopsia: from the Amsler grid to the hand-held mobile devices for home monitoring. This review addresses some new insights into the pathophysiology of metamorphopsia and different available tests for the evaluation of this symptom in most common macular disorders. The importance of quantification of metamorphopsia in macular diseases is confirmed by the most recent therapeutic approaches. PMID:26554918

  4. [Language Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by progressive memory disturbance. Language symptoms are considered to be less disease specific and therefore did not attract many researchers, interest until recently. Typical patients with AD present amnesic aphasia in the early disease stage followed by transcortical sensory aphasia; however, their language symptoms are varied. Recently, the concept of logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) has been developed, which is reported to have Alzheimer's neuropathology. Clinicians should verify patients' language abilities, as language can be the key to reveal their true cognitive functions. PMID:27156508

  5. Symptoms and Symptom Clusters Identified by Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer Using a Symptom Heuristics App.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Suzanne; Erickson, Jeanne M; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Stegenga, Kristin; Linder, Lauri A

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer experience multiple distressing symptoms during treatment. Because the typical approach to symptom assessment does not easily reflect the symptom experience of individuals, alternative approaches to enhancing communication between the patient and provider are needed. We developed an iPad-based application that uses a heuristic approach to explore AYAs' cancer symptom experiences. In this mixed-methods descriptive study, 72 AYAs (13-29 years old) with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy used the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT) to create images of the symptoms and symptom clusters they experienced from a list of 30 symptoms. They answered open-ended questions within the C-SCAT about the causes of their symptoms and symptom clusters. The images generated through the C-SCAT and accompanying free-text data were analyzed using descriptive, content, and visual analyses. Most participants (n = 70) reported multiple symptoms (M = 8.14). The most frequently reported symptoms were nausea (65.3%), feeling drowsy (55.6%), lack of appetite (55.6%), and lack of energy (55.6%). Forty-six grouped their symptoms into one or more clusters. The most common symptom cluster was nausea/eating problems/appetite problems. Nausea was most frequently named as the priority symptom in a cluster and as a cause of other symptoms. Although common threads were present in the symptoms experienced by AYAs, the graphic images revealed unique perspectives and a range of complexity of symptom relationships, clusters, and causes. Results highlight the need for a tailored approach to symptom management based on how the AYA with cancer perceives his or her symptom experience. PMID:26455729

  6. Health care utilization by United Nations peacekeeping veterans with co-occurring, self-reported, post-traumatic stress disorder and depression symptoms versus those without.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Jennifer A; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Woods, Meghan; Taylor, Steven; Stein, Murray B

    2006-06-01

    It remains to be determined whether patients with comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression use more health care resources than do those without. United Nations peacekeeping veterans from Canada were divided into four groups, i.e., PTSD alone (n = 23), depression alone (n = 167), comorbid PTSD and depression (n = 119), and neither (n = 164), and compared with respect to total number of visits to any health care professional in the past year. Analysis of variance revealed that the groups significantly differed in total visits. Post hoc analyses indicated that veterans with co-occurring PTSD and depression symptoms had more visits than did those in the other groups and that veterans with PTSD symptoms alone and depression symptoms alone had more visits than did those with neither PTSD nor depression. Additional analyses revealed that veterans with co-occurring PTSD and depression symptoms made more visits to general practitioners, specialists, pharmacists, and mental health professionals than did the others. Future research directions and implications for treatment planning are discussed. PMID:16808142

  7. Developmental Influences on Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Buffington, C.A. Tony

    2009-01-01

    Background Medically unexplained (or ‘functional’) symptoms (MUS) are physical symptoms that prompt the sufferer to seek healthcare but remain unexplained after an appropriate medical evaluation. Examples of MUS also occur in veterinary medicine. For example, domestic cats suffer a syndrome comparable to interstitial cystitis, a chronic pelvic pain syndrome of humans. Method Review of current evidence suggests the hypothesis that developmental factors may play a role in some cases of MUS. Maternal perception of a threatening environment may be transmitted to the fetus when hormones cross the placenta and affect fetal physiology, effectively ‘programming’ the fetal stress response system and associated behaviors toward enhanced vigilance. After birth, intense stress responses in the individual may result in similar vulnerability, which may be unmasked by subsequent stressors. Results Epigenetic modulation of gene expression (EMGEX) appears to play a central role in creation of this ‘survival phenotype’. The recent development of techniques to identify the presence of EMGEX provides new tools to investigate these questions, and drugs and other interventions that may reverse EMGEX are also under active investigation. Conclusion Viewing MUS from the perspective of underlying developmental influences involving EMGEX that affect function of a variety of organs based on familial (genetic and environmental) predispositions rather than from the traditional viewpoint of isolated organ-originating diseases has at least two important implications: it provides a parsimonious explanation for findings heretofore difficult to reconcile, and it opens whole new areas of investigation into causes and treatments for this class of disorders. PMID:19270468

  8. Cigarette smoking and pain: depressive symptoms mediate smoking-related pain symptoms.

    PubMed

    Goesling, Jenna; Brummett, Chad M; Hassett, Afton L

    2012-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown an association between smoking and pain, with smokers reporting more pain and worse functioning. However, little is known about factors that impact this complex relationship. This study investigated the association between smoking, pain, and depressive symptoms. Participants were new patients seen at a multidisciplinary pain clinic. All patients were mailed an intake packet of validated questionnaires as part of an ongoing research and clinical care initiative. Of the 497 patients evaluated, 426 had valid smoking data. Among these patients, 32.6% (n = 139) reported being current smokers, 31.7% (n = 135) were classified as former smokers, and 35.7% (n = 152) were never smokers. A multivariate analysis of covariance (smoking status, age, gender, education) revealed a main effect for pain severity (F = 7.36, P<0.001), pain interference (F = 4.03, P = 0.001), and depressive symptoms (F = 7.87, P<0.001). Current smokers demonstrated higher pain severity, pain interference, and depressive symptoms compared with former smokers and never smokers (P<0.01 for all analyses), while there were no differences between the former-smoker and never-smoker groups. However, the effect of smoking on pain severity (P = 0.06) and pain interference (P = 0.22) was no longer significant after controlling for depressive symptoms in a mediation model. Additionally, among former smokers, longer quit duration was associated with less pain severity. In conclusion, smoking rates were high and smoking was associated with a worse chronic pain phenotype. Importantly, depressive symptoms emerged as a critical mediating factor in helping to explain the relationship between smoking and pain. PMID:22703693

  9. Physiology of motion sickness symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.

    1990-01-01

    Motion sickness research is reviewed with the emphasis placed on theories developed to explain its symptomatology. A general review of central nervous system, autonomic nervous system, and neuroendocrine system involvement in the syndrome. Particular attention is given to signs, symptoms, and physiological correlates, methodological issues, and directions for future research based on a dynamic interactive systems model.

  10. Schizophrenic Symptoms Improve with Apomorphine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamminga, Carol A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    In eighteen chronic schizophrenics, subcutaneous doses of the dopamine reception agonist, apomorphine, improved psychotic symptoms. The results are interpreted as a consequence of presynaptic dopamine receptor activationby apomorphine with a subsequent decrease in dopamine-mediated neural transmission. (Author/BB)

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NIAID Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases web site to work incorrectly. Please visit your browser settings and turn JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Symptoms Most children ...

  12. Perfectionism, Shame, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Jeffrey S.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Martin, James L.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between depression, maladaptive perfectionism, and shame. Regression analyses were used to replicate a model in which maladaptive perfectionism was negatively associated with self-esteem and positively associated with symptoms of depression, with self-esteem mediating the effects of maladaptive perfectionism…

  13. The Interacting Effect of Depressive Symptoms, Gender, and Distress Tolerance on Substance Use Problems among Residential Treatment-Seeking Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Bina; Seitz-Brown, C. J.; Daughters, Stacey B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with substance use problems; however, the specific individual characteristics influencing this association are not well identified. Empirical evidence and theory suggest that gender and distress tolerance—defined behaviorally as an individual’s ability to persist in goal-directed behavior while experiencing negative affective states—are important underlying factors in this relationship. Hence, the purpose of the current study was to examine whether gender and distress tolerance moderate the relationship between depressive symptoms and substance use problems. Methods Participants included 189 substance users recruited from a residential substance abuse treatment center. The Short Inventory of Problems-Alcohol and Drugs scale was used to measure self-reported substance use problems. The Beck Depression Inventory was used to assess self-reported depressive symptoms. Gender was self-reported, and distress tolerance was behaviorally indexed by the Computerized Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task. Results Hierarchical linear regression analysis indicated a significant three-way interaction of depressive symptoms, gender, and distress tolerance on substance use problems, adjusting for relevant demographic variables, anxiety symptoms, impulsivity, as well as DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. Probing of this three-way interaction demonstrated a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and substance use problems among females with low distress tolerance. Conclusion Findings indicate that female treatment-seeking substance users with high levels of depressive symptoms exhibit greater substance use problems if they also evidence low distress tolerance. Study implications are discussed, including the development of prevention and intervention programs that target distress tolerance skills. PMID:25578252

  14. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  15. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  16. Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ...

  17. Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  18. Subclinical symptoms of panic disorder: new insights into pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Fava, G A; Mangelli, L

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this review was to survey the available literature on prodromal and residual symptoms of panic disorder. Both a computerized (Medline) and a manual search of the literature were performed. In a substantial proportion of patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia a prodromal phase can be identified. Most patients report residual symptoms despite successful treatment. Residual symptoms upon remission have a prognostic value. There appears to be a relationship between residual and prodromal symptomatology (the rollback phenomenon). Appraisal of subclinical symptomatology in panic disorder has important implications as to the pathophysiological model of disease, its conceptualization and treatment. PMID:10559707

  19. Perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms among immigrant-origin adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tummala-Narra, Pratyusha; Claudius, Milena

    2013-07-01

    Although discrimination has been found to contribute to psychological distress among immigrant populations, there are few studies that have examined the relationship between racial and ethnic discrimination in the school setting among foreign-born immigrant and U.S.-born immigrant-origin adolescents. This study examined the relationship between perceived discrimination by adults and peers in the school setting and depressive symptoms in a sample (N = 95) of racial minority immigrant-origin adolescents (13 to 19 years of age) attending an urban high school. We examined the relation between perceived discrimination and depressive symptomology across gender and nativity status (foreign born vs. U.S. born), and the potential moderating role of ethnic identity and social support. Consistent with previous research, girls reported higher levels of depressive symptomology than boys, although the relationship between perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms was significant for both boys and girls. Perceived discrimination by adults and by peers at school was positively related to depressive symptoms for U.S.-born adolescents. For U.S.-born adolescents, ethnic identity mitigated the negative effects of perceived adult discrimination on depressive symptoms. However, ethnic identity did not moderate the relationship between perceived peer discrimination and depressive symptoms. Social support did not moderate the relationship between adult and peer discrimination and depressive symptoms for either foreign-born or U.S.-born adolescents. The findings support previous research concerning the immigrant paradox and highlight the importance of context in the relationship between perceived discrimination and mental health. Implications for future research and intervention are discussed. PMID:23875851

  20. Mediators of Depressive Symptoms in Children with Type 1 Diabetes and their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Jaser, Sarah S.; Whittemore, Robin; Ambrosino, Jodie M.; Lindemann, Evie; Grey, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationships among maternal and child depressive symptoms and child and family psychosocial factors. Method Secondary analysis of baseline data for a coping skills intervention for school-age children (ages 8-12) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their mothers. Children and mothers completed measures of depressive symptoms, coping, quality of life, and family functioning. Results There was a strong relationship between maternal and child depressive symptoms (r = .44, p < .001). Maternal depressive symptoms were negatively related to child quality of life, perceptions of coping, and family functioning. Impact of diabetes on quality of life, upset related to coping, and family warmth mediated the relationship between maternal and child depressive symptoms. Conclusions Maternal depression may negatively affect child adjustment through its influence on quality of life, coping, and family functioning. Implications for interventions to improve psychosocial adjustment in children with T1D are discussed. PMID:17991690

  1. Dimensions of Temperament and Depressive Symptoms: Replicating a Three-Way Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Vasey, Michael W.; Harbaugh, Casaundra N.; Lonigan, Chistopher J.; Phillips, Beth M.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Willem, Lore; Bijttebier, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    High negative emotionality (NE), low positive emotionality (PE), and low self-regulatory capacity (i.e., effortful control or EC) are related to depressive symptoms and furthermore, may moderate one another’s relations to such symptoms. Indeed, preliminary evidence suggests they may operate in a three-way interaction (Dinovo & Vasey, 2011), but the replicability of that finding remains unknown. Therefore, we tested this NExPExEC interaction in association with depressive symptoms in 5 independent samples. This interaction was significant in 4 of the 5 samples and a combined sample and approached significance in the fifth sample. In contrast, the NExPExEC interaction was unrelated to general anxious symptoms and thus may be specific to symptoms of depression. Implications, directions for future research, and limitations are discussed. PMID:24493906

  2. Cognition, negative symptoms, and diagnosis: a comparison of schizophrenic, bipolar, and control samples.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, K A; Hoffman, R E; Quinlan, D M; Rakfeldt, J; Docherty, N M; Sledge, W H

    1997-01-01

    Forty-six schizophrenic, 22 bipolar, and 26 normal control subjects were administered negative and positive symptoms scales and tests of cognitive function. Test performance was related to diagnosis and to positive and negative symptom ratings within the schizophrenic group. Bipolar patients were significantly superior in cognitive status when compared with all schizophrenic patients, but less so when compared only with those who did not have key negative symptoms (affective nonresponsivity and poverty of speech). The schizophrenic patients with negative symptoms displayed severe impairment, performing significantly worse than the control, bipolar, and other schizophrenic subjects. Negative symptoms thus are significantly implicated in the cognitive inferiority of schizophrenic to bipolar patients. Although the data suggest bipolar patients may also have cognitive deficiencies, these findings are inconclusive and require cross-validation. PMID:9017533

  3. The Relationship between Parental Efficacy and Depressive Symptoms in a Diverse Sample of Low Income Mothers

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Jennifer; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relationship between parental efficacy and depressive symptoms in a diverse sample of low income mothers. The sample consisted of 607 European American, African American, and Hispanic mothers who participated in The Early Steps Project, a multi-site, longitudinal, preventative intervention study. Parental efficacy was found to be significantly associated with depressive symptoms in the entire sample of low income mothers. Ethnicity moderated results, however, such that parental efficacy was significantly associated with depressive symptoms for European American mothers but was not for the African American and Hispanic mothers. Ethnic differences in the various categories of depressive symptoms (i.e., total, somatic, and psychological) were also explored, with the results showing that African American mothers reported higher levels of depressive symptoms than both European American and Hispanic mothers in each of the categories. The theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:20057924

  4. Moderators of the Link between Marital Hostility and Change in Spouses’ Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Proulx, Christine M.; Buehler, Cheryl; Helms, Heather

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the moderating roles of marital warmth and recent life events in the association between observed marital hostility and changes in spouses’ depressive symptoms over 3 years. Using the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM), structural equation models (N = 416 couples) suggested that husbands’ marital hostility was significantly related to increases in wives’ depressive symptoms. Moderator analyses showed that husbands’ warmth and wives’ warmth moderate the association between marital hostility and change in wives’ depressive symptoms. The association between husbands’ hostility and increases in wives’ depressive symptoms was stronger under conditions of lower levels of husbands’ warmth than under conditions of higher levels of husbands’ warmth. This same pattern was found for wives’ warmth. Regarding life events, the association between wives’ hostility and increases in husbands’ depressive symptoms was stronger for couples with more recent life events than for couples with fewer recent life events. Practical and empirical implications are discussed. PMID:19685989

  5. Effects of Family Violence on Psychopathology Symptoms in Children Previously Exposed to Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Maikovich, Andrea Kohn; Jaffee, Sara R.; Odgers, Candice L.; Gallop, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Although many studies suggest that family violence is associated with child psychopathology, multiple features of the home environment might account for this association, such as poverty and caregiver psychopathology. Studies are needed examining how change in psychopathology symptoms is affected by home violence, controlling for children's own developmental symptom histories and other predictors of psychopathology. This study used latent difference score structural equation modeling to test if witnessing home violence and/or experiencing harsh physical discipline predicted changes in psychopathology symptoms among 2,925 youth aged 5 – 16 years previously exposed to violence. Results demonstrated that harsh physical discipline predicted child-specific changes in externalizing symptoms, whereas witnessing violence predicted child-specific changes in internalizing symptoms across time. Implications for research and policy are discussed. PMID:18826538

  6. Language Delays and Child Depressive Symptoms: the Role of Early Stimulation in the Home.

    PubMed

    Herman, Keith C; Cohen, Daniel; Owens, Sarah; Latimore, Tracey; Reinke, Wendy M; Burrell, Lori; McFarlane, Elizabeth; Duggan, Anne

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the role of early stimulation in the home and child language delays in the emergence of depressive symptoms. Data were from a longitudinal study of at-risk children in Hawaii (n = 587). Low learning stimulation in the home at age 3 and language delays in first grade both significantly increased risk for child depressive symptoms in third grade. Structural equation modeling supported the hypothesized path models from home learning environment at age 3 to depressive symptoms in third grade controlling for a host of correlated constructs (maternal depression, child temperament, and child internalizing symptoms). Total language skills in the first grade mediated the effect of home learning environment on depressive symptoms. The study and findings fit well with a nurturing environment perspective. Implications for understanding the etiology of child depression and for designing interventions and prevention strategies are discussed. PMID:27178009

  7. Effect of developmental quotient on symptoms of inattention and impulsivity among toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Matson, Johnny L; Mahan, Sara; Hess, Julie A; Fodstad, Jill C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of developmental quotient on symptoms of inattention and impulsivity was examined among 198 toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders. There were two levels of developmental quotient: (1) low (less than or equal to 70; n=80), and (2) typical (greater than 70; n=118). Symptoms of inattention and impulsivity were assessed using 14 items that comprise the BISCIUT-Part 2 inattention/impulsivity subscale. There was no significant effect of developmental quotient on these items representing inattention and impulsivity when severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder symptoms was controlled for. However, the covariate, severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder symptoms, was significantly related to 12 of the 14 items. Percent endorsement of impairment of symptoms relating to inattention and impulsivity for the low and typical developmental quotient groups is also listed. Implications of the results are also discussed. PMID:19914796

  8. The Personal Importance of Being Independent: Associations with Changes in Disability and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Monin, Joan K.; Schulz, Richard; Martire, Lynn M.; Connelly, Dyan; Czaja, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective This study examined the role of independence centrality (the personal importance of being functionally independent) in adapting to functional disability in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). We assessed how changes in disability related to changes in depressive symptoms, the association between independence centrality and depressive symptoms, and the role of independence centrality in moderating the association between changes in disability and changes in depressive symptoms. Research method/Design Using data from a randomized controlled trial (Schulz, Czaja, Lustig, Zdaniuk, Martire, & Perdomo, 2009) we focused on 173 SCI survivors who completed baseline and 12-month follow-up measures of independence centrality, disability (activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living needs), and depressive symptoms. Results Consistent with our predictions, increased disability was related to increased depressive symptoms, and higher independence centrality was associated with more depressive symptoms at baseline. Consistent with the lifespan theory of control, SCI survivors with high independence centrality experienced more depressive symptoms when disability increased but less depressive symptoms when disability decreased. SCI survivors low in independence centrality were less affected by changing levels of disability. Conclusion/Implications Persons with SCI with high in independence centrality have higher levels of depressive symptoms and are more responsive to changes in functional status. Given the functional status trajectories of SCI survivors, having low independence centrality may be adaptive because it facilitates disengagement from unattainable goals. PMID:24320943

  9. The relationship between psychiatric symptoms and glycemic status in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Wu, Jin-Shang; Chang, Yin-Fan; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Yang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2012-07-01

    With the exception of depression and anxiety, there has been no study designed to evaluate the association between other psychiatric symptoms and Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between different psychiatric symptoms and diabetes as well as pre-diabetes (Pre-DM) in a Chinese population. Totally, 9561 participants without a history of diabetes, depression, psychosis, use of hypnotics, and abnormal thyroid function were enrolled. Psychiatric symptoms were measured by Brief Symptoms Rating Scale questionnaire, which consists of three global indices [General Severity Index (GSI), Total Number of Positive Symptoms (PST), and Positive Symptom Distress Index (PSDI)] and ten subscales, including somatization, obsession, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobia, paranoid ideation, psychoticism and additional symptoms. Different glycemic statuses included normal glucose tolerance (NGT), Pre-DM, and newly-diagnosed diabetes (NDD) group. GSI, somatization, hostility, phobia, psychoticism, and additional symptoms were the factors positively associated with NDD as well as pre-DM in an age-adjusted model. After adjustments for age, gender, body mass index, educational level, hypertension, plasma triglycerides and creatinine, smoking, alcohol use, regular exercise, marital status, and family history of diabetes mellitus, the following psychiatric symptoms were independently related to both NDD and pre-DM: GSI, PST, somatization, obsession, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobia, psychoticism, and additional symptoms. In addition to depression and anxiety, global indices of psychiatric symptoms and other subscales, including somatization, obsession, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility, phobia, psychoticism and additional symptoms, may have an impact on both diabetes and Pre-DM. PMID:22608774

  10. Autism Spectrum Disorder Symptoms and Comorbidity in Emerging Adults.

    PubMed

    Gadke, Daniel L; McKinney, Cliff; Oliveros, Arazais

    2016-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) continues to grow in prevalence each passing year. As more children are diagnosed, it makes sense that the emerging adult and adult population with ASD also will continue to grow. Although the body of research is quite large for children with ASD, the literature for emerging adults with ASD is sparse in comparison. The current study aimed to extend existing literature further by beginning to explore the realm of emerging adulthood. Specifically, the study investigated the presence of comorbid psychiatric symptoms in emerging adults who also presented with ASD symptoms as measured by the Adult Self-Report (Rescorla and Achenbach in The Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) for ages 18 to 90 years. The use of psychological testing for treatment planning and outcomes assessment: volume 3: instruments for adults, 3rd edn. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, pp 115-152, 2004). Emerging adults were categorized as having normal, mild, moderate, or severe levels of ASD symptoms and were compared for the presence of comorbid psychiatric symptoms. Overall, results suggested that emerging adults who presented with greater ASD symptom severity were more likely to experience the presence of additional comorbid symptoms. PMID:25995020

  11. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  12. Cult Affiliation and Disaffiliation: Implications for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Beth; Frye, Ellen M.; Bradley, Loretta J.

    1997-01-01

    Data on cult membership and the characteristics of cults are provided. The process of cult affiliation and its relationship to family dynamics are reviewed. Defection, the processes of disaffiliation (voluntary and involuntary), and clinical symptoms after cult disaffiliation are discussed. Implications and recommendations for counselors are…

  13. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  14. Partner violence, depression, and practice implications with families of Chinese descent.

    PubMed

    Yick, Alice G; Shibusawa, Tazuko; Agbayani-Siewert, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    Because the Chinese tend to display psychological problems such as depression in somatic This article examines cultural aspects, experiences, and the mental health consequences of partner violence among families of Chinese descent. A total of 262 Chinese men and women participated in a telephone survey about partner violence and psychological well-being. Symptoms, two indicators of mental health were employed in the research study. Findings indicated a high level of verbal aggression both perpetrated and sustained by participants. Rates of physical abuse were lower; however, these figures dispel the model minority myth associated with Asian Americans. In addition, findings showed a positive correlation between depression and partner violence. Those who experienced verbal and physical aggression by a spouse/intimate partner in the last 12 months were more likely to experience depression. Those who perpetrated physical aggression were more likely to experience somatic symptoms. Practice and research implications are highlighted. PMID:14692179

  15. Prefrontal dopamine signaling and cognitive symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Nandakumar S.; Rodnitzky, Robert L.; Uc, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common symptom of Parkinson’s disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The severity of these symptoms ranges from minor executive symptoms to frank dementia involving multiple domains. In the present review, we will concentrate on the aspects of cognitive impairment associated with prefrontal dopaminergic dysfunction seen in non-demented patients with PD. These symptoms include executive dysfunction and disorders of thought such as hallucinations and psychosis. Such symptoms may go on to predict dementia related to Parkinson’s disease, which involves amnestic dysfunction and is typically seen later in the disease. Cognitive symptoms are associated with dysfunction in cholinergic circuits in addition to the abnormalities in the prefrontal dopaminergic system. These circuits can be carefully studied and evaluated in Parkinson’s disease, and could be leveraged to treat difficult clinical problems related to cognitive symptoms of PD. PMID:23729617

  16. Combat high or traumatic stress: violent offending is associated with appetitive aggression but not with symptoms of traumatic stress

    PubMed Central

    Köbach, Anke; Schaal, Susanne; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Former members of armed groups in eastern DR Congo had typically witnessed, experienced, and perpetrated extreme forms of violence. Enhanced trauma-related symptoms had been shown in prior research. But also lashing out in self-defense is a familiar response to threat defined as reactive aggression. Another potential response is appetitive aggression, in which the perpetration of excessive violence is perceived as pleasurable (combat high). What roles do these forms of aggressive behavior play in modern warfare and how are they related to posttraumatic stress symptoms? To answer the question, we sought to determine predictors for appetitive aggressive and trauma-related mental illness, and investigated the frequency of psychopathological symptoms for high- and low-intensity conflict demobilization settings. To this end, we interviewed 213 former members of (para)military groups in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in regard to their combat exposure, posttraumatic stress, appetitive aggression, depression, suicidality, and drug dependence. Random forest regression embedded in a conditional inference framework revealed that perpetrated violent acts are not necessarily stressful. In fact, the experience of violent acts that typically implicated salient cues of hunting (e.g., blood, suffering of the victim, etc.) had the strongest association with an appetite for aggression. Furthermore, the number of lifetime perpetrated violent acts was the most important predictor of appetitive aggression. However, the number of perpetrated violent acts did not significantly affect the posttraumatic stress. Greater intensity of conflict was associated with more severe posttraumatic stress symptoms and depression. Psychotherapeutic interventions that address appetitive aggression in addition to trauma-related mental illness, including drug dependence, therefore seem indispensible for a successful reintegration of those who fought in the current civil wars. PMID:25709586

  17. Developmental Trajectories of Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social-Cognitive Problem Solving in Emerging Adolescents with Clinically Elevated ADHD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross; Sarver, Dustin E.; Tolan, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Middle school is a critical yet understudied period of social behavioral risks and opportunities that may be particularly difficult for emerging adolescents with ADHD given their childhood social difficulties. Although childhood ADHD has been associated with increased aggression and peer relational difficulties, relatively few ADHD studies have examined social behavior beyond the elementary years, or examined aspects of positive (prosocial) behavior. In addition, social-cognitive problem solving has been implicated in ADHD; however, its longitudinal impact on prosocial and aggressive behavior is unclear. The current study examined how middle school students with clinically elevated ADHD symptoms differ from their non-ADHD peers on baseline (sixth grade) and age-related changes in prosocial and aggressive behavior, and the extent to which social-cognitive problem solving strategies mediate these relations. Emerging adolescents with (n = 178) and without (n = 3,806) clinically elevated, teacher-reported ADHD inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive symptoms were compared longitudinally across sixth through eighth grades using parallel process latent growth curve modeling, accounting for student demographic characteristics, ODD symptoms, deviant peer association, school climate, and parental monitoring. Sixth graders with elevated ADHD symptoms engaged in somewhat fewer prosocial behaviors (d= −0.44) and more aggressive behavior (d= 0.20) relative to their peers. These small social behavioral deficits decreased but were not normalized across the middle school years. Contrary to hypotheses, social-cognitive problem solving was not impaired in the ADHD group, and did not mediate the association between ADHD and social behavior during the middle school years. ADHD and social-cognitive problem solving contributed independently to social behavior, both in sixth grade and across the middle school years; the influence of social-cognitive problem solving on social behavior was

  18. Clinical Symptoms and Risk Factors in Cerebral Microangiopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Okroglic, Sandra; Widmann, Catherine N.; Urbach, Horst; Scheltens, Philip; Heneka, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although the clinical manifestation and risk factors of cerebral microangiopathy (CM) remain unclear, the number of diagnoses is increasing. Hence, patterns of association among lesion topography and severity, clinical symptoms and demographic and disease risk factors were investigated retrospectively in a cohort of CM patients. Methods Patients treated at the Department of Neurology, University of Bonn for CM (n = 223; 98m, 125f; aged 77.32±9.09) from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. Clinical symptoms, blood chemistry, potential risk factors, demographic data and ratings of vascular pathology in the brain based on the Wahlund scale were analyzed using Pearson's chi square test and one-way ANOVA. Results Progressive cognitive decline (38.1%), gait apraxia (27.8%), stroke-related symptoms and seizures (24.2%), TIA-symptoms (22%) and vertigo (17%) were frequent symptoms within the study population. Frontal lobe WMLs/lacunar infarcts led to more frequent presentation of progressive cognitive decline, seizures, gait apraxia, stroke-related symptoms, TIA, vertigo and incontinence. Parietooccipital WMLs/lacunar infarcts were related to higher frequencies of TIA, seizures and incontinence. Basal ganglia WMLs/lacunar infarcts were seen in patients with more complaints of gait apraxia, vertigo and incontinence. Age (p = .012), arterial hypertension (p<.000), obesity (p<.000) and cerebral macroangiopathy (p = .018) were positively related to cerebral lesion load. For increased glucose level, homocysteine, CRP and D-Dimers there was no association. Conclusion This underlines the association of CM with neurological symptoms upon admission in a topographical manner. Seizures and vertigo are symptoms of CM which may have been missed in previous studies. In addition to confirming known risk factors such as aging and arterial hypertension, obesity appears to increase the risk as well. Since the incidence of CM is increasing, future studies should

  19. Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorder Symptoms in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulkowski, Michael L.; Mariaskin, Amy; Storch, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs) and associated symptomology in college students. Participants: Participants included 358 undergraduate students. Results: Results suggest that clinically significant levels of OCSD symptoms are relatively common. Additionally, OCSD symptoms…

  20. [Cardinal symptoms of polydipsia/polyuria in birds].

    PubMed

    Korbel, R

    1990-02-01

    The relatively nonspecific symptom complex of polydipsia/polyuria can be based on a large number of causes either infectious or non-infectious in nature. These causes are listed and described in more detail. In addition, diagnostic methods and possible forms of therapy are discussed. PMID:2183389

  1. Cultural stressors and mental health symptoms among Mexican Americans: a prospective study examining the impact of the family and neighborhood context.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rajni L; White, Rebecca M B; Roosa, Mark W; Zeiders, Katharine H

    2013-10-01

    Studies of stress consistently have linked individuals' experiences of stress to maladjustment, but limited attention has been given to cultural stressors commonly experienced by minority individuals. To address this, the current study examined the links between cultural stressors and prospective changes in mental health symptoms in a sample of 710 (49 % female) Mexican American youth. In addition, the moderating role of both family and neighborhood cohesion was examined. In-home interviews were completed with youth, mothers (required) and fathers (optional) to collect data on youth's experiences of cultural stressors (discrimination and language hassles) and internalizing/externalizing behavior, and mothers' report of family cohesion and mothers' and fathers' report of neighborhood cohesion. Analyses revealed that youth's experiences of discrimination and language hassles at 5th grade were related positively to increases in internalizing symptoms at 7th grade. Additionally, youths who reported higher levels of language hassles in 5th grade experienced increases in externalizing symptoms across the 2-year span. Both family and neighborhood cohesion emerged as significant moderating factors but their impact was conditional on youth's gender and nativity. Limitations and future implications are discussed. PMID:23111841

  2. Cultural Stressors and Mental Health Symptoms among Mexican Americans: A Prospective Study Examining the Moderating Roles of the Family and Neighborhood Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Rajni L; White, Rebecca. M. B.; Zeiders, Katherine. H.; Roosa, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of stress consistently have linked individuals’ experiences of stress to maladjustment, but limited attention has been given to cultural stressors commonly experienced by minority individuals. To address this, the current study examined the links between cultural stressors and prospective changes in mental health symptoms in a sample of 710 (49% female) Mexican American youth. In addition, the moderating role of both family and neighborhood cohesion was examined. In-home interviews were completed with youth, mothers (required) and fathers (optional) to collect data on youth’s experiences of cultural stressors (discrimination and language hassles) and internalizing/externalizing behavior, and mothers’ report of family cohesion and mothers’ and fathers’ report of neighborhood cohesion. Analyses revealed that youth’s experiences of discrimination and language hassles at 5th grade were related positively to increases in internalizing symptoms at 7th grade. Additionally, youths who reported higher levels of language hassles in 5th grade experienced increases in externalizing symptoms across the 2-year span. Both family and neighborhood cohesion emerged as significant moderating factors but their impact was conditional on youth’s gender and nativity. Limitations and future implications are discussed. PMID:23111841

  3. Predictors of depressive symptoms in Chinese American college students: parent and peer attachment, college challenges and sense of coherence.

    PubMed

    Ying, Yu-Wen; Lee, Peter Allen; Tsai, Jeanne L

    2007-04-01

    Based on Antonovsky's salutogenic model, the authors hypothesized that sense of coherence would mediate the effects of parent and peer attachment and college challenges on depressive symptoms as well as moderate the relationship between college challenges and depressive symptoms in Chinese Americans. To test our hypotheses, 353 Chinese American college students completed paper-pencil measures. Supporting our hypotheses, sense of coherence fully mediated the effects of parent and peer attachment on depressive symptom level and served as a partial mediator and moderator of the effect of college challenges on depressive symptoms. Implications of the study findings for promoting the mental health of Chinese American students are discussed. PMID:17535129

  4. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  5. Visual symptoms in Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Neil K; Clarke, Mike P; Mosimann, Urs P; Burn, David J

    2011-11-01

    Visual symptoms are common in PD and PD dementia and include difficulty reading, double vision, illusions, feelings of presence and passage, and complex visual hallucinations. Despite the established prognostic implications of complex visual hallucinations, the interaction between cognitive decline, visual impairment, and other visual symptoms remains poorly understood. Our aim was to characterize the spectrum of visual symptomatology in PD and examine clinical predictors for their occurrence. Sixty-four subjects with PD, 26 with PD dementia, and 32 age-matched controls were assessed for visual symptoms, cognitive impairment, and ocular pathology. Complex visual hallucinations were common in PD (17%) and PD dementia (89%). Dementia subjects reported illusions (65%) and presence (62%) more frequently than PD or control subjects, but the frequency of passage hallucinations in PD and PD dementia groups was equivalent (48% versus 69%, respectively; P = 0.102). Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity was impaired in parkinsonian subjects, with disease severity and age emerging as the key predictors. Regression analysis identified a variety of factors independently predictive of complex visual hallucinations (e.g., dementia, visual acuity, and depression), illusions (e.g., excessive daytime somnolence and disease severity), and presence (e.g., rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and excessive daytime somnolence). Our results demonstrate that different "hallucinatory" experiences in PD do not necessarily share common disease predictors and may, therefore, be driven by different pathophysiological mechanisms. If confirmed, such a finding will have important implications for future studies of visual symptoms and cognitive decline in PD and PD dementia. PMID:21953737

  6. Mediational pathways through which positive and negative emotionality contribute to anhedonic symptoms of depression: a prospective study of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wetter, Emily K; Hankin, Benjamin L

    2009-05-01

    This study takes a developmental psychopathological approach to examine mechanisms through which baseline levels of positive emotionality (PE) and negative emotionality (NE) prospectively predict increases in anhedonic depressive symptoms in a community sample of 350 adolescents (6th-10th graders). Dependent stressors mediated the relationship between baseline levels of NE and anhedonic depressive symptoms after controlling for initial symptoms. Supportive relationships mediated the relationship between baseline levels of PE and anhedonic depressive symptoms, after controlling for baseline symptoms. In addition, NE X PE interacted to predict later anhedonic depressive symptoms, such that adolescents with low levels of PE and high levels of NE experienced the greatest increase in anhedonic depressive symptoms. Last, supportive relationships interacted with baseline PE to predict prospective changes in anhedonic depressive symptoms, such that adolescents with low PE and low supportive relationships experienced the greatest increase in anhedonic depressive symptoms. Results are discussed in terms of current theoretical models of the link between temperament and depression. PMID:19184402

  7. [On the symptomatological meaning of the others-intruding symptoms].

    PubMed

    Takano, R

    1994-01-01

    There is a group of patients who insist as follows: "Someone comes into my room during my absence and removes, conceals or steals my belongings. In addition the intruder sometimes scatters about dirty things." "A young man living just across from my room is always observing me and criticizing my behavior." The others-intruding symptoms like those above are frequently harbored by the female patients of paranoia and schizophrenia. However, these symptoms are rarely seen in male patients. My study shows that fourteen out of fifty-six female employees patients having the paranoic or schizophrenic symptoms had the so-called others-intruding symptoms. At the time of visiting the psychiatric department of the center, the ages of the patients varied from 18 to 51 years old and five cases were in their thirties. Ten patients were single and two cases were divorced. Most of these patients were living alone. In some cases, the others-intruding symptoms faded away after the patients began living with their family members. In eight cases, there was a change of residence before the appearance of the symptoms. The patients have the following character traits: assertive, obstinate, unstable, unsociable and lacking adaptability. Although some patients showed mood fluctuations, they consistently displayed their delusion which distinguished them from maniac depressive patients. More than half of the patients showed neither the severe personality disorders nor rapid deterioration which are typically seen in the schizophrenic process. The patients of others-intruding symptoms have the same experience as those of mysophobia. The patients believe someone or something dirty invade their private space and deprive them of their cleanliness, freedom and security. In contrast, the patients of anthrpophobia and egorrhea feel that they are shunned by others because of something dirty which goes out of the patient's ego and threatens others. Usually the delusion of persecution accompanies the

  8. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis? The signs and symptoms ... symptoms develop quickly, over days or weeks. Systemic Signs and Symptoms Systemic signs and symptoms are those ...

  9. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  10. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  11. Mindfulness Is Associated with Fewer PTSD Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, Physical Symptoms, and Alcohol Problems in Urban Firefighters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bruce W.; Ortiz, J. Alexis; Steffen, Laurie E.; Tooley, Erin M.; Wiggins, Kathryn T.; Yeater, Elizabeth A.; Montoya, John D.; Bernard, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the association between mindfulness, other resilience resources, and several measures of health in 124 urban firefighters. Method: Participants completed health measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depressive symptoms, physical symptoms, and alcohol problems and measures of resilience…

  12. DSM-5 changes enhance parent identification of symptoms in adolescents with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Margaret H; Kuriyan, Aparajita B

    2016-08-30

    This study evaluates the impact of the DSM-5 ADHD symptom wording changes on symptom endorsement among adolescents with ADHD. Parents of adolescents with systematically diagnosed DSM-IV-TR ADHD (N=78) completed counterbalanced DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 ADHD symptom checklists in a single sitting. General linear models were conducted to evaluate whether the new DSM-5 symptom descriptors influenced the total number of ADHD symptoms and overall ADHD symptom severity endorsed by parents, how demographic factors were associated with noted changes in symptom endorsement when moving to the DSM-5, and which DSM ADHD items displayed notable changes in endorsement rates under the new wording. On average, parents identified 1.15 additional symptoms of ADHD in adolescents when moving from the DSM-IV-TR to the DSM-5. Increased symptom identification was not specific to age, sex, ethnicity, race, or socioeconomic status. Over half of the sample experienced increased symptom endorsement when changing texts (59.0%). Under the new DSM-5 wording, four symptoms had statistically significant endorsement increases (range: 11.2-16.7%): difficulty sustaining attention, easily distracted, difficulty organizing tasks and activities, and does not seem to listen. PMID:27288736

  13. Early pubertal timing as a vulnerability to depression symptoms: differential effects of race and sex.

    PubMed

    Hamlat, Elissa J; Stange, Jonathan P; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2014-05-01

    Robust evidence supports that girls and boys who experience early pubertal timing, maturing earlier than one's peers, are vulnerable to developing symptoms of depression. However, it has yet to be clarified whether early pubertal timing confers vulnerability to African American as well as to Caucasian adolescents and whether this vulnerability is specific to depressive symptoms or can be generalized to symptoms of social anxiety. In previous studies, one race or one sex was examined in isolation or sample sizes were too small to examine racial differences. Our longitudinal study consisted of a sample of 223 adolescents (Mage = 12.42, 54.3 % female, 50.2 % African American, and 49.8 % Caucasian). At baseline, depressive symptoms, social anxiety symptoms, and pubertal timing were assessed by self-report. Nine months later, we assessed depressive symptoms, social anxiety symptoms, body esteem, and stressful life events that occurred between baseline and follow-up. Analyses indicated that early pubertal timing interacted with stressful life events to predict increased symptoms of depression, but only for Caucasian girls and African American boys. Results were found to be specific to depressive symptoms and did not generalize to symptoms of social anxiety. Additionally, there was a significant positive indirect effect of pubertal timing on symptoms of depression through body esteem for Caucasian females. PMID:24014162

  14. Early Pubertal Timing as a Vulnerability to Depression Symptoms: Differential Effects of Race and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Hamlat, Elissa J.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Alloy, Lauren B.; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    Robust evidence supports that girls and boys who experience early pubertal timing, maturing earlier than one’s peers, are vulnerable to developing symptoms of depression. However, it has yet to be clarified whether early pubertal timing confers vulnerability to African American as well as to Caucasian adolescents and whether this vulnerability is specific to depressive symptoms or can be generalized to symptoms of social anxiety. In previous studies, one race or one sex was examined in isolation or sample sizes were too small to examine racial differences. Our longitudinal study consisted of a sample of 223 adolescents (Mean age = 12.42, 54.3% female, 50.2% African American, and 49.8% Caucasian). At baseline, depressive symptoms, social anxiety symptoms, and pubertal timing were assessed by self-report. Nine months later, we assessed depressive symptoms, social anxiety symptoms, body esteem, and stressful life events that occurred between baseline and follow-up. Analyses indicated that early pubertal timing interacted with stressful life events to predict increased symptoms of depression, but only for Caucasian girls and African American boys. Results were found to be specific to depressive symptoms and did not generalize to symptoms of social anxiety. Additionally, there was a significant positive indirect effect of pubertal timing on symptoms of depression through body esteem for Caucasian females. PMID:24014162

  15. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  16. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  17. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  18. A very rare paroxysmal symptom in multiple sclerosis: convergence spasm.

    PubMed

    Anlıaçık, Süleyman; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Akpınar, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects many regions of the central nervous system and leads to visual, oculomotor, motor, sensorial, cerebellar, and cognitive disorders. In addition to classic clinical findings, sudden paroxysmal symptoms triggered by motion, hyperventilation, or sensory stimulus may occur. In this article, we present a case of convergence spasm attended by paroxysmal symptoms, a rarely observed situation but one which can have complete recovery through administration of 5-day intravenous (i.v.) methylprednisolone therapy, together with its imaging findings and video records. PMID:26164409

  19. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Hilt, Lori M.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of most adult psychiatric disorders varies across racial/ethnic groups and has important implications for prevention and intervention efforts. Research on racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of internalizing and externalizing symptoms and disorders in adolescents has been less consistent or generally lacking. The current…

  20. Personality Subtypes, Coping Styles, Symptom Correlates, and Substances of Choice among a Cohort of Substance Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quirk, Stuart W.; McCormick, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of the Five-Factor personality domains of the NEO Personality Inventory (P. Costa and R. McCrae, 1992) in identifying subtypes was studied with 3,256 substance abusers. Three groups, differing in coping style, psychopathological symptoms, and pattern of substance choice, were reliably identified. Implications for use of the measure…

  1. Symptom Severity in Bilingual Hispanics as a Function of Clinician Ethnicity and Language of Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malgady, Robert G.; Costantino, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    In this study, 148 Hispanic Americans with schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety disorders were interviewed in English, Spanish, or both. Hispanic clinicians rated symptoms more severely than did Anglo clinicians, and severity was rated highest in bilingual interviews, followed by Spanish, and lowest in English. Implications for diagnosis and…

  2. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Glaucoma Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Symptoms ... patients may need to keep taking drugs. Latest Research Researchers are studying the causes of glaucoma, looking ...

  3. Many Smokers Have COPD Symptoms, without Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158913.html Many Smokers Have COPD Symptoms, Without Diagnosis It's not clear how many ... smokers have symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) even before they've been diagnosed with the ...

  4. Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159082.html Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime Follow your care ... 27, 2016 FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important ...

  5. Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs . Early Signs and Symptoms (3 to 30 days after tick bite) Fever, chills, headache, fatigue, muscle ... examples of EM rashes Later Signs and Symptoms (days to months after tick bite) Severe headaches and ...

  6. Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159082.html Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime Follow your care ... 27, 2016 FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important ...

  7. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  8. Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your family's history. Signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder Bipolar disorder differs significantly from clinical depression, although ... or restlessness. Symptoms of mania - the "highs" of bipolar disorder Increased physical and mental activity and energy Heightened ...

  9. Management of Hormone Deprivation Symptoms After Cancer.

    PubMed

    Faubion, Stephanie S; Loprinzi, Charles L; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2016-08-01

    Cancer survivors often experience symptoms related to hormone deprivation, including vasomotor symptoms, genitourinary symptoms, and sexual health concerns. These symptoms can occur due to natural menopause in midlife women, or they can be brought on by oncologic therapies in younger women or men. We searched PubMed for English-language studies from January 1990 through January 2016 to identify relevant articles on the management of hormone deprivation symptoms, including vasomotor, genitourinary, and sexual symptoms in patients with cancer. The search terms used included hormone deprivation, vasomotor symptoms, hot flash, vaginal dryness, sexual dysfunction, and breast cancer. This manuscript provides a comprehensive description of data supporting the treatment of symptoms associated with hormone deprivation. PMID:27492917

  10. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000775.htm Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease To use the ... often develops over time. You may have early signs or symptoms long before you have serious heart ...

  11. What Are the Symptoms of Uterine Fibroids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Publications What are the symptoms of uterine fibroids? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content ​Uterine fibroids can cause uncomfortable or sometimes painful symptoms, such ...

  12. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Glaucoma Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Symptoms and Diagnosis Glaucoma can develop in one or both eyes. Often ...

  13. Many Smokers Have COPD Symptoms, without Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158913.html Many Smokers Have COPD Symptoms, Without Diagnosis It's not clear how many will go on ... May 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many smokers have symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) even before ...

  14. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... is considered invasive. Symptoms of pneumonia usually include: Fever and chills Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Sweating ... the blood. It can cause symptoms such as: Fever and chills Excessive tiredness Pain in the belly Nausea with ...

  15. Subjective psychological symptoms in outpatient asthmatic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lebowitz, M D; Thompson, H C; Strunk, R C

    1981-12-01

    Outpatient adolescent asthmatics were studied using the Asthma Symptom Checklist (ASC) of Kinsman et al. The study showed that outpatient asthmatic adolescents are similar in many respects to older institutionalized asthmatics, except that in the former, psychological symptoms are more diffuse and recognition of respiratory symptoms is less severe. Further studies are needed to determine which psychological symptoms are most important in predicting prognosis in affected asthmatics or the development of "psychosomatic" asthma. PMID:7338897

  16. p53 and rapamycin are additive

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith; Huang, Jing; Jones, Diane; Dodds, Sherry G.; Williams, Charnae; Hubbard, Gene; Livi, Carolina B.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan; Curiel, Tyler; Sharp, Z. Dave; Hasty, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase found in a complex (mTORC1) that enables macromolecular synthesis and cell growth and is implicated in cancer etiology. The rapamycin-FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP12) complex allosterically inhibits mTORC1. In response to stress, p53 inhibits mTORC1 through a separate pathway involving cell signaling and amino acid sensing. Thus, these different mechanisms could be additive. Here we show that p53 improved the ability of rapamycin to: 1) extend mouse life span, 2) suppress ionizing radiation (IR)-induced senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and 3) increase the levels of amino acids and citric acid in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. This additive effect could have implications for cancer treatment since rapamycin and p53 are anti-oncogenic. PMID:26158292

  17. Prenatal changes in parenting self-efficacy: linkages with anxiety and depressive symptoms in primiparous women.

    PubMed

    Wernand, Just J; Kunseler, Florentina C; Oosterman, Mirjam; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Schuengel, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine parenting self-efficacy in relation to depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy. Five hundred thirty-three first-time pregnant women completed questionnaires at 12, 22, and 32 weeks of pregnancy that measure parenting self-efficacy, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Parenting self-efficacy increased slightly but significantly over the course of pregnancy. Higher levels of depressive symptoms as well as state and trait anxiety symptoms were related to lower expectations of parenting self-efficacy at all time points, but only anxiety symptoms uniquely predicted parenting self-efficacy. Higher levels of anxiety symptoms in the first trimester predicted less positive change in parenting self-efficacy over the course of pregnancy, but depressive symptoms did not when anxiety levels were taken into account. The findings highlight the role of antenatal anxiety symptoms as a predictor of suboptimal preparation for the parenting role in first-time-expecting mothers. Possible explanations and implications for clinical practice are briefly discussed. PMID:25424405

  18. IL1B Gene Variation and Internalizing Symptoms in Maltreated Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Ridout, Kathryn K.; Parade, Stephanie H.; Seifer, Ronald; Price, Lawrence H.; Gelernter, Joel; Feliz, Paloma; Tyrka, Audrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence now implicates inflammatory proteins in the neurobiology of internalizing disorders. Genetic factors may influence individual responses to maltreatment; however, little work has examined inflammatory genetic variants in adults and none in children. The present study examined the role of an IL1B variant in preschoolers exposed to maltreatment and other forms of adversity in internalizing symptom development. One hundred ninety-eight families were enrolled, with one child (age 3-5 years) from each family. Adversity measures included child protective service documentation of moderate-severe maltreatment in the last 6 months and interview-assessed contextual stressors. Internalizing symptoms were measured using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Diagnostic Infant and Preschool Assessment (DIPA). Maltreated children had higher MDD and PTSD symptoms and marginally higher internalizing symptoms on the CBCL. Controlling for age, sex and race, IL1B genotype was associated with MDD symptoms (p = .002). Contextual stressors were significantly associated with MDD and PTSD and marginally with internalizing symptoms. The IL1B genotype interacted with contextual stress such that children homozygous for the minor allele had more MDD symptoms (p = .045). These results suggest that genetic variants of IL1B may modulate the development of internalizing symptoms in the face of childhood adversity. PMID:25422961

  19. Metacognition in first-episode psychosis and its association with positive and negative symptom profiles.

    PubMed

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Gumley, Andrew; Jansen, Jens Einar; Pedersen, Marlene Buch; Nielsen, Hanne-Grethe Lyse; Trier, Christopher Høier; Haahr, Ulrik H; Simonsen, Erik

    2016-04-30

    There is growing evidence that metacognitive abilities which include the ability to synthesize knowledge regarding mental states in self and others and use this ability to solve problems are impaired in non-affective psychosis and associated with positive and negative symptom severity. We sought to (a) investigate the severity of metacognitive impairments in first-episode psychosis (FEP) compared to non-clinical controls and (b) explore associations with positive and negative symptom profiles. Ninety-seven people with FEP were compared to 101 control persons. Metacognition was assessed with interviews and the Metacognitive assessment scale-abbreviated. Four groups based on positive and negative symptoms were identified by cluster analysis and compared on metacognition, childhood adversities, duration of untreated psychosis and premorbid social and academic adjustment. Those with high levels of negative symptoms had poorer metacognitive abilities. Those with high positive and low negative symptoms did not have poorer metacognitive abilities than those with low positive and negative symptoms. None of the other predictors differed between the groups. The FEP group had poorer metacognitive abilities than the control group. Inclusion of metacognition in psychosis models may improve our understanding of negative symptoms, while previous findings of a relation with positive symptoms may have been confounded. Implications for current interventions are discussed. PMID:27086205

  20. Nocturnal symptoms and sleep disturbances in clinically stable asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Inder Mohan; Khanna, Puneet; Shah, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    Presence of nocturnal symptoms is related to asthma severity. Clinically stable asthmatic children, too, report frequent nocturnal symptoms and sleep disturbances. The study determined these parameters in stable, asthmatic children, in their home environment. This case-control, questionnaire-based study in 70 school-going children comprised 40 asthmatics (Group 1) and 30, age/gender matched, healthy children (Group 2). Parents maintained peak expiratory flow (PEF) and sleep diaries for one week. Group 1 had significantly lower mean morning (250.3 vs. 289.1 I/minute) and mean evening PEF values (261.7 vs. 291.3 I/minute). Group 1 (38.95%), reported frequent nocturnal symptoms like cough (36.90%), breathlessness (32.80%), wheeze (27.68%) and chest tightness (14.35%). Sleep disturbances, significant in Group 1 (38, 95% vs. 14.35%), included daytime sleepiness (24.60%), daytime tiredness (20.50%), difficulty in maintaining sleep (15.38%), early morning awakening (14.35%), struggle against sleep during daytime (12.30%), and involuntarily falling asleep (17.43%). On a scale of 1-6, Group 1 scored significant sleep disturbances/patient (3 vs. 0.8); lethargy/tiredness in morning (2.9 vs. 2.2), poorer sleep quality (4.7 vs. 5.4), less parents' satisfaction with child's sleep (4.5 vs. 5.5) and daytime fitness (4.1 vs. 5.3). Group 1, when exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (22, 55%), reported significant nocturnal symptoms (18/22, 81%) and reduced mean morning and evening PEF values (17/22, 77%). It is concluded that clinically stable, asthmatic children reported increased nocturnal symptoms, sleep disturbances and poorer sleep quality. Lack of awareness of asthma-sleep association and its clinical implications could lead to poor asthma control and impaired daytime activity. PMID:17136879

  1. Exercise-Associated Symptoms in Triathletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Stephen N.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 110 triathletes was made to identify symptoms experienced during triathlon activities, to determine factors affecting the symptoms, and to find out if symptoms were specific to the athlete or to the event. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  2. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  3. Peer Victimisation and Depressive Symptoms: Can Specific Coping Strategies Buffer the Negative Impact of Cybervictimisation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machmutow, Katja; Perren, Sonja; Sticca, Fabio; Alsaker, Francoise D.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated whether cybervictimisation is an additional risk factor for depressive symptoms over and beyond traditional victimisation in adolescents. Furthermore, it explored whether certain coping strategies moderate the impact of cybervictimisation on depressive symptoms. A total of 765 Swiss seventh graders (mean age at…

  4. Relations between Suicidal Ideation and Dimensions of Depressive Symptoms in High-School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabrol, Henri; Rodgers, Rachel; Rousseau, Amelie

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the link between the different dimensions of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in adolescents. A sample of 1057 adolescents completed the CES-D (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) and three additional items measuring suicidal ideation. The four dimensions of depressive symptoms on the…

  5. Self-Reported Symptoms of ADHD among College Students in China and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norvilitis, Jill M.; Ingersoll, Travis; Zhang, Jie; Jia, Shuhua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The present study examined ADHD symptoms among college students in China and the United States. Method: A total of 283 (45%) American and 343 (55%) Chinese students completed the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) and the Current Symptoms Scale (CSS), in addition to other measures. Results: Both of the ADHD measures appear to be reliable…

  6. Longitudinal relations between symptoms, neurocognition, and self-concept in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Klaus; Kriston, Levente; Wittorf, Andreas; Herrlich, Jutta; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Klingberg, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive models suggest that the self-concept of persons with psychosis can be fundamentally affected. Self-concepts were found to be related to different symptom domains when measured concurrently. Longitudinal investigations to disentangle the possible causal associations are rare. Method: We examined a sample of 160 people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who took part in a psychotherapy study. All participants had the DSM-IV diagnosis of a schizophrenia and pronounced negative symptoms. Neurocognition, symptoms, and self-concepts were assessed at two time points 12 months apart. Structural equation modeling was used to test whether symptoms influence self-concepts (scar-model) or self-concepts affect symptoms (vulnerability model). Results: Negative symptoms correlated concurrently with self-concepts. Neurocognitive deficits are associated with more negative self-concepts 12 months later. Interpersonal self-concepts were found to be relevant for paranoia. Conclusion: The findings implicate that if deficits in neurocognition are present, fostering a positive self-concept should be an issue in therapy. Negative interpersonal self-concept indicates an increased risk for paranoid delusions in the course of 1 year. New aspects for cognitive models in schizophrenia and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:26191025

  7. Cognitive vulnerabilities as mediators between emotional abuse and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Padilla Paredes, Patricia; Calvete, Esther

    2014-01-01

    This study tested whether childhood parental emotional abuse and peer emotional bullying serve as antecedents of depression in adolescence and identified the cognitive mechanisms involved in this process. It was hypothesized that the experience of emotional abuse would predict depressive symptoms via development of rumination and negative inferences. A 3-wave longitudinal study was carried out with 998 adolescents (471 girls and 526 boys) between 13 and 17 years of age. Results showed that emotional abuse by parents and peers at Time 1 predicted a worsening of several cognitive vulnerabilities at Time 2. In addition, brooding mediated between the experiences of abuse and the increase of depressive symptoms at Time 3. Thus, findings suggest that the experiences of childhood emotional abuse by parents and peers serve as antecedents to develop a negative cognitive style, vulnerability that, once developed, is a risk factor for the onset of depressive symptoms in adolescence. PMID:24292965

  8. Translational research and symptom management in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Júnior, Luis Carlos; Olson, Karin; de Omena Bomfim, Emiliana; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia

    In recent years, translational research (TR) has become a new approach for bridging basic research and clinical practice. This article examines studies in which the authors used TR to learn more about the underlying causes of selected symptoms, and to discuss these results in the context of cancer nursing and symptom management. A literature review was undertaken, plus critical analysis of the authors. TR conducted by cancer nursing scholars has been relatively limited in the past, but is becoming more common as nurses complete additional academic work in the basic sciences and develop research teams with colleagues of those areas of knowledge. The goal in these studies is to show how a set of variables explains differential interventional effects. The availability of TR provides new evidence for the management of symptoms experienced by individuals with cancer, which could lead to improvements in the care of cancer patients across the world. PMID:27231745

  9. [Negative symptoms of schizophrenia: from electrophysiology to electrotherapy].

    PubMed

    Micoulaud Franchi, J-A; Quiles, C; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review of the literature is to summarize the state of the knowledge concerning the relationship between negative symptoms in schizophrenia, electrophysiology and electrotherapy. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed during August and September 2015 using the PubMed electronic database. We used the following MeSH terms: "Negative symptoms", "Schizophrenia", "Electrophysiology", "Neurophysiology", "EEG power", "Alpha rhythm", "Transcranial magnetic stimulation", "Transcranial direct current stimulation", "Electroconvulsive therapy", "Neurofeedback", "Vagus Nerve Stimulation", "Deep Brain Stimulation", and "State dependent". Negative symptoms in schizophrenia are associated with altered activity in prefrontal cortex in functional neuroimaging studies. This is in line with electrophysiological measurements that found a change in EEG spectral power in the alpha frequency band over prefrontal brain regions. The notion of functional hypofrontality has led to hypotheses that electrotherapy applied to the prefrontal cortex may be an effective treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) were used to increase cortical activity in schizophrenia and achieve a clinical effect on negative symptoms. Three meta-analyses confirmed, with a moderate effect size, that rTMS is an effective treatment option for negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The two subsequently published prospective multicenter studies, however, found opposite results from each other. Two randomized controlled studies suggested that tDCS is an effective treatment option for negative symptoms. There is no study on the efficacy of neurofeedback, vagal nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Additional studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of rTMS and tDCS on negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Influencing factors

  10. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  11. Postmenopausal Estrogen Therapy and Depressive Symptoms in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Whooley, Mary A; Grady, Deborah; Cauley, Jane A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND Evidence regarding the effect of postmenopausal estrogen therapy on mood is limited. METHODS To determine whether postmenopausal estrogen therapy is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in elderly women, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 6,602 white women ages 71 years or older who were recruited from population-based listings in Baltimore, Md; Minneapolis, Minn; Portland, Ore; and the Monongahela Valley, Pa. Use of estrogen and progestin was determined by interview. Participants completed the Geriatric Depression Scale short form (GDS) and were considered depressed if they reported 6 or more of 15 possible symptoms of depression. RESULTS A total of 6.3% (72/1,150) of current estrogen users, 7.2% (142/1,964) of past estrogen users, and 9.0% (313/3,488) of never users reported 6 or more symptoms of depression (P = .004). Current estrogen users had a decreased risk of reporting 6 or more depressive symptoms, compared with not current (past or never) users of estrogen (odds ratio [OR], 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9; P = .01], adjusted for living alone, bilateral oophorectomy, current smoking, physical activity, social network, self-perceived health, cognitive function, functional status, and antidepressant use. However, excluding women who use estrogen or progestin alone, we were unable to find an association between current use of combined estrogen plus progestin therapy and depressive symptoms (adjusted OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.4; P = .5). CONCLUSIONS This cross-sectional study found that current use of unopposed estrogen was associated with a decreased risk of depressive symptoms in older women. Additional studies are needed to understand the effect of combined estrogen and progestin therapy on the prevalence of depressive symptoms in older women. PMID:10940144

  12. Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Drivers of All-Terrain Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    REHN, B.; BERGDAHL, I. A.; AHLGREN, C.; FROM, C.; JÄRVHOLM, B.; LUNDSTRÖM, R.; NILSSON, T.; SUNDELIN, G.

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to characterize the risk of experiencing musculoskeletal symptoms in the region of the neck, shoulders and upper and lower back for professional drivers of various categories of all-terrain vehicles and to assess the association between symptoms and duration of exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock from driving all-terrain vehicles. The study group consisted of 215 drivers of forest machines, 137 drivers of snowmobiles and 79 drivers of snowgroomers and a control group of 167 men randomly selected from the general population. The subjects were all from one of the four most northern counties in Sweden and they were all men. Musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed by use of a standardized questionnaire. In addition, the questionnaire held items about the driving time with all-terrain vehicles and a subjective estimation of exposure to unpleasant movements (shock, jolt, irregular sway). The job strain was measured according to Karasek's demands/control model. The prevalence ratios were adjusted for age, smoking and job strain. Among drivers, significantly increased prevalence ratios within the range of 1∂5-2·9 were revealed for symptoms from the neck-shoulder and thoracic regions during the previous year. None of the driver categories had a statistically significantly increased risk of low back pain. Forest vehicles were those most reported to cause unpleasant movements. In conclusion, drivers of all-terrain vehicles exhibit an increased risk of symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck-shoulder and thoracic regions. The increased risk is suggested to be related to physical factors such as exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock, static overload or extreme body postures. However, since symptoms of low back pain were not significantly increased, it appears that factors other than WBV would explain the occurrence of symptoms in the group of all-terrain drivers.

  13. Enhancing Self-Efficacy for Optimized Patient Outcomes through the Theory of Symptom Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Amy J.

    2012-01-01

    Background In today’s world, greater patient empowerment is imperative since 90 million Americans live with one or more chronic conditions such as cancer. Evidence reveals that healthy behaviors such as effective symptom self-management can prevent or reduce much of the suffering from cancer. Oncology nurses play a pivotal role in developing a symptom self-management plan that is critical to optimizing a patient’s symptom self-management behaviors. Objective This article uses exemplars to describe how oncology nurses can apply a tested middle-range theory, the Theory of Symptom Self-Management, to clinical practice by incorporating interventions to increase a patient’s perceived self-efficacy to optimize patient outcomes. Methods The Theory of Symptom Self-Management provides a means to understand the dynamic aspects of symptom self-management and provides a tested framework for the development of efficacy enhancing interventions for use by oncology nurses in clinical practice. Results Exemplars based on the Theory of Symptom Self-Management that depict how oncology nursing can use perceived self-efficacy enhancing symptom self-management interventions to improve the functional status and quality of life of their patients. Conclusion Guided by a theoretical approach, oncology nurses can have a significant positive impact on the lives of their patients by reducing the symptom burden associated with cancer and its treatment. Implications for Practice Oncology nurses can partner with their patients to design tailored approaches to symptom self-management. These tailored approaches provide the ability to implement patient specific behaviors that recognize, prevent, relieve, or decrease the timing, intensity, distress, concurrence, and unpleasant quality of symptoms. PMID:22495550

  14. A pilot study exploring the relationship between trauma symptoms and appearance concerns following burns.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Individuals who have experienced burns often have to adjust to distressing changes to their appearance. Trauma symptoms are another common psychological difficulty in the burn-injured population. However, there has been a lack of research exploring the possible relationship between trauma symptoms and appearance concerns in populations where incidents have led to appearance changes, including burns. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the relationship between trauma symptoms and appearance concerns in the burn-injured population. Burn-injured patients (n=33) referred to a Burns Clinical Psychology service completed measures of trauma symptom severity, appearance concerns and changes in outlook. Analyses revealed a statistically significant positive relationship between trauma symptoms and appearance concerns (r=0.41, p<0.01, one-tailed). Participants with higher trauma symptoms had more appearance concerns. Furthermore, negative changes in outlook following the burns were positively related to trauma symptoms (r=0.69, p<0.001, two-tailed) and appearance concerns (r=0.50, p<0.01, two-tailed). Age was negatively related to appearance concerns (r=-0.41, p<0.05, two-tailed) but not trauma symptoms. Gender was not statistically related to trauma symptoms or appearance concerns. Burn injury factors (% TBSA, primary location of the injury, cause of the injury and time since the injury) were not related to trauma symptoms or appearance concerns. In conclusion, trauma symptoms and appearance concerns following burns may be positively related and further research in this area is needed. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25234955

  15. Friendships and Family Support Reduce Subsequent Depressive Symptoms in At-Risk Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    van Harmelen, Anne-Laura; Gibson, Jenny L.; St Clair, Michelle C.; Owens, Matt; Brodbeck, Jeannette; Dunn, Valerie; Lewis, Gemma; Croudace, Tim; Jones, Peter B.; Kievit, Rogier A.; Goodyer, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early life stress (ELS) consists of child family adversities (CFA: negative experiences that happened within the family environment) and/or peer bullying. ELS plays an important role in the development of adolescent depressive symptoms and clinical disorders. Identifying factors that may reduce depressive symptoms in adolescents with ELS may have important public mental health implications. Methods We used structural equation modelling and examined the impact of adolescent friendships and/or family support at age 14 on depressive symptoms at age 17 in adolescents exposed to ELS before age 11. To this end, we used structural equation modelling in a community sample of 771 adolescents (322 boys and 477 girls) from a 3 year longitudinal study. Significant paths in the model were followed-up to test whether social support mediated or moderated the association between ELS and depressive symptoms at age 17. Results We found that adolescent social support in adolescence is negatively associated with subsequent depressive symptoms in boys and girls exposed to ELS. Specifically, we found evidence for two mediational pathways: In the first pathway family support mediated the link between CFA and depressive symptoms at age 17. Specifically, CFA was negatively associated with adolescent family support at age 14, which in turn was negatively associated with depressive symptoms at age 17. In the second pathway we found that adolescent friendships mediated the path between peer bullying and depressive symptoms. Specifically, relational bullying was negatively associated with adolescent friendships at age 14, which in turn were negatively associated with depressive symptoms at age 17. In contrast, we did not find a moderating effect of friendships and family support on the association between CFA and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Friendships and/or family support in adolescence mediate the relationship between ELS and late adolescent depressive symptoms in boys and

  16. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  17. Mediation of symptom changes during inpatient treatment for eating disorders: the role of obsessive-compulsive features.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Tart, Candyce D; Shewmaker, Shona; Wall, David; Smits, Jasper A J

    2010-10-01

    The present study examined the relative contributions of changes in obsessive-compulsive symptoms among eating-disorder patients with (n = 254) and without (n = 254) obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) to eating-disorder symptom improvement observed with inpatient treatment. Consistent with hypothesis, multilevel mediation analyses revealed that improvements in OCD symptoms over time accounted for significant variance in the improvements in eating-disorder symptoms over time, with stronger mediation evident among eating-disorder patients with comorbid OCD (percent mediated; P(M) = 22.5%) compared to those without OCD (P(M) = 12.2%). However, decreases in eating-disorder symptoms over time fully mediated improvements in OCD symptoms over time, and this mediated pathway did not vary substantially as a function of comorbid OCD status. The theoretical and treatment implications of these findings for conceptualizing the relationship between eating disorders and OCD are discussed. PMID:20359715

  18. The effects of mental health symptoms and marijuana expectancies on marijuana use and consequences among at-risk adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Osilla, Karen Chan; Ewing, Brett A.; Hunter, Sarah B.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Based on expectancy theory, adolescents at risk for mental health symptoms, such as those involved in the juvenile court system, may use marijuana due to the belief that use will attenuate anxiety and depressive symptoms. In a diverse sample of youth involved in the Santa Barbara Teen Court system (N = 193), we examined the association between mental health symptoms and marijuana expectancies on marijuana use and consequences. In general, stronger positive expectancies and weaker negative expectancies were both associated with increased marijuana use. Youth that reported more symptoms of both anxiety and depression and stronger positive expectancies for marijuana also reported more consequences. We found that youth experiencing the greatest level of consequences from marijuana were those that reported more depressive symptoms and stronger positive expectancies for marijuana. Findings suggest that these symptoms, combined with strong positive expectancies about marijuana’s effects, have implications for consequences among at-risk youth. PMID:25977590

  19. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Hypoglycemia Symptoms Improved with Diet Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Sukriti

    2016-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that a relationship may exist between high glycemic index diets and the development of anxiety and depression symptoms; however, as no interventional studies assessing this relationship in a psychiatric population have been completed, the possibility of a causal link is unclear. AB is a 15-year-old female who presented with concerns of generalized anxiety disorder and hypoglycemia symptoms. Her diet consisted primarily of refined carbohydrates. The addition of protein, fat, and fiber to her diet resulted in a substantial decrease in anxiety symptoms as well as a decrease in the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia symptoms. A brief return to her previous diet caused a return of her anxiety symptoms, followed by improvement when she restarted the prescribed diet. This case strengthens the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index may play a role in the pathogenesis or progression of mental illnesses such as generalized anxiety disorder and subsequently that dietary modification as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of mental illness warrants further study. PMID:27493821

  20. Treatment improves symptoms shared by PTSD and disordered eating.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Karen S; Wells, Stephanie Y; Mendes, Adell; Resick, Patricia A

    2012-10-01

    Eating disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are debilitating conditions that frequently co-occur. Although the two disorders have different clinical presentations, they share associated features, including cognitive disturbances, emotion dysregulation, dissociation, and impulsivity. We hypothesized that reductions in PTSD symptoms following cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and its treatment components (CPT without the written account or the written account only) would be associated with improvements in symptoms common to PTSD and eating disorders. Participants in the current investigation included women with PTSD (N = 65) who reported a history of rape or physical assault, were in a randomized dismantling study of CPT, and completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) at pre- and posttreatment. Latent growth modeling results indicated that decreases in PTSD symptom scores were significantly associated with reductions in the Impulse Regulation, Interoceptive Awareness, Interpersonal Distrust, Ineffectiveness, and Maturity Fears subscales of the EDI-2. Thus, PTSD treatment affected symptoms shared by PTSD and eating disorders. Currently, there are no clear guidelines for treatment of comorbid PTSD and eating disorders. Traditional CPT may impact symptoms common to both, but additional therapy may be needed for specific disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. PMID:23073973

  1. Massage Therapy for Lyme Disease Symptoms: a Prospective Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Meghan J.; Moyer, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To study the effects of massage therapy (MT) on Lyme disease (LD) symptoms and affect. Methods A 21-year-old female college student previously diagnosed with LD was recruited for a prospective case study that incorporated alternating periods of treatment and nontreatment across 65 days. Her self-reported symptoms of pain, fatigue, and impairment of concentration were assessed by means of a daily diary with corresponding visual analog scales. Immediate effects of MT on affect were assessed by completion of the Positive and Negative Affect Scales before and after each treatment session. Results LD symptoms decreased during treatment periods and increased during nontreatment periods. Positive affect was increased at every MT session. Conclusions MT is a promising treatment for the symptoms pain, fatigue, and impaired concentration associated with LD. In addition, MT reliably increased positive affect. Massage therapists should consider using light-to-medium pressure MT for treatment of persons who present with a similar pattern of LD symptoms, and further research with this population is warranted. PMID:23429967

  2. Healthcare practices among blacks and whites with urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Daniel L.; Edwards, Bennett G.; Whitehead, Kimberly; Amamoo, M. Ahinee; Godley, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: The reasons for African-American men to seek care for lower urinary care symptoms has not been determined due to sparse population-based data. OBJECTIVE: Our study examines the solicitation and receipt of medical care for urinary symptoms among racially oversampled elderly urban and rural cohort of African Americans and whites. DESIGN: Longitudinal analyses were conducted on five North Carolina counties through the Piedmont Health Survey of the Elderly Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly. In 1994, the analytic cohort included 482 African Americans and 407 whites; by 1998, 249 and 222, respectively. RESULTS: In 1994, 49.4% of African Americans presented with lower urinary tract symptoms compared to 56.8% of whites. By 1998, these percentages increased to 60.6% and 70.3%, respectively. African Americans reported more interference with activities of daily living than whites. African Americans were less likely than whites to have regular digital rectal exams (DRE) and were more likely to have never received a DRE at all. Additionally, elders with less educational attainment, those who smoked, those who delayed care quite often and those who used less-experienced physicians were less likely to receive regular DREs. CONCLUSION: Poor health behavior has the greatest impact on healthcare seeking for lower urinary tract symptoms. These health behavior risk factors are systemic of a lack of health education. Increases in health education among African Americans regarding lower urinary tract symptoms may close the racial disparity in healthcare-seeking behaviors. PMID:17444430

  3. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Hypoglycemia Symptoms Improved with Diet Modification.

    PubMed

    Aucoin, Monique; Bhardwaj, Sukriti

    2016-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that a relationship may exist between high glycemic index diets and the development of anxiety and depression symptoms; however, as no interventional studies assessing this relationship in a psychiatric population have been completed, the possibility of a causal link is unclear. AB is a 15-year-old female who presented with concerns of generalized anxiety disorder and hypoglycemia symptoms. Her diet consisted primarily of refined carbohydrates. The addition of protein, fat, and fiber to her diet resulted in a substantial decrease in anxiety symptoms as well as a decrease in the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia symptoms. A brief return to her previous diet caused a return of her anxiety symptoms, followed by improvement when she restarted the prescribed diet. This case strengthens the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index may play a role in the pathogenesis or progression of mental illnesses such as generalized anxiety disorder and subsequently that dietary modification as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of mental illness warrants further study. PMID:27493821

  4. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Kiderman, Alexander; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza

    2016-01-01

    Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications. PMID:26727256

  5. Enhanced Visual Search in Infancy Predicts Emerging Autism Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gliga, Teodora; Bedford, Rachael; Charman, Tony; Johnson, Mark H

    2015-06-29

    In addition to core symptoms, i.e., social interaction and communication difficulties and restricted and repetitive behaviors, autism is also characterized by aspects of superior perception. One well-replicated finding is that of superior performance in visual search tasks, in which participants have to indicate the presence of an odd-one-out element among a number of foils. Whether these aspects of superior perception contribute to the emergence of core autism symptoms remains debated. Perceptual and social interaction atypicalities could reflect co-expressed but biologically independent pathologies, as suggested by a "fractionable" phenotype model of autism. A developmental test of this hypothesis is now made possible by longitudinal cohorts of infants at high risk, such as of younger siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Around 20% of younger siblings are diagnosed with autism themselves, and up to another 30% manifest elevated levels of autism symptoms. We used eye tracking to measure spontaneous orienting to letter targets (O, S, V, and +) presented among distractors (the letter X; Figure 1). At 9 and 15 months, emerging autism symptoms were assessed using the Autism Observation Scale for Infants (AOSI;), and at 2 years of age, they were assessed using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS;). Enhanced visual search performance at 9 months predicted a higher level of autism symptoms at 15 months and at 2 years. Infant perceptual atypicalities are thus intrinsically linked to the emerging autism phenotype. PMID:26073135

  6. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshis, Erin; Baumert, Jens; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Marciante, Kristin; Meirelles, Osorio; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Yu, Lei; Bandinelli, Stefania; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bennett, David A.; Boomsma, Dorret; Cannas, Alessandra; Coker, Laura H.; de Geus, Eco; De Jager, Philip L.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Purcell, Shaun; Hu, Frank B.; Rimma, Eric B.; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Curhan, Gary; Rice, Kenneth; Penman, Alan D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Emeny, Rebecca; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Illig, Thomas; Kardia, Sharon; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Koenen, Karestan; Kraft, Peter; Kuningas, Maris; Massaro, Joseph M.; Melzer, David; Mulas, Antonella; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Murray, Anna; Oostra, Ben A.; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda; Petersmann, Astrid; Pilling, Luke C.; Psaty, Bruce; Rawal, Rajesh; Reiman, Eric M.; Schulz, Andrea; Shulman, Joshua M.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Smith, Albert V.; Sutin, Angelina R.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Völzke, Henry; Widen, Elisabeth; Yaffe, Kristine; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cucca, Francesco; Harris, Tamara; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Llewellyn, David J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Tanaka, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a heritable trait that exists on a continuum of varying severity and duration. Yet, the search for genetic variants associated with depression has had few successes. We exploit the entire continuum of depression to find common variants for depressive symptoms. Methods In this genome-wide association study, we combined the results of 17 population-based studies assessing depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Replication of the independent top hits (p < 1 × 10−5) was performed in five studies assessing depressive symptoms with other instruments. In addition, we performed a combined meta-analysis of all 22 discovery and replication studies. Results The discovery sample comprised 34,549 individuals (mean age of 66.5) and no loci reached genome-wide significance (lowest p = 1.05 × 10−7). Seven independent single nucleotide polymorphisms were considered for replication. In the replication set (n = 16,709), we found suggestive association of one single nucleotide polymorphism with depressive symptoms (rs161645, 5q21, p = 9.19 × 10−3). This 5q21 region reached genome-wide significance (p = 4.78 × 10−8) in the overall meta-analysis combining discovery and replication studies (n = 51,258). Conclusions The results suggest that only a large sample comprising more than 50,000 subjects may be sufficiently powered to detect genes for depressive symptoms. PMID:23290196

  7. Negative Generalization and Symptoms of Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fulford, Daniel; Rosen, Rebecca K.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Carver, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    The tendency to generalize from a single failure to one's entire self-worth is an important correlate and predictor of depression. Despite conceptual overlap between cognitive biases in anxiety and depression, little research has examined whether negative generalization relates to anxiety symptoms. We examined associations of negative generalization with symptoms of several anxiety disorders, above and beyond its association with lifetime symptoms of depression, among 248 undergraduates. After controlling for lifetime symptoms of major depression, negative generalization was significantly correlated with symptoms of each anxiety disorder tested, most notably generalized anxiety and social phobia. PMID:24340170

  8. The influence of adult attachment styles on the association between marital adjustment and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rogina L; Cordova, James V

    2002-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that attachment styles moderate the relationship between marital adjustment and depressive symptoms among husbands and wives. In a sample of 91 married couples, ratings of the anxious-ambivalent attachment style moderated the relationship between marital adjustment and depressive symptoms for both husbands and wives. Additionally, ratings of the secure attachment style moderated the relationship between marital adjustment and depressive symptoms for wives, with a trend for husbands. These findings suggest a relationship between insecurity and a predisposition to depressive symptoms in marital relationships. PMID:12085732

  9. Agenesis of the corpus callosum: symptoms consistent with developmental disability in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Cavalari, Rachel N S; Donovick, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) is a congenital disorder that disrupts the development of neurological structures connecting the right and left hemispheres of the brain. In addition to neurological symptoms, many individuals with AgCC demonstrate marked deficits in social, communication, and adaptive skills. This paper presents two case studies of congenital AgCC in siblings with socioemotional and behavioral symptoms consistent with developmental disability, but with notably different symptom presentations and clinical needs. Conclusions from these cases suggest that unique symptom profiles of individuals with AgCC warrant careful consideration for referral to appropriate academic and habilitative services. PMID:24417213

  10. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  11. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  12. Self-Reported ADHD Symptoms among College Students: Item Positioning Affects Symptom Endorsement Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, John T.; Knouse, Laura E.; Nelson-Gray, Rosemery O.; Kwapil, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The effect of manipulating item positioning on self-reported ADHD symptoms was examined. We assessed whether listing DSM-IV ADHD symptoms serially or interspersed affected (a) the correlation between ADHD symptoms and (b) the rate of symptom endorsement. Method: In Study 1, an undergraduate sample (n = 102) completed a measure that…

  13. Trauma prevalence and somatoform symptoms: are there specific somatoform symptoms related to traumatic experiences?

    PubMed

    Sack, Martin; Lahmann, Claas; Jaeger, Burkard; Henningsen, Peter

    2007-11-01

    There is still insufficient knowledge on the subject of possibly specific patterns of somatoform symptoms related to sexual or nonsexual traumatizations. Using standardized questionnaires, a sample of 892 patients consecutively admitted to a psychotherapy outpatient clinic were evaluated for psychological symptoms in general, for somatoform symptoms and for history of traumatizations. Any severe lifetime trauma was reported in 67.8% of the total sample. Somatoform symptoms were notably more prevalent in traumatized patients when compared with nontraumatized patients. Descriptive data analysis revealed specific elevations of symptom frequencies for pseudoneurological symptoms and for symptoms associated with discomfort or dysfunction in sexual organs. PMID:18000455

  14. [Risk hidden in the small print? : Some food additives may trigger pseudoallergic reactions].

    PubMed

    Zuberbier, Torsten; Hengstenberg, Claudine

    2016-06-01

    Some food additives may trigger pseudoallergenic reactions. However, the prevalence of such an overreaction is - despite the increasing number of food additives - rather low in the general population. The most common triggers of pseudoallergic reactions to food are naturally occurring ingredients. However, symptoms in patients with chronic urticaria should improve significantly on a pseudoallergen-free diet. In addition, some studies indicate that certain food additives may also have an impact on the symptoms of patients with neurodermatitis and asthma. PMID:27173908

  15. The role of experiential avoidance in posttraumatic stress symptoms and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization.

    PubMed

    Tull, Matthew T; Gratz, Kim L; Salters, Kristalyn; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2004-11-01

    This study examined the relationships between experiential avoidance in general (and thought suppression in particular), posttraumatic stress symptom severity, and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization among a sample of individuals exposed to multiple potentially traumatic events. Although experiential avoidance was not associated with severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms beyond their shared relationship with general psychiatric symptom severity, it was associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization when controlling for posttraumatic stress symptom severity. Thought suppression, on the other hand, was associated with severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms when controlling for their shared relationship with general psychiatric symptom severity. No significant relationships were found between thought suppression and the presence of depression, anxiety, and somatization symptoms when controlling for posttraumatic stress symptom severity. Results suggest the importance of separately examining the influence of different forms of experiential avoidance on posttraumatic psychopathology. PMID:15505519

  16. [Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders: diagnosis and pharmacological treatment].

    PubMed

    Paslakis, G; Schredl, M; Alm, B; Sobanski, E

    2013-08-01

    Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterised by inattention and/or hyperactivity and impulsivity and is a frequent psychiatric disorder with childhood onset. In addition to core symptoms, patients often experience associated symptoms like emotional dysregulation or low self-esteem and suffer from comorbid disorders, particularly depressive episodes, substance abuse, anxiety or sleep disorders. It is recommended to include associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders in the diagnostic set-up and in the treatment plan. Comorbid psychiatric disorders should be addressed with disorder-specific therapies while associated symptoms also often improve with treatment of the ADHD core symptoms. The most impairing psychiatric disorder should be treated first. This review presents recommendations for differential diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD with associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders with respect to internationally published guidelines, clinical trials and expert opinions. PMID:23864520

  17. Problematic eating behaviors in adolescents with low self-esteem and elevated depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Elizabeth A; Gamboz, Julie; Johnson, Jeffrey G

    2008-12-01

    Previous research has indicated that low self-esteem may be an important risk factor for the development of eating disorders. Few longitudinal studies have examined the relationships between low self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and eating disorders in adolescents. The present study investigated whether low self-esteem was associated with depressive symptoms and problematic eating behaviors. Measures of low self-esteem and problematic eating behaviors were administered to a sample of 197 adolescent primary-care patients. Depressive symptoms and problematic eating behaviors were assessed ten months later. Youths with low self-esteem were at greater risk for high levels of depressive symptoms and eating disorder symptoms. In addition, depressive symptoms mediated the association of low self-esteem with problematic eating behaviors. PMID:18928903

  18. The Continuum of Psychotic Symptoms in the General Population: A Cross-national Study

    PubMed Central

    Nuevo, Roberto; Chatterji, Somnath; Verdes, Emese; Naidoo, Nirmala; Arango, Celso; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the cross-national prevalence of psychotic symptoms in the general population and to analyze their impact on health status. Method: The sample was composed of 256 445 subjects (55.9% women), from nationally representative samples of 52 countries worldwide participating in the World Health Organization's World Health Survey. Standardized and weighted prevalence of psychotic symptoms were calculated in addition to the impact on health status as assessed by functioning in multiple domains. Results: Overall prevalences for specific symptoms ranged from 4.80% (SE = 0.14) for delusions of control to 8.37% (SE = 0.20) for delusions of reference and persecution. Prevalence figures varied greatly across countries. All symptoms of psychosis produced a significant decline in health status after controlling for potential confounders. There was a clear change in health impact between subjects not reporting any symptom and those reporting at least one symptom (effect size of 0.55). Conclusions: The prevalence of the presence of at least one psychotic symptom has a wide range worldwide varying as much as from 0.8% to 31.4%. Psychotic symptoms signal a problem of potential public health concern, independent of the presence of a full diagnosis of psychosis, as they are common and are related to a significant decrement in health status. The presence of at least one psychotic symptom is related to a significant poorer health status, with a regular linear decrement in health depending on the number of symptoms. PMID:20841326

  19. Contingency management improves outcomes in cocaine-dependent outpatients with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Gloria; Secades-Villa, Roberto; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Peña-Suárez, Elsa; Sánchez-Hervás, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    Despite depressive symptoms being very common among patients seeking treatment for cocaine dependence, few studies have examined the effects of depressive symptoms on cocaine outpatient treatment outcomes, and there is even less research in the context of Contingency Management (CM). The purpose of this study was to assess the main and interactive effects of co-occurring depressive symptoms on CM outcomes. Cocaine-dependent individuals (N = 108) were randomized to Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) or CRA plus CM in two outpatient community clinical settings. Participants were categorized according to depression symptoms, self-reported by means of the BDI at treatment entry. Outcome measures included treatment retention and documented cocaine abstinence over a 6-month treatment period. Depressive symptoms were more commonly found in females and in unemployed participants, and were associated with more drug-related, social, and psychiatric problems at treatment entry. Individuals with baseline depressive symptoms had poorer treatment outcomes than patients without depressive symptoms. The addition of CM to CRA made the program more effective than with CRA alone, regardless of depressive symptoms. CM was associated with better abstinence treatment outcomes, while the interaction between unemployment and depressive symptoms was associated with negative retention treatment outcomes. This study supports the efficacy of CM for cocaine-dependent outpatients with and without depressive symptoms, and highlights its importance for improving treatment for unemployed and depressed cocaine-dependent individuals. PMID:24080020

  20. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  1. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  2. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  3. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  4. Multimethod Study of Distress Tolerance and PTSD Symptom Severity in a Trauma-Exposed Community Sample*

    PubMed Central

    Marshall-Berenz, Erin C.; Vujanovic, Anka A.; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O.; Bernstein, Amit; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite initial evidence linking distress tolerance to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, there is a need for the investigation of interrelations among multiple measures of distress tolerance and PTSD symptom severity. Therefore, the present study investigated concurrent relations among multiple measures of distress tolerance, as well as the relations between these measures and PTSD symptom severity, within a trauma-exposed community sample. The sample consisted of 81 trauma-exposed adults (63.1% women). Results indicated that Distress Tolerance Scale (Simons & Gaher, 2005) scores, but no other measures of distress tolerance were significantly related to PTSD symptom severity above and beyond the variance accounted for by number of traumas, trait-level neuroticism, and participant sex. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:20848616

  5. Chronic thought suppression and posttraumatic symptoms: data from the Madrid March 11, 2004 terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Carmelo; Hervás, Gonzalo; Pérez-Sales, Pau

    2008-12-01

    Although a considerable number of people either witnessed directly or in the mass media the traumatic scenes of the terrorist attack that took place on March 11th, 2004 in Madrid, only a fraction of Madrid citizens developed posttraumatic symptoms. In this study, posttraumatic stress-related symptoms, degree of exposure, coping strategies related to the attack, and chronic attempts to avoid intrusive thoughts (i.e., thought suppression) were assessed in a general population Madrid sample (N=503) 2-3 weeks after the attacks. Our results showed that participants with higher scores in chronic thought suppression exhibited higher levels of PTSD symptoms. Higher scores in chronic thought suppression also correlated positively with the use of avoidant coping strategies after the attacks. We discuss the possible common roots of avoidance of intrusive thoughts and avoidant coping strategies and the implications of this relationship for the emergence of stress-related symptoms as well as for public health policies. PMID:18329844

  6. Eating Disorder Symptoms and Suicidal Ideation: The Moderating Role of Disgust.

    PubMed

    Chu, Carol; Bodell, Lindsay P; Ribeiro, Jessica D; Joiner, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    Disgust has been implicated as a factor that maintains and exacerbates eating disorder (ED) symptoms. Emerging research suggests that disgust may be a risk factor for suicidality. Given the high rates of suicidality among individuals with EDs, we propose that disgust may contribute to the link between EDs and suicidality. To test this hypothesis, self-report data were collected from 341 young adults (66% women). Cross-sectional associations between disgust with the self, others and the world and disgust sensitivity and propensity, ED symptoms and suicidal ideation were examined using multivariate regression analyses. ED symptoms and body dissatisfaction were associated with increased suicidal ideation at high levels of disgust with the self and the world; at low levels of disgust, ED symptoms and body dissatisfaction did not significantly relate to suicidal ideation. Disgust may indicate risk for suicidal ideation among individuals with eating psychopathology. PMID:26010299

  7. Prevalence of depressive symptoms and associated factors in older adult public housing residents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ju Young; Sims, Regina C; Bradley, Diane L; Pohlig, Ryan T; Harrison, Barbara E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to identify the prevalence of and risk factors associated with depressive symptoms among older adult residents of a public housing apartment. Self-reported depressive symptoms were measured with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) 8. A self-report questionnaire was used to collect data on risk factors of sociodemographic information, cardiovascular health history, and history of depression. Fifty-eight of 171 residents responded, and 31% of residents met the CES-D 8 criterion for depression (total score ≥7). Sequential multiple regression models identified age, loss of loved ones in the past year, and financial worries as significant predictors of CES-D 8 scores. These study results have implications for future studies of depressive symptoms in older adults, suggesting that grief and financial assistance programs may help reduce risks associated with depressive symptoms among community-dwelling older adults living in public housing. PMID:25036530

  8. Dissociative symptoms and academic functioning in maltreated children: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Perzow, Sarah E D; Petrenko, Christie L M; Garrido, Edward F; Combs, Melody D; Culhane, Sara E; Taussig, Heather N

    2013-01-01

    Research has identified numerous negative sequelae of child maltreatment that may adversely impact academic functioning (AF). There is limited research, however, on the relationship between specific trauma symptoms, such as dissociation, and poor AF. This cross-sectional study examined the association between dissociative symptoms and multi-informant reports of AF in a sample of maltreated youth with a history of out-of-home care. Participants included 149 youth and their caregivers and teachers. Dissociative symptoms were measured based on youth report, whereas AF was assessed using (a) standardized measures of academic achievement, (b) youth-report measures of school membership and perceived academic competence, (c) caregiver reports of youths' performance in school, and (d) teacher reports of student grades. Results of multiple regression analyses suggested that dissociative symptoms were generally related to poorer AF after IQ, age, gender, and the total number of school and caregiver transitions were controlled. Implications for school personnel are discussed. PMID:23627479

  9. Pubertal Timing and Vulnerabilities to Depression in Early Adolescence: Differential Pathways to Depressive Symptoms by Sex

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jessica L.; Hamlat, Elissa J.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2014-01-01

    Although research implicates pubertal processes in the emergence of the sex difference in depression during adolescence, few studies have examined how cognitive and affective vulnerabilities influence the effect of pubertal timing on depressive symptoms. The current study prospectively examined whether early pubertal timing predicted increases in depressive symptoms among adolescents with more negative cognitive styles and lower emotional clarity, and whether this risk was specific to adolescent girls. In a diverse sample of 318 adolescents, early pubertal timing predicted increases in depressive symptoms among adolescent boys and girls with more negative cognitive styles and adolescent girls with poor emotional clarity. These findings suggest that earlier pubertal maturation may heighten the risk of depression for adolescents with pre-existing vulnerabilities to depression, and that early-maturing adolescent girls with lower levels of emotional clarity may be particularly vulnerable to depressive symptoms, representing one pathway through which the sex difference in depression may emerge. PMID:24439622

  10. Contribution of concrete cognition to emotion: neutral symptoms as elicitors of worry about cancer.

    PubMed

    Easterling, D V; Leventhal, H

    1989-10-01

    The relationship between worry about cancer and judged cancer risk was examined among 54 expatients who had been cured of breast cancer and 81 women with no history of cancer. Worry required both a perception of substantial risk and the presence of concrete perceptual cues. Worry promoters include visits to a physician and concrete, noncancerlike symptoms (e.g., fever, pain). Supporting analyses indicate that the symptom effects are not due to self-report biases or attributions of symptoms to cancer but are the result of a reminder process whereby vulnerability beliefs are aroused by somatic cues. Judged cancer risk was unrelated to affective cues, suggesting that across-time variation in worry about cancer reflects the onset and offset of symptom episodes rather than a shift in risk appraisals. Expatients were more worried overall than nonpatient controls. The results have implications for controlling disease worry and initiating preventive behaviors. PMID:2793775

  11. Parental monitoring in late adolescence: relations to ADHD symptoms and longitudinal predictors.

    PubMed

    Salari, Raziye; Thorell, Lisa B

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to replicate Stattin and Kerr's (2000) study on parental monitoring and adolescents' deviant behavior, to extend their findings to ADHD symptoms, and to examine the longitudinal predictors (8-18 years) of parental knowledge and child disclosure. Results showed that conduct problems were primarily associated with parental knowledge and child disclosure, but not with parental solicitation and control. A similar pattern was observed for ADHD symptoms. However, while the relations for conduct problems were generally independent of ADHD symptoms, the relations for ADHD symptoms were primarily non-significant after controlling for conduct problems. Moreover, early behavior problems, but not insecure/disorganized attachment, were associated with parental knowledge and child disclosure in adolescence. In conclusion, child disclosure is primarily associated with deviant behavior rather than ADHD, and early child problem behavior is a more important predictor of child disclosure (implicating reciprocal relations between these two constructs) than is insecure/disorganized attachment. PMID:25602918

  12. Exploring the Relationship Between Social Anxiety and Bulimic Symptoms: Mediational Effects of Perfectionism Among Females

    PubMed Central

    Menatti, Andrew R.; Weeks, Justin W.; Levinson, Cheri A.; McGowan, Maggie M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that social anxiety and bulimia co-occur at high rates; one mechanism that has been proposed to link these symptom clusters is perfectionism. We tested meditational models among 167 female undergraduates in which maladaptive evaluative perfectionism concerns (MEPC; i.e., critical self-evaluative perfectionism) mediated the relationship between social anxiety and bulimic symptoms. Results from a first model indicated that MEPC mediated the relationship between fear of public scrutiny and bulimia symptoms. This indirect effect was significant above and beyond the indirect effects of maladaptive body-image cognitions and perfectionism specific to pure personal standards. A second model was tested with MEPC mediating the relationship between social interaction anxiety and bulimia symptoms. Similar results were obtained; however, in this model, a significant direct effect remained after partialing out the indirect effect of the mediators. Theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:24932054

  13. Depressive symptoms in low-income, urban adolescents: cognitive and contextual factors.

    PubMed

    Cardemil, Esteban V; O'Donnell, Ellen H; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; D'Eramo, Kristen Schoff; Derrick, Bree E; Spirito, Anthony; Grant, Kathryn E; Lambert, Sharon F

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among cognitive variables, family immigration history, negative life events, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 306 low-income, urban fifth- and sixth-grade children. Explanatory style and negative automatic thoughts were the cognitive variables examined. There were three key findings. First, children who were immigrants reported significantly more depressive symptoms, more negative life events, and more negative automatic thoughts than children who were not immigrants. Second, both explanatory style and negative automatic thoughts were significantly associated with depressive symptoms above and beyond the effects of child immigration history and negative life events. Finally, negative automatic thoughts mediated the relationship between child immigration history and depressive symptoms. We discuss the clinical and research implications of these findings. PMID:25050603

  14. The Body Image Dissatisfaction and Psychological Symptoms among Invasive and Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Y. Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Hayatbini, Niki; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Latifi, Noor Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elective aesthetic surgeries are increasing in the Iranian population with reasons linked to body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms. This study compared the body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms among invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery patients and a control group. METHODS Data from 90 participants (invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, minimally invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, and control group=30 Ss) were included. Subjects were assessed on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms to provide an evidence for a continuum of body image dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity in invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery clients. RESULTS Between the three groups of invasive, minimally invasive aesthetic surgeries and control on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms (anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity), there was a significant difference. CONCLUSION These findings have implications for pre-surgical assessment as well as psychological interventions rather than invasive medical interventions at first step.

  15. Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income, Urban Adolescents: Cognitive and Contextual Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cardemil, Esteban V.; O’Donnell, Ellen H.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; D’Eramo, Kristen Schoff; Derrick, Bree E.; Spirito, Anthony; Grant, Kathryn E.; Lambert, Sharon F.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among cognitive variables, family immigration history, negative life events, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 306 low-income, urban fifth- and sixth-grade children. Explanatory style and negative automatic thoughts were the cognitive variables examined. There were two key findings. First, children who were immigrants reported significantly more depressive symptoms, more negative life events, and more negative automatic thoughts than children who were not immigrants. Second, both explanatory style and negative automatic thoughts were significantly associated with depressive symptoms above and beyond the effects of child immigration history and negative life events. Finally, negative automatic thoughts mediated the relationship between child immigration history and depressive symptoms. We discuss the clinical and research implications of these findings. PMID:25050603

  16. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  17. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  18. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  19. PTSD symptoms and dominant emotional response to a traumatic event:an examination of DSM-IV Criterion A2.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Lisa M; Boals, Adriel; Banks, Jonathan B

    2010-01-01

    To qualify for a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) requires that individuals report experiencing dominant emotions of fear, helplessness, and horror during the trauma (Criterion A2). Despite this stipulation, traumatic events can elicit a myriad of emotions other than fear, such as anger, guilt or shame, sadness, and numbing. The present study examined which emotional reactions to a stressful event in a college student sample are associated with the highest levels of PTSD symptoms. Our results suggest mixed support for the DSM-IV criteria. Although, participants who experienced a dominant emotion of fear reported relatively high PTSD symptomatology, participants who experience danger, disgust-related emotions, and sadness reported PTSD symptoms of equivalent severity. Additionally, participants reported dominant emotions of sadness and other emotions (including disgust, guilt, and shame) more frequently than they reported fear. These results question the specifics of diagnostic Criterion A2 and may have diagnostic and treatment implications. PMID:19337884

  20. Myocardial Infarction: Symptoms and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Liu, Min; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a term used for an event of heart attack which is due to formation of plaques in the interior walls of the arteries resulting in reduced blood flow to the heart and injuring heart muscles because of lack of oxygen supply. The symptoms of MI include chest pain, which travels from left arm to neck, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart beating, anxiety, fatigue, weakness, stress, depression, and other factors. The immediate treatment of MI include, taking aspirin, which prevents blood from clotting, and nitro-glycerin to treat chest pain and oxygen. The heart attack can be prevented by taking an earlier action to lower those risks by controlling diet, fat, cholesterol, salt, smoking, nicotine, alcohol, drugs, monitoring of blood pressure every week, doing exercise every day, and loosing body weight. The treatment of MI includes, aspirin tablets, and to dissolve arterial blockage injection of thrombolytic or clot dissolving drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator, streptokinase or urokinase in blood within 3 h of the onset of a heart attack. The painkillers such as morphine or meperidine can be administered to relieve pain. Nitroglycerin and antihypertensive drugs such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers may also be used to lower blood pressure and to improve the oxygen demand of heart. The ECG, coronary angiography and X-ray of heart and blood vessels can be performed to observe the narrowing of coronary arteries. In this article the causes, symptoms and treatments of MI are described. PMID:25638347

  1. Psychological Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Risk Behavior: Examining the Role of Distinct PTSD Symptoms in the Partner Violence-sexual Risk Link

    PubMed Central

    Overstreet, Nicole M.; Willie, Tiara C.; Hellmuth, Julianne C.; Sullivan, Tami P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research has examined how physical and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization increases sexual risk behavior, yet research is lacking on 1) the effect of psychological IPV on sexual risk behavior and 2) factors through which psychological IPV may be linked to sexual risk behavior. METHODS The current study examined the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior controlling for other forms of IPV (i.e., physical and sexual) in a sample of 186 HIV-negative community women currently experiencing IPV. Further, this study examined the potential mediating effects of four posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity clusters (i.e., re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing, and hyperarousal) on this relationship. FINDINGS Results revealed that greater severity of psychological IPV was uniquely and directly related to greater sexual risk behavior. Additionally, of the four PTSD symptom severity clusters, only avoidance symptom severity mediated the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior. CONCLUSION Implications for addressing psychological IPV and PTSD to improve women’s sexual health outcomes are discussed. PMID:25498762

  2. [Burnout : concepts and implications affecting public health].

    PubMed

    Segura, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Burnout was originally described as a mental condition characterized by reduced work performance, impotence, frustration and lack of capability to reach objectives or goals while performing a job. For some authors, burnout is a poorly defined mixture of symptoms and signs, while other professionals think of it as a disease and a potential threat to public health. Worldwide, it has been observed that the most afflicted professionals and technicians are those who work providing services or assistance to other people, especially those dedicated to health care. This paper focuses on the idea that burnout should be considered a disease more than a syndrome. On the other hand, definitions of health and disease have changed with time, as well as theoretical and methodological references about burnout. In addition, burnout remains a condition that is being discussed in various scientific areas, with radically opposing positions; these approaches are discussed in this article. After presenting different conceptions regarding burnout, the essay concludes with an exploration of its implications and the identification of possible treatments, especially for health workers, among whom it is more common depending on their predisposing conditions and environments. PMID:25504242

  3. Elevated Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Human Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Postpartum Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ilona S.; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Hobel, Calvin J.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Postpartum depression (PPD) is common and has serious implications for the mother and her newborn. A possible link between placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) and PPD incidence has been discussed, but there is a lack of empirical evidence. Objective To determine whether accelerated pCRH increases throughout pregnancy are associated with PPD symptoms. Design Pregnant women were recruited into this longitudinal cohort study. Blood samples were obtained at 15, 19, 25, 31 and 37 weeks gestational age (GA) for assessment of pCRH, cortisol and ACTH. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a standardized questionnaire at the last four pregnancy visits and postpartum. Setting Subjects were recruited from two Southern California Medical Centers, and visits were conducted in university research laboratories. Participants 100 adult women with a singleton pregnancy. Main Outcome Measure PPD symptoms were assessed 8.7 weeks (SD = 2.94 wks) after delivery with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Results Sixteen women developed PPD symptoms. At 25 weeks GA, pCRH was a strong predictor of PPD symptoms (R2 = .21, β = .46, p < .001), an effect that remained significant after controlling for prenatal depressive symptoms. No significant associations were found for cortisol and ACTH. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses revealed that pCRH at 25 weeks GA is a useful diagnostic test (area under the curve = .78, p = .001). Sensitivity (.75) and specificity (.74) at the ideal cut-off point (56.86 pg/ml pCRH) were high. Growth curve analyses indicated that pCRH trajectories in women with PPD symptoms are significantly accelerated between 23 and 26 weeks GA. Conclusion There is a critical period in mid-pregnancy during which pCRH is a sensitive and specific early diagnostic test for PPD symptoms. If replicated, these results have implications for identification and treatment of pregnant women at risk of PPD. PMID:19188538

  4. Anxiety symptoms in young people with autism spectrum disorder attending special schools: Associations with gender, adaptive functioning and autism symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Magiati, Iliana; Ong, Clarissa; Lim, Xin Yi; Tan, Julianne Wen-Li; Ong, Amily Yi Lin; Patrycia, Ferninda; Fung, Daniel Shuen Sheng; Sung, Min; Poon, Kenneth K; Howlin, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Anxiety-related problems are among the most frequently reported mental health difficulties in autism spectrum disorder. As most research has focused on clinical samples or high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder, less is known about the factors associated with anxiety in community samples across the ability range. This cross-sectional study examined the association of gender, age, adaptive functioning and autism symptom severity with different caregiver-reported anxiety symptoms. Participants were caregivers of 241 children (6-18 years old) with autism spectrum disorder attending special schools in Singapore. Measures included the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale and assessments of overall emotional, behavioural and adaptive functioning. Caregivers reported more anxiety symptoms in total, but fewer social anxiety symptoms, than Spence Children's Anxiety Scale Australian/Dutch norms. There were no gender differences. Variance in total anxiety scores was best explained by severity of repetitive speech/stereotyped behaviour symptoms, followed by adaptive functioning. Severity of repetitive speech/behaviour symptoms was a significant predictor of separation anxiety, generalized anxiety, panic/agoraphobia and obsessive-compulsive subscale symptoms, but not of social phobia and physical injury fears. Adaptive functioning and chronological age predicted social phobia and generalized anxiety symptoms only. Severity of social/communication autism symptoms did not explain any anxiety symptoms, when the other variables were controlled for. Findings are discussed in relation to the existing literature. Limitations and possible implications for prevention, assessment and intervention are also discussed. PMID:25916865

  5. [Negative symptoms: clinical and psychometric aspects].

    PubMed

    Adida, M; Azorin, J-M; Belzeaux, R; Fakra, E

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis have suggested that negative symptoms are multidimensional, including evidence for at least two distinct negative symptom subdomains: diminished expression and amotivation. Guidance for selection of instruments for measurement of negative symptoms is rapidly evolving. As there are continuing advances in the description of negative symptoms, new instruments are under development, and new data on the performance of instruments emerge from clinical trials. The Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment-16 (NSA-16) are considered to be reliable and valid measures for negative symptom trials but differ with respect to their domain coverage, use of informants, integration of global scores, administration time and comprehensiveness of their structured interviews. In response to the 2005 NIMH - MATRICS consensus statement, work groups are field testing and refining two new measures, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Both address the five currently recognized domains of negative symptoms, differentiate appetitive from consummatory aspects of anhedonia and address desire for social relationships. Thus far, both have exhibited promising psychometric properties. PMID:26776385

  6. Spouses and depressive symptoms in older adulthood.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Neeti; Sutin, Angelina R

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms may co-occur within couples and follow similar trajectories, but relatively little is known about this process in old age. This study thus examined the association between some spousal characteristics (spouse's depressive symptoms, age difference between spouses) and the trajectory of depressive symptoms in older adults. Participants ≥ 65 years old were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (N = 12,010; Mean age = 70.60 and 69.16 for target husbands and wives, respectively). Depressive symptoms were measured with a short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. Hierarchical Linear Modeling was used to model up to 9 assessments of depressive symptoms of target spouses (Mean number of CESD assessments per target spouse = 3, range 1-9). Depressive symptoms between spouses were correlated; convergence over time was modest. For both husbands and wives, having a younger spouse was associated with more depressive symptoms at age 65. These results suggest that there is concordance between spouses' depressive symptoms and that the age difference between spouses contribute to depressive symptoms as couples enter old age. The association between spouses' depressive symptoms is nearly as strong as the effect of each decade increase in age. PMID:25716455

  7. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  8. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  9. Initial Evaluation of an Electronic Symptom Diary for Adolescents with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Faith; Coll, Beatriz; Kletter, Richard; Zeltzer, Paul; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background The delivery of optimal care depends on accurate communication between patients and clinicians regarding untoward symptoms. Documentation of patients’ symptoms necessitates reliance on memory, which is often imprecise. We developed an electronic diary (eDiary) for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer to record symptoms. Objective The purpose of this paper is to describe the utility of an eDiary designed for AYAs with cancer, including dependability of the mobile application, the reasons for any missing recorded data, patients’ adherence rates to daily symptom queries, and patients’ perceptions of the usefulness and acceptability of symptom data collection via mobile phones. Methods Our team developed an electronic symptom diary based on interviews conducted with AYAs with cancer and their clinicians. This diary included daily severity ratings of pain, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and sleep. The occurrence of other selected physical sequelae was assessed daily. Additionally, patients selected descriptors of their mood. A 3-week trial of the eDiary was conducted with 10 AYA cancer patients. Mobile phones with service plans were loaned to patients who were instructed to report their symptoms daily. Patients completed a brief questionnaire and were interviewed to elicit their perceptions of the eDiary and any technical difficulties encountered. Results Overall adherence to daily symptom reports exceeded 90%. Young people experienced few technical difficulties and reported benefit from daily symptom reports. Symptom occurrence rates were high and considerable inter- and intra-patient variability was noted in symptom and mood reports. Conclusions We demonstrated the utility of an eDiary that may contribute insight into patients’ symptom patterns to promote effective symptom management. PMID:23612521

  10. Emotion Regulation Mediates the Association Between ADHD and Depressive Symptoms in a Community Sample of Youth

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Karen E.; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Iwamoto, Derek K.; Kurdziel, Gretchen; MacPherson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal relationship between attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, emotion regulation (ER) ability, and depressive symptoms within a diverse community sample of 277 youth, ages 9–12 (56 % male). Participants were drawn from a larger study examining adolescent risk behaviors, and completed annual assessments over 3 years. Youth ADHD symptoms were assessed at Time 1 (T1) using the parent-reported Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale, ER was assessed with the parent-reported Emotion Regulation Checklist at Time 2 (T2), and youth depressive symptoms were assessed using the self-reported Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales at Time 3 (T3). Analyses examined T2 ER as a mediator between T1 ADHD symptoms (including the unique contributions of inattentive [IA] versus hyperactive/impulsive [HI] symptoms) and T3 depressive symptoms. Structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated the path model specified provided an excellent fit to the data. Tests of indirect effects suggested that T2 ER appears to be a significant mechanism that underlies the relationship between T1 ADHD and T3 depression, even when accounting for T1 oppositional defiant and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, while both T1 IA and HI symptoms had significant indirect effects on T3 depression through the mechanism T2 ER, HI proved a more robust predictor of T2 ER than IA. Results of this prospective study support cross-sectional findings pointing to ER as a potential mechanism linking ADHD and depressive symptoms in youth. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:24221724

  11. Emotion regulation mediates the association between ADHD and depressive symptoms in a community sample of youth.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Karen E; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Iwamoto, Derek K; Kurdziel, Gretchen; Macpherson, Laura

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal relationship between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, emotion regulation (ER) ability, and depressive symptoms within a diverse community sample of 277 youth, ages 9-12 (56 % male). Participants were drawn from a larger study examining adolescent risk behaviors, and completed annual assessments over 3 years. Youth ADHD symptoms were assessed at Time 1 (T1) using the parent-reported Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale, ER was assessed with the parent-reported Emotion Regulation Checklist at Time 2 (T2), and youth depressive symptoms were assessed using the self-reported Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales at Time 3 (T3). Analyses examined T2 ER as a mediator between T1 ADHD symptoms (including the unique contributions of inattentive [IA] versus hyperactive/impulsive [HI] symptoms) and T3 depressive symptoms. Structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated the path model specified provided an excellent fit to the data. Tests of indirect effects suggested that T2 ER appears to be a significant mechanism that underlies the relationship between T1 ADHD and T3 depression, even when accounting for T1 oppositional defiant and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, while both T1 IA and HI symptoms had significant indirect effects on T3 depression through the mechanism T2 ER, HI proved a more robust predictor of T2 ER than IA. Results of this prospective study support cross-sectional findings pointing to ER as a potential mechanism linking ADHD and depressive symptoms in youth. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:24221724

  12. Genome-wide linkage and follow-up association study of postpartum mood symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, PB; Payne, JL; MacKinnon, DF; Mondimore, FM; Goes, FS; Schweizer, B; Jancic, D; Coryell, WH; Holmans, PA; Shi, J; Knowles, JA; Scheftner, WA; Weissman, MM; Levinson, DF; DePaulo, JR; Zandi, PP; Potash, JB

    2013-01-01

    Objective Family studies have suggested that postpartum mood symptoms might have a partly genetic etiology. The authors used a genome-wide linkage analysis to search for chromosomal regions that harbor genetic variants conferring susceptibility for such symptoms. The authors then fine-mapped their best linkage regions, assessing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic association with postpartum symptoms. Method Subjects were ascertained from two studies: the NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder project and the Genetics of Recurrent Early-Onset Depression. Subjects included women with a history of pregnancy, any mood disorder, and information about postpartum symptoms. In the linkage study, 1,210 women met criteria (23% with postpartum symptoms), and 417 microsatellite markers were analyzed in multipoint allele sharing analyses. For the association study, 759 women met criteria (25% with postpartum symptoms), and 16,916 SNPs in the regions of the best linkage peaks were assessed for association with postpartum symptoms. Results The maximum linkage peak for postpartum symptoms occurred on chromosome 1q21.3-q32.1, with a chromosome-wide significant likelihood ratio Z score (ZLR) of 2.93 (permutation p=0.02). This was a significant increase over the baseline ZLR of 0.32 observed at this locus among all women with a mood disorder (permutation p=0.004). Suggestive linkage was also found on 9p24.3-p22.3 (ZLR=2.91). In the fine-mapping study, the strongest implicated gene was HMCN1 (nominal p=0.00017), containing four estrogen receptor binding sites, although this was not region-wide significant. Conclusions This is the first study to examine the genetic etiology of postpartum mood symptoms using genome-wide data. The results suggest that genetic variations on chromosomes 1q21.3-q32.1 and 9p24.3-p22.3 may increase susceptibility to postpartum mood symptoms. PMID:19755578

  13. Symptom clusters at midlife: A four-country comparison of checklist and qualitative responses

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency and clustering of somatic symptoms as reported by women aged 45-55 years in four countries, to compare women's responses to open-ended questions with those derived from structured checklists, and to assess the extent to which bodily symptoms grouped with emotional complaints. Methods The Decisions at Menopause Study (DAMES) recruited 1,193 women from the general population in Beirut, Lebanon; Rabat, Morocco; Madrid, Spain; and central Massachusetts. Women participated in semi-structured interviews about health, menopause, and bodily changes at midlife. Women's responses to symptom checklists and their statements in response to open-ended questions were analyzed through factor analysis and textual analysis. Results There was considerable consistency between the frequencies of quantitative and qualitative responses, and the analyses of qualitative data illustrate the extent to which women associate somatic and emotional complaints. In open-ended responses, women in Massachusetts and Spain did not often cluster somatic symptoms together with emotional symptoms. In Morocco, dizziness, fatigue, and headaches were clustered with emotional symptoms. Women in Lebanon explicitly associated shortness of breath, chest pain, palpitations, dizziness, fatigue, gastro-intestinal complaints, headaches, and, to a lesser extent, joint pain and numbness with emotional symptoms. Conclusions The number of volunteered symptom responses was small because respondents were relatively healthy; however, the extent and pattern of association between somatic and emotional symptoms varied across sites. Certain somatic symptoms may be more likely to communicate psychosocial distress in particular cultures. These results have implications for patterns of health care utilization. PMID:22042326

  14. Media exposure and dimensions of anxiety sensitivity: differential associations with PTSD symptom clusters.

    PubMed

    Collimore, Kelsey C; McCabe, Randi E; Carleton, R Nicholas; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2008-08-01

    The present investigation examined the impact of anxiety sensitivity (AS) and media exposure on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Reactions from 143 undergraduate students in Hamilton, Ontario were assessed in the Fall of 2003 to gather information on anxiety, media coverage, and PTSD symptoms related to exposure to a remote traumatic event (September 11th). Regression analyses revealed that the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI; [Peterson, R. A., & Reiss, S. (1992). Anxiety Sensitivity Index manual, 2nd ed. Worthington, Ohio: International Diagnostic Systems]) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait form (STAI-T; [Spielberger, C. D., Gorsuch, R. L., & Lushene, R. E. (1970). State-trait anxiety inventory. Palo Alto, California: Consulting Psychologists Press]) total scores were significant predictors of PTSD symptoms in general. The ASI total score was also a significant predictor of hyperarousal and avoidance symptoms. Subsequent analyses further demonstrated differential relationships based on subscales and symptom clusters. Specifically, media exposure and trait anxiety predicted hyperarousal and re-experiencing symptoms, whereas the ASI fear of somatic sensations subscale significantly predicted avoidance and overall PTSD symptoms. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:18093798

  15. "But it might be a heart attack": intolerance of uncertainty and panic disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Duranceau, Sophie; Freeston, Mark H; Boelen, Paul A; McCabe, Randi E; Antony, Martin M

    2014-06-01

    Panic disorder models describe interactions between feared anxiety-related physical sensations (i.e., anxiety sensitivity; AS) and catastrophic interpretations therein. Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has been implicated as necessary for catastrophic interpretations in community samples. The current study examined relationships between IU, AS, and panic disorder symptoms in a clinical sample. Participants had a principal diagnosis of panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia (n=132; 66% women). IU was expected to account for significant variance in panic symptoms controlling for AS. AS was expected to mediate the relationship between IU and panic symptoms, whereas IU was expected to moderate the relationship between AS and panic symptoms. Hierarchical linear regressions indicated that IU accounted for significant unique variance in panic symptoms relative to AS, with comparable part correlations. Mediation and moderation models were also tested and suggested direct and indirect effects of IU on panic symptoms through AS; however, an interaction effect was not supported. The current cross-sectional evidence supports a role for IU in panic symptoms, independent of AS. PMID:24873884

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Studying Schizophrenia, Negative Symptoms, and the Glutamate System

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Oliver; Chadha Santuccione, Antonella; Aach, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms. While positive symptoms occur periodically during psychotic exacerbations, negative and cognitive symptoms often emerge before the first psychotic episode and persist with low functional outcome and poor prognosis. This review article outlines the importance of modern functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques for developing a stratified therapy of schizophrenic disorders. Functional neuroimaging evidence on the neural correlates of positive and particularly negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenic disorders is briefly reviewed. Acute dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission is crucially involved in the occurrence of psychotic symptoms. However, increasing evidence also implicates glutamatergic pathomechanisms, in particular N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dysfunction in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and in the appearance of negative symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions. In line with this notion, several gene variants affecting the NMDA receptor’s pathway have been reported to increase susceptibility for schizophrenia, and have been investigated using the imaging genetics approach. In recent years, several attempts have been made to develop medications modulating the glutamatergic pathway with modest evidences for efficacy. The most successful approaches were those that aimed at influencing this pathway using compounds that enhance NMDA receptor function. More recently, the selective glycine reuptake inhibitor bitopertin has been shown to improve NMDA receptor hypofunction by increasing glycine concentrations in the synaptic cleft. Further research is required to test whether pharmacological agents with effects on the glutamatergic system can help to improve the treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenic disorders. PMID:24765078

  17. Internalized stigma of mental illness and depressive and psychotic symptoms in homeless veterans over 6 months.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jennifer E; Hayward, H'Sien; Bassett, Elena D; Hoff, Rani

    2016-06-30

    We investigated the relationship between internalized stigma of mental illness at baseline and depressive and psychotic symptoms 3 and 6 months later, controlling for baseline symptoms. Data on homeless veterans with severe mental illness (SMI) were provided by the Northeast Program Evaluation Center (NEPEC) Special Needs-Chronic Mental Illness (SN-CMI) study (Kasprow and Rosenheck, 2008). The study used the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) scale to measure internalized stigma at baseline and the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) to measure depressive and psychotic symptoms at baseline and 3 and 6 month follow-ups. Higher levels of internalized stigma were associated with greater levels of depressive and psychotic symptoms 3 and 6 months later, even controlling for symptoms at baseline. Alienation and Discrimination Experience were the subscales most strongly associated with symptoms. Exploratory analyses of individual items yielded further insight into characteristics of potentially successful interventions that could be studied. Overall, our findings show that homeless veterans with SMI experiencing higher levels of internalized stigma are likely to experience more depression and psychosis over time. This quasi-experimental study replicates and extends findings of other studies and has implications for future controlled research into the potential long-term effects of anti-stigma interventions on mental health recovery. PMID:27138814

  18. Prevalence and correlates of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in Korean college students

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Young-Sook; Jung, Young-Eun; Kim, Moon-Doo

    2015-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) persists into adulthood in a high proportion of cases, causing social difficulties and affective problems. We evaluated the prevalence of symptoms of ADHD and the correlates thereof in Korean college students. Methods A total of 2,172 college students, stratified to reflect geographical differences, were asked to complete self-report questionnaires on ADHD symptoms, depression, and related factors. Results ADHD symptoms were found in 7.6% of college students. Univariate analysis revealed that younger students had higher rates of ADHD symptoms than did older students. We found significant associations between ADHD symptoms and problematic alcohol use, depression, and lifetime suicidal behavior. Multivariate analysis revealed that ADHD symptoms in adults were significantly associated with depression (odds ratio [OR] =4.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.23–6.80; P<0.001) and overweight or obesity (OR =1.50; 95% CI 1.02–2.22; P=0.040), after controlling for sex and age. Conclusion These results have implications in terms of the mental health interventions required to assess problems such as depression, alcohol use, obesity, and suicidality in young adults with ADHD symptoms. PMID:25848277

  19. Measuring post-concussion symptoms in adolescents: feasibility of ecological momentary assessment.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Lawrence; Rieger, Brian; Smyth, Joshua; Perry, Lorraine; Gathje, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    Although there is a large literature examining head trauma in general, several areas remain understudied. Notably, little is known about symptom expression over the course of a day for adolescents recovering from concussion. Furthermore, intra-individual symptom variability has not been well characterized. This pilot study examined the feasibility of a momentary data-gathering method, as well as the sensitivity of the assessment to the subtle and dynamic changes in symptoms of concussion. Six adolescents, three of whom suffered a concussion and three non-injured controls, provided symptom ratings five times per day for 5 days. This ecological momentary assessment (EMA) was conducted on a personal digital assistant to capture variability in symptom reports while in the natural environment. Preliminary results indicated that the EMA method showed great promise as a research tool in natural settings (e.g., school and home). Adolescents were able to comply with all tasks with little interference in their daily activities. Students with concussion showed generally higher symptom ratings across physical, cognitive, and affective domains, and temporal and diurnal patterns for symptoms emerged. Implications for future research and patient care are discussed. PMID:19892712

  20. Brooding and reflection as explanatory of depressive symptoms in adolescents experiencing stressful life events.

    PubMed

    Young, Cara Calloway; Dietrich, Mary S; Lutenbacher, Melanie

    2014-03-01

    Delineating etiologic mechanisms of adolescent-onset depressive disorders has implications for advances in depression recognition and prevention. Two cognitive processes, namely brooding and reflection, may be instrumental in the development of depressive symptoms. Study aims were to (1) examine the relationships among brooding, reflection, dysfunctional attitudes, negative inferential style, stressful life events, and depressive symptoms and (2) determine the unique contributions of brooding and reflection to depressive symptoms in adolescents who are experiencing stressful life events. A secondary data analysis was conducted using cross-sectional data gathered via a web-based survey (N = 111) of 12-15 year olds. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlations, and hierarchical linear regression modeling were used to evaluate study aims. The final regression model explained approximately 73% of the variance in depressive symptoms (Multiple R = 0.85, p < .001). After controlling for each of the study variables, both brooding (beta = .48, p < .001) and reflection (beta = .33, p < .001) demonstrated unique contributions to the prevalence of depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that brooding and reflection are significant contributors to depressive symptoms in young adolescents experiencing stressful life events. With this knowledge, nurses are better equipped to identify adolescents at high risk for depressive symptoms and implement appropriate levels of intervention. PMID:24597582

  1. Depressive symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: do stress and coping matter?

    PubMed

    Shah, Bijal M; Gupchup, Gireesh V; Borrego, Matthew E; Raisch, Dennis W; Knapp, Katherine K

    2012-04-01

    This article examines the relationship among diabetes-related stress, appraisal, coping and depressive symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the transactional model of stress and coping (TMSC) as the theoretical framework. In this cross-sectional study, a convenience sample of 201 patients with T2DM was recruited from three outpatient clinics. Patients with depressive symptoms reported significantly more diabetes-related stress than patients without depressive symptoms. The results of path analysis suggest that patients who experience greater diabetes-related stress or greater depressive symptoms have a negative appraisal of their diabetes. Negative appraisal is, in turn, associated with greater use of avoidance, passive resignation and diabetes integration coping and lesser use of problem-focused coping. Avoidance, passive resignation and diabetes integration coping are, in turn, related to greater depressive symptoms or greater diabetes-related stress. Overall, the results of this study support the TMSC as a framework to elucidate the relationships among diabetes-related stress, appraisal, coping and depressive symptoms in patients with T2DM. However, given the cross-sectional nature of the study, we are unable to elucidate the directionality of the relationship between stress and depressive symptoms. Implications of the findings and the need for longitudinal studies to evaluate these relationships are discussed. PMID:22282035

  2. Parenting Behavior Mediates the Intergenerational Association of Parent and Child Offspring ADHD Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tung, Irene; Brammer, Whitney A; Li, James J; Lee, Steve S

    2015-01-01

    Although there are likely to be multiple mechanisms underlying parent attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms as a key risk factor for offspring ADHD, potential explanatory factors have yet to be reliably identified. Given that parent ADHD symptoms independently predict parenting behavior and child ADHD symptoms, we tested whether individual differences in multiple dimensions of positive and negative parenting behavior (i.e., corporal punishment, inconsistent discipline, positive parenting behavior, observed negative talk, and observed praise) mediated the association between parental and offspring ADHD. We used a prospective design that featured predictors (i.e., parent ADHD symptoms) and mediators (i.e., parenting behavior) that temporally preceded the outcome (i.e., offspring ADHD symptoms). Using a well-characterized sample of 120 children with and without ADHD (ages 5-10 at Wave 1, 7-12 at Wave 2) and their biological parents, we examined multimethod (i.e., observed, self-report) measures of positive and negative parenting behavior as simultaneous mediators of the association of Wave 1 parent and Wave 2 offspring ADHD symptoms. Using a multiple mediation framework, consisting of rigorous bootstrapping procedures and controlling for parent depression, child's baseline ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder, and child's age, corporal punishment significantly and uniquely mediated the association of Wave 1 parent ADHD symptoms and Wave 2 offspring ADHD. We consider the role of parenting behavior in the intergenerational transmission of ADHD as well as implications of these findings for the intervention and prevention of childhood ADHD. PMID:24926775

  3. Childhood stress and symptoms of drug dependence in adolescence and early adulthood: social phobia as a mediator.

    PubMed

    DeWit, D J; MacDonald, K; Offord, D R

    1999-01-01

    Retrospective data from 7,871 individuals age 16 to 64 were used to investigate whether, among those diagnosed with lifetime social phobia, its symptoms serve to link life events and chronic strains in childhood with symptoms of drug dependence in adulthood. Findings suggest social phobia as a pathway through which early life events and chronic strains affect the development of drug-related problems. Implications for research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:9990437

  4. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Artery Disease? Many people ... flow, so the symptoms will go away. Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms of P. ...

  5. A symptom-related monitoring program following pulmonary embolism for the early detection of CTEPH: a prospective observational registry study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a long-term complication following an acute pulmonary embolism (PE). It is frequently diagnosed at advanced stages which is concerning as delayed treatment has important implications for favourable clinical outcome. Performing a follow-up examination of patients diagnosed with acute PE regardless of persisting symptoms and using all available technical procedures would be both cost-intensive and possibly ineffective. Focusing diagnostic procedures therefore on only symptomatic patients may be a practical approach for detecting relevant CTEPH. This study aimed to evaluate if a follow-up program for patients with acute PE based on telephone monitoring of symptoms and further examination of only symptomatic patients could detect CTEPH. In addition, we investigated the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) as a diagnostic tool. Methods In a prospective cohort study all consecutive patients with newly diagnosed PE (n=170, 76 males, 94 females within 26 months) were recruited according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were contacted via telephone and asked to answer standardized questions relating to symptoms. At the time of the final analysis 130 patients had been contacted. Symptomatic patients underwent a structured evaluation with echocardiography, CPET and complete work-up for CTEPH. Results 37.7%, 25.5% and 29.3% of the patients reported symptoms after three, six, and twelve months respectively. Subsequent clinical evaluation of these symptomatic patients saw 20.4%, 11.5% and 18.8% of patients at the respective three, six and twelve months time points having an echocardiography suggesting pulmonary hypertension (PH). CTEPH with pathological imaging and a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) ≥ 25 mm Hg at rest was confirmed in eight subjects. Three subjects with mismatch perfusion defects showed an exercise induced increase of PAP without increasing pulmonary artery

  6. Cognitive phenotype of psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: evidence for impaired visuoperceptual function in the misidentification subtype

    PubMed Central

    Clark‐Papasavas, Chloe; Gould, Rebecca L.; Ffytche, Dominic; Howard, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Establishing the cognitive phenotype of psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease (AD) could localise discrete pathology and target symptomatic treatment. This study aimed to establish whether psychotic symptoms would be associated with poorer performance on neuropsychological tests known to correlate with striatal dopaminergic function and to investigate whether these differences would be attributed to the paranoid (persecutory delusions) or misidentification (misidentification phenomena +/− hallucinations) subtype. Methods Seventy patients with probable AD (34 psychotic and 36 nonpsychotic) were recruited to the study. Analysis of covariance was used to compare motor speed and the rapid visual processing test of sustained visual attention, after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Multivariate analyses were used to compare performance across other cognitive domains. Significant findings were explored by separating patients on the basis of subtype. Results Rapid visual processing performance accuracy was reduced in patients with psychotic symptoms (F 1,58 = 5.94, p = 0.02) and differed significantly across subtypes (F 2,51 = 3.94, p = 0.03), largely because of poorer performance in the misidentification compared with nonpsychotic group. Multivariate analyses (corrected for multiple comparisons) showed poorer performance on the incomplete letters task in psychotic patients (F 1,63 = 8.77, p = 0.004) and across subtypes (F 2,55 = 10.90, p < 0.001), similarly attributed to the misidentification subtype. Conclusions These findings provide further support of the involvement of dopaminergic networks in the psychosis endophenotype in AD and, in addition, implicate the ventral (temporo‐occipital) pathway in the misidentification subtype. Future studies should investigate the early trajectory of neuropathological change in vivo across psychosis subtypes.© 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric

  7. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  8. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  9. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  10. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  11. Treatment of Non Pain-Related Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    von Gunten, Charles F.; Gafford, Ellin

    2013-01-01

    Relieving the suffering associated with cancer and its treatment in the physical, emotional, practical and spiritual domains is impossible without impeccable symptom control. This review summarizes key features essential to the management of: anorexia/cachexia, bowel obstruction, diarrhea, fatigue, mucositis, and nausea/vomiting. Taken together, these are some of the most vexing symptoms for cancer patients. Well-managed symptoms enable the course of overall cancer care to be unimpeded. PMID:24051612

  12. Overt Social Support Behaviors: Associations With PTSD, Concurrent Depressive Symptoms and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Crevier, Myra G.; Marchand, André; Nachar, Nadim; Guay, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Women are twice as likely as men to develop a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Gender differences in social support after a traumatic event might partially explain this disparity. However, the portrait of the links among PTSD, depression, social support, and gender is still unclear. This study examined behaviors of individuals with PTSD and their significant other in relation to PTSD and concurrent depressive symptoms, and tested gender as a moderator of these associations. Observed overt supportive and countersupportive behaviors of 68 dyads composed of an individual with PTSD and a significant other in a trauma-oriented discussion were coded with a support coding system and analyzed according to gender. Gender was revealed to act as a moderator of the links between interactional behaviors of individuals with PTSD and their concurrent depressive symptoms. More specifically, women were less implicated and less likely to propose positive solutions compared with men. On the other hand, men were more implicated and less likely to criticize their significant other than were women. PTSD and concurrent depressive symptoms were related to poorer interpersonal communication in women. Hence, women and men with PTSD and concurrent depressive symptoms might benefit from gender-tailored interventions targeting symptoms and dyadic behaviors. PMID:26440610

  13. Identifying early pathways of risk and resilience: The co-development of internalizing and externalizing symptoms and the role of harsh parenting

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Mitchell, Colter; Hyde, Luke W.; Monk, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Psychological disorders co-occur often in children, but little has been done to document the types of conjoint pathways internalizing and externalizing symptoms may take from the crucial early period of toddlerhood or how harsh parenting may overlap with early symptom co-development. To examine symptom co-development trajectories, we identified latent classes of individuals based on internalizing and externalizing symptoms across ages 3–9 and found three symptom co-development classes: normative symptoms (low), severe-decreasing symptoms (initially high but rapidly declining) and severe symptoms (high) trajectories. Next, joint models examined how parenting trajectories overlapped with internalizing and externalizing symptom trajectories. These trajectory classes demonstrated that, normatively, harsh parenting increased after toddlerhood, but the severe symptoms class was characterized by a higher level and steeper increase in harsh parenting and the severe-decreasing class by high, stable harsh parenting. Additionally, a transactional model examined the bi-directional relationships among internalizing and externalizing symptoms and harsh parenting as they may cascade over time in this early period. Harsh parenting uniquely contributed to externalizing symptoms, controlling for internalizing symptoms, but not vice versa. Also, internalizing symptoms appeared to be a mechanism by which externalizing symptoms increase. Results highlight the importance accounting for both internalizing and externalizing symptoms from an early age to understand risk for developing psychopathology and the role harsh parenting plays in influencing these trajectories. PMID:26439075

  14. [Cultural assimilation and factitious symptoms].

    PubMed

    Chambonet, J Y

    1998-01-01

    With description of the case of a patient birth in Maroco and emigrated in France at 10 years old, met during 6 years, we try to include signs noticed in a nosologic entity. Some patients offer many complaints and have very frequent contacts for themselves or their family, with the practitioners. Events of current life grow expression of their troubles. Cultural difference will be integrated in anamnesis, hearing and in care. Production of symptoms for himself or for children are called: factitious disorders, Münchhausen's syndrome, Polle's syndrome or Meadow's syndrome. Generally physicians are in check with these patients. During medical session this relationship requires to try to have clarifications or have research of meaning. These patients are very often refractory in psychotherapy and no compliant for institutional therapy. For second generation of immigrants, cultural identity is in conflict with personal identity, in part caused by the decay of social group of belonging. Troubles caused by distortion of fusional relation with mother can be favoring factors of these diseases for Maghrebian patients. PMID:9622794

  15. Autism and ADHD Symptoms in Patients with OCD: Are They Associated with Specific OC Symptom Dimensions or OC Symptom Severity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anholt, Gideon E.; Cath, Danielle C.; van Oppen, Patricia; Eikelenboom, Merijn; Smit, Johannes H.; van Megen, Harold; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    2010-01-01

    In obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the relationship between autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom, and obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptom dimensions and severity has scarcely been studied. Therefore, 109 adult outpatients with primary OCD were compared to 87 healthy controls on OC, ADHD and…

  16. Understanding the somatic consequences of depression: biological mechanisms and the role of depression symptom profile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder worldwide. The burden of disease for depression goes beyond functioning and quality of life and extends to somatic health. Depression has been shown to subsequently increase the risk of, for example, cardiovascular, stroke, diabetes and obesity morbidity. These somatic consequences could partly be due to metabolic, immuno-inflammatory, autonomic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis dysregulations which have been suggested to be more often present among depressed patients. Evidence linking depression to metabolic syndrome abnormalities indicates that depression is especially associated with its obesity-related components (for example, abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia). In addition, systemic inflammation and hyperactivity of the HPA-axis have been consistently observed among depressed patients. Slightly less consistent observations are for autonomic dysregulation among depressed patients. The heterogeneity of the depression concept seems to play a differentiating role: metabolic syndrome and inflammation up-regulations appear more specific to the atypical depression subtype, whereas hypercortisolemia appears more specific for melancholic depression. This review finishes with potential treatment implications for the downward spiral in which different depressive symptom profiles and biological dysregulations may impact on each other and interact with somatic health decline. PMID:23672628

  17. Relationship Between Depression and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Secondary to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Claire; Laor, Leanna; Te, Alexis; Kaplan, Steven; Chughtai, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current data on the relationship between depression and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), with a focus on pathophysiology and patient management implications. Review of the literature indicated a clear relationship between LUTS secondary to BPH and depression. It is unknown whether this relationship is bidirectional or unidirectional. Depression is associated with the impact of LUTS on quality of life in men with BPH. Research suggests that depression alters the experience of LUTS in this population. Medical and surgical treatments for BPH may impact quality of life and, therefore, depression. Results conflict on the exact nature of the relationship examined, and on the extent to which the relationship may be attributed to physiological factors such as inflammation. Practicing clinicians should consider using a brief self-administered scale to assess for depression in patients with BPH. There is a clear need for additional research to decisively determine the nature of the relationship between LUTS secondary to BPH and depression, as well as the extent to which change in either condition may be affected by the other.

  18. Parasympathetic Reactivity in Fibromyalgia and Temporomandibular Disorder: Associations with Sleep Problems, Symptom Severity, and Functional Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A.; Crofford, Leslie J.; Howard, Thomas; Yepes, Juan F.; Carlson, Charles R.; de Leeuw, Reny

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence of autonomic disturbances in chronic multi-symptom illnesses such as temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and fibromyalgia (FM), additional work is needed to characterize the role of parasympathetic reactivity in these disorders. Given the high levels of comorbidity with psychiatric disorders characterized by stronger parasympathetic reductions than controls in safe contexts (leading to higher arousal), it was hypothesized that individuals with TMD and FM would respond similarly. In this preliminary investigation, 43 women with TMD (n = 17), TMD + FM (n = 11), or neither (controls; n = 15) completed a baseline assessment of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA; a measure of parasympathetic activity) followed by ongoing parasympathetic assessment during a questionnaire period. As predicted, patients showed greater parasympathetic decline in response to the questionnaire period, suggesting an autonomic stance that supports defensive rather than engagement behaviors. Individual differences in parasympathetic reduction during the questionnaire period were related to a variety of physical and psychosocial variables. Although this study has a number of key limitations, including a convenience sampling approach and the small group sizes, if replicated in larger samples, the findings would have important implications for the treatment of patients with these disorders. Perspective Compared to controls, individuals with temporomandibular disorders or temporomandibular disorder and fibromyalgia demonstrated greater parasympathetic reduction during psychosocial assessment, and individual differences in parasympathetic reduction predicted negative patient outcomes. Such parasympathetic reductions may betray a tendency to readily perceive danger in safe environments. PMID:25542636

  19. Understanding the somatic consequences of depression: biological mechanisms and the role of depression symptom profile.

    PubMed

    Penninx, Brenda W J H; Milaneschi, Yuri; Lamers, Femke; Vogelzangs, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder worldwide. The burden of disease for depression goes beyond functioning and quality of life and extends to somatic health. Depression has been shown to subsequently increase the risk of, for example, cardiovascular, stroke, diabetes and obesity morbidity. These somatic consequences could partly be due to metabolic, immuno-inflammatory, autonomic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis dysregulations which have been suggested to be more often present among depressed patients. Evidence linking depression to metabolic syndrome abnormalities indicates that depression is especially associated with its obesity-related components (for example, abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia). In addition, systemic inflammation and hyperactivity of the HPA-axis have been consistently observed among depressed patients. Slightly less consistent observations are for autonomic dysregulation among depressed patients. The heterogeneity of the depression concept seems to play a differentiating role: metabolic syndrome and inflammation up-regulations appear more specific to the atypical depression subtype, whereas hypercortisolemia appears more specific for melancholic depression. This review finishes with potential treatment implications for the downward spiral in which different depressive symptom profiles and biological dysregulations may impact on each other and interact with somatic health decline. PMID:23672628

  20. Emotionally Biased Cognitive Processes: The Weakest Link Predicts Prospective Changes in Depressive Symptom Severity

    PubMed Central

    Everaert, Jonas; Duyck, Wouter; Koster, Ernst H. W.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory are predictive of future depressive symptoms. It remains unknown, however, how these biased cognitive processes interact to predict depressive symptom levels in the long-term. In the present study, we tested the predictive value of two integrative approaches to model relations between multiple biased cognitive processes, namely the additive (i.e., cognitive processes have a cumulative effect) vs. the weakest link (i.e., the dominant pathogenic process is important) model. We also tested whether these integrative models interacted with perceived stress to predict prospective changes in depressive symptom severity. At Time 1, participants completed measures of depressive symptom severity and emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory. At Time 2, one year later, participants were reassessed to determine depressive symptom levels and perceived stress. Results revealed that the weakest link model had incremental validity over the additive model in predicting prospective changes in depressive symptoms, though both models explained a significant proportion of variance in the change in depressive symptoms from Time 1 to Time 2. None of the integrative models interacted with perceived stress to predict changes in depressive symptomatology. These findings suggest that the best cognitive marker of the evolution in depressive symptoms is the cognitive process that is dominantly biased toward negative material, which operates independent from experienced stress. This highlights the importance of considering idiographic cognitive profiles with multiple cognitive processes for understanding and modifying effects of cognitive biases in depression. PMID:25951241

  1. Intimate Partner Victimization, Poor Relationship Quality, and Depressive Symptoms during Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.; Giordano, Peggy C.; Copp, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Examining longitudinal data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS) (n = 927), we assessed associations between physical victimization by an intimate partner, indicators of poor relationship quality, and depressive symptoms among young adult men and women in casually dating, exclusively dating, cohabiting, and marital relationships. In zero-order models, we found that physical victimization increased depressive symptoms. In multivariate models, victimization was a risk factor for depressive symptoms with the inclusion of prior depressive symptoms, family factors reflecting the intergenerational transmission of violence, sociodemographic background, and relationship characteristics including union status. Yet with the additional inclusion of indicators of poor relational quality, victimization was not a significant predictor of depressive symptoms. Arguing and poor communication influenced victimization and depressive symptoms. The associations between victimization and depressive symptoms did not differ by gender, nor were the effects of poor relationship quality on depressive symptoms conditional on gender. Thus, depressive symptoms are similarly responsive to intimate partner victimization, and for both women and men these associations were not significant with the inclusion of indicators of poor relationship quality. Findings underscored that victimization often occurs within relationship contexts characterized by a range of negative dynamics; thus multifaceted relationship-centered prevention and intervention efforts are likely to be more useful than those focusing only on negative messages about the use of aggression with an intimate partner. PMID:25131276

  2. Symptoms and fear in heart failure patients approaching end of life: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Abshire, Martha; Xu, Jiayun; Himmelfarb, Cheryl Dennison; Davidson, Patricia; Sulmasy, Daniel; Kub, Joan; Hughes, Mark; Nolan, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives The purpose of this study was to consider how fear and symptom experience are perceived in patients with heart failure at the end of life. Background Heart failure is a burdensome condition and mortality rates are high globally. There is substantive literature describing suffering and unmet needs but description of the experience of fear and the relationship with symptom burden is limited. Design A convergent mixed methods design was used. Methods Data from the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (n = 55) were compared to data from in-depth interviews (n = 5). Results Patients denied fear when asked directly, but frequently referred to moments of being afraid when they were experiencing symptoms. In addition, patients reported few troublesome symptoms on the survey, but mentioned many more symptoms during interviews. Conclusions These data not only identify the relationship between psychological issues and symptom experience but also elucidate the benefit of a mixed method approach in describing such experiences from the perspective of the patient. Future research should examine relationships between and among symptom experience, fear and other psychological constructs across the illness trajectory. Relevance to Clinical Practice Conversations about the interaction of symptom burden and fear can lead to both a more robust assessment of symptoms and lead to patient centred interventions. PMID:26404121

  3. Neural Response to Reward as a Predictor of Rise in Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Judith K.; Olino, Thomas M.; McMakin, Dana L.; Ryan, Neal D.; Forbes, Erika E.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period characterized by significant increases in the onset of depression, but also by increases in depressive symptoms, even among psychiatrically healthy youth. Disrupted reward function has been postulated as a critical factor in the development of depression, but it is still unclear which adolescents are particularly at risk for rising depressive symptoms. We provide a conceptual stance on gender, pubertal development, and reward type as potential moderators of the association between neural response to reward and rises in depressive symptoms. In addition, we describe preliminary findings that support claims of this conceptual stance. We propose that (1) status-related rewards may be particularly salient for eliciting neural response relevant to depressive symptoms in boys, whereas social rewards may be more salient for eliciting neural response relevant to depressive symptoms in girls and (2) the pattern of reduced striatal response and enhanced medial prefrontal response to reward may be particularly predictive of depressive symptoms in pubertal adolescents. We found that greater vmPFC activation when winning rewards predicted greater increases in depressive symptoms over two years, for boys only, and less striatal activation when anticipating rewards predicted greater increases in depressive symptoms over two years, for adolescents in mid to late pubertal stages but not those in pre to early puberty. We also propose directions for future studies, including the investigation of social vs. monetary reward directly and the longitudinal assessment of parallel changes in pubertal development, neural response to reward, and depressive symptoms. PMID:22521464

  4. Celiac symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    García-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Carrasco, Jorge Luis Ordóñez; Slim, Mahmoud; Calandre, Elena P

    2015-03-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome associated with numerous somatic symptoms including gastrointestinal manifestations of nonspecific nature. Celiac disease and nongluten sensitivity frequently evolve in adults with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms similar to those found among patients with fibromyalgia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of celiac-type symptoms among patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy subjects and with those experienced by adult celiac patients and subjects with gluten sensitivity. A list of typical celiac-type symptoms was developed, comparing the frequency of presentation of these symptoms between patients with fibromyalgia (N = 178) and healthy subjects (N = 131), in addition to those of celiac patients and gluten-sensitive patients reported in the literature. The frequency of presentation of every celiac-type symptom, excepting anemia, was significantly higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Regarding the existing data in the literature, the prevalence of fatigue, depression, cognitive symptoms and cutaneous lesions predominated among patients with fibromyalgia, whereas the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms was higher among patients with fibromyalgia compared to gluten-sensitive patients and was similar among patients with fibromyalgia and celiac disease patient. The symptomatological similarity of both pathologies, especially gastrointestinal symptoms, suggests that at least a subgroup of patients with fibromyalgia could experience subclinical celiac disease or nonceliac gluten intolerance. PMID:25119831

  5. A prospective longitudinal cohort study: evolution of GERD symptoms during the course of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in pregnancy are reported with a prevalence of 30–80%. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and severity of GERD symptoms during the course of pregnancy. Furthermore current practice in medical care for GERD during pregnancy was assessed. Methods We performed a prospective longitudinal cohort study on 510 pregnant women (mean age 28.12, SD 5.3). Investigations for reflux symptoms where based on the use of validated reflux-disease questionnaire (RDQ). Additional information was collected about the therapy. A group of non-pregnant women (mean age 24.56, SD 5.7) was included as controls. Frequency and severity of reflux symptoms were recorded in each trimester of pregnancy. Results The prevalence of GERD symptoms in pregnant women increased from the first trimester with 26.1 to 36.1% in the second trimester and to 51.2% in the third trimester of pregnancy. The prevalence of GERD symptoms in the control group was 9.3%. Pregnant women received medication for their GERD symptoms in 12.8% during the first, 9.1% during the second and 15.7% during the third trimester. Medications used >90% antacids, 0% PPI. Conclusion GERD symptoms occur more often in pregnant women than in non-pregnant and the frequency rises in the course of pregnancy. Medical therapy is used in a minority of cases and often with no adequate symptom relief. PMID:23006768

  6. Neighborhood Characteristics, Adherence to Walking, and Depressive Symptoms in Midlife African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Zenk, Shannon; Wang, Edward; Oh, April; McDevitt, Judith; Block, Dick; McNeil, Sue; Ju, SuKyung

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background African American women have more symptoms of depressed mood than white women. Adverse neighborhood conditions may contribute to these symptoms. Although reductions in depressive symptoms with physical activity have been demonstrated in white adults, little research has examined the mental health benefits of physical activity in African American women. Further, it is unknown whether physical activity can offset the effects of living in disadvantaged neighborhoods on depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among neighborhood characteristics, adherence to a physical activity intervention, and change over time in depressive symptoms in midlife African American women. Methods Two hundred seventy-eight women participated in a home-based, 24-week moderate-intensity walking intervention. Either a minimal treatment (MT) or enhanced treatment (ET) version of the intervention was randomly assigned to one of the two community health centers. Walking adherence was measured as the percentage of prescribed walks completed. Objective and perceived measures of neighborhood deterioration and crime were included. Results Adjusting for demographics, body mass index (BMI), and depressive symptoms at baseline, walking adherence and objective neighborhood deterioration were associated with significantly lower depressive symptoms, whereas perceived neighborhood deterioration was associated with significantly higher depressive symptoms at 24 weeks. Conclusions Adherence to walking as well as aspects of the environment may influence depressive symptoms in African American women. In addition to supporting active lifestyles, improving neighborhood conditions may also promote mental health among African American women. PMID:19630546

  7. Tears in your beer: Gender differences in coping drinking motives, depressive symptoms and drinking

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Dawn W.; Young, Chelsie M.; Steers, Mai-Ly; Quist, Michelle C.; Bryan, Jennifer L.; Neighbors, Clayton

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates associations between coping drinking motives (CDM; drinking to regulate negative affect), depressive symptoms, and drinking behavior and extends the literature by also taking into account gender differences. Two hundred forty-three college students (Mean age = 22.93, SD = 6.29, 82% female) participated. Based on previous research, we expected that CDM would be positively associated with drinking and problems, particularly among those higher in depressive symptoms, as individuals experiencing higher levels of negative affect (i.e. depressive symptoms) and who drink to cope are likely to drink more and experience more alcohol-related problems. Lastly, based on established gender differences, we expected that CDM would be positively associated with drinking and problems, especially among females higher in depressive symptoms. Unexpectedly, findings suggested that CDMs were positively related to peak drinking, especially among those lower in depressive symptoms. Results further revealed a significant three-way interaction between CDM, depressive symptoms, and gender when predicting alcohol-related problems and drinking frequency. Specifically, we found that CDM were more strongly associated with problems among women who were lower in depressive symptoms; whereas CDM were more strongly associated with problems among men who were higher in depressive symptoms. These findings offer a more comprehensive depiction of the relationship between depressive symptoms, CDM, and drinking behavior by taking into account the importance of gender differences. These results provide additional support for considering gender when designing and implementing alcohol intervention strategies. PMID:25525419

  8. The Impact of School Connectedness and Teacher Support on Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents: A Multilevel Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Early, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from Waves I and II of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), this study examined the association between school connectedness and teacher support and depressive symptoms in a weighted sample of 11,852 adolescents from 132 schools. To account for the nested data, multilevel regression was utilized. The results indicated higher school connectedness and getting along with teachers were significantly associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Findings offer implications for school social work practice and future research. Suggestions for future research are described and strategies to enhance school connectedness and teacher support are discussed. PMID:25132696

  9. Effects of Parental Alcoholism, Sense of Belonging, and Resilience on Depressive Symptoms: A Path Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunhwa; Williams, Reg A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explored the relationships between parental alcoholism, sense of belonging, resilience, and depressive symptoms in Koreans in the U.S. Data from 206 Koreans (Mean age = 28.4 years; 59.8% females) living in a Midwestern state were collected in 2009, using a web-based survey, which included Children of Alcoholic Screening Test, Sense of Belonging Instrument, Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory-II. Path analysis results revealed sense of belonging as the most powerful, and resilience as the second important factor, resisting depressive symptoms associated with parental alcoholism. Implications for practice and research and study limitations are discussed. PMID:23302055

  10. Effect of 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitor on Storage Symptoms in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Jun; Kang, Se Hee; Kim, Hyo Sin; Koh, Jun Sung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Many patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have storage symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor (5ARI) on storage symptoms in patients with BPH. Methods This study was conducted in 738 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to BPH. Patients with a prostate volume of higher than 30 mL on the transrectal ultrasound were classified into two groups: group A, in which an alpha blocker was solely administered for at least 12 months, and group B, in which a combination treatment regimen of an alpha blocker plus 5ARI was used. This was followed by an analysis of the changes in parameters such as the total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), voiding symptom subscore, and storage symptom subscore between the two groups. In addition, we examined whether there was a significant difference between the two groups in the degree of change in storage symptoms between before and after the pharmacological treatment. Results Of the 738 men, 331 had a prostate volume ≥30 mL, including 150 patients in group A and 181 patients in group B. Total IPSS, the voiding symptom subscore, and the storage symptom subscore were significantly lower after treatment than before treatment in both groups (P<0.05). A comparison of the degree of change between before and after treatment, however, showed no significant differences in the storage symptom subscore between the two groups (P>0.05). Conclusions Alpha blocker and 5ARI combination treatment is effective for patients with BPH including storage symptoms. However, 5ARI does not exert a significant effect on storage symptoms in BPH patients. PMID:22087424

  11. Depressive Symptoms, Anatomical Region, and Clinical Outcomes for Patients Seeking Outpatient Physical Therapy for Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Beneciuk, Jason M.; Valencia, Carolina; Werneke, Mark W.; Hart, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines advocate the routine identification of depressive symptoms for patients with pain in the lumbar or cervical spine, but not for other anatomical regions. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and impact of depressive symptoms for patients with musculoskeletal pain across different anatomical regions. Design This was a prospective, associational study. Methods Demographic, clinical, depressive symptom (Symptom Checklist 90–Revised), and outcome data were collected by self-report from a convenience sample of 8,304 patients. Frequency of severe depressive symptoms was assessed by chi-square analysis for demographic and clinical variables. An analysis of variance examined the influence of depressive symptoms and anatomical region on intake pain intensity and functional status. Separate hierarchical multiple regression models by anatomical region examined the influence of depressive symptoms on clinical outcomes. Results Prevalence of severe depression was higher in women, in industrial and pain clinics, and in patients who reported chronic pain or prior surgery. Lower prevalence rates were found in patients older than 65 years and those who had upper- or lower-extremity pain. Depressive symptoms had a moderate to large effect on pain ratings (Cohen d=0.55–0.87) and a small to large effect on functional status (Cohen d=0.28–0.95). In multivariate analysis, depressive symptoms contributed additional variance to pain intensity and functional status for all anatomical locations, except for discharge values for the cervical region. Conclusions Rates of depressive symptoms varied slightly based on anatomical region of musculoskeletal pain. Depressive symptoms had a consistent detrimental influence on outcomes, except on discharge scores for the cervical anatomical region. Expanding screening recommendations for depressive symptoms to include more anatomical regions may be indicated in physical therapy

  12. A randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual.

    PubMed

    Wantland, Dean J; Holzemer, William L; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Willard, Suzanne S; Arudo, John; Kirksey, Kenn M; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rosa, María E; Robinson, Linda L; Nicholas, Patrice K; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Human, Sarie; Rivero, Marta M; Maryland, Mary; Huang, Emily

    2008-09-01

    This study investigates whether using an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual with self-care strategies for 21 common symptoms, compared to a basic nutrition manual, had an effect on reducing symptom frequency and intensity. A 775-person, repeated measures, randomized controlled trial was conducted over three months in 12 sites from the United States, Puerto Rico, and Africa to assess the relationship between symptom intensity with predictors for differences in initial symptom status and change over time. A mixed model growth analysis showed a significantly greater decline in symptom frequency and intensity for the group using the symptom management manual (intervention) compared to those using the nutrition manual (control) (t=2.36, P=0.018). The models identified three significant predictors for increased initial symptom intensities and in intensity change over time: (1) protease inhibitor-based therapy (increased mean intensity by 28%); (2) having comorbid illness (nearly twice the mean intensity); and (3) being Hispanic receiving care in the United States (increased the mean intensity by 2.5 times). In addition, the symptom manual showed a significantly higher helpfulness rating and was used more often compared to the nutrition manual. The reduction in symptom intensity scores provides evidence of the need for palliation of symptoms in individuals with HIV/AIDS, as well as symptoms and treatment side effects associated with other illnesses. The information from this study may help health care providers become more aware of self-management strategies that are useful to persons with HIV/AIDS and help them to assist patients in making informed choices. PMID:18400461

  13. Maternal Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms and Parenting of Adolescent Daughters

    PubMed Central

    Zalewski, Maureen; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Scott, Lori N.; Whalen, Diana J.; Beeney, Joseph F.; Hipwell, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms are associated with poorer parenting. However, most studies conducted are with young children. In the current study, the authors examined associations between maternal BPD symptoms and parenting in an urban community sample of 15- to 17-year-old girls (n = 1,598) and their biological mothers. Additionally, the authors tested the impact of adolescent temperament on these associations. Mothers reported on their own psychopathology and their daughters' temperament. Adolescent girls reported on mothers' parenting methods in terms of psychological and behavioral control. Results demonstrated that maternal BPD symptoms were associated with aspects of psychological and behavioral control, even after controlling for maternal depression and alcohol use severity. After examining specific BPD components that may account for these associations, the authors found that affective/behavioral dysregulation, but not interpersonal dysregulation or identity disturbance, uniquely accounted for parenting. Adolescent temperament did not moderate these associations. BPD symptoms, particularly affective/behavioral dysregulation, are important targets when conducting parenting interventions. PMID:24689767

  14. Basic symptoms and P300 abnormalities in young schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Pallanti, S; Quercioli, L; Pazzagli, A

    1999-01-01

    Among the reasons for the relatively limited number of investigations of self-knowledge phenomena should be included, in addition to theoretical motives, the difficulties regarding the use of instruments available for this kind of approach and their content validity. This study investigates the relationship between subjective and objective deficits in schizophrenia, taking into account subjective experiences of cognitive impairment, clinical symptoms, and cognitive evoked potentials (P300 component). A group of 36 young schizophrenic patients (29 on neuroleptic treatment and seven drug-naive) were considered, together with a comparison group of 36 healthy subjects. Auditory event-correlated potentials (ERPs) were obtained using a simple "oddball" paradigm. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS), and while subjective disturbances were assessed by the Frankfurter Beschwerde Fragebogen (FBF, also called the Complaint Questionnaire). Correlation analysis showed that P300 amplitude was inversely correlated with subjective experiences of cognitive deficit, especially in the area of automatic skills and overstimulation. No relationship emerged between BPRS, SANS, and SAPS scores and P300 alterations. The results suggest that subjective cognitive disturbances, more than objective symptoms, are related to P300 alterations in schizophrenia, and that the FBF questionnaire appropriately covers the domain of schizophrenic cognitive disorders. PMID:10509619

  15. Testosterone and Androgen Receptor Sensitivity in Relation to Hyperactivity Symptoms in Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and hyperactivity symptoms exhibit an incidence that is male-biased. Thus androgen activity can be considered a plausible biological risk factor for these disorders. However, there is insufficient information about the association between increased androgen activity and hyperactivity symptoms in children with ASD. Methods In the present study, the relationship between parameters of androgenicity (plasmatic testosterone levels and androgen receptor sensitivity) and hyperactivity in 60 boys (age 3–15) with ASD is investigated. Given well documented differences in parent and trained examiners ratings of symptom severity, we employed a standardized parent`s questionnaire (Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form) as well as a direct examiner`s rating (Autism diagnostic observation schedule) for assessment of hyperactivity symptoms. Results Although it was found there was no significant association between actual plasmatic testosterone levels and hyperactivity symptoms, the number of CAG triplets was significantly negatively correlated with hyperactivity symptoms (R2 = 0.118, p = 0.007) in the sample, indicating increased androgen receptor sensitivity in association with hyperactivity symptoms. Direct trained examiner´s assessment appeared to be a relevant method for evaluating of behavioral problems in the investigation of biological underpinnings of these problems in our study. Conclusions A potential ASD subtype characterized by increased rates of hyperactivity symptoms might have distinct etiopathogenesis and require a specific behavioral and pharmacological approach. We propose an increase of androgen receptor sensitivity as a biomarker for a specific ASD subtype accompanied with hyperactivity symptoms. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for practice and future research. PMID:26910733

  16. Birth order effects on autism symptom domains.

    PubMed

    Reichenberg, Abraham; Smith, Christopher; Schmeidler, James; Silverman, Jeremy M

    2007-03-30

    Autism is predominantly genetically determined. Evidence supports familiality of the main sets of behavioral characteristics that define the syndrome of autism; however, possible non-genetic effects have also been suggested. The present study compared levels of autism symptom domains, as measured by the Autism Diagnostic Interview, and useful phrase speech scores between 106 pairs of first- and second-born siblings from multiply affected families. In addition, the intercorrelations between the measures were compared between siblings. The overall mean repetitive behavior total score was significantly higher (worse) in first-born than in second-born siblings. In contrast, first-born siblings had significantly lower (better) useful phrase speech than their younger siblings. Autism social and non-verbal communication scores were significantly correlated in first- and in second-born siblings. However, there was a significant difference in the coefficients between first- and second-born siblings. Performance on the non-verbal communication domain was also significantly and positively correlated with useful phrase speech score in both first- and second-born siblings. It is unclear at this time whether these results are of biologic origin. Nevertheless, the findings suggest that genetic studies in autism using specific levels of familial autism traits as phenotypes should take into account their intercorrelations and birth order effects embedded in the instrument. PMID:17289158

  17. Increased generalization of learned associations is related to re-experiencing symptoms in veterans with symptoms of post-traumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Anastasides, Nicole; Beck, Kevin D; Pang, Kevin C H; Servatius, Richard J; Gilbertson, Mark W; Orr, Scott P; Myers, Catherine E

    2015-01-01

    One interpretation of re-experiencing symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is that memories related to emotional information are stored strongly, but with insufficient specificity, so that stimuli which are minimally related to the traumatic event are sufficient to trigger recall. If so, re-experiencing symptoms may reflect a general bias against encoding background information during a learning experience, and this tendency might not be limited to learning about traumatic or even autobiographical events. To test this possibility, we administered a discrimination-and-transfer task to 60 Veterans (11.2% female, mean age 54.0 years) self-assessed for PTSD symptoms in order to examine whether re-experiencing symptoms were associated with increased generalization following associative learning. The discrimination task involved learning to choose the rewarded object from each of six object pairs; each pair differed in color or shape but not both. In the transfer phase, the irrelevant feature in each pair was altered. Regression analysis revealed no relationships between re-experiencing symptoms and initial discrimination learning. However, re-experiencing symptom scores contributed to the prediction of transfer performance. Other PTSD symptom clusters (avoidance/numbing, hyperarousal) did not account for significant additional variance. The results are consistent with an emerging interpretation of re-experiencing symptoms as reflecting a learning bias that favors generalization at the expense of specificity. Future studies will be needed to determine whether this learning bias may pre-date and confer risk for, re-experiencing symptoms in individuals subsequently exposed to trauma, or emerges only in the wake of trauma exposure and PTSD symptom development. PMID:26372003

  18. Personality and substance dependence symptoms: modeling substance-specific traits.

    PubMed

    Grekin, Emily R; Sher, Kenneth J; Wood, Phillip K

    2006-12-01

    Personality traits related to neuroticism and disinhibition have been consistently associated with substance use disorders (SUDs). It is unclear, however, whether different personality traits predict distinct forms of substance dependence. Additionally, it is unclear whether personality traits continue to predict alcohol, drug, and tobacco dependence after controlling for comorbid antisociality and other SUDs. The current study addresses these questions by characterizing relations between personality traits and substance dependence symptoms in a longitudinal sample of 3,720 college students. Results revealed that antisociality and certain core personality traits predicted multiple types of substance pathology. In addition, several personality traits were differentially associated with alcohol, drug, and tobacco symptomatology. PMID:17176176

  19. Somatic Symptoms in Traumatized Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugler, Brittany B.; Bloom, Marlene; Kaercher, Lauren B.; Truax, Tatyana V.; Storch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood exposure to trauma has been associated with increased rates of somatic symptoms (SS), which may contribute to diminished daily functioning. One hundred and sixty-one children residing at a residential treatment home who had experienced neglect and/or abuse were administered the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), the…

  20. Does cold winter weather produce depressive symptoms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Michael J.; Goodes, Mike; Furlong, Candy; Tollefson, Gary D.

    1988-06-01

    To examine whether harsh winter weather is associated with depressive symptoms, 45 healthy subjects from Minnesota were compared to 42 subjects from California near the end of the winter season. No differences in the prevalence of depressive symptoms were found between the two groups.