Sample records for important geologic process

  1. Geological processes and evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Head, J.W.; Greeley, R.; Golombek, M.P.; Hartmann, W.K.; Hauber, E.; Jaumann, R.; Masson, P.; Neukum, G.; Nyquist, L.E.; Carr, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Geological mapping and establishment of stratigraphic relationships provides an overview of geological processes operating on Mars and how they have varied in time and space. Impact craters and basins shaped the crust in earliest history and as their importance declined, evidence of extensive regional volcanism emerged during the Late Noachian. Regional volcanism characterized the Early Hesperian and subsequent to that time, volcanism was largely centered at Tharsis and Elysium, continuing until the recent geological past. The Tharsis region appears to have been largely constructed by the Late Noachian, and represents a series of tectonic and volcanic centers. Globally distributed structural features representing contraction characterize the middle Hesperian. Water-related processes involve the formation of valley networks in the Late Noachian and into the Hesperian, an ice sheet at the south pole in the middle Hesperian, and outflow channels and possible standing bodies of water in the northern lowlands in the Late Hesperian and into the Amazonian. A significant part of the present water budget occurs in the present geologically young polar layered terrains. In order to establish more firmly rates of processes, we stress the need to improve the calibration of the absolute timescale, which today is based on crater count systems with substantial uncertainties, along with a sampling of rocks of unknown provenance. Sample return from carefully chosen stratigraphic units could calibrate the existing timescale and vastly improve our knowledge of Martian evolution.

  2. Coastal Geological Processes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Coastlines are places of continuous, often dramatic geological activity. They change daily and seasonally, but especially over long time periods. This interactive feature discusses the forces that help shape coastal landforms like cliffs and beaches. Topics include waves, tides, and currents; weathering, erosion, and deposition; and other factors, such as the activity of organisms and human modifications. A background essay and discussion questions are included.

  3. Proglacial lakes: character, behaviour and geological importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Tweed, Fiona S.

    2013-10-01

    Proglacial lakes are ubiquitous within the Quaternary record and can provide exceptional breadth and depth of palaeoenvironmental information. Present deglaciation is increasing the number and size of proglacial lakes around the world. This study provides a synthesis of knowledge on proglacial lake character and behaviour and critically evaluates the importance of proglacial lakes from a geological perspective. We show how ‘ice-marginal' or ‘ice-contact' lakes and other distal proglacial lakes can be distinguished from each other by geomorphological, sedimentological, chemical and biological characteristics. The key controls on proglacial lake geomorphology and sedimentology are outlined and discussed. Proglacial lakes can exacerbate mountain glacier and ice sheet margin ablation via mechanical and thermal stresses, but very large lakes can moderate summer air temperatures and relatively retard summer ice ablation. Proglacial lakes interrupt meltwater flux and are very efficient sediment traps. Hydrological routing and consequent geomorphological activity can be radically modified by sudden drainage of proglacial lakes and resultant glacial lake outburst floods; exceptionally large proglacial lake drainages affected global ocean circulation and global climate during the Quaternary. Overall, analyses of proglacial lakes can provide a valuable insight into (i) patterns, character and behaviour of mountain glaciers, ice sheets and glaciations, and (ii) the impacts of past, present and future deglaciation.

  4. Processes of Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 16 July 2003

    This THEMIS visible image captures a complex process of deposition, burial and exhumation. The crater ejecta in the top of the image is in the form of flow lobes, indicating that the crater was formed in volatile-rich terrain. While a radial pattern can be seen in the ejecta, the pattern is sharper in the lower half of the ejecta. This is because the top half of the ejecta is still buried by a thin layer of sediment. It is most likely that at one time the entire area was covered. Wind, and perhaps water erosion have started to remove this layer, once again exposing the what was present underneath.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.3, Longitude 181.2 East (178.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Health benefits of geologic materials and geologic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    The reemerging field of Medical Geology is concerned with the impacts of geologic materials and geologic processes on animal and human health. Most medical geology research has been focused on health problems caused by excess or deficiency of trace elements, exposure to ambient dust, and on other geologically related health problems or health problems for which geoscience tools, techniques, or databases could be applied. Little, if any, attention has been focused on the beneficial health effects of rocks, minerals, and geologic processes. These beneficial effects may have been recognized as long as two million years ago and include emotional, mental, and physical health benefits. Some of the earliest known medicines were derived from rocks and minerals. For thousands of years various clays have been used as an antidote for poisons. "Terra sigillata," still in use today, may have been the first patented medicine. Many trace elements, rocks, and minerals are used today in a wide variety of pharmaceuticals and health care products. There is also a segment of society that believes in the curative and preventative properties of crystals (talismans and amulets). Metals and trace elements are being used in some of today's most sophisticated medical applications. Other recent examples of beneficial effects of geologic materials and processes include epidemiological studies in Japan that have identified a wide range of health problems (such as muscle and joint pain, hemorrhoids, burns, gout, etc.) that may be treated by one or more of nine chemically distinct types of hot springs, and a study in China indicating that residential coal combustion may be mobilizing sufficient iodine to prevent iodine deficiency disease. ?? 2006 MDPI. All rights reserved.

  6. The Importance of Geological Uncertainty for Flow and Transport Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, J.; Hojberg, A. L.; Troldborg, L.; Sonneborg, T. O.

    2008-12-01

    The impact of geological uncertainty has during the past decade been studied extensively in Denmark by establishing alternative conceptual models, each representing a plausible geological interpretation, and use these multiple conceptual models to construct multiple groundwater models of the same area. Four published case studies will be reviewed. The cases comprise groundwater modelling for areas ranging from 300 km2 to 1000 km2 with various types of glacial geological settings including multi aquifer systems and buried valleys. The modelling studies have included simulations and uncertainty assessments of groundwater head, groundwater recharge, location of well capture zones, groundwater age and concentrations of environmental tracers. All studies had multiple geological models, while one study compared the impacts of conceptual uncertainty versus parameter uncertainty using the Monte Carlo approach, and another study compared deterministic geological models with stochastic realisations generated by TPROGS. A trivial finding from the studies is that possible errors in a conceptual model (wrong geological interpretation) can be compensated through the calibration with respect to simulations of variables for which data are used in the calibration. However, once extrapolation beyond the calibration base is attempted, different conceptual model formulations result in significantly different results. A key conclusion from the studies is that uncertainties in the conceptual model become of increasing importance, when predictive simulations consider data types that are extrapolated from the data types used for calibration. Examples from the four cases will be shown and a discussion of the future perspectives will be given.

  7. Comparison Charts of Geological Processes: Terrestrial Planets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This chart presents information on the geological processes (volcanism, impact cratering, tectonics, and gradation) that have affected the Earth, Moon, and the terrestrial planets. Students compare the effects these processes have had on the Moon and planets. There is also a blank chart and a sheet of notes on the geological processes that may be used in conjunction with this chart. This chart is one of the activities for the Exploring Planets in the Classroom's Introduction to the Solar System.

  8. The importance of geobotany in geological remote sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouat, D. A.; Collins, W.; Elvidge, C.; Lyon, R. J. P.; Labovitz, M. L.; Milton, N. M.; Parrish, J.; Rock, B. N.; Wickland, D. E.; Arp, G. K.

    1983-01-01

    A description of the different effects of variations in ground cover vegetation on remote sensing data in geological and prospecting applications is presented. The different variations are divided into three categories: structural; taxonomic and spectral. Structural variations include changes in the physical appearance of ground cover which may be detectable by a remote sensing instrument. Taxonomic variations occur in those plant communities which are associated with specific geological regions. Spectral variations are due to specific geochemical stresses which may be useful in characterizing geological features at a site. The need for a general scheme for the interpretation of geobotanical remote sensing data is discussed: Geosat data for the field reflectance spectra of different tree species in West Virginia are presented as examples.

  9. Determining probabilities of geologic events and processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Hunter; C. J. Mann; R. M. Cranwell

    1985-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has recently published a probabilstic standard for releases of high-level radioactive waste from a mined geologic repository. The standard sets limits for contaminant releases with more than one change in 100 of occurring within 10,000 years, and less strict limits for releases of lower probability. The standard offers no methods for determining probabilities of geologic events

  10. Business Process-Based Resource Importance Determination

    E-print Network

    Business Process-Based Resource Importance Determination Stefan Fenz1 , Andreas Ekelhart2 are still missing: How can business processes be used to determine resources' importance in the overall or on business processes. Therefore, this paper presents our novel business process-based resource importance de

  11. Geologic processes on Venus: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masursky, H.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of Venera 15 and 16 radar image and altimetry data and reevaluation of Pioneer Venus and earlier Venera data have greatly expanded the perception of the variety and complexity of geologic processes on Venus. PV data have discriminated four highland regions (each different in geomorphic appearance), a large upland rolling plains region, and smaller areas of lowland plains. Two highland volcanic centers were identified that may be presently active, as suggested by their geomorphologic appearance combined with positive gravity anomalies, lightning strike clusters, and a change in SO2 content in the upper atmosphere. Geochemical data obtained by the Venera landers have indicated that one upland area and nearby rolling plains are composed of volcanic rocks, probably basalts or syenites. New Venera radar images of the Ishtar Terra region show folded and/or faulted linear terrain and associated volcanic features that may have been deformed by both compressional and extensional forces. Lowland surfaces resemble the mare basaltic lava flows that fill basins on the Moon, Mars and Earth. Ubiquitous crater like forms may be of either volcanic or impact origin; the origin of similar lunar features was determined by the character of their ejecta deposits.

  12. The Behaviour of Selenium in Geological Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. P. Malisa

    2001-01-01

    Selenium contents were analyzed from a total of 244 soil samples collected over different rock types at a sampling density of one sample per 4?km2 around Geita gold mining areas, Northwestern Tanzania. Comparisons using literature survey contents of selenium in geological materials and some implications on the selenium in soils are compiled and discussed. Most selenium occurs as simple selenides

  13. The Moon: Keystone to Understanding Planetary Geological Processes and History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Extensive and intensive exploration of the Earth's Moon by astronauts and an international array of automated spacecraft has provided an unequaled data set that has provided deep insight into geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, petrology, chronology, geophysics and internal structure. This level of insight is unequaled except for Earth. Analysis of these data sets over the last 35 years has proven fundamental to understanding planetary surface processes and evolution, and is essential to linking surface processes with internal and thermal evolution. Much of the understanding that we presently have of other terrestrial planets and outer planet satellites derives from the foundation of these data. On the basis of these data, the Moon is a laboratory for understanding of planetary processes and a keystone for providing evolutionary perspective. Important comparative planetology issues being addressed by lunar studies include impact cratering, magmatic activity and tectonism. Future planetary exploration plans should keep in mind the importance of further lunar exploration in continuing to build solid underpinnings in this keystone to planetary evolution. Examples of these insights and applications to other planets are cited.

  14. Abstracts for the Planetary Geology Field Conference on Aeolian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R. (editor); Black, D. (editor)

    1978-01-01

    The Planetary Geology Field Conference on Aeolian Processes was organized at the request of the Planetary Geology Program office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to bring together geologists working on aeolian problems on earth and planetologists concerned with similar problems on the planets. Abstracts of papers presented at the conference are arranged herein by alphabetical order of the senior author. Papers fall into three broad categories: (1) Viking Orbiter and Viking Lander results on aeolian processes and/or landforms on Mars, (2) laboratory results on studies of aeolian processes, and (3) photogeology and field studies of aeolian processes on Earth.

  15. Geology of the Icy Galilean Satellites: Understanding Crustal Processes and Geologic Histories Through the JIMO Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueredo, P. H.; Tanaka, K.; Senske, D.; Greeley, R.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the geology, style and time history of crustal processes on the icy Galilean satellites is necessary to understanding how these bodies formed and evolved. Data from the Galileo mission have provided a basis for detailed geologic and geo- physical analysis. Due to constrained downlink, Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) data consisted of global coverage at a -1 km/pixel ground sampling and representative, widely spaced regional maps at -200 m/pixel. These two data sets provide a general means to extrapolate units identified at higher resolution to lower resolution data. A sampling of key sites at much higher resolution (10s of m/pixel) allows evaluation of processes on local scales. We are currently producing the first global geological map of Europa using Galileo global and regional-scale data. This work is demonstrating the necessity and utility of planet-wide contiguous image coverage at global, regional, and local scales.

  16. Techniques for determining probabilities of geologic events and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.L. (ed.) (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Mann, C.J. (ed.) (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of this study has been to search out and evaluate existing quantitative methods for determining probabilities of events and processes in fields that seemed to be most closely related to the majority of the events considered important to long-term performance by earlier workers. These fields are thermomechanical behavior, mining engineering, hydrology, climatology, seismicity and tectonics, seismic hazard, volcanology, geochemistry, and resource exploration. Most of these events and processes can initiate, releases of the radioactive waste from a geologic repository, although geochemical processes primarily affect transport of wastes after release. The quantitative methods for determining probabilities identified here are those that have been reported in the literature, and some that could be used but have not been reported. Merits and limitations of each method have been described, and the current availability of databases adequate for determining accurate probabilities of events and processes has been appraised. A secondary goal has been to identify phenomena for which accurate probabilities cannot be determined now and areas of research that could materially improve our ability to make better probabilistic predictions in the immediate future.

  17. Techniques for determining probabilities of geologic events and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.L. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mann, C.J. [ed.] [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

    1992-10-01

    The primary goal of this study has been to search out and evaluate existing quantitative methods for determining probabilities of events and processes in fields that seemed to be most closely related to the majority of the events considered important to long-term performance by earlier workers. These fields are thermomechanical behavior, mining engineering, hydrology, climatology, seismicity and tectonics, seismic hazard, volcanology, geochemistry, and resource exploration. Most of these events and processes can initiate, releases of the radioactive waste from a geologic repository, although geochemical processes primarily affect transport of wastes after release. The quantitative methods for determining probabilities identified here are those that have been reported in the literature, and some that could be used but have not been reported. Merits and limitations of each method have been described, and the current availability of databases adequate for determining accurate probabilities of events and processes has been appraised. A secondary goal has been to identify phenomena for which accurate probabilities cannot be determined now and areas of research that could materially improve our ability to make better probabilistic predictions in the immediate future.

  18. Using Springs to Study Groundwater Flow and Active Geologic Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Manga

    2001-01-01

    Spring water provides a unique opportunity to study a range of subsurface processes in regions with few boreholes or wells. However, because springs integrate the signal of geological and hydrological processes over large spatial areas and long periods of time, they are an indirect source of information. This review illustrates a variety of techniques and approaches that are used to

  19. The importance of subsurface geology for water source and vegetation communities in Cherokee Marsh, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurtz, A.M.; Bahr, J.M.; Carpenter, Q.J.; Hunt, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of disturbed wetland systems is an important component of wetland mitigation, yet uncertainty remains about how hydrologic processes affect biologic processes and wetlands patterns. To design more effective restoration strategies and re-establish native plant communities in disturbed wetlands, it is imperative to understand undisturbed systems. A site within Cherokee Marsh located in Madison, Wisconsin, USA, contains a relatively undisturbed area of wetland consisting of plant communities common within the prairie landscape including a fen, sedge meadow, and shallow marsh. These distinct communities are found within an area of minimal topographic relief, yet transitions from one community to the next occur over short distances. This study sought to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and chemical gradients associated with these shifts in vegetation to gain insight into the factors controlling the spatial differences in dominant plant species, which could be critical for restoration success. Vegetation analyses revealed a transition of dominant sedge species, which appeared to correspond to changes in hydrology from a ground-water dominated to a surface-water dominated system (as determined by water isotopes). Along the same vegetation transect, subsurface coring results show a heterogeneous composition of peat and till with lateral and vertical variations in stratigraphy, which relates to variability in ground-water discharge as evidenced by hydroperiods and stable isotope composition. Applications of this type of approach throughout the glaciated terrains of the midwestern and northeastern United States and Canada can improve future wetland restoration and management. ?? 2007, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  20. Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P.

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms in the context of the region’s geologic history. This chapter is based on the information in the geology data package for the SST waste management areas and SST RFI Appendix E, which builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  1. Simulation and Processing Seismic Data in Complex Geological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri da Gama Rodrigues, S.; Moreira Lupinacci, W.; Martins de Assis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic simulations in complex geological models are interesting to verify some limitations of seismic data. In this project, different geological models were designed to analyze some difficulties encountered in the interpretation of seismic data. Another idea is these data become available for LENEP/UENF students to test new tools to assist in seismic data processing. The geological models were created considering some characteristics found in oil exploration. We simulated geological medium with volcanic intrusions, salt domes, fault, pinch out and layers more distante from surface (Kanao, 2012). We used the software Tesseral Pro to simulate the seismic acquisitions. The acquisition geometries simulated were of the type common offset, end-on and split-spread. (Figure 1) Data acquired with constant offset require less processing routines. The processing flow used with tools available in Seismic Unix package (for more details, see Pennington et al., 2005) was geometric spreading correction, deconvolution, attenuation correction and post-stack depth migration. In processing of the data acquired with end-on and split-spread geometries, we included velocity analysis and NMO correction routines. Although we analyze synthetic data and carefully applied each processing routine, we can observe some limitations of the seismic reflection in imaging thin layers, great surface depth layers, layers with low impedance contrast and faults.

  2. Geology and Geophysics of Venus: Implications for Magmatic Processes

    E-print Network

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Geology and Geophysics of Venus: Implications for Magmatic Processes Walter S. Kiefer Lunar and Planetary Institute Venus Geochemistry Workshop Feb. 26, 2009 #12;#12;Basaltic Volcanism on Venus #12 decompression melting in plume head near base of lithosphere · Venus: Beta Regio, Atla Regio · Earth: Hawaii

  3. The consideration of geological uncertainty in the siting process for a Geological Disposal Facility for radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathers, Steve; McEvoy, Fiona; Shaw, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Any decision about the site of a Geological Disposal Facility at depth for medium to high level radioactive waste is based on a safety case which in turn is based on an understanding of the geological environment which enables, for example, understanding groundwater flows and groundwater chemical composition. Because the information on which geological understanding is based cannot be fully understood, it is important to ensure that: i. Inferences are made from data in a way that is consistent with the data. ii. The uncertainty in the inferred information is described, quantitatively where this is appropriate. Despite these uncertainties decisions can and must be made, and so the implications of the uncertainty need to be understood and quantified. To achieve this it is important to ensure that: i. An understanding of how error propagates in all models and decision tools. Information which is collected to support the decision-making process may be used as input into models of various kinds to generate further information. For example, a process model may be used to predict groundwater flows, so uncertainty in the properties which are input to the model (e.g. on rock porosity and structure) will give rise to uncertainty in the model predictions. Understanding how this happens is called the analysis of error propagation. It is important that there is an understanding of how error propagates in all models and decision tools, and therefore knowledge of how much uncertainty remains in the process at any stage. As successive phases of data collection take place the analysis of error propagation shows how the uncertainty in key model outputs is gradually reduced. ii. The implications of all uncertainties can be traced through the process. A clear analysis of the decision-making process is necessary so that the implications of all uncertainties can be traced through the process. This means that, when a final decision is made, one can state with a high level of confidence that site conditions, while not known exactly, fall within an acceptable range.

  4. The Importance of Communicating Uncertainty to the 3D Geological Framework Model of Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCormack, Kelsey

    2015-04-01

    The Alberta Geological Survey (AGS) has been tasked with developing a 3-dimensional (3D) geological framework for Alberta (660,000 km2). Our goal is to develop 'The Framework' as a sophisticated platform, capable of integrating a variety of data types from multiple sources enabling the development of multi-scale, interdisciplinary models with built-in feedback mechanisms, allowing the individual components of the model to adapt and evolve over time as our knowledge and understanding of the subsurface increases. The geoscience information within these models is often taken at face value and assumed that the attribute accuracy is equivalent to the digital accuracy recorded by the computer, which can lead to overconfidence in the model results. We need to make sure that decision makers understand that models are simply versions of reality and all contain a certain amount of error and uncertainty. More importantly, it is necessary to convey that error and uncertainty are not bad, and should be quantified and understood rather than ignored. This presentation will focus on how the AGS is quantifying and communicating uncertainty within the Geologic Framework to decision makers and the general public, as well as utilizing uncertainty results to strategically prioritize future work.

  5. Environmental quality and preservation; bedrock beneath reefs; the importance of geology in understanding biological decline in a modern reef ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidz, Barbara H.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental Quality and Preservation-Bedrock Beneath Reefs: the Importance of Geology in Understanding Biological Decline in a Modern Ecosystem' is a four-page and one-plate full-color discussion of the geologic framework and evolutionary history of the coral reef ecosystem that lines the outer shelf off the Florida Keys.

  6. Hydro-geological process chain for building a flood scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoni, Laura; Brambilla, Davide; Papini, Monica; Ivanov, Vladislav; Radice, Alessio

    2015-04-01

    Flash-flood events in mountain environments are often related to the transport of large amounts of sediment from the slopes through the stream network. As a consequence, significant morphological changes may occur in rivers during a single, short-duration event, with possibly significant effect on the water elevation. An appropriate hazard evaluation would therefore require the thorough modelling of the flood-related phenomena and of their interconnection. In this context, this work is focused on an attempt of integrated modelling of event-scale water and sediment transport processes for a reference case-study of the Mallero basin in the Italian Alps. The area of the catchments is about 320 square km, the main stream being almost 25 km long and having slopes in the range from 1 to 40 %. A town (Sondrio) is present at the downstream end of the river. In 1987, Sondrio was at risk of inundation due to a combined effect of relatively high discharge and aggradation of the river bed up to 5 m (almost equal to the bankfull depth in the in-town reach). A 100-year flood scenario was produced including (i) a sediment supply model, (ii) a one-dimensional, hydro-morphologic model of the river bed evolution, and (iii) an estimation of the outflowing discharge at river sections where the bank elevation was exceeded by water. Rainfall-runoff transformation was not included into the modelling chain as the 100-year water hydrograph was already available from previous studies. For the sediment production model, a downscaling in time of the Gavrilovic equation was attempted using rainfall estimation from depth-duration-frequency curves, which furnished values in reasonable agreement with some available data. The hydro-morphologic model, based on the Saint-Venant and Exner equations, was preliminarily calibrated against data for bed aggradation measured in 1987. A point of separation was chosen at an appropriate location in the basin, and the sediment yield estimated upstream of this point was used as an upstream boundary condition for the hydro-morphologic model, under a simplifying hypothesis of process separation that would be later discussed. Particular attention is indeed necessary when dealing with the interface between the geologic and hydraulic processes, where models lack consistency between their respective spatial and temporal scales. Uncertainty was dealt with by sensitivity analysis. Modelling results are discussed in terms of the validity of the separate models as well as of the approach for their integration. In general, the importance of antecedent conditions of the river reach is highlighted, which suggests to apply long-term analysis prior to short-term modelling of the event.

  7. The importance of geological data and derived information in seismic response assessment for urban sites. An example from the Island of Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsangaratos, Paraskevas; Loupasakis, Constantinos; Rozos, Dimitrios; Rondoyianni, Theodora; Vafidis, Antonios; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Soupios, Pantelis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Sarris, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    The magnitude, frequency content and duration of an earthquake ground motion depends mainly on the surrounding geological, tectonic and geomorphological conditions. Numerous reports have been contacted illustrating the necessity of providing accurate geological information in order to estimate the level of seismic hazard. In this context, geological information is the outcome of processing primary, raw field data and geotechnical investigation data that are non - organized and associated with the geological model of the study area. In most cases, the geological information is provided as an advance element, a key component of the "function" that solves any geo-environmental problem and is primarily reflected on analogue or digital maps. The main objective of the present study is to illustrate the importance of accurate geological information in the thirteen (13) selected sites of the Hellenic Accelerometric Network (HAN) in the area of Crete Island, in order to estimate the seismic action according to Eurocode (EC8). As an example the detailed geological-geotechnical map of the area around HAN site in Rethymno city, Crete is presented. The research area covers a 250m radius surrounding the RTHE HAN-station at a scale of 1: 2000 with detail description of the geological and geotechnical characteristics of the formations as well as the tectonic features (cracks, upthrust, thrust, etc) of the rock mass. The field survey showed that the RTHE station is founded over limestones and dolomites formations. The formations exhibit very good geomechanical behaviour; however they present extensive fragmentation and karstification. At this particular site the identification of a fault nearby the station proved to be significant information for the geophysical research as the location and orientation of the tectonic setting provided new perspective on the models of seismic wave prorogation. So, the geological data and the induced information along with the tectonic structure of the area, revealed variations that could alter the seismic wave prorogation models as well as the ground type/soil category of the foundation formations. In conclusion, the produced geological-geotechnical maps are the main mean of communication and flow of geological information between different scientific disciplines providing the bases for defining the ground type at each HAN site and calibrating the corresponding code prescribed spectra. This study is part of the on-going project that has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: THALES. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  8. Importance of quantum decoherence in brain processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegmark, Max

    2000-04-01

    Based on a calculation of neural decoherence rates, we argue that the degrees of freedom of the human brain that relate to cognitive processes should be thought of as a classical rather than quantum system, i.e., that there is nothing fundamentally wrong with the current classical approach to neural network simulations. We find that the decoherence time scales (~10-13-10-20 s) are typically much shorter than the relevant dynamical time scales (~10-3-10-1 s), both for regular neuron firing and for kinklike polarization excitations in microtubules. This conclusion disagrees with suggestions by Penrose and others that the brain acts as a quantum computer, and that quantum coherence is related to consciousness in a fundamental way.

  9. The importance of precise U-Pb ages in geological correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, T. (Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1992-01-01

    A reduction of lead laboratory background contamination by six orders of magnitude over the past two decades provides a similar reduction in the sample size required for the analysis. Single grains and parts of grains from growth stages in complex populations with a diameter like that of a human hair can now be precisely dated ([+-] 2 m.y., 2 sigma) without a need to average many grains or many spots as with previous conventional or ion microprobe techniques. New methods to eliminate discordance add to the reliability of the method. Precise ages for igneous events, metamorphism, deformation and mineralization provide a means of correlating geological processes at different structural levels and on a scale far greater than normally possible by proximal relationships. Ages of granulite formation and ductile flow in the Superior Province show that these deep level processes occurred more than 50 m.y. after volcanism at the same time as gold deposits formed in active faults at high structural levels. Episodes of isotopic resetting and new zircon growth due to overthrusting in the Grenville Front tectonic zone allow the ages of deformation to be compared for the 1,500 km length of this structure. Dating single zircons in sedimentary packages like the Toridonian sandstone gives the age of a continental source now removed by continental drift. Single zircon cores indicate the protolith age for 372 Ma and 30 Ma granites in Nova Scotia and Chile, respectively. Diabase dykes of the McKenzie dyke swarm separated by up to 2,000 Km can be shown to be coeval at 1,267 [+-] 2 Ma and hence to have formed by a common process of these dimensions. Precise dating of single zircons (microgram size) from the K-T boundary layer that show varying degrees of shock metamorphism define a circa 550 Ma age for the target rock and 65.5 [+-] 3 Ma age for the impact event.

  10. Linking subsurface temperature and hillslope processes through geologic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, Katherine; Anderson, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Many periglacial hillslope processes - physical, chemical, and biological - depend on subsurface temperature and water availability. As the subsurface temperature field varies both in space and through time over many scales up to climate cycles, the dominant processes of mobile regolith production and transport and the rate at which they act will vary. These processes include the chemical weathering of minerals, cracking of rocks through frost action and tree roots, presence and impact of vegetation on soil cohesion, location and activity of burrowing and trampling animals, frost creep, and solifluction. In order to explore the interplay between these processes across a landscape over the geologic timescales on which such landscapes evolve, we explore the effects of slope, aspect, latitude, atmosphere, and time before present on the expected energy balance at the surface of the earth and the resulting subsurface temperature field. We begin by calculating top-of-atmosphere insolation at any time in the Quaternary, honoring the variations in orbit over Milankovitch timescales. We then incorporate spatial and temporal variations in incoming short-wave radiation on sub-daily timescales due to elevation, latitude, aspect, and shading. Outgoing long-wave radiation is taken to depend on the surface temperature and may be modified by allowing back-radiation from the atmosphere. We then solve for the subsurface temperature field using a numerical model that acknowledges depth-varying material properties, water content, and phase change. With these tools we target variations in regolith production and motion over the long timescales on which periglacial hillslopes evolve. We implement a basic parameterization of temperature-dependent chemical and physical weathering linked to mobile regolith generation. We incorporate multiple regolith transport processes including frost heave and creep. Our intention is not to parameterize all operative processes, but to include sufficient detail to identify how the different processes interact. We address questions that include: What governs contrasts in process rate on pole-ward vs. equator-ward slopes? Under what conditions should we expect temporal transitions between transport-limited and weathering-limited erosion? How does the legacy of past climate impact later hillslope activity?

  11. Beowulf Distributed Processing and the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maddox, Brian G.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) National Mapping Discipline (NMD) has expanded its scientific and research activities. Work is being conducted in areas such as emergency response research, scientific visualization, urban prediction, and other simulation activities. Custom-produced digital data have become essential for these types of activities. High-resolution, remotely sensed datasets are also seeing increased use. Unfortunately, the NMD is also finding that it lacks the resources required to perform some of these activities. Many of these projects require large amounts of computer processing resources. Complex urban-prediction simulations, for example, involve large amounts of processor-intensive calculations on large amounts of input data. This project was undertaken to learn and understand the concepts of distributed processing. Experience was needed in developing these types of applications. The idea was that this type of technology could significantly aid the needs of the NMD scientific and research programs. Porting a numerically intensive application currently being used by an NMD science program to run in a distributed fashion would demonstrate the usefulness of this technology. There are several benefits that this type of technology can bring to the USGS's research programs. Projects can be performed that were previously impossible due to a lack of computing resources. Other projects can be performed on a larger scale than previously possible. For example, distributed processing can enable urban dynamics research to perform simulations on larger areas without making huge sacrifices in resolution. The processing can also be done in a more reasonable amount of time than with traditional single-threaded methods (a scaled version of Chester County, Pennsylvania, took about fifty days to finish its first calibration phase with a single-threaded program). This paper has several goals regarding distributed processing technology. It will describe the benefits of the technology. Real data about a distributed application will be presented as an example of the benefits that this technology can bring to USGS scientific programs. Finally, some of the issues with distributed processing that relate to USGS work will be discussed.

  12. Influences of geomorphology and geology on alpine treeline in the American West - More important than climatic influences?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.R.; Malanson, G.P.; Walsh, S.J.; Fagre, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial distribution and pattern of alpine treeline in the American West reflect the overarching influences of geological history, lithology and structure, and geomorphic processes and landforms, and geologic and geomorphic factors - both forms and processes - can control the spatiotemporal response of the ecotone to climate change. These influences occur at spatial scales ranging from the continental scale to fine scale processes and landforms at the slope scale. Past geomorphic influences, particularly Pleistocene glaciation, have also left their impact on treeline, and treelines across the west are still adjusting to post-Pleistocene conditions within Pleistocene-created landforms. Current tine scale processes include solifluction and changes on relict solifluction and digging by animals. These processes should be examined in detail in future studies to facilitate a better understanding of where individual tree seedlings become established as a primary response of the ecotone to climate change. Copyright ?? 2007 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Geologic mapping of the Ladakh Himalaya by computer processing of Landsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francica, J. R.; Birnie, R. W.; Johnson, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer processed Landsat digital data and field studies have been integrated to make a geologic map of the Indus Suture in the Ladakh Himalaya. This coordinated approach has been successful at locating and identifying the areal extent of the major rock bodies in a 2500 square kilometer area, much of which is inaccessable for conventional field geologic studies.

  14. Geology Field Trips as Performance Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Callan

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important goals the author has for students in his introductory-level physical geology course is to give them the conceptual skills for solving geologic problems on their own. He wants students to leave his course as individuals who can use their knowledge of geologic processes and logic to figure out the extended geologic history…

  15. Constraining geologic properties and processes through the use of impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    2015-07-01

    Impact cratering is the one geologic process which is common to all solar system objects. Impact craters form by the resulting explosion between a solar system body and hypervelocity objects. Comparison with craters formed by chemical and nuclear explosions reveals that crater diameter is related to other morphometric characteristics of the crater, such as depth and rim height. These relationships allow scientists to use impact craters to probe the subsurface structure within the upper few kilometer of a planetary surface and to estimate the amounts and types of degradational processes which have affected the planet since crater formation. Crater size-frequency distribution analysis provides the primary mechanism for determining ages of planetary terrains and constraining the timing of resurfacing episodes. Thus, impact craters provide many important insights into the evolution of planetary surfaces.

  16. The Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC): Mapping Mars and Implications for Geological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Ralf; Tirsch, Daniela; Hauber, Ernst; Hoffmann, Harald; Neukum, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    After 10 years of ESA's Mars Express orbiting the planet its High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) covered about 90 % of the surface in stereo and color with resolutions up to 10 m/pixel. Digital elevation models of up to 50 m grid spacing [1], generated from all suitable datasets of the stereo coverage, currently cover about 40 % of the surface [2]. The geomorphological analysis of surface features, observed by the HRSC indicate major surface modifications by endogenic and exogenic processes on all scales. Endogenic landforms (e.g., tectonic rifts, small basaltic shield volcanoes) were found to be very similar to their equivalents on Earth, suggesting that no unique processes are required to explain their formation. Volcanism may have been active up to the very recent past or even to the present, putting important constraints on thermal evolution models [e.g., 3]. The analysis of diverse landforms produced by aqueous processes revealed that surface water activity was likely episodic, but ranged in age from very ancient to very recent [e.g., 3]. Particularly important is prominent glaciation and periglacial features at several latitudes, including mountain glaciers [e.g., 3]. The identification of aqueous alteration minerals and their geological context has enabled a better understanding of paleoenvironmental conditions and pedogenetic processes [e.g., 4]. Dark dunes contain volcanic material and are evidence for the significantly dynamic surface environment, characterized by widespread erosion, transport, and redeposition [e.g., 3, 5]. Since basically all geologic interpretations of extraterrestrial features require profound knowledge of the Earth as key reference, studies of terrestrial analogues are mandatory in planetary geology. Field work in Antarctica, Svalbard and Iceland [e.g., 6] provided a basis for the analysis of periglacial and volcanic processes, respectively. References: [1] Jaumann et al., 2007, PSS 55, 928-952; [2] Gwinner et al., 2010, EPSL 294, 506-519; [3] Jaumann et al., 2015, PSS, in press, [4] Jaumann et al., 2014, PSS 98, 128-145; [5] Tirsch et al., 2011, JGR 116, doi: 10.1029/2009je003562; [6] Hauber et al., 2011, Geol. Soc. Am. 483, 111-131

  17. Important geological and biological impacts of natural hydrocarbon seeps: Northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Large volumes of siliciclastic sediments, input especially during periods of lowered sea level, and compensating salt tectonics have produced a continental slope that is arguably the most complex in today's oceans. Faults associated with deformation of salt and shale provide the primary migration routes for hydrocarbon gases, crude oil, brines, and formation fluids to the modern sea floor. Since the mid 1980s, it has become increasingly clearer that this process has an extremely important impact on the geomorphology, sedimentology, and biology of the modern continental slope. Hydrocarbon source, flux rate, and water depth are important determinants of sea-floor response. Under rapid flux conditions mud volcanoes (to 1 km wide and 50 m high) result, and hydrate hills (rich with authigenic carbonates), carbonate lithoherms, and isolated communities of chemosymbiotic organisms with associated hardgrounds represent much slower flux responses. In numerous moderate- to low-flux cases, cold seep products function to support islands of productivity for communities of chemosymbiotic organisms that contribute both directly (shell material) and through chemical byproducts to the production of massive volumes of calcium-magnesium carbonate in the form of hardgrounds, stacked slabs, and discrete moundlike buildups (commonly >20m). Seep-related carbonates of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope, as well those formed through degassing of accretionary prisms along active margins, are now thought to create hardgrounds and discrete buildups that are excellent analogs for many problematic carbonate buildups in ancient deep-water siliciclastic rocks.

  18. Digitizing rocks standardizing the geological description process using workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, M.R. (EXLOG (Services), Windsor, Berkshire (United Kingdom)); Shields, J.A. (EXLOG North Sea, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Taylor, M.R. (EXLOG, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The preservation of geological knowledge in a standardized digital form presents a challenge. Data sources, inherently fuzzy, range in scale from the macroscopic (e.g., outcrop) through the mesoscopic (e.g., hand-specimen) core and sidewall core, to the microscopic (e.g., drill cuttings, thin sections, and microfossils). Each scale change results in increased heterogeneity and potentially contradictory data and the providers of such data may vary in experience level. To address these issues with respect to cores and drill cuttings, a geological description workstation has been developed and is undergoing field trials. Over 1000 carefully defined geological attributes are currently available within a depth-indexed, relational database. Attributes are stored in digital form, allowing multiple users to select familiar usage (e.g., diabase vs. dolerite). Data can be entered in one language and retrieved in other languages. The database structure allow groupings of similar elements (e.g., rhyolites in acidic, igneous or volcanics subgroups or the igneous rock group) permitting different uses to analyze details appropriate to the scale of the usage. Data entry uses a graphical user interface, allowing the geologist to make quick, logical selections in a standardized or custom-built format with extensive menus, on-screen graphics and help screens available. Description ranges are permissible. Entries for lithology, petrology, structures (sedimentary, organic and deformational), reservoir characteristics (porosity and hydrocarbon shows), and macrofossils are available. Sampling points for thin sections, core analysis, geochemistry, or micropaleontology studies are also recorded. Using digital data storage, geological logs using graphical, alphanumeric and symbolic depictions are possible. Data can be integrated with drilling and mud gas data, MWD and wireline data and off well-site analyses to produced composite formation evaluation logs and interpretational crossplots.

  19. The lively Aysén fjord, Chile: Records of multiple geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastras, Galderic; Amblas, David; Calafat, Antoni; Canals, Miquel; Frigola, Jaime; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Lafuerza, Sara; Longva, Oddvar; Micallef, Aaron; Sepúlveda, Sergio A.; Vargas, Gabriel; Azpiroz, María; Bascuńán, Ignacio; Duhart, Paul; Iglesias, Olaia; Kempf, Philipp; Rayo, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The Aysén fjord is a 65 km long, east-west oriented fjord in Chilean Patagonia, located approximately at 45.4şS and 73.2şW, with a maximum water depth of 345 m. The fjord receives at present the riverine input of Aysén, Pescado, Condor and Cuervo rivers, which drain the surrounding up to 2000 m high Patagonian Andes. The fjord is crossed by a number of faults associated to the seismically active Liquińe-Ofqui Fault Zone, a major trench parallel intra-arc fault system. After a four-month period of moderate seismicity, an Mw 6.2 earthquake on 21 April 2007 triggered dozens of subaerial landslides along the fjord flanks. Some of the landslides reached the fjord water mass, generating a series of tsunami-like displacement waves that impacted the adjacent coastlines with 3-12 m, locally over 50 m high run-ups, causing ten fatalities and severe damage to salmon farms. The research cruise DETSUFA on board BIO Hespérides in March 2013 mapped the submerged morphology of the fjord and gathered air-gun seismic profiles and sediment gravity cores in order to characterise the footprint of the landslides in the fjord floor. Very-high resolution multibeam bathymetry (4 m cell size) clearly shows the deformation structures created by the landslides in the inner fjord. The landslides descended and accelerated down the submerged fjord flanks, and reached the fjord floor at approx. 200 m water depth generating large, 1 to 10 m deep impact depressions. Sediment removed from these depressions moved radially and piled up in deformation rings formed by compressional ridges 10-15 m in height, block fields and a narrow frontal depression. Up to six >1.5 square km of these structures can be identified in the fjord. In addition, the DETSUFA survey extended beyond the SE-NW-oriented inner fjord past the Cuervo Ridge, located in front of the Cuervo river delta. The ridge, previously interpreted as a volcanic transverse structure, has most probably acted as a limit for grounding ice in the past, as suggested by the presence of melt-water channels lateral to the ridge. Beyond the ridge, the fjord smoothens and deepens to more than 330 m forming an enclosed basin before turning SW. There, it shallows back across a field of streamlined submerged hills of glacial origin. The external Aysén fjord, before joining to Canal Costa and Canal Moraleda, is characterized by three volcanic cones, one of them forming Isla Colorada - which also acted as a glacial limit - and the other two totally submerged and previously unknown. The largest one is 160 m high, 1.3 km in diameter and tops at 67 m water depth. This data set illustrates the complex interaction between fluvial, glacial, tectonic, volcanic and gravity processes and evidences the recent lively geological history of Aysén fjord.

  20. Rainwater as a chemical agent of geologic processes; a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, Dorothy

    1962-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the rainwater collected at several localities are given to show the variations of the principal constitutents. In rock weathering and soil-forming processes, the chemical composition of rainwater has an important effect which has been evaluated for only a few arid areas. In humid regions the important amounts of calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium added yearly by rain may be expected to influence the composition of the soil water and thereby the cations in the exchange positions of soil clay minerals. The acquisition of cations by clay minerals may slow down chemical weathering. The stability of soil clay minerals is influenced by the constant accession of cations from rainwater. Conversely, the clay minerals modify the amounts and kinds of cations that are leached out by drainage waters. The stability of micaceous minerals in soils may be partly due to accessions of K +1 ions from rainwater. The pH of rainwater in any area varies considerably and seems to form a seasonal and regional pattern. The recorded pH values range from 3.0 to 9.8.

  1. Active geologic processes in Barrow Canyon, northeast Chukchi Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eittreim, S.; Grantz, A.; Greenberg, J.

    1982-01-01

    Circulation patterns on the shelf and at the shelf break appear to dominate the Barrow Canyon system. The canyon's shelf portion underlies and is maintained by the Alaska Coastal Current (A.C.C.), which flows northeastward along the coast toward the northeast corner of the broad Chukchi Sea. Offshelf and onshelf advective processes are indicated by oceanographic measurements of other workers. These advective processes may play an important role in the production of bedforms that are found near the canyon head as well as in processes of erosion or non-deposition in the deeper canyon itself. Coarse sediments recovered from the canyon axis at 400 to 570 m indicate that there is presently significant flow along the canyon. The canyon hooks left at a point north of Point Barrow where the A.C.C. loses its coastal constriction. The left hook, as well as preferential west-wall erosion, continues down to the abyssal plain of the Canada Basin at 3800 m. A possible explanation for the preferential west-wall erosion along the canyon, at least for the upper few hundred meters, is that the occasional upwelling events, which cause nutrient-rich water to flow along the west wall would in turn cause larger populations of burrowing organisms to live there than on the east wall, and that these organisms cause high rates of bioerosion. This hypothesis assumes that the dominant factor in the canyon's erosion is biological activity, not current velocity. Sedimentary bedforms consisting of waves and furrows are formed in soft mud in a region on the shelf west of the canyon head; their presence there perhaps reflects: (a) the supply of fine suspended sediments delivered by the A.C.C. from sources to the south, probably the Yukon and other rivers draining northwestern Alaska; and (b) the westward transport of these suspended sediments by the prevailing Beaufort Gyre which flows along the outer shelf. ?? 1982.

  2. Molecular Modeling of Environmentally Important Processes: Reduction Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne; Bumpus, John A.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Cramer, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing use of computational quantum chemistry in the modeling of environmentally important processes is described. The employment of computational quantum mechanics for the prediction of oxidation-reduction potential for solutes in an aqueous medium is discussed.

  3. General Ledger File Transfer/Import Process (Journal Import) The General Ledger File Transfer/Import Process (data file transfer) involves the electronic

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    General Ledger File Transfer/Import Process (Journal Import) The General Ledger File Transfer application, into the General Ledger. This process eliminates the manual entry of a large volume of financial transactions directly into the General Ledger. Initial Set-up: Financial Information Administration must

  4. The importance of U-series dating for understanding the Quaternary geology

    E-print Network

    at the con- sequential geomorphology and sedimentology. Of particular importance to the project significantly more developed sedimentology. The sedimentology of the Kyrenia Terrace is a relatively mature

  5. Radiogenic Strontium-87 as an Index of Geologic Processes.

    PubMed

    Hedge, C E; Walthall, F G

    1963-06-14

    The abundance of radiogenic Sr(87) relative to Sr(86) at the time of crystallization has been determined for 45 rocks. The total range in the ratio Sr(87)/Sr(86) is less than 2 percent. Ratios for recent lavas range from 0.702 to 0.711. Oceanic basalts are closely grouped at 0.703, whereas ratios for continental volcanic rocks spread from 0.702 to 0.711. Among the volcanic rocks, ranging from basalt to rhyolite, no correlation was found between original ratio and rock type. Older mafic and felsic rocks that include both plutonic and extrusive types also cover this same range in original Sr(87)/Sr(86) ratios; however, there is a definite trend with geologic time. Precambrian rocks give values as low as 0.700. The data indicate that Sr(87)/Sr(86) of the weathering crust has changed 1.1 percent in 3000 million years, while the ratio in the mantle has changed no more than 0.5 percent. PMID:17837503

  6. Refining Martian Ages and Understanding Geological Processes From Cratering Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    2005-01-01

    Senior Scientist William K. Hartman presents his final report on Mars Data Analysis Program grant number NAG5-12217: The third year of the three-year program was recently completed in mid-2005. The program has been extremely productive in research and data analysis regarding Mars, especially using Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey imagery. In the 2005 alone, three papers have already been published, to which this work contributed.1) Hartmann, W. K. 200.5. Martian cratering 8. Isochron refinement and the history of Martian geologic activity Icarus 174, 294-320. This paper is a summary of my entire program of establishing Martian chronology through counts of Martian impact craters. 2) Arfstrom, John, and W. K. Hartmann 2005. Martian flow features, moraine-like rieges, and gullies: Terrestrial analogs and interrelationships. Icarus 174,32 1-335. This paper makes pioneering connections between Martian glacier-like features and terrestrial glacial features. 3) Hartmann, W.K., D. Winterhalter, and J. Geiss. 2005 Chronology and Physical Evolution of Planet Mars. In The Solar System and Beyond: Ten Years of ISSI (Bern: International Space Science Institute). This is a summary of work conducted at the International Space Science Institute with an international team, emphasizing our publication of a conference volume about Mars, edited by Hartmann and published in 2001.

  7. Geological images

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Marli Bryant Miller

    This site from Marli Bryant Miller, a professor at the University of Oregon, presents images of geological features from around the world. Photographs of glacial features, igneous and metamorphic rocks and processes, and structural geology are featured.

  8. Processing of Neutron Diffraction Data for Strain Measurement in Geological Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL] [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL] [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL] [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Dessieux Jr, Luc Lucius [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    : Conventional rock mechanics testing techniques typically involve the loading of samples and measurement of displacements or strains on the outer boundary of the specimen surface. Neutron diffraction based strain measurement techniques represent a unique and powerful tool for measuring the strain within geological materials under load. The structural variability and non-uniform crystallinity of geological materials, however, create many complexities in the intensity patterns that must be analyzed to quantify strains within the material. The attenuating and scattering properties of the pressure cell housing the sample further add difficulties to the data analysis. This paper describes the methods and processes used to process neutron scattering data for strain measurement in geological materials. It is intended to provide a primer for those in the rock mechanics community that are interested in utilizing this technique along with additional discussion of neutron diffraction experimental factors that may affect data quality.

  9. Impact craters: their importance in geologic record and implications for natural resource development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Jr

    1986-01-01

    Impacting bodies of sufficient size traveling at hypervelocities carry tremendous potential energy. This relatively infrequent process results in the instantaneous formation of unique structures that are characterized by extensive fracturing and brecciation of the target material. Impacts onto continental shield areas can create rich ore deposits, such as the Sudbury mining district in Canada. Impacts into the sedimentary column can

  10. Processes in karst systems, physics, chemistry, and geology

    SciTech Connect

    Dreybrodt, W.

    1988-01-01

    Dreybrodt deals quantitatively with many of the chemical and hydrological processes involved in the formation of karst systems. The book is divided into 3 major parts. The first part develops the basic chemical and fluid-flow principles needed in modeling karst systems. The second part investigates the experimental kinetics of calcite dissolution and precipitation and applies the resulting kinetic laws to the modeling of these processes in systems both open and closed to carbon dioxide. The last part of the book includes a qualitative examination of karst systems, quantitative modeling of the development of karst features, and an examination and modeling of the growth of spelotherms in caves.

  11. Impacts of Juniper Vegetation and Karst Geology on Subsurface Flow Processes in the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Surajit Dasgupta; Binayak P. Mohanty; J. Maximilian Köhne

    2006-01-01

    Impacts of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei J. Buchholz) and karst geology on the regional water cycle in the Edwards plateau region of Texas are complex and not well understood. The objective of our study was to gain a comprehensive understanding of the subsurface flow processes occurring at a juniper woodland site on the Edwards Plateau near Honey Creek State Natural

  12. Applying Seismic Methods to National Security Problems: Matched Field Processing With Geological Heterogeneity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Myers; S Larsen; J Wagoner; B Henderer; D McCallen; J Trebes; P Harben; D Harris

    2003-01-01

    Seismic imaging and tracking methods have intelligence and monitoring applications. Current systems, however, do not adequately calibrate or model the unknown geological heterogeneity. Current systems are also not designed for rapid data acquisition and analysis in the field. This project seeks to build the core technological capabilities coupled with innovative deployment, processing, and analysis methodologies to allow seismic methods to

  13. Lexico-Grammatical Features of Geology Textbooks: Process and Product Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Alison

    1993-01-01

    Examines lexico-grammatical features in an introductory textbook in relation to the thematic organization of the textbook. Comparison is made with a second textbook and the contribution of the lexico-grammatical feature to establish an epistemology of geology. Suggestions are made for supporting English-as-a-Second-Language students in processing

  14. GEOLOGICAL CONTROLS IN THE FORMATIONS AND EXPANSIONS OF GULLIES OVER HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN THE

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    PROCESSES IN THE HIGHLANDS OF ETHIOPIA, NORTHERN BLUE NILE REGION A Thesis Presented to the Faculty geological material and land use type. #12;Water head upstream of the dyke is near or above surface water pressure development and landslides. Saturated area soils have little strength and result in soil

  15. Use of clay minerals in reconstructing geological processes: recent advances and some perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Srodon

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews that clay literature from the last ten years, which is devoted to the applications of clay minerals in the interpretation of geological processes in sedimentary basins. The results, selected by the author as being of particular interest, are presented, arranged according to the successive phases of the rock cycle. The research field defined in the title has

  16. Impact of food processing industry on geology, soil and ecology: The Nigerian experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ogbonnaya Chukwu

    In developing countries it is common to cite industries without carrying out environmental impact assessment. This is the case of the two industries audited in this study. It becomes necessary therefore to audit food processing industries in Nigeria to determine their impact on geology, soil and ecology. This will enhance a cleaner and healthier environment. In this study the impact

  17. Time-lapse motion picture technique applied to the study of geological processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Crandell, D.R.

    1959-01-01

    Light-weight, battery-operated timers were built and coupled to 16-mm motion-picture cameras having apertures controlled by photoelectric cells. The cameras were placed adjacent to Emmons Glacier on Mount Rainier. The film obtained confirms the view that exterior time-lapse photography can be applied to the study of slow-acting geologic processes.

  18. The Importance of Biophysicochemical Transport Processes in Hyporheic Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.

    2001-12-01

    Hyporheic exchange processes are generally analyzed in terms of hydrologic stream-subsurface interactions, biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone, or nutrient and carbon uptake in the context of stream metabolism. Often, investigations are motivated primarily by applications in hydrology, contaminant transport, or stream ecology, and thus focus on only one of these aspects of hyporheic exchange. However, it is important to consider the interrelationships between biological, physical, and chemical processes, which are inevitably and inextricably linked because the hyporheic zone represents an extraordinary complex environmental system. The nature of biophysicochemical linkages in the hyporheic zone will be discussed in general terms and illustrated with two important examples. The transport of microorganisms such as the pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum in streams is dependent on both physical transport processes and physicochemical interactions in the hyporheic zone. The transport of labile particulate organic matter to the hyporheic zone is dependent on similar processes, but also induces biologically-mediated alteration of the subsurface environment. In these types of studies, insufficient characterization of either physical, chemical, or biological processes can lead to errors in interpretation of overall system behavior.

  19. The large impact process inferred from the geology of lunar multiring basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of the impact process has been inferred through the study of the geology of a wide variety of impact crater types and sizes. Some of the largest craters known are the multiring basins found in ancient terrains of the terrestrial planets. Of these features, those found on the Moon possess the most extensive and diverse data coverage, including morphological, geochemical, geophysical, and sample data. The study of the geology of lunar basins over the past 10 years has given us a rudimentary understanding of how these large structures have formed and evolved. The topics covered include basin morphology, basin ejecta, basin excavation, and basin ring formation.

  20. Disribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, T.; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to ~2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30 degrees), with no dunes being present above 60 degrees. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30 degrees and 60 degrees north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial/pluvial/lacustrine processes are the most recent, while tectonic processes that led to the formation of mountains and Xanadu are likely the most ancient.

  1. Distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, T.; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ???350 m to ???2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30??), with no dunes being present above 60??. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30?? and 60?? north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial/pluvial/lacustrine processes are the most recent, while tectonic processes that led to the formation of mountains and Xanadu are likely the most ancient. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Importance of field scientific learning at the time of elementary and junior high school. - Introduction of geological field learning in Shimane Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, I.

    2014-12-01

    Importance of the scientific field learning is increasing since the disaster by the Tohoku-Earthquake and Tsunami at the 11th March 2011, in Japan. Effective enforcement of the environmental education from a kindergarten to a University student is very important educational tool for protecting future earth's environment. Practice of the geological field study at the time of elementary and junior high school is very important. This study reports the present situation and the practice example of field scientific learning of Japan. Particularly, I report practice of the geological field education in a class of Shimane prefecture. I point out that "Consciousness (In)", "knowledge (About)", and "action (For)" are important three factors not only environmental education but also geological field education (e.g. Matsumoto, 2014). However, the practice rate of field geological learning at the elementary and junior high school is very low in Japan (Miyashita and Matsumoto, 2010). I introduce the effective method of increasing the practice rate of field geological study. I discuss about pedagogy which improves especially a student's scientific literacy.

  3. Dark Carbon Fixation: An Important Process in Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Ana Lúcia; Bastviken, David; Gudasz, Cristian; Tranvik, Lars; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Close to redox boundaries, dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria may be a large contributor to overall carbon fixation. Still, little is known about the relative importance of this process in lake systems, in spite the potentially high chemoautotrophic potential of lake sediments. We compared rates of dark carbon fixation, bacterial production and oxygen consumption in sediments from four Swedish boreal and seven tropical Brazilian lakes. Rates were highly variable and dark carbon fixation amounted up to 80% of the total heterotrophic bacterial production. The results indicate that non-photosynthetic carbon fixation can represent a substantial contribution to bacterial biomass production, especially in sediments with low organic matter content. PMID:23776549

  4. Laboratory Studies of Heterogeneous Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct measurements of chemical kinetics parameters for heterogeneous reactions of importance in the stratosphere and the troposphere. It involves the elucidation of the mechanism of the interaction of HCl vapor with ice surfaces, which is the first step in the heterogeneous chlorine activation processes, as well as the investigation of the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of soot particles emitted by biomass and fossil fuels. The techniques being employed include turbulent flow-chemical ionization mass spectrometry and optical ellipsometry, among others.

  5. Theoretical studies of important processes in planetary and comet atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1990-01-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) reactions in planetary and comet atmospheres are discussed. A computer program was developed which determines DR cross sections and rates using potential curves and electronic capture widths. It uses Multi-Channel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT) to include excited Rydberg resonance levels in the DR cross section and rate calculations. Each vibrational level of a molecular ion is the limit for an infinite series of Rydberg states. Above each ion vibrational level are Rydberg vibrational levels having higher ion levels as their series limit. These Rydberg vibrational levels are resonances, i.e., neutral states which are imbedded in the electron-molecular ion continuum. The process in which the Rydberg level causes an abrupt perturbation in the cross section for DR (because of interference between capture into the Rydberg level and capture into the repulsive dissociative state) is referred to as indirect recombination. The process in which the Rydberg levels are excluded and recombination goes from the entrance channel to the repulsive state is called direct recombination. The full DR process, i.e., both direct and indirect recombination, is the process of importance for planetary atmospheres. These ideas are illustrated with the new results for DR from excited ion vibrational levels of O2(+) into the dissociative state which leads to O(1S) + O(1D).

  6. The importance of sensory integration processes for action cascading

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Krutika; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Dual tasking or action cascading is essential in everyday life and often investigated using tasks presenting stimuli in different sensory modalities. Findings obtained with multimodal tasks are often broadly generalized, but until today, it has remained unclear whether multimodal integration affects performance in action cascading or the underlying neurophysiology. To bridge this gap, we asked healthy young adults to complete a stop-change paradigm which presented different stimuli in either one or two modalities while recording behavioral and neurophysiological data. Bimodal stimulus presentation prolonged response times and affected bottom-up and top-down guided attentional processes as reflected by the P1 and N1, respectively. However, the most important effect was the modulation of response selection processes reflected by the P3 suggesting that a potentially different way of forming task goals operates during action cascading in bimodal vs. unimodal tasks. When two modalities are involved, separate task goals need to be formed while a conjoint task goal may be generated when all stimuli are presented in the same modality. On a systems level, these processes seem to be related to the modulation of activity in fronto-polar regions (BA10) as well as Broca's area (BA44). PMID:25820681

  7. Understanding geological processes: Visualization of rigid and non-rigid transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, T. F.; Atit, K.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Resnick, I.; Tikoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Visualizations are used in the geological sciences to support reasoning about structures and events. Research in cognitive sciences offers insights into the range of skills of different users, and ultimately how visualizations might support different users. To understand the range of skills needed to reason about earth processes we have developed a program of research that is grounded in the geosciences' careful description of the spatial and spatiotemporal patterns associated with earth processes. In particular, we are pursuing a research program that identifies specific spatial skills and investigates whether and how they are related to each other. For this study, we focus on a specific question: Is there an important distinction in the geosciences between rigid and non-rigid deformation? To study a general spatial thinking skill we employed displays with non-geological objects that had been altered by rigid change (rotation), and two types of non-rigid change ("brittle" (or discontinuous) and "ductile" (or continuous) deformation). Disciplinary scientists (geosciences and chemistry faculty), and novices (non-science faculty and undergraduate psychology students) answered questions that required them to visualize the appearance of the object before the change. In one study, geologists and chemists were found to be superior to non-science faculty in reasoning about rigid rotations (e.g., what an object would look like from a different perspective). Geologists were superior to chemists in reasoning about brittle deformations (e.g., what an object looked like before it was broken - here the object was a word cut into many fragments displaced in different directions). This finding is consistent with two hypotheses: 1) Experts are good at visualizing the types of changes required for their domain; and 2) Visualization of rigid and non-rigid changes are not the same skill. An additional important finding is that there was a broad range of skill in both rigid and non-rigid reasoning within the panels of science experts. In a second study, individual differences in reasoning about brittle deformations were correlated with reasoning about ductile deformations (e.g., what a bent plastic sheet would look like when unbent). Students who were good at visualizing what something looked like before it was broken were also good at visualizing what something looked like before it was bent, and this skill was not correlated to reasoning about rigid rotations. These findings suggest the cognitive processes that support reasoning about rigid and non-rigid events may differ and thus may require different types of support and training. We do not know if differences between experts and novices result from experience or self-selection, or both. Nevertheless, the range of spatial skill evinced by novices and experts strongly argues for designing visualizations to support a variety of users.

  8. New technique for the determination of trace noble metal content in geological and process materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N Mitkin; S. B Zayakina; G. N Anoshin

    2003-01-01

    A new two-step sample preparation technique is proposed for the instrumental determination of trace quantities of noble metals (NM) in refractory geological and process materials. The decomposition procedure is based on the oxidizing fluorination of samples with subsequent sulfatization (OFS) of the sample melt or cake. Fluorination of samples is accomplished using a mixture of KHF2+KBrF4 or KHF2+BrF3 depending on

  9. Applying Seismic Methods to National Security Problems: Matched Field Processing With Geological Heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S; Larsen, S; Wagoner, J; Henderer, B; McCallen, D; Trebes, J; Harben, P; Harris, D

    2003-10-29

    Seismic imaging and tracking methods have intelligence and monitoring applications. Current systems, however, do not adequately calibrate or model the unknown geological heterogeneity. Current systems are also not designed for rapid data acquisition and analysis in the field. This project seeks to build the core technological capabilities coupled with innovative deployment, processing, and analysis methodologies to allow seismic methods to be effectively utilized in the applications of seismic imaging and vehicle tracking where rapid (minutes to hours) and real-time analysis is required. The goal of this project is to build capabilities in acquisition system design, utilization of full three-dimensional (3D) finite difference modeling, as well as statistical characterization of geological heterogeneity. Such capabilities coupled with a rapid field analysis methodology based on matched field processing are applied to problems associated with surveillance, battlefield management, finding hard and deeply buried targets, and portal monitoring. This project, in support of LLNL's national-security mission, benefits the U.S. military and intelligence community. Fiscal year (FY) 2003 was the final year of this project. In the 2.5 years this project has been active, numerous and varied developments and milestones have been accomplished. A wireless communication module for seismic data was developed to facilitate rapid seismic data acquisition and analysis. The E3D code was enhanced to include topographic effects. Codes were developed to implement the Karhunen-Loeve (K-L) statistical methodology for generating geological heterogeneity that can be utilized in E3D modeling. The matched field processing methodology applied to vehicle tracking and based on a field calibration to characterize geological heterogeneity was tested and successfully demonstrated in a tank tracking experiment at the Nevada Test Site. A three-seismic-array vehicle tracking testbed was installed on site at LLNL for testing real-time seismic tracking methods. A field experiment was conducted over a tunnel at the Nevada Site that quantified the tunnel reflection signal and, coupled with modeling, identified key needs and requirements in experimental layout of sensors. A large field experiment was conducted at the Lake Lynn Laboratory, a mine safety research facility in Pennsylvania, over a tunnel complex in realistic, difficult conditions. This experiment gathered the necessary data for a full 3D attempt to apply the methodology. The experiment also collected data to analyze the capabilities to detect and locate in-tunnel explosions for mine safety and other applications. In FY03 specifically, a large and complex simulation experiment was conducted that tested the full modeling-based approach to geological characterization using E2D, the K-L statistical methodology, and matched field processing applied to tunnel detection with surface seismic sensors. The simulation validated the full methodology and the need for geological heterogeneity to be accounted for in the overall approach. The Lake Lynn site area was geologically modeled using the code Earthvision to produce a 32 million node 3D model grid for E3D. Model linking issues were resolved and a number of full 3D model runs were accomplished using shot locations that matched the data. E3D-generated wavefield movies showed the reflection signal would be too small to be observed in the data due to trapped and attenuated energy in the weathered layer. An analysis of the few sensors coupled to bedrock did not improve the reflection signal strength sufficiently because the shots, though buried, were within the surface layer and hence attenuated. Ability to model a complex 3D geological structure and calculate synthetic seismograms that are in good agreement with actual data (especially for surface waves and below the complex weathered layer) was demonstrated. We conclude that E3D is a powerful tool for assessing the conditions under which a tunnel could be detected in a specific geological setting. Finally, the Lak

  10. Canada's Deep Geological Repository For Used Nuclear Fuel -The Geoscientific Site Evaluation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschorn, S.; Ben Belfadhel, M.; Blyth, A.; DesRoches, A. J.; McKelvie, J. R. M.; Parmenter, A.; Sanchez-Rico Castejon, M.; Urrutia-Bustos, A.; Vorauer, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management, the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. In May 2010, the NWMO published and initiated a nine-step site selection process to find an informed and willing community to host a deep geological repository for Canada's used nuclear fuel. The site selection process is designed to address a broad range of technical and social, economic and cultural factors. The suitability of candidate areas will be assessed in a stepwise manner over a period of many years and include three main steps: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Characterizations. The Preliminary Assessment is conducted in two phases. NWMO has completed Phase 1 preliminary assessments for the first eight communities that entered into this step. While the Phase 1 desktop geoscientific assessments showed that each of the eight communities contains general areas that have the potential to satisfy the geoscientific safety requirements for hosting a deep geological repository, the assessment identified varying degrees of geoscientific complexity and uncertainty between communities, reflecting their different geological settings and structural histories. Phase 2 activities will include a sequence of high-resolution airborne geophysical surveys and focused geological field mapping to ground-truth lithology and structural features, followed by limited deep borehole drilling and testing. These activities will further evaluate the site's ability to meet the safety functions that a site would need to ultimately satisfy in order to be considered suitable. This paper provides an update on the site evaluation process and describes the approach, methods and criteria that are being used to conduct the geoscientific Preliminary Assessments.

  11. Giant ore deposits formed by optimal alignments and combinations of geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Jeremy P.

    2013-11-01

    Giant ore deposits contain anomalously large quantities of metal and are priority targets for mineral exploration companies. It is debated whether these giant deposits have a unique mode of formation. Alternatively they may simply represent the extreme end of a spectrum of deposit sizes, formed by an optimum coincidence of common geological processes to build unusually large accumulations of metal. If formed by unique processes, the occurrence of giant ore deposits may be difficult to predict. Conversely, if formed by common processes, understanding the mechanisms that lead to optimum circumstances for giant metal deposits could help with exploration. A review of several giant porphyry copper-molybdenum-gold and epithermal gold-silver deposits reveals that many have characteristics consistent with formation during the optimization of normal ore-forming processes. In several cases, the large size of the deposit reflects specific factors, such as distinct tectonic configurations, reactive host rocks or focused fluid flow, that are not unusual by themselves but have helped to enhance the overall process. Thus, I suggest that effective exploration for giant deposits should seek distinct conditions within fundamentally prospective geological settings that might lead to enhanced ore-forming processes.

  12. Quantifying geological processes on Mars-Results of the high resolution stereo camera (HRSC) on Mars express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.; Tirsch, D.; Hauber, E.; Ansan, V.; Di Achille, G.; Erkeling, G.; Fueten, F.; Head, J.; Kleinhans, M. G.; Mangold, N.; Michael, G. G.; Neukum, G.; Pacifici, A.; Platz, T.; Pondrelli, M.; Raack, J.; Reiss, D.; Williams, D. A.; Adeli, S.; Baratoux, D.; de Villiers, G.; Foing, B.; Gupta, S.; Gwinner, K.; Hiesinger, H.; Hoffmann, H.; Deit, L. Le; Marinangeli, L.; Matz, K.-D.; Mertens, V.; Muller, J. P.; Pasckert, J. H.; Roatsch, T.; Rossi, A. P.; Scholten, F.; Sowe, M.; Voigt, J.; Warner, N.

    2015-07-01

    This review summarizes the use of High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) data as an instrumental tool and its application in the analysis of geological processes and landforms on Mars during the last 10 years of operation. High-resolution digital elevations models on a local to regional scale are the unique strength of the HRSC instrument. The analysis of these data products enabled quantifying geological processes such as effusion rates of lava flows, tectonic deformation, discharge of water in channels, formation timescales of deltas, geometry of sedimentary deposits as well as estimating the age of geological units by crater size-frequency distribution measurements. Both the quantification of geological processes and the age determination allow constraining the evolution of Martian geologic activity in space and time. A second major contribution of HRSC is the discovery of episodicity in the intensity of geological processes on Mars. This has been revealed by comparative age dating of volcanic, fluvial, glacial, and lacustrine deposits. Volcanic processes on Mars have been active over more than 4 Gyr, with peak phases in all three geologic epochs, generally ceasing towards the Amazonian. Fluvial and lacustrine activity phases spread a time span from Noachian until Amazonian times, but detailed studies show that they have been interrupted by multiple and long lasting phases of quiescence. Also glacial activity shows discrete phases of enhanced intensity that may correlate with periods of increased spin-axis obliquity. The episodicity of geological processes like volcanism, erosion, and glaciation on Mars reflects close correlation between surface processes and endogenic activity as well as orbit variations and changing climate condition.

  13. Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel - Geo-scientific Site Evaluation Process - 13117

    SciTech Connect

    Blyth, Alec; Ben Belfadhel, Mahrez; Hirschorn, Sarah; Hamilton, Duncan; McKelvie, Jennifer [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2S3 (Canada)] [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario M4T 2S3 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 meters (m) (1,640 feet [ft]). In May 2010, the NWMO published a nine-step site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. The safety and appropriateness of any potential site will be assessed against a number of factors, both technical and social in nature. The selected site will be one that can be demonstrated to be able to safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel, protecting humans and the environment over the very long term. The geo-scientific suitability of potential candidate sites will be assessed in a stepwise manner following a progressive and thorough site evaluation process that addresses a series of geo-scientific factors revolving around five safety functions. The geo-scientific site evaluation process includes: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Evaluations. As of November 2012, 22 communities have entered the site selection process (three in northern Saskatchewan and 18 in northwestern and southwestern Ontario). (authors)

  14. A Case Study on the Importance of Local Geology on Selection of Cut-off Wall Construction Procedure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gülgün Yilmaz; Turhan Karadayilar; Ali Günay

    A cut-off wall was implemented for a shopping mall to be constructed in Eskisehir\\/Turkey. The subject site is located near Porsuk River on an alluvial plain. Local geology of the subject site consists of Quaternary aged alluvial deposits overlying Eosen and Neogene aged marls and limestones. In the soil investigation results, it was reported that the alluvial deposits consists of

  15. Marine Geology: Research Beneath the Sea

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Another informative offering from the US Geological Survey is the Marine Geology: Research Beneath the Sea Web site. Visitors can read about the agency's Marine Geology program which "strives to increase our understanding of the geology of the lands covered by water." Topics include methods and equipment used for the research, plate tectonics, resources in the marine realm, predicting effects of marine processes, new frontiers, and even images of marine geology. This interesting and unique site does a good job of explaining and educating the public on this important segment of the agency's research.

  16. Processes that initiate turbidity currents and their influence on turbidites: A marine geology perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, David J.W.; Normark, William R.

    2009-01-01

    How the processes that initiate turbidity currents influence turbidite deposition is poorly understood, and many discussions in the literature rely on concepts that are overly simplistic. Marine geological studies provide information on the initiation and flow path of turbidity currents, including their response to gradient. In case studies of late Quaternary turbidites on the eastern Canadian and western U.S. margins, initiation processes are inferred either from real-time data for historical flows or indirectly from the age and contemporary paleogeography, erosional features, and depositional record. Three major types of initiation process are recognized: transformation of failed sediment, hyperpycnal flow from rivers or ice margins, and resuspension of sediment near the shelf edge by oceanographic processes. Many high-concentration flows result from hyperpycnal supply of hyperconcentrated bedload, or liquefaction failure of coarse-grained sediment, and most tend to deposit in slope conduits and on gradients < 0.5?? at the base of slope and on the mid fan. Highly turbulent flows, from transformation of retrogressive failures and from ignitive flows that are triggered by oceanographic processes, tend to cannibalize these more proximal sediments and redeposit them on lower gradients on the basin plain. Such conduit flushing provides most of the sediment in large turbidites. Initiation mechanism exerts a strong control on the duration of turbidity flows. In most basins, there is a complex feedback between different types of turbidity-current initiation, the transformation of the flows, and the associated slope morphology. As a result, there is no simple relationship between initiating process and type of deposit. ?? 2009, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  17. The Importance of Geological Models in Understanding and Predicting the Life Span of Rockslide Dams: The Case of Scanno Lake, Central Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Bianchi-Fasani; C. Esposito; M. Petitta; G. Scarascia-Mugnozza; M. Barbieri; E. Cardarelli; M. Cercato; G. Di Filippo

    \\u000a In order to explain the long life span of the Scanno rockslide-avalanche dammed lake (Central Italy), whose age of impoundment\\u000a is older than 2,300 years, and to get indications about its present and future stability conditions, it was assumed of fundamental\\u000a importance to build a representative geological model aimed at defining (i) the geometry of the boundary surface between the

  18. Product development processes and their importance to organizational capabilities

    E-print Network

    Liu, Bing, 1968 Oct. 25-

    2003-01-01

    Product development is a creative and interdisciplinary activity that transforms a market opportunity and technological innovation into successful products. It is a set of activity-based processes in a product-oriented ...

  19. US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S NATIONAL SYSTEM FOR PROCESSING AND DISTRIBUTION OF NEAR REAL-TIME HYDROLOGICAL DATA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shope, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The US Geological Survey is utilizing a national network of more than 1000 satellite data-collection stations, four satellite-relay direct-readout ground stations, and more than 50 computers linked together in a private telecommunications network to acquire, process, and distribute hydrological data in near real-time. The four Survey offices operating a satellite direct-readout ground station provide near real-time hydrological data to computers located in other Survey offices through the Survey's Distributed Information System. The computerized distribution system permits automated data processing and distribution to be carried out in a timely manner under the control and operation of the Survey office responsible for the data-collection stations and for the dissemination of hydrological information to the water-data users.

  20. Geoelectrical signals of geologic and hydrologic processes in a fringing reef lagoon setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kevin M.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Tait, Douglas R.; Erler, Dirk V.

    2014-09-01

    Coastal groundwater may discharge into nearshore and offshore waters forced by terrestrial fluxes, controlled by local geology, and modulated by the hydrodynamics of littoral water. We investigated the electrical signature of these features with a dense, multiscale network of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys in the Muri Lagoon of Rarotonga, Cook Islands. The ERT surveys spanned from onshore to 400 m into the lagoon and used standard electrodes on land and across the foreshore, submerged electrodes in the shallow subtidal zone, and floating electrodes towed throughout the reef lagoon by a boat. ERT surveys on land mapped a typical freshwater lens underlain by a saltwater wedge, but with possible deviations from the classical model due to an adjacent tidal creek. Further inland, ERT surveys imaged a layer of lava flow deposits that is potentially a confining hydrogeologic unit; this unit was used to constrain the expected electrical resistivity of these deposits below the lagoon. ERT surveys across the intertidal zone and into the lagoon indicated fresh groundwater and porewater salinity patterns consistent with previous small-scale studies including the seaward extension of fresh groundwater pathways to the lagoon. Electrical resistivity (ER) variations in the lagoon subsurface highlighted heterogeneities in the lagoon structure that may focus submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) through previously unknown buried lava flow deposits in the lagoon. A transition to higher ER values near the reef crest is consistent with the ER signature of porosity reduction due to ongoing differential cementation of reef deposits across the lagoon. The imaged coastal hydrostratigraphic heterogeneity may thus control terrestrial and marine porewater mixing, support SGD, and provide the pathways for groundwater and the materials it transports into the lagoon. This hydrogeophysical investigation highlighted the spatial heterogeneity of submarine coastal geology and its hydrogeologic control in a reef lagoon setting, but is likely to occur in many similar coastal settings. Ignoring geologic complexity can result in mischaracterization of SGD and other coastal groundwater processes at many spatial scales.

  1. Identifying Cognitive Processes Important to Mathematics Learning but Often Overlooked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Ross

    2011-01-01

    In August 2010, ACER held its annual conference in Melbourne. The theme of the 2010 conference--"Teaching Mathematics? Make It Count"--was chosen to highlight that mathematics education is an area of high priority in Australia. In the author's own presentation to the conference, he outlined research into an area that he believes is very important

  2. Team Teachers: The Importance of the Selection Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matranga, Myrna

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the team teaching process developed in the Washoe County School District in Reno, Nevada, resulting from the Nevada Legislature's mandate to reduce class size to a 15:1 ratio. Describes the nature of team relationships and how teachers came to teach in a team situation. Advises teacher input in team partner selection as essential to…

  3. The importance of green chemistry in process research and development.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Peter J

    2012-02-21

    Green Chemistry or Sustainable Chemistry is defined by the Environmental Protection Agency as "the design of chemical products that reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous substances" In recent years there is a greater societal expectation that chemists and chemical engineers should produce greener and more sustainable chemical processes and it is likely that this trend will continue to grow over the next few decades. This tutorial review gives information on solvents and solvent selection, basic environmental metrics collection and three industrial case histories. All three case histories involve enzymatic chemistry. Pregabalin (Lyrica®) is produced using a lipase based resolution and is extremely unusual in that all four manufacturing steps to make pregabalin are performed in water. Sitagliptin (Januvia®) uses a transaminase in the final chemical step. Finally a rosuvastatin (Crestor®) intermediate is produced using a deoxy ribose aldolase (DERA) enzyme in which two carbon-carbon bonds and two chiral centres are formed in the same process step. PMID:21562677

  4. Geological Processes Affecting the Shallow Seafloor Temperature Fields: Results from 2D and 3D Seismic Reflection Data Offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, W. C.; Chen, L.; Liu, C. S.; Wang, Y.; Berndt, C.; Han, W. C.; Lin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor heat flow measurements provide fundamental geophysical information that can be used to better understand tectonic processes. Regional heat flow patterns have been successfully used to study the cooling of the oceanic lithosphere, exhumation of deep crustal materials, strength of the faults, and other geological processes. However, sometimes there are variations of heat flows within a small area, making the interpretation of the heat flows difficult. Here we study the geological processes that can cause such variations. Over the last two decades, we have collected many dense 2D and 3D seismic reflection data offshore SW Taiwan and there is a wide-spread bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) found in the seismic profiles. The BSR is interpreted as associated with the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, and can be used to infer the temperature fields at shallow oceanic crust using a hydrate phase diagram. Such a dense and wide-spread dataset provides an unprecedented opportunity to study processes that can affect temperature fields in scales less than a kilometer. Here we show evidence of bathymetry-induced temperature perturbations at shallow oceanic crust by comparing the BSR-based temperature data with the temperature derived from steady-state 3D finite element modeling. We have also documented focused fluid flow migration along faults and fissures based on elevated temperature fields near those geological features. We also found seismic evidence of abnormal high heat flows caused by rapid erosion. Our results demonstrate that sometimes it is necessary to correct those effects before the heat flow data can be used for regional studies. Our study is among the first to provide observational data to study small-scale geological processes affecting seafloor temperature fields. Such information might also be important for gas and oil reservoir studies.

  5. Separating macroecological pattern and process: comparing ecological, economic, and geological systems.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Benjamin; Sloat, Lindsey; Enquist, Brian J; McGill, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Theories of biodiversity rest on several macroecological patterns describing the relationship between species abundance and diversity. A central problem is that all theories make similar predictions for these patterns despite disparate assumptions. A troubling implication is that these patterns may not reflect anything unique about organizational principles of biology or the functioning of ecological systems. To test this, we analyze five datasets from ecological, economic, and geological systems that describe the distribution of objects across categories in the United States. At the level of functional form ('first-order effects'), these patterns are not unique to ecological systems, indicating they may reveal little about biological process. However, we show that mechanism can be better revealed in the scale-dependency of first-order patterns ('second-order effects'). These results provide a roadmap for biodiversity theory to move beyond traditional patterns, and also suggest ways in which macroecological theory can constrain the dynamics of economic systems. PMID:25383874

  6. Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01

    The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

  7. Significant achievements in the planetary geology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W. (editor)

    1984-01-01

    Recent developments in planetology research are summarized. Important developments are summarized in topics ranging from solar system evolution, comparative planetology, and geologic processes active on other planetary bodies, to techniques and instrument development for exploration.

  8. Development of a requirements management system for technical decision - making processes in the geological disposal project

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyoshi Ueda; Katsuhiko Ishiguro; Kazumi Kitayama [Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), Mita NN Bldg., 1-23, Shiba 4-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0014 (Japan); Kiyoshi Oyamada [JGC Corporation (Japan); Shoko Sato [Obayashi Corporation (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    NUMO (Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan) has a responsibility for implementing geological disposal of vitrified HLW (High-Level radioactive Waste) in the Japanese nuclear waste management programme. Its staged siting procedure was initiated in 2002 by an open call for volunteer sites. Careful management strategy and methodology for the technical decision-making at every milestone are required to prepare for the volunteer site application and the site investigation stages after that. The formal Requirement Management System (RMS) is planned to support the computerized implementation of the specific management methodology, termed the NUMO Structured Approach (NSA). This planned RMS will help for comprehensive management of the decision-making processes in the geological disposal project, change management towards the anticipated project deviations, efficient project driving such as well programmed R and D etc. and structured record-keeping regarding the past decisions, which leads to soundness of the project in terms of the long-term continuity. The system should have handling/management functions for the database including the decisions/requirements in the project in consideration, their associated information and the structures composed of them in every decision-making process. The information relating to the premises, boundary conditions and time plan of the project should also be prepared in the system. Effective user interface and efficient operation on the in-house network are necessary. As a living system for the long-term formal use, flexibility to updating is indispensable. In advance of the formal system development, two-year activity to develop the preliminary RMS was already started. The purpose of this preliminary system is to template the decision/requirement structure, prototype the decision making management and thus show the feasibility of the innovative RMS. The paper describes the current status of the development, focusing on the initial stage including work analysis/modeling and the system conceptualization. (authors)

  9. The importance of cost considerations in the systems engineering process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, John D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the question of cost, from the birth of a program to its conclusion, particularly from the point of view of large multi-center programs, and suggests how to avoid some of the traps and pitfalls. Emphasis is given to cost in the systems engineering process, but there is an inevitable overlap with program management. (These terms, systems engineering and program management, have never been clearly defined.) In these days of vast Federal budget deficits and increasing overseas competition, it is imperative that we get more for each research and development dollar. This is the only way we will retain our leadership in high technology and, in the long run, our way of life.

  10. Processes of lunar crater degradation - Changes in style with geologic time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Relative age schemes of crater degradation are calibrated to radiometric dates obtained from lunar samples, changes in morphologic features are analyzed, and the style and rate of lunar surface degradation processes are modeled in relation to lunar geologic time. A comparison of radiometric age scales and the relative degradation of morphologic features for craters larger than about 5 km in diameter shows that crater degradation can be divided into two periods: Period I, prior to about 3.9 billion years ago and characterized by a high meteoritic influx rate and the formation of large multiringed basins, and Period II, from about 3.9 billion years ago to the present and characterized by a much lower influx rate and a lack of large multiringed basins. Diagnostic features for determining the relative ages of craters are described, and crater modification processes are considered, including primary impacts, lateral sedimentation, proximity weathering, landslides, and tectonism. It is suggested that the fundamental degradation of early Martian craters may be associated with erosional and depositional processes related to the intense bombardment characteristics of Period I.

  11. Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    R. James Kirkpatrick; Andrey G. Kalinichev

    2008-11-25

    Research supported by this grant focuses on molecular scale understanding of central issues related to the structure and dynamics of geochemically important fluids, fluid-mineral interfaces, and confined fluids using computational modeling and experimental methods. Molecular scale knowledge about fluid structure and dynamics, how these are affected by mineral surfaces and molecular-scale (nano-) confinement, and how water molecules and dissolved species interact with surfaces is essential to understanding the fundamental chemistry of a wide range of low-temperature geochemical processes, including sorption and geochemical transport. Our principal efforts are devoted to continued development of relevant computational approaches, application of these approaches to important geochemical questions, relevant NMR and other experimental studies, and application of computational modeling methods to understanding the experimental results. The combination of computational modeling and experimental approaches is proving highly effective in addressing otherwise intractable problems. In 2006-2007 we have significantly advanced in new, highly promising research directions along with completion of on-going projects and final publication of work completed in previous years. New computational directions are focusing on modeling proton exchange reactions in aqueous solutions using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), metadynamics (MTD), and empirical valence bond (EVB) approaches. Proton exchange is critical to understanding the structure, dynamics, and reactivity at mineral-water interfaces and for oxy-ions in solution, but has traditionally been difficult to model with molecular dynamics (MD). Our ultimate objective is to develop this capability, because MD is much less computationally demanding than quantum-chemical approaches. We have also extended our previous MD simulations of metal binding to natural organic matter (NOM) to a much longer time scale (up to 10 ns) for significantly larger systems. These calculations have allowed us, for the first time, to study the effects of metal cations with different charges and charge density on the NOM aggregation in aqueous solutions. Other computational work has looked at the longer-time-scale dynamical behavior of aqueous species at mineral-water interfaces investigated simultaneously by NMR spectroscopy. Our experimental NMR studies have focused on understanding the structure and dynamics of water and dissolved species at mineral-water interfaces and in two-dimensional nano-confinement within clay interlayers. Combined NMR and MD study of H2O, Na+, and Cl- interactions with the surface of quartz has direct implications regarding interpretation of sum frequency vibrational spectroscopic experiments for this phase and will be an important reference for future studies. We also used NMR to examine the behavior of K+ and H2O in the interlayer and at the surfaces of the clay minerals hectorite and illite-rich illite-smectite. This the first time K+ dynamics has been characterized spectroscopically in geochemical systems. Preliminary experiments were also performed to evaluate the potential of 75As NMR as a probe of arsenic geochemical behavior. The 75As NMR study used advanced signal enhancement methods, introduced a new data acquisition approach to minimize the time investment in ultra-wide-line NMR experiments, and provides the first evidence of a strong relationship between the chemical shift and structural parameters for this experimentally challenging nucleus. We have also initiated a series of inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements of water dynamics in the interlayers of clays and layered double hydroxides. The objective of these experiments is to probe the correlations of water molecular motions in confined spaces over the scale of times and distances most directly comparable to our MD simulations and on a time scale different than that probed by NMR. This work is being done in collaboration with Drs. C.-K. Loong, N. de Souza, and A.I. Kolesnikov at the Intense Pulsed

  12. Antarctic Dry Valley analogs for Mars gullies: Geological setting and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Marchant, D. R.; Dickson, J. L.; Levy, J. S.; Morgan, G. A.

    2008-09-01

    Malin and Edgett [1,2] initially described a class of young features on Mars that they termed gullies, consisting of an alcove, a channel and a fan. Restricted to middle and high latitude locations, these features were interpreted to have originated through processes related to the presence of liquid water (through groundwater discharge); the potential presence of liquid water on the surface of Mars currently or in the very recent geological past, when liquid water is metastable [3], generated a host of alternative explanations for the gullies [see summary in 4]. Detailed analysis of the conditions under which H2O could flow as a liquid in the current Mars environment shows a range of conditions under which gully-forming activity is possible [3,5]. Recent observations of changes in gullies, interpreted to mean that a few gullies are currently active [6], have intensified this discussion. Terrestrial analogs to martian environments may provide insight into the processes operating on Mars. For example, the nature of perennial saline springs forming channels on Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic has been used to support the argument that martian gullies formed from subsurface groundwater springs [7]. In this analysis we report on the results of ongoing [8-11] field studies in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV), a hyperarid polar desert analog for Mars [11].

  13. Schoolyard Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This set of lessons provides teachers with ideas on how to turn their schoolyards into a rich geologic experience that students will find familiar, easily accessible, and personally relevant. The three lesson plans feature materials on mapping, rock descriptions and geologic interpretations, ages of rocks, and dinosaur tracks. Lesson 1, "Map Your Schoolyard," teaches students what maps are, what they are used for, and some symbols used on maps (north arrow, scale bar, legend, etc.). Lesson 2, "Rock Stories," illustrates how to make geologic observations and what important properties of rocks to look for. Lesson 3, "GeoSleuth Schoolyard," teaches students that geology is a lot like detective work, in which geologists infer the sequence and timing of events by collecting evidence and making observations. Relevant California state science standards are also listed.

  14. Report of the second meeting of the consultants on coupled processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Mangold, D.C.

    1985-09-01

    The second meeting of the Consultants on Coupled Processes Associated with Geological Disposal of Nuclear Waste occurred on January 15-16, 1985 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). All the consultants were present except Dr. K. Kovari, who presented comments in writing afterward. This report contains a brief summary of the presentations and discussions from the meeting. The main points of the speakers' topics are briefly summarized in the report. Some points that emerged during the discussions of the presentations are included in the text related to the respective talks. These comments are grouped under the headings: Comments on Coupled Processes in Unsaturated Fractured Porous Media, Comments on Overview of Coupled Processes, Presentations by Consultants on Selected Topics of Current Interest in Coupled Processes, and Recommendations for Underground Field Tests with Applications to Three Geologic Environments.

  15. In Situ Optical Observation of High-Temperature Geological Processes With the Moissanite Cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Walte; H. Keppler

    2005-01-01

    A major drawback of existing techniques in experimental earth and material sciences is the inability to observe ongoing high-temperature processes in situ during an experiment. Examples for important time-dependent processes include the textural development of rocks and oxide systems during melting and crystallization, solid-state and melt-present recrystallization and Ostwald ripening, and bubble nucleation and growth during degassing of glasses and

  16. Taking geoscience to the IMAX: 3D and 4D insight into geological processes using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Katherine; Dingwell, Don; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Withers, Philip; Lee, Peter; Pistone, Mattia; Fife, Julie; Atwood, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Geology is inherently dynamic, and full understanding of any geological system can only be achieved by considering the processes by which change occurs. Analytical limitations mean understanding has largely developed from ex situ analyses of the products of geological change, rather than of the processes themselves. Most methods essentially utilise "snap shot" sampling: and from thin section petrography to high resolution crystal chemical stratigraphy and field volcanology, we capture an incomplete view of a spatially and temporally variable system. Even with detailed experimental work, we can usually only analyse samples before and after we perform an experiment, as routine analysis methods are destructive. Serial sectioning and quenched experiments stopped at different stages can give some insight into the third and fourth dimension, but the true scaling of the processes from the laboratory to the 4D (3D + time) geosphere is still poorly understood. Micro computed tomography (XMT) can visualise the internal structures and spatial associations within geological samples non-destructively. With image resolutions of between 200 microns and 50 nanometres, tomography has the ability to provide a detailed sample assessment in 3D, and quantification of mineral associations, porosity, grain orientations, fracture alignments and many other features. This allows better understanding of the role of the complex geometries and associations within the samples, but the challenge of capturing the processes that generate and modify these structures remains. To capture processes, recent work has focused on developing experimental capability for in situ experiments on geological materials. Data presented will showcase examples from recent experiments where high speed synchrotron x-ray tomography has been used to acquire each 3D image in under 2 seconds. We present a suite of studies that showcase how it is now possible to take quantification of many geological processed into 3D and 4D. This will include tracking the interactions between bubbles and crystals in a deforming magma, the dissolution of individual mineral grains from low grade ores, and quantification of three phase flow in sediments and soils. Our aim is to demonstrate how XMT can provide new insight into dynamic processes in all geoscience disciplines, and give you some insight into where 4D geoscience could take us next.

  17. Geologically Controlled Isotope-Time Patterns Reveal Early Differentiation and Crust Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, V. C.; Nutman, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms of continental crust production and evolution in the early Earth remain controversial, as are questions of the relative roles of early differentiation versus subsequent tectonic procssing in creating Earth's chemical signatures. Here we present geologic observations integrated with whole rock major, trace element and Sm-Nd isotopic signatures and combined with U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic compositions of zircon populations from the same rocks, from the most extensive early rock record comprising the 3.9 Ga to 3.6 Ga terranes of southwest Greenland. These data reveal repeated patterns of formation of juvenile TTG crust and associated mafic and ultramafic rocks in convergent margin settings followed by formation of more evolved granites [1]. Our new zircon Lu-Hf data from rare 3.6-3.7 Ga tonalites within the Itsaq Gneiss Complex, obtained from single component, non-migmatitic gneisses with simple zircon populations, limited within sample Hf isotopic variability and accurate U-Pb ages, now document extraction of juvenile tonalites from a near chondritic mantle source between 3.9 Ga and 3.6 Ga. The more evolved, granitic rocks in each area show slightly negative initial ?Hf in accord with crustal reworking of the older (3.8-3.9 Ga) gniesses. There is no evidence for Hadean material in the sources of the granitoids. The Hf isotope-time patterns are consistent with juvenile crust production from a mantle source that experienced only modest amounts of prior crustal extraction. They are distinct from those predicted by reprocessing of an enriched Hadean mafic crust, as has been proposed for this region [2] and for the source of the Hadean Jack Hills zircons [3]. The well-documented, time decreasing, positive 142Nd anomalies [e.g., 4] from these rocks are further evidence of crustal derivation from a convecting mantle source, rather than reworking of an enriched mafic lithosphere. The 143Nd isotopic -time patterns are more complex, reflecting the interplay between early Sm/Nd fractionation processes as required by the 142Nd data, juvenile crustal growth and in some cases geologic disturbance of the whole rock Sm-Nd system. [1] Nutman, et al, (2013) Amer. Jour. Sci. 313, 877-911. [2] Naeraa et al.. (2012) Nature 485, 627-631. [3] Kemp et al., (2010) EPSL 296, 45-56. [4] Bennett et al., (20070 Science 318, 1907.

  18. Processing and geologic analysis of conventional cores from well ER-20-6 No. 1, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Prothro, L.B., Townsend, M.J.; Drellack, S.L. Jr. [and others

    1997-09-01

    In 1996, Well Cluster ER-20-6 was drilled on Pahute Mesa in Area 20, in the northwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The three wells of the cluster are located from 166 to 296 meters (m) (544 to 971 feet [ft]) southwest of the site of the underground nuclear test code-named BULLION, conducted in 1990 in Emplacement Hole U-20bd. The well cluster was planned to be the site of a forced-gradient experiment designed to investigate radionuclide transport in groundwater. To obtain additional information on the occurrence of radionuclides, nature of fractures, and lithology, a portion of Well ER-20-6 No. 1, the hole closest to the explosion cavity, was cored for later analysis. Bechtel Nevada (BN) geologists originally prepared the geologic interpretation of the Well Cluster ER-20-6 site and documented the geology of each well in the cluster. However, the cores from Well ER-20-6 No. 1 were not accessible at the time of that work. As the forced-gradient experiment and other radio nuclide migration studies associated with the well cluster progressed, it was deemed appropriate to open the cores, describe the geology, and re-package the core for long-term air-tight storage. This report documents and describes the processing, geologic analysis, and preservation of the conventional cores from Well ER20-6 No. 1.

  19. New technique for the determination of trace noble metal content in geological and process materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitkin, V. N.; Zayakina, S. B.; Anoshin, G. N.

    2003-02-01

    A new two-step sample preparation technique is proposed for the instrumental determination of trace quantities of noble metals (NM) in refractory geological and process materials. The decomposition procedure is based on the oxidizing fluorination of samples with subsequent sulfatization (OFS) of the sample melt or cake. Fluorination of samples is accomplished using a mixture of KHF 2+KBrF 4 or KHF 2+BrF 3 depending on the ratio of sample mass to oxidizing mixture. Both cakes and melts can result using this procedure. Sulfatization of resulting fluorides is completed using concentrated sulfuric acid heated to 550 °C. Validation studies using certified geostandard reference materials (GSO VP-2, ZH-3, Matte RTP, HO-1, SARM-7) have shown that the proposed method is fast, convenient and most often produces non-hygroscopic homogeneous residues suitable for analysis by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). Results obtained for NM concentrations in reference materials agreed with certified concentration ranges and results obtained using other methods of analysis. The OFS procedure combined with direct current plasma d.c. plasma AES achieved the following limits of detection (LOD) for the noble metals: Ag, Au, Pd, 1-2×10 -6; Pt, 5×10 -6; and Ru, Rh, Ir, Os, 1-3×10 -7 wt.%. Using graphite furnace AAS (GFAAS) combined extraction pre-concentration the following LODs for NMs were achieved: Pt, Ru, 1×10 -6; Pd, Rh, 1×10 -7; and Au, Ag, 1-2×10 -8 wt.%. The relative standard deviation for NM determinations ( Sr) was dependent on NM concentration and sample type, but commonly was in the range of 3-15% for d.c. plasma AES and 5-30% for GFAAS.

  20. IGIS (Interactive Geologic Interpretation System) computer-aided photogeologic mapping with image processing, graphics and CAD/CAM capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffie, B.A.; Johnson, L.F.; Alley, R.E.; Lang, H.R. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Advances in computer technology are changing the way geologists integrate and use data. Although many geoscience disciplines are absolutely dependent upon computer processing, photogeological and map interpretation computer procedures are just now being developed. Historically, geologists collected data in the field and mapped manually on a topographic map or aerial photographic base. New software called the interactive Geologic Interpretation System (IGIS) is being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-funded Multispectral Analysis of Sedimentary Basins Project. To complement conventional geological mapping techniques, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) or other digital remote sensing image data and co-registered digital elevation data are combined using computer imaging, graphics, and CAD/CAM techniques to provide tools for photogeologic interpretation, strike/dip determination, cross section construction, stratigraphic section measurement, topographic slope measurement, terrain profile generation, rotatable 3-D block diagram generation, and seismic analysis.

  1. Influence in the Policy Making Process: the Rise of Economics at the Expense of Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, K. M.

    2007-12-01

    Scientific influence in resource policy making reached a zenith in the early 1970s during the legislative monopoly in the United States Congress that produced command and control regulatory protection policies. This congressional consensus began in 1879 with legislation producing the U.S. Geological Survey. Other scientific agencies followed. The Congresses of the first half of the 20th century merely strengthened the influence of science in policy outcomes that was present in the earliest congressional debates. What then happened at the turn of the 21st century when representatives in the administration frequently dismissed sound science in their policy deliberations? Policy monopolies arise from agreement in principle, and alternately decline as rival ideas gain hold in policy space. The science policy monopoly began to face competition from economics when cost benefit analysis was introduced into political parlance in 1936, again in the 1950s as a successful blocking tactic by the minority in opposition to western dams, and in 1961 when systems analysis was introduced to the Department of Defense under Robert McNamara. As businessmen replaced farmers as the modal profession of legislators, the language of politics increasingly contained economic terms and concepts. A ternary diagram and a budget simplex have the same shape, but have different theoretical meanings and imply different processes. Policy consensus is not dissimilar to a mineral phase diagram, with boundary conditions marked by election magnitudes and majority parties. The 1980 elections brought economic principles into all aspects of government decision-making, with a particular long-term interest in reducing the size and scope of government. Since then the shift in policy jargon from science to economics has been incremental. With the 1994 Republican legislative majority, scientists, their programs, and the funds required to maintain data collection projects became targets. The Conservative Consensus resulting from the 2000 elections has disregarded and even ridiculed scientific experts, their analyses, and their data. The first step in rebuilding an effective policy consensus based on sound science is recognizing the phase transition that privileges conservative policy solutions which minimize science and elevate economic principles.

  2. Geologic Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Russell Graymer

    This web site provides an introduction to geologic maps. Topics covered include what is a geologic map, unique features of geologic maps, letter symbols, faults, and strike and dip. Users may click to view colored geologic maps, the geologic map of the United States and the geologic relief map of the United States.

  3. How important is vehicle safety in the new vehicle purchase process?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sjaanie Koppel; Judith Charlton; Brian Fildes; Michael Fitzharris

    2008-01-01

    Whilst there has been a significant increase in the amount of consumer interest in the safety performance of privately owned vehicles, the role that it plays in consumers’ purchase decisions is poorly understood. The aims of the current study were to determine: how important vehicle safety is in the new vehicle purchase process; what importance consumers place on safety options\\/features

  4. How Important is Vehicle Safety in the New Vehicle Purchase\\/Lease Process for Fleet Vehicles?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sjaanie Koppel; Judith Charlton; Brian Fildes

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Despite the potential benefits that fleet vehicle purchase decisions could have on road safety, the role that vehicle safety plays in fleet managers' purchase decisions is poorly understood.Methods. In this study, fleet managers from Sweden and Spain completed a questionnaire regarding the importance of vehicle safety in the new vehicle purchase\\/lease process and the importance that is placed on

  5. Quaternary geology and geomorphology of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California: evolution and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Maier, K. L.; Holzer, T. L.; Knudsen, K. L.; Olson, H.; Pagenknopp, M.; Ponti, D. J.; Rosa, C.; Tinsley, J. C.; Wan, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (~1,400 km2) is a combination of tidal marsh, islands and agricultural lands at the confluence of the Sacramento and the San Joaquin Rivers, in northern California. Most of the Delta islands are now 3 to 8 m below sea-level and must be protected by levees from inundation. Because of the Delta's crucial role in conveying fresh water to the State, levee failures can cause substantial economic loss by disrupting this supply. Understanding the evolution of the Delta is fundamental to assess the vulnerability of the Delta islands to seismically-induced levee failure. The modern Delta is a young geological feature that began forming during the middle Holocene. Preceding versions of the Delta hosted a variety of depositional environments as sea level fluctuated, responding to climatically-controlled changes. The rising sea reached the Delta about 8,000 years ago, and modern deltaic evolution continued into Holocene time until present. More accurate stratigraphic studies incorporating depositional ages are required to i) better understand the late Quaternary evolution of the Delta, ii) trace the base of Holocene deposits, iii) identify potentially active faults, and iv) evaluate liquefaction hazard for the Delta . This study uses the large amount of data available on the Delta (collected by the California Department of Water Resources and others during the past 30 years) and merges them into a unified dataset. We have produced a database that includes historic and surficial maps, aerial photographs, boreholes, and CPT data, for the purpose of clarifying the nature of the Quaternary deposits and the evolution of the Late Quaternary Delta. Additionally, we have identified recently discovered Pleistocene tephra as the Rockland ash, ~0.575 Ma, and the Loleta ash, ~0.40-0.37 Ma, which have improved stratigraphic correlations and assessment of subsidence rates. Delta sediments include sequences of glacial and interglacial deposits. Borehole logs reveal sequences of incision and backfilling corresponding to major climatic fluctuations: incised channels, sand-filling channels, gravel alluvial fans and eolian dunes during glacial periods, and fine-grained alluvial floodplains, mud flats deposits, marshes and peat during warmer interglacials. The evolution of the Delta is likely the result of three processes: subsidence (based on tephra ages, between ~0.004 cm/yr and 0.007 cm/yr in the Northern Delta, ~0.01 cm/yr in the central Delta, ~0.06 cm/yr in the Eastern Delta), compaction due to organic soil oxidation (3.6-6.1 cm/yr), and tectonic control. The thickness of the organic soils (>20 m) suggests that the Holocene sea-level rise was the major factor controlling the Delta's morphology before agricultural drainage began in the 1850's. Because the patterns suggest that sea-level rise was the major cause of changes in the Delta, it is likely that once the organic soil is all oxidized by anthropogenic processes within a few centuries, the major controlling factor will become anthropogenic sea-level rise.

  6. Significant achievements in the planetary geology program, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, H. E. (editor)

    1980-01-01

    Recent developments in planetology research as reported at the 1980 NASA Planetology Program Principal Investigators meeting are summarized. Important developments are summarized in topics ranging from solar system evolution and comparative planetology to geologic processes active on other planetary bodies.

  7. Significant achievements in the planetary geology program, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    Recent developments in planetology research are summarized. Important developments are summarized in topics ranging from solar system evolution, comparative planetology, and geologic processes, to techniques and instrument development for future exploration.

  8. Importance of Q-Values in Astrophysical Rapid Proton Capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Chirashree; Gangopadhyay, G.

    2013-06-01

    The importance of measuring Q-values in rapid proton capture process has been investigated. The microscopic optical model, derived using a nucleon-nucleon interaction and densities from relativistic mean field (RMF) calculations, has been utilized to calculate the reaction rates. It has been observed that the Q-values involved in the reactions at waiting points at A = 60 and 64 are very important in determining the final abundance of the process. Some other Q-values also play a crucial role in the final abundance of nuclei near the end point of the process.

  9. Genesis of karren in Kentucky Lake, Tennessee: Interaction of geologic structure, weathering processes, and bioerosion

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, M.A.; Smith, W.L. (Univ. of Tennessee, Martin, TN (United States))

    1993-03-01

    While karst features formed along marine coastlines are commonly reported, shoreline karst features produced within lacustrine systems have received little attention. The shoreline of Bond Island'' in Kentucky Lake has evolved a distinctive karren geomorphology not recognized elsewhere in the lake. The karren consist of well-developed clint and grike topography, trench formation, solution pits, flutes, and runnels, and pit and tunnel development. Two processes are responsible for the karren. First, freshwater dissolution and wave action on structurally fractured Decatur Limestone (Silurian) mechanically and chemically weaken the entire exposed surface. Second, a seasonal cycle of winter freeze-thaw and frost wedging followed by spring bioerosion overprints the first set of processes. Bioerosion by chemical dissolution involving a complex association of predominantly chironomids, algae, fungi, and bryozoa results in preferential dissolution along joints, stylolites, and bedding planes to form shallow spindle-shaped solution pits over the entire surface and sides of the karren. The solution pits average 1 cm length by 0.4 cm depth densely covering rock surfaces. This study suggests that seasonal bioerosion may constitute a more important geomorphic factor in lacustrine systems than previously recognized.

  10. In Situ Optical Observation of High-Temperature Geological Processes With the Moissanite Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walte, N.; Keppler, H.

    2005-12-01

    A major drawback of existing techniques in experimental earth and material sciences is the inability to observe ongoing high-temperature processes in situ during an experiment. Examples for important time-dependent processes include the textural development of rocks and oxide systems during melting and crystallization, solid-state and melt-present recrystallization and Ostwald ripening, and bubble nucleation and growth during degassing of glasses and melts. The investigation of these processes by post-mortem analysis of a quenched microstructure is time consuming and often unsatisfactory. Here, we introduce the moissanite cell that allows optical in situ observation of long-term experiments at high temperatures. Moissanite is a transparent gem-quality type of SiC that is characterized by its hardness and superior chemical and thermal resistance. Two moissanite windows with a thickness and diameter of several millimeters are placed into sockets of fired pyrophyllite and fixed onto two opposite metal plates. The sockets are wrapped with heating wire and each window is connected to a thermocouple for temperature control. The sample is placed directly between the moissanite windows and the cell is assembled similarly to a large diamond anvil cell. In situ observation of the sample is done with a microscope through observation windows and movies are recorded with an attached digital camera. Our experiments with the new cell show that temperatures above 1200°C can be maintained and observed in a sample for several days without damaging the cell nor the windows. Time-lapse movies of melting and crystallizing natural and synthetic rocks and of degassing glasses and melts will be presented to show the potential of the new technique for experimental earth and material science.

  11. Quaternary geology and sedimentary processes in the vicinity of Six Mile Reef, eastern Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Williams, S.J.; Moser, M.S.; Forfinski, N.A.; Stewart, H.F.; Doran, E.F.

    2008-01-01

    Six Mile Reef, a sandy, 22-m-high shoal trending east-west and located about 7.8 km off the Connecticut coast, has a core of postglacial marine deltaic deposits mantled by tidally reworked modern sediments. Sedimentary environments off the eastern end of the shoal are characterized by processes associated with long-term erosion or nondeposition, a mobile-sediment-limited seafloor armored by gravelly sand, and scattered elongate fields of barchanoid sand waves. The barchanoid waves reach amplitudes of 20 m, are concave westward, and occur in individual and coalesced forms that become progressively more complex westward. The seafloor on and adjacent to the shoal is characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport and covered primarily with asymmetrical transverse sand waves. The transverse waves exceed 8 m in amplitude, have slip faces predominantly oriented to the west and southwest, and have straight, slightly sinuous, and curved crests. Megaripples, which mimic the asymmetry of the sand waves, are commonly present on stoss slopes and in troughs; current ripples are ubiquitous. The amplitude and abundance of large bedforms decrease markedly westward of Six Mile Reef. The seabed there is covered with small, degraded ripples, reflecting lower-energy environments and processes associated with sorting and reworking of seafloor sediments. Megaripples and current ripples on the sand waves suggest that transport is active and that the bedforms are propagating under the present hydraulic regime. Net bedload sediment transport is primarily to the west, as evidenced by textural trends of surficial sediments, orientation of the barchanoid waves, and asymmetry of the transverse waves and of the scour marks around bedrock outcrops, boulders, and shipwrecks. One exception occurs at the western tip of the shoal, where sand-wave morphology indicates long-term eastward transport, suggesting that countercurrents in this area shape the shoal and are important to its maintenance.

  12. Geology of Kentucky

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website contains geologic maps of Kentucky, with a discussion of geologic time in regards to the rocks, minerals, fossils, and economic deposits found there. There are also sections that describe strata and geologic structures beneath the surface (faults, basins, and arches), the structural processes (folding and faulting) that create stratigraphic units, the geomorphology of the state, geologic information by county, a general description of geologic time, fossil, rocks, and minerals of Kentucky, and a virtual field trip through Natural Bridges State Park. Links are provided for further information.

  13. Process consistency in models: The importance of system signatures, expert knowledge, and process complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Fovet, O.; Ruiz, L.; Euser, T.; Gharari, S.; Nijzink, R.; Freer, J.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrological models frequently suffer from limited predictive power despite adequate calibration performances. This can indicate insufficient representations of the underlying processes. Thus, ways are sought to increase model consistency while satisfying the contrasting priorities of increased model complexity and limited equifinality. In this study, the value of a systematic use of hydrological signatures and expert knowledge for increasing model consistency was tested. It was found that a simple conceptual model, constrained by four calibration objective functions, was able to adequately reproduce the hydrograph in the calibration period. The model, however, could not reproduce a suite of hydrological signatures, indicating a lack of model consistency. Subsequently, testing 11 models, model complexity was increased in a stepwise way and counter-balanced by "prior constraints," inferred from expert knowledge to ensure a model which behaves well with respect to the modeler's perception of the system. We showed that, in spite of unchanged calibration performance, the most complex model setup exhibited increased performance in the independent test period and skill to better reproduce all tested signatures, indicating a better system representation. The results suggest that a model may be inadequate despite good performance with respect to multiple calibration objectives and that increasing model complexity, if counter-balanced by prior constraints, can significantly increase predictive performance of a model and its skill to reproduce hydrological signatures. The results strongly illustrate the need to balance automated model calibration with a more expert-knowledge-driven strategy of constraining models.

  14. The Preliminary Processing and Geological Interpretation of Lunar Penetrating Radar Channel-1 Data from Chang'E-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Zhu, P.; Zhao, N.; Guo, S.; Xiao, L.; Xiao, Z.

    2014-12-01

    This is the first time to obtain the subsurface profiles using the lunar penetrating radar (LPR) on the Moon surface. Two types of antennas, channel-1 and channel-2, with different resolutions were equipped on the LPR, which detected the lunar subsurface structure with low frequency and the thickness of regolith with high frequency, respectively. We focus on the study of the lunar subsurface structure using channel-1 data. Considering the propagation characteristics of radar wave, the processing of amplitude compensation and filtering are applied to improve the imaging quality, and the processed profile clearly represents deeper than 300 meters of layered information. Based on the geological background around landing site, we present the preliminary geological interpretation for the lunar subsurface structure. More than 5 obvious reflecting events should be concerned along the track of the Yutu rover, which infer different lava sequences, including the Eratosthenian basalts, paleo-regolith formed between Eratosthenian and Imbrium, and multistage infilled lavas formed inter-layers among the Imbrium basalts.

  15. Exploring the importance and implementation of COBIT processes in Saudi organizations: An empirical study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmad Abu-musa

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance and implementation of the Control Objectives for Information and Related Technology (COBIT) processes in Saudi organizations. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An empirical survey, using a self-administered questionnaire, was conducted to achieve this purpose. A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed to a selected sample of organizations in Saudi Arabia. Of

  16. Abstract --Image segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. The aim of conventional hard

    E-print Network

    Abstract -- Image segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. The aim spatial resolution of medical imaging equipment and the complex anatomic structure of soft tissues, a single voxel in a medical image may be composed of several tissue types, which is called partial volume

  17. Flow Tube Studies of Gas Phase Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct measurements of elementary reaction rate constants and photochemistry parameters for processes of importance in the atmosphere. These measurements are being carried out under temperature and pressure conditions covering those applicable to the stratosphere and upper troposphere, using the chemical ionization mass spectrometry turbulent flow technique developed in our laboratory.

  18. Predation is an important process reg-ulating egg survival in marine systems

    E-print Network

    655 Predation is an important process reg- ulating egg survival in marine systems (Bailey and Houde, 1989). Pacific her- ring (Clupea pallasi) spawn demersal adherent eggs on shallow subtidal and intertidal substrates. Consequently, their eggs are available to a variety of predators throughout incubation

  19. NIH Grants.gov Application Submission Process Important Points to Remember as You Prepare Your Application

    E-print Network

    Bacuta, Constantin

    NIH Grants.gov Application Submission Process Important Points to Remember as You Prepare Your package, please leave any field or reference to a CFDA number blank; NIH will fill in this information Name." 4. When preparing your application, the NIH guidelines on font-size, font-type, and ˝ -inch

  20. 77 FR 38033 - Notice of Establishment of a Commodity Import Approval Process Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    We are announcing the creation of a new Plant Protection and Quarantine Web site that will provide stakeholders with information about the commodity import approval process for plants and plant products and give them the opportunity to consult with us on risk assessments as they are being drafted. We are doing this in response to stakeholder requests for more information about the commodity......

  1. Role of geology in diamond project development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubec, Jaroslav

    2004-09-01

    For a mining operation to be successful, it is important to bring fundamental and applied science together. The mining engineer needs to understand the importance of geology, mineralogy and petrography, and how projects can benefit from the data collected during the exploration and pre-exploration stage. Geological scientists also need to understand the process of project development from the exploration stage through mine design and operation to mine closure. Kimberlite pipe or dyke emplacement, geology and petrology/mineralogy are three areas that illustrate how information obtained from the geological studies could directly influence the mining method selection and the project strategy and design. Kimberlite emplacement is one of the fundamental processes that rely on knowledge of the kimberlite body geology. Although the importance of the emplacement model is commonly recognized in the resource geology, mining engineers do not always appreciate its importance to the mine design. The knowledge of the orebody geometry, character of the contact zones, internal structures and distribution of inclusions could directly influence pit wall stability (thus strip ratio), underground mining method selection, dilution, treatability, and the dewatering strategy. Understanding the internal kimberlite geology mainly includes the geometry and character of individual phases, and the orientation and character of internal structures that transect the rock mass. For any mining method it is important to know "where the less and where the more competent rocks are located" to achieve stability. On the other hand, the detailed facies studies may not be important for the resource and mine design if the rock types have similar physical properties and diamond content. A good understanding of the kimberlite petrology and mineralogy could be crucial not only to the treatability (namely diamond damage and liberation), but also to the pit wall and underground excavation stability, support design, mine safety (mudrush risk assessment) and mine dewatering. There is no doubt that a better understanding of the kimberlite and country rock geology has a direct impact on the safety and economics of the mining operations. The process of mine design can start at the beginning of kimberlite discovery by incorporating the critical geological information without necessarily increasing the exploration budget. It is important to appreciate the usefulness of fundamental geological research and its impact on increased confidence in the mine design. Such studies should be viewed as worthwhile investments, not as cost items.

  2. USGS: Geology in the Parks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey Geology in the Parks Web site is a cooperative project of the USGS Western Earth Surface Processes Team and the National Park Service. This extensive site covers geologic maps, plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, geologic time, US geologic provinces, park geology of the Mojave, Sunset Crater, Lake Mead, North Cascades, Death Valley, Yosemite National Park, and much more. Descriptions, graphics, photographs, and animations all contribute to this informative and interesting Web site making it a one stop, all encompassing, resource for everything geology and US national park related.

  3. Vesta: A Geological Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.

    2012-04-01

    Observations from the Dawn spacecraft [1] enable the derivation of the asteroid 4Vesta's shape, facilitate mapping of the surface geology, and provide the first evidence for interpreting Vesta's geological evolution. Science data were acquired during the approach to Vesta, a circular polar (Survey) orbit at an altitude of 2700 km providing ~ 230 m/pix camera scale, and during a circular high-altitude mapping orbit (HAMO) at 700 km altitude with a camera scale of ~ 65 m/pixel. Currently Dawn is orbiting Vesta in a low-altitude mapping orbit (LAMO) at 210 km altitude, yielding a global image coverage of ~20 m/pixel at the time of EGU [2,3,4,5]. Geomorphology and distribution of surface features provide evidence for impact cratering, tectonic activity, and regolith and probable volcanic processes. Craters with dark rays, bright rays, and dark rim streaks have been observed, suggesting buried stratigraphy. The largest fresh craters retain a simple bowl-shaped morphology, with depth/diameter ratios roughly comparable to lunar values. The largest crater Rheasilvia, an ~500 km diameter depression at the south pole, includes an incomplete inward facing cuspate scarp and a large central mound surrounded by unusual complex arcuate ridge and groove patterns, and overlies an older ~400 km wide basin. A set of large equatorial troughs is related to these south polar structures. Vesta exhibits rugged topography ranging from -22 km to +19 km relative to a best fit ellipsoidal shape. Vesta's topography has a much greater range in elevation relative to its radius (15%) than do the Moon and Mars (1%) or the Earth (0.3%), but less than highly battered smaller asteroids like Lutetia (40%). This also identifies Vesta as a transitional body between asteroids and planets. The surface of Vesta exhibits very steep topographic slopes that are near the angle of repose. Impacts onto these steep surfaces, followed by slope failure, make resurfacing - due to impacts and their associated gravitational forces and seismic activity - an important geologic process on Vesta that significantly alters the morphology of geologic features and adds to the complexity of its geologic history. In general, Vesta's geology is more like the Moon and rocky planets than other asteroids.

  4. GIS-project: geodynamic globe for global monitoring of geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryakhovsky, V.; Rundquist, D.; Gatinsky, Yu.; Chesalova, E.

    2003-04-01

    A multilayer geodynamic globe at the scale 1:10,000,000 was created at the end of the nineties in the GIS Center of the Vernadsky Museum. A special soft-and-hardware complex was elaborated for its visualization with a set of multitarget object directed databases. The globe includes separate thematic covers represented by digital sets of spatial geological, geochemical, and geophysical information (maps, schemes, profiles, stratigraphic columns, arranged databases etc.). At present the largest databases included in the globe program are connected with petrochemical and isotopic data on magmatic rocks of the World Ocean and with the large and supperlarge mineral deposits. Software by the Environmental Scientific Research Institute (ESRI), USA as well as ArcScan vectrorizator were used for covers digitizing and database adaptation (ARC/INFO 7.0, 8.0). All layers of the geoinformational project were obtained by scanning of separate objects and their transfer to the real geographic co-ordinates of an equiintermediate conic projection. Then the covers were projected on plane degree-system geographic co-ordinates. Some attributive databases were formed for each thematic layer, and in the last stage all covers were combined into the single information system. Separate digital covers represent mathematical descriptions of geological objects and relations between them, such as Earth's altimetry, active fault systems, seismicity etc. Some grounds of the cartographic generalization were taken into consideration in time of covers compilation with projection and co-ordinate systems precisely answered a given scale. The globe allows us to carry out in the interactive regime the formation of coordinated with each other object-oriented databases and thematic covers directly connected with them. They can be spread for all the Earth and the near-Earth space, and for the most well known parts of divergent and convergent boundaries of the lithosphere plates. Such covers and time series reflect in diagram form a total combination and dynamics of data on the geological structure, geophysical fields, seismicity, geomagnetism, composition of rock complexes, and metalloge-ny of different areas on the Earth's surface. They give us possibility to scale, detail, and develop 3D spatial visualization. Information filling the covers could be replenished as in the existing so in newly formed databases with new data. The integrated analyses of the data allows us more precisely to define our ideas on regularities in development of lithosphere and mantle unhomogeneities using some original technologies. It also enables us to work out 3D digital models for geodynamic development of tectonic zones in convergent and divergent plate boundaries with the purpose of integrated monitoring of mineral resources and establishing correlation between seismicity, magmatic activity, and metallogeny in time-spatial co-ordinates. The created multifold geoinformation system gives a chance to execute an integral analyses of geoinformation flows in the interactive regime and, in particular, to establish some regularities in the time-spatial distribution and dynamics of main structural units in the lithosphere, as well as illuminate the connection between stages of their development and epochs of large and supperlarge mineral deposit formation. Now we try to use the system for prediction of large oil and gas concentration in the main sedimentary basins. The work was supported by RFBR, (grants 93-07-14680, 96-07-89499, 99-07-90030, 00-15-98535, 02-07-90140) and MTC.

  5. Progress on the development of a three-dimensional capability for simulating large-scale complex geologic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Argueello, J.G.; Stone, C.M.; Fossum, A.F.

    1998-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in developing a three-dimensional capability for predicting the mechanical response of rock over spatial and time scales of geologic interest to the Oil and Gas industry. An Advanced Computational Technology Initiative (ACTI) initiated three years ago to achieve such a computational technology breakthrough has made significant progress towards its goal by adapting and improving the unique advanced quasistatic finite element technology developed by Sandia National Laboratories to the mechanics applications important to exploration and production (E and P). This capability now gives the industry a powerful tool to help reduce risk on prospects, improve pre-project initial reserve estimates, and lower operating costs. Progress to date on this program is reported herein by presenting and discussing the enhancements and adaptations that have been made to the technology, with specific examples to illustrate their use on large E and P geomechanics problems.

  6. Ecology of Caribbean Sponges: Are Top-Down or Bottom-Up Processes More Important?

    PubMed Central

    Lesser, Michael P.; Slattery, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Benthic-pelagic coupling and the role of bottom-up versus top-down processes are recognized as having a major impact on the structure of marine communities. While the roles of bottom-up processes are better appreciated they are still viewed as principally affecting the outcome of top-down processes. Sponges on coral reefs are important members of the benthic community and provide a critically important functional linkage between water-column productivity and the benthos. As active suspension feeders sponges utilize the abundant autotrophic and heterotrophic picoplankton in the water column. As a result sponges across the Caribbean basin exhibit a consistent and significant pattern of greater biomass, tube extension rate, and species numbers with increasing depth. Likewise, the abundance of their food supply also increases along a depth gradient. Using experimental manipulations it has recently been reported that predation is the primary determinant of sponge community structure. Here we provide data showing that the size and growth of the sponge Callyspongia vaginalis are significantly affected by food availability. Sponges increased in size and tube extension rate with increasing depth down to 46 m, while simultaneously exposed to the full range of potential spongivores at all depths. Additionally, we point out important flaws in the experimental design used to demonstrate the role of predation and suggest that a resolution of this important question will require well-controlled, multi-factorial experiments to examine the independent and interactive effects of predation and food abundance on the ecology of sponges. PMID:24244563

  7. Image Gallery for Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Allen Glazner

    These images of geologic phenomena are used to supplement introductory geology classes at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The images are categorized under plutonic, volcanic and sedimentary rocks; structural geology; weathering; and coastlines. There are photographs of different kinds of volcanoes; lavas and pyroclastic rocks; volcanic hazards; different types of sedimentary rocks and sedimentary structures; folds and faults; beach processes; and barrier islands.

  8. Geology Before Pluto: Pre-encounter Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Pluto, its large satellite Charon, and its four known satellites represent the first trans-Neptunian Kuiper Belt objects populating the outer-most solar system beyond the gas giant planets to be studied in detail from a spacecraft (New Horizons). A complete picture of the solar nebula, and solar system formation cannot be confidently formulated until representatives of this group of bodies at the edge of solar space have been examined. The Pluto system is composed of unique lunar- and intermediate-sized objects that can tell us much about how objects with volatile icy compositions evolve. Modeling of the interior suggests that geologic activity may have been to some degree, and observations of frost on the surface could imply the need for a geologic reservoir for the replenishment of these phases. However, the putative indicators of Pluto's geologic history are inconclusive and unspecific. Detailed examination of Pluto's geologic record is the only plausible means of bridging the gap between theory and observations. In this talk I will examine the potential importance of these tentative indications of geologic activity and how specific spacecraft observations have been designed and used to constrain the Pluto system's geologic history. The cameras of New Horizons will provide robust data sets that should be immanently amenable to geological analysis of the Pluto System's landscapes. In this talk, we begin with a brief discussion of the planned observations by New Horizons' cameras that will bear most directly on geological interpretability. Then I will broadly review major geological processes that could potentially operate of the surfaces of Pluto and its moons. I will first survey exogenic processes (i.e., those for which energy for surface modification is supplied externally to the planetary surface): impact cratering, sedimentary processes (including volatile migration) and the work of wind. I will conclude with an assessment of prospects for endogenic activity in the form of tectonics and cryo-volcanism.

  9. Geology Before Pluto: Pre-encounter Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Pluto, its large satellite Charon, and its four small known satellites represent the first trans-Neptunian Kuiper Belt objects populating the outer-most solar system beyond the gas giant planets to be studied in detail from a spacecraft (New Horizons). A complete picture of the solar nebula and solar system formation cannot be confidently formulated until representatives of this group of bodies at the edge of solar space have been examined. The Pluto system is composed of unique, lunar- and intermediate-sized objects that can tell us much about how objects with volatile icy compositions evolve. Modeling of the interior suggests that geologic activity may have been significant to some degree, and observations of frost on the surface could imply the need for a geologic reservoir for the replenishment of these phases. However, these putative indicators of Pluto's geologic history are inconclusive and unspecific. Detailed examination of Pluto's geologic record is the only plausible means of bridging the gap between theory and observation. In this talk I will examine the potential importance of these tentative indications of geologic activity and how specific spacecraft observations have been designed and used to constrain the Pluto system's geologic history. The cameras of New Horizons will provide robust data sets that should be immanently amenable to geological analysis of the Pluto system's landscapes. In this talk, we begin with a brief discussion of the planned observations by the New Horizons cameras that will bear most directly on geological interpretability. Then I will broadly review major geological processes that could potentially operate on the surfaces of Pluto and its moons. I will first survey exogenic processes (i.e., those for which energy for surface modification is supplied externally to the planetary surface): impact cratering, sedimentary processes (including volatile migration), and the work of wind. I will conclude with an assessment of the prospects for endogenic activity in the form of tectonics and cryovolcanism.

  10. Important role of autophagy in regulation of metabolic processes in health, disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Papá?ková, Z; Cahová, M

    2014-09-01

    Autophagy is the basic catabolic mechanism that involves degradation of dysfunctional cellular components through the action of lysosome as well as supplying energy and compounds for the synthesis of essential biomacromolecules. This process enables cells to survive stress from the external environment like nutrient deprivation. Autophagy is important in the breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids as well. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that autophagy is critical in wide range of normal human physiological processes, and defective autophagy is associated with diverse diseases, including lysosomal storage disease, myopathies, neurodegeneration and various metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the most up-to-date findings on what role autophagy plays in metabolism. PMID:24702497

  11. Geologic Explorations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alec Bodzin

    2002-04-01

    Geologic Explorations allows learners to explore a variety of unique geological formations of Utah using Quicktime Virtual Reality (QTVR) panoramas and digital still imagery. Spectacular panoramas and striking images capture Utah's unique geology and invite students to explore and learn interesting facts and concepts central to the study of geology.

  12. Geology of the Colorado Plateau

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Colorado Plateau Field Institute

    This web page provides a general description of the geology of the Colorado Plateau. Topics include information about the various geologic environments and processes active during the Precambrian and the Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras.

  13. Petroleum geology of Tunisia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. F. Burollet; A. B. Ferjami; F. Mejri

    1990-01-01

    Recent discoveries and important oil shows have proven the existence of hydrocarbons in newly identified depocenters and reservoirs. In general, except for some areas around the producing fields, Tunisia is largely underdrilled. The national company ETAP has decided to release data and to publish a synthesis on the petroleum geology of Tunisia. The geology of Tunisia provides a fine example

  14. Statistical pre-processing and analyses of hydro-meteorological time series in a geologic clay site (methodology and first results for Mont Terri’s PP experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatmi, H.; Ababou, R.; Matray, J. M.

    This article presents a set of statistical methods for pre-processing (or pre-conditioning) and analyzing multivariate hydro-geologic time series, such as pore pressures and atmospheric pressure (temporal structures). The pre-processing methods are necessary to enhance or complete the signals due to defects in the observed time series (data gaps, spurious values, variable time steps). The statistical analyses aim, in fine, at characterizing the hydraulic behaviour of a clayey formation in the context of deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste. Pore water and atmospheric pressure time series from the Mont Terri rock laboratory (BPP-1 borehole) are taken as an example.

  15. Tectonomagmatic evolution of the terrestrial planets: importance for understanding of processes of their formation and subsequent development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, E.; Bogatikov, O.

    2009-04-01

    Our knowledge about formation and evolution of the terrestrial planets (the Earth, Venus, Mars, Mercury and, possibly, the Moon) based on different physical and geochemical speculations and models. The main disadvantage of such hypotheses is their abstract character and ignoring any data on tectonomagmatic evolution of those planets. At the same time, just this type of data provide an important information, which is necessary for elaborating of a present-day theory of their formation and evolution. The Earth has been much better studied compared to the other planets, therefore we will discuss the main questions of planetary tectonomagmatic evolution using the Earth as example plus involve other data on the Moon and the terrestrial planets. Two dominating hypotheses about composition of the primordial Earth's crust exist now: (1) traditional implies that the primordial crust had basic composition, whereas the sialic crust resulted from a geosyncline process or, in modern terms, from processes at convergent plate margins, and (2) primordial crust was sialic; the plate tectonic mechanisms started in the Middle Paleoproterozoic and resulted in oceanic spreading and formation of the secondary oceanic crust. Both models require a global melting of a primary chondritic material to form the primordial crust. The final result depends on the degree of melt differentiation during solidification of a magmatic ocean. Such a solidification, due to differences between adiabatic and melting-points gradients had to proceed in bottom-top direction (Jeffries, 1929) and resulted in accumulation of low-temperature derivates in the primordial crust. Geological data, namely granite-dominated Archean crust, and results of studying of detrital zircon from Australia supports the primordial-sialic crust hypothesis. The Moon which is four times smaller than Earth has a basic primordial crust. Such a difference can be explained by different depths of their magmatic oceans. The Early Precambrian (Archean, Early Paleoproterozoic) tectonomagmatic activity on the Earth was rather different from the Phanerozoic: the major features then were huge granite-greenstone terranes (GGTs) and their separating granulite belts; mantle melts were derived from a depleted source. The GGTs consisting of greenstone belts with komatiite-basaltic magmatism in Archean, "submerged" in granite gneiss matrix, probably, strong reworked primordial sialic crust, and by siliceous high-Mg series (SHMS) in early Paleoproterozoic. GGTs were areas of extension, uplifting and denudation, whereas the granulite belts were dominated by compression, sinking and sedimentation. Generally, the Early Precambrian geological pattern was rather different from the modern plate tectonics and can be described in plumetectonics terms. A drastic change of the tectonomagamtic and ecology processes on it's surface occurred at ca. 2.3-2.0 Ga: instead of high-Mg magmas appeared geochemical enriched Fe-Ti pucrites and basalts, and the plume tectonic was changed by plate tectonics, which is still active now, as well as ecologic situation on the surface. Since that time the primordial sialic continental crust has been gradually replaced by the secondary basaltic oceanic crust. Systematic consumption of the ancient crust in subduction zones obviously started at ~2 Ga and led to gradually replacing it by the secondary mafic (oceanic) crust. The crustal materials has stored in the "slab cemeteries", revealed in the mantle by seismic tomography. Tectonomagmatic evolution of the Moon began4.4-4.0 Ga in lunar highlands with low-Ti magnesium suite, analogous to the terrestrial Paleoproterozoic SHMS. Cardinal change of tectonomagmatic processes, close to that on the Earth, happed on the Moon ~3.9 Ga to form large depressions of lunar maria with thinned crust and vast basaltic volcanism with signatures of plume magmatism (high-Ti basalts). The lunar maria were, probably, specific analogues of Earth's oceans. On Venus and Mars also two main types of morphostructures, which are vast fields of basal

  16. Geologic Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Geologic Maps are unique in that they show the distribution of geologic features on a landscape through specific symbols and colors. The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) site Geologic Maps provides visitors with a good introduction to these concepts, which include the unique features of a geologic map; the meaning of their lines, colors, and symbols; the location of faults; and more. Anyone working with geologic maps or just interested in learning a little about cartography or geology will find this site easy to explore and full of good information.

  17. Mercury emissions from natural processes and their importance in the global mercury cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert P. Mason

    The emission to the atmosphere of mercury (Hg) via natural processes constitutes an important part of the global Hg input\\u000a and is a dominant part of the global mercury cycle. However, while there is an ongoing and continued effort to quantify these\\u000a fluxes, the magnitude of their extent is still relatively poorly constrained. It must be emphasized that while the

  18. Important Atomic, Molecular and Radiative Processes in Low Pressure Discharge Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Graeme G.

    2007-08-01

    Low pressure discharges are used in a number of light sources, of which the most important application for general lighting is the fluorescent lamp (FL). In conventional FL, electrical energy is converted to UV radiation through excitation of mercury atoms; the UV is then converted to visible radiation using a phosphor. Other atomic radiators, such as sodium and rare gases, are used for applications but are unsuitable for general lighting. In recent years, there has been strong interest in finding alternative atomic and molecular radiators and research is continuing. The efficiency of producing light in a low pressure discharge depends on the balance between ionization processes, which sustain the plasma, and the excitation of atoms or molecules into radiating states through electron impact excitation and collisions between atoms in excited states. Since radiation emitted at one point in the discharge may be absorbed and re-emitted several times before it finally reaches the wall, radiation transport also plays a significant role in determining the fraction of electrical energy which is converted to radiation. Numerical models can help guide the development of more efficient light sources, but there is currently a lack of data for a number of important fundamental processes. This paper will describe the important physical processes in low pressure discharge light sources, and discuss the requirements for new and improved atomic and molecular data.

  19. Importance of joint efforts for balanced process of designing and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorova, V. I.; Bannova, O. K.; Kristiansen, T.-H.; Igritsky, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses importance of a strategic planning and design process when developing long-term space exploration missions both robotic and manned. The discussion begins with reviewing current and/or traditional international perspectives on space development at the American, Russian and European space agencies. Some analogies and comparisons will be drawn upon analysis of several international student collaborative programs: Summer International workshops at the Bauman Moscow State Technical University, International European Summer Space School "Future Space Technologies and Experiments in Space", Summer school at Stuttgart University in Germany. The paper will focus on discussion about optimization of design and planning processes for successful space exploration missions and will highlight importance of the following: understanding connectivity between different levels of human being and machinery; simultaneous mission planning approach; reflections and correlations between disciplines involved in planning and executing space exploration missions; knowledge gained from different disciplines and through cross-applying and re-applying design approaches between variable space related fields of study and research. The conclusions will summarize benefits and complications of applying balanced design approach at all levels of the design process. Analysis of successes and failures of organizational efforts in space endeavors is used as a methodological approach to identify key questions to be researched as they often cause many planning and design processing problems.

  20. How important is vehicle safety in the new vehicle purchase process?

    PubMed

    Koppel, Sjaanie; Charlton, Judith; Fildes, Brian; Fitzharris, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Whilst there has been a significant increase in the amount of consumer interest in the safety performance of privately owned vehicles, the role that it plays in consumers' purchase decisions is poorly understood. The aims of the current study were to determine: how important vehicle safety is in the new vehicle purchase process; what importance consumers place on safety options/features relative to other convenience and comfort features, and how consumers conceptualise vehicle safety. In addition, the study aimed to investigate the key parameters associated with ranking 'vehicle safety' as the most important consideration in the new vehicle purchase. Participants recruited in Sweden and Spain completed a questionnaire about their new vehicle purchase. The findings from the questionnaire indicated that participants ranked safety-related factors (e.g., EuroNCAP (or other) safety ratings) as more important in the new vehicle purchase process than other vehicle factors (e.g., price, reliability etc.). Similarly, participants ranked safety-related features (e.g., advanced braking systems, front passenger airbags etc.) as more important than non-safety-related features (e.g., route navigation systems, air-conditioning etc.). Consistent with previous research, most participants equated vehicle safety with the presence of specific vehicle safety features or technologies rather than vehicle crash safety/test results or crashworthiness. The key parameters associated with ranking 'vehicle safety' as the most important consideration in the new vehicle purchase were: use of EuroNCAP, gender and education level, age, drivers' concern about crash involvement, first vehicle purchase, annual driving distance, person for whom the vehicle was purchased, and traffic infringement history. The findings from this study are important for policy makers, manufacturers and other stakeholders to assist in setting priorities with regard to the promotion and publicity of vehicle safety features for particular consumer groups (such as younger consumers) in order to increase their knowledge regarding vehicle safety and to encourage them to place highest priority on safety in the new vehicle purchase process. PMID:18460367

  1. Sea Level Change, A Fundamental Process When Interpreting Coastal Geology and Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, John M.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the meaning of sea level change and identifies the major factors responsible for this occurrence. Elaborates on the theory and processes involved in indirect measurement of changes in sea volume. Also explains how crustal movement affects sea level. (ML)

  2. Results From an International Simulation Study on Couples Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes Near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rutqvist; D. Barr; J.T. Birkholzer; M. Chijimatsu; O. Kolditz; Q. Liu; Y. Oda; W. Wang; C. Zhang

    2006-08-02

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near waste emplacement drifts of geological nuclear waste repositories. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower postclosure temperatures, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses is currently being resolved. In particular, good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglected complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level.

  3. Layer Cake Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Wagner

    This classroom activity uses a cake to demonstrate geologic processes and introduce geologic terms. Students will learn how folds and faults occur, recognize the difference in behavior between brittle and ductile rocks, and attempt to predict structures likely to result from application of various forces to layered rocks. They will also attempt to interpret 'core samples' to determine subsurface rock structure.

  4. Total volume and latitudinal variations of the sedimentary trench-fill off Central and Southern Chile: A record of short and long-term geologic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geersen, J.; Voelker, D.; Contreras Reyes, E.

    2012-12-01

    The amount and composition of trench sediment that is underthrust in a subduction zone impacts on the physical state of the shallow megathrust. Knowledge about the sedimentary and tectonic state and the geologic history of a trench system is therefore an important step towards understanding the structural and seismotectonic evolution of a convergent margin. The Chilean Trench south of 32°S is a sediment-filled basin that stretches in N-S direction. Variations in trench-fill are directly linked to and controlled by a number of sedimentary-tectonic processes and their interplay over space and time. In this work we unravel the individual processes for a ~1500 km long segment of the Chilean trench (32°S-46°S) and investigate their temporal and spatial significance. We use swath bathymetric and reflection seismic data to produce grids of the seafloor and the surface of the subducting oceanic plate buried beneath the trench sediments. The volume of the sedimentary trench-fill and its along-strike variations are derived from the difference between the two grids. Our results indicate that the volumetric sediment distribution can be best explained by high sediment input in the south and active northward sediment transport along the trench during glacial periods. However, during interglacial periods, small-scale factors that locally modify the sediment input seem to dominate. For the future along-strike variations in sediment volume will be compared with variations in structure and seismic behavior of the margin.

  5. Dynamics of present-day geological processes from remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, Ia. G.; Poletaev, A. I.; Rumiantseva, E. F.; Tevelev, A. V.

    Remotely sensed data on the dynamics of present-day exogenous and endogenous processes occurring at different depths and with different intensity and manifestations are discussed. Attention is given to the processes of continental-sediment accumulation at the Tedzhen and Murgab River deltas and the Amu-Daria River bed, deformation processes occurring in the Pamir-Alai region, and the deep-lying interactions of the Iranian and Turan platforms. It is noted that the presence of high-degree correlations among the lineament fields of the individual subregions of the Pamir-Alai region, the Gissar-Alai region, and the region of northern Pamir suggests that these regions belong to a single elongated dynamic zone.

  6. The Large Impact Process Inferred from the Geology of Lunar Multiring Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    The study of the geology of multiring impact basins on the Moon over the past ten years has given us a rudimentary understanding of how these large structures have formed and evolved on the Moon and other bodies. Two-ring basins on the Moon begin to form at diameters of about 300 km; the transition diameter at which more than two rings appear is uncertain, but it appears to be between 400 and 500 km in diameter. Inner rings tend to be made up of clusters or aligned segments of massifs and are arranged into a crudely concentric pattern; scarp-like elements may or may not be present. Outer rings are much more scarp-like and massifs are rare to absent. Basins display textured deposits, interpreted as ejecta, extending roughly an apparent basin radius exterior to the main topographic rim. Ejecta may have various morphologies, ranging from wormy and hummocky deposits to knobby surfaces; the causes of these variations are not known, but may be related to the energy regime in which the ejecta are deposited. Outside the limits of the textured ejecta are found both fields of satellitic craters (secondaries) and light plains deposits. Impact melt sheets are observed on the floors of relatively unflooded basins. Samples of impact melts from lunar basins have basaltic major-element chemistry, characterized by K, rare-earth elements (REE), P, and other trace elements of varying concentration (KREEP); ages are between 3.8 and 3.9 Ga. These lithologies cannot be produced through the fusion of known pristine (plutonic) rock types, suggesting the occurrence of unknown lithologies within the Moon. These melts were probably generated at middle to lower crustal levels. Ejecta compositions, preservation of pre-basin topography, and deposit morphologies all indicate that the excavation cavity of multiring basins is between about 0.4 and 0.6 times the diameter of the apparent crater diameter. Basin depths of excavation can be inferred from the composition of basin ejecta. A variety of mechanisms has been proposed to account for the formation of basin rings but none of them are entirely plausible. Mechanisms can be divided into two broad groups: (1) forcible uplift due to fluidization of the target; (2) concentric, brittle, fracturing and failure of the target, on regional (megaterraces) to global scales (lithospheric fracturing). Most basin rings are spaced at a constant factor on all planets. Evidence supports divergent ringforming models, so it may be that the ring-locating mechanism differs from the ring-forming mechanism. Thus, large-scale crustal foundering (megaterracing) could occur along concentric zones of weakness created by some type of resonant wave mechanism (fluidization and uplift); such immediate crustal adjustment could then be followed by long-term adjustment of the fractured lithosphere.

  7. Flow Tube Studies of Gas Phase Chemical Processes of Atmospheric Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct measurements of elementary reaction rate constants and photochemical parameters for processes of importance in the atmosphere. These measurements are being carried out under temperature and pressure conditions covering those applicable to the stratosphere and upper troposphere, using the chemical ionization mass spectrometry turbulent flow technique developed in our laboratory. The next section summarizes our research activities during the first year of the project, and the section that follows consists of the statement of work for the third year. Additional details concerning the projects listed in the statement of work were described in our original proposal.

  8. Processes of lunar crater degradation: Changes in style with geologic time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James W. Head

    1975-01-01

    Lunar crater degradation can be divided into two time periods based on differing styles and rates of crater degradation processes.\\u000a Comparison of lunar radiometric age scales and the relative degradation of crater morphologic features for craters larger\\u000a than about 5 km diam shows that Period I, prior to about 3.85–3.95 b.y. ago, is characterized by a high influx rate and

  9. Process-orientated psychoanalytic work in initial interviews and the importance of the opening scene.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Peter

    2014-06-01

    From the very first moment of the initial interview to the end of a long course of psychoanalysis, the unconscious exchange between analysand and analyst, and the analysis of the relationship between transference and countertransference, are at the heart of psychoanalytic work. Drawing on initial interviews with a psychosomatically and depressively ill student, a psychoanalytic understanding of initial encounters is worked out. The opening scene of the first interview already condenses the central psychopathology - a clinging to the primary object because it was never securely experienced as present by the patient. The author outlines the development of some psychoanalytic theories concerning the initial interview and demonstrates their specific importance as background knowledge for the clinical situation in the following domains: the 'diagnostic position', the 'therapeutic position', the 'opening scene', the 'countertransference' and the 'analyst's free-floating introspectiveness'. More recent investigations refer to 'process qualities' of the analytic relationship, such as 'synchronization' and 'self-efficacy'. The latter seeks to describe after how much time between the interview sessions constructive or destructive inner processes gain ground in the patient and what significance this may have for the decision about the treatment that follows. All these factors combined can lead to establishing a differential process-orientated indication that also takes account of the fact that being confronted with the fear of unconscious processes of exchange is specific to the psychoanalytic profession. PMID:24571347

  10. International Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1977-01-01

    Briefly discusses recent international programs in various areas of geology, including land-use problems, coping with geological hazards, and conserving the environment while searching for energy and mineral resources. (MLH)

  11. Environmental Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, James R.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses ways that geologic techniques can be used to help evaluate our environment, make economic realities and environmental requirements more compatible, and expand the use of geology in environmental analyses. (MLH)

  12. Archeological Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, George

    1977-01-01

    Describes the rapid expansion of archeological geology, especially in the area of archeological excavations, where geologists use dating techniques and knowledge of geological events to interpret archeological sites. (MLH)

  13. Cruciform structures are a common DNA feature important for regulating biological processes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    DNA cruciforms play an important role in the regulation of natural processes involving DNA. These structures are formed by inverted repeats, and their stability is enhanced by DNA supercoiling. Cruciform structures are fundamentally important for a wide range of biological processes, including replication, regulation of gene expression, nucleosome structure and recombination. They also have been implicated in the evolution and development of diseases including cancer, Werner's syndrome and others. Cruciform structures are targets for many architectural and regulatory proteins, such as histones H1 and H5, topoisomerase II?, HMG proteins, HU, p53, the proto-oncogene protein DEK and others. A number of DNA-binding proteins, such as the HMGB-box family members, Rad54, BRCA1 protein, as well as PARP-1 polymerase, possess weak sequence specific DNA binding yet bind preferentially to cruciform structures. Some of these proteins are, in fact, capable of inducing the formation of cruciform structures upon DNA binding. In this article, we review the protein families that are involved in interacting with and regulating cruciform structures, including (a) the junction-resolving enzymes, (b) DNA repair proteins and transcription factors, (c) proteins involved in replication and (d) chromatin-associated proteins. The prevalence of cruciform structures and their roles in protein interactions, epigenetic regulation and the maintenance of cell homeostasis are also discussed. PMID:21816114

  14. Structural Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, this site describes the basics of structural geology with text and images. The page includes the discussion of stress, strain, strike and dip, faults, folds, mountain building, erosion, economic geology, and environmental geology. This is a nice introduction to the basic topics in geology. Images from the field help to enhance the topics on the site. Instructors can use this resource to help create or simply enhance their curriculum.

  15. Product or waste? Importation and end-of-life processing of computers in Peru.

    PubMed

    Kahhat, Ramzy; Williams, Eric

    2009-08-01

    This paper considers the importation of used personal computers (PCs) in Peru and domestic practices in their production, reuse, and end-of-life processing. The empirical pillars of this study are analysis of government data describing trade in used and new computers and surveys and interviews of computer sellers, refurbishers, and recyclers. The United States is the primary source of used PCs imported to Peru. Analysis of shipment value (as measured by trade statistics) shows that 87-88% of imported used computers had a price higher than the ideal recycle value of constituent materials. The official trade in end-of-life computers is thus driven by reuse as opposed to recycling. The domestic reverse supply chain of PCs is well developed with extensive collection, reuse, and recycling. Environmental problems identified include open burning of copper-bearing wires to remove insulation and landfilling of CRT glass. Distinct from informal recycling in China and India, printed circuit boards are usually not recycled domestically but exported to Europe for advanced recycling or to China for (presumably) informal recycling. It is notable that purely economic considerations lead to circuit boards being exported to Europe where environmental standards are stringent, presumably due to higher recovery of precious metals. PMID:19731711

  16. Geological Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    "Why do engineers need to know about geologic time?" That question is answered in this resource from the University of Saskatchewan's Department of Civil and Geological Engineering. Provided here is a discussion of the concepts of geological time; relative dating methods, such as correlation; and absolute dating methods, such as radiometric methods. Diagrams and charts are included to demonstrate these complex concepts.

  17. The relative importance of microbial nitrate reduction processes in an agriculturally-impacted estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, E.; Francis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Human activities are increasing reactive nitrogen levels worldwide. Reactive nitrogen exists largely as nitrate and may be ecologically harmful to nutrient-limited systems. Nitrate loadings to the environment may be transformed by the microbial nitrate reduction processes of denitrification (converting nitrate to dinitrogen gas), or of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) (allowing reactive nitrogen to persist). The predominant nitrate reduction pathway largely determines the nitrogen removal capacity of the estuary. Therefore, identifying the relative importance of denitrification and DNRA in a given system provides insight into how much nitrate is transformed to dinitrogen and ammonium. Estuary sediments often have high nitrate reduction rates, but the environmental factors that determine which process prevails are underexplored. Nitrate availability and salinity are thought to influence which nitrate reduction process predominates. Elkhorn Slough is a small California estuary that experiences a range of nitrate concentrations (0 to over 2,000 ?M) and salinities (0 to 33.5) depending on the agricultural runoff introduced through the Old Salinas River and the tidal influence. This study investigates how the fluctuating nutrient and salinity conditions found over the diel cycle at the interface of the Old Salinas River and Elkhorn Slough influences the nitrogen transformation rates observed. Benthic denitrification and DNRA are evaluated using whole sediment core incubations amended with an overlying 15NO3- labeled pool. Rates of denitrification and DNRA in the sediment are calculated using the isotope pairing technique. The results of this research will help elucidate the relative importance of dissimilatory nitrate removal pathways in an agriculturally-impacted estuary and ultimately reveal whether anthropogenic nitrate inputs are preserved or removed from the system.

  18. Waiting is the hardest part: anticipating medical test results affects processing and recall of important information.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, David B

    2010-07-01

    Waiting for medical test results that signal physical harm can be a stressful and potentially psychologically harmful experience. Despite this, interventionists and physicians often use this wait time to deliver behavior change messages and other important information about the test, possible results and its implications. This study examined how "bracing" for a medical test result impacts cognitive processing, as well as recall of information delivered during this period. Healthy U.S. university students (N = 150) were tested for a deficiency of a fictitious saliva biomarker that was said to be predictive of long-term health problems using a 2 (Test Result) x 2 (Expected immediacy of result: 10 min, 1 month) factorial design. Participants expecting to get the test result shortly should have been bracing for the result. While waiting for the test results participants completed measures of cognitive processing. After participants received the test result, recall of information about the biomarker was tested in addition to cognitive measures. One week later, participants who were originally told they did not have the deficiency had their recall assessed again. Results showed that anticipating an imminent test result increased cognitive distraction in the processing of information and lowered recall of information about the test and the biomarker. These results suggest that delivering critical information to patients after administering a test and immediately before giving the results may not be optimal. PMID:20556876

  19. Waiting is the hardest part: Anticipating medical test results affects processing and recall of important information.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, David B

    2010-05-01

    Waiting for medical test results that signal physical harm can be a stressful and potentially psychologically harmful experience. Despite this, interventionists and physicians often use this wait time to deliver behavior change messages and other important information about the test, possible results and its implications. This study examined how "bracing" for a medical test result impacts cognitive processing, as well as recall of information delivered during this period. Healthy U.S. university students (N = 150) were tested for a deficiency of a fictitious saliva biomarker that was said to be predictive of long-term health problems using a 2 (Test Result) x 2 (Expected immediacy of result: 10 min, 1 month) factorial design. Participants expecting to get the test result shortly should have been bracing for the result. While waiting for the test results participants completed measures of cognitive processing. After participants received the test result, recall of information about the biomarker was tested in addition to cognitive measures. One week later, participants who were originally told they did not have the deficiency had their recall assessed again. Results showed that anticipating an imminent test result increased cognitive distraction in the processing of information and lowered recall of information about the test and the biomarker. These results suggest that delivering critical information to patients after administering a test and immediately before giving the results may not be optimal. PMID:20570029

  20. Geologic Mapping of Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High- Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were emplaced; these lie stratigraphically above the equatorial ridges that likely were formed by Rheasilvia. The last features to be formed were craters with bright rays and other surface mantling deposits. Executed progressively throughout data acquisition, the iterative mapping process provided the team with geologic proto-units in a timely manner. However, interpretation of the resulting map was hampered by the necessity to provide the team with a standard nomenclature and symbology early in the process. With regard to mapping and interpreting units, the mapping process was hindered by the lack of calibrated mineralogic information. Topography and shadow played an important role in discriminating features and terrains, especially in the early stages of data acquisition.

  1. Geologic mapping of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

    2014-11-01

    We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were emplaced; these lie stratigraphically above the equatorial ridges that likely were formed by Rheasilvia. The last features to be formed were craters with bright rays and other surface mantling deposits. Executed progressively throughout data acquisition, the iterative mapping process provided the team with geologic proto-units in a timely manner. However, interpretation of the resulting map was hampered by the necessity to provide the team with a standard nomenclature and symbology early in the process. With regard to mapping and interpreting units, the mapping process was hindered by the lack of calibrated mineralogic information. Topography and shadow played an important role in discriminating features and terrains, especially in the early stages of data acquisition.

  2. The geomorphology of RHEA - Implications for geologic history and surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. M.; Horner, V. M.; Greeley, R.

    1985-02-01

    Morphological analyses of landforms on Rhea are used to define three physiographic provinces: cratered terrain 1 undifferentiated; cratered terrain 1 lineated; and cratered terrain 2. The important statigraphic relationships between the different provinces are examined with respect to major impact basins and tectonic features. It is shown that the formation of multiringed basins may have caused, or at least controlled the locations of major resurfacing and mantling events. The diameters of the central peaks relative to the impact crater diameters are found to be significantly larger than those within the craters of the moon or Mercury. Both cratered and noncrater lineaments have regional orientations which do not fit current global or regional stress models. On the basis of the morphological analysis, a chronological order is established for the origin of the three provinces: the cratered terrain 1 province was formed first; and cratered terrain 1 lineated and cratered terrain 2 were formed second, and last, respectively. It is shown that the chronological order is generally consistent with current theoretical models of the evolution of Rhea.

  3. The Importance of Submesoscale Versus Basin-scale Processes in Driving the Subpolar Spring Phytoplankton Bloom.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, S.; Mahadevan, A.; Lozier, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The subpolar spring phytoplankton bloom has important consequences for marine ecosystems and the carbon cycle. The timing of the bloom has been conceived of as a basin-scale event: as the ocean warms, the seasonal mixed layer shoals, restricting phytoplankton to shallower depths and increasing available light to a level at which the bloom can begin. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of localized phenomena in driving the bloom initiation. Specifically, the role of lateral density gradients in generating <10km instabilities in the upper ocean, which then stratify the mixed layer before surface heating begins, has been explored with a process study model and fine-scale observations from a field program to study the North Atlantic spring bloom [1]. However, an alternative hypothesis has recently been validated at both the small scale, using the same observational data [2], and at the basin scale, using remote sensing data [3]. According to this hypothesis, blooms begin when surface heat fluxes weaken, mixing shifts from primarily convectively-driven to primarily wind-driven, and the depth of active mixing in the upper ocean consequently decreases. Here, we compare the importance of the barriers to mixing presented by submesoscale instabilities with the decreases in mixing depth caused by changes in surface forcing in driving the initiation of the spring bloom prior to the onset of surface heating. To make this comparison, we use a Lagrangian framework to track the light history of particles seeded in a high-resolution numerical model that we initialize with various surface forcing scenarios, and with and without lateral density gradients. Because the model parameterizes convection with convective adjustment, we present two methodologies to account for turbulent mixing processes that utilize observations of turbulent vertical mixing from a Lagrangian float. We present conclusions on whether and how submesoscale processes affect bloom initiation under varied surface forcing conditions in the context of whether the timing of the subpolar phytoplankton bloom can be thought of as a basin-scale or submesoscale phenomenon. [1] A. Mahadevan et al.. Science 337, 6090 (2012). [2] Brody, S.R. and Lozier, M.S. (under review, ICES J. Mar. Sci) [3] Brody, S.R. and Lozier, M.S. Geophys. Res. Lett. 41, (2014).

  4. The CB1 receptor as an important mediator of hedonic reward processing.

    PubMed

    Friemel, Chris M; Zimmer, Andreas; Schneider, Miriam

    2014-09-01

    The endocannabinoid (ECB) system has emerged recently as a key mediator for reward processing. It is well known that cannabinoids affect appetitive learning processes and can induce reinforcing and rewarding effects. However, the involvement of the ECB system in hedonic aspects of reward-related behavior is not completely understood. With the present study, we investigated the modulatory role of the ECB system on hedonic perception, measured by the pleasure attenuated startle (PAS) paradigm for a palatable food reward. Here, a conditioned odor is thought to induce a pleasant affective state that attenuates an aversive reflex-the acoustic startle response. Modulatory effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR1411716 and the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55?212-2 on PAS were examined in rats. PAS was also measured in CB1 receptor knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Pharmacological inhibition as well as the absence of CB1 receptors was found to reduce PAS, whereas WIN 55?212-2 administration increased PAS. Finally, presentation of a conditioned reward cue was found to induce striatal FosB/?FosB expression in WT mice, but not in KO mice, indicating a reduced stimulation of reward-related brain regions in conditioned KO mice by odor presentation. We here show that in addition to our previous studies in rats, PAS may also serve as a valuable and suitable measure to assess hedonic processing in mice. Our data further indicate that the ECB system, and in particular CB1 receptor signaling, appears to be highly important for the mediation of hedonic aspects of reward processing. PMID:24718372

  5. Geology of California. Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.M.; Webb, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two introductory chapters familiarize readers with basic geologic concepts. The following chapters describe the geology of each of California's 11 geomorphic provinces; the San Andreas fault and offshore geology are discussed in two separate chapters. Four appendices acquaint readers with technical words and terms, common minerals and rocks in California, geologic time, and geologic theories that pertain to California. During the 1960s evidence collected from the east Pacific sea floor off the western coast of North America gave scientists supporting data for Alfred Wegener's 1910 theory of continental drift. In addition to the confirmation of continental drift, since the 1960s scientists have discovered paleomagnetism, sea-floor spreading, exotic and suspect terranes, and polar wandering. These important concepts have had far reaching effects about how we understand the geology of California and how this region has evolved through geologic time. Improved investigative procedures enable earth scientists to comprehend previously puzzling aspects of California's geology.

  6. Occurrence of native silicon in a fulgurite and implications of extreme reduction as a geologic process

    SciTech Connect

    Essene, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Native silicon was discovered in fulgurite recently formed on till near Winan's Lake, Michigan. Further examination of immiscible metallic globules in fulgurite glass reported by Essene and Fisher has revealed native silicon as euhedral crystals in metal and intergrown with SiO/sub 2/-rich glass in the fulgurite matrix. Although difficult to distinguish from moissanite (SiC), sinoite (Si/sub 2/N/sub 2/O) or silica (SiO/sub 2/) on the microprobe, the identity of silicon was confirmed by scans showing no N, C or O at 0.2% detection limits. X-ray powder data revealed the major peaks for Si, and confirmed its existence as a mineral. The native Si occurs in a highly reducing assemblage with Fe/sub 3/Si/sub 7/, FeSi, FeTiP and more rarely Au, Ag that unmixed as metallic liquid from silicate liquid at T > 2100/sup 0/K during a lightning strike. This remarkable process of reduction may also occur during other ultra-high temperature phenomena such as (extra)terrestrial meteoritic and cometary impacts, or even atomic-bomb blasts. Lightning strikes possibly involving carbon compounds in primitive stellar nebulae may have produced similar reduction. Asteroidal impacts may also yield similar results and impact glasses should be searched for highly reduced metals, carbides and silicides. Fulgurite and impact events may also be recorded by persistent reports of other highly reduced minerals, such as SiC, Al, Cr, Cr/sub 2/C, TaC, or Mg/sub 2/Si. Their identity as minerals should not be discounted a priori unless such ultra-high temperature events can be conclusively rejected.

  7. Discrete fracture modeling of hydro-mechanical damage processes in geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents a modeling approach for investigating coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior, including fracture development, within geomaterials and structures. In the model, the coupling procedure consists of an effective linkage between two codes: TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and an implementation of the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) method, a discrete (lattice) modeling approach to represent geomechanical behavior. One main advantage of linking these two codes is that they share the same geometrical mesh structure based on the Voronoi discretization, so that a straightforward representation of discrete fracture networks (DFN) is available for fluid flow processes. The capabilities of the TOUGH-RBSN model are demonstrated through simulations of hydraulic fracturing, where fluid pressure-induced fracturing and damage-assisted flow are well represented. The TOUGH-RBSN modeling methodology has been extended to enable treatment of geomaterials exhibiting anisotropic characteristics. In the RBSN approach, elastic spring coefficients and strength parameters are systematically formulated based on the principal bedding direction, which facilitate a straightforward representation of anisotropy. Uniaxial compression tests are simulated for a transversely isotropic material to validate the new modeling scheme. The model is also used to simulate excavation fracture damage for the HG-A microtunnel in the Opalinus Clay rock, located at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Opalinus Clay has transversely isotropic material properties caused by natural features such as bedding, foliation, and flow structures. Preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts were observed following excavation, which are believed to be strongly influenced by the mechanical anisotropy of the rock material. The simulation results are qualitatively representative of the nonuniform fracture patterns observed in the HG-A microtunnel.

  8. Geologic guide to the island of Hawaii: A field guide for comparative planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R. (editor)

    1974-01-01

    With geological data available for all inner planets except Venus, we are entering an era of true comparative planetary geology, when knowledge of the differences and similarities for classes of structures (e.g., shield volcanoes) will lead to a better understanding of general geological processes, regardless of planet. Thus, it is imperative that planetologists, particularly those involved in geological mapping and surface feature analysis for terrestrial planets, be familiar with volcanic terrain in terms of its origin, structure, and morphology. One means of gaining this experience is through field trips in volcanic terrains - hence, the Planetology Conference in Hawaii. In addition, discussions with volcanologists at the conference provide an important basis for establishing communications between the two fields that will facilitate comparative studies as more data become available.

  9. Interannual Variation of the Wet Season Onsets over Southern Amazonia and Important Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Fu, R.; Zhang, Y.; Arias, P. A.; Fernando, D. N.; Li, W.; Fernandes, K.

    2013-05-01

    Interannual variation of the wet season onsets over the Amazon has a strong impact on the bioproductivity of the rainforests, fire risk, agriculture and hydropower production of the Amazon, and contributes significantly to global atmospheric carbon fluxes. Previous studies have established that the tropical Sea Surface Temperature anomalies (SSTA) have strong influences on the wet season onset and can explain part of its variance. However, few studies have investigated what can explain the rest variance of the interannual variation of the wet season onset and how the relative importance of SSTA and physical processes can impact its predictability. We identify that such a complex relationship between SSTA and the onsets is the result of several competing processes that are non-linearly related to the SSTA. In particular, three dry season conditions are crucial for determining interannual variation of the wet season onset and triggering the late onset. A poleward shift of the subtropical jet partly induced by the wave trains generated from the warming of the tropical Pacific could inhibit the cold air incursion and result in late wet season onset. The low level zonal winds over the southern Amazon and the meridional winds in the southwest Atlantic directly affect the moisture transport to the southern Amazon. Higher Convective Inhibition (CIN), induced by a decrease of evapotranspiration (ET) and resulting in a less moist boundary layer, inhibits the occurrence of convection during the late dry season. We used two statistical methods to investigate by how much percentage these dry season conditions can explain the wet season onset with the exclusion of the interconnections between these conditions. The three most important conditions (CIN, U850 and SHSJ) can explain about 51% of the total variance.

  10. Raising the bar: the importance of hospital library standards in the continuing medical education accreditation process.

    PubMed

    Gluck, J C; Hassig, R A

    2001-07-01

    The Connecticut State Medical Society (CSMS) reviews and accredits the continuing medical education (CME) programs offered by Connecticut's hospitals. As part of the survey process, the CSMS assesses the quality of the hospitals' libraries. In 1987, the CSMS adopted the Medical Library Association's (MLA's) "Minimum Standards for Health Sciences Libraries in Hospitals." In 1990, professional librarians were added to the survey team and, later, to the CSMS CME Committee. Librarians participating in this effort are recruited from the membership of the Connecticut Association of Health Sciences Librarians (CAHSL). The positive results of having a qualified librarian on the survey team and the invaluable impact of adherence to the MLA standards are outlined. As a direct result of this process, hospitals throughout the state have added staffing, increased space, and added funding for resources during an era of cutbacks. Some hospital libraries have been able to maintain a healthy status quo, while others have had proposed cuts reconsidered by administrators for fear of losing valuable CME accreditation status. Creating a relationship with an accrediting agency is one method by which hospital librarians elsewhere may strengthen their efforts to ensure adequate library resources in an era of downsizing. In addition, this collaboration has provided a new and important role for librarians to play on an accreditation team. PMID:11465686

  11. Importance of the accretion process in asteroid thermal evolution: 6 Hebe as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Weidenschilling, S. J.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.

    2003-05-01

    Widespread evidence exists for heating that caused melting, thermal metamorphism, and aqueous alteration in meteorite parent bodies. Previous simulations of asteroid heat transfer have assumed that accretion was instantaneous. For the first time, we present a thermal model that assumes a realistic (incremental) accretion scenario and takes into account the heat budget produced by decay of 26Al during the accretion process. By modeling 6 Hebe (assumed to be the H chondrite parent body), we show that, in contrast to results from instantaneous accretion models, an asteroid may reach its peak temperature during accretion, the time at which different depth zones within the asteroid attain peak metamorphic temperatures may increase from the center to the surface, and the volume of high-grade material in the interior may be significantly less than that of unmetamorphosed material surrounding the metamorphic core. We show that different times of initiation and duration of accretion produce a spectrum of evolutionary possibilities, and thereby, highlight the importance of the accretion process in shaping an asteroid's thermal history. Incremental accretion models provide a means of linking theoretical models of accretion to measurable quantities (peak temperatures, cooling rates, radioisotope closure times) in meteorites that were determined by their thermal histories.

  12. Effect of the Different DEM and Geological Parameters on the Accuracy of Landslide Susceptibility Map

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Kawabata; J. Bandibas; S. Nonogaki

    2009-01-01

    An efficient and accurate method of generating landslide susceptibility maps is very important to mitigate the loss of properties and lives caused by this type of geological hazard. This study focuses on the development of an accurate and efficient method of data integration, processing and generation of a landslide susceptibility map using an ANN, geological parameters and DEM generated from

  13. Isotope Tracer Studies of Diffusion in Sillicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, Gerald J

    2008-07-31

    The objectives were directed toward understanding the transport of chemical species in nature, with particular emphasis on aqueous transport in solution, in colloids, and on particles. Major improvements in measuring ultra-low concentrations of rare elements were achieved. We focused on two areas of studies: (1) Field, laboratory, and theoretical studies of the transport and deposition of U, Th isotopes and their daughter products in natural systems; and (2) Study of calcium isotope fractionation effects in marine carbonates and in carbonates precipitated in the laboratory, under controlled temperature, pH, and rates of precipitation. A major study of isotopic fractionation of Ca during calcite growth from solution has been completed and published. It was found that the isotopic shifts widely reported in the literature and attributed to biological processes are in fact due to a small equilibrium fractionation factor that is suppressed by supersaturation of the solution. These effects were demonstrated in the laboratory and with consideration of the solution conditions in natural systems, where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. The controlling rate is not the diffusion of Ca, as was earlier proposed, but rather the rate of supply of [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] ions to the interface. This now opens the issues of isotopic fractionation of many elements to a more physical-chemical approach. The isotopic composition of Ca {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) in calcite crystals has been determined relative to that in the parent solutions by TIMS using a double spike. Solutions were exposed to an atmosphere of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, provided by the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. Alkalinity, pH, and concentrations of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and CO{sub 2} in solution were determined. The procedures permitted us to determine {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) over a range of pH conditions, with the associated ranges of alkalinity. Two solutions with greatly different Ca concentrations were used, but, in all cases, the condition [Ca] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] was met. A wide range in {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) was found for the calcite crystals, extending from 0.04 {+-} 0.13 to -1.34 {+-} 0.15 {per_thousand}, generally anticorrelating with the amount of Ca removed from the solution. The results show that {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) is a linear function of the saturation state of the solution with respect to calcite ({Omega}). The two parameters are very well correlated over a wide range in {Omega} for each solution with a given [Ca]. Solutions, which were vigorously stirred, showed a much smaller range in {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) and gave values of -0.42 {+-} 0.14 {per_thousand}, with the largest effect at low {Omega}. It is concluded that the diffusive flow of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} into the immediate neighborhood of the crystal-solution interface is the rate-controlling mechanism and that diffusive transport of Ca{sup 2+} is not a significant factor. The data are simply explained by the assumptions that: (a) the immediate interface of the crystal and the solution is at equilibrium with {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) {approx} -1.5 {+-} 0.25 {per_thousand}, and (b) diffusive inflow of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} causes supersaturation, thus precipitating Ca from the regions, exterior to the narrow zone of equilibrium. We consider this model to be a plausible explanation of the available data reported in the literature. The well-resolved but small and regular isotope fractionation shifts in Ca are thus not related to the diffusion of very large hydrated Ca complexes, but rather due to the ready availability of Ca in the general neighborhood of the crystal solution interface. The largest isotopic shift which occurs is a small equilibrium effect which is then subdued by supersaturation precipitation for solutions where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. It is shown that there is a clear temperature dependence of the net isotopic shifts, which is simply due to changes in {Omega}

  14. Pristine Noachian crust and key geologic transitions in the lower walls of Valles Marineris: Insights into early igneous processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flahaut, Jessica; Quantin, Cathy; Clenet, Harold; Allemand, Pascal; Mustard, John F.; Thomas, Pierre

    2012-09-01

    Valles Marineris is a unique vertical section through the uppermost kilometers of the martian crust. Its location, east of the Tharsis bulge, and its water-related history, fuel a great diversity of rock types in this area (Carr, M.H., Head, J.W. [2010]. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 294, 185-203). HiRISE and CRISM data available over the walls of the canyon were analyzed to infer the importance of magmatic and sedimentary processes through time. This contribution provides a complete morphologic and mineralogic characterization of the cross-section of rocks exposed in the canyon walls. Low-calcium pyroxene and olivine are detected in the lower portion of the walls, in association with morphologically distinct outcrops, leading to the idea that pristine Noachian crust might be exposed. Phyllosilicates are also present within the walls, but they appear to correspond to an alteration product. No proper sedimentary layers were observed within the walls of Valles Marineris at the resolution available today. All these detections are limited to the eastern portion of Valles Marineris, especially Juventae, Coprates, Capri, and Ganges chasmata. Preserved Noachian crustal material is rare on the martian surface and is rarely exposed in its pristine geologic context. Such detections lend precious information about early igneous processes. This survey also supports observations from the nearby impact crater central peaks (Quantin, C., Flahaut, J., Allemand, P. [2009]. Lunar Planet. Sci. 10; Quantin, C., Flahaut, J., Clenet, H., Allemand, P., Thomas, P. [2011]. Icarus, submitted for publication) and suggests that the western part of Valles Marineris may be cut into another material, consistent with lavas or volcanic sediments.

  15. Accumulation of metals by microorganisms — processes and importance for soil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledin, Maria

    2000-08-01

    Metal accumulation by solid substances can counteract metal mobilization in the environment if the solid substance is immobile. Microorganisms have a high surface area-to-volume ratio because of their small size and therefore provide a large contact area that can interact with metals in the surrounding environment. Microbial metal accumulation has received much attention in the last years due to the potential use of microorganisms for cleaning metal-polluted water. However, considerably less attention has been paid to the role of microorganisms for metal mobility in soil even though the same processes may occur there. Therefore, this paper highlights this area. The different accumulation processes that microorganisms perform are analyzed and their potential significance in soil systems is discussed. Different kinds of mechanisms can be involved in the accumulation of metals by microorganisms, e.g. adsorption, precipitation, complexation and active transport into the cell. Physicochemical parameters like pH and ionic composition, as well as biological factors are of importance for the magnitude of accumulation. Often large amounts of metals can be accumulated with varying specificity, and microorganisms may provide nucleation sites for mineral formation. Several studies of microbial metal accumulation have been made with different methods and aims. Most of these studies concern single-component systems with one organism at a time. Data from accumulation experiments with pure cultures of microorganisms have been used to model the overall metal retention in soil. A further development is experimental model systems using various solid soil components in salt medium. Microbial metal accumulation is difficult to study in situ, but some experimental methods have been applied as tools for studying real soil systems, e.g. litter bags buried in soil containing microorganisms, a method where discs with microorganisms have been put onto agar plates with soil extracts, and comparison of sterilized and non-sterilized soils or soils with or without nutrient amendment. Different aspects of microbial metal accumulation are emphasized with the different methods applied. Single-component systems have the advantage of providing excellent information of the metal binding properties of microorganisms but cannot directly be applied to metal behavior in the heterogenous systems that real soils constitute. Studies focused on the behavior of metals in real soils can, in contrast, provide information on the overall metal distribution but less insight into the processes involved. Obviously, a combination of approaches is needed to describe metal distribution and mobility in polluted soil such as areas around mines. Different kinds of multi-component systems as well as modelling may bridge the gap between these two types of studies. Several experimental methods, complementary to each other and designed to allow for comparison, may emphasize different aspects of metal accumulation and should therefore be considered. To summarize, there are studies that indicate that microorganisms may also accumulate metals in soil and that the amounts may be considerable. However, much work remains to be done, with the focus of microorganisms in soil. It is also important to put microbial metal accumulation in relation to other microbial processes in soil, which can influence metal mobility, to determine the overall influence of soil microorganisms on metal mobility, and to be able to quantify these processes.

  16. An Assessment of the Economic Importance of the San Carlos Island Shrimp Processing Industry to the Lee County Economy

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    An Assessment of the Economic Importance of the San Carlos Island Shrimp Processing Industry the shrimp processing industry on San Carlos Island contributes to the Lee County economy. Most of the shrimp offloading, grading, packing, and processing in Lee County occurs on San Carlos Island. Shrimp-laden vessels

  17. Geologic influences on the in situ processing of tar sand at the Northwest Asphalt Ridge deposit, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Sinks, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Laramie Energy Technology Center, Department of Energy, completed three in situ oil recovery field experiments, two combustion and one steamflood, in tar sand at Northwest Asphalt Ridge, Utah. Inadequate resource and site characterization prior to the field experiments contributed to process design and operation problems. The 10-acre field site is part of the Sohio Shale Oil Co. D tract located west of Vernal, Uintah County. The target zone, the middle portion of the Cretaceous Rim Rock Sandstone of the Mesaverde Group, varied from 300 to 500 feet deep. From petrographic analyses of the target zone, this portion is classified as a moderately sorted litharenite with an average visible porosity of 18%. Dominant constituents include quartz, rock fragments, chert, feldspars and clay minerals. X-ray analyses of selected core samples from the Rim Rock and Asphalt Ridge Sandstones indicate the presence of quartz, calcite, dolomite, ankerite, microcline, orthoclase, anorthite, kaolinite and muscovite. Carbonate mineral species were present only in the lower Rim Rock and Asphalt Ridge Sandstones. Reservoir characteristics of the target zone which adversely affected the field experiments include faulting at all three experiment areas, lateral and vertical heterogeneities of permeability and porosity, inadequate target zone confinement, rough surface texture of clastic grains, and oil-wet grains. Favorable target zone characteristics include high quartz content; absence of carbonates; lack of clay minerals bridging and cementing pore spaces; and sufficient porosity, initial oil saturation and overburden. Recommended geologic evaluation methods to aid in the identification of potentially suitable resources and sites for in situ oil recovery from tar sands include seismic surveys; well logging; coring and core analyses; petrographic, binocular, and scanning electron microscopy; and x-ray analyses. 54 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  18. Importance of 3D Processes Near the Ocean's Surface for Material Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    There are a number of practical problems that demand an accurate knowledge of ocean currents near the surface of the ocean. It is known that oceanic coherent features transport heat and carry out vertical exchange of biogeochemical tracers. Ocean currents can affect biological primary production, air-sea gas exchanges and global tracer budgets. Ocean currents are also important for the dispersion of substances that pose a danger to society, economy and human health. Examples of such events include algal blooms, the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011, and repeated large oil spills in the Gulf of Mexico, namely the IXTOC in 1978 and the Deepwater Horizon event in 2010. Such incidents demand accurate answers to questions such as ``where will the pollutant go?", ``how fast will it get there?" and ``how much pollutant will arrive there?", and in some instances ``where did the pollutant come from?". The answers to these questions are critical to the allocation of limited response resources, and in determining the overall impact of the events. We will summarize the efforts by the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE). One of the primary objectives of CARTHE is to improve predictive modeling capability for flows near the air-sea interface. In particular, two large experiments, Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) and Surf-zone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE), coordinated with real-time modeling were instructive on processes influencing near-surface material transport. Findings on submesoscale flows as well as model deficiencies to capture processes relevant to transport will be discussed. Insight into future modeling and observational plans will be provided.

  19. Utah Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Utah Geological Survey's Web site, Utah Geology, offers a variety of interesting geological information about the state. Good descriptions, illustrations, and photographs can be accessed on earthquakes and hazards, dinosaurs and fossils, rocks and minerals, oil and energy, and more. For example, the Rocks and Minerals page contains everything from how to stake a mining claim to downloadable summaries of mineral activity in the state. There is quite a bit of information within the site, and anyone interested in geology will find themselves exploring these pages for quite a while.

  20. Geologic Maps and Geologic Structures: A Texas Example

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roger Steinberg

    This Historical Geology lab exercise is an accompaniment to lab class instruction about geologic structures (folding and faulting) and geologic maps. It also serves as an excellent introduction to the Geology of the state of Texas. "Coloring" geologic maps, an important part of the exercise, may seem like a very elementary learning technique. But this lab engages students actively, and since the subject is often already somewhat familiar to them, emphasizing both the geology and geography of Texas, students receive it enthusiastically. This activity could be adapted to other regions, since most states have color 8 1/2 by 11 geologic maps available. A color map could be scanned and modified in Photoshop to create a simplified black and white version as was done in the assignment handout.

  1. 27 CFR 41.1 - Importation of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 41.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  2. 27 CFR 41.1 - Importation of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 41.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  3. 27 CFR 41.1 - Importation of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 41.1 Section...TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Scope of Regulations...tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. This...

  4. 40 CFR 761.187 - Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. 761.187 Section 761... POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. In addition to...

  5. 40 CFR 761.187 - Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. 761.187 Section 761... POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. In addition to...

  6. 40 CFR 761.187 - Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. 761.187 Section 761... POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. In addition to...

  7. 40 CFR 761.187 - Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. 761.187 Section 761... POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. In addition to...

  8. 40 CFR 761.187 - Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. 761.187 Section 761... POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE...persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. In addition to...

  9. Side-scan sonar along the north wall of the Hess Deep Rift: Processing, texture analysis, and geologic ground truth on an oceanic escarpment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Stephen D.; Karson, Jeffrey A.

    2004-02-01

    Side-scan sonar data collected along the steep, faulted north wall of the Hess Deep Rift provide images of a cross section of the upper oceanic crust. These data are integrated with ground truth from the submersible Alvin and the Argo II remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to evaluate faulting and mass wasting associated with the opening of the rift and to help trace geologic contacts between widely spaced dives and ROV surveys. Initial shipboard and subsequently processed data show excellent backscatter returns with well-imaged textures and distinctive patterns corresponding to specific rock units and surficial deposits. Four backscatter textures are widely developed and found to correspond to outcrops of basaltic lavas, outcrops of sheeted dikes and gabbroic rocks, surficial talus and rubble deposits, and pelagic sedimentary material. Using test areas identified by Alvin dives, the side-scan sonar data were processed to automatically classify the backscatter returns in terms of major rock units. The resultant processed image is used for further manual and computer-aided classification of the scarp geology. These techniques are evaluated for mapping the geology in rugged terrains similar to the steep walls of Hess Deep Rift.

  10. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  11. Geologic analyses of LANDSAT-1 multispectral imagery of a possible power plant site employing digital and analog image processing. [in Pennsylvania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovegreen, J. R.; Prosser, W. J.; Millet, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A site in the Great Valley subsection of the Valley and Ridge physiographic province in eastern Pennsylvania was studied to evaluate the use of digital and analog image processing for geologic investigations. Ground truth at the site was obtained by a field mapping program, a subsurface exploration investigation and a review of available published and unpublished literature. Remote sensing data were analyzed using standard manual techniques. LANDSAT-1 imagery was analyzed using digital image processing employing the multispectral Image 100 system and using analog color processing employing the VP-8 image analyzer. This study deals primarily with linears identified employing image processing and correlation of these linears with known structural features and with linears identified manual interpretation; and the identification of rock outcrops in areas of extensive vegetative cover employing image processing. The results of this study indicate that image processing can be a cost-effective tool for evaluating geologic and linear features for regional studies encompassing large areas such as for power plant siting. Digital image processing can be an effective tool for identifying rock outcrops in areas of heavy vegetative cover.

  12. North Cascades Geology: Geologic Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This article describes the period of geologic time spanned by the rocks of the North Cascades area of Washington. Users can access a simplified geologic time scale that provides links to geologic events in the North Cascades region. These include the deposition of various terranes, periods of intrusion and metamorphism, the beginning of the Cascade volcanic arc, and periods of major glaciation. Links to related materials are also provided.

  13. Geological gyrocompass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, M. H.; Beason, S. C.

    1988-08-01

    The geological gyrocompass is an accurate, portable instrument useful for geologic mapping and surveying which employs an aircraft gyrocompass, strike reference bars, a pair of sights and levelling devices for horizontally levelling the instrument. A clinometer graduated in degrees indicates the dip of the surface being measured.

  14. Yosemite Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Park Service maintains the Yosemite National Park Web site and the corresponding Geology page. This Web site gives an overview of the geologic history of the site, tells how the Sierra Nevada range formed, explains the basics of granitic rock, shows how glaciers carved out the canyons, and much more.[JAB

  15. Abstract--Digital signal processing (DSP) applications involve processing long streams of input data. It is important to take into

    E-print Network

    Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S.

    Abstract--Digital signal processing (DSP) applications involve processing long streams of input for DSP systems. Task-level vectorization, or block pro- cessing, is a useful dataflow graph, and use of more efficient DSP- oriented addressing modes. On the other hand, block processing generally

  16. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)] [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M., E-mail: paul.michels@uclouvain.be [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ? Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ? PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ? TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ? Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ? PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5?-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and {sup 35}S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed.

  17. Geological Mapping of Impact Melt Deposits at Lunar Complex Craters: New Insights into Morphological Diversity, Distribution and the Cratering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, D.; Head, J. W., III; Pieters, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have completed high resolution geological mapping of impact melt deposits at the young lunar complex craters (<1 billion years) Copernicus, Jackson and Tycho using data from recent missions. Crater floors being the largest repository of impact melt, we have mapped their morphological diversity expressed in terms of varied surface texture, albedo, character and occurrence of boulder units as well as relative differences in floor elevation. Examples of wall and rim impact melt units and their relation to floor units have also been mapped. Among the distinctive features of these impact melt deposits are: 1) Impact Melt Wave Fronts: These are extensive (sometimes several kilometers in length) and we have documented their occurrence and distribution in different parts of the crater floor at Jackson and Tycho. These features emphasize melt mobility and style of emplacement during the modification stage of the craters. 2) Variations in Floor Elevations: Spatially extensive and coherent sections of crater floors have different elevations at all the three craters. The observed elevation differences could be caused by subsidence due to cooling of melt and/or structural failure, together with a contribution from regional slope. 3) Melt-Covered Megablocks: We also observe large blocks/rock-fragments (megablocks) covered in impact melt, which could be sections of collapsed wall or in some cases, subdued sections of central peaks. 4) Melt-Covered Central Peaks: Impact melt has also been mapped on the central peaks but varies in spatial extent among the craters. The presence of melt on peaks must be taken into account when interpreting peak mineralogy as exposures of deeper crust. 5) Boulder Distribution: Interesting trends are observed in the distribution of boulder units of various sizes; some impact melt units have spatially extensive boulders, while boulder distribution is very scarce in other units on the floor. We interpret these distributions to be influenced by a) the differential collapse of the crater walls during the modification stage, and b) the amount of relative melt volume retained in different parts of the crater floor. These observations provide important documentation of the morphological diversity and better understanding of the emplacement and final distribution of impact melt deposits.

  18. The encyclopedia of applied geology

    SciTech Connect

    Finkl, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    This compendium of engineering geology data includes contributions by experts from many countries. Topics center around the field of engineering geology, with special focus on landscapes, earth materials, and the ''management'' of geological processes. How to use geology to serve man is given particular attention. More than 80 entries deal with hydrology, rock structure monitoring, soil mechanics, and engineering geology. Facts are provided on earth science information and sources, electrokinetics, forensic geology, geogryology, nuclear plant siting, photogrammetry, tunnels and tunneling, urban geomorphology, and well data systems. This guide explains the geology of alluvial plains, arid lands, beaches and coasts, delataic plains, cold regions, glacial landscapes, and urban environments. Detailed analyses are given of the geotechnical properties of caliche, clay, duricrust, soil, laterite, marine sediments, and rocks.

  19. Geologic Evolution of Eastern Hellas, Mars: Styles and Timing of Volatile-driven Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Bleamaster, Leslie F., III; Mest, Scott C.

    2004-01-01

    The east rim of the Hellas basin and the surrounding highlands comprise a geologically significant region for evaluating volatile abundance, volatile distribution and cycling, and potential changes in Martian environmental conditions. This region of the Martian surface exhibits landforms shaped by a diversity of geologic processes and has a well-preserved geologic record, with exposures of Noachian, Hesperian, and Amazonian units, as well as spans a wide range in both latitude and elevation due to the magnitude of Hellas basin. In addition, geologically contemporaneous volcanism and volatile-driven activity in the circum-Hellas highlands provide important ingredients for creating habitats for potential Martian life.

  20. Use of Library Readings to Augment Conventional Geology Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nold, John Lloyd

    1989-01-01

    Examples of sets of questions on library readings designed to lead students into articles and emphasize important information and associated literature are presented for introductory geology courses, historical geology, structural geology, mineralogy, and petrology. (Author/CW)

  1. Digital Geology of Idaho

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-02-17

    If you have ever wanted to learn about the geology of Idaho, this site is a great way to explore everything from Coeur d'Alene to the Sawtooth Mountains. This digital version of a course offered at Idaho State University systematically divides Idaho geology into a set of different teaching modules. The modules cover topics like the Idaho Batholith, the Columbia River Basalts, and the Lake Bonneville Flood. Each module contains maps, charts, diagrams, and photographs that illuminate the various geological processes that have formed, and continue to form, in each region of the state. Many of the modules also have fly-throughs that superimpose color-coded geology on 3-D topographic maps to provide a graphic visualization Idaho's rivers. Additionally, the site contains slide shows and a set of teaching exercises.

  2. Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations in Tempe Town Lake: biogDissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations in Tempe Town Lake: biogeochemical & hydrologic processeseochemical & hydrologic processes 1Department of Geological Sciences, 871404, Arizona State Un

    E-print Network

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations in Tempe Town Lake: biogDissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations in Tempe Town Lake: biogeochemical & hydrologic processeseochemical & hydrologic processes 1Department of Geological Sciences, 871404, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 2 Department

  3. Laboratory studies of potentially important atmospheric processes involving oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estupinan, Edgar Garcia

    2001-12-01

    The work presented in this dissertation comprises two major objectives. The first objective has been to carry out an investigation of the production of N2O from reactions of electronically and vibrationally excited atmospheric trace species with N2 (using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy as the N2O detection method). The second objective of this study has been to accurately investigate the kinetics of the important stratospheric reaction O(3P) + NO2 --> O2 + NO (k1) (using the technique of laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence). Investigation of N2O production from the collisional deactivation of electronically excited NO 2 and OH by N2 and from the interaction of nascent O 3 with N2 have resulted in upper limit quantum yields which render all three processes as insignificant sources of atmospheric N 2O. The following expression adequately describes the observed temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for the reaction O(1D) + N2 + M --> N2O + M (k2) in its third order low-pressure limit over the temperature range 220-324 K: k2,0(T) = (2.72 +/- 0.08) × 10-36 (T/300)-(0.92 +/- 0.37) cm6 molecule-2 s-1, where the uncertainties represent precision at the 2? level. The accuracy of the reported rate coefficients is estimated to range from 30 to 40%. Preliminary calculations indicate that reaction 2 represents a source of about 0.2 Tg N2O per year to the atmosphere (i.e., about 1% of the currently estimated global source budget of N 2O). This is the first suggested mechanism that generates N2O photochemically in the atmosphere that is capable of explaining the altitude dependence of the N2O isotopic signature. The following Arrhenius expression adequately describes the observed temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for reaction 1: k1(T ) = (4.21 +/- 0.25) × 10-12 exp[(273 +/- 18)/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1, where the uncertainties represent precision at the 2? level. The accuracy of the reported values for k 1(T) is estimated to be +/-6% over the entire temperature range investigated (221-425 K). Incorporation of our kinetics results for reaction 1 into models of stratospheric chemistry would lead to somewhat lower mid-stratospheric ozone levels than would be obtained using results of previous studies.

  4. Status report on the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Foreman, J.L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Dreier, R.B.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Lee, Suk Young (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lietzke, D.A. (Lietzke (David A.), Rutledge, TN (United States)); McMaster, W.M. (McMaster (William M.), Heiskell, TN (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR (Plate 1), which remains in progress. An understanding of the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. Therefore, this report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the available data that provide the basic framework for additional geologic mapping, subsurface geologic, and geohydrologic studies. In addition, some recently completed, detailed work on soils and other surficial materials is included because of the close relationships to bedrock geology and the need to recognize the weathered products of bedrock units. Weathering processes also have some influence on hydrologic systems and processes at depth.

  5. Geologic Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    William L. Newman

    1997-01-01

    The Earth is very old -- 4.5 billion years or more -- according to recent estimates. This vast span of time, called geologic time by earth scientists, is difficult to comprehend in the familiar time units of months and years, or even centuries. How then do scientists reckon geologic time, and why do they believe the Earth is so old? A great part of the secret of the Earth's age is locked up in its rocks, and our centuries-old search for the key led to the beginning and nourished the growth of geologic science.

  6. Geologic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, William L.

    2000-01-01

    The Earth is very old 4 1/2 billion years or more according to recent estimates. This vast span of time, called geologic time by earth scientists, is difficult to comprehend in the familiar time units of months and years, or even centuries. How then do scientists reckon geologic time, and why do they believe the Earth is so old? A great part of the secret of the Earth's age is locked up in its rocks, and our centuries-old search for the key led to the beginning and nourished the growth of geologic science.

  7. Geologic History

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Philip Medina

    This unit introduces younger students to the concept of relative versus absolute time and how geologists determine the age of geologic events and features. Topics include the laws that determine relative age (superposition, cross-cutting relationships, included fragments, and others), and how to re-construct the geologic history of an area using these relationships. There is also information on geologic correlation and the use of index fossils to determine relative age. The section on absolute time discusses some ways of measurement (tree rings, radioactive dating) and introduces the concepts of natural selection and mass extinctions. A vocabulary and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

  8. Geology Before Pluto: Pre-encounter Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    Jeffrey M. Moore (NASA Ames) and the New Horizons Science Team Pluto, its large satellite Charon, and its four small known satellites represent the first trans-Neptunian Kuiper Belt objects populating the outer-most solar system beyond the gas giant planets to be studied in detail from a spacecraft (New Horizons). A complete picture of the solar nebula and solar system formation cannot be confidently formulated until representatives of this group of bodies at the edge of solar space have been examined. The Pluto system is composed of unique, lunar- and intermediate-sized objects that can tell us much about how objects with volatile icy compositions evolve. Modeling of the interior suggests that geologic activity may have been significant to some degree, and observations of frost on the surface could imply the need for a geologic reservoir for the replenishment of these phases. However, these putative indicators of Pluto's geologic history are inconclusive and unspecific. Detailed examination of Pluto's geologic record is the only plausible means of bridging the gap between theory and observation. In this talk I will examine the potential importance of these tentative indications of geologic activity and how specific spacecraft observations have been designed and used to constrain the Pluto system's geologic history. The cameras of New Horizons will provide robust data sets that should be immanently amenable to geological analysis of the Pluto System's landscapes. In this talk, we begin with a brief discussion of the planned observations by the New Horizons cameras that will bear most directly on geological interpretability. Then I will broadly review major geological processes that could potentially operate on the surfaces of Pluto and its moons. I will first survey exogenic processes (i.e. those for which energy for surface modification is supplied externally to the planetary surface): impact cratering, sedimentary processes (including volatile migration), and the work of wind. I will conclude with an assessment of the prospects for endogenic activity in the form of tectonics and cryo-volcanism.

  9. 9 CFR 130.4 - User fees for processing import permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...products or by products, organisms, vectors, or germ plasm (embryos or semen) or to transport organisms or vectors1 Initial...Import or In Transit Permit (Animals, Animal Semen, Animal Embryos, Birds, Poultry, or Hatching Eggs).” 2...

  10. 9 CFR 130.4 - User fees for processing import permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...products or by products, organisms, vectors, or germ plasm (embryos or semen) or to transport organisms or vectors1 Initial...Import or In Transit Permit (Animals, Animal Semen, Animal Embryos, Birds, Poultry, or Hatching Eggs).” 2...

  11. 9 CFR 130.4 - User fees for processing import permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...products or by products, organisms, vectors, or germ plasm (embryos or semen) or to transport organisms or vectors1 Initial...Import or In Transit Permit (Animals, Animal Semen, Animal Embryos, Birds, Poultry, or Hatching Eggs).” 2...

  12. 9 CFR 130.4 - User fees for processing import permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...products or by products, organisms, vectors, or germ plasm (embryos or semen) or to transport organisms or vectors1 Initial...Import or In Transit Permit (Animals, Animal Semen, Animal Embryos, Birds, Poultry, or Hatching Eggs).” 2...

  13. 9 CFR 130.4 - User fees for processing import permit applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...products or by products, organisms, vectors, or germ plasm (embryos or semen) or to transport organisms or vectors1 Initial...Import or In Transit Permit (Animals, Animal Semen, Animal Embryos, Birds, Poultry, or Hatching Eggs).” 2...

  14. Never underestimate the importance of networking: an imperative process for career success!

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lynn C

    2003-01-01

    The importance of establishing connections to other powerful, intelligent people is extremely important to having a successful nursing career. Nurses can and will continue to learn the important aspects of career networking for themselves, other nurses, and their patients. Sharing information, whether it is clinical, administrative, educational, or research-based, is extremely important to maintain the current knowledge that is necessary to be successful in the profession. According to Christy (1987), sharing information and opportunities with colleagues has a synergistic effect. In short, we can increase our supply of information and be influential and powerful leaders by sharing that information. Nurses need to become better networkers to build successful careers. This will require breaking out of our zones of comfort and becoming players on the health care stage. Nurses, patients, and the public will all be beneficiaries of their greater involvement in all health care networks in our country! PMID:14626019

  15. Geology of a complex kimberlite pipe (K2 pipe, Venetia Mine, South Africa): insights into conduit processes during explosive ultrabasic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Tait, M.; Field, M.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    2009-01-01

    K2 is a steep-sided kimberlite pipe with a complex internal geology. Geological mapping, logging of drillcore and petrographic studies indicate that it comprises layered breccias and pyroclastic rocks of various grain sizes, lithic contents and internal structures. The pipe comprises two geologically distinct parts: K2 West is a layered sequence of juvenile- and lithic-rich breccias, which dip 20-45° inwards, and K2 East consists of a steep-sided pipe-like body filled with massive volcaniclastic kimberlite nested within the K2 pipe. The layered sequence in K2 West is present to > 900 m below present surface and is interpreted as a sequence of pyroclastic rocks generated by explosive eruptions and mass-wasting breccias generated by rock fall and sector collapse of the pipe walls: both processes occurred in tandem during the infill of the pipe. Several breccia lobes extend across the pipe and are truncated by the steep contact with K2 East. Dense pyroclastic rocks within the layered sequence are interpreted as welded deposits. K2 East represents a conduit that was blasted through the layered breccia sequence at a late stage in the eruption. This phase may have involved fluidisation of trapped pyroclasts, with loss of fine particles and comminution of coarse clasts. We conclude that the K2 kimberlite pipe was emplaced in several distinct stages that consisted of an initial explosive enlargement, followed by alternating phases of accumulation and ejection.

  16. Spatial distribution of seafloor bio-geological and geochemical processes as proxies of fluid flux regime and evolution of a carbonate/hydrates mound, northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macelloni, Leonardo; Brunner, Charlotte A.; Caruso, Simona; Lutken, Carol B.; D'Emidio, Marco; Lapham, Laura L.

    2013-04-01

    Woolsey Mound, a carbonate/hydrate complex of cold seeps, vents, and seafloor pockmarks in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, is the site of the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium's (GOMHRC) multi-sensor, multi-disciplinary, permanent seafloor observatory. In preparation for installing the observatory, the site has been studied through geophysical, biological, geological, and geochemical surveys. By integrating high-resolution, swath bathymetry, acoustic imagery, seafloor video, and shallow geological samples in a morpho-bio-geological model, we have identified a complex mound structure consisting of three main crater complexes: southeast, northwest, and southwest. Each crater complex is associated with a distinct fault. The crater complexes exhibit differences in morphology, bathymetric relief, exposed hydrates, fluid venting, sediment accumulation rates, sediment diagenesis, and biological community patterns. Spatial distribution of these attributes suggests that the complexes represent three different fluid flux regimes: the southeast complex seems to be an extinct or quiescent vent; the northwest complex exhibits young, vigorous activity; and the southwest complex is a mature, fully open vent. Geochemical evidence from pore-water gradients corroborates this model suggesting that upward fluid flux waxes and wanes over time and that microbial activity is sensitive to such change. Sulfate and methane concentrations show that microbial activity is patchy in distribution and is typically higher within the northwest and southwest complexes, but is diminished significantly over the southeast complex. Biological community composition corroborates the presence of distinct conditions at the three crater complexes. The fact that three different fluid flux regimes coexist within a single mound complex confirms the dynamic nature of the plumbing system that discharges gases into bottom water. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of bio-geological processes appears to be a valid indicator of multiple fluid flux regimes that coexist at the mound.

  17. United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response is comprised of numerous components within the United States Geological Survey (USGS requirements and deactivation process in supporting natural hazards events. 1.2 Scope

  18. Why is the new employee self-service Address Verification process important? When will this process begin and by when should I complete my personal Address Verification?

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Q Q Q Q Q Q A A A A A A Why is the new employee self-service Address Verification process important? When will this process begin and by when should I complete my personal Address Verification? What Home Mailing Address. Why? What if I don't want to update my information yet? Accurate employee contact

  19. Importance of $1n$-stripping process in the $^{6}$Li+$^{159}$Tb reaction

    E-print Network

    M. K. Pradhan; A. Mukherjee; Subinit Roy; P. Basu; A. Goswami; R. Kshetri; R. Palit; V. V. Parkar; M. Ray; M. Saha Sarkar; S. Santra

    2013-12-10

    The inclusive cross sections of the $\\alpha$-particles produced in the reaction $^{6}$Li+$^{159}$Tb have been measured at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The measured cross sections are found to be orders of magnitude larger than the calculated cross sections of $^{6}$Li breaking into $\\alpha$ and $d$ fragments, thus indicating contributions from other processes. The experimental cross sections of $1n$-stripping and $1n$-pickup processes have been determined from an entirely different measurement, reported earlier. Apart from incomplete fusion and/ $d$-transfer processes, the $1n$-stripping process is found to be a significant contributor to the inclusive $\\alpha$-particle cross sections in this reaction.

  20. Physical Characteristics, Geologic Setting, and Possible Formation Processes of Spring Deposits on Mars Based on Terrestrial Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.

    2003-01-01

    Spring formation is a predicted consequence of the interaction of former Martian aquifers with structures common to Mars, including basin margins, Tharsis structures, and other structural deformation characteristics. The arid environment and high abundance of water soluble compounds in the crust will have likewise encouraged spring deposit formation at spring sites. Such spring deposits may be recognized from morphological criteria if the characteristics of formation and preservation are understood. An important first step in the current Mars exploration strategy [10] is the detection of sites where there is evidence for past or present near-surface water on Mars. This study evaluates the large-scale morphology of spring deposits and the physical processes of their formation, growth, and evolution in terms that relate to (1) their identification in image data, (2) their formation, evolution, and preservation in the environment of Mars, and (3) their potential as sites of long-term or late stage shallow groundwater emergence at the surface of Mars.

  1. Rehabilitation between institutional and non-institutional forensic psychiatric care: important influences on the transition process.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, E; Holm, M; Flensner, G

    2012-10-01

    All patients cared for in forensic psychiatric care (FPC) have some kind of psychiatric disorder and most of them have committed one or more criminal acts. One part of the patient's rehabilitation is the transition from institutional to non-institutional FPC, but a number of patients do not succeed. The aim of this study was to elucidate different caregivers' experiences of aspects that influence the patients' ability to manage this rehabilitation. A qualitative approach was chosen. Data were collected by interviews in two focus groups, each group comprising of six caregivers representing both institutional and non-institutional FPC. The transcribed interviews were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. Important aspects influencing the patients' transition described were a well-planned care plan, together with a suitable non-institutional dwelling and a tailored occupation. Other important areas were having a well-functioning and trusting social network and a good relationship with a contact person/advocate. A major barrier to a successful transition was whether the patients managed their own finances or not. It was stated that it is important that the patients participate in the care and that different authorities create individual conditions and flexible solutions. All of these factors are important to focus on when caring for patients during their stay in the institutional FPC. PMID:22182281

  2. Scatterometer Sensitivity for Statistical Process Control: Importance of Modeling for In-direct Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brian; Bushman, Scott; Baum, Chris [Texas Instruments, Inc., 13560 N. Central Expressway, MS3736, Dallas, TX, 75243 (United States)

    2005-09-09

    Scatterometer-based control in semiconductor processing requires careful thin-film model selection to obtain the best repeatability, reproducibility, linearity, and bias. A 'working' standard based on process capability is used to gather data that is then re-matched with different models for comparison. This study provides a framework for model comparisons and examines the effects of the index of refraction and model complexity, or the number of trapezoids, on measurement system capability for control of a polysilicon gate etch process. Measurement capability for the gate profile is needed in addition to gate length. Results from a single-wavelength, multiple angle-of-incidence scatterometer are compared to reference data from atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. The polysilicon index of refraction has a strong effect on measurement scaling and repeatability. A counter-intuitive result is that a single-trapezoid model can perform better than a double-trapezoid model for linearity and bias.

  3. Integration of the first and second generation bioethanol processes and the importance of by-products.

    PubMed

    Lennartsson, Patrik R; Erlandsson, Per; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-08-01

    Lignocellulosic ethanol has obstacles in the investment costs and uncertainties in the process. One solution is to integrate it with the running dry mills of ethanol from grains. However, the economy of these mills, which dominate the world market, are dependent on their by-products DDGS (Distiller's Dried Grains and Solubles), sold as animal feed. The quality of DDGS therefore must not be negatively influenced by the integration. This puts restraints on the choice of pretreatment of lignocelluloses and utilizing the pentose sugars by food-grade microorganisms. The proposed solution is to use food related filamentous Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes fungi, and to produce fungal biomass as a high-grade animal feed from the residues after the distillation (stillage). This also has the potential to improve the first generation process by increasing the amount of the thin stillage directly sent back into the process, and by decreasing the evaporator based problems. PMID:24582951

  4. The importance of observation versus process error in analyses of global ungulate populations.

    PubMed

    Ahrestani, Farshid S; Hebblewhite, Mark; Post, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Population abundance data vary widely in quality and are rarely accurate. The two main components of error in such data are observation and process error. We used Bayesian state space models to estimate the observation and process error in time-series of 55 globally distributed populations of two species, Cervus elaphus (elk/red deer) and Rangifer tarandus (caribou/reindeer). We examined variation among populations and species in the magnitude of estimates of error components and density dependence using generalized linear models. Process error exceeded observation error in 75% of all populations, and on average, both components of error were greater in Rangifer than in Cervus populations. Observation error differed significantly across the different observation methods, and predation and time-series length differentially affected the error components. Comparing the Bayesian model results to traditional models that do not separate error components revealed the potential for misleading inferences about sources of variation in population dynamics. PMID:24201239

  5. Geology of Mojave National Preserve

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS) highlights the geology of the Mojave National Preserve in California. It includes a field trip describing areas of interest at the preserve, as well as a geologic time scale describing the history and development of this area. Processes that shaped this region include volcanism, tectonics, faulting, erosion, deposition, spreading, intrusions, and glaciation. There is a geologic map of the area with units and a legend, and links to maps and technical papers.

  6. Cari L. Johnson $ Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Building 320, Stanford

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Cari

    ecological processes and events deep in geologic time. J. Michael Moldowan $ Department of Geolog- icalAUTHORS Cari L. Johnson $ Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Building 320, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305-2115; current address: Department of Geology

  7. Reports of planetary geology program, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, H. E. (compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Several areas of the Planetary Geology Program were addressed including outer solar system satellites, asteroids, comets, Venus, cratering processes and landform development, volcanic processes, aeolian processes, fluvial processes, periglacial and permafrost processes, geomorphology, remote sensing, tectonics and stratigraphy, and mapping.

  8. Developing an Assessment of Learning Process: The Importance of Pre-Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheran, Michelle; Sarbaum, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities are increasingly being held accountable for assessing and reporting student learning. Recently there has been increased focus on using assessment to improve learning over time. In this paper we present a simple, step-by-step assessment process that will deliver meaningful results to achieve these ends. We emphasize the…

  9. 78 FR 38555 - Importer Permit Requirements for Tobacco Products and Processed Tobacco, and Other Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ...Products, Processed Tobacco, and Cigarette Papers and Tubes AGENCY: Alcohol and Tobacco...requirements for tobacco products and cigarette papers and tubes, and, as a result, these...pertaining to tobacco products and cigarette papers and tubes. Section 5701 of the...

  10. Leaching the Poison--The Importance of Process and Partnership in Working with Yolngu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marika, Rarriwuy; Yunupingu, Yalmay; Marika-Mununggiritj, Raymattja; Muller, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The popular construction of rural places as "white" spaces has significant repercussions for ethnic, Indigenous and "other" groups who do not always fit within prescribed dominant processes. This paper provides new insights for rural scholarship through an engagement with Indigenous specific experiences of governance and decision making in rural…

  11. Measuring Edge Importance: A Quantitative Analysis of the Stochastic Shielding Approximation for Random Processes on Graphs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models of cellular physiological mechanisms often involve random walks on graphs representing transitions within networks of functional states. Schmandt and Galán recently introduced a novel stochastic shielding approximation as a fast, accurate method for generating approximate sample paths from a finite state Markov process in which only a subset of states are observable. For example, in ion-channel models, such as the Hodgkin–Huxley or other conductance-based neural models, a nerve cell has a population of ion channels whose states comprise the nodes of a graph, only some of which allow a transmembrane current to pass. The stochastic shielding approximation consists of neglecting fluctuations in the dynamics associated with edges in the graph not directly affecting the observable states. We consider the problem of finding the optimal complexity reducing mapping from a stochastic process on a graph to an approximate process on a smaller sample space, as determined by the choice of a particular linear measurement functional on the graph. The partitioning of ion-channel states into conducting versus nonconducting states provides a case in point. In addition to establishing that Schmandt and Galán’s approximation is in fact optimal in a specific sense, we use recent results from random matrix theory to provide heuristic error estimates for the accuracy of the stochastic shielding approximation for an ensemble of random graphs. Moreover, we provide a novel quantitative measure of the contribution of individual transitions within the reaction graph to the accuracy of the approximate process. PMID:24742077

  12. INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND GROUP PROCESSES Maintaining Sexual Desire in Intimate Relationships: The Importance of

    E-print Network

    Reber, Paul J.

    relationships, gender differences, daily experience methods I know nothing about sex, because I was alwaysINTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND GROUP PROCESSES Maintaining Sexual Desire in Intimate Relationships Barbara Three studies tested whether adopting strong (relative to weak) approach goals in relationships (i

  13. Tenure: An Important Due Process Right or a Hindrance to Change in the Schools?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julianne Coleman; Stephen T. Schroth; Lisa Molinaro; Mark Green

    2005-01-01

    Teacher tenure is a hotly contested concept in today’s’ school reform battles. Many discussions of tenure, however, use the term in incorrect ways that add little to the concepts that should be debated. Historically, tenure represents due process rights teachers acquire after several years of successful service. Other procedures, such as teacher credentialing, the granting of tenure, and teacher evaluation,

  14. The Acclimation Process of New CEOs in Community Colleges: Important Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammons, James O.; Murphree, Jackie

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process by which new community college presidents acclimate to their roles. Discusses a survey of 71 new community college CEOs. Provides conclusions and implications for improved practice, and includes recommended (and not recommended) actions and suggestions for current and future CEOs and boards of trustees. Contains 45…

  15. The preparation of illustrations for reports of the United States Geological survey : with brief descriptions of processes of reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridgway, John L.

    1920-01-01

    There has been an obvious need in the Geological Survey oŁ a paper devoted wholly to illustrations. No complete paper on the character, use, and mode of preparation of illustration has been published by the Survey, though brief suggestions concerning certain features of their use have been printed in connection wit other suggestions pertaining to publications. The present paper includes matter which it is hoped will be of service to authors in their work of making up original drafts of illustrations and to drafsmen who are using these originals in preparing more finished drawing but it is not a technical treatise on drafting.

  16. Impact of geological model uncertainty on integrated catchment hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Jřrgensen, Flemming; Refsgaard, Jens Christian

    2014-05-01

    Various types of uncertainty can influence hydrological model performance. Among them, uncertainty originated from geological model may play an important role in process-based integrated hydrological modeling, if the model is used outside the calibration base. In the present study, we try to assess the hydrological model predictive uncertainty caused by uncertainty of the geology using an ensemble of geological models with equal plausibility. The study is carried out in the 101 km2 Norsminde catchment in western Denmark. Geostatistical software TProGS is used to generate 20 stochastic geological realizations for the west side the of study area. This process is done while incorporating the borehole log data from 108 wells and high resolution airborne transient electromagnetic (AEM) data for conditioning. As a result, 10 geological models are generated based solely on borehole data, and another 10 geological models are based on both borehole and AEM data. Distributed surface water - groundwater models are developed using MIKE SHE code for each of the 20 geological models. The models are then calibrated using field data collected from stream discharge and groundwater head observations. The model simulation results are evaluated based on the same two types of field data. The results show that the differences between simulated discharge flows caused by using different geological models are relatively small. The model calibration is shown to be able to account for the systematic bias in different geological realizations and hence varies the calibrated model parameters. This results in an increase in the variance between the hydrological realizations compared to the uncalibrated models that uses the same parameter values in all 20 models. Furthermore, borehole based hydrological models in general show more variance between simulations than the AEM based models; however, the combined total uncertainty, bias plus variance, is not necessarily higher.

  17. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robida, François; Wächter, Joachim; Tulstrup, Jřrgen; Lorenz, Henning; Carter, Mary; Cipolloni, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Geological data and models are important assets for the EPOS community. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS will be designed and implemented in an efficient and sustainable access system for geological multi-scale data assets for EPOS through the integration of distributed infrastructure components (nodes) of geological surveys, research institutes and the international drilling community (ICDP) . The TCS will develop and take benefit of the synergy between the existing data infrastructures of the Geological Surveys of Europe (EuroGeoSurveys / OneGeology-Europe / EGDI) and on the large amount of information produced by the research organisations. These nodes will offer a broad range of resources including: digitised geological maps, borehole data, geophysical data (seismic data, borehole log data), archived information on physical material (samples, cores), geochemical and other analyses of rocks, soils and minerals, and Geological models (3D, 4D). The services will be implemented on international standards (such as INSPIRE, IUGS/CGI, OGC, W3C, ISO) in order to guarantee their interoperability with other EPOS TCS as well as their compliance with INSPIRE European Directive or international initiatives (such as OneGeology). This will provide future virtual research environments with means to facilitate the use of existing information for future applications. In addition, workflows will be established that allow the integration of other existing and new data and applications. Processing and the use of simulation and visualization tools will subsequently support the integrated analysis and characterization of complex subsurface structures and their inherent dynamic processes. This will in turn aid in the overall understanding of complex multi-scale geo-scientific questions. This TCS will work alongside other EPOS TCSs to create an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth Sciences in Europe.

  18. Terrestrial analogs, planetary geology, and the nature of geological reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    2014-05-01

    Analogical reasoning is critical to planetary geology, but its role can be misconstrued by those unfamiliar with the practice of that science. The methodological importance of analogy to geology lies in the formulation of genetic hypotheses, an absolutely essential component of geological reasoning that was either ignored or denigrated by most 20th century philosophers of science, who took the theoretical/ experimental methodology of physics to be the sole model for all of scientific inquiry. Following the seminal 19th century work of Grove Karl Gilbert, an early pioneer of planetary geology, it has long been recognized that broad experience with and understanding of terrestrial geological phenomena provide geologists with their most effective resource for the invention of potentially fruitful, working hypotheses. The actions of (1) forming such hypotheses, (2) following their consequences, and (3) testing those consequences comprise integral parts of effective geological practice in regard to the understanding of planetary surfaces. Nevertheless, the logical terminology and philosophical bases for such practice will be unfamiliar to most planetary scientists, both geologists and nongeologists. The invention of geological hypotheses involves both inductive inferences of the type Gilbert termed “empiric classification” and abductive inferences of a logical form made famous by the 19th century American logician Charles Sanders Peirce. The testing and corroboration of geological hypotheses relies less on the correspondence logic of theoretical/ experimental sciences, like physics, and more on the logic of consistency, coherence, and consilience that characterizes the investigative and historical sciences of interpretation exemplified by geology.

  19. The Importance of Sample Processing in Analysis of Asbestos Content in Rocks and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. D.; Wright, J.

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of asbestos content in rocks and soils using Air Resources Board (ARB) Test Method 435 (M435) involves the processing of samples for subsequent analysis by polarized light microscopy (PLM). The use of different equipment and procedures by commercial laboratories to pulverize rock and soil samples could result in different particle size distributions. It has long been theorized that asbestos-containing samples can be over-pulverized to the point where the particle dimensions of the asbestos no longer meet the required 3:1 length-to-width aspect ratio or the particles become so small that they no longer can be tested for optical characteristics using PLM where maximum PLM magnification is typically 400X. Recent work has shed some light on this issue. ARB staff conducted an interlaboratory study to investigate variability in preparation and analytical procedures used by laboratories performing M435 analysis. With regard to sample processing, ARB staff found that different pulverization equipment and processing procedures produced powders that have varying particle size distributions. PLM analysis of the finest powders produced by one laboratory showed all but one of the 12 samples were non-detect or below the PLM reporting limit; in contrast to the other 36 coarser samples from the same field sample and processed by three other laboratories where 21 samples were above the reporting limit. The set of 12, exceptionally fine powder samples produced by the same laboratory was re-analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and results showed that these samples contained asbestos above the TEM reporting limit. However, the use of TEM as a stand-alone analytical procedure, usually performed at magnifications between 3,000 to 20,000X, also has its drawbacks because of the miniscule mass of sample that this method examines. The small amount of powder analyzed by TEM may not be representative of the field sample. The actual mass of the sample powder analyzed by PLM is about six orders of magnitude greater than that analyzed by TEM and, thus, more likely to be representative of the field sample. TEM results do not always match those of PLM from the same sample because TEM examines smaller fibers/particles than PLM, analyzes less subsample mass, and has results typically expressed in different units (e.g., percent by weight, visual estimate, or point count). Paired PLM and TEM analyses of field samples taken by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) illustrate this point. Processing quality control (QC) checks could be implemented to limit the number of artificial PLM non-detects. Example QC processing checks include properly calibrating processing equipment and periodic particle size analysis, such as dry sieving of the powdered samples. In addition, some government agencies use a combination of analytical techniques when analyzing for asbestos. For instance, the State of New York prescribes the use of PLM but requires TEM to verify non-detects by PLM for non-friable organically bound materials. Homogenization after sample pulverization is another appropriate processing element that should garner more attention. Homogenization equipment currently exist that, when used properly, could greatly improve the accuracy, precision, and representativeness of sample results.

  20. Are multiple parton interactions important at high energies? New types of hadrons production processes

    E-print Network

    V. A. Abramovsky

    2009-11-25

    Hadrons interaction at high energies is carried out by one color gluon exchange. All quarks and gluons contained in colliding hadrons take part in interaction and production of particles. The contribution of multiple parton interactions is negligible. Multiple hadrons production at high energies occurs only in three types of processes. The first process is hadrons production in gluon string, the second is hadrons production in two quark strings and the third is hadrons production in three quark strings. In proton-proton interaction production of only gluon string and two quark strings is possible. In proton-antiproton interaction production of gluon string, two quark strings and three quark strings is possible. Therefore multiplicity distributions in proton-proton and proton-antiproton interactions are different.

  1. The Importance of Non-Data Touching Processing Overheads in TCP\\/IP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Kay; Joseph Pasquale

    1993-01-01

    We present detailed measurements of various processing overheads of the TCP\\/IP and UDP\\/IP protocol stacks on a DECstation 5000\\/200 running the Ultrix 4.2a operating system. These overheads include data-touching operations, such as the checksum computation and data movement, which are well known to be major time consumers. In this study, we also considered overheads due to non-data touching operations, such

  2. Global Sensitivity Analysis for the determination of parameter importance in bio-manufacturing processes.

    PubMed

    Chhatre, Sunil; Francis, Richard; Newcombe, Anthony R; Zhou, Yuhong; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; King, Josh; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2008-10-01

    The present paper describes the application of GSA (Global Sensitivity Analysis) techniques to mathematical models of bioprocesses in order to rank inputs such as feed titres, flow rates and matrix capacities for the relative influence that each exerts upon outputs such as yield or throughput. GSA enables quantification of both the impact of individual variables on process outputs, as well as their interactions. These data highlight those attributes of a bioprocess which offer the greatest potential for achieving manufacturing improvements. Whereas previous GSA studies have been limited to individual unit operations, this paper extends the treatment to an entire downstream process and illustrates its utility by application to the production of a Fab-based rattlesnake antivenom called CroFab [(Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine); Protherics U.K. Limited]. Initially, hyperimmunized ovine serum containing rattlesnake antivenom IgG (product), other antibodies and albumin is applied to a synthetic affinity ligand adsorbent column to separate the antibodies from the albumin. The antibodies are papain-digested into Fab and Fc fragments, before concentration by ultrafiltration. Fc, residual IgG and albumin are eliminated by an ion-exchanger and then CroFab-specific affinity chromatography is used to produce purified antivenom. Application of GSA to the model of this process showed that product yield was controlled by IgG feed concentration and the synthetic-material affinity column's capacity and flow rate, whereas product throughput was predominantly influenced by the synthetic material's capacity, the ultrafiltration concentration factor and the CroFab affinity flow rate. Such information provides a rational basis for identifying the most promising strategies for delivering improvements to commercial-scale biomanufacturing processes. PMID:18205624

  3. Measuring student understanding of geological time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff Dodick; Nir Orion

    2003-01-01

    There have been few discoveries in geology more important than deep time - the understanding that the universe has existed for countless millennia, such that man's existence is confined to the last milliseconds of the metaphorical geological clock. The influence of deep time is felt in a variety of sciences including geology, cosmology, and evolutionary biology. Thus, any student that

  4. Measuring Student Understanding of Geological Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodick, Jeff; Orion, Nir

    2003-01-01

    There have been few discoveries in geology more important than "deep time"--the understanding that the universe has existed for countless millennia, such that man's existence is confined to the last milliseconds of the metaphorical geological clock. The influence of deep time is felt in a variety of sciences including geology, cosmology, and…

  5. Neuroimaging of developmental psychopathologies: the importance of self-regulatory and neuroplastic processes in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Spessot, Alexandra L; Plessen, Kerstin J; Peterson, Bradley S

    2004-06-01

    Normal brain maturational and developmental processes, together with plastic reorganization of the brain in response to experiential demands, contribute to the acquisition of improved capacities for self-regulation and impulse control during adolescence. The frontal lobe is a main focus for these developmental and plastic processes during the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Tourette syndrome (TS), defined as the chronic presence of motor and vocal tics, has been increasingly conceptualized as a disorder of impaired self-regulatory control. This disordered control is thought to give rise to semicompulsory urges to perform the movements that constitute simple tics, complex tics, or compulsions. Neuroimaging studies suggest that the expression of the genetic diathesis to TS is influenced by genetic and nongenetic factors affecting activity-dependent reorganization of neuroregulatory systems, thereby influencing the phenotype, illness severity, and adult outcome of tic disorders. Similar developmental processes during adolescence likely determine the phenotype and natural history of a broad range of other complex neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood onset, and they likely contribute to the acquisition of improved self-regulatory capacities that characterize normal adolescent development. PMID:15251878

  6. Structural Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, John; Frankel, Kurt L.

    2011-05-01

    Structural geology and continental tectonics were ushered in to the modern quantitative age of geosciences with the arrival of the global plate tectonics paradigm (circa 1968), derived using new data from the oceans' depths, and John Ramsay's 1967 seminal work, Folding and Fracturing of Rocks. Fossen is to be applauded for crafting a unique, high-caliber, and accessible undergraduate textbook on structural geology that faithfully reflects this advance and the subsequent evolution of the discipline. This well-written text draws on Fossen's wealth of professional experience, including his broad and diverse academic research and experience in the petroleum industry. This book is beautifully illustrated, with excellent original color diagrams and with impressive color field photographs that are all keyed to locations and placed into geologic context.

  7. pH influences the importance of niche-related and neutral processes in lacustrine bacterioplankton assembly.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lijuan; Jeppesen, Erik; He, Dan; Wang, Jianjun; Liboriussen, Lone; Xing, Peng; Wu, Qinglong L

    2015-05-01

    pH is an important factor that shapes the structure of bacterial communities. However, we have very limited information about the patterns and processes by which overall bacterioplankton communities assemble across wide pH gradients in natural freshwater lakes. Here, we used pyrosequencing to analyze the bacterioplankton communities in 25 discrete freshwater lakes in Denmark with pH levels ranging from 3.8 to 8.8. We found that pH was the key factor impacting lacustrine bacterioplankton community assembly. More acidic lakes imposed stronger environmental filtering, which decreased the richness and evenness of bacterioplankton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and largely shifted community composition. Although environmental filtering was determined to be the most important determinant of bacterioplankton community assembly, the importance of neutral assembly processes must also be considered, notably in acidic lakes, where the species (OTU) diversity was low. We observed that the strong effect of environmental filtering in more acidic lakes was weakened by the enhanced relative importance of neutral community assembly, and bacterioplankton communities tended to be less phylogenetically clustered in more acidic lakes. In summary, we propose that pH is a major environmental determinant in freshwater lakes, regulating the relative importance and interplay between niche-related and neutral processes and shaping the patterns of freshwater lake bacterioplankton biodiversity. PMID:25724952

  8. Zi-Wei Lin Oct 5, 2004 UAH / NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MS Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zi-wei

    Zi-Wei Lin Oct 5, 2004 UAH / NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MS Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations Why do we need to study? Conclusions Zi-Wei Lin University of Alabama in Huntsville/ NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MSFC #12

  9. Leeds Internship Programme Internships are an important part of the learning process for many of our students. Through

    E-print Network

    Haase, Markus

    Leeds Internship Programme Internships are an important part of the learning process for many of our students. Through Campaign funding for the Leeds Internship Programme, we will offer more of our the funds to pay for an internship. Equally, students who would be ideally suited to such an opportunity

  10. Grants.gov Submission Process for NIH Applications Important Points to Remember as You Prepare Your Application

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Grants.gov Submission Process for NIH Applications Important Points to Remember as You Prepare Your package, please leave any field or reference to a CFDA number blank; NIH will fill in this information Name." 4. When preparing your application, the NIH guidelines on font-size, font-type, and ˝ -inch

  11. Biological nitrogen fixation is a much more important process in the nitrogen cycle of the oceans than previously thought.

    E-print Network

    Capone, Douglas G.

    341 Biological nitrogen fixation is a much more important process in the nitrogen cycle of the oceans than previously thought. Further, nitrogen fixation may have an influence on the capacity of the oceans to sequester carbon. A greater diversity of marine nitrogen fixers has also been uncovered

  12. Importance of Translational Entropy of Water in Biological Self-Assembly Processes like Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    We briefly review our studies on the folding/unfolding mechanisms of proteins. In biological self-assembly processes such as protein folding, the number of accessible translational configurations of water in the system increases greatly, leading to a large gain in the water entropy. The usual view looking at only the water in the close vicinity of the protein surface is capable of elucidating neither the large entropic gain upon apoplastocyanin folding, which has recently been found in a novel experimental study, nor the pressure and cold denaturation. With the emphasis on the translational entropy of water, we are presently constructing a reliable method for predicting the native structure of a protein from its amino-acid sequence. PMID:19399238

  13. Changing human behavior to prevent disease: the importance of targeting automatic processes.

    PubMed

    Marteau, Theresa M; Hollands, Gareth J; Fletcher, Paul C

    2012-09-21

    Much of the global burden of disease is associated with behaviors--overeating, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity--that people recognize as health-harming and yet continue to engage in, even when undesired consequences emerge. To date, interventions aimed at changing such behaviors have largely encouraged people to reflect on their behaviors. These approaches are often ineffectual, which is in keeping with the observation that much human behavior is automatic, cued by environmental stimuli, resulting in actions that are largely unaccompanied by conscious reflection. We propose that interventions targeting these automatic bases of behaviors may be more effective. We discuss specific interventions and suggest ways to determine whether and how interventions that target automatic processes can enhance global efforts to prevent disease. PMID:22997327

  14. [The birthing ball: rediscovering a non pharmacological resource of great importance in the birth process].

    PubMed

    Luces Lago, Ana María; Mosquera Pan, Lucía; Tizón Bouza, Eva

    2014-03-01

    Advances occurred in recent years in obstetrics show that the free movement of the pelvis during labour decreases pain and facilitates the birth of the newborn. Nowadays, many techniques have effective non pharmacological relief in pain during labour. The birthing ball (BB) is one of them, closely linked to freedom of movement, the pelvic tilt and vertical feeding; it has shown a decrease in anxiety and pain during the birthing process and increased rate of normal deliveries. The BB does not replace other non-pharmacological techniques during the period of expansion, but can complement it, thereby improving their effectiveness. Not shown any harmful effects associated with the use of the BB both the mother and the newborn. As health professionals, we must know how to use and the benefits that are associated with the BB, to offer it as an effective method of pain relief in labour available to us. PMID:24851341

  15. [Nature and hygienic importance of industrial dust from the high-temperature processing of quartz].

    PubMed

    Lukanova, R; Duneva, G; Tsvetanova, T

    1987-01-01

    The study aims at assessing, according to the physiochemical indices for silicosogenicity of the dusts, the risk of industrial aerosols of condensed SiO2, entailing the production of quartz glass in plant "Lenin" - Sliven and of ferrosilicon in plant "Kremikovci". The evaluation is done according to the present norms for quartz in this country (State Gazette No. 61/1977), accepted temporary on the basis of foreign experiment and as norms for condensed SiO2. The quantitative determination of free SiO2 in dusts is performed after infrared spectrophotometric method. In most of the studied processes on both working places pollution above the norm is registered with total and fine dust and condensed SiO2. In order to specify the silicogenicity of the respective dusts a study is to be carried out according to biological indices. PMID:2831533

  16. Spray granulation: importance of process parameters on in vitro and in vivo behavior of dried nanosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Carlos E; Bose, Sonali

    2013-11-01

    The use of fluid bed granulation for drying of pharmaceutical nanoparticulates on micron-sized granule substrates is a relatively new technique, with limited understanding in the current literature of the effects of process parameters on the physical properties of the dried nanoparticle powders. This work evaluated the effects of spray mode, spray rate and atomizing pressure for spray granulation of drug nanosuspensions through a systematic study. Naproxen and a proprietary Novartis compound were converted into nanosuspensions through wet media milling and dried onto a mannitol based substrate using spray granulation. For naproxen, various physical properties of the granules, as well as the in vitro re-dispersion and dissolution characteristics of the nano-crystals, were measured. It was found that the spray mode had the most drastic effect, where top spray yielded smaller re-dispersed particle sizes and faster release rates of drug from granules than bottom spray. This was attributed to the co-current spraying in bottom spray resulting in denser, homogenous films on the substrate. Similar in vitro results were obtained for the proprietary molecule, Compound A. In vivo studies in beagle dogs with Compound A showed no significant difference between the liquid and the dried forms of the nanosuspension in terms of overall AUC, differences were observed in the tmax which correlated with the rank ordering observed from the in vitro dissolution profiles. These findings make spray granulation amenable to the production of powders with desired processing and handling properties, without compromising the overall exposure of the compound under investigation. PMID:23916460

  17. Geologic Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy Heaton

    This site contains 24 questions on the topic of geologic time, which covers dating techniques and unconformities. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit their answers and are provided immediate feedback.

  18. Effects of Rock Type and Geologic Process on the Structure and Evolution of Nano, Meso and Micro-Scale Porosity: A (U)SANS, SEM/BSE Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anovitz, L.; Wang, H.; Cole, D. R.; Rother, G.

    2012-12-01

    The microstructure and evolution of porosity in time and space play a critical role in many geologic processes, including the migration and retention of water, gas and hydrocarbons, the evolution of hydrothermal systems, weathering, diagenesis and metamorphism, as well as technological processes such as CO2 sequestration, shale gas and secondary oil recovery. The size, distribution and connectivity of these confined geometries collectively dictate how fluids migrate into and through these micro- and nanoenvironments, wet and react with mineral surfaces. (Ultra)small-angle neutron scattering and autocorrelations derived from SEM/BSE imaging provide a method of quantifying pore structures in a statistically significant manner from the nanometer to the centimeter scale. Data from this approach suggests that there are significant primary and evolutionary differences between the multiscale pore structures of carbonate and clastic rocks. Our work on the St. Peter sandstone shows total porosity correlates with changes in pores structure including pore size ratios, surface fractal dimensions, and lacunarity. There is no evidence of mass-fractal scattering and while previous scattering data from sandstones suggest scattering is dominated by surface fractal behavior over many orders of magnitude, our data show both fractal and pseudo-fractals. Larger pores fill at a faster rate than small pores as overgrowths form, leading to an increase in the small/large pore ratio. Overall, therefore, the relative importance of fluid reactions in confined geometries is likely to increase with increased silcrete formation. The changes observed with overgrowth formation in sandstones contrast with available data for metamorphism of chemical sediments (limestones) in both the Marble Canyon contact aureole, TX (Anovitz et al., 2009), and the Hatrurim Fm. (the Mottled Zone), Israel. The unmetamorphosed limestones both show distinct multifractal scattering patterns at larger scales, and true surface fractals at smaller scales. Total porosity increases with metamorphism, as does the surface area to volume ratio. The mass fractal dimension increases with metamorphic grade. In the Hatrurim the surface fractal dimension also increase suggesting that increases in pore mass density and formation of less branching pore networks are accompanied by a roughening of pore/grain interfaces. Ds changes are more complex at Marble Canyon, possibly due to hydrothermal processes. Pore evolution during combustion metamorphism is also characterized by reduced contributions from small-scale pores to the cumulative porosity in the high-grade rocks. The evolution of pore/grain microstructures may be correlated to the growth (nucleation) of high-temperature phases that preferentially close small pores, producing a rougher morphology with increasing temperature. The transition to a rough morphology may be a consequence of pore/grain surface free energies that are smaller than those that arise from heterogeneous phase contacts. Large-scale pores may also develop at the expense of small-scale pores. [1] Anovitz et al. (2009) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 73, 7303-7324. Research sponsored by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. The importance of local and landscape-scale processes to the occupancy of wetlands by pond-breeding amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scherer, Rick D.; Muths, Erin; Noon, Barry R.

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the distribution and abundance of species across landscapes has traditionally been attributed to processes operating at fine spatial scales (i.e., environmental conditions at the scale of the sampling unit), but processes that operate across larger spatial scales such as seasonal migration or dispersal are also important. To determine the relative importance of these processes, we evaluated hypothesized relationships between the probability of occupancy in wetlands by two amphibians [wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) and boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata)] and attributes of the landscape measured at three spatial scales in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. We used cost-based buffers and least-cost distances to derive estimates of landscape attributes that may affect occupancy patterns from the broader spatial scales. The most highly ranked models provide strong support for a positive relationship between occupancy by breeding wood frogs and the amount of streamside habitat adjacent to a wetland. The model selection results for boreal chorus frogs are highly uncertain, though several of the most highly ranked models indicate a positive association between occupancy and the number of neighboring, occupied wetlands. We found little evidence that occupancy of either species was correlated with local-scale attributes measured at the scale of individual wetlands, suggesting that processes operating at broader scales may be more important in influencing occupancy patterns in amphibian populations.

  20. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. ON THE IMPORTANCE OF PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND X-RAY IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Nomura, Hideko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri, E-mail: catherine.walsh@qub.ac.uk [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the impact of photochemistry and X-ray ionization on the molecular composition of, and ionization fraction in, a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. We use a sophisticated physical model, which includes a robust treatment of the radiative transfer of UV and X-ray radiation, and calculate the time-dependent chemical structure using a comprehensive chemical network. In previous work, we approximated the photochemistry and X-ray ionization; here, we recalculate the photoreaction rates using the explicit UV wavelength spectrum and wavelength-dependent reaction cross sections. We recalculate the X-ray ionization rate using our explicit elemental composition and X-ray energy spectrum. We find that photochemistry has a larger influence on the molecular composition than X-ray ionization. Observable molecules sensitive to the photorates include OH, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH. The only molecule significantly affected by the X-ray ionization is N{sub 2}H{sup +}, indicating that it is safe to adopt existing approximations of the X-ray ionization rate in typical T Tauri star-disk systems. The recalculation of the photorates increases the abundances of neutral molecules in the outer disk, highlighting the importance of taking into account the shape of the UV spectrum in protoplanetary disks. A recalculation of the photoreaction rates also affects the gas-phase chemistry due to the adjustment of the H/H{sub 2} and C{sup +}/C ratios. The disk ionization fraction is not significantly affected by the methods adopted to calculate the photochemistry and X-ray ionization. We determine that there is a probable 'dead zone' where accretion is suppressed, present in a layer, Z/R {approx}< 0.1-0.2, in the disk midplane, within R Almost-Equal-To 200 AU.

  1. Proteomic analysis of renal calculi indicates an important role for inflammatory processes in calcium stone formation.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Michael L; Cummins, Timothy D; Wilkey, Daniel W; Salyer, Sarah A; Powell, David W; Klein, Jon B; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2008-10-01

    Even though renal stones/calculi occur in approximately 10% of individuals, they are an enormous economic burden to the entire US health system. While the relative metabolic composition of renal calculi is generally known, there is no clear understanding of the genetics of renal stone formation, nor are there clear prognostic indicators of renal stone formation. The application of proteomics to the analysis of renal calculi axiomatically holds that insight into renal stone pathobiology can be gained by a more comprehensive understanding of renal calculus protein composition. We analyzed isolated renal stone matrix proteins with mass spectrometric and immunohistochemical methods identifying 158 proteins with high confidence, including 28 common proteins. The abundant proteins included those identified previously in stones and proteins identified here for the first time, such as myeloid lineage-specific, integral membrane and lipid regulatory proteins. Pathway analyses of all proteins identified suggested that a significant fraction of the most abundant matrix proteins participate in inflammatory processes. These proteomic results support the hypothesis that stone formation induces a cellular inflammatory response and the protein components of this response contribute to the abundant stone matrix proteome. PMID:18701630

  2. Importance of resist transparency and development rate control in via-first dual damascene processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, Seiji; Fujimoto, Masashi; Yamana, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Takeo

    2002-07-01

    We have investigated the requirements for resist materials in via-first dual damascene copper processes. We first patterned vias on a dielectric stack, and then, after via etching and stripping, we formed metal trench patterns using KrF/ArF lithography. A bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) was used to fill the vias prior to the resist coating in order to protect the bottom of the vias during the trench etching. Trench patterns were formed on the BARC using chemically amplified resists. We found that resists with lower transparency and a lower maximum development rate (Rmax) were not developed in the vias on the partially filled BARC. When the trench patterns were etched with resist residue in the vias, severe fence defects were observed around the via openings at the bottom of the trenches. These defects cannot be removed by dry or wet stripping. Complete removal of the resists in the vias prevented the formation of fences. Simulation of the resist profile showed the use of resists with high transparency and a high Rmax prevented the accumulation of resist residue in the vias. A KrF resist formulated with higher transparency and a higher Rmax was completely developed even in the vias, so that trench patterns without the fences were formed after trench etching.

  3. The Emerging Medical and Geological Association

    PubMed Central

    Finkelman, Robert B; Centeno, Jose A; Selinus, Olle

    2005-01-01

    The impact on human health by natural materials such as water, rocks, and minerals has been known for thousands of years but there have been few systematic, multidisciplinary studies on the relationship between geologic materials and processes and human health (the field of study commonly referred to as medical geology). In the past few years, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in medical geology. Geoscientists working with medical researchers and public health scientists have made important contributions to understanding novel exposure pathways and causes of a wide range of environmental health problems such as: exposure to toxic levels of trace essential and non-essential elements such as arsenic and mercury; trace element deficiencies; exposure to natural dusts and to radioactivity; naturally occurring organic compounds in drinking water; volcanic emissions, etc. By linking with biomedical/public health researchers geoscientists are finally taking advantage of this age-old opportunity to help mitigate environmental health problems. The International Medical Geology Association has recently been formed to support this effort. PMID:16555612

  4. Teaching Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The study of geology at the University of Colorado has a long and distinguished history, and in recent years they have also become increasingly interested in providing online teaching resources in the field. Educators will be glad to learn about this site's existence, as they can scroll through a list of interactive demonstrations that can be utilized in the classroom. Specifically, these demonstrations include a shaded interactive topographical map of the western United States, a magnetic field of the Earth, and several animated maps of various National Park sites. The site comes to a compelling conclusion with the inclusion of the geology department's slide library, which can be used without a password or registration.

  5. Physical Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stephen Nelson

    This Tulane University course covers the nature of the Earth, the development of its surficial features, and the results of the interaction of chemical, physical, and biological factors on the planet. Lecture notes are about energy and minerals; igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks; weathering and soils; geologic time; mass wasting; streams; groundwater; wind action and deserts; oceans; deformation of rock; earthquakes and the interior of the Earth; global tectonics; planetary changes; and glaciers.

  6. Influence of introgression and geological processes on phylogenetic relationships of Western North American mountain suckers (Pantosteus, Catostomidae).

    PubMed

    Unmack, Peter J; Dowling, Thomas E; Laitinen, Nina J; Secor, Carol L; Mayden, Richard L; Shiozawa, Dennis K; Smith, Gerald R

    2014-01-01

    Intense geological activity caused major topographic changes in Western North America over the past 15 million years. Major rivers here are composites of different ancient rivers, resulting in isolation and mixing episodes between river basins over time. This history influenced the diversification of most of the aquatic fauna. The genus Pantosteus is one of several clades centered in this tectonically active region. The eight recognized Pantosteus species are widespread and common across southwestern Canada, western USA and into northern Mexico. They are typically found in medium gradient, middle-elevation reaches of rivers over rocky substrates. This study (1) compares molecular data with morphological and paleontological data for proposed species of Pantosteus, (2) tests hypotheses of their monophyly, (3) uses these data for phylogenetic inferences of sister-group relationships, and (4) estimates timing of divergence events of identified lineages. Using 8055 base pairs from mitochondrial DNA protein coding genes, Pantosteus and Catostomus are reciprocally monophyletic, in contrast with morphological data. The only exception to a monophyletic Pantosteus is P. columbianus whose mtDNA is closely aligned with C. tahoensis because of introgression. Within Pantosteus, several species have deep genetic divergences among allopatric sister lineages, several of which are diagnosed and elevated to species, bringing the total diversity in the group to 11 species. Conflicting molecular and morphological data may be resolved when patterns of divergence are shown to be correlated with sympatry and evidence of introgression. PMID:24619087

  7. Influence of Introgression and Geological Processes on Phylogenetic Relationships of Western North American Mountain Suckers (Pantosteus, Catostomidae)

    PubMed Central

    Unmack, Peter J.; Dowling, Thomas E.; Laitinen, Nina J.; Secor, Carol L.; Mayden, Richard L.; Shiozawa, Dennis K.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Intense geological activity caused major topographic changes in Western North America over the past 15 million years. Major rivers here are composites of different ancient rivers, resulting in isolation and mixing episodes between river basins over time. This history influenced the diversification of most of the aquatic fauna. The genus Pantosteus is one of several clades centered in this tectonically active region. The eight recognized Pantosteus species are widespread and common across southwestern Canada, western USA and into northern Mexico. They are typically found in medium gradient, middle-elevation reaches of rivers over rocky substrates. This study (1) compares molecular data with morphological and paleontological data for proposed species of Pantosteus, (2) tests hypotheses of their monophyly, (3) uses these data for phylogenetic inferences of sister-group relationships, and (4) estimates timing of divergence events of identified lineages. Using 8055 base pairs from mitochondrial DNA protein coding genes, Pantosteus and Catostomus are reciprocally monophyletic, in contrast with morphological data. The only exception to a monophyletic Pantosteus is P. columbianus whose mtDNA is closely aligned with C. tahoensis because of introgression. Within Pantosteus, several species have deep genetic divergences among allopatric sister lineages, several of which are diagnosed and elevated to species, bringing the total diversity in the group to 11 species. Conflicting molecular and morphological data may be resolved when patterns of divergence are shown to be correlated with sympatry and evidence of introgression. PMID:24619087

  8. Chip-off-the-old-rock: the study of reservoir-relevant geological processes with real-rock micromodels.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; de Haas, Thomas W; Fadaei, Hossein; Sinton, David

    2014-11-21

    We present a real-rock micromodel approach whereby microfluidic channels are fabricated in a naturally occurring mineral substrate. The method is applied to quantify calcite dissolution which is relevant to oil/gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, and wastewater disposal in carbonate formations - ubiquitous worldwide. The key advantage of this method is the inclusion of both the relevant substrate chemistry (not possible with conventional microfluidics) and real-time pore-scale resolution (not possible with core samples). Here, microchannels are etched into a natural calcite crystal and sealed with a glass slide. The approach is applied to study acidified brine flow through a single channel and a two-dimensional micromodel. The single-channel case conforms roughly to a 1-D analytical description, with crystal orientation influencing the local dissolution rate an additional 25%. The two-dimensional experiments show highly flow-directed dissolution and associated positive feedback wherein acid preferentially invades high conductivity flow paths, resulting in higher dissolution rates ('wormholing'). These experiments demonstrate and validate the approach of microfabricating fluid structures within natural minerals for transport and geochemical studies. More broadly, real-rock microfluidics open the door to a vast array of lab-on-a-chip opportunities in geology, reservoir engineering, and earth sciences. PMID:25236399

  9. A Comparison of Multivariate and Pre-Processing Methods for Quantitative Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Geologic Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Morris, R. V.; Clegg, S. M.; Bell, J. F., III; Humphries, S. D.; Wiens, R. C.

    2011-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument selected for the Curiosity rover is capable of remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).[1] We used a remote LIBS instrument similar to ChemCam to analyze 197 geologic slab samples and 32 pressed-powder geostandards. The slab samples are well-characterized and have been used to validate the calibration of previous instruments on Mars missions, including CRISM [2], OMEGA [3], the MER Pancam [4], Mini-TES [5], and Moessbauer [6] instruments and the Phoenix SSI [7]. The resulting dataset was used to compare multivariate methods for quantitative LIBS and to determine the effect of grain size on calculations. Three multivariate methods - partial least squares (PLS), multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks (MLP ANNs) and cascade correlation (CC) ANNs - were used to generate models and extract the quantitative composition of unknown samples. PLS can be used to predict one element (PLS1) or multiple elements (PLS2) at a time, as can the neural network methods. Although MLP and CC ANNs were successful in some cases, PLS generally produced the most accurate and precise results.

  10. The importance of ergonomics in the design conceptual process: Daciano da Costa - a case study on practicing and teaching.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ana Moreira

    2012-01-01

    This paper, which stems from a developing research project, aims to disseminate among the international scientific community the thought of Daciano da Costa (1930-2005) given the importance he conferred to Ergonomics, throughout his teaching career and his professional practice as a reference figure in the Design of the twentieth century in Portugal. We focus on the important role played by Ergonomics within the conceptual Design process, through the case study Daciano da Costa.What Daciano brought to the practice and teaching was a modernization of processes, a new perspective on the emerging themes of design, like ergonomics. Daciano believed that designing was providing a service. This task was understood as the building of a relationship with users. One of his distinguished features was the particular attention he paid to the unique aspects of the scale of proximity: the scale of the hand, of the immediate gesture, of the body. As a professor he insisted not so much on the end product, but rather on the recognition of the research process and how it was conducted. When designing, developing and supervising the exercises he set, ergonomic factors were one of his main concerns. PMID:22317615

  11. Results from an International Simulation Study on Coupled Thermal,Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes near Geological NuclearWaste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Barr, D.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Chijimatsu, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liu, Q.-S; Oda, Y.; Wang, W.; Zhang, C.-Y.

    2007-10-23

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near waste emplacement drifts of geological nuclear waste repositories. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower postclosure temperatures, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses is currently being resolved. In particular, good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglected complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level.

  12. Geologic Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Classroom Connectors lesson plan discusses the characteristics of geologic time, including the law of superposition, fossil preservation, casts and molds, and various events through the history of the Earth. The site provides goals, objectives, an outline, time required, materials, activities, and closure ideas for the lesson. The Classroom Connectors address content with an activity approach while incorporating themes necessary to raise the activity to a higher cognition level. The major motivation is to employ instructional strategies that bring the students physically and mentally into touch with the science they are studying.

  13. On the relative importance of magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during substorm onset and expansion: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.

    1992-01-01

    The question of whether substorm onset is triggered in the magnetotail or the ionosphere is presented. The possible influence of the ionosphere in the subsequent development of a substorm is discussed. Theoretical considerations involved are reviewed and a case study to address this question is examined. The evidence indicates that magnetotail processes initiate the sequence of events called a substorm, while the ionosphere appears to play a critical role in the subsequent evolution of the substorm expansion phase. However, the necessary observations, in particular high time resolution coordinated observations in the ionosphere and magnetotail are relatively rare. Continued examination of existing ground and space based data sets, in particular underutilized observations such as the Scatha data, may provide a more solid foundation for clarifying this issue and determining the relative importance of magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during substorms.

  14. Briquetting of coal with roller processes. An important technology for the production of coal based compliance fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, I.W. [Koppern Equipment, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This will be the third of a series of papers at this Conference discussing the briquetting of coal. While the first presentation in 1993 covered the historical and technical fundamentals, equipment designs, as well as traditional and contemporary applications, the second paper in 1994 looked at briquetting as an upgrading process for different types of coal. This years Conference theme is: {open_quotes}1995 - The year of Compliance{close_quotes}. Therefore, the paper will show that briquetting plays an important, often critical role in the production of coal based compliance fuel. After summarizing present clean coal technologies and the characteristics of coal based compliance fuels resulting from such processes the beneficial and economical application of modem roller presses is being dismissed.

  15. Subject: Office of the University Registrar: Important things to do in June June marks the beginning of a number of important processes for both new and returning students!

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Randy

    welcome from us to all new undergraduate students! If you are planning to live in residence, be sure in June. Follow us on Twitter here to receive timely reminders! The Office of the University RegistrarSubject: Office of the University Registrar: Important things to do in June June marks

  16. Precise determination of ?88Sr in rocks, minerals, and waters by double-spike TIMS: A powerful tool in the study of chemical, geologic, hydrologic and biologic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Premo, Wayne R.; Mel'nikov, Nikolay N.; Emsbo, Poul

    2014-01-01

    We present strontium isotopic (88Sr/86Sr and 87Sr/86Sr) results obtained by 87Sr–84Sr double spike thermal ionization mass-spectrometry (DS-TIMS) for several standards as well as natural water samples and mineral samples of abiogenic and biogenic origin. The detailed data reduction algorithm and a user-friendly Sr-specific stand-alone computer program used for the spike calibration and the data reduction are also presented. Accuracy and precision of our ?88Sr measurements, calculated as permil (‰) deviations from the NIST SRM-987 standard, were evaluated by analyzing the NASS-6 seawater standard, which yielded ?88Sr = 0.378 ± 0.009‰. The first DS-TIMS data for the NIST SRM-607 potassium feldspar standard and for several US Geological Survey carbonate, phosphate, and silicate standards (EN-1, MAPS-4, MAPS-5, G-3, BCR-2, and BHVO-2) are also reported. Data obtained during this work for Sr-bearing solids and natural waters show a range of ?88Sr values of about 2.4‰, the widest observed so far in terrestrial materials. This range is easily resolvable analytically because the demonstrated external error (±SD, standard deviation) for measured ?88Sr values is typically ?0.02‰. It is shown that the “true” 87Sr/86Sr value obtained by the DS-TIMS or any other external normalization method combines radiogenic and mass-dependent mass-fractionation effects, which cannot be separated. Therefore, the “true” 87Sr/86Sr and the ?87Sr parameter derived from it are not useful isotope tracers. Data presented in this paper for a wide range of naturally occurring sample types demonstrate the potential of the ?88Sr isotope tracer in combination with the traditional radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr tracer for studying a variety of biological, hydrological, and geological processes.

  17. Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin

    2010-03-01

    Although many geological processes take place on time scales that are very long compared with the human experience, essentially all geological processes, fast or slow, are far from equilibrium processes. Surprisingly often, geological processes lead to the formation of quite simple and distinctive patterns, which hint at an underlying simplicity in many complex geological systems.. The ability to predict the seasons was critically important to early human society, and Halley’s prediction of the return of the comet that bears his name is still considered to be a scientific milestone. Spatial patterns have also attracted attention because of their aesthetic appeal, which depends in subtle ways on a combination of regularity and irregularity. In recent decades, rapid growth in the capabilities of digital computers has facilitated the simulation of pattern formation processes, and computer simulations have become an important tool for evaluating theoretical concepts and for scientific discovery. Computer technology in combination with other technologies such as high resolution digital cameras, scanning microprobes (atomic force microscopy AFM), confocal microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), for example) has facilitated the quantitative characterization of patterns over a wide range of scales and has enabled rapid advances in our ability to understand the links between large scale pattern formation and microscopic processes. The ability to quantitatively characterize patterns is important because it enables a more rigorous comparison between the predictions of computer models and real world patterns and their formation.In some cases, the idea that patterns with a high degree of regularity have simple origins appears to be justified, but in other cases, such as the formation of almost perfectly circular stone rings due to freeze-thaw cycles simple patterns appear to be the consequence of quite complex processes. In other cases, it has been shown that very simple non-linear processes can lead to extremely complicated patterns, and that some apparently complex disordered systems can be described quantitatively in terms of simple fractal models.

  18. An evaluation of the ERTS data collection system as a potential operational tool. [automatic hydrologic data collection and processing system for geological surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Earth Resources Technology Satellite Data Collection System has been shown to be, from the users vantage point, a reliable and simple system for collecting data from U.S. Geological Survey operational field instrumentation. It is technically feasible to expand the ERTS system into an operational polar-orbiting data collection system to gather data from the Geological Survey's Hydrologic Data Network. This could permit more efficient internal management of the Network, and could enable the Geological Survey to make data available to cooperating agencies in near-real time. The Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of the costs and benefits of satellite data-relay systems.

  19. The Geologic History of the Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundquist, E. T.; Visser, K.

    2003-12-01

    Geologists, like other scientists, tend to view the global carbon cycle through the lens of their particular training and experience. The study of Earth's history requires a view both humbled by the knowledge of past global transformations and emboldened by the imagination of details not seen in the fragments of the rock record. In studying the past behavior of the carbon cycle, geologists are both amazed by unexpected discoveries and reassured by the extent to which "the present is the key to the past." Understanding the present-day carbon cycle has become a matter of societal urgency because of concerns about the effects of human activities on atmospheric chemistry and global climate. This public limelight has had far-reaching consequences for research on the geologic history of the carbon cycle as well as for studies of its present and future. The burgeoning new "interdiscipline" of biogeochemistry claims among its adherents many geologists as well as biologists, chemists, and other scientists. The pace of discovery demands that studies of the geologic history of the carbon cycle cannot be isolated from the context of present and future events.This chapter describes the behavior of the carbon cycle prior to human influence. It describes events and processes that extend back through geologic time and include the exchange of carbon between the Earth's surface and the long-term reservoirs in the lithosphere. Chapter 8.10 emphasizes carbon exchanges that are important over years to decades, with a focus on relatively recent human influences and prospects for change during the coming century. Chapter 4.03 presents an overview of the biogeochemistry of methane, again with emphasis on relatively recent events. In these chapters as well as in the present chapter, relationships between the carbon cycle and global climate are a central concern. Together, these chapters provide an overview of how our knowledge of the present-day carbon cycle can be applied both to contemporary issues and to the record of the past. Similarly, these chapters collectively reflect the collaborative efforts of biogeochemists to utilize information about past variations in the carbon cycle to understand both Earth's history and modern changes.This chapter begins with an overview of the carbon exchanges and processes that control the variations observed in the geologic record of the carbon cycle. Then examples of past carbon-cycle change are described, beginning with the most recent variations seen in cores drilled from glaciers and the sea floor, and concluding with the distant transformations inferred from the rock record of the Precambrian. Throughout this treatment, three themes are prominent. One is that different processes control carbon cycling over different timescales. A second theme is that relatively "abrupt" changes have played a central role in the evolution of the carbon cycle throughout Earth's history. The third theme is that the geologic cycling of carbon over all timescales passes through the atmosphere and the hydrosphere, and "it is this common course that unites the entire carbon cycle and allows even its most remote constituents to influence our environment and biosphere" (Des Marais, 2001).The description of geologic events in this chapter includes examples from a broad span of the geologic record, but does not distribute attention in proportion to the distribution of geologic time in Earth's history. Readers will note, in particular, a disproportional emphasis on the Quaternary period, the most recent but briefest of geologic periods. The reason for this emphasis is twofold. First, the quality of the available Quaternary record of carbon-cycle change is far better than that available for earlier geologic periods. Second, the Quaternary record reveals a particularly illuminating array of details about interactions among the atmosphere, the biosphere, and the hydrosphere - the subset of the carbon cycle that must be understood in order to comprehend carbon cycling over nearly all times and t

  20. Illinois State Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) homepage provides information on geologic mapping, earthquakes, fossils, groundwater, wetlands, glacial geology, bedrock geology, and Lake Michigan geology. Educational materials include field trip guides, short publications on Illinois geology for students and teachers, online tours, single-page maps, and a geologic column. Other materials include databases and collections of GIS data, well records, drill cores, and mining information; a bibliography of Illinois geology; online maps and data; and information on water and land use, resource development, and geologic hazards.

  1. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

  2. Geological Time Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This document describes how geologic time is approached in discussions of geologic topics. The uses of relative time and absolute time are compared, and a geologic time scale is provided to represent both concepts. References are provided.

  3. Geologic Technician New Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Stanley E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a developing two-year geologic technician program at Bakersfield College in which a student may major in five areas - geologic drafting, land and legal, geologic assistant, engineering or paleontology. (RR)

  4. Geology of the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Edgar, N.T.; Scanlon, K.M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1987-01-01

    The Venezuelan and Colombian basins are located on the Caribbean Plate whilst the Yucatan basin is on the North American Plate. The processes occurring at the boundaries between the Caribbean Plate and the adjacent North American, South American and Cocos Plates, and the resulting surface features and patterns of volcanic and earthquake activity are described. Most of the Caribbean area is floored by atypical oceanic crust and its most valuable main geologic resources identified so far are petroleum, together with sand and gravel. Geological research is being carried out with techniques for broad-range swath imaging of the seafloor, such as GLORIA, and for directly measuring the movement between plates. -J.G.Harvey

  5. Thermal Conduction - A Tool for Exploring Geological Processes on the Earth and Other Bodies in our Solar System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eric Grosfils

    Thermal conduction is a fundamental physical process, one which controls many aspects of the volcanic and tectonic evolution of bodies within our solar system. Using transmission of thermal energy through the crust of the Earth as an initial, physically intuitive conceptual model, the module's background material will (a) help students deduce the thermal conduction equation-a second order differential which can be constructed from first principles, (b) evaluate volume-adjusted conduction incorporating internal heat generation and temperature change, and (c) explore special forms of the equation such as steady state conduction and thermal diffusion.

  6. Geology of Wisconsin

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Steven Dutch

    1997-09-10

    This site contains geologic maps of Wisconsin including relief and topography maps; maps of the bedrock geology and elevation, Pleistocene geology, thickness of unconsolidated deposits, and soils; and atlases of geologic history. There is information on: rock types, Paleozoic formations, and the Pleistocene and Precambrian history of Wisconsin; how to obtain a geologic map of personal property; the Niagara Escarpment; castellated mounds; geologic field localities; and unusual weather events in Wisconsin. There is also a data table on earthquakes in Wisconsin.

  7. Geologic Mapping on Mars

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Germari De Villiers

    This lab is part of a Lunar and Planetary Geology course offered to both geology and non-geology majors, and it involves basic geological mapping of an area within the Tyrrhena Patera region on Mars. Students are encouraged to work in groups to prepare a geological map from a photomosaic map and to interpret the geologic stratigraphy from a geological map of the greater area. This activity reinforces mapping skills as well as group work skills, and aims to teach students more about Martian stratigraphy and geology through a hands-on activity.

  8. Opening the mind to close it: considering a message in light of important values increases message processing and later resistance to change.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Kevin L; Wegener, Duane T

    2008-02-01

    Past research showed that considering a persuasive message in light of important rather than unimportant values creates attitudes that resist later attack. The traditional explanation is that the attitudes come to express the value or that a cognitive link between the value and attitude enhances resistance. However, the current research showed that another explanation is plausible. Similar to other sources of involvement, considering important rather than unimportant values increases processing of the message considered in light of those values. This occurs when the values are identified as normatively high or low in importance and when the perceived importance differs across participants for the same values. The increase in processing creates resistance to later attacks, and unlike past research, individual-level measures of initial amount of processing mediate value importance effects on later resistance to change. Important values motivate processing because they increase personal involvement with the issue, rather than creating attitudes that represent or express core values. PMID:18211172

  9. Old Geology and New Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 May 2003

    Mangala Vallis one of the large outflow channels that channeled large quantities of water into the northern lowlands, long ago on geological timescales. This valley is one of the few in the southern hemisphere, as well as one of the few west of the Tharsis bulge. A closer look at the channel shows more recent weathering of the old water channel: the walls of the channel show small, dark slope streaks that form in dusty areas; and much of the surrounding terrain has subtle linear markings trending from the upper left to the lower right, which are probably features sculpted and streamlined by the wind. Geology still shapes the surface of Mars today, but its methods over the eons have changed.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6, Longitude 209.6 East (150.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Identifying and quantifying natural CO2 sequestration processes over geological timescales: The Jackson Dome CO2 Deposit, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng; Ballentine, Chris J.; Schoell, Martin; Stevens, Scott H.

    2012-06-01

    CO2 sources, sinks and migration mechanisms in natural CO2 gas fields provide critical analogues for developing the safe application of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration technologies. Here we use noble gas and carbon isotopes, together with other gases, to identify and quantify the origin, transport and trapping mechanisms of CO2 in the Late Cretaceous Jackson Dome CO2 gas deposit (98.75% to 99.38% CO2). Located in central Mississippi, USA, and producing from >5000 m, it is one of the deepest commercial CO2 gas fields in the world. 10 gas samples from producing wells were determined for their noble gas, chemical and stable carbon isotope composition. 3He/4He ratios range between 4.27Ra and 5.01Ra (where Ra is the atmospheric value of 1.4 × 10-6), indicating a strong mantle signature. Similar to CO2 deposits worldwide, CO2/3He decreases with increasing groundwater-derived 20Ne (and 4He). We model several different processes that could account for the Jackson Dome data, and conclude that, similar to other CO2 dominated deposits, a Groundwater Gas Stripping and Re-dissolution (GGS-R) process best accounts for observed 20Ne/36Ar, 84Kr/36Ar, CO2/3He, ?13C(CO2), 4He, 20Ne and 36Ar. In this context, crustal and magmatic CO2 components contribute 57% and 43%, respectively. Changes in CO2/3He across the field show that groundwater contact is responsible for up to 75% loss of original emplaced CO2. ?13C(CO2) variance limits the degree of precipitation to be less than 27%, with the remaining CO2 loss being accounted for by dissolution only. A higher degree of dissolution gas loss and evidence for water contact at the reservoir crest compared to the reservoir flanks is used to argue that CO2 in this system has not undergone subsequent loss to either dissolution or precipitation since shortly after reservoir filling at over 60 Ma.

  11. Colorado Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) is an agency of state government within the Department of Natural Resources whose mission is to help reduce the impact of geologic hazards on the citizens of Colorado, to promote the responsible economic development of mineral and mineral fuel resources, to provide geologic insight into water resources, and to provide geologic advice and information to a variety of constituencies. This site contains extensive information about Colorado geology such as maps, a geologic time scale for the state, program information, and state field trip information. This site hosts the Avalanche Information Center which contains avalanche forecasting and education center details. Publications report on geologic hazards, land use, environmental geology, mineral resources, oil, gas, coal, geologic mapping and earthquake information for the state. There are online editions of RockTalk, which is a quarterly newsletter published by the Colorado Geological Survey dealing with all aspects of geology throughout the state of Colorado. Links are provided for more resources.

  12. Geological characteristics and ore-forming process of the gold deposits in the western Qinling region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajun; Liu, Chonghao; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Li, Yujie; Mao, Zhihao; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Yinhong; Zhang, Jing; Zhai, Degao; Zhang, Huafeng; Shan, Liang; Zhu, Laimin; Lu, Rukui

    2015-05-01

    The western Qinling, belonging to the western part of the Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogen between the North China Block and South China Block, is one of the most important gold regions in China. Isotopic dates suggest that the Mesozoic granitoids in the western Qinling region emplaced during the Middle-Late Triassic, and the deposits formed during the Late Triassic. Almost all gold deposits in the western Qinling region are classified as orogenic, Carlin-type, and Carlin-like gold deposits, and they are the products of Qinling Orogenesis caused by the final collision between the North China Block and the South China Block. The early subduction of the Mian-Lue oceanic crust and the latter collision between South Qinling Terrane and the South China Block along the Mian-Lue suture generated lithosphere-scale thermal anomalies to drive orogen-scale hydrothermal systems. The collision-related magmatism also provided heat source for regional ore-forming fluids in the Carlin-like gold deposits. Orogenic gold deposits such as Huachanggou, Liziyuan, and Baguamiao lie between the Shang-Dan and Mian-Lue sutures and are confined to WNW-trending brittle-ductile shear zones in Devonian and Carboniferous greenschist-facies metasedimentary rocks that were highly-deformed and regionally-metamorphosed. These deposits are typical orogenic gold deposits and formed within a Late Triassic age. The deposits show a close relationship between Au and Ag. Ores contain mainly microscopic gold, and minor electrum and visible gold, along with pyrite. The ore-forming fluids were main metamorphic fluids. Intensive tectonic movements caused by orogenesis created fluid-migrating channels for precipitation locations. Although some orogenic gold deposits occur adjacent to granitoids, mineralization is not synchronous with magmatism; that is, the granitoids have no genetic relations to orogenic gold deposits. As ore-forming fluids converged into dilated fractures during the extension stage of orogenesis, changes of physico-chemical conditions resulted in fluid immiscibility that played a key role in gold and sulfide deposition. The geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Carlin-type deposits in the western Qinling region are similar to those in the Carlin trend, Nevada, USA. Gold deposits such as La'erma and Jinlongshan occur mostly in the southeastern margin of the western Qinling regionic region whereas some deposits occur in its eastern part. These deposits are hosted in slightly metamorphosed Cambrian to Triassic sedimentary rocks, showing structurally- and stratigraphically-controlled features. The deposits mainly contain submicroscopic and microscopic gold in arsenian pyrite and arsenopyrite, with characteristic ore-forming elements of Au-As-Sb-Ba. The ore-forming fluids are early-stocked formation water and later-recharged meteoric water. Meteoric water apparently evolved in ore-forming fluids by circulation, indicating the extensional setting, and led to the deposition of Au and other elements in cool reactive permeable rocks at shallow levels, forming the disseminated ores. Carlin-like gold deposits occur between the Shang-Dan suture and the Fengxian-Zhen'an fault. The host rocks are mainly sedimentary rocks that underwent reconstruction through reworking by structural metamorphism. These deposits are structurally controlled by brittle-ductile shear zone and occur adjacent to granitoid plutons. The most important characteristic that differ to the orogenic and Carlin-type gold deposits is the genetic relationship with the synchronous magmatism. Gold occurs mainly as microscopic gold. Pyrite and arsenian pyrite can be recognized as gold-bearing minerals. The ore-forming fluids are main magmatic water mixed with metamorphic and/or formation water. Similar to orogenic gold deposits, fluid immiscibility caused the deposition of gold Carlin-like gold deposits.

  13. Geological assessing of urban environments with a systematic mapping survey: The 1:5000 urban geological map of Catalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilŕ, Miquel; Pi, Roser; Cirés, Jordi; de Paz, Ana; Berástegui, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    The ground features of urban areas and the geologic processes that operate on them are, in general, strongly altered from their natural original condition as a result of anthropogenic activities. Assessing the stability of the ground, the flooding areas, and, the health risk as a consequence of soil pollution, are, among others, fundamental topics of urban areas that require a better understanding. The development of systematic urban geological mapping projects provides valuable resources to address these issues. Since 2007, the Institut Geologic de Catalunya (IGC) runs an urban geological mapping project, to provide accurate geologic information of county capitals and towns of more than 10000 inhabitants of Catalonia. The urban zones of 131 towns will be surveyed for this project, totalizing an area of about 2200 km2 to be mapped in 15 years. According to the 2008 census, the 82 % of the population of Catalonia (7.242.458 inhabitants) lives in the areas to be mapped in this project. The mapping project integrates in a GIS environment the following subjects: - Data from pre-existing geotechnical reports, historical geological and topographical maps and, from historical aerial photographs. - Data from available borehole databases. - Geological characterization of outcrops inside the urban network and neighbouring areas. - Geological, chemical and physical characterisation of representative rocks, sediments and soils. - Ortophotographs (0.5 m pixel size) and digital elevation models (5 meter grid size) made from historical aerial photographs, to depict land use changes, artificial deposits and geomorphological elements that are either hidden or destroyed by urban sprawl. - Detailed geological mapping of quaternary sediments, subsurface bedrock and artificial deposits. - Data from subsurface prospection in areas with insufficient or confuse data. - 3D modelling of the main geological surfaces such as the top of the pre-quaternary basement. All the gathered data is harmonised and stored it in a database. The analysis of the database allows to compile and print the 1:5000 scale urban geological map according to the 1:5000 topographic grid of Catalonia. The map is composed by a principal map, geologic cross sections and several complementary maps, charts and tables. Regardless of the geological map units, the principal map also includes the main artificial deposits (such as infilled river valleys and road embankments), very recent or current superficial deposits, contours of outcropping areas, structural data and other relevant information gathered in stations, sampling points, boreholes indicating the thickness of artificial deposits and the depth of the pre-quaternary basement, contour lines of the top of the pre-quaternary basement surface and, water level data. The complementary maps and charts may change depending on the gathered data, the geological features of the area and the urban typology. However, the most representative complementary maps that includes the printed urban map are the quaternary subsurface bedrock map and the isopach map of thickness of quaternary and anthropogenic deposits. The map also includes charts and tables of relevant physical and chemical parameters of the geological materials, harmonised downhole lithological columns from selected boreholes, and, photographs and figures illustrating the geology of the mapped area and how urbanisation has changed the natural environment. The object of this systematic urban mapping survey is to provide a robust database to be used in targeted studies related to urban planning, geoengineering works, soil pollution and other important environmental issues that society should deal in the future.

  14. Beyond the Förster theory of excitation energy transfer: importance of higher-order processes in supramolecular antenna systems.

    PubMed

    May, Volkhard

    2009-12-01

    Electronic excitation energy transfer in molecular systems is connected with the de-excitation of one molecule and the excitation of the other. Mostly, it can be understood in terms of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer. An increasing interest in the optimization of artificial light harvesting systems, however, requires a more detailed study going beyond the standard Förster scheme. There are two main routes to do this. Considering a Coulombic less-strongly coupled system first, coherences among different chromophores may be considered in the framework of perturbation theory with higher-order mechanisms correcting the standard second-order description. Secondly, if inter-chromophore coherences are dominant and delocalized Frenkel-exciton states are formed, it becomes of some importance to study their decay due to the coupling to vibrational degrees of freedom. While we will also comment on this latter mechanism, the first description based on localized excitations will be the main focus. A general higher-order theory resulting in respective transition rates and rate equations is utilized. Its capability is demonstrated when presenting a systematic description of short-range and long-range corrections to the basic Förster mechanism. Accordingly, a unique description of bridge-mediated and photon-mediated long-range electronic excitation energy transfer is offered. Moreover, short-range excitation energy transfer appearing as a two electron exchange is also discussed. And, the exciton-exciton annihilation process present at higher optical excitation intensities is described as a direct higher-order transition. The related higher-order vibrational correlation functions are presented and estimated for the reference case where the coupling to vibrational degrees of freedom either of intra-molecular or inter-molecular type is reduced to a simple electronic state dephasing process. PMID:19904437

  15. Geologic Maps and Mapping

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to resources on geologic mapping, and to sources of geologic maps. There is an introduction to geologic mapping, which summarizes its principles and practices, and a history of United States Geological Survey (USGS) mapping activities from 1879 to the present, as well as links to papers on the values and hazards associated with geologic maps and mapping. Online sources of maps include the USGS Geologic Map Database, other federal map products (FEDMAP), state geological survey products (STATEMAP), and university map products (EDMAP).

  16. Tennessee Division of Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the Geology Division of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. It provides information on the division's programs, including geologic hazards research, public service, education programs, basic and applied research on geology and mineral resources, publication of geologic information, permitting of oil and gas wells, and regulation of Tennessee's oil and gas industry. Materials include a catalog of publications, maps, geologic bulletins, and the Public Information series of pamphlets; the Geology Division Newsletter; and information on the state's mineral industry. There is also a section on the Gray Fossil Site, an unusual assemblage of fossils and sedimentary geology encountered during road construction near the town of Gray, Tenessee.

  17. Vermont Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Vermont Geological Survey, also known as the Division of Geology and Mineral Resources in the Department of Environmental Conservation, conducts surveys and research relating to the geology, mineral resources and topography of the State. This site provides details about the states geology with a downloadable state geologic map and key, state rock information, gold in Vermont, fossils found in the state, bedrock mapping details, stream geomorphology, the Champlain thrust fault, earthquakes, radioactive waste and links for additional information.

  18. GWM-a ground-water management process for the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model (MODFLOW-2000)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahlfeld, David P.; Barlow, Paul M.; Mulligan, Anne E.

    2005-01-01

    GWM is a Ground?Water Management Process for the U.S. Geological Survey modular three?dimensional ground?water model, MODFLOW?2000. GWM uses a response?matrix approach to solve several types of linear, nonlinear, and mixed?binary linear ground?water management formulations. Each management formulation consists of a set of decision variables, an objective function, and a set of constraints. Three types of decision variables are supported by GWM: flow?rate decision variables, which are withdrawal or injection rates at well sites; external decision variables, which are sources or sinks of water that are external to the flow model and do not directly affect the state variables of the simulated ground?water system (heads, streamflows, and so forth); and binary variables, which have values of 0 or 1 and are used to define the status of flow?rate or external decision variables. Flow?rate decision variables can represent wells that extend over one or more model cells and be active during one or more model stress periods; external variables also can be active during one or more stress periods. A single objective function is supported by GWM, which can be specified to either minimize or maximize the weighted sum of the three types of decision variables. Four types of constraints can be specified in a GWM formulation: upper and lower bounds on the flow?rate and external decision variables; linear summations of the three types of decision variables; hydraulic?head based constraints, including drawdowns, head differences, and head gradients; and streamflow and streamflow?depletion constraints. The Response Matrix Solution (RMS) Package of GWM uses the Ground?Water Flow Process of MODFLOW to calculate the change in head at each constraint location that results from a perturbation of a flow?rate variable; these changes are used to calculate the response coefficients. For linear management formulations, the resulting matrix of response coefficients is then combined with other components of the linear management formulation to form a complete linear formulation; the formulation is then solved by use of the simplex algorithm, which is incorporated into the RMS Package. Nonlinear formulations arise for simulated conditions that include water?table (unconfined) aquifers or head?dependent boundary conditions (such as streams, drains, or evapotranspiration from the water table). Nonlinear formulations are solved by sequential linear programming; that is, repeated linearization of the nonlinear features of the management problem. In this approach, response coefficients are recalculated for each iteration of the solution process. Mixed?binary linear (or mildly nonlinear) formulations are solved by use of the branch and bound algorithm, which is also incorporated into the RMS Package. Three sample problems are provided to demonstrate the use of GWM for typical ground?water flow management problems. These sample problems provide examples of how GWM input files are constructed to specify the decision variables, objective function, constraints, and solution process for a GWM run. The GWM Process runs with the MODFLOW?2000 Global and Ground?Water Flow Processes, but in its current form GWM cannot be used with the Observation, Sensitivity, Parameter?Estimation, or Ground?Water Transport Processes. The GWM Process is written with a modular structure so that new objective functions, constraint types, and solution algorithms can be added.

  19. Geologic Measurements using Rover Images: Lessons from Pathfinder with Application to Mars 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    The Pathfinder Sojourner rover successfully acquired images that provided important and exciting information on the geology of Mars. This included the documentation of rock textures, barchan dunes, soil crusts, wind tails, and ventifacts. It is expected that the Marie Curie rover cameras will also successfully return important information on landing site geology. Critical to a proper analysis of these images will be a rigorous determination of rover location and orientation. Here, the methods that were used to compute rover position for Sojourner image analysis are reviewed. Based on this experience, specific recommendations are made that should improve this process on the '01 mission.

  20. Differentiating the relative importance of land cover change and geomorphic processes on fine sediment sequestration in a logged watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprak, Alan; Magilligan, Francis J.; Nislow, Keith H.; Renshaw, Carl E.; Snyder, Noah P.; Dade, W. Brian

    2013-03-01

    Timber harvest often results in accelerated soil erosion and subsequent elevated fine (< 2 mm) sediment delivery to channels causing deleterious effects to numerous aquatic species, particularly salmonid fishes. Here we determine, through sediment physical analyses (pebble counts, embeddedness surveys, and interstitial shelter space counts) and geochemical analyses (7Be and 210Pbex activities), the amount and timing of delivery of fine sediment currently found on streambeds of the Narraguagus River watershed in coastal Maine. The role of recent timber harvest, documented via aerial photo spatial analysis, on fine sediment delivery is contrasted with the ability of the glacially influenced topography and surficial geology to deliver fine sediment to streams and to influence channel substrate. Results show that of the land use and geomorphic variables examined, only 210Pbex activities were significantly correlated with the amount of upstream harvest (r2 = 0.49). Concurrently, we find that unit stream power (particularly the slope component) explains much of the variability in channel substrate and that slope and stream power are largely influenced by the legacy of Pleistocene glaciation on channel form. Results suggest a conceptual model whereby fine sediment delivery as a result of late twentieth century timber harvest is likely dampened because of the low gradient landscape of coastal Maine. While geochemical tracers indicate recent fine sediment delivery in harvested areas, channels are likely capable of quickly winnowing these fines from the channel bed. These results further suggest that under contemporary land use conditions, the geomorphic and geologic setting represents a first-order control on channel substrate and habitat suitability for salmonid fishes, including federally endangered Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), in coastal drainages of northeastern Maine.

  1. (abstract) Topographic Signatures in Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Evans, Diane L.

    1996-01-01

    Topographic information is required for many Earth Science investigations. For example, topography is an important element in regional and global geomorphic studies because it reflects the interplay between the climate-driven processes of erosion and the tectonic processes of uplift. A number of techniques have been developed to analyze digital topographic data, including Fourier texture analysis. A Fourier transform of the topography of an area allows the spatial frequency content of the topography to be analyzed. Band-pass filtering of the transform produces images representing the amplitude of different spatial wavelengths. These are then used in a multi-band classification to map units based on their spatial frequency content. The results using a radar image instead of digital topography showed good correspondence to a geologic map, however brightness variations in the image unrelated to topography caused errors. An additional benefit to the use of Fourier band-pass images for the classification is that the textural signatures of the units are quantative measures of the spatial characteristics of the units that may be used to map similar units in similar environments.

  2. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; processing, taxonomy, and quality control of benthic macroinvertebrate samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moulton, Stephen R., II; Carter, James L.; Grotheer, Scott A.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Short, Terry M.

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative methods to process benthic macroinvertebrate (BMI) samples have been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water Quality Laboratory Biological Group. The qualitative processing method is based on visually sorting a sample for up to 2 hours. Sorting focuses on attaining organisms that are likely to result in taxonomic identifications to lower taxonomic levels (for example, Genus or Species). Immature and damaged organisms are also sorted when they are likely to result in unique determinations. The sorted sample remnant is scanned briefly by a second person to determine if obvious taxa were missed. The quantitative processing method is based on a fixed-count approach that targets some minimum count, such as 100 or 300 organisms. Organisms are sorted from randomly selected 5.1- by 5.1-centimeter parts of a gridded subsampling frame. The sorted remnant from each sample is resorted by a second individual for at least 10 percent of the original sort time. A large-rare organism search is performed on the unsorted remnant to sort BMI taxa that were not likely represented in the sorted grids. After either qualitatively or quantitatively sorting the sample, BMIs are identified by using one of three different types of taxonomic assessment. The Standard Taxonomic Assessment is comparable to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Rapid Bioassessment Protocol III and typically provides Genus- or Species-level taxonomic resolution. The Rapid Taxonomic Assessment is comparable to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Rapid Bioassessment Protocol II and provides Familylevel and higher taxonomic resolution. The Custom Taxonomic Assessment provides Species-level resolution whenever possible for groups identified to higher taxonomic levels by using the Standard Taxonomic Assessment. The consistent use of standardized designations and notes facilitates the interpretation of BMI data within and among water-quality studies. Taxonomic identifications are quality assured by verifying all referenced taxa and randomly reviewing 10 percent of the taxonomic identifications performed weekly by Biological Group taxonomists. Taxonomic errors discovered during this review are corrected. BMI data are reviewed for accuracy and completeness prior to release. BMI data are released phylogenetically in spreadsheet format and unprocessed abundances are corrected for laboratory and field subsampling when necessary.

  3. 13 CFR 120.1821 - What is the process to obtain designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealer? 120.1821 Section...Program for Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealers (SISMBD Loan Program...designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealer? (a) SBA will...

  4. 13 CFR 120.1821 - What is the process to obtain designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealer? 120.1821 Section...Program for Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealers (SISMBD Loan Program...designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealer? (a) SBA will...

  5. 13 CFR 120.1821 - What is the process to obtain designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealer? 120.1821 Section...Program for Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealers (SISMBD Loan Program...designation as a Systemically Important Secondary Market Broker-Dealer? (a) SBA will...

  6. National Park Service: Tour of Park Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The tour of Park geologic resources includes pages specific to individual National Parks, Monuments, Recreation Areas, Preserves, Seacoasts, Reserves, and Recreation Areas. These pages are indexed by park name, state, or by one of the following topics: basin and range, caves, Colorado Plateau, fossils, glaciers, hot springs, human use, mountain building, oldest rocks, plate tectonics, river systems, sand dunes, shoreline geology, or volcanoes. Organization of each of the pages typically follows a NPS template with categories for park geology, maps, photographs, geologic research, related links, visitor information, multimedia, and "teacher features" (educational resources and links for teaching geology with National Park examples.) Common subjects that are addressed at various park sites include: minerals, rocks, fossils, cave and karst systems, coastlines, glaciers, volcanoes, faults, landforms, landslides, structures, fluvial systems, sediments, soils, stratigraphic relations, processes that form or act on geologic features and their chemical compositions, and the history of the planet and its life forms.

  7. Chemical interaction of aqueous solutions with epidote-feldspar mineral assemblages in geologic systems. II. Equilibrium constraints in metamorphic/geothermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, D.K.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1981-05-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of the system Na/sub 2/O-K/sub 2/O-CaO-FeO-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SiO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O-HCl-CO/sub 2/ at pressures and temperatures to 5 kb and 600/sup 0/C affords quantitative description and interpretation of phase relations among epidote, garnet, plagioclase, and alkali feldspar solid solutions in hydrothermal systems. Comparison of computed and observed compositions of these minerals and coexisting fluids suggests that the calculations afford close approximation of equilibrium and mass transfer in metamorphic/geothermal processes. The standard molal enthalpies of decomposition reactions for plagioclase are of the order of -4 to -50 kcal mole/sup -1/, which requires the activity of the anorthite component of plagioclase coexisting with epidote solid solutions to increase with increasing temperature at constant pressure. In contrast, because the standard molal volumes of these reactions are also negative, a/sub CaAl/sub 2/Si/sub 2/O/sub 8// decreases with increasing pressure at constant temperature. Either stoichiometric epidote or clinozoisite is compatible with plagioclase, quartz, calcite, and an aqueous phase, but only at X/sub CO/sub 2// less than or equal to 0.2. The complex zoning commonly exhibited by both plagioclase and epidote solid solutions in geologic systems can be attributed to minor isothermal/isobaric changes in the composition of coexisting aqueous solutions. Logarithmic activity and fugacity diagrams constructed with provision for solid solution permit documentation of such changes and facilitate thermodynamic interpretation of mineral and fluid compositions in metamorphic/geothermal systems.

  8. Mathematical Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Daniel F.

    1978-01-01

    Geomathematics is a developing field that is being used in practical applications. Classification is an important element and the dynamic-cluster method (DCM), a nonhierarchial procedure, was introduced this past year. A method for testing the degree of cluster distinctness was developed also. (MA)

  9. What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-05-16

    Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrews’s ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

  10. Measuring geologic time on Mars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter T. Doran; Steven L. Forman; Neil C. Sturchio; Stephen M. Clifford; Dimitri A. Papanastassiouje

    2000-01-01

    Recent images from Mars show compelling evidence of near-surface flowing water, aeolian activity, slope processes, and ice cap evolution that underscores the dynamic geologic history of the planet. Establishing an accurate chronology for Martian planetary features is critical for addressing fundamental questions about the evolution of the planet's surface and atmosphere and the differentiation of its interior. For example, how

  11. GEOLOGY, August 2008 663 INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Gilli, Adrian

    GEOLOGY, August 2008 663 INTRODUCTION Putative nanobacterial fossils and grainy textures have been confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscope equipped with cryogenic preparation to distinguish actual structures from arti- facts due to the sample preparation processes. CLSM and cryo

  12. Weird Geology: The Devil's Tower

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lee Krystek

    This page features a brief introduction to the several theories about the geological processes that formed Devil's Tower, which rises 1,267 feet above the nearby Belle Fourche River and is still considered a sacred place by some Native American Tribes. Information on climbing the tower as well as images and a cross section are provided.

  13. Geological rhythms and cometary impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.; Strothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Time series analysis reveals two dominant, long-term periodicities approximately equal to 32 and 260 million years in the known series of geological and biological upheavals during the Phanerozoic Eon. The cycles of these episodes agree in period and phase with the cycles of impact cratering on Earth, suggesting that periodic comet impacts strongly influence Earth processes.

  14. Glossary of Geologic Terms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page from Iowa State University presents a general glossary of geologic terms. The site would be a good reference for geology coursework. This glossary of geologic terms is based on the glossary in Earth: An Introduction to Geologic Change, by S. Judson and S.M. Richardson (Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice Hall, 1995). Where possible, definitions conform generally, and in some cases specifically, to definitions given in Robert L Bates and Julia A Jackson (editors), Glossary of Geology, 3rd ed., American Geological Institute, Alexandria, Virginia, 1987.

  15. A Geological Wonder: Niagara Falls

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 9-12. It focuses on the geological history of the Niagara Falls area, as well as the physical and geological processes that have formed this region. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, performing extensions, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, audio vocabulary, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  16. Protein-protein interactions play important roles in a variety of cellular processes. The lifetime and the affinity of a protein complex are well correlated with its

    E-print Network

    van den Brink, Jeroen

    143 Summary Protein-protein interactions play important roles in a variety of cellular processes. The lifetime and the affinity of a protein complex are well correlated with its function in a process. Transient interactions between electron transfer proteins are of great interests because a fast association

  17. 404 IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LETTERS, VOL. 11, NO. 3, MARCH 2004 A Hybrid Importance Function for Particle Filtering

    E-print Network

    as , and the importance weights of the particles are obtained from (1) where the superscript denotes the -th trajectory for Particle Filtering Yufei Huang, Member, IEEE, and Petar M. Djuric´, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Particle-Gaussian dy- namic problems. One crucial issue in particle filtering is the selec- tion of the importance

  18. Principles of Historical Geology Geology 331

    E-print Network

    Kammer, Thomas

    of a valley can be correlated. · This principle is used to trace coal seams from one mountain to the next in West Virginia. #12;Original Lateral Continuity #12;Geology Field Camp in the Badlands of South Dakota Rocks #12;James Hutton, 18th Century founder of Geology #12;Siccar Point, Scotland, where Hutton

  19. Utah Geological Survey: Teaching Geology Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From Arches National Park to the towering cliffs at Castle Rock Campground, Utah has some remarkable geology on display. The Utah Geological Survey decided to draw on these fantastic "outdoor laboratories" and create a set of resources designed for science educators. While some of the resources are geared towards users in Utah, many of the sections contain helpful overviews that will help all educators remain on a steady foundation of geologic knowledge. One key area on the site is the "Earthquakes & Geologic Hazards" section. Here, visitors can find well-composed and straight forward summaries on topics like liquefaction, ground cracks, and fault lines. Moving on to the "Teacher Resources" area, visitors will find the delightful "Glad You Asked" articles and the very useful "Teacher's Corner" column which provides information on reading a stone wall and geologic stretching.

  20. Geology. Grade 6. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchorage School District, AK.

    This resource book introduces sixth-grade children to the environment by studying rocks and other geological features. Nine lessons are provided on a variety of topics including: (1) geologic processes; (2) mountain building; (3) weathering; (4) geologic history and time; (5) plate tectonics; (6) rocks and minerals; (7) mineral properties; (8)…

  1. Unraveling Geological History: Glaciers and Faults at Discovery Park, Seattle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Trileigh Tucker

    This introductory geology field exercise asks students to make individual observations about parts of an outcrop, then combine their observations in larger teams to interpret the overall geological history of the exposure. Content learning includes stratigraphy, faulting, and local geologic history; process learning includes data gathering and recording, hypothesis formation, and outlining helpful evidence that could be gathered in the future.

  2. GSA Geologic Time Scale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    This Geological Society of America (GSA) site contains a detailed geologic time scale as an educational resource. It may be downloaded to a larger size, and includes all Eras, Eons, Periods, Epochs and ages as well as magnetic polarity information.

  3. Geophysics & Geology Inspected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, E. R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes findings of a recently published report of the Canadian Geoscience Council, which includes the following topics regarding college geology: facilities; teaching; undergraduate enrollments; postgraduate enrollments; geologic research; and integration of Canadian geoscience with other countries. (CS)

  4. Geologic spatial analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, R.L.; Eliason, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the development of geologic spatial analysis research which focuses on conducting comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of regions using geologic data sets that can be referenced by latitude, longitude, and elevation/depth. (CBS)

  5. Petroleum geology of Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Burollet, P.F. (CIFEG, Paris (France)); Ferjami, A.B.; Mejri, F. (ETAP, Tunis (Tunisia))

    1990-05-01

    Recent discoveries and important oil shows have proven the existence of hydrocarbons in newly identified depocenters and reservoirs. In general, except for some areas around the producing fields, Tunisia is largely underdrilled. The national company ETAP has decided to release data and to publish a synthesis on the petroleum geology of Tunisia. The geology of Tunisia provides a fine example of the contrast between Alpine folding, which typifies northern Tunisia and the African craton area of the Saharan part. Eastern Tunisia corresponds to an unstable platform forming plains or low hills and extending eastwards to the shallow Pelagian Sea. There are a wide variety of basins: central and northern Tunisia represents a front basin the Saharan Ghadames basin or the Chott trough are sag basins; the Gulf of Gabes was formed as a distension margin the Gulf of Hammamet is a composite basin and several transversal grabens cut across the country, including offshore, and are rift-type basins. All these features are known to be oil prolific throughout the world. Two large fields and many modest-size pools are known in Tunisia. Oil and gas fields in the surrounding countries, namely the Saharan fields of Algeria and Libya the large Bouri field offshore Tripolitania and discoveries in the Italian part of the Straits of Sicily, suggest a corresponding potential in Tunisia. Exposed paleogeographic and structural maps, balanced sections, and examples of fields and traps will support an optimistic evaluation of the future oil exploration in Tunisia.

  6. Geology and the environment in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathu, E. M.; Davies, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    Kenya is in a unique environmental setting by virtue of its geographical location, range of altitudes and perhaps most importantly, the Great Rift System that traverses it. The country displays virtually every facet of environmental geological phenonmena — seismicity, volcanism, mass-movements, the impact of mining, mineral processing and geothermal energy resources development, soil and beach erosion, desertification, air, water and soil pollution, etc. A significant mass of data on these topics already exists, but it lies scattered in various journals and agency reports, some of which are not readily available to environmental researchers and country-planners. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to highlight some features of geology and the environment in Kenya and to set the scene for the subsequent papers in this issue, which examine more deeply various aspects of the subject. The uniqueness of the country's environmental setting is emphasised throughout, since it gives it a special appeal to geomorphologists, geophysicists, hydrologists and land-use planners. A comprehensive list of references is given at the end of this paper in order to aid the search process of those who seek additional information on areas covered in this review.

  7. Physiography, geology, and land cover of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter A in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Gould, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Four watersheds with differing geology and land cover in eastern Puerto Rico have been studied on a long-term basis by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate water, energy, and biogeochemical budgets. These watersheds are typical of tropical, island-arc settings found in many parts of the world. Two watersheds are located on coarse-grained granitic rocks that weather to quartz- and clay-rich, sandy soils, and two are located on fine-grained volcanic rocks and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks that weather to quartz-poor, fine-grained soils. For each bedrock type, one watershed is covered with mature forest, and the other watershed, like most of Puerto Rico, has transformed from relatively undisturbed pre-European forest to intensive agriculture in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and further to ongoing reforestation that began in the middle of the 20th century. The comparison of water chemistry and hydrology in these watersheds allows an evaluation of the effects of land-use history and geology on hydrologic regimes and erosion rates. This chapter describes the physiography, geology, and land cover of the four watersheds and provides background information for the remaining chapters in this volume.

  8. South Dakota Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the geological survey is to conduct geologic studies, hydrologic studies, and research, and to collect, correlate, preserve, interpret, and disseminate information, leading to a better understanding of the geology and hydrology of South Dakota. Information includes maps of relief, geology, ground water, and earthquakes; projects such as well testing, hydrology, and aquifers; and searchable databases, such as lithologic logs, digital base, and water quality. Links are provided for more information.

  9. Louisiana Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Louisiana Geological Survey, located at Louisiana State University, developed this website to promote its goal to provide geological and environmental data that will allow for environmentally sound natural resource development and economic decisions. Users can find general information about the Survey's mission, staff, plan, and history. The website features the research and publications of the Basin Research, Cartographic, Coastal, Geologic Mapping, and Water and Environmental sections. Researchers can discover stratigraphic charts of Louisiana, information on lignite resources, and other geologic data.

  10. South Carolina Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The South Carolina Geological Survey (SCGS) homepage contains information about state mapping, education and outreach programs, and recent news. For educators, there is the Earth Science education series of publications which includes presentations and page-size graphics on such topics as earthquakes, plate tectonics, geologic time, fossils, and others. Other materials include information on mineral resources, links to organizations in and about South Carolina geology, the South Carolina core repository, the Geologic Map of South Carolina, and others.

  11. Iowa Geological Survey Bureau

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Iowa Geological Survey Bureau (GSB) homepage contains: general information about the geology of Iowa; the Natural Resources Geographic Information System, which is a collection of databases on geology and water wells; and information about GSB staff, geologic studies, water monitoring programs, and services. There are maps, photographs, general interest articles, technical abstracts, lists of available publications, and an on-line book about the natural resource history of Iowa.

  12. 7 CFR 319.56-11 - Importation of dried, cured, or processed fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...intended for purposes other than propagation, except those grown in...Mexico for purposes other than propagation may be imported in accordance...this section. (3) For propagation . Acorns and chestnuts...

  13. 7 CFR 319.56-11 - Importation of dried, cured, or processed fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE...intended for purposes other than propagation, except those grown in...Mexico for purposes other than propagation may be imported in accordance...this section. (3) For propagation . Acorns and chestnuts...

  14. Geological Survey Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    If your research or interests lie in the geology of South Dakota, then the state's Geological Survey Program Web site is for you. Offered are online publications and maps, a geologic reference database, a lithologic logs database, digital base maps, a water quality database, and several other quality information sources worth checking out.

  15. Christopher U.S. Geological Survey

    E-print Network

    desalinization loop in Chula Vista, California. Hydrologist U.S. Geological Survey, Tucson, Arizona. May 2000-controlled rivers. · Analyzed debris flows and debris-flow processes in arid and mountainous regions from convective

  16. Indicators of Early and Late Processing Reveal the Importance of Within-Trial-Time for Theories of Associative Learning

    PubMed Central

    Lachnit, Harald; Thorwart, Anna; Schultheis, Holger; Lotz, Anja; Koenig, Stephan; Uengoer, Metin

    2013-01-01

    In four human learning experiments (Pavlovian skin conductance, causal learning, speeded classification task), we evaluated several associative learning theories that assume either an elemental (modified unique cue model and Harris’ model) or a configural (Pearce’s configural theory and an extension of it) form of stimulus processing. The experiments used two modified patterning problems (A/B/C+, AB/BC/AC+ vs. ABC-; A+, BC+ vs. ABC-). Pearce’s configural theory successfully predicted all of our data reflecting early stimulus processing, while the predictions of the elemental theories were in accord with all of our data reflecting later stages of stimulus processing. Our results suggest that the form of stimulus representation depends on the amount of time available for stimulus processing. Our findings highlight the necessity to investigate stimulus processing during conditioning on a finer time scale than usually done in contemporary research. PMID:23826092

  17. Geologic Time: The Story of a Changing Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    It's hard imagining how one could fit the entirety of geologic time onto one website, but the staff members of the department of paleobiology at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History have done an excellent job with this site. The intent of the site is to provide an interactive timeline of geological history, beginning with the Hadean eon and proceeding all the way to the current day. After a compelling introductory section, visitors are led into the elegant timeline interface which allows them to explore the site's primary contents. Using a drag tool, visitors can move around the span of the different geological eons, eras, periods, and epochs in a direct fashion. Clicking on each of the icons within each division of time brings up a brief overview of each segment, along with a map of each period, complete with various renderings of the conditions that existed on the Earth at the time. Visitors will also appreciate the "Foundational Concepts" area, which provides a foundation for understanding the nature of geology, such as the importance of different dating methods and earth processes. Overall, this site is extraordinarily helpful, both for the general public and for more seasoned amateur geologists.

  18. Geologic Time: The Story of a Changing Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Itâ??s hard imagining how one could fit the entirety of geologic time onto one website, but the staff members of the department of paleobiology at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History have done an excellent job with this site. The intent of the site is to provide an interactive timeline of geological history, beginning with the Hadean eon and proceeding all the way to the current day. After a compelling introductory section, visitors are led into the elegant timeline interface which allows them to explore the siteâ??s primary contents. Using a drag tool, visitors can move around the span of the different geological eons, eras, periods, and epochs in a direct fashion. Clicking on each of the icons within each division of time brings up a brief overview of each segment, along with a map of each period, complete with various renderings of the conditions that existed on the Earth at the time. Visitors will also appreciate the â??Foundational Conceptsâ?ť area, which provides a foundation for understanding the nature of geology, such as the importance of different dating methods and earth processes. Overall, this site is extraordinarily helpful, both for the general public and for more seasoned amateur geologists.

  19. 40 CFR 761.193 - Maintenance of monitoring records by persons who import, manufacture, process, distribute in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...manufacture, process, distribute in commerce, or use chemicals containing PCBs present as a result of inadvertent generation or recycling who perform any actual monitoring of PCB concentrations must maintain records of any such monitoring for a period of...

  20. Phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in eastern Mediterranean water frogs have been determined by geological processes and climate change in the Late Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Ak?n, Ci?dem; Bilgin, C Can; Beerli, Peter; Westaway, Rob; Ohst, Torsten; Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Uzzell, Thomas; Bilgin, Metin; Hotz, Hansjürg; Guex, Gaston-Denis; Plötner, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    AIM: Our aims were to assess the phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in eastern Mediterranean water frogs and to estimate divergence times using different geological scenarios. We related divergence times to past geological events and discuss the relevance of our data for the systematics of eastern Mediterranean water frogs. LOCATION: The eastern Mediterranean region. METHODS: Genetic diversity and divergence were calculated using sequences of two protein-coding mitochondrial (mt) genes: ND2 (1038 bp, 119 sequences) and ND3 (340 bp, 612 sequences). Divergence times were estimated in a Bayesian framework under four geological scenarios representing alternative possible geological histories for the eastern Mediterranean. We then compared the different scenarios using Bayes factors and additional geological data. RESULTS: Extensive genetic diversity in mtDNA divides eastern Mediterranean water frogs into six main haplogroups (MHG). Three MHGs were identified on the Anatolian mainland; the most widespread MHG with the highest diversity is distributed from western Anatolia to the northern shore of the Caspian Sea, including the type locality of Pelophylax ridibundus. The other two Anatolian MHGs are restricted to south-eastern Turkey, occupying localities west and east of the Amanos mountain range. One of the remaining three MHGs is restricted to Cyprus; a second to the Levant; the third was found in the distribution area of European lake frogs (P. ridibundus group), including the Balkans. MAIN CONCLUSIONS: Based on geological evidence and estimates of genetic divergence we hypothesize that the water frogs of Cyprus have been isolated from the Anatolian mainland populations since the end of the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), i.e. since c. 5.5-5.3 Ma, while our divergence time estimates indicate that the isolation of Crete from the mainland populations (Peloponnese, Anatolia) most likely pre-dates the MSC. The observed rates of divergence imply a time window of c. 1.6-1.1 million years for diversification of the largest Anatolian MHG; divergence between the two other Anatolian MHGs may have begun about 3.0 Ma, apparently as a result of uplift of the Amanos Mountains. Our mtDNA data suggest that the Anatolian water frogs and frogs from Cyprus represent several undescribed species. PMID:22473251

  1. Phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in eastern Mediterranean water frogs have been determined by geological processes and climate change in the Late Cenozoic

    PubMed Central

    Ak?n, Çi?dem; Bilgin, C. Can; Beerli, Peter; Westaway, Rob; Ohst, Torsten; Litvinchuk, Spartak N.; Uzzell, Thomas; Bilgin, Metin; Hotz, Hansjürg; Guex, Gaston-Denis; Plötner, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Aim Our aims were to assess the phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in eastern Mediterranean water frogs and to estimate divergence times using different geological scenarios. We related divergence times to past geological events and discuss the relevance of our data for the systematics of eastern Mediterranean water frogs. Location The eastern Mediterranean region. Methods Genetic diversity and divergence were calculated using sequences of two protein-coding mitochondrial (mt) genes: ND2 (1038 bp, 119 sequences) and ND3 (340 bp, 612 sequences). Divergence times were estimated in a Bayesian framework under four geological scenarios representing alternative possible geological histories for the eastern Mediterranean. We then compared the different scenarios using Bayes factors and additional geological data. Results Extensive genetic diversity in mtDNA divides eastern Mediterranean water frogs into six main haplogroups (MHG). Three MHGs were identified on the Anatolian mainland; the most widespread MHG with the highest diversity is distributed from western Anatolia to the northern shore of the Caspian Sea, including the type locality of Pelophylax ridibundus. The other two Anatolian MHGs are restricted to south-eastern Turkey, occupying localities west and east of the Amanos mountain range. One of the remaining three MHGs is restricted to Cyprus; a second to the Levant; the third was found in the distribution area of European lake frogs (P. ridibundus group), including the Balkans. Main conclusions Based on geological evidence and estimates of genetic divergence we hypothesize that the water frogs of Cyprus have been isolated from the Anatolian mainland populations since the end of the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), i.e. since c. 5.5-5.3 Ma, while our divergence time estimates indicate that the isolation of Crete from the mainland populations (Peloponnese, Anatolia) most likely pre-dates the MSC. The observed rates of divergence imply a time window of c. 1.6-1.1 million years for diversification of the largest Anatolian MHG; divergence between the two other Anatolian MHGs may have begun about 3.0 Ma, apparently as a result of uplift of the Amanos Mountains. Our mtDNA data suggest that the Anatolian water frogs and frogs from Cyprus represent several undescribed species. PMID:22473251

  2. Arkansas Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Arkansas Geological Survey (AGS) homepage aims to develop and provide knowledge of the geology and hydrogeology of the State, and to stimulate development and effective management and utilization of the mineral, fossil-fuel, and water resources of Arkansas while protecting the environment. The AGC collects and disperses geologic data consisting of geologic maps, historical data concerning resources, and various datasets concerning water, fossil-fuel, and mineral resources of Arkansas. The site contains publications that can be ordered, sections about Arkansas geology, a list of mineral producers of Arkansas, and reports on mineral resources.

  3. Virtual-Geology.Info

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At virtual-geology.info, Roger Suthren, a professor at Oxford Brookes University, offers educational materials on geologic phenomena throughout the world. Users can take virtual field trips to study the geology of Scotland, Alaska, and France. In the Regional Geology link, visitors can view wonderful pictures of the volcanoes of Germany, Italy, France, and Greece. Educators can find images of sediments and sedimentary rocks which can be used in a variety of classroom exercises. The website supplies descriptions and additional educational links about sedimentology and environmental geology.

  4. Streamflow and water-quality conditions including geologic sources and processes affecting selenium loading in the Toll Gate Creek watershed, Aurora, Arapahoe County, Colorado, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, Suzanne S.; Runkel, Robert L.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Kimball, Briant A.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.

    2013-01-01

    Toll Gate Creek is a perennial stream draining a suburban area in Aurora, Colorado, where selenium concentrations have consistently exceeded the State of Colorado aquatic-life standard for selenium of 4.6 micrograms per liter since the early 2000s. In cooperation with the City of Aurora, Colorado, Utilities Department, a synoptic water-quality study was performed along an 18-kilometer reach of Toll Gate Creek extending from downstream from Quincy Reservoir to the confluence with Sand Creek to develop a detailed understanding of streamflow and concentrations and loads of selenium in Toll Gate Creek. Streamflow and surface-water quality were characterized for summer low-flow conditions (July–August 2007) using four spatially overlapping synoptic-sampling subreaches. Mass-balance methods were applied to the synoptic-sampling and tracer-injection results to estimate streamflow and develop spatial profiles of concentration and load for selenium and other chemical constituents in Toll Gate Creek surface water. Concurrent groundwater sampling determined concentrations of selenium and other chemical constituents in groundwater in areas surrounding the Toll Gate Creek study reaches. Multivariate principal-component analysis was used to group samples and to suggest common sources for dissolved selenium and major ions. Hydrogen and oxygen stable-isotope ratios, groundwater-age interpretations, and chemical analysis of water-soluble paste extractions from core samples are presented, and interpretation of the hydrologic and geochemical data support conclusions regarding geologic sources of selenium and the processes affecting selenium loading in the Toll Gate Creek watershed. Streamflow conditions observed and measured during the synoptic water-quality study represent summer base-flow conditions and rainfall conditions for July 2007. The lack of large tributary inflows and the spatial distribution of small tributary inflows, seeps, and springs indicate that diffuse and discrete groundwater inflow supports streamflow during low-flow conditions along the entire 18-kilometer stream reach. Concentrations of dissolved selenium within all subreaches of Toll Gate Creek exceeded the Colorado aquatic-life standard of 4.6 micrograms per liter in 2007. Concentrations of selenium in the upper portion of the Toll Gate Headwaters subreach (TGH) remained close to the aquatic-life standard at about 5 micrograms per liter. Downstream from a concrete-lined channel section, inflows with selenium concentrations greater than the stream contribute selenium load to surface water. However, stream selenium concentrations were less than 20 micrograms per liter all along Toll Gate Creek. Concentrations of selenium in groundwater were in general substantially greater than the Colorado aquatic-life standard of 4.6 micrograms per liter and at some locations were greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking-water standard for selenium of 50 micrograms per liter. The distribution of selenium concentrations in groundwater, springs, and the 11 inflows with the greatest selenium concentrations indicates that shallow groundwater in surficial materials and the Denver Formation bedrock is a source of selenium loading to Toll Gate Creek and that selenium loading is distributed along the entire length of the study reach downstream from the concrete-lined channel. Water-quality and solids-sampling results from this study indicate weathering processes release water-soluble selenium from the underlying Denver Formation claystone bedrock with subsequent cycling of selenium in the aquatic environment of Toll Gate Creek. Exposure of the Denver Formation selenium-bearing bedrock to oxidizing atmospheric conditions, surface water, and groundwater, oxidizes selenide, held as a trace element in pyrite or in complexes with organic matter, to selenite and selenate. Secondary weathering products including iron oxides and selenium-bearing salts have accumulated in the weathered zone in the semiarid climate and also can serve as sources or sinks of selenium. P

  5. Ohio Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the Ohio Geological Survey. Materials available through the site include a variety of publications, particularly the Survey's reports, bulletins, information circulars, guidebooks, and many others. There is an extensive selection of maps, including topographic maps in several scales, and downloadable geologic maps of several themes (drift thickness, bedrock geology, karst areas, glacial geology, and many others), as well as digital maps and data. The interactive maps section features online map viewers of abandoned mines, earthquake epicenters, surficial geology, geology of Lake Erie, and others. The educational resources page has links to the 'Hands On Earth' series of activities, GeoFacts (short bulletins on Ohio geological topics), nontechnical educational leaflets, field guides, and links to other publications, rock and mineral clubs, educational associations, and related websites. There is also a link to the Ohio Seismic Network, a network of seismograph stations located at colleges, universities, and other institutions that collects and disseminates information about earthquakes in Ohio.

  6. Tectonomagmatic evolution of the terrestrial planets: importance for understanding of processes of their formation and subsequent development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Sharkov; O. Bogatikov

    2009-01-01

    Our knowledge about formation and evolution of the terrestrial planets (the Earth, Venus, Mars, Mercury and, possibly, the Moon) based on different physical and geochemical speculations and models. The main disadvantage of such hypotheses is their abstract character and ignoring any data on tectonomagmatic evolution of those planets. At the same time, just this type of data provide an important

  7. 7 CFR 361.8 - Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain Canadian-origin screenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...screenings. (a) Imported seed that is found to contain noxious weed seeds at a level higher than the tolerances set forth in...or by APHIS; if the seed is found to be within the noxious weed tolerances set forth in § 361.6(b), the seed may be...

  8. 7 CFR 361.8 - Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain Canadian-origin screenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...screenings. (a) Imported seed that is found to contain noxious weed seeds at a level higher than the tolerances set forth in...or by APHIS; if the seed is found to be within the noxious weed tolerances set forth in § 361.6(b), the seed may be...

  9. 7 CFR 361.8 - Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain Canadian-origin screenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...screenings. (a) Imported seed that is found to contain noxious weed seeds at a level higher than the tolerances set forth in...or by APHIS; if the seed is found to be within the noxious weed tolerances set forth in § 361.6(b), the seed may be...

  10. 7 CFR 361.8 - Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain Canadian-origin screenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...screenings. (a) Imported seed that is found to contain noxious weed seeds at a level higher than the tolerances set forth in...or by APHIS; if the seed is found to be within the noxious weed tolerances set forth in § 361.6(b), the seed may be...

  11. 7 CFR 361.8 - Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain Canadian-origin screenings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...screenings. (a) Imported seed that is found to contain noxious weed seeds at a level higher than the tolerances set forth in...or by APHIS; if the seed is found to be within the noxious weed tolerances set forth in § 361.6(b), the seed may be...

  12. Map Showing Geology, Oil and Gas Fields and Geologic Provinces of Africa, Ver. 2.0

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ahlbrandt, Thomas S.

    The US Geological Survey offers the Map Showing Geology, Oil and Gas Fields and Geologic Provinces of Africa Web site and report. The agency's goal for the pieces includes assessing the undiscovered and technically recoverable oil and gas resources of the world. The site includes various descriptions of what the map depicts and how data was processed using Geographic Information Systems. Once the interactive map is activated, users can search and click the map of Africa to view geologic provinces, oil and gas fields, as well as the various surface geological classifications. Although the interface is a bit cumbersome and works best with a fast Internet connection, the unique information provided should draw the attention of those interested in geology. [JAB

  13. Geological consequences of superplumes

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.L. (Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Superplumes are suggested to have caused the period of constant normal magnetic polarity in mid-Cretaceous time (124-83 Ma) and, possibly, the period of constant reversed polarity in Pennsylvania-Permian time (323-248 Ma). These times coincide with increases in world temperature, deposition of black shales, oil generation, and eustatic sea level in the mid-Cretaceous, and increased coal generation and gas accumulation in the Pennsylvanian-Permian, accompanied by an intracratonic Pennsylvanian transgression of epicontinental seas. These geologic anomalies are associated with episodes of increased world-wide ocean-crust production and mantle outgassing, especially of carbon and nutrients. These superplumes originated just above the core-mantle boundary, significantly increased convection in the outer core, and stopped the magnetic field reversal process for 41 m.y. in the Cretaceous and 75 m.y. in Pennsylvanian-Permian time.

  14. Carbon dioxide reaction processes in a model brine aquifer at 200 °C and 200 bars: implications for geologic sequestration of carbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John P. Kaszuba; David R. Janecky; Marjorie G. Snow

    2003-01-01

    The reactive behavior of supercritical CO2 under conditions relevant to geologic storage and sequestration of C is largely unknown. Experiments were conducted in a flexible cell hydrothermal apparatus to determine the extent of fluid–rock reactions, in addition to carbonate mineral precipitation, that may occur in a brine aquifer–aquitard system that simulates a saline aquifer storage scenario. The system was held

  15. Phonemic awareness is a more important predictor of orthographic processing than rapid serial naming: Evidence from Russian.

    PubMed

    Rakhlin, Natalia; Cardoso-Martins, Cláudia; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2014-11-01

    We studied the relationship between rapid serial naming (RSN) and orthographic processing in Russian, an asymmetrically transparent orthography. Ninety-six students (mean age = 13.73) completed tests of word and pseudoword reading fluency, spelling, orthographic choice, phonological choice, PA and RSN. PA was a better predictor of orthographic skills and pseudoword reading accuracy than RSN, which accounted for more variance in word and pseudoword reading fluency. Controlling for pseudoword reading fluency washed out RSN's contribution to word reading fluency. These results extend previous findings questioning the role of RSN as an index of orthographic processing skills and support the idea that RSN taps into automaticity/efficiency of processing print-sound mappings. PMID:25435759

  16. Shock compression of geological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Simon; Braithwaite, Chris; Williamson, David; Jardine, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the shock compression of geological materials is important for many applications, and is particularly important to the mining industry. During blast mining the response to shock loading determines the propagation speed and resulting fragmentation of the rock. The present work has studied the Hugoniot of two geological materials; Lake Quarry Granite and Gosford Sandstone. For samples of these materials, the composition and microstructure was characterised in detail. The Hugoniot of Lake Quarry Granite was predicted from this information, as the material is fully dense, in good agreement with the measured Hugoniot. Gosford Sandstone is porous and undergoes compaction during shock loading. Such behaviour is similar to a granular material and we show how it can be described using shock compaction models.

  17. Shock compression of geological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, S.; Braithwaite, C.; Williamson, D.; Jardine, A.

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the shock compression of geological materials is important for many applications, and is particularly important to the mining industry. During blast mining the response to shock loading determines the wave propagation speed and resulting fragmentation of the rock. The present work has studied the Hugoniot of two geological materials; Lake Quarry Granite and Gosford Sandstone. For samples of these materials, the composition was characterised in detail. The Hugoniot of Lake Quarry Granite was predicted from this information as the material is fully dense and was found to be in good agreement with the measured Hugoniot. Gosford Sandstone is porous and undergoes compaction during shock loading. Such behaviour is similar to other granular material and we show how it can be described using a P-a compaction model.

  18. Principle and geometric precision of photographic geological logging of tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Rong-Chun; Yang, Biao; Wu, Ming-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Considering the problem of engineering geological logging technique by means of sketching at the work site, this paper presents a photographic geological logging technique based on photogrammetry as well as engineering geology. The principles, methods, and working process have been discussed, and the photographic geological logging precision of a tunnel and its estimation method have been researched. The theoretical and experimental analysis shows that the precision of the digital unfolded image map of tunnel automatically generated by the photographic geological logging method is sufficient for serving as the logging base map. Besides, the measurement precision of unfolded images or stereopairs meets the requirements of geological attitude measurement. The new technique of photographic geological logging proposed in this paper is expected to replace the current sketch way of engineering geological logging on site, with the operation mode converted from manual operation to computer-aided operation and informatized management.

  19. Bathymetric terrain model of the Atlantic Margin for marine geological investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Brian D.; Chaytor, Jason D.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Brothers, Daniel S.; Gardner, James V.

    2013-01-01

    Bathymetric terrain models of seafloor morphology are an important component of marine geological investigations. Advances in acquisition and processing technologies of bathymetric data have facilitated the creation of high-resolution bathymetric surfaces that approach the resolution of similar surfaces available for onshore investigations. These bathymetric terrain models provide a detailed representation of the Earth’s subaqueous surface and, when combined with other geophysical and geological datasets, allow for interpretation of modern and ancient geological processes. The purpose of the bathymetric terrain model presented in this report is to provide a high-quality bathymetric surface of the Atlantic margin of the United States that can be used to augment current and future marine geological investigations. The input data for this bathymetric terrain model, covering almost 305,000 square kilometers, were acquired by several sources, including the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Geophysical Data Center and the Ocean Exploration Program, the University of New Hampshire, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. These data have been edited using hydrographic data processing software to maximize the quality, usability, and cartographic presentation of the combined terrain model.

  20. Water, Water Everywhere! [Narrator] Water, Water Everywhere Water is all around us, and its importance to nearly every process

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Water, Water Everywhere! [Narrator] Water, Water Everywhere Water is all around us, and its naturally as a liquid, gas, and solid. The process by which water moves around the Earth, from the ocean to the atmosphere to the land, and back to the ocean, is called the water cycle. Water regulates climate, storing

  1. Homogenity of geological units with respect to the radon risk in the Walloon region of Belgium.

    PubMed

    Tondeur, François; Cinelli, Giorgia; Dehandschutter, Boris

    2014-10-01

    In the process of mapping indoor radon risk, an important step is to define geological units well-correlated with indoor radon. The present paper examines this question for the Walloon region of Belgium, using a database of more than 18,000 indoor radon measurements. With a few exceptions like the Carboniferous (to be divided into Tournaisian, Visean and Namurian-Westphalian) and the Tertiary (in which all Series may be treated together), the Series/Epoch stratigraphic level is found to be the most appropriate geological unit to classify the radon risk. A further division according to the geological massif or region is necessary to define units with a reasonable uniformity of the radon risk. In particular, Paleozoic series from Cambrian to Devonian show strong differences between different massifs. Local hot-spots are also observed in the Brabant massif. Finally, 35 geological units are defined according to their radon risk, 6 of which still present a clear weak homogeneity. In the case of 4 of these units (Jurassic, Middle Devonian of Condroz and of Fagne-Famenne, Ordovician of the Stavelot massif) homogeneity is moderate, but the data are strongly inhomogeneous for Visean in Condroz and in the Brabant massif. The 35 geological units are used in an ANOVA analysis, to evaluate the part of indoor radon variability which can be attributed to geology. The result (15.4-17.7%) agrees with the values observed in the UK. PMID:24953229

  2. Geologic mapping of northern Lunae Planun, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, Robert A.; Maxwell, Ted A.

    1991-01-01

    Lunae Planum is an elevated region east of the Tharsis rise, and ridged plains containing numerous Sacra Dorsa wrinkle ridges, cross-cutting Sacra Fossae grabens, and lobate scarps compose this Martian Plateau. Geologic mapping of the northern Lunae Planum region was undertaken to better understand to emplacement history of the ridge plains, the structural history of deformation, and the periods of fluvial processes that have modified the region. These investigations are important for several reasons: (1) the history of plains emplacement yields information valuable for understanding the evolution of Tharsis volcanism; (2) interpretation of structural deformation has implications on the lithology of the Martian crust; and (3) determining the history and fate of Martian volatiles is dependent upon knowing the periods of outflow activity. A discussion of the findings is presented.

  3. OneGeology-Europe - The Challenges and progress of implementing a basic geological infrastructure for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asch, Kristine; Tellez-Arenas, Agnes

    2010-05-01

    OneGeology-Europe is making geological spatial data held by the geological surveys of Europe more easily discoverable and accessible via the internet. This will provide a fundamental scientific layer to the European Plate Observation System Rich geological data assets exist in the geological survey of each individual EC Member State, but they are difficult to discover and are not interoperable. For those outside the geological surveys they are not easy to obtain, to understand or to use. Geological spatial data is essential to the prediction and mitigation of landslides, subsidence, earthquakes, flooding and pollution. These issues are global in nature and their profile has also been raised by the OneGeology global initiative for the International Year of Planet Earth 2008. Geology is also a key dataset in the EC INSPIRE Directive, where it is also fundamental to the themes of natural risk zones, energy and mineral resources. The OneGeology-Europe project is delivering a web-accessible, interoperable geological spatial dataset for the whole of Europe at the 1:1 million scale based on existing data held by the European geological surveys. Proof of concept will be applied to key areas at a higher resolution and some geological surveys will deliver their data at high resolution. An important role is developing a European specification for basic geological map data and making significant progress towards harmonising the dataset (an essential first step to addressing harmonisation at higher data resolutions). It is accelerating the development and deployment of a nascent international interchange standard for geological data - GeoSciML, which will enable the sharing and exchange of the data within and beyond the geological community within Europe and globally. The geological dataset for the whole of Europe is not a centralized database but a distributed system. Each geological survey implements and hosts an interoperable web service, delivering their national harmonized geological data. These datasets are registered in a multilingual catalogue, who is one the main part of this system. This catalogue and a common metadata profile allows the discovery of national geological and applied geological maps at all scapes, Such an architecture is facilitating re-use and addition of value by a wide spectrum of users in the public and private sector and identifying, documenting and disseminating strategies for the reduction of technical and business barriers to re-use. In identifying and raising awareness in the user and provider communities, it is moving geological knowledge closer to the end-user where it will have greater societal impact and ensure fuller exploitation of a key data resource gathered at huge public expense. The project is providing examples of best practice in the delivery of digital geological spatial data to users, e.g. in the insurance, property, engineering, planning, mineral resource and environmental sectors. The scientifically attributed map data of the project will provide a pan-European base for science research and, importantly, a prime geoscience dataset capable of integration with other data sets within and beyond the geoscience domain. This presentation will demonstrate the first results of this project and will indicate how OneGeology-Europe is ensuring that Europe may play a leading role in the development of a geoscience spatial data infrastructure (SDI) globally.

  4. 'Best practice' development and transfer in the NHS: the importance of process as well as product knowledge.

    PubMed

    Newell, Sue; Edelman, Linda; Scarbrough, Harry; Swan, Jacky; Bresnen, Mike

    2003-02-01

    A core prescription from the knowledge management movement is that the successful management of organizational knowledge will prevent firms from 'reinventing the wheel', in particular through the transfer of 'best practices'. Our findings challenge this logic. They suggest instead that knowledge is emergent and enacted in practice, and that normally those involved in a given practice have only a partial understanding of the overall practice. Generating knowledge about current practice is therefore a precursor to changing that practice. In this sense, knowledge transfer does not occur independently of or in sequence to knowledge generation, but instead the process of knowledge generation and its transfer are inexorably intertwined. Thus, rather than transferring 'product' knowledge about the new 'best practice' per se, our analysis suggests that it is more useful to transfer 'process' knowledge about effective ways to generate the knowledge of existing practice, which is the essential starting point for attempts to change that practice. PMID:12626022

  5. Pick-up ion transport under conservation of particle invariants: how important are velocity diffusion and cooling processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, H. J.; Fichtner, H.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The phase space transport of pick-up ions (PUIs) in the heliosphere has been studied for the cases that these particles are experiencing a second-order Fermi process, i.e. velocity diffusion, a convection with the solar wind, and adiabatic or "magnetic" cooling, i.e. cooling connected with the conservation of the magnetic moment. Aims: The study aims at a quantification of the process of "magnetic cooling" that has recently been introduced as a modification of adiabatic cooling in the presence of frozen-in magnetic fields. Methods: The isotropic PUI velocity distributions are obtained as numerical solutions of a Fokker-Planck phase space transport equation. Results: It is demonstrated that this newly discussed process is, like adiabatic energy changes, not limited to cooling but can also, depending on the shape of the distribution function, result in heating. For pure cooling with negligible velocity diffusion a v-5 velocity power law is found for magnetic cooling, thus confirming earlier analytical results. For non-negligible second-order Fermi acceleration, the tails of the distribution functions exhibit different shapes, which in special cases are also close to the prominent v-5 behaviour, which is often found in observations. Conclusions: The existence of an exact v-5 power law of PUI distribution functions can be confirmed for insignificant velocity diffusion and its approximate validity for specific choices of the velocity dependence of the diffusion coefficient.

  6. Geologic Map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake partly fills one of the most spectacular calderas of the world, an 8-by-10-km basin more than 1 km deep formed by collapse of the volcano known as Mount Mazama (fig. 1) during a rapid series of explosive eruptions about 7,700 years ago. Having a maximum depth of 594 m, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. Crater Lake National Park, dedicated in 1902, encompasses 645 km2 of pristine forested and alpine terrain, including the lake itself, virtually all of Mount Mazama, and most of the area of the geologic map. The geology of the area was first described in detail by Diller and Patton (1902) and later by Williams (1942), whose vivid account led to international recognition of Crater Lake as the classic collapse caldera. Because of excellent preservation and access, Mount Mazama, Crater Lake caldera, and the deposits formed by the climactic eruption constitute a natural laboratory for study of volcanic and magmatic processes. For example, the climactic ejecta are renowned among volcanologists as evidence for systematic compositional zonation within a subterranean magma chamber. Mount Mazama's climactic eruption also is important as the source of the widespread Mazama ash, a useful Holocene stratigraphic marker throughout the Pacific Northwest, adjacent Canada, and offshore. A detailed bathymetric survey of the floor of Crater Lake in 2000 (Bacon and others, 2002) provides a unique record of postcaldera eruptions, the interplay between volcanism and filling of the lake, and sediment transport within this closed basin. Knowledge of the geology and eruptive history of the Mount Mazama edifice, greatly enhanced by the caldera wall exposures, gives exceptional insight into how large volcanoes of magmatic arcs grow and evolve. Lastly, the many smaller volcanoes of the High Cascades beyond the limits of Mount Mazama are a source of information on the flux of mantle-derived magma through the region. General principles of magmatic and eruptive processes revealed by the present study have been incorporated not only in scientific investigations elsewhere, but in the practical evaluation of hazards (Bacon and others, 1997b) and geothermal resources (Bacon and Nathenson, 1996) in the Crater Lake region. In addition to papers in scientific journals, field trip guides, and the hazard and geothermal reports, the major product of this long-term study of Mount Mazama is the geologic map. The map is unusual because it portrays bedrock (outcrop), surficial, and lake floor geology. Caldera wall geology is depicted in detail on the accompanying geologic panoramas.

  7. Two-step Processing Is Not Essential for the Import and Assembly of Functionally Active Iron-Sulfur Protein into the Cytochrome bc1

    E-print Network

    Trumpower, Bernard L.

    the respiratory defi- cient phenotype of a yeast strain in which the endoge- nous gene for the iron-sulfur proteinTwo-step Processing Is Not Essential for the Import and Assembly of Functionally Active Iron From the Department of Biochemistry, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 The iron

  8. Recommendation letters are extraordinarily important during the academic job search process. You should start thinking about who your letter writers will be well in advance of application deadlines.

    E-print Network

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Recommendation letters are extraordinarily important during the academic job search process. You in your job search, perhaps even before you've seen interesting job postings. At the very least, give in the job description and your cover letter. o For example, if you emphasized your leadership

  9. Recommendation letters are extraordinarily important during the academic job search process. You should start thinking about who your letter writers will be well in advance of application deadlines.

    E-print Network

    Manchak, John

    Recommendation letters are extraordinarily important during the academic job search process. You search, perhaps even before you've seen interesting job postings. At the very least, give your in the job description and your cover letter. o For example, if you emphasized your leadership

  10. Making a Geologic Cross Section Name _____________________________ Geology 100 Harbor Section

    E-print Network

    Harbor, David

    of cross section A for help) 2. What symbols represent these formations and in what geologic time periodsp. 1 Making a Geologic Cross Section Name _____________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor Section Your task is to complete a cross section of geologic structures from a geologic map. Please do

  11. Landslide susceptibility mapping using geological data, a DEM from ASTER images and an Artificial Neural Network (ANN)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daisaku Kawabata; Joel Bandibas

    2009-01-01

    An efficient and accurate method of generating landslide susceptibility maps is very important to mitigate the loss of properties and lives caused by this type of geological hazard. This study focuses on the development of an accurate and efficient method of data integration, processing and generation of a landslide susceptibility map using an ANN and data from ASTER images. The

  12. Sample Preparation for Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Geological Samples by ICP-MS: A Critical Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederico Garcia Pinto; Rainério Escalfoni Junior; Tatiana Dillenburg SaintPierre

    2012-01-01

    The presence of rare earth elements (REE) in geological materials provides important information about the formation and the geochemical processes suffered by the rocks. Therefore, there is a constant necessity for accurate data and reliable and fast analytical methods. However, the low concentrations of these elements typically found in rocks require quantification by sufficiently sensitive techniques, such as Inductively Coupled

  13. Geologic Time: Online Edition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-10-09

    Offered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as a general interest publication, this site is an online edition of a text by the same name, offering a concise overview of the concepts associated with the age of the Earth. The online edition was revised in October of 1997 to reflect current thinking on this topic. Section headers are Geologic Time, Relative Time Scale, Major Divisions of Geologic Time, Index Fossils, Radiometric Time Scale, and Age of the Earth.

  14. The Geology of Virginia

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From the College of William of Mary Department of Geology comes the Geology of Virginia Web site. From the Appalachian Plateau to the coastal plain, visitors can explore the geology and physical characteristics of the diverse landscape of the commonwealth of Virginia through simple descriptions and well designed graphics. Even if you don't live in the area, the site does a good job of capturing the interest of anyone looking for quality material on the presented subjects.

  15. Sedimentology and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorlykke, K.O. (Oslo Univ. (Norway))

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to sedimentology as well as petroleum geology. It integrates both subjects, which are closely related but mostly treated separately. The author covers the basic aspects of sedimentology, sedimentary geochemistry and diagenesis. Principles of stratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy and basin modelling forms the base for the part on petroleum geology. Subjects discussed include the composition of kerogen and hydrocarbons, theories of migration and trapping of hydrocarbons and properties of reservoir rocks. Introductions to well logging and production geology are given.

  16. Low energy positron diffraction from Cu(111): Importance of surface loss processes at large angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Lessor, D.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Duke, C.B. (Xerox Corp., Webster, NY (USA). Webster Research Center); Lippel, P.H.; Brandes, G.R.; Canter, K.F.; Horsky, T.N. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-10-01

    Intensities of positrons specularly diffracted from Cu(111) were measured at the Brandeis positron beam facility and analyzed in the energy range 8eVprocesses is necessary to obtain a satisfactory description of the absolute magnitude of the diffracted intensities below E = 50eV. Detailed comparison of the calculated and observed diffraction intensities reveals the necessity of incorporating surface loss processes explicitly into the model in order to achieve a quantitative description of the measured intensities for E<40eV and {theta}>40{degree}. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A program for mass spectrometer control and data processing analyses in isotope geology; written in BASIC for an 8K Nova 1120 computer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Hope, J.

    1975-01-01

    A system is described which uses a minicomputer to control a surface ionization mass spectrometer in the peak switching mode, with the object of computing isotopic abundance ratios of elements of geologic interest. The program uses the BASIC language and is sufficiently flexible to be used for multiblock analyses of any spectrum containing from two to five peaks. In the case of strontium analyses, ratios are corrected for rubidium content and normalized for mass spectrometer fractionation. Although almost any minicomputer would be suitable, the model used was the Data General Nova 1210 with 8K memory. Assembly language driver program and interface hardware-descriptions for the Nova 1210 are included.

  18. Reports of Planetary Geology Program, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, H. E. (compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Abstracts of 205 reports from Principal investigators of NASA's Planetary Geology Program succinctly summarize work conducted and reflect the significant accomplishments. The entries are arranged under the following topics: (1) Saturnian satellites; (2) asteroids, comets and Galilean satellites; (3) cratering processes and landform development; (4) volcanic processes and landforms; (5) Aerolian processes and landforms; (6) fluvial, preglacial, and other processes of landform development; (7) Mars polar deposits, volatiles, and climate; (8) structure, tectonics, and stratigraphy; (9) remote sensing and regolith chemistry; (10) cartography and geologic mapping; and (11) special programs.

  19. OneGeology-Europe: architecture, portal and web services to provide a European geological map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez-Arenas, Agnčs.; Serrano, Jean-Jacques; Tertre, François; Laxton, John

    2010-05-01

    OneGeology-Europe is a large ambitious project to make geological spatial data further known and accessible. The OneGeology-Europe project develops an integrated system of data to create and make accessible for the first time through the internet the geological map of the whole of Europe. The architecture implemented by the project is web services oriented, based on the OGC standards: the geological map is not a centralized database but is composed by several web services, each of them hosted by a European country involved in the project. Since geological data are elaborated differently from country to country, they are difficult to share. OneGeology-Europe, while providing more detailed and complete information, will foster even beyond the geological community an easier exchange of data within Europe and globally. This implies an important work regarding the harmonization of the data, both model and the content. OneGeology-Europe is characterised by the high technological capacity of the EU Member States, and has the final goal to achieve the harmonisation of European geological survey data according to common standards. As a direct consequence Europe will make a further step in terms of innovation and information dissemination, continuing to play a world leading role in the development of geosciences information. The scope of the common harmonized data model was defined primarily by the requirements of the geological map of Europe, but in addition users were consulted and the requirements of both INSPIRE and ‘high-resolution' geological maps were considered. The data model is based on GeoSciML, developed since 2006 by a group of Geological Surveys. The data providers involved in the project implemented a new component that allows the web services to deliver the geological map expressed into GeoSciML. In order to capture the information describing the geological units of the map of Europe the scope of the data model needs to include lithology; age; genesis and metamorphic character. For high resolution maps physical properties, bedding characteristics and weathering also need to be added. Furthermore, Geological data held by national geological surveys is generally described in national language of the country. The project has to deal with the multilingual issue, an important requirement of the INSPIRE directive. The project provides a list of harmonized vocabularies, a set of web services to deal with them, and a web site for helping the geoscientists while mapping the terms used into the national datasets into these vocabularies. The web services provided by each data provider, with the particular component that allows them to deliver the harmonised data model and to handle the multilingualism, are the first part of the architecture. The project also implements a web portal that provides several functionalities. Thanks to the common data model implemented by each web service delivering a part of the geological map, and using OGC SLD standards, the client offers the following option. A user can request for a sub-selection of the map, for instance searching on a particular attribute such as "age is quaternary", and display only the parts of the map according to the filter. Using the web services on the common vocabularies, the data displayed are translated. The project started September 2008 for two years, with 29 partners from 20 countries (20 partners are Geological Surveys). The budget is 3.25 M€, with a European Commission contribution of 2.6 M€. The paper will describe the technical solutions to implement OneGeology-Europe components: the profile of the common data model to exchange geological data, the web services to view and access geological data; and a geoportal to provide the user with a user-friendly way to discover, view and access geological data.

  20. Understanding Geologic Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cara Burberry

    This is an exercise in which students are reintroduced to geologic maps and encouraged to "deconstruct" the map into constituent elements in order to understand the geologic history of the area. The preceding lectures in the course have recapitulated material that the students have covered in Introduction to Physical Geology. During class, the students work through the maps that were part of lab exercises in the Intro level course, so that basic concepts are recalled (superposition, cross-cutting relationships, basic faults and folds). The final product is a geologic history of this map area.

  1. Geologic Mapping Exercise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Andrew Smith

    This exercise is designed to simulate how a basic geological investigation of a site takes place. A basic geological investigation includes familiarizing yourself with the unconsolidated sediments, rocks, structural geology, and groundwater present at your site. As part of this exercise you will have to properly identify a variety of rock types and sediments, create maps that represent data you collected at each location, and complete a basic report of your findings (optional). Once completed, this exercise should give students a basic understanding of how the various concepts used throughout the semester are applied in the real world in the form of a geological investigation.

  2. Mapping watershed potential to contribute phosphorus from geologic materials to receiving streams, southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terziotti, Silvia; Hoos, Anne B.; Harned, Douglas; Garcia, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    As part of the southeastern United States SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) water-quality model implementation, the U.S. Geological Survey created a dataset to characterize the contribution of phosphorus to streams from weathering and erosion of surficial geologic materials. SPARROW provides estimates of total nitrogen and phosphorus loads in surface waters from point and nonpoint sources. The characterization of the contribution of phosphorus from geologic materials is important to help separate the effects of natural or background sources of phosphorus from anthropogenic sources of phosphorus, such as municipal wastewater or agricultural practices. The potential of a watershed to contribute phosphorus from naturally occurring geologic materials to streams was characterized by using geochemical data from bed-sediment samples collected from first-order streams in relatively undisturbed watersheds as part of the multiyear U.S. Geological Survey National Geochemical Survey. The spatial pattern of bed-sediment phosphorus concentration is offered as a tool to represent the best available information at the regional scale. One issue may weaken the use of bed-sediment phosphorus concentration as a surrogate for the potential for geologic materials in the watershed to contribute to instream levels of phosphorus-an unknown part of the variability in bed-sediment phosphorus concentration may be due to the rates of net deposition and processing of phosphorus in the streambed rather than to variability in the potential of the watershed's geologic materials to contribute phosphorus to the stream. Two additional datasets were created to represent the potential of a watershed to contribute phosphorus from geologic materials disturbed by mining activities from active mines and

  3. Dione's spectral and geological properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephan, K.; Jaumann, R.; Wagner, R.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Roatsch, T.; Hoffmann, H.; Brown, R.H.; Filiacchione, G.; Buratti, B.J.; Hansen, G.B.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the variations in spectral properties across the surface of Saturn's satellite Dione using Cassini/VIMS data and their relationships to geological and/or morphological characteristics as seen in the Cassini/ISS images. This analysis focuses on a local region on Dione's anti-saturnian hemisphere that was observed by VIMS with high spatial resolution during orbit 16 in October 2005. The results are incorporated into a global context provided by VIMS data acquired within Cassini's first 50 orbits. Our results show that Dione's surface is dominated by at least one global process. Bombardment by magnetospheric particles is consistent with the concentration of dark material and enhanced CO2 absorption on the trailing hemisphere of Dione independent of the geology. Local regions within this terrain indicate a special kind of resurfacing that probably is related to large-scale impact process. In contrast, the enhanced ice signature on the leading side is associated with the extended ejecta of the fresh impact crater Creusa (???49??N/76??W). Although no geologically active regions could be identified, Dione's tectonized regions observed with high spatial resolution partly show some clean H2O ice implying that tectonic processes could have continued into more recent times. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Marine Geology Program of the US Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, N. T.

    The U.S. Geological Survey and charged it with the responsibility for the classification of public lands and examination of the geologic structure, mineral resources and products of the national domain. The national domain for seabed resources was extended to 200 nautical miles offshore. This United States Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a marine domain surrounding the continental U.S., Hawaii, and U.S. related islands, constitutes an area about one and two thirds larger than the size of the onshore area. In this vast domain lie resources of immense importance to the Nation: an estimated 35 percent of the economically recoverable oil and gas yet to be found in the United States; major resources of strategic metals like cobalt, manganese, and nickel in seafloor crusts, pavements, and modules; massive sulfide deposits actively forming today; and major concentrations of heavy minerals in nearshore sand bodies.

  5. Case studies of current trends in development geology

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, N.D.

    1987-05-01

    Traditionally, development geologists have been responsible for studying leases, logs, and cores in detail in support of engineering functions. These responsibilities have grown from defining gross reservoir geometries to understanding subtle differences in reservoirs attributed to stratigraphic and structural complexities, depositional environments, and hydrodynamic processes. To handle these increased responsibilities, expertise has become essential in the areas of computer applications, log analysis, modeling, and management of produced water. Examples of the use and application of each area to projects from fields on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley demonstrate current techniques employed by development geologists and the evolution of a development department within Texaco. A study of a property in the South Belridge field on which 330 wells were drilled over a two-year period illustrates how computer resources have become vital in handling the vast amount of data needed to perform detailed geologic studies. Intricate geologic characterization has become essential to optimizing and defining reservoir performance in several fields: (1) Southeast Lost Hills, a complex diagenetic trap; (2) Buena Vista Hills, where log analysis is needed to make reserve estimates and step-out potential meaningful; (3) Midway-Sunset field, for which detailed geology leads to new field-wide models and future prospects. Increasing environmental concern over waste disposal has required an important involvement of development geologists in the geologic and hydrologic aspects of subsurface injection of produced water and other brines in the Santiago Creek field. Instead of providing a training ground for future explorationists, development geology should be viewed as an alternative career with potential for a much greater demand in the future.

  6. Deciphering how the chromatin factor RCC1 recognizes the nucleosome: the importance of individuals in the scientific discovery process

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Song

    2012-01-01

    The nucleosome repeating unit of chromatin is the target of chromatin enzymes and factors which regulate gene activity in a eukaryotic cell. How the nucleosome is recognized by chromatin enzymes and factors is poorly understood even though such interaction is fundamental to gene regulation and chromatin biology. My laboratory recently determined the structural basis for how the RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) chromatin factor binds to the nucleosome, including the first atomic crystal structure of a chromatin protein complexed with the nucleosome core particle. I describe here how we developed and investigated structural models for RCC1 binding to the nucleosome using biochemical methods, and how we crystallized the 300 kDa complex of RCC1 with the nucleosome core particle. This article highlights the contributions made by key laboratory members and explains our thinking and rationale during the discovery process. PMID:22435811

  7. Geologic and structural map of eastern Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Letouzey, J.; Sage, L.

    1986-07-01

    A synthesis of the onshore and offshore geologic data of eastern Asia, prepared by the Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), has allowed the construction of geologic and structural maps for this region. These maps include three color sheets (scale = 1:2.5 million) and three plates of geologic and structural cross sections. Located between lat. 4/sup 0/ and 35/sup 0/N, and long. 106/sup 0/ and 132/sup 0/E, the maps cover the following geographic areas: East and South China Sea, Sulu Sea, West Philippine basin and onshore neighboring terrains, Kyushu and Ryukyu Islands, the China margin, Taiwan Island, Vietnam, North West Borneo, and the Philippines. The maps synthesize seismic interpretations, oil well data, geologic work in south Japan, Taiwan, Borneo, and the Philippines, and recent data published between 1976 and 1985. Twenty-four geologic cross sections (scale = 1:1.25 million, vertical exaggeration x 6) intersect ocean margins, important basins, and the different structural domains. They are based on seismic profiles, well data, and available onshore and offshore geologic data. These cross sections show basement composition and structures, different tectonic and sedimentary domains, and the structure and thickness of different sedimentary deposits (such as age, unconformities, and geologic structures). Maps and cross sections will be published in early 1987.

  8. Prediction and quantifying parameter importance in simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal process using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Qaisar, Mahmood; Luo, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The present investigation deals with the prediction of the performance of simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor through an artificial neural network (ANN). Influent sulfide concentration, influent nitrate concentration, S/N mole ratio, pH, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) for 144 days' steady-state condition were the inputs of the model; whereas output parameters were sulfide removal percentage, nitrate removal percentage, sulfate production percentage, and nitrogen production percentage. The prediction performance was evaluated by calculating root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), mean absolute relative error (MARE), and determination coefficient (R (2)) values. Generally, the ANN model exhibited good prediction of the simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal process. The effect of five input parameters to the performance of the reactor was quantified and compared using the connection weights method, Garson's algorithm method, and partial derivatives (PaD) method. The results showed that HRT markedly affects the performance of the reactor. PMID:25523291

  9. Bedrock Geologic Map of Maine and Surficial Geologic Map of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. B.

    For the tectonic, structural, or surficial geologist, a geologic map is the ultimate document, encompassing within its bounds a concise display of the current status of geologic information for the region that it embraces. Because the state of Maine, areally, is half of the New England region, the new bedrock and surficial maps of that state, produced under the direction of State Geologist Walter Anderson with the collaboration of 13 bedrock area compilers, 12 surficial areal compilers, and aided by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy and the Maine Geological Survey, are important contributions to our knowledge of this portion of the northern Appalachian Mountains. These maps follow closely upon recently published bedrock maps of Massachusetts (E.-A. Zen et al., U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C., 1983) and Connecticut U. Rodgers, Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, Hartford, 1985). Revisions of maps for the other New England states are in progress.

  10. Importance of the Inverted Control in Measuring Holistic Face Processing with the Composite Effect and Part-Whole Effect

    PubMed Central

    McKone, Elinor; Davies, Anne Aimola; Darke, Hayley; Crookes, Kate; Wickramariyaratne, Tushara; Zappia, Stephanie; Fiorentini, Chiara; Favelle, Simone; Broughton, Mary; Fernando, Dinusha

    2013-01-01

    Holistic coding for faces is shown in several illusions that demonstrate integration of the percept across the entire face. The illusions occur upright but, crucially, not inverted. Converting the illusions into experimental tasks that measure their strength – and thus index degree of holistic coding – is often considered straightforward yet in fact relies on a hidden assumption, namely that there is no contribution to the experimental measure from secondary cognitive factors. For the composite effect, a relevant secondary factor is size of the “spotlight” of visuospatial attention. The composite task assumes this spotlight can be easily restricted to the target half (e.g., top-half) of the compound face stimulus. Yet, if this assumption were not true then a large spotlight, in the absence of holistic perception, could produce a false composite effect, present even for inverted faces and contributing partially to the score for upright faces. We review evidence that various factors can influence spotlight size: race/culture (Asians often prefer a more global distribution of attention than Caucasians); sex (females can be more global); appearance of the join or gap between face halves; and location of the eyes, which typically attract attention. Results from five experiments then show inverted faces can sometimes produce large false composite effects, and imply that whether this happens or not depends on complex interactions between causal factors. We also report, for both identity and expression, that only top-half face targets (containing eyes) produce valid composite measures. A sixth experiment demonstrates an example of a false inverted part-whole effect, where encoding-specificity is the secondary cognitive factor. We conclude the inverted face control should be tested in all composite and part-whole studies, and an effect for upright faces should be interpreted as a pure measure of holistic processing only when the experimental design produces no effect inverted. PMID:23382725

  11. Appraising U.S. Geological Survey science records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faundeen, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center has legislative charters to preserve and make accessible land remote sensing records important to the United States. This essay explains the appraisal process developed by EROS to ensure the science records it holds and those offered to it align with those charters. The justifications behind the questions employed to weed and to complement the EROS archive are explained along with the literature reviewed supporting their inclusion. Appraisal results are listed by individual collection and include the recommendations accepted by EROS management. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.

  12. Advances in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (editor)

    1981-01-01

    This second issue in a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications includes (1) a catalog of terrestrial craterform structures for northern Europe; (2) abstracts of results of the Planetary Geology Program, and (3) a list of the photographic holdings of regional planetary image facilities.

  13. External Resource: Geologic Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    This NASA sponsored webpage, Center for Educational Technologies, teaches students about Geologic Time. The age of Earth is so long compared to all periods of time that we humans are familiar with, it has been given a special name: Geologic time. The age

  14. Geologic time scale bookmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    This bookmark, designed for use with U.S. Geological Survey activities at the 2nd USA Science and Engineering Festival (April 26–29, 2012), is adapted from the more detailed Fact Sheet 2010–3059 "Divisions of Geologic Time." The information that it presents is widely sought by educators and students.

  15. National Geologic Map Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    The National Geologic Map Database (NGMDB) is an Internet-based system for query and retrieval of earth-science map information, created as a collaborative effort between the USGS and the Association of American State Geologists. Its functions include providing a catalog of available map information; a data repository; and a source for general information on the nature and intended uses of the various types of earth-science information. The map catalog is a comprehensive, searchable catalog of all geoscience maps of the United States, in paper or digital format. It includes maps published in geological survey formal series and open-file series, maps in books, theses and dissertations, maps published by park associations, scientific societies, and other agencies, as well as publications that do not contain a map but instead provide a geological description of an area (for example, a state park). The geologic-names lexicon (GEOLEX) is a search tool for lithologic and geochronologic unit names. It now contains roughly 90% of the geologic names found in the most recent listing of USGS-approved geologic names. Current mapping activities at 1:24,000- and 1:100,000-scale are listed in the Geologic Mapping in Progress Database. Information on how to find topographic maps and list of geology-related links is also available.

  16. Geology of the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, William P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes some of the geologic characteristics of the Caribbean region. Discusses the use of some new techniques, including broad-range swath imaging of the sea floor that produces photograph-like images, and satellite measurement of crustal movements, which may help to explain the complex geology of the region. (TW)

  17. Geology of Caves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This webpage of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and National Park Service (NPS) describes the geology and features of caves. It discusses cave formation, features, minerals found in caves, uses of caves, and various investigations of caves. There is an educational activity on karst topography formation, and links for additional information.

  18. California Geological Survey - Landslides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    California Geological Survey

    This page from the CA Geological Survey (CGS) presents information on landslides as well as maps and products of various past and present CGS programs to map and respond to landslides in the state of California, including the Forest and Watershed Geology Program, the Seismic Hazards Zonation Program, the Caltrans Highway Corridor Mapping project, and the Landslide Map Index.

  19. Advances in Planetary Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (editor)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in Planetary Geology is a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications. There are no set lists of acceptable topics or formats, and submitted manuscripts will not undergo a formal review. All submissions should be in a camera ready form, preferably spaced, and submitted to the editor.

  20. Earth Sciences Geology Option

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Earth Sciences with Geology Option Geological sciences focus on understanding the Earth, from its, mountain building, land surface evolution, and mineral resource creation over the Earth's 4.6 billion-year history. A geologist contributes to society through the discovery of earth resources, such as metals

  1. Earthquakes and Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Ozsvath

    In this activity, students investigate the relationship between intensity of ground motion and type of rock or alluvium, as seen in the 1994 Northridge, California earthquake. They will examine a map of Mercalli intensity, a cross-section showing geologic structures and rock types, and a map of surficial geology, and answer questions pertaining to amplification of ground motion and S-wave velocities.

  2. Glossary of geology

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.L.; Jackson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This third edition of the Glossary of Geology contains approximately 37,000 terms, or 1,000 more than the second edition. New entries are especially numerous in the fields of carbonate sedimentology, hydrogeology, marine geology, mineralogy, ore deposits, plate tectonics, snow and ice, and stratigraphic nomenclature. Many of the definitions provide background information.

  3. British Geological Survey: Learning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) has a wealth of information about the earth sciences, and they are quite willing to share it with others. This page contains information and resources for anyone interested in geology for educational or leisure purposes, and it is contained with four sections. First up is "Popular geology", which includes "Britain beneath our feet", an interactive atlas of geology, resources, and land quality. This section also contains graphics about climate change and earthquakes. The second section is titled "Educational resources". Here visitors can ask scientists at the BGS specific questions and they can also download several free posters. The third section is called "Educational news and events" and it features upcoming events at the BGS and links to their free magazine, "Earthwise". The site is rounded out by the fourth section titled "From the BGS Archives". Here visitors can view historic geological photographs and also view field sketches and watercolors by Alexander Henry Green, the celebrated Victorian geologist.

  4. Wyoming State Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This agency's mission is to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; to prepare, publish, and distribute reports and maps of Wyoming's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. This site contains details and reports about metals in Wyoming, earthquakes and other hazards, coal, industrial minerals, uranium, oil and gas. The field trip section contains details about various areas to visit with students and gives a general geologic description. There is also a searchable bibliography with publications about Wyoming geology. Links are provided for additional resources.

  5. Virtual Tour of Maine Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This selection of slide shows provides a photographic tour of Maine geology. Users can choose slide shows on surficial, bedrock, and coastal geology; fossils, geologic hazards, groundwater and wells; or mineral collecting, mining, and quarrying.

  6. Essential Elements of Geologic Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Elmer James

    1988-01-01

    Described is a report outline for geologic reports. Essential elements include title; abstract; introduction; stratigraphy; petrography; geochemistry; petrology; geophysics; structural geology; geologic history; modeling; economics; conclusions; and recommendations. (Author/CW)

  7. Roadside Geology of Yosemite Valley

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A virtual geology field trip to Yosemite Valley. Includes a geologic map of Yosemite, numerous large pictures of the area and discussion of geological events and natural disasters which have occurred in Yosemite.

  8. The importance and the sensitivity of the reaction 17O(n {gamma})18O in the s-process nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, K.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M. [Department of Physics, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Nishimura, T.; Fujimoto, M. Y.; Kato, K. [Division of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Suda, T. [Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aikawa, M. [Hokkaido University OpenCourseWare, Sapporo 060-0811 (Japan)

    2007-02-26

    We apply our Monte Carlo method to the s-process element synthesis in the helium shell flash model for extremely metal-poor stars. We emphasize the importance of the reaction 17O(n {gamma})18O. It is presented that the uncertainty of this reaction rate affects the heaver elements abundance. We also discuss the variation of the O-Ne reaction paths with the uncertainty of the reaction rate of 17O(n {gamma})18O.

  9. Geologic studies: Executive summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Popenoe, P.

    1994-01-01

    The general objectives of the geological oceanography program in 1976-1977 were to (1) measure the rate, direction, and forcing mechanisms of sediment mobility over the sea bed, and to monitor resultant changes in bottom morphology or texture; (2) determine the concentration, distribution, and flux of suspended particulate matter in the water column; (3) determine the vertical distribution of trace metals in the near-surface sediment at selected locations; (4) evaluate potential geological hazards to oil and gas development due to surficial and intermediate depth structure and mass sediment transport events; (5) identify and evaluate the distribution and significance of outcrop and reefal structures; and (6) support the activities of the chemical/biological contractor by obtaining information on sediment texture and composition, particularly as it relates to the physical, biological, and chemical processes of the shelf. The report presents a summation of principal findings and conclusions from this initial effort.

  10. Prototype of Partial Cutting Tool of Geological Map Images Distributed by Geological Web Map Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonogaki, S.; Nemoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Geological maps and topographical maps play an important role in disaster assessment, resource management, and environmental preservation. These map information have been distributed in accordance with Web services standards such as Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) recently. In this study, a partial cutting tool of geological map images distributed by geological WMTS was implemented with Free and Open Source Software. The tool mainly consists of two functions: display function and cutting function. The former function was implemented using OpenLayers. The latter function was implemented using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). All other small functions were implemented by PHP and Python. As a result, this tool allows not only displaying WMTS layer on web browser but also generating a geological map image of intended area and zoom level. At this moment, available WTMS layers are limited to the ones distributed by WMTS for the Seamless Digital Geological Map of Japan. The geological map image can be saved as GeoTIFF format and WebGL format. GeoTIFF is one of the georeferenced raster formats that is available in many kinds of Geographical Information System. WebGL is useful for confirming a relationship between geology and geography in 3D. In conclusion, the partial cutting tool developed in this study would contribute to create better conditions for promoting utilization of geological information. Future work is to increase the number of available WMTS layers and the types of output file format.

  11. Geologic effects on groundwater salinity and discharge into an estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russonielloa, Christopher J.; Fernandeza, Cristina; Brattonb, John F.; Banaszakc, Joel F.; Krantzc, David E.; Andresd, Scott; Konikowe, Leonard F.; Michaela, Holly A.

    2013-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) can be an important pathway for transport of nutrients and contaminants to estuaries. A better understanding of the geologic and hydrologic controls on these fluxes is critical for their estimation and management. We examined geologic features, porewater salinity, and SGD rates and patterns at an estuarine study site. Seismic data showed the existence of paleovalleys infilled with estuarine mud and peat that extend hundreds of meters offshore. A low-salinity groundwater plume beneath this low-permeability fill was mapped with continuous resistivity profiling. Extensive direct SGD measurements with seepage meters (n = 551) showed fresh groundwater discharge patterns that correlated well with shallow porewater salinity and the hydrogeophysical framework. Small-scale variability in fresh and saline discharge indicates influence of meter-scale geologic heterogeneity, while site-scale discharge patterns are evidence of the influence of the paleovalley feature. Beneath the paleovalley fill, fresh groundwater flows offshore and mixes with saltwater before discharging along paleovalley flanks. On the adjacent drowned interfluve where low-permeability fill is absent, fresh groundwater discharge is focused at the shoreline. Shallow saltwater exchange was greatest across sandy sediments and where fresh SGD was low. The geologic control of groundwater flowpaths and discharge salinity demonstrated in this work are likely to affect geochemical reactions and the chemical loads delivered by SGD to coastal surface waters. Because similar processes are likely to exist in other estuaries where drowned paleovalleys commonly cross modern shorelines, the existence and implications of complex hydrogeology are important considerations for studies of groundwater fluxes and related management decisions.

  12. A model-based assessment of whether anammox or denitrification is the more important nitrogen-loss process in the Eastern Tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Ivonne; Oschlies, Andreas; Gutknecht, Elodie; Dadou, Isabelle; Garçon, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    The Oxygen Minimum zones (OMZs) are well known for being nitrogen (N) loss regions, brought about by the two processes: denitrification and anammox. The relative importance of these processes has, however, been subject to some debate. By means of a high-resolution coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the Eastern Tropical Pacific, encompassing the extended OMZ off Peru, we investigate whether we can infer from biogeochemical tracer distributions which of these two N-loss processes dominate. Sensitivity simulations are performed in which variations of biogeochemical model parameters select either anammox or denitrification as dominant N-loss process, and implications on the simulated nitrogen, carbon and oxygen fluxes and biogeochemical tracer distributions are investigated. Largest sensitivities are found in the simulated nitrate, nitrite and ammonium fields. Our model results provide an estimate of the biogeochemical and physical conditions that control the relative contributions of these two processes. In our model, both processes are active at the same depths, occurring in suboxic zones and near the upper edge of the OMZ. In the case study with anammox dominating N loss, the first step of denitrification is still required to provide the substrates for anammox.

  13. Geology of Earth's Moon

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    First, researchers at the University of California, San Diego discuss the importance of studying earthquakes on the moon, also known as moonquakes, and the Apollo Lunar Seismic Experiment (1). Users can discover the problems scientists must deal with when collecting the moon's seismic data. The students at Case Western Reserve University created the second website to address three missions the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) has planned between now and 2010, including a mission to the moon (2). Visitors can learn about the Lunar-A probe that will be used to photograph the surface of the moon, "monitor moonquakes, measure temperature, and study the internal structure." Next, the Planetary Data Service (PDS) at the USGS offers users four datasets that they can use to create an image of a chosen area of the moon (3). Each dataset can be viewed as a basic clickable map; a clickable map where users can specify size, resolution, and projection; or an advanced version where visitors can select areas by center latitude and longitude. The fourth site, produced by Robert Wickman at the University of North Dakota, presents a map of the volcanoes on the moon and compares their characteristics with those on earth (4). Students can learn how the gravitational forces on the Moon affect the lava flows. Next, Professor Jeff Ryan at the University of South Florida at Tampa supplies fantastic images and descriptive text of the lunar rocks obtained by the Apollo missions (5). Visitors can find links to images of meteorites, terrestrial rocks, and Apollo landings as well. At the Science Channel website, students and educators can find a video clip discussing the geologic studies on the moon along with videos about planets (6). Users can learn about how studying moon rocks help scientists better understand the formation of the earth. Next, the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum presents its research of "lunar topography, cratering and impacts basins, tectonics, lava flows, and regolith properties" (7). Visitors can find summaries of the characteristics of the moon and the main findings since the 1950s. Lastly, the USGS Astrogeology Research Program provides archived lunar images and data collected between 1965 and 1992 by Apollo, Lunar Orbiter, Galileo, and Zond 8 missions (8). While the data is a little old, students and educators can still find valuable materials about the moon's topography, chemical composition, and geology.

  14. Geological research for public outreach and education in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Guobyte, Rimante

    2013-04-01

    Successful IYPE activities and implementation of Geoheritage day in Lithuania increased public awareness in geology. A series of projects introducing geology to the general public and youth, supported by EU funds and local communities, were initiated. Researchers from the scientific and applied geology institutions of Lithuania participated in these projects and provided with the geological data. In one case, the Lithuanian Survey of Protected Areas supported the installation of a series of geological exhibitions in several regional and national parks. An animation demonstrating glacial processes was chosen for most of these because the Lithuanian surface is largely covered with sedimentary deposits of the Nemunas (Weichselian) glaciation. Researchers from the Lithuanian Geological Survey used the mapping results to demonstrate real glacial processes for every chosen area. In another case, 3D models showing underground structures of different localities were based on detailed geological maps and profiles obtained for that area. In case of the Sartai regional park, the results of previous geological research projects provided the possibility to create a movie depicting the ca. 2 Ga geological evolution of the region. The movie starts with the accretion of volcanic island arcs on the earlier continental margin at ca. 2 Ga and deciphers later Precambrian tectonic and magmatic events. The reconstruction is based on numerous scientific articles and interpretation of geophysical data. Later Paleozoic activities and following erosion sculptured the surface which was covered with several ice sheets in Quaternary. For educational purpose, a collection of minerals and rocks at the Forestry Institute was used to create an exhibition called "Cycle of geological processes". Forestry scientists and their students are able to study the interactions of geodiversity and biodiversity and to understand ancient and modern geological processes leading to a soil formation. An aging exposition at the Museum of Erratic Boulders in NW Lithuania is being rearranged for educational purposes, to show the major rock types and their origins more clearly. A new exhibition is supplemented with computer portals presenting geological processes, geological quizzes, animations etc. Magmatism, metamorphism, sedimentation and other geological processes are demonstrated using erratic boulders brought by glaciers from Scandinavia and northern Russia. A part of the exhibition is devoted to glaciation processes and arrival of ice sheets to Lithuania. Visitors are able to examine large erratic boulder groups in a surrounding park and to enjoy beautiful environment. The exhibition also demonstrates mineral resources of Lithuania, different fossils and stones from a human body. In all cases it was recognised that a lack of geological information limits the use of geology for public outreach. Ongoing scientific research is essential in many places as well as a mediator's job for interpreting the results of highly specialised research results and to adapt them for public consumption.

  15. Formation evaluation: Geological procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.

    1985-01-01

    This volume goes beyond a discussion of petroleum geology and the techniques of hydrocarbon (oil and gas) logging as a reservoir evaluation tool. It provides the logging geologist with a review of geological techniques and classification systems that will ensure the maximum development of communicable geological information. Contents include: 1. Introduction--cuttings recovery, cutting sampling, core sampling, rock classification; 2. Detrital rocks--classification, description; 3. Carbonate rocks--classification, description; 4. Chemical rocks-introduction, siliceous rocks, ferruginous rocks, aluminous rocks, phosphatic rocks, aluminous rocks, carbonaceous rocks; 5. Igneous and metamorpbic rocks; Appendix; References and Index.

  16. Journal of Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From the University of Chicago Press's Journals Division, the Journal of Geology is currently available online free of charge (note: subscription fees may soon apply, but no initiation date is provided). This first-rate technical journal, which publishes "research and theory in geophysics, geochemistry, sedimentology, geomorphology, petrology, plate tectonics, volcanology, structural geology, mineralogy, and planetary sciences" has been in print form since 1893. All of the 1999 issues of the Journal of Geology electronic edition are available here. Internet users can access full-text articles with internal links to references and figures (html, .pdf. .ps).

  17. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  18. Regional geology subprogram: Geological interpretation of ERTS imagery of the occidental region of Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, C. E. (principal investigator); Ayllon, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Using ERTS-1 imagery, it is possible to delimit great lithological units, folds, lineaments, faults, and in lesser degree unconformities. In the morphological aspect, the images show clearly the relief necessary for geological interpretation. The ERTS-1 images are important for the preparation of the geological and tectonic map of Bolivia, on a 1:1 million scale, if conventional methods of work are used as a base.

  19. Radionuclide migration in clayrock host formations for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste: advances in process understanding and up-scaling methods resulting from the EC integrated project `Funmig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, S.; Tournassat, C.; Goutelard, F.; Parneix, J. C.; Gimmi, T.; Maes, N.

    2009-04-01

    One of the ‘pillars' supporting Safety Cases for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in clayrock formations is the knowledge base regarding radionuclide (Rn) retention by sorption and diffusion-driven transport which is why the EC integrated project ‘Funmig' focused a major part of its effort on advancing understanding of these two macroscopic phenomena. This talk presents some of the main results of this four year effort (2005-2008). One of the keys to understanding diffusion-driven transport of anionic and cationic radionuclide species in clayrocks lies in a detailed understanding of the phenomena governing Rn total concentration and speciation (dissolved, adsorbed) in the different types of pore spaces present in highly-compacted masses of permanently charged clay minerals. Work carried out on a specifically synthesized montmorillonite (a model for the clay mineral fraction in clayrocks) led to development, and preliminary experimental validation, of a conceptually coherent set of theoretical models (molecular dynamics, electrostatic double layer, thermodynamic) describing dissolved ion and water solvent behavior in this material. This work, complemented by the existing state of the art, provides a sound theoretical basis for explaining such important phenomena as anion exclusion, cation exchange and the diffusion behavior of anions, weakly sorbing cations and water tracers. Concerning the behavior of strongly sorbing and/or redox-reactive radionuclides in clay systems, project research improved understanding of the nature of sorption reactions and sorbed species structure for key radioelements, or analogues (U, Se, Eu, Sm, Yb, Nd) on the basal surfaces and in the interlayers of synthetic or purified clay minerals. A probable mechanism for Se(IV) retention by reduction to Se° in Fe2+-containing clays was brought to light; this same process was also studied on the Callovo-Oxfordien clayrock targeted by the French radwaste management program. The migration of most radionuclides in clayrocks, in particular the actinides, is limited by their strong sorption on rock mineral surfaces. Much effort was devoted in Funmig to improving understanding of this process on the clayrocks being studied in the Swiss, Belgian and French radwaste management programs. Specific attention was focused on (i) elucidating the effect of dissolved organic matter on Am(III), Th(IV), Eu(III) sorption on clayrock surfaces and (ii) determining the link between Kd measured on dispersed rock systems and the Kd operant in intact rock volumes, i.e. during diffusion. Regarding the latter question, results indicate that Kd values for ‘dispersed' and ‘intact' materials are quite similar for certain elements (Na, Sr, Cs, Co). On the other hand, Kd values obtained by modeling results of diffusion experiments involving strongly sorbing elements as Cs, Co and Eu were always significantly smaller than those predicted based on sorption data measured in corresponding batch systems. This is an area where additional research is being planned. A major effort was devoted to improving understanding of the effects of small-scale (?m to cm) clayrock structure and large-scale (dm to hm) mineralogical composition on radionuclide diffusion-retention. The program focusing on the small-scale produced a method for simulating the results of tracer diffusion in an intact rock based on the actual rock microstructure of the rock sample to be used in the diffusion experiment. This model was used to predict / inverse model the spatial distribution of highly sorbing tracers (Eu, Cu). This overall approach is also being used to understand how changes in mineralogical composition can affect the values of macroscopic diffusion parameters (De, tortuosity, anisiotropy). At a much larger scale, the results of (i) a geostatistical analysis of clayrock mineralogical variability and (ii) measurements of De and Kd dependence on mineralogy for Cs and Cl, were combined to create models of parameter variability at the formation scale. These models were used to evaluate t

  20. Biological and geological carbon sources in a steppe ecosystem in the SE of Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana; Belelli-Marchesini, Luca; Etiope, Giuseppe; Papale, Dario

    2015-04-01

    Widespread recognition of the importance of soil CO2 efflux as a major source of CO2 to the atmosphere has led to active research. A large soil respiration database and recent reviews have compiled data, methods, and current challenges. However, some processes of soil CO2 production and transport have not received enough attention. In the current soil respiration literature it has mostly been assumed that soil CO2 efflux is the result of biological processes (i.e. soil respiration) but recent studies demonstrate that pedochemical and geological processes, such as geothermal and volcanic CO2 degassing, are potentially important in some areas. We carried out a study in the SE of Spain that showed that wind was the main determinant of the net ecosystem carbon balance with anomalous CO2 fluxes that could not be attributed to biological activity alone and hypothesised the presence of a geo-CO2 source given that the site was located over an tectonic fault in an ancient volcanic area (Rey et al., 2012a). After proving the existence of a geological CO2 source (Rey et al., 2013b), we developed a methodology using parameters of the boundary layer to derive biological (FBIO) and geological (FGEO) components and then partitioned FBIO into gross primary productivity and ecosystem respiration (Rey et al. 2013). We estimated that ca 50% of the carbon emitted annually came from geological sources. Thus these sources can be very important in some regions and confound our estimates of the CO2 exchange attributed to biological activity. This study highlights the need to improve our understanding of the processes involved in ecosystem and soil CO2 efflux and to standardise current methodologies among the scientific community. The complexity of the CO2 production and transport mechanisms will require a much better interdisciplinary integration (Rey 2014). This should be a research priority given the importance of this flux in the global carbon budget.

  1. Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, George E.

    2004-01-01

    Geological mapping and topical studies, primarily in the southern Acidalia Planitia/Cydonia Mensae region of Mars is presented. The overall objective was to understand geologic processes and crustal history in the northern lowland in order to assess the probability that an ocean once existed in this region. The major deliverable is a block of 6 1:500,000 scale geologic maps that will be published in 2004 as a single map at 1:1,000,000 scale along with extensive descriptive and interpretive text. A major issue addressed by the mapping was the relative ages of the extensive plains of Acidalia Planitia and the knobs and mesas of Cydonia Mensae. The mapping results clearly favor a younger age for the plains. Topical studies included a preliminary analysis of the very abundant small domes and cones to assess the possibility that their origins could be determined by detailed mapping and remote-sensing analysis. We also tested the validity of putative shorelines by using GIs to co-register full-resolution MOLA altimetry data and Viking images with these shorelines plotted on them. Of the 3 proposed shorelines in this area, one is probably valid, one is definitely not valid, and the third is apparently 2 shorelines closely spaced in elevation. Publications supported entirely or in part by this grant are included.

  2. Geology and Human Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The link between geology and human health may not seem obvious, but it many ways geology can affect public health in a variety of crucial ways. Certainly, the relationship between geological factors and water and air quality is one that continues to interest policy makers and others. This site explores these issues, and it was created by the people at Carleton College's Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty initiative. Here visitors can make use of a wide range of educational and supporting materials, including classroom activities, key visualizations, and collections of external links. First-time users may wish to start at the "Resources for Educators" area, which includes a brief overview titled "Essential components of geology and human health" and several helpful posters. The remaining materials can be viewed in sections that include "Bookshelf", "Visualizations", and "Internet Resources".

  3. Devil's Tower Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Park Service (NPS)

    This site from the National Park Service briefly addresses the geology of Devil's Tower. The evolution of various theories on the formation of the tower are discussed. A slide show of the emplacement of the tower is also available.

  4. Bedrock Geology Mapping Exercise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jim Miller

    This field mapping and map-making exercise is a capstone project for a course on Geological Maps. Over a weekend (~12 hours of field work), students collect lithologic and structural data from outcrops scattered over a one square mile area. Back in the classroom, students digitally compile their field data (outcrop, structure measurements, traverse locations) into ArcMAP. They infer geologic linework (faults and contacts) and units from this data in ArcMAP and then export these data layers into Illustrator. In Illustrator, they add ancillary map components (a cross section, description of map units, correlation diagram, map symbol legend,...) to create a final map at a 1:10,000 scale. Their maps are printed out on 11"x17" paper and saved as a pdf file. This exercise helps the students to appreciate how field data is collected and how these geologic facts are interpretively organized into a four-dimensional picture that is a geologic map.

  5. Experiencing Structural Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, George H.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate structural geology course that incorporates field lab time and research. Lectures, outside readings, and in-class experimentation are coordinated with the field work to prepare a scientific report. (MA)

  6. Stratigraphy and structural geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Wilhelms, D. E.; Greeley, R.; Guest, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The immediate goal of stratigraphy and structural geology is to reduce the enormous complexity of a planetary surface to comprehensible proportions by dividing the near-surface rocks into units and mapping their distribution and attitude.

  7. Economic Geology and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Presents tabulated data of questionnaire responses from 207 colleges. More than 30 groups of data are included relating to various aspects of geology programs including enrollment, student and faculty data and courses. (PR)

  8. External Resource: Geology Jeopardy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    This interactive Geology Jeopardy game can by used by the individual to review concepts in earth science or in the classroom as a classroom activity. Topics: rocks, minerals, topography, plate tectonics, weathering, erosion, astronomy, meteorology.

  9. North Dakota Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the North Dakota Geological Survey. Site materials include information on the state's oil, gas and coal resources, maps, publications, and regulations. The paleontology page features educational articles, information on fossil collecting, articles about fossil exhibits, and information on the state fossil collection. The state GIS hub creates and distributes digital spatial data that conforms to national mapping standards. The teaching tools page includes illustrations and descriptions of rocks and minerals found in the state, as well as information on meteorites and newsletter articles about teaching North Dakota geology. There are also links to landslide maps, surficial geology maps, and links to other survey publications such as reports, bulletins, field studies, other geological and topographic maps, and information on groundwater resources.

  10. Interactive Geologic Timeline Activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Environmental Literacy and Inquiry Working Group at Lehigh University

    In this learning activity, students use a web-based geologic timeline to examine temperature, CO2 concentration, and ice cover data to investigate how climate has changed during the last 715 million years.

  11. USGS Geologic Hazards

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Geologic Hazards section of the US Geological Survey (USGS) conducts research into the causes of geological phenomena such as landslides and earthquakes. The homepage connects visitors to the Geologic Hazards team's three main areas of endeavor. Geomagnetism provides links to the National Geomagnetic Information Center; Magnetic Observatories, Models, and Charts; and the Geomagnetic Information Node, which receives geomagnetic observatory data from around the world. The Landslide group studies the "causes and mechanisms of ground failure" to prevent "long-term losses and casualties." Their section provides links to the program and information center, publications, events, and current projects. The Earthquakes department hosts a wealth of information, including neotectonics, engineering seismology, and paleoseismology. Interactive maps are also provided.

  12. Manitoba Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site offers materials on Manitoba geology and minerals, mining and mineral exploration, a Digital Elevation Model of Southern Manitoba (DEMSM) landforms including oblique views, an interactive GIS map gallery of minerals and geology, a study of paleofloods in the Red River Basin including photographs illustrating how scientists delineated the paleofloods, and information on the Manitoba Protected Areas Initiative. Some maps and reports are available to download.

  13. Geologic Time Discussion Analogies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Noah Fay

    The slides provide a fun way of discussing the immensity of geologic time and help to grasp the age of the earth, the time gaps between major geologic events, and the relative minuteness of humans time on earth. After the discussion with the class, students are given opportunity to develop their own analogies using "everyday" things (other than the calendar and money examples used in this activity).

  14. Interpreting Geologic Sections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Paul Morris

    Athro, Limited is a for-profit corporation that publishes high school and college level biology, earth science, and geology course supplements and independent learning materials on the Web. This site provides instruction in interpreting the order of events in three hypothetical and one real geological section. For each section there is a list of events and an animation of the history of the section once the student has decided on the order of events.

  15. Geoscape Vancouver: Living with our Geological Landscape

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site is about the geology and dynamic landscape of the Vancouver, British Columbia area. The people of Vancouver live where the Fraser River breaches the coastal mountains to reach the inland sea of the Strait of Georgia. This landscape is underlain by a variety of earth materials and is continually shaped by earth processes - a geological landscape or geoscape. The processes include colliding crustal plates and mountain-building, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and the work of water, and past glaciers. References are given to printed and web resources for additional information.

  16. Impact, and its implications for geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin, Ursula B.

    The publication of seminal texts on geology and on meteoritics in the 1790s, laid the groundwork for the emergence of each discipline as a modern branch of science. Within the past three decades, impact cratering has become universally accepted as a process that sculptures the surfaces of planets and satellites throughout the solar system. Nevertheless, one finds in-depth discussions of impact processes mainly in books on the Moon or in surveys of the Solar System. The historical source of the separation between meteoritics and geology is easy to identify. It began with Hutton. Meteorite impact is an extraordinary event acting instantaneously from outside the Earth. It violates Hutton's principles, which were enlarged upon and firmly established as fundamental to the geological sciences by Lyell. The split between meteoritics and geology surely would have healed as early as 1892 if the investigations conducted by Gilbert (1843-1918) at the crater in northern Arizona had yielded convincing evidence of meteorite impact. The 1950s and 1960s saw a burgeoning of interest in impact processes. The same period witnessed the so-called revolution in the Earth Sciences, when geologists yielded up the idea of fixed continents and began to view the Earth's lithosphere as a dynamic array of horizontally moving plates. Plate tectonics, however, is fully consistent with the geological concepts inherited from Hutton: the plates slowly split, slide, and suture, driven by forces intrinsic to the globe.

  17. A Lithology Based Map Unit Schema For Onegeology Regional Geologic Map Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosdorf, N.; Richard, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    A system of lithogenetic categories for a global lithological map (GLiM, http://www.ifbm.zmaw.de/index.php?id=6460&L=3) has been compiled based on analysis of lithology/genesis categories for regional geologic maps for the entire globe. The scheme is presented for discussion and comment. Analysis of units on a variety of regional geologic maps indicates that units are defined based on assemblages of rock types, as well as their genetic type. In this compilation of continental geology, outcropping surface materials are dominantly sediment/sedimentary rock; major subdivisions of the sedimentary category include clastic sediment, carbonate sedimentary rocks, clastic sedimentary rocks, mixed carbonate and clastic sedimentary rock, colluvium and residuum. Significant areas of mixed igneous and metamorphic rock are also present. A system of global categories to characterize the lithology of regional geologic units is important for Earth System models of matter fluxes to soils, ecosystems, rivers and oceans, and for regional analysis of Earth surface processes at global scale. Because different applications of the classification scheme will focus on different lithologic constituents in mixed units, an ontology-type representation of the scheme that assigns properties to the units in an analyzable manner will be pursued. The OneGeology project is promoting deployment of geologic map services at million scale for all nations. Although initial efforts are commonly simple scanned map WMS services, the intention is to move towards data-based map services that categorize map units with standard vocabularies to allow use of a common map legend for better visual integration of the maps (e.g. see OneGeology Europe, http://onegeology-europe.brgm.fr/ geoportal/ viewer.jsp). Current categorization of regional units with a single lithology from the CGI SimpleLithology (http://resource.geosciml.org/201202/ Vocab2012html/ SimpleLithology201012.html) vocabulary poorly captures the lithologic character of such units in a meaningful way. A lithogenetic unit category scheme accessible as a GeoSciML-portrayal-based OGC Styled Layer Description resource is key to enabling OneGeology (http://oneGeology.org) geologic map services to achieve a high degree of visual harmonization.

  18. Impact of Large-scale Geological Architectures On Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troldborg, L.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Engesgaard, P.; Jensen, K. H.

    Geological and hydrogeological data constitutes the basis for assessment of ground- water flow pattern and recharge zones. The accessibility and applicability of hard ge- ological data is often a major obstacle in deriving plausible conceptual models. Nev- ertheless focus is often on parameter uncertainty caused by the effect of geological heterogeneity due to lack of hard geological data, thus neglecting the possibility of alternative conceptualizations of the large-scale geological architecture. For a catchment in the eastern part of Denmark we have constructed different geologi- cal models based on different conceptualization of the major geological trends and fa- cies architecture. The geological models are equally plausible in a conceptually sense and they are all calibrated to well head and river flow measurements. Comparison of differences in recharge zones and subsequently well protection zones emphasize the importance of assessing large-scale geological architecture in hydrological modeling on regional scale in a non-deterministic way. Geostatistical modeling carried out in a transitional probability framework shows the possibility of assessing multiple re- alizations of large-scale geological architecture from a combination of soft and hard geological information.

  19. Connecting Soils and Glacial Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Holly Dolliver

    The goal of this activity is to provide students an opportunity to connect soil science to surficial geology by using a Soil Surveys. By the end of the activity, students should be able to use a Soil Survey to identify and interpret landforms and surficial features. This activity can be adapted to variety of process (ex. eolian deposits, glacial deposits, bedrock weathering, etc.). County-level soil surveys are available in both paper and online formats for the majority of the United States. Designed for a geomorphology course Has minimal/no quantitative component

  20. Ore metals through geologic history.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C

    1985-03-22

    The ores of chromite, nickel, copper, and zinc show a wide distribution over geologic time, but those of iron, titanium, lead, uranium, gold, silver, molybdenum, tungsten, and tin are more restricted. Many of the limitations to specific time intervals are probably imposed by the evolving tectonic history of Earth interacting with the effects of the biomass on the evolution of the earth's s surface chemistry. Photosynthetic generation of free oxygen and "carbon" contributes significantlly to the diversity of redox potentials in both sedimentary and igneous-related processes of ore formation, influencing the selection of metals at the source, during transport, and at the site of ore deposition. PMID:17777763

  1. Illustrated Glossary of Geologic Terms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Provided by the Geology Department at Iowa State University, this handy illustrated glossary of geological terms is an excellent quick reference resource for students. Continuously upgraded with links to illustrations and text, this geological lexicon is based on the glossary in the textbook Earth: An Introduction to Geological Change by S. Judson and S.M. Richardson. Alphabetical tabs and internal links to related terms let users move quickly around this useful aid for geology students.

  2. The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Geology of Your Region

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-08-15

    The guides give teachers the background to make sense of regional and local geology in terms of a basic sequence of historical events and processes. The guides help teachers to meet national and state science standards by providing concrete examples of geologic processes that are closer to home than many classic textbook examples. The guides explain why geological features occur when and where they do in order to help students to remember and predict the nature of local geology.

  3. The Evolution of Dinosaurs Over Geologic Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan asks high school students to combine their knowledge of evolution, geologic time, and dinosaurs into a discussion of how these three topics overlap with regard to dinosaur evolution in the Cretaceous period. Students will read about the work of paleontologist Paul Sereno and list the dinosaurs he has discovered as well as the locations in which they were found and the time periods in which they lived; review the periods of geologic time; review the theory of evolution and write a paragraph explaining how geographic isolation would contribute to the evolutionary process; write paragraphs describing the changes to the continental layout of the Earth during the Cretaceous period; write paragraphs relating geological changes to dinosaur evolution during the Cretaceous period; and create posters or computer presentations illustrating the Earth during the Cretaceous period and the evolution processes of dinosaur species during this time.

  4. Geologic Sequestration Studies with Hawaiian Picrites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. T. Johnson; B. P. McGrail; H. T. Schaef

    2010-01-01

    Capturing and storing anthropogenic carbon dioxide in deep geologic formations is a potential CO2 mitigation solution being studied to reduce adverse effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations on the global climate. Basalt formations, widespread globally, are currently being considered as a long term storage option. Because combustion gas streams often contain impurities, it is also important to consider contaminants (e.g.,

  5. OneGeology-Europe Plus Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capova, Dana; Kondrova, Lucie

    2014-05-01

    The Geological Surveys of the European countries hold valuable resources of geological data but, to discover, understand and use this data efficiently, a good level of standardization is essential. The OneGeology-Europe project had the aim of making geological maps at a scale 1:1M from Europe discoverable and accessible, available under a common data license and described by multilingual metainformation. A harmonized specification for basic geological map data was developed so that significant progress towards harmonizing the datasets was achieved. Responsibility for the management of the OneGeology-Europe portal has been taken by EuroGeoSurveys and provided by CGS and BRGM. Of the 34 members of EuroGeoSurveys (EGS), only 20 participated in the OneGeology-Europe project (Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom), so the European area was not completely covered. At the 33rd General Meeting and Directors Workshop in 2012 it was therefore decided to establish a successor initiative OneGeology Europe Plus (1G-E+) with the purpose of extending the coverage by geological maps at a scale of 1:1 M to all the EGS member countries (including Albania, Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Iceland, Lithuania, Malta, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine) and also, if possible, to the other European countries (Belorussia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Faeroe Islands, Kosovo, Latvia, Macedonia, Moldavia, Montenegro, Serbia). In order to achieve the desired result, it has been necessary for the new GSOs who intend to supply the additional 1G-E standardized services to carry out the work using their own staff and resources. The technical guidance and other support have been provided by the 1G-E+ Technical Support Team, funded from the internal budgets of their respective surveys. The team is coordinated by the Czech Geological Survey (CGS) working with the Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Miničres (BRGM), the British Geological Survey (BGS), the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) and the Geological Survey of Slovenia (GeoZS). The Geological Survey of the Netherlands (TNO) decided to provide financial support for the initiative. The Technical Support Team has been providing the technical advice required to enable the inclusion of geological maps from new countries in the 1G-E Portal using the standards developed and accepted for 1G-E. Cookbooks, on-line help and a helpdesk are provided during the work. A technical workshop was organized at which all the technical steps required to reach the target solution were presented and discussed. All newcomers must agree the existing common license that was created for downloading the 1G-E data. It should be emphasized that the results will be displayed as part of the 1G-E project and metadata/portal infrastructures. The process is still ongoing because the harmonization work for most of the countries involved has been a demanding process. Some countries are facing difficulties because of the lack of expert personnel or insufficient resources of data. Despite some problems, the 1G-E+ initiative and the work involved has contributed to effective networking and technical cooperation between the GSOs across the wider European region.

  6. Compositional Controls on the Geological Behavior of Icy Satellites, and a Call for More Lab Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    The tectonic, volcanic, and some other important types of geologic activity of solid planetary objects arises mainly from the differential partitioning and transport of thermal energy that produces rheological structures, density inversions, and unequilibrated pressure/stress gradients, thereby causing conditions that are prone to advective mass transfers and restabilization of stress conditions. The composition of icy satellites and solid planets determines the material properties of the condensed materials, and thus their physical responses to heating and virtually all geological processes. Many key mechanical and thermodynamic properties (e.g., melting temperature, effective viscosity, and thermal conductivity) vary across orders of magnitude among the volatile ices, silicates, metals, liquid solutions, gases, and other substances making up icy satellites. Given this wide range of material properties, it is easy to understand why there is so much variability in the appearance and geologic processes of icy satellites. However, another striking discovery are some key geological/morphological similarities among many satellites. There may be three explanations for their similar appearances. (1) Dissimilar materials and dissimilar satellite attributes and conditions may give rise to dissimilar features that merely appear to be similar but are actually produced by very different processes. (2) The icy satellites are actually made of very similar materials and have responded with roughly similar processes to make similar features. (3) The icy satellites are made of dissimilar materials and operate under disparate conditions, but nevertheless many of them tend to exhibit similar geological/geophysical processes so long as they are heated sufficiently. Examples may be cited that seem consistent with each of these explanations. Theoretical understanding and modeling of satellite differentiation, cryovolcanism, solid state diapirism, magnetic field induction, and other geologic and geophysical processes depends on adequate laboratory measurements of the physical and thermodynamic properties of ices, salts, silicates, brines, gases, and other materials making up icy satellites. Examples of existing measurements of solid/liquid phase equilibria, gas solubility in aqueous solutions, thermal conductivity of solids, and rheology of aqueous solutions, ices, and salts are shown, and theoretical applications to problems of cryovolcanism and tectonism on Enceladus and Titan are given. These applications, and comparisons to silicate systems controlling much about the geology of the terrestrial planets, suggest that the third explanation above may be a key to understanding strangely familiar landscapes on Titan and Enceladus. An insufficiency in our laboratory data and our compositional knowledge of icy satellites limits our understanding of those worlds.

  7. State geological surveys: Their growing national role in policy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerhard, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    State geological surveys vary in organizational structure, but are political powers in the field of geology by virtue of their intimate knowledge of and involvement in legislative and political processes. Origins of state geological surveys lie in the recognition of society that settlement and prosperity depended on access to a variety of natural resources, resources that are most familiar to geologists. As the surveys adapt to modern societal pressures, making geology serve the public has become the new mission for many state geological surveys. Geologic mapping was the foundation of most early surveys, and the state surveys have brought mapping back into the public realm to meet today's challenges of growing population density, living environment desires, and resource access.

  8. Activities in planetary geology for the physical and earth sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalli, R.; Greeley, R.

    1982-01-01

    A users guide for teaching activities in planetary geology, and for physical and earth sciences is presented. The following topics are discussed: cratering; aeolian processes; planetary atmospheres, in particular the Coriolis Effect and storm systems; photogeologic mapping of other planets, Moon provinces and stratigraphy, planets in stereo, land form mapping of Moon, Mercury and Mars, and geologic features of Mars.

  9. The History of the Earth: Darwin, Geology and Landscape Art

    E-print Network

    of geological time, all of human history was but a fleeting moment. Charles Darwin surely had such ideas in mind necessary for what he believed to be the very slow process of evolution by natural selection. In Origin#12;2 The History of the Earth: Darwin, Geology and Landscape Art REBECCA BEDELL Nineteenth

  10. Geological and mathematical framework for failure modes in granular rock

    E-print Network

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    Geological and mathematical framework for failure modes in granular rock Atilla Aydina, *, Ronaldo processes in granular rock and provide a geological framework for the corresponding structures. We describe show that sharp structures overlap older narrow tabular structures in the same rock. This switch

  11. Geodynamics applications of continuum physics to geological problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Turcotte; G. Schubert

    1982-01-01

    This textbook deals with the fundamental physical processes necessary for an understanding of plate tectonics and a variety of geologic phenomena. The first chapter reviews plate tectonics; its main purpose is to provide physics, chemistry, and engineering students with the geologic background necessary to understand the applications throughout the rest of the book. It goes on to discuss in following

  12. EAS 2600: EARTH PROCESSES Spring, 2010

    E-print Network

    Black, Robert X.

    , it is important that you understand the processes that shape the landscape, cause natural hazards, influence climate change, and produce natural resources. Knowledge of how the Earth works can also help you in your daily lives. For example, it is useful to be able to evaluate potential geologic hazards when buying

  13. NADM Conceptual Model 1.0 -- A Conceptual Model for Geologic Map Information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    North American Geologic Map Data Model (NADM) Steering Committee Data Model Design Team

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The NADM Data Model Design Team was established in 1999 by the North American Geologic Map Data Model Steering Committee (NADMSC) with the purpose of drafting a geologic map data model for consideration as a standard for developing interoperable geologic map-centered databases by state, provincial, and federal geological surveys. The model is designed to be a technology-neutral conceptual model that can form the basis for a web-based interchange format using evolving information technology (e.g., XML, RDF, OWL), and guide implementation of geoscience databases in a common conceptual framework. The intended purpose is to allow geologic information sharing between geologic map data providers and users, independent of local information system implementation. The model emphasizes geoscience concepts and relationships related to information presented on geologic maps. Design has been guided by an informal requirements analysis, documentation of existing databases, technology developments, and other standardization efforts in the geoscience and computer-science communities. A key aspect of the model is the notion that representation of the conceptual framework (ontology) that underlies geologic map data must be part of the model, because this framework changes with time and understanding, and varies between information providers. The top level of the model distinguishes geologic concepts, geologic representation concepts, and metadata. The geologic representation part of the model provides a framework for representing the ontology that underlies geologic map data through a controlled vocabulary, and for establishing the relationships between this vocabulary and a geologic map visualization or portrayal. Top-level geologic classes in the model are Earth material (substance), geologic unit (parts of the Earth), geologic age, geologic structure, fossil, geologic process, geologic relation, and geologic event.

  14. CONSERVING GEODIVERSITY, THE IMPORTANCE OF VALUING OUR GEOLOGICAL HERITAGE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Pemberton

    Most people associate nature conservation with the protection of biodiversity. Quite clearly there is a lot more to nature, and to conservation, and this is where geoconservation or the conservation of geodiversity needs to be promoted and taken more seriously. It will assist to communicate the fascinating history of the earth and our continent to the large majority of people

  15. Origins of Sinuous and Braided Channels on Ascraeus Mons, Mars - A Keck Geology Consortium Undergraduate Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wet, A. P.; Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.

    2012-01-01

    Water has clearly played an important part in the geological evolution of Mars. There are many features on Mars that were almost certainly formed by fluvial processes -- for example, the channels Kasei Valles and Ares Vallis in the Chryse Planitia area of Mars are almost certainly fluvial features. On the other hand, there are many channel features that are much more difficult to interpret -- and have been variously attributed to volcanic and fluvial processes. Clearly unraveling the details of the role of water on Mars is extremely important, especially in the context of the search of extinct or extant life. In this project we built on our recent work in determining the origin of one channel on the southwest rift apron of Ascraeus Mons. This project, funded by the Keck Geology Consortium and involving 4 undergraduate geology majors took advantage of the recently available datasets to map and analyze similar features on Ascraeus Mons and some other areas of Mars. A clearer understanding of how these particular channel features formed might lead to the development of better criteria to distinguish how other Martian channel features formed. Ultimately this might provide us with a better understanding of the role of volcanic and fluvial processes in the geological evolution of Mars.

  16. Geology By Lightplane

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Maher, Louis J.

    In 1966, Professor Louis J. Maher of the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Geology and Geophysics piloted a department-owned Cessna over the continental US taking photos for use in his geology courses. As Maher flew, his trusty co-pilot and graduate assistant, Charles Mansfield, snapped the photos. The resulting collection is an assortment of breathtaking images of classic geological features, now available online for noncommercial use by educators (download via FTP). Maher gives us birds-eye views of structural features in Wyoming's Wind River Range, sedimentary strata in Arches National Park and the Grand Canyon, glacial landscapes in Northern Minnesota, and ancient lava flows in Arizona, to name just a few.

  17. The geology of Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, E. M.; Lucchitta, B. K.; Wilhelms, D. E.; Plescia, J. B.; Squyres, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    A broad outline of the geologic history of Ganymede is presented, obtained from a first attempt to map the geology on a global scale and to interpret the characteristics of the observed geologic units. Features of the ancient cratered terrain such as craters and palimpsests, furrows and troughs, are discussed. The grooved terrain is described, including its sulci and cells, and the age relation of these units is considered along with the structure and origin of this terrain. The Gilgamesh Basin and Western Equatorial Basin in the post grooved terrain are treated, as are the bright and dark ray craters and the regolith. The development of all these regions and features is discussed in context. For the regolith, this includes the effect of water migration, sputtering, and thermal annealing. The histories of the ancient cratered terrain, the grooved terrain, and the post grooved terrain are presented.

  18. Minnesota Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Established in 1872 by the State of Minnesota as part of the University of Minnesota, the Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS) serves the people of Minnesota by providing systematic geoscience information to support the stewardship of water, land, and mineral resources. This rather lovely digital collection brings together a record of all items published by the MGS since its creation. Here, visitors will find documents, reports, maps, and GIS data for online viewing or downloading as well. The thematic collections here include the Aeromagnetic Map Series, the annual reports of the Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey, and the wonderful county atlas series. Visitors with a penchant for geology, natural history, and geography will find much to enjoy here.

  19. Sedimentology and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorlykke, K.

    1989-01-01

    In this introduction to sedimentology and petroleum geology the subjects, which are closely related but mostly treated separately, are integrated. The first part covers the basic aspects of sedimentology, sedimentary geochemistry and diagenesis, including brief discussions of flow in rivers and channels, types of sediment transport, lake and river deposits, deltas (river-dominated, tide-dominated, and wave-dominated) and the water budget. Principles of stratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy and basin modeling form the basis for the last part on petroleum geology. Here subjects include the composition of kerogen and hydrocarbons, theories of migration and trapping of hydrocarbons and properties of reservoir rocks. Finally, short introductions to well logging and production geology are given.

  20. Global sedimentary geology program

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, R.N.; Clifton, H.E.; Weimer, R.J.

    1986-07-01

    The Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists, in collaboration with the International Association of Sedimentologists and the International Union of Geological Sciences Committee on Sedimentology, is developing a new international study under the provisional title of Global Sedimentary Geology Program (GSGP). Initially, three research themes are being considered: (1) event stratigraphy-the documentation of examples of mass extinctions, eustatic fluctuations in sea level, major episodes of volcanisms, and changes in ocean composition; (2) facies models in time and space-an expansion of the existing data base of examples of facies models (e.G., deltas, fluvial deposits, and submarine fans) and global-scale study of the persistence of facies at various times in geologic history; and (3) sedimentary indices of paleogeography and tectonics-the use of depositional facies and faunas in paleogeography and in assessing the timing, locus, and characteristics of tectonism. Plans are being developed to organize pilot projects in each of these themes.

  1. Geological fakes and frauds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffell, Alastair; Majury, Niall; Brooks, William E.

    2012-02-01

    Some geological fakes and frauds are carried out solely for financial gain (mining fraud), whereas others maybe have increasing aesthetic appeal (faked fossils) or academic advancement (fabricated data) as their motive. All types of geological fake or fraud can be ingenious and sophisticated, as demonstrated in this article. Fake gems, faked fossils and mining fraud are common examples where monetary profit is to blame: nonetheless these may impact both scientific theory and the reputation of geologists and Earth scientists. The substitution or fabrication of both physical and intellectual data also occurs for no direct financial gain, such as career advancement or establishment of belief (e.g. evolution vs. creationism). Knowledge of such fakes and frauds may assist in spotting undetected geological crimes: application of geoforensic techniques helps the scientific community to detect such activity, which ultimately undermines scientific integrity.

  2. Geology for Everyone

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Geological Survey of Ireland website can increase the public's excitement about geology by offering simple, straightforward materials on the basics of geology. The website is divided into numerous themes such as Volcanoes, Rocks, Caves, and the Water Cycle. The links from each of the headings introduce the topic with simple descriptions and remarkable pictures and offer easy experiments when applicable. Students and educators can take virtual tours of the Ox Mountains, Killiney Beach, and other Irish landscapes. Everyone should visit the Landscapes for the Living link, which offers outstanding images of the diverse landscapes of Europe. While some of the themes are currently under construction, including Planet Earth, Plate Tectonics, and Earthquakes, the authors indicate that these materials will be added in the near future.

  3. Lunar Crustal Magnetism: Correlations with Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Frey, S.; Acuna, M. H.; Hood, L. L.; Binder, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    With Lunar Prospector reflectometry data we now have sufficient surface coverage to allow detailed comparisons between crustal magnetism and geology. We find substantial evidence that lunar magnetism is dominated by the effects of impact processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. The Geology of Comet 19/P Borrelly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, D. T.; Boice, D. C; Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Nelson, R. M.; Oberst, J.; Sandel, B. R.; Soderblom, L. A.; Stern, S. A.; Thomas, N.

    2002-01-01

    The Deep Space One spacecraft flew by Comet 19P/Borrelly on September 22, 2001 and returned a rich array of imagery with resolutions of up to 48 m/pixel. These images provide a window into the surface structure, processes, and geological history of a comet. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Methods for probabilistic assessments of geologic hazards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. John Mann

    1988-01-01

    Although risk analysis today is considered to include three separate aspects (1) identifing sources of risk, (2) estimating probabilities quantitatively, and (3) evaluating consequences of risk, here only estimation of probabilities for natural geologic events, processes, and phenomena is addressed. Ideally, evaluation of potential future hazards includes an objective determination of probabilities that have been derived from past occurrences of

  6. Methods for probabilistic assessments of geologic hazards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mann

    1987-01-01

    Although risk analysis today is considered to include three separate aspects: (1) identifying sources of risk, (2) estimating probabilities quantitatively, and (3) evaluating consequences of risk, here, only estimation of probabilities for natural geologic events, processes, and phenomena is addressed. Ideally, evaluation of potential future hazards includes an objective determination of probabilities that has been derived from past occurrences of

  7. Ancient Martian Lakestands and Fluvial Processes in Iani Chaos: Geology of Light-Toned Layered Deposits and their Relationship to Ares Vallis Outflow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guallini, Luca; Gilmore, Martha; Marinangeli, Lucia; Thomas, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Iani Chaos is a ~30,000 square kilometers region that lies at the head of the Ares Vallis outflow channel system. Mapping of Ares Vallis reveals multiple episodes of erosion, probably linked to several discharge events from the Iani Chaos aquifer. We present the first detailed geomorphological map of the Iani region. Five chaos units have been distinguished with varying degrees of modification (primarily by erosion and fracturing), starting from a common terrain (Noachian highlands). We observe a general progressive decrease of their mean elevation from the Mesas, Mesas & Knobs and Hummocky (Hy) terrains to the Knobs and Knobby morphologies. This trend is consistent with an initial collapse of the original surface with an increase of the fracturing and/or of the erosion. Light-toned Layered Deposits (LLD) have been also mapped and described in Iani Chaos. These terrains are clearly distinguished by a marked light-toned albedo, high thermal inertia and a pervasively fractured morphology. LLD both fill the basins made by the collapsed chaotic terrains and are found to be partially modified by the chaos formation. LLD also overlap chaos mounds or are themselves eroded into mounds after deposition. These stratigraphic relationships demonstrate that LLD deposition occurred episodically in the Iani region and throughout the history of the development of the chaos. Water seems to have had an active role in the geological history of Iani. The composition and morphologies of the LLD are consistent with deposition in an evaporitic environment and with erosion by outflows, requiring stable water on the surface. For the first time, we have also mapped and analyzed potential fluvial features (i.e., channels, streamlined islands, terraces, grooved surfaces) on the surface of the LLD. These landforms describe a fluvial system that can be traced from central Iani and linked northward to Ares Vallis. Using topographic data, we have compared the elevation of the LLD and channel units and find that their altitudes are remarkably similar to the altitude of the floors of the major Ares Vallis channels. This is decisive evidence of 1) a possible fluvial system within Iani linked to the Ares Vallis outflow system, characterized by five episodes of outflow at least (S1 to S5), and 2) of the existence of the LLD within Iani during the occurrence of the outflows (i.e., the LLD are coeval with or postdate the Ares Vallis outflow channels). On the basis of our analysis, we propose the following formation model for Iani Chaos: 1) Initial fracturing and tectonic subsidence of the pristine Noachian materials and subsequent outflow erosion of the bedrock (Ares Vallis S1 channel origin); 2) Evaporitic deposition of older LLD units on top and between chaotic terrains. Layering suggests cyclic wetting and drying; 3) Tectonic subsidence and fluvial erosion of chaos and LLD (Ares Vallis S2 to S3 channels); 4) Deposition of younger LLD units in central and northern Iani; 5) Tectonic subsidence and outflows, erosion of chaos and LLD (Ares Vallis S4 to S5 channel origin and subsequent downdropping of NW and N(e) Iani).

  8. Roping Geologic Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Randall Richardson

    After having talked about the geologic time scale (Precambrian: prior to 570 Ma; Paleozoic: 570-245 Ma; Mesozoic: 245-65 Ma; Cenozoic: 65 Ma - Present), I ask for two volunteers from the class to hold a rope that is 50 feet long. I say that one end is the beginning of the Earth (4.6 billion years ago), and the other is today. I then give out 16 clothes pins and ask various students to put a cloths pin on the 'time line' at various 'geologic events'. For example, I ask them to put one where the dinosaurs died out (end of the Mesozoic). They almost invariably put it much too old (65 Ma is less than 2% of Earth history!). Then I ask them to put one on their birthday (they now laugh). Then I ask them to put one where we think hominoids (humans) evolved (~3-4 Ma), and they realize that we have not been here very long geologically. Then I ask them to put one at the end of the Precambrian, where life took off in terms of the numbers of species, etc. They are amazed that this only represents less than 15% of Earth history. Throughout the activity I have a quiz going on where the students calculate percentages of Earth History for major geologic events, and compare it to their own ages. On their time scale, the dinosaurs died only about two 'months' ago! The exercise is very effective at letting them get a sense of how long geologic time is, and how 'recently' some major geologic events happened when you consider a time scale that is the age of the earth.

  9. Reports of Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, H. E. (compiler); Watters, T. R. (compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Topics include outer planets and satellites; asteroids and comets; Venus; lunar origin and solar dynamics; cratering process; planetary interiors, petrology, and geochemistry; volcanic processes; aeolian processes and landforms; fluvial processes; geomorphology; periglacial and permafrost processes; remote sensing and regolith studies; structure, tectonics, and stratigraphy; geological mapping, cartography, and geodesy; and radar applications.

  10. Petroleum development geology

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of geological concepts and reservoir engineering practices as they apply to the field of development (production) geology is presented. The author touches on nearly every aspect of the field in the 21 chapters of the book. He summarizes the basic depositional origin, sedimentary characteristics, and petrology of hydrocarbon-bearing rocks. He discusses physical properties, origin, and migration of subsurface oil and gas, oil field water, and their behavior, including subsurface pressures and fluid mechanics. Also covered are various methods of estimating reserves, the major tools of the trade and their limitations, and case histories.

  11. Introduction to Geology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jagoutz, Oliver

    If you are having difficulty remembering the details of the Earth's geological structure or the nature of major minerals and rock types, you can consult this excellent introductory course offered as part of MIT's OpenCourseWare initiative. The materials are drawn from Professors Perron and Jagoutz's 2011 "Introduction to Geology" course, and they include a number of lecture notes, available for download in PDF file format. The course is designed for undergraduates, though anyone can benefit from examining the materials. Visitors can make their way through lecture notes that cover metamorphic rocks, rock deformation, earthquakes, and the formation of continents.

  12. Geological assessment of the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the sensitivity of the system to greenhouse gas changes cannot yet be constrained by paleoclimate data below its present large range. Geologic records do not support one of the major predictions of greenhouse models-namely, that tropical sea surface temperatures will increase. Geologic data also suggest that winter cooling in high-latitude land areas is less than predicted by models. As the above-mentioned predictions appear to be systemic features of the present generation of climate models, some significant changes in model design may be required to reconcile models and geologic data. However, full acceptance of this conclusion requires more measurements and more systematic compilations of existing geologic data. Since progress in data collection in this area has been quite slow, uncertainties associated with these conclusions may persist for some time. 106 refs., 6 figs.

  13. A generalized geologic map of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Masursky, H.; Saunders, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    A generalized geologic map of Mars has been constructed largely on the basis of differences in the topography of the surface. A number of topographic features on Mars whose form is highly diagnostic of their origin are shown. Of particular note are the shield volcanoes and lava plains. In some areas, the original features have been considerably modified by subsequent erosional and tectonic processes. These have not, however, resulted in homogenization of the planet's surface, but rather have emphasized its variegated character by leaving a characteristic imprint in specific areas. The topography of the planet, therefore, lends itself well to remote geologic interpretation.

  14. Mitochondrial import and processing of rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase II defines the amino terminus of the mature protein. Possibility of differential modification of the rat and human isoforms.

    PubMed

    Brown, N F; Esser, V; Gonzalez, A D; Evans, C T; Slaughter, C A; Foster, D W; McGarry, J D

    1991-08-15

    [35S]Methionine-labeled porcine heart citrate synthase (used here as a positive control) and rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) were generated by in vitro transcription and translation of their cDNA constructs in appropriate Bluescript plasmids. Each product was imported into rat liver mitochondria in an energy-dependent manner to yield an immunoprecipitable protein of smaller size that comigrated with the corresponding purified enzyme. The size shift occurring with citrate synthase was consistent with the removal of the postulated 27-amino acid leader peptide. To determine the amino terminus of mature CPT II, [35S]methionine- or [3H]leucine-labeled material (after import and processing) was subjected to Edman degradation, followed by counting of the radioactivity released on each cycle. The results established that the precursor targeting peptide was cleaved between leucine 25 and serine 26 in the previously deduced amino acid sequence. Taken in conjunction with the recent report of Finocchiaro et al. (Finocchiaro, G., Taroni, F., Rocchi, M., Martin, A. L., Colombo, I., Tarelli, G. T., and DiDonato, S. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 661-665), the present results establish three key points concerning the rat and human forms of CPT II. First, it appears that in both species the initial translation product contains 658 amino acids and, upon mitochondrial import, is reduced in length by 25 residues through cleavage at an identical site. Second, the difference in electrophoretic mobility between the two mature proteins (documented earlier) presumably reflects either anomalous behavior of one of them on polyacrylamide gels or differential covalent modification. Finally, the recent suggestion by Brady et al. (Brady, P. S., Liu, J. S., Park, E. A., Hanson, R. W., and Brady, L. J. (1991) FASEB J. 5, A817) that our CPT II cDNA construct is incomplete in the 5'-coding region is refuted. PMID:1869564

  15. Mass transfer and transport in a geologic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.; Ahn, J.; Kajiwara, S.; Kim, C.L.; Kimura, H.; Lung, H.; Williams, W.J.; Zavoshy, S.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report is in a continuing series of reports that present analytic solutions for the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides from geologic repositories of nuclear waste. Previous reports have dealt mainly with radionuclide transport in the far-field, away from the effects of the repository. In the present report, the emphasis is on near-field processes, the transfer and transport of radionuclides in the vicinity of the waste packages. The primary tool used in these analyses is mass transfer theory from chemical engineering. The thrust of our work is to develop methods for predicting the performance of geologic repositories. The subjects treated in the present report are: radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill; analysis of radionuclide transport through a backfill using a non-linear sorption isotherm; radionuclide transport from a prolate spheroid-equivalent waste form with a backfill; radionuclide transport from a spherical-equivalent waste form through a backfill, where the solubility, diffusivity and retardation coefficients are temperature dependent; a coupled near-field, far-field analysis where dissolution and migration rates are temperature dependent; transport of radionuclides from a point source in a three-dimensional flow field; and a general solution for the transport of radioactive chains in geologic media. There are several important results from the numerical evaluations. First, radioactive decay, higher sorption in the rock and the backfill steepens the gradient for mass transfer, and lead to higher dissolution rates. This is contrary to what was expected by some other workers, but is shown clearly in the analytical solutions. Second, the backfill serves to provide sorption sites so that there is a delay in the arrival of radionuclides in the rock, although this effect is not so important for the steady-state transport of long-lived radionuclides.

  16. Geographic Variation in the Acoustic Traits of Greater Horseshoe Bats: Testing the Importance of Drift and Ecological Selection in Evolutionary Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Keping; Luo, Li; Kimball, Rebecca T.; Wei, Xuewen; Jin, Longru; Jiang, Tinglei; Li, Guohong; Feng, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of intraspecific geographic variation of signaling systems provide insight into the microevolutionary processes driving phenotypic divergence. The acoustic calls of bats are sensitive to diverse evolutionary forces, but processes that shape call variation are largely unexplored. In China, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum displays a diverse call frequency and inhabits a heterogeneous landscape, presenting an excellent opportunity for this kind of research. We quantified geographic variation in resting frequency (RF) of echolocation calls, estimated genetic structure and phylogeny of R. ferrumequinum populations, and combined this with climatic factors to test three hypotheses to explain acoustic variation: genetic drift, cultural drift, and local adaptation. Our results demonstrated significant regional divergence in frequency and phylogeny among the bat populations in China's northeast (NE), central-east (CE) and southwest (SW) regions. The CE region had higher frequencies than the NE and SW regions. Drivers of RF divergence were estimated in the entire range and just the CE/NE region (since these two regions form a clade). In both cases, RF divergence was not correlated with mtDNA or nDNA genetic distance, but was significantly correlated with geographic distance and mean annual temperature, indicating cultural drift and ecological selection pressures are likely important in shaping RF divergence among different regions in China. PMID:23950926

  17. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-print Network

    Harbor, David

    in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic maps and geologic cross sections. A big part of this task is developing a skill for thinking in 3-D shows the rocks that occur at the surface (or just below the soil) and is usually printed on top

  18. USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Infobank

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This clearinghouse provides organized access to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) coastal and marine data and metadata. The facilities section features material on Coastal and Marine Geology (CMG) regional centers such as maps and information about staff, facilities, labs, research libraries and archives. The Atlas includes maps for specific geographic areas and information about specific types of data within the area such as bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, sampling, and others. The Field Activities section provides information about specific data collection activities (date, place, crew, equipment used, data collected, publications). The Field Activity Collection System (FACS) provides information about field activities (overviews, crew lists, equipment lists, and events). The "Geology School" provides general, broad-based information about earth science concepts, processes and terminology, indexed to keywords. There is also a set of links to additional databases, software tools and viewers, and to related topics.

  19. Bathymetric Variation in Recruitment and Relative Importance of Pre- and Post-Settlement Processes in Coral Assemblages at Lyudao (Green Island), Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, Yoko; Lin, Che-Hung; Chung, Ai-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Studies on coral communities have typically been conducted in shallow waters (?5 m). However, in the face of climate change, and as shallow coral communities become degraded, a greater understanding of deeper coral communities is needed as they become the main reef remnants, playing a central role in the future of coral reefs. To understand the dynamics of deeper coral assemblages, the recruitment and taxonomic composition of different life-stages at 5 and 15 m depths were compared at three locations in Lyudao, southeastern Taiwan in 2010. Coral recruits (<1 cm diameter, <4 months old) were examined using settlement plates. Juvenile corals (1–5 cm, several years old) were examined with quadrats, and adult corals (>5 cm, several years to decades old) were examined using transect lines. Pocilloporid and poritid corals had similar and higher numbers of recruits at 5 m compared to 15 m, whereas acroporid recruits were more abundant at 15 m. The primary cause for the former may be larval behavior, such that they position themselves in shallow waters, while that for the latter may be the dominance of brooding acroporid species (Isopora spp.) at 15 m. The taxonomic composition, especially between recruits and juveniles/adults, was more similar at 15 m than at 5 m. These results suggest a change in the relative importance of pre- and post-settlement processes in assemblage determinants with depth; coral assemblages in shallow habitats (more disturbed) are more influenced by post-settlement processes (mortality events), while those in deeper habitats (more protected) are more influenced by pre-settlement processes (larval supply). PMID:24312304

  20. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  1. THE ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGICAL HAZARDS AND DISASTERS IN NEWFOUNDLAND: AN UPDATE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Batterson; D. G. E. Liverman; J. Ryan; D. Taylor

    A geological disaster occurs when natural geological processes impact on our activities, either through loss of life or injury, or through economic loss. A geological hazard is a potential disaster. Many Newfoundland communities have devel- oped at the base of steep slopes and are, therefore, prone to landslides and avalanches, or are built adjacent to the coast and are susceptible

  2. VISITORS' GEOLOGICAL CONCEPTIONS AND MEANING MAKING AT PETRIFIED FOREST NATIONAL PARK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nievita F. Bueno Watts; Steven Semken; Monica Pineda; Cheryl Alvarado

    When observing the natural landscape at National Parks, how do visitors make meaning of the geology? Interpretative geologic displays and programs here are typically uninformed by knowledge of visitor conceptions. Visitors' ideas about geological processes and landscape formation at Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona were investigated by interviewing 80 visitor groups (N= 235) at a landscape overlook and analyzing

  3. Planetary Geology: A Teacher's Guide with Activities in Physical and Earth Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educator's guide discusses planetary geology. Exercises are grouped into five units: (1) introduction to geologic processes; (2) impact cratering activities; (3) planetary atmospheres; (4) planetary surfaces; and (5) geologic mapping. Suggested introductory exercises are noted at the beginning of each exercise. Each activity includes an…

  4. Advances in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A wide variety of topics on planetary geology are presented. Subjects include stratigraphy and geomorphology of Copernicus, the Mamers valle region, and other selected regions of Mars and the Moon. Crater density and distribution are discussed for Callisto and the lunar surface. Spectroscopic analysis is described for Europa and Ganymede.

  5. IDAHO FLUVIAL GEOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restricted availability. Major Attributes: Polygons described by geologic type codes & descriptions. May be incorporated into maps at the state/county/basin scale. Probably too coarse for use at the site scale. Scale: 1:500:000. Extent: Idaho. Projection: Albers. Source: ...

  6. Geology by Lightplane

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Louis J. Maher

    This site is a collection of aerial images of US geological features. Detailed 2000-pixel-wide JPEG versions of these photos (averaging 1MB in size and suitable for video projection or for slides) can be down-loaded from an FTP site. There are also text captions for the photographs.

  7. Geologic evolution of Arizona

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Penny; S. J. Reynolds

    1989-01-01

    Seven years in the making, the 35 papers in this volume summarize the stratigraphic, structural, and tectonic evolution of Arizona from Precambrian through Quaternary time. Intended as a compendium of current knowledge of Arizona geology, the papers synthesize previous work with new data, ideas, and concepts as well as identifying unresolved problems for future research. Emphasis is placed on the

  8. Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    Included are a teacher's guidebook and two filmstrips, "Geology of Wisconsin," and associated materials. The following are described: outline of objectives; suggested use of the filmstrips and guidebook; outline of the filmstrip content; four pages of illustrations suitable for duplication; a test for each filmstrip; and a list of additional…

  9. Soviet geology, 1976

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. Vakhrameyev

    1976-01-01

    The geological history of the Jurassic period shows that the most abrupt change in physiogeographical, and particularly in climatic, conditions occured not at its lower or upper limit but at the boundary between the middle and late epochs. This is shown especially clearly by a study of the lacustral and continental sediments which form such a significant feature of the

  10. Geological and Inorganic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, L. L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review focusing on techniques and their application to the analysis of geological and inorganic materials that offer significant changes to research and routine work. Covers geostandards, spectroscopy, plasmas, microbeam techniques, synchrotron X-ray methods, nuclear activation methods, chromatography, and electroanalytical methods.…

  11. Dinosaur Paleobiology Geology 331

    E-print Network

    Kammer, Thomas

    Dinosaur Paleobiology Geology 331 Paleontology #12;Dinosaurs are popular with the public #12;Jack Horner, Montana State Univ. #12;Field Work in Montana #12;A dinosaur "drumstick" in its field jacket. #12;Abundant vascular canals in dinosaur bone support the warm- blooded theory #12;Thin section of dinosaur

  12. Geological impacts on nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews the nutritional roles of mineral elements, as part of a volume on health implications of geology. The chapter addresses the absorption and post-absorptive utilization of the nutritionally essential minerals, including their physiological functions and quantitative requirements....

  13. Glacial Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    This publication is a teacher's resource and guidebook for the presentation of the three filmstrips in the "Glacial Geology of Wisconsin" series. The first filmstrip is subtitled, "Evidence of the Glaciers," the second "How the Glaciers Reshaped the Landscape," and the third "Fossils of the Ice Age." Included are a list of objectives, an outline…

  14. Appendix E: Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2008-01-17

    This appendix provides a detailed description of geology under the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site, emphasizing the areas around tank farms. It is to be published by client CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., as part of a larger, multi-contractor technical report.

  15. American Geological Institute Homepage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the American Geological Institute (AGI). Visitors can access information about geoscience education, public policy, environmental geoscience, careers in geoscience, publications, news articles, and events. Materials presented here include databases, curriculum materials, legislation and appropriations information, and an image bank.

  16. Geological Time Machine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Allen Collins

    This University of California site provides an interactive geologic time scale to explore the history of the Earth. Beginning in the Precambrian Eon (4.6 million years ago) and ending today (Holocene Epoch), each Epoch, Period, Era, and Eon are covered. Information provided includes ancient life, dates, descriptions of major events, localities, tectonics, and stratigraphy. Links to additional resources are also available.

  17. Analysis of geological events

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. L. Burns

    1975-01-01

    Geological events, such as emplacement of granite or growth of slaty cleavage, may be ordered into a sequence by two methods. One is to assign each event a place in a time scale, such as years before the present, which amounts to assigning events an age designation from the set of real numbers. In ordering such a list, the algebra

  18. Geology Fieldnotes: Noatak National Monument

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This feature discusses the geologic framework, history, tectonic setting, and soil and rock types of Northwest Alaska, as seen in the Noatak National Monument. Links are also provided to maps, visitor information, and to geological and conservation organizations.

  19. Physical Geology: Principles and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skehan, James W.

    1984-04-01

    Textbooks on physical geology have proliferated over the past 20 years or more, during which time most fields have undergone a subject matter explosion. The challenge of authoring such a textbook is to accurately summarize the most important factual and theoretical results and to present the material in a pedagogically attractive and meaningful manner. The authors mainly have met that challenge.Basically, I could teach the course quite happily using this book as the text. An attractive feature is that the authors have summarized those aspects o f the science with which I am most familar in a generally acceptable and interesting manner. This includes excellent line drawings and block diagrams calculated to be very helpful to the student. Those chapters dealing with areas of the authors' scientific expertise are understandably stronger and smoother than some others. A useful perspective for the beginning student and teacher is an explicit discussion of geology as a science with a comparison and contrast of methods and results in relation to other fields of science.

  20. Leverage and Delegation in Developing an Information Model for Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    GeoSciML is an information model and XML encoding developed by a group of primarily geologic survey organizations under the auspices of the IUGS CGI. The scope of the core model broadly corresponds with information traditionally portrayed on a geologic map, viz. interpreted geology, some observations, the map legend and accompanying memoir. The development of GeoSciML has followed the methodology specified for an Application Schema defined by OGC and ISO 19100 series standards. This requires agreement within a community concerning their domain model, its formal representation using UML, documentation as a Feature Type Catalogue, with an XML Schema implementation generated from the model by applying a rule-based transformation. The framework and technology supports a modular governance process. Standard datatypes and GI components (geometry, the feature and coverage metamodels, metadata) are imported from the ISO framework. The observation and sampling model (including boreholes) is imported from OGC. The scale used for most scalar literal values (terms, codes, measures) allows for localization where necessary. Wildcards and abstract base- classes provide explicit extensibility points. Link attributes appear in a regular way in the encodings, allowing reference to external resources using URIs. The encoding is compatible with generic GI data-service interfaces (WFS, WMS, SOS). For maximum interoperability within a community, the interfaces may be specialised through domain-specified constraints (e.g. feature-types, scale and vocabulary bindings, query-models). Formalization using UML and XML allows use of standard validation and processing tools. Use of upper-level elements defined for generic GI application reduces the development effort and governance resonsibility, while maximising cross-domain interoperability. On the other hand, enabling specialization to be delegated in a controlled manner is essential to adoption across a range of subdisciplines and jurisdictions. The GeoSciML design team is responsible only for the part of the model that is unique to geology but for which general agreement can be reached within the domain. This paper is presented on behalf of the Interoperability Working Group of the IUGS Commission for Geoscience Information (CGI) - follow web-link for details of the membership.