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Sample records for imprinted igf2 expression

  1. Monotreme IGF2 expression and ancestral origin of genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Killian, J K; Nolan, C M; Stewart, N; Munday, B L; Andersen, N A; Nicol, S; Jirtle, R L

    2001-08-15

    IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) and M6P/IGF2R (mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor) are imprinted in marsupials and eutherians but not in birds. These results along with the absence of M6P/IGF2R imprinting in the egg-laying monotremes indicate that the parental imprinting of fetal growth-regulatory genes may be unique to viviparous mammals. In this investigation, we have cloned IGF2 from two monotreme mammals, the platypus and echidna, to further investigate the origin of imprinting. We report herein that like M6P/IGF2R, IGF2 is not imprinted in monotremes. Thus, although IGF2 encodes for a highly conserved growth factor in chordates, it is only imprinted in therian mammals. These findings support a concurrent origin of IGF2 and M6P/IGF2R imprinting in the late Jurassic/early Cretaceous period. The absence of imprinting in monotremes, despite apparent interparental conflicts over maternal-offspring exchange, argues that a fortuitous congruency of genetic and epigenetic events may have limited the phylogenetic breadth of genomic imprinting to therian mammals. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 291:205-212, 2001. PMID:11479919

  2. Tissue specificity and variability of imprinted IGF2 expression in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Giannoukakis, N.; Rouleau, G.; Polychronakos, C.

    1994-09-01

    Parental genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon where expression of a gene copy depends on the sex of the parent from which it is derived. The human insulin-like growth factor II gene, IGF2, is parentally imprinted with the paternal gene copy exclusively expressed in fetal and term placenta as well as in fetal kidney. In mice, imprinted IGF2 expression is tissue-specific. In a preliminary approach to investigate tissue-specific IGF2 imprinting in humans, we evaluated allele-specific expression in four samples of umbilical cord blood leukocytes of fetuses found to imprint IGF2 in placenta. IGF2 mRNA transcripts from the gene copy transmitted from each parent were distinguished using a transcribed ApaI polymorphism by performing reverse transcription-PCR on total RNA from cord blood leukocytes. Postnatal peripheral blood was examined using the same method. Of 77 informative individuals, 68 expressed both IGF2 copies, but 9 individuals showed unambiguous monoallelic expression. Two individuals from each category were screened again and the results were identical. These data indicate that imprinted IGF2 expression is tissue-specific and show variability of IGF2 imprinting among individuals. This variability may be genetic. We are in the process of screening large pedigrees to test this hypothesis.

  3. Promoter-specific expression and imprint status of marsupial IGF2.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jessica M; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-01-01

    In mice and humans, IGF2 has multiple promoters to maintain its complex tissue- and developmental stage-specific imprinting and expression. IGF2 is also imprinted in marsupials, but little is known about its promoter region. In this study, three IGF2 transcripts were isolated from placental and liver samples of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Each transcript contained a unique 5' untranslated region, orthologous to the non-coding exons derived from promoters P1-P3 in the human and mouse IGF2 locus. The expression of tammar IGF2 was predominantly from the P2 promoter, similar to humans. Expression of IGF2 was higher in pouch young than in the adult and imprinting was highly tissue and developmental-stage specific. Interestingly, while IGF2 was expressed throughout the placenta, imprinting seemed to be restricted to the vascular, trilaminar region. In addition, IGF2 was monoallelically expressed in the adult mammary gland while in the liver it switched from monoalleleic expression in the pouch young to biallelic in the adult. These data suggest a complex mode of IGF2 regulation in marsupials as seen in eutherian mammals. The conservation of the IGF2 promoters suggests they originated before the divergence of marsupials and eutherians, and have been selectively maintained for at least 160 million years. PMID:22848567

  4. Alterations in methylation and expression levels of imprinted genes H19 and Igf2 in the fetuses of diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei-Juan; Tao, Ling-Yun; Gao, Cheng; Xie, Jian-Yun; Zhao, Ru-Qian

    2008-08-01

    The study aimed to reveal alterations in expression and methylation levels of the growth-related imprinted genes H19 and Igf2 in fetuses of diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced in female mice by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. DNA and total RNA were extracted from fetuses obtained from diabetic and control dams on embryonic day (E) 14. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA expression of Igf2 in fetuses from diabetic mice was 0.65-fold of the control counterparts. Bisulfite genomic sequencing demonstrated that the methylation level of the H19-Igf2 imprint control region was 19.1% higher in diabetic fetuses than in those of control dams. In addition, the body weight of pups born to diabetic dams was 26.5% lower than that of the control group. The results indicate that maternal diabetes can affect fetal development by means of altered expression of imprinted genes. The modified genomic DNA methylation status of imprinting genes may account for the change in gene expression. PMID:18724775

  5. Imprinting of opossum Igf2r in the absence of differential methylation and air.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Jennifer R; Dolinoy, Dana C; Maloney, Kristin A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Jirtle, Randy L

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic comparison of extant mammals with divergent imprint status is a powerful method for identifying critical components of imprint regulation at individual loci. The entire genomic region of Igf2r in the imprinted marsupials, Didelphis virginiana and Monodelphis domestica, and the non-imprinted monotreme, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, was isolated and sequenced. Genetic and epigenetic comparisons of over 160 kb of sequence were then performed in five distinct mammalian species. Surprisingly, opossum Igf2r is imprinted and maternally expressed despite the absence of the intron 2 CpG island (CpG2), antisense Igf2r RNA (Air) and differential methylation of the promoter (CpG1) required for imprinting of this gene in mice. These findings demonstrate that the genomic elements necessary for imprinted Igf2r expression in eutherians are not required for imprinting of this locus in metatherians. Thus, the regulatory mechanisms of Igf2r imprinting did not evolve convergently within the Therian subclass of mammals. PMID:17998818

  6. Epigenetic changes encompassing the IGF2/H19 locus associated with relaxation of IGF2 imprinting and silencing of H19 in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, T; Sullivan, M J; Ogawa, O; Reeve, A E

    1995-01-01

    In most tissues IGF2 is expressed from the paternal allele while H19 is expressed from the maternal allele. We have previously shown that in some Wilms tumors the maternal IGF2 imprint is relaxed such that the gene is expressed biallelically. We have now investigated this subset of tumors further and found that biallelic expression of IGF2 was associated with undetectable or very low levels of H19 expression. The relaxation of IGF2 imprinting in Wilms tumors also involved a concomitant reversal in the patterns of DNA methylation of the maternally inherited IGF2 and H19 alleles. Furthermore, the only specific methylation changes that occurred in tumors with relaxation of IGF2 imprinting were solely restricted to the maternal IGF2 and H19 alleles. These data suggest that there has been an acquisition of a paternal epigenotype in these tumors as the result of a pathologic disruption in the normal imprinting of the IGF2 and H19 genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7534414

  7. Maternal and paternal genomes function independently in mouse ova in establishing expression of the imprinted genes Snrpn and Igf2r: no evidence for allelic trans-sensing and counting mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, P E; Mann, J R

    1996-01-01

    It has often been suggested that the parental-specific expression of mammalian imprinted genes might be dependent on maternal-paternal intergenomic or interallelic interactions. Using quantitative allele-specific RT-PCR single nucleotide primer extension assays developed for two imprinted genes, Snrpn and Igf2r, we demonstrate: (i) No role for maternal-paternal allelic interactions: the modes of parental-specific expression of Snrpn and Igf2r in normal ova were unchanged in gynogenetic and androgenetic ova; the latter contain two maternal and two paternal genomes respectively, and cannot undergo maternal-paternal interactions. (ii) No role for allelic counting or exclusion mechanisms: in individual blastomeres of androgenetic ova, both paternal Snrpn alleles were active (Snrpn was not expressed in gynogenetic ova), and in individual gynogenetic and androgenetic blastomeres, both maternal and paternal Igf2r alleles, respectively, were active. (iii) No role for ploidy: the mode of parental-specific expression of Snrpn and Igf2r in normal diploid ova was unchanged in individual blastomeres of triploid and tetraploid ova. Thus, the maternal and paternal genomes function independently in establishing the pre-implantation mode of parental-specific expression of Snrpn and Igf2r, with no role for trans-allelic/genomic interaction phenomena. In addition, the results show that inactive and biallelic modes of expression of imprinted genes are potential mechanisms for the death of gynogenones and androgenones at the peri-implantation stage. Images PMID:8947024

  8. Differential genomic imprinting regulates paracrine and autocrine roles of IGF2 in mouse adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrón, S. R.; Radford, E. J.; Domingo-Muelas, A.; Kleine, I.; Ramme, A.; Gray, D.; Sandovici, I.; Constancia, M.; Ward, A.; Menheniott, T. R.; Ferguson-Smith, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is implicated in the control of gene dosage in neurogenic niches. Here we address the importance of Igf2 imprinting for murine adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in vivo. In the SVZ, paracrine IGF2 is a cerebrospinal fluid and endothelial-derived neurogenic factor requiring biallelic expression, with mutants having reduced activation of the stem cell pool and impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis. In contrast, Igf2 is imprinted in the hippocampus acting as an autocrine factor expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs) solely from the paternal allele. Conditional mutagenesis of Igf2 in blood vessels confirms that endothelial-derived IGF2 contributes to NSC maintenance in SVZ but not in the SGZ, and that this is regulated by the biallelic expression of IGF2 in the vascular compartment. Our findings indicate that a regulatory decision to imprint or not is a functionally important mechanism of transcriptional dosage control in adult neurogenesis. PMID:26369386

  9. Differential genomic imprinting regulates paracrine and autocrine roles of IGF2 in mouse adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferrón, S R; Radford, E J; Domingo-Muelas, A; Kleine, I; Ramme, A; Gray, D; Sandovici, I; Constancia, M; Ward, A; Menheniott, T R; Ferguson-Smith, A C

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is implicated in the control of gene dosage in neurogenic niches. Here we address the importance of Igf2 imprinting for murine adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in vivo. In the SVZ, paracrine IGF2 is a cerebrospinal fluid and endothelial-derived neurogenic factor requiring biallelic expression, with mutants having reduced activation of the stem cell pool and impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis. In contrast, Igf2 is imprinted in the hippocampus acting as an autocrine factor expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs) solely from the paternal allele. Conditional mutagenesis of Igf2 in blood vessels confirms that endothelial-derived IGF2 contributes to NSC maintenance in SVZ but not in the SGZ, and that this is regulated by the biallelic expression of IGF2 in the vascular compartment. Our findings indicate that a regulatory decision to imprint or not is a functionally important mechanism of transcriptional dosage control in adult neurogenesis. PMID:26369386

  10. POST-WEANING DIETS AFFECTS GENOMIC IMPRINTING AT THE INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR 2 (IGF2) LOCUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IGF2 loss of imprinting (LOI) is fairly prevalent and implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer and developmental disease; however, the causes of this phenomenon are largely unknown. We determined whether the post-weaning diet of mice affects allelic expression and CpG methylation of Igf2. C57B...

  11. Expression and protein localisation of IGF2 in the marsupial placenta

    PubMed Central

    Ager, Eleanor I; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    Background In eutherian mammals, genomic imprinting is critical for normal placentation and embryo survival. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is imprinted in the placenta of both eutherians and marsupials, but its function, or that of any imprinted gene, has not been investigated in any marsupial. This study examines the role of IGF2 in the yolk sac placenta of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Results IGF2 mRNA and protein were produced in the marsupial placenta. Both IGF2 receptors were present in the placenta, and presumably mediate IGF2 mitogenic actions. IGF2 mRNA levels were highest in the vascular region of the yolk sac placenta. IGF2 increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression in placental explant cultures, suggesting that IGF2 promotes vascularisation of the yolk sac. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of a physiological role for any imprinted gene in marsupial placentation. The conserved imprinting of IGF2 in this marsupial and in all eutherian species so far investigated, but not in monotremes, suggests that imprinting of this gene may have originated in the placenta of the therian ancestor. PMID:18284703

  12. Ancestral TCDD exposure promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of imprinted gene Igf2: Methylation status and DNMTs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Chen, Xi; Liu, Yanan; Xie, Qunhui; Sun, Yawen; Chen, Jingshan; Leng, Ling; Yan, Huan; Zhao, Bin; Tang, Naijun

    2015-12-01

    Ancestral TCDD exposure could induce epigenetic transgenerational phenotypes, which may be mediated in part by imprinted gene inheritance. The aim of our study was to evaluate the transgenerational effects of ancestral TCDD exposure on the imprinted gene insulin-like growth factor-2 (Igf2) in rat somatic tissue. TCDD was administered daily by oral gavage to groups of F0 pregnant SD rats at dose levels of 0 (control), 200 or 800 ng/kg bw during gestation day 8-14. Animal transgenerational model of ancestral exposure to TCDD was carefully built, avoiding sibling inbreeding. Hepatic Igf2 expression of the TCDD male progeny was decreased concomitantly with hepatic damage and increased activities of serum hepatic enzymes both in the F1 and F3 generation. Imprinted Control Region (ICR) of Igf2 manifested a hypermethylated pattern, whereas methylation status in the Differentially Methylated Region 2 (DMR2) showed a hypomethylated manner in the F1 generation. These epigenetic alterations in these two regions maintained similar trends in the F3 generation. Meanwhile, the expressions of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B) changed in a non-monotonic manner both in the F1 and F3 generation. This study provides evidence that ancestral TCDD exposure may promote epigenetic transgenerational alterations of imprinted gene Igf2 in adult somatic tissue. PMID:26455773

  13. Tissue-specific insulator function at H19/Igf2 revealed by deletions at the imprinting control region.

    PubMed

    Ideraabdullah, Folami Y; Thorvaldsen, Joanne L; Myers, Jennifer A; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2014-12-01

    Parent-of-origin-specific expression at imprinted genes is regulated by allele-specific DNA methylation at imprinting control regions (ICRs). This mechanism of gene regulation, where one element controls allelic expression of multiple genes, is not fully understood. Furthermore, the mechanism of gene dysregulation through ICR epimutations, such as loss or gain of DNA methylation, remains a mystery. We have used genetic mouse models to dissect ICR-mediated genetic and epigenetic regulation of imprinted gene expression. The H19/insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) ICR has a multifunctional role including insulation, activation and repression. Microdeletions at the human H19/IGF2 ICR (IC1) are proposed to be responsible for IC1 epimutations associated with imprinting disorders such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). Here, we have generated and characterized a mouse model that mimics BWS microdeletions to define the role of the deleted sequence in establishing and maintaining epigenetic marks and imprinted expression at the H19/IGF2 locus. These mice carry a 1.3 kb deletion at the H19/Igf2 ICR [Δ2,3] removing two of four CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites and the intervening sequence, ∼75% of the ICR. Surprisingly, the Δ2,3 deletion does not perturb DNA methylation at the ICR; however, it does disrupt imprinted expression. While repressive functions of the ICR are compromised by the deletion regardless of tissue type, insulator function is only disrupted in tissues of mesodermal origin where a significant amount of CTCF is poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated. These findings suggest that insulator activity of the H19/Igf2 ICR varies by cell type and may depend on cell-specific enhancers as well as posttranslational modifications of the insulator protein CTCF. PMID:24990148

  14. Promoter-restricted histone code, not the differentially methylated DNA regions or antisense transcripts, marks the imprinting status of IGF2R in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Vu, Thanh H; Li, Tao; Hoffman, Andrew R

    2004-10-01

    Imprinting of the mouse Igf2r depends upon an intronic differentially methylated DNA region (DMR) and the presence of the Air antisense transcript. However, biallelic expression of mouse Igf2r in brain occurs despite the presence of Air, and biallelic expression of human IGF2R in peripheral tissues occurs despite the presence of an intronic DMR. We examined histone modifications throughout the mouse and human Igf2r/IGF2R using chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) assays in combination with quantitative real time PCR. Methylation of Lys4 and Lys9 of histone H3 in the promoter regions marks the active and silenced alleles, respectively. We measured di- and tri-methyl Lys4 and Lys9 across the Igf2r and Air promoters. While both di- and tri-methyl Lys4 marked the active Igf2r and the active Air allele, tri-methyl Lys9, but not di-methyl Lys9, marked the suppressed Air allele. We show here that enrichment of parental allele-specific histone modifications in the promoter region, rather than the presence of DNA methylation or antisense transcription, correctly identifies the tissue- and species- specific imprinting status of Igf2r/IGF2R. We discuss these findings in light of recent progress in identifying specific components of the epigenetic marks in imprinted genes. PMID:15294879

  15. The Impact of First Trimester Phthalate and Phenol Exposure on IGF2/H19 Genomic Imprinting and Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Jessica; Binder, Alexandra; McElrath, Thomas F.; Michels, Karin B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting leads to parent-of-origin specific gene expression and is determined by epigenetic modification of genes. The paternally expressed gene insulin-like growth-factor 2 (IGF2) is located about ∼100 kb from the maternally expressed non-coding gene H19 on human chromosome 11, and both genes play major roles in embryonic and placental growth. Given adverse gestational environments can influence DNA methylation patterns in extra-embryonic tissues, we hypothesized that prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) alters H19 and IGF2 methylation in placenta. Our study was restricted to a total of 196 women co-enrolled in the Predictors of Preeclampsia Study and the Harvard Epigenetic Birth Cohort. First trimester urine concentrations of 8 phenols and 11 phthalate metabolites were measured and used to characterize EDC exposure profiles. We assessed methylation of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by pyrosequencing of H19, IGF2DMR0, and IGF2DMR2 and correlated values with phenol and phthalate metabolites. We also assessed overall expression and allele-specific expression of H19 and IGF2. We found several significant associations between DNA methylation and additive biomarker measurements. A significant decrease in H19 methylation was associated with high level of the sum (Σ) of phthalate metabolites and metabolites of low molecular weight (LMW) phthalates. Σphthalate and LMW phthalate concentrations were inversely associated with IGF2DMR0 methylation values. Variation in methylation was not associated with changes in allele-specific expression. However increased deviation of allele-specific expression of H19 was associated with Σ di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites and high molecular weight phthalates. Neither methylation nor expression of these imprinted regions had a significant impact on birth length or birth weight. Overall, our study provides new insight into an epigenetic mechanism that occurs following EDC exposure. PMID

  16. The impact of first trimester phthalate and phenol exposure on IGF2/H19 genomic imprinting and birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    LaRocca, Jessica; Binder, Alexandra M; McElrath, Thomas F; Michels, Karin B

    2014-08-01

    Genomic imprinting leads to parent-of-origin specific gene expression and is determined by epigenetic modification of genes. The paternally expressed gene insulin-like growth-factor 2 (IGF2) is located about ~100kb from the maternally expressed non-coding gene H19 on human chromosome 11, and both genes play major roles in embryonic and placental growth. Given adverse gestational environments can influence DNA methylation patterns in extra-embryonic tissues, we hypothesized that prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) alters H19 and IGF2 methylation in placenta. Our study was restricted to a total of 196 women co-enrolled in the Predictors of Preeclampsia Study and the Harvard Epigenetic Birth Cohort. First trimester urine concentrations of 8 phenols and 11 phthalate metabolites were measured and used to characterize EDC exposure profiles. We assessed methylation of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by pyrosequencing of H19, IGF2DMR0, and IGF2DMR2 and correlated values with phenol and phthalate metabolites. We also assessed overall expression and allele-specific expression of H19 and IGF2. We found several significant associations between DNA methylation and additive biomarker measurements. A significant decrease in H19 methylation was associated with high levels of the sum (Σ) of phthalate metabolites and metabolites of low molecular weight (LMW) phthalates. Σphthalate and LMW phthalate concentrations were inversely associated with IGF2DMR0 methylation values. Variation in methylation was not associated with changes in allele-specific expression. However increased deviation of allele-specific expression of H19 was associated with Σdi(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites and high molecular weight phthalates. Neither methylation nor expression of these imprinted regions had a significant impact on birth length or birth weight. Overall, our study provides new insight into an epigenetic mechanism that occurs following EDC exposure. PMID

  17. DNA methylation of the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region and adiposity distribution in young adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and H19 imprinted genes control growth and body composition. Adverse in-utero environments have been associated with obesity-related diseases and linked with altered DNA methylation at the IGF2/H19 locus. Postnatally, methylation at the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR) has been linked with cerebellum weight. We aimed to investigate whether decreased IGF2/H19 ICR methylation is associated with decreased birth and childhood anthropometry and increased contemporaneous adiposity. DNA methylation in peripheral blood (n = 315) at 17 years old was measured at 12 cytosine-phosphate-guanine sites (CpGs), analysed as Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER units within the IGF2/H19 ICR. Birth size, childhood head circumference (HC) at six time-points and anthropometry at age 17 years were measured. DNA methylation was investigated for its association with anthropometry using linear regression. Results The principal component of IGF2/H19 ICR DNA methylation (representing mean methylation across all CpG units) positively correlated with skin fold thickness (at four CpG units) (P-values between 0.04 to 0.001) and subcutaneous adiposity (P = 0.023) at age 17, but not with weight, height, BMI, waist circumference or visceral adiposity. IGF2/H19 methylation did not associate with birth weight, length or HC, but CpG unit 13 to 14 methylation was negatively associated with HC between 1 and 10 years. β-coefficients of four out of five remaining CpG units also estimated lower methylation with increasing childhood HC. Conclusions As greater IGF2/H19 methylation was associated with greater subcutaneous fat measures, but not overall, visceral or central adiposity, we hypothesize that obesogenic pressures in youth result in excess fat being preferentially stored in peripheral fat depots via the IGF2/H19 domain. Secondly, as IGF2/H19 methylation was not associated with birth size but negatively with early childhood HC, we hypothesize that the

  18. Increased In Vitro Osteopotential in SHED Associated with Higher IGF2 Expression When Compared with hASCs.

    PubMed

    Fanganiello, Roberto Dalto; Ishiy, Felipe Augusto Andre; Kobayashi, Gerson Shigeru; Alvizi, Lucas; Sunaga, Daniele Yumi; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) osteogenic differentiation potential varies according to factors such as tissue source and cell population heterogeneity. Pre-selection of cell subpopulations harboring higher osteopotential is a promising strategy to achieve a thorough translation of MSC-based therapies to the clinic. Here, we searched for novel molecular markers predictive of osteopotential by comparing MSC populations from two sources harboring different osteogenic potentials. We show that MSCs from human deciduous teeth (SHED) have an intrinsically higher osteogenic potential when compared with MSCs from human adipose tissue (hASCs) under the same in vitro controlled induction system. Transcriptome profiling revealed IGF2 to be one of the top upregulated transcripts before and during early in vitro osteogenic differentiation. Further, exogenous IGF2 supplementation enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization, and inhibition of IGF2 lessened these parameters in SHED and hASCs, validating IGF2 as an osteogenic factor in these MSCs. Further, we found IGF2 to be biallelically expressed in SHED, but not in hASCs. We observed a 4 % methylation increase in the imprinting control region within the IGF2-H19 locus in SHED, and this is mainly due to 2 specific CpG sites. Thus, we suggest that IGF2 upregulation in SHED is due to loss of imprinting. This study unravels osteogenic properties in SHED, implying IGF2 as a potential biomarker of MSCs with higher osteopotential, and unveils IGF2 loss-of-imprinting in SHED. PMID:25931278

  19. Postnatal survival of mice with maternal duplication of distal chromosome 7 induced by a Igf2/H19 imprinting control region lacking insulator function.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Szabó, Piroska E; Mann, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    The misexpressed imprinted genes causing developmental failure of mouse parthenogenones are poorly defined. To obtain further insight, we investigated misexpressions that could cause the pronounced growth deficiency and death of fetuses with maternal duplication of distal chromosome (Chr) 7 (MatDup.dist7). Their small size could involve inactivity of Igf2, encoding a growth factor, with some contribution by over-expression of Cdkn1c, encoding a negative growth regulator. Mice lacking Igf2 expression are usually viable, and MatDup.dist7 death has been attributed to the misexpression of Cdkn1c or other imprinted genes. To examine the role of misexpressions determined by two maternal copies of the Igf2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR)-a chromatin insulator, we introduced a mutant ICR (ICR(Delta)) into MatDup.dist7 fetuses. This activated Igf2, with correction of H19 expression and other imprinted transcripts expected. Substantial growth enhancement and full postnatal viability was obtained, demonstrating that the aberrant MatDup.dist7 phenotype is highly dependent on the presence of two unmethylated maternal Igf2/H19 ICRs. Activation of Igf2 is likely the predominant correction that rescued growth and viability. Further experiments involved the introduction of a null allele of Cdkn1c to alleviate its over-expression. Results were not consistent with the possibility that this misexpression alone, or in combination with Igf2 inactivity, mediates MatDup.dist7 death. Rather, a network of misexpressions derived from dist7 is probably involved. Our results are consistent with the idea that reduced expression of IGF2 plays a role in the aetiology of the human imprinting-related growth-deficit disorder, Silver-Russell syndrome. PMID:20062522

  20. Oct4/Sox2 Binding Sites Contribute to Maintaining Hypomethylation of the Maternal Igf2/H19 Imprinting Control Region

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, David L.; Boddy, Craig S.; Schoenherr, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    A central question in genomic imprinting is how parental-specific DNA methylation of imprinting control regions (ICR) is established during gametogenesis and maintained after fertilization. At the imprinted Igf2/H19 locus, CTCF binding maintains the unmethylated state of the maternal ICR after the blastocyst stage. In addition, evidence from Beckwith-Wiedemann patients and cultured mouse cells suggests that two Sox-Oct binding motifs within the Igf2/H19 ICR also participate in maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal allele. We found that the Sox and octamer elements from both Sox-Oct motifs were required to drive hypomethylation of integrated transgenes in mouse embryonic carcinoma cells. Oct4 and Sox2 showed cooperative binding to the Sox-Oct motifs, and both were present at the endogenous ICR. Using a mouse with mutations in the Oct4 binding sites, we found that maternally transmitted mutant ICRs acquired partial methylation in somatic tissues, but there was little effect on imprinted expression of H19 and Igf2. A subset of mature oocytes also showed partial methylation of the mutant ICR, which suggested that the Sox-Oct motifs provide some protection from methylation during oogenesis. The Sox-Oct motifs, however, were not required for erasure of paternal methylation in primordial germ cells, which indicated that the oocyte methylation was acquired post-natally. Maternally inherited mutant ICRs were unmethylated in blastocysts, which suggested that at least a portion of the methylation in somatic tissues occurred after implantation. These findings provide evidence that Sox-Oct motifs contribute to ICR hypomethylation in post-implantation embryos and maturing oocytes and link imprinted DNA methylation with key stem cell/germline transcription factors. PMID:24324735

  1. Characterization of the IGF2 Imprinted Gene Methylation Status in Bovine Oocytes during Folliculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Anelise dos Santos; Guimarães, Ana Luíza Silva; da Silva, Naiara Milagres Augusto; Caetano, Alexandre Rodrigues; Dode, Margot Alves Nunes; Franco, Maurício Machaim

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation reprogramming occurs during mammalian gametogenesis and embryogenesis. Sex-specific DNA methylation patterns at specific CpG islands controlling imprinted genes are acquired during this window of development. Characterization of the DNA methylation dynamics of imprinted genes acquired by oocytes during folliculogenesis is essential for understanding the physiological and genetic aspects of female gametogenesis and to determine the parameters for oocyte competence. This knowledge can be used to improve in vitro embryo production (IVP), specifically because oocyte competence is one of the most important aspects determining the success of IVP. Imprinted genes, such as IGF2, play important roles in embryo development, placentation and fetal growth. The aim of this study was to characterize the DNA methylation profile of the CpG island located in IGF2 exon 10 in oocytes during bovine folliculogenesis. The methylation percentages in oocytes from primordial follicles, final secondary follicles, small antral follicles, large antral follicles, MII oocytes and spermatozoa were 73.74 ± 2.88%, 58.70 ± 7.46%, 56.00 ± 5.58%, 65.77 ± 5.10%, 56.35 ± 7.45% and 96.04 ± 0.78%, respectively. Oocytes from primordial follicles showed fewer hypomethylated alleles (15.5%) than MII oocytes (34.6%) (p = 0.039); spermatozoa showed only hypermethylated alleles. Moreover, MII oocytes were less methylated than spermatozoa (p<0.001). Our results showed that the methylation pattern of this region behaves differently between mature oocytes and spermatozoa. However, while this region has a classical imprinted pattern in spermatozoa that is fully methylated, it was variable in mature oocytes, showing hypermethylated and hypomethylated alleles. Furthermore, our results suggest that this CpG island may have received precocious reprogramming, considering that the hypermethylated pattern was already found in growing oocytes from primordial follicles. These results may contribute to

  2. The IGF2 Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  3. Epigenetic consequences of artificial reproductive technologies to the bovine imprinted genes SNRPN, H19/IGF2, and IGF2R

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lawrence C.; Therrien, Jacinthe; Filion, France; Bressan, Fabiana; Meirelles, Flávio V.

    2015-01-01

    Animal breeders have made widespread use of assisted reproductive technologies to accelerate genetic improvement programs aimed at obtaining more, better and cheaper food products. Selection approaches have traditionally focused on Mendel’s laws of inheritance using parental phenotypic characteristics and quantitative genetics approaches to choose the best parents for the next generation, regardless of their gender. However, apart from contributing DNA sequence variants, male and female gametes carry parental-specific epigenetic marks that play key roles during pre- and post-natal development and growth of the offspring. We herein review the epigenetic anomalies that are associated with artificial reproductive technologies in current use in animal breeding programs. For instance, we demonstrate that bovine embryos and fetuses derived by in vitro culture and somatic cell nuclear transfer show epigenetic anomalies in the differentially methylated regions controlling the expression of some imprinted genes. Although these genomic imprinting errors are undetected in the somatic tissues after birth, further research is warranted to examine potential germ cell transmission of epimutations and the potential risks of reproducing cattle using artificial reproductive technologies. PMID:25763013

  4. Epigenetic status of H19/IGF2 and SNRPN imprinted genes in aborted and successfully derived embryonic stem cell lines in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Wianny, Florence; Blachère, Thierry; Godet, Murielle; Guillermas, Rémi; Cortay, Véronique; Bourillot, Pierre-Yves; Lefèvre, Annick; Savatier, Pierre; Dehay, Colette

    2016-05-01

    The imprinted genes of primate embryonic stem cells (ESCs) often show altered DNA methylation. It is unknown whether these alterations emerge while deriving the ESCs. Here we studied the methylation patterns of two differentially methylated regions (DMRs), SNRPN and H19/IGF2 DMRs, during the derivation of monkey ESCs. We show that the SNRPN DMR is characteristically methylated at maternal alleles, whereas the H19/IGF2 DMR is globally highly methylated, with unusual methylation on the maternal alleles. These methylation patterns remain stable from the early stages of ESC derivation to late passages of monkey ESCs and following differentiation. Importantly, the methylation status of H19/IGF2 DMR and the expression levels of IGF2, H19, and DNMT3B mRNAs in early embryo-derived cells were correlated with their capacity to generate genuine ESC lines. Thus, we propose that these markers could be useful to predict the outcomes of establishing an ESC line in primates. PMID:26999759

  5. Identification of transgenic cloned dairy goats harboring human lactoferrin and methylation status of the imprinted gene IGF2R in their lungs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y L; Zhang, G M; Wan, Y J; Jia, R X; Li, P Z; Han, L; Wang, F; Huang, M R

    2015-01-01

    Dairy goat is a good model for production of transgenic proteins in milk using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, animals produced from SCNT are often associated with lung deficiencies. We recently produced six transgenic cloned dairy goats harboring the human lactoferrin gene, including three live transgenic clones and three deceased transgenic clones that died from respiratory failure during the perinatal period. Imprinted genes are important regulators of lung growth, and may be subjected to faulty reprogramming. In the present study, first, microsatellite analysis, PCR, and DNA sequence identification were conducted to confirm that these three dead kids were genetically identical to the transgenic donor cells. Second, the CpG island methylation profile of the imprinted insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF2R) gene was assessed in the lungs of the three dead transgenic kids and the normally produced kids using bisulfite sequencing PCR. In addition, the relative mRNA level of IGF2R was also determined by real-time PCR. Results showed that the IGF2R gene in the lungs of the dead cloned kids showed abnormal hypermethylation and higher mRNA expression levels than the control, indicating that aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming is one of the important factors in the death of transgenic cloned animals. PMID:26400340

  6. Different Epigenetic Alterations Are Associated with Abnormal IGF2/Igf2 Upregulation in Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Baoling; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Xiaozhen; Miao, Chunyue; Shangguan, Shaofang; Bao, Yihua; Guo, Jin; Wang, Li; Zhang, Ting; Li, Huili

    2014-01-01

    The methylation status of DNA methylation regions (DMRs) of the imprinted gene IGF2/Igf2 is associated with neural tube defects (NTDs), which are caused by a failure of the neural tube to fold and close and are the second-most common birth defect; however, the characterization of the expression level of IGF2/Igf2 in neural tissue from human fetuses affected with NTDs remains elusive. More importantly, whether abnormal chromatin structure also influences IGF2/Igf2 expression in NTDs is unclear. Here, we investigated the transcriptional activity of IGF2/Igf2 in normal and NTD spinal cord tissues, the methylation status of different DMRs, and the chromatin structure of the promoter. Our data indicated that in NTD samples from both human fetuses and retinoic acid (RA)-treated mouse fetuses, the expression level of IGF2/Igf2 was upregulated 6.41-fold and 1.84-fold, respectively, compared to controls. H19 DMR1, but not IGF2 DMR0, was hypermethylated in human NTD samples. In NTD mice, h19 DMR1 was stable, whereas the chromatin structure around the promoter of Igf2 might be loosened, which was displayed by higher H3K4 acetylation and lower H3K27 trimethylation. Therefore, the data revealed that IGF2/Igf2 expression can be ectopically up-regulated by dual epigenetic factors in NTDs. In detail, the upregulation of IGF2/Igf2 is likely controlled by hypermethylation of H19 DMR1 in human NTDs, however, in acute external RA-induced NTD mice it is potentially determined by more open chromatin structure. PMID:25423083

  7. A novel de novo point mutation of the OCT-binding site in the IGF2/H19-imprinting control region in a Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Higashimoto, K; Jozaki, K; Kosho, T; Matsubara, K; Fuke, T; Yamada, D; Yatsuki, H; Maeda, T; Ohtsuka, Y; Nishioka, K; Joh, K; Koseki, H; Ogata, T; Soejima, H

    2014-12-01

    The IGF2/H19-imprinting control region (ICR1) functions as an insulator to methylation-sensitive binding of CTCF protein, and regulates imprinted expression of IGF2 and H19 in a parental origin-specific manner. ICR1 methylation defects cause abnormal expression of imprinted genes, leading to Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) or Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). Not only ICR1 microdeletions involving the CTCF-binding site, but also point mutations and a small deletion of the OCT-binding site have been shown to trigger methylation defects in BWS. Here, mutational analysis of ICR1 in 11 BWS and 12 SRS patients with ICR1 methylation defects revealed a novel de novo point mutation of the OCT-binding site on the maternal allele in one BWS patient. In BWS, all reported mutations and the small deletion of the OCT-binding site, including our case, have occurred within repeat A2. These findings indicate that the OCT-binding site is important for maintaining an unmethylated status of maternal ICR1 in early embryogenesis. PMID:24299031

  8. Disruption of genomic neighbourhood at the imprinted IGF2-H19 locus in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome and Silver–Russell syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nativio, Raffaella; Sparago, Angela; Ito, Yoko; Weksberg, Rosanna; Riccio, Andrea; Murrell, Adele

    2011-01-01

    Hyper- and hypomethylation at the IGF2-H19 imprinting control region (ICR) result in reciprocal changes in IGF2-H19 expression and the two contrasting growth disorders, Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS). DNA methylation of the ICR controls the reciprocal imprinting of IGF2 and H19 by preventing the binding of the insulator protein, CTCF. We here show that local changes in histone modifications and CTCF–cohesin binding at the ICR in BWS and SRS together with DNA methylation correlate with the higher order chromatin structure at the locus. In lymphoblastoid cells from control individuals, we found the repressive histone H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 marks associated with the methylated paternal ICR allele and the bivalent H3K4me2/H3K27me3 mark together with H3K9ac and CTCF–cohesin associated with the non-methylated maternal allele. In patient-derived cell lines, the mat/pat asymmetric distribution of these epigenetic marks was lost with H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 becoming biallelic in the BWS and H3K4me2, H3K27me3 and H3K9ac together with CTCF–cohesin becoming biallelic in the SRS. We further show that in BWS and SRS cells, there is opposing chromatin looping conformation mediated by CTCF–cohesin binding sites surrounding the locus. In normal cells, lack of CTCF–cohesin binding at the paternal ICR is associated with monoallelic interaction between two CTCF sites flanking the locus. CTCF–cohesin binding at the maternal ICR blocks this interaction by associating with the CTCF site downstream of the enhancers. The two alternative chromatin conformations are differently favoured in BWS and SRS likely predisposing the locus to the activation of IGF2 or H19, respectively. PMID:21282187

  9. Relative IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression in maternal and fetal tissues from diabetic swine

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, C.K.; Leaman, D.W.; White, M.E.; Ramsay, T.G. )

    1990-02-26

    Fourteen pregnant, crossbred gilts were utilized in this study. Seven gilts were injected with alloxan (50 mg/kg) at day 75 of gestation to induce diabetes. Gilts underwent caesarean section on day 105 of gestation. Samples were collected from maternal skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, uterus and endometrium; and from fetal skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, placenta, liver, lung, kidney, heart, brain and spleen. Tissues were frozen in liquid nitrogen for later analysis of IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression. Samples were pooled and total RNA was isolated using the guanidine isothiocynate method. Total mRNA was analyzed by dot blot hybridization. Blots were probed with {sup 32}P-cDNA for porcine IGF-1 and rat IGF-2. IGF-1 gene expression in maternal tissues was unaffected by diabetes. Maternal diabetes increased IGF-2 mRNA in maternal adipose tissue but exhibited no effect in muscle or uterus. Expression of IGF-2 by maternal endometrium was decreased by diabetes. Maternal diabetes induced an increase in IGF-1 gene expression in muscle and placenta while causing an increase in IGF-2 expression in fetal liver and placenta. IGF-2 mRNA was lower in lung from fetuses of diabetic mothers than in controls. These results suggest that maternal diabetes alters IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression in specific tissues and differential regulation of these genes appears to exist in the mother and developing fetus.

  10. Pyrosequencing for Accurate Imprinted Allele Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Damaschke, Nathan; Yao, Tianyu; McCormick, Johnathon; Wagner, Jennifer; Jarrard, David

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restricts gene expression to one inherited allele. Improper maintenance of imprinting has been implicated in a number of human diseases and developmental syndromes. Assays are needed that can quantify the contribution of each paternal allele to a gene expression profile. We have developed a rapid, sensitive quantitative assay for the measurement of individual allelic ratios termed Pyrosequencing for Imprinted Expression (PIE). Advantages of PIE over other approaches include shorter experimental time, decreased labor, avoiding the need for restriction endonuclease enzymes at polymorphic sites, and prevent heteroduplex formation which is problematic in quantitative PCR-based methods. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of PIE including the ability to detect differences in allelic expression down to 1%. The assay is capable of measuring genomic heterozygosity as well as imprinting in a single run. PIE is applied to determine the status of Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF2) imprinting in human and mouse tissues. PMID:25581900

  11. Paxillin-dependent regulation of IGF2 and H19 gene cluster expression.

    PubMed

    Marášek, Pavel; Dzijak, Rastislav; Studenyak, Irina; Fišerová, Jindřiška; Uličná, Lívia; Novák, Petr; Hozák, Pavel

    2015-08-15

    Paxillin (PXN) is a focal adhesion protein that has been implicated in signal transduction from the extracellular matrix. Recently, it has been shown to shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. When inside the nucleus, paxillin promotes cell proliferation. Here, we introduce paxillin as a transcriptional regulator of IGF2 and H19 genes. It does not affect the allelic expression of the two genes; rather, it regulates long-range chromosomal interactions between the IGF2 or H19 promoter and a shared distal enhancer on an active allele. Specifically, paxillin stimulates the interaction between the enhancer and the IGF2 promoter, thus activating IGF2 gene transcription, whereas it restrains the interaction between the enhancer and the H19 promoter, downregulating the H19 gene. We found that paxillin interacts with cohesin and the mediator complex, which have been shown to mediate long-range chromosomal looping. We propose that these interactions occur at the IGF2 and H19 gene cluster and are involved in the formation of loops between the IGF2 and H19 promoters and the enhancer, and thus the expression of the corresponding genes. These observations contribute to a mechanistic explanation of the role of paxillin in proliferation and fetal development. PMID:26116569

  12. IGF2 expression is a marker for paraganglionic/SIF cell differentiation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    Hedborg, F.; Ohlsson, R.; Sandstedt, B.; Grimelius, L.; Hoehner, J. C.; Pählman, S.

    1995-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood tumor of the sympathetic nervous system. Observations in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome suggest that sympathetic embryonal cells with an abundant expression of the insulin-like growth factor 2 gene (IGF2) may be involved in the genesis of low-malignant infant neuroblastomas. We have therefore compared the cell type-specific IGF2 expression of the human sympathetic nervous system during early development with that of neuroblastoma. An abundant expression in normal sympathetic tissue was specific to extra-adrenal chromaffin cells, ie, paraganglia and small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells, whereas sympathetic neuronal cells were IGF2-negative. A subpopulation of neuroblastomas expressed IGF2, which correlated with an early age at diagnosis, an extra-adrenal tumor origin, and severe hemodynamic signs of catecholamine secretion. Histologically IGF2-expressing tumors displayed a lobular growth pattern, and expression was restricted to the most mature and least proliferative cells. Typically, these cells were morphologically and histochemically similar to paraganglia/SIF cells and formed distinct ring-like zones in the center of the lobules around a core of apoptosis-like tumor cells. The similarities found between IGF2-expressing neuroblastoma cells and paraganglia/SIF cells in terms of histological features, anatomical origin, and age-dependent growth suggest a paraganglionic/SIF cell lineage of most infant tumors and also of extra-adrenal tumors diagnosed after infancy. Furthermore, since paraganglia/SIF cells undergo postnatal involution, the same cellular mechanism may be responsible for spontaneous regression in infant neuroblastoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 p839-a Figure 4 PMID:7717451

  13. Complete Biallelic Insulation at the H19/Igf2 Imprinting Control Region Position Results in Fetal Growth Retardation and Perinatal Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Singh, Purnima; Tsark, Walter M. K.; Szabó, Piroska E.

    2010-01-01

    Background The H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR) functions as an insulator exclusively in the unmethylated maternal allele, where enhancer-blocking by CTCF protein prevents the interaction between the Igf2 promoter and the distant enhancers. DNA methylation inhibits CTCF binding in the paternal ICR allele. Two copies of the chicken β-globin insulator (ChβGI)2 are capable of substituting for the enhancer blocking function of the ICR. Insulation, however, now also occurs upon paternal inheritance, because unlike the H19 ICR, the (ChβGI)2 does not become methylated in fetal male germ cells. The (ChβGI)2 is a composite insulator, exhibiting enhancer blocking by CTCF and chromatin barrier functions by USF1 and VEZF1. We asked the question whether these barrier proteins protected the (ChβGI)2 sequences from methylation in the male germ line. Methodology/Principal Findings We genetically dissected the ChβGI in the mouse by deleting the binding sites USF1 and VEZF1. The methylation of the mutant versus normal (ChβGI)2 significantly increased from 11% to 32% in perinatal male germ cells, suggesting that the barrier proteins did have a role in protecting the (ChβGI)2 from methylation in the male germ line. Contrary to the H19 ICR, however, the mutant (mChβGI)2 lacked the potential to attain full de novo methylation in the germ line and to maintain methylation in the paternal allele in the soma, where it consequently functioned as a biallelic insulator. Unexpectedly, a stricter enhancer blocking was achieved by CTCF alone than by a combination of the CTCF, USF1 and VEZF1 sites, illustrated by undetectable Igf2 expression upon paternal transmission. Conclusions/Significance In this in vivo model, hypomethylation at the ICR position together with fetal growth retardation mimicked the human Silver-Russell syndrome. Importantly, late fetal/perinatal death occurred arguing that strict biallelic insulation at the H19/Igf2 ICR position is not tolerated in development

  14. Sexual differences of imprinted genes' expression levels.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Kim, Hana; Kim, Joomyeong

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, genomic imprinting has evolved as a dosage-controlling mechanism for a subset of genes that play critical roles in their unusual reproduction scheme involving viviparity and placentation. As such, many imprinted genes are highly expressed in sex-specific reproductive organs. In the current study, we sought to test whether imprinted genes are differentially expressed between the two sexes. According to the results, the expression levels of the following genes differ between the two sexes of mice: Peg3, Zim1, Igf2, H19 and Zac1. The expression levels of these imprinted genes are usually greater in males than in females. This bias is most obvious in the developing brains of 14.5-dpc embryos, but also detected in the brains of postnatal-stage mice. However, this sexual bias is not obvious in 10.5-dpc embryos, a developmental stage before the sexual differentiation. Thus, the sexual bias observed in the imprinted genes is most likely attributable by gonadal hormones rather than by sex chromosome complement. Overall, the results indicate that several imprinted genes are sexually different in terms of their expression levels, and further suggest that the transcriptional regulation of these imprinted genes may be influenced by unknown mechanisms associated with sexual differentiation. PMID:24125951

  15. Transcription factor ZBED6 mediates IGF2 gene expression by regulating promoter activity and DNA methylation in myoblasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were up regulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels wer...

  16. Analysis of Imprinted Gene Expression in Normal Fertilized and Uniparental Preimplantation Porcine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chi-Hun; Uh, Kyung-Jun; Mulligan, Brendan P.; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Ka, Hakhyun; Lee, Chang-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    In the present study quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the expression status of eight imprinted genes (GRB10, H19, IGF2R, XIST, IGF2, NNAT, PEG1 and PEG10) during preimplantation development, in normal fertilized and uniparental porcine embryos. The results demonstrated that, in all observed embryo samples, a non imprinted gene expression pattern up to the 16-cell stage of development was common for most genes. This was true for all classes of embryo, regardless of parental-origins and the direction of imprint. However, several differentially expressed genes (H19, IGF2, XIST and PEG10) were detected amongst the classes at the blastocyst stage of development. Most interestingly and despite the fact that maternally and paternally expressed genes should not be expressed in androgenones and parthenogenones, respectively, both uniparental embryos expressed these genes when tested for in this study. In order to account for this phenomenon, we compared the expression patterns of eight imprinted genes along with the methylation status of the IGF2/H19 DMR3 in haploid and diploid parthenogenetic embryos. Our findings revealed that IGF2, NNAT and PEG10 were silenced in haploid but not diploid parthenogenetic blastocysts and differential methylation of the IGF2/H19 DMR3 was consistently observed between haploid and diploid parthenogenetic blastocysts. These results appear to suggest that there exists a process to adjust the expression status of imprinted genes in diploid parthenogenetic embryos and that this phenomenon may be associated with altered methylation at an imprinting control region. In addition we believe that imprinted expression occurs in at least four genes, namely H19, IGF2, XIST and PEG10 in porcine blastocyst stage embryos. PMID:21804912

  17. An isocorydine derivative (d-ICD) inhibits drug resistance by downregulating IGF2BP3 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chao; Chen, Lijuan; Fang, Tao; Li, Hong; Tian, Hua; Liu, Junxi; Chen, Taoyang; Jiang, Guoping; Xie, Haiyang; Cui, Ying; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    In our previous studies, we reported that CD133+ cancer stem cells (CSCs) were chemoresistant in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and that isocorydine treatment decreased the percentage of CD133+ CSCs. Here, we found that a derivative of isocorydine (d-ICD) inhibited HCC cell growth, particularly among the CD133+ subpopulation, and rendered HCC cells more sensitive to sorafenib treatment. d-ICD inhibited IGF2BP3 expression in a time-dependent manner, and IGF2BP3 expression negatively correlated with d-ICD-induced growth suppression. IGF2BP3 overexpression enriched the CD133+ CSC subpopulation in HCC, enhanced tumor sphere formation and suppressed the cytotoxic effects of sorafenib and doxorubicin. The expression of drug resistance-related genes, including ABCB1 and ABCG2, and the CSC marker CD133 expression was increased after IGF2BP3 overexpression. The significance of these observations was underscored by our findings that high IGF2BP3 expression predicted poor survival in a cohort of 236 patients with HCC and positively correlated with ABCG2 and CD133 expression in vivo. These results suggested that the d-ICD may inhibit HCC cells growth by IGF2BP3 decrease and that IGF2BP3 may serve as a therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:26327240

  18. A Common Polymorphism within the IGF2 Imprinting Control Region Is Associated with Parent of Origin Specific Effects in Infantile Hemangiomas

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Brent; Yao, Xiaopan; Deng, Yanhong; Waner, Milton; Spock, Christopher; Tom, Laura; Persing, John; Narayan, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common tumor of the pediatric age group, affecting up to 4% of newborns ranging from inconsequential blemishes, to highly aggressive tumors. Following well defined growth phases (proliferative, plateau involutional) IH usually regress into a fibro-fatty residuum. Despite the high prevalence of IH, little is known regarding the pathogenesis of disease. A reported six fold decrease in IGF2 expression (correlating with transformation of proliferative to involuted lesions) prompted us to study the IGF-2 axis further. We demonstrate that IGF2 expression in IH is strongly related to the expression of a cancer testes and suspected oncogene BORIS (paralog of CTCF), placing IH in the unique category of being the first known benign BORIS positive tumor. IGF2 expression was strongly and positively related to BORIS transcript expression. Furthermore, a stronger association was made when comparing BORIS levels against the expression of CTCF via either a percentage or difference between the two. A common C/T polymorphism at CTCF BS6 appeared to modify the correlation between CTCF/BORIS and IGF2 expression in a parent of origin specific manner. Moreover, these effects may have phenotypic consequences as tumor growth also correlates with the genotype at CTCF BS6. This may provide a framework for explaining the clinical variability seen in IH and suggests new insights regarding CTCF and BORIS related functionality in both normal and malignant states. PMID:26496499

  19. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P < 0.05). A luciferase assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P < 0.05). An over-expression assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  20. An exon splice enhancer primes IGF2:IGF2R binding site structure and function evolution.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher; Hoppe, Hans-Jürgen; Rezgui, Dellel; Strickland, Madeleine; Forbes, Briony E; Grutzner, Frank; Frago, Susana; Ellis, Rosamund Z; Wattana-Amorn, Pakorn; Prince, Stuart N; Zaccheo, Oliver J; Nolan, Catherine M; Mungall, Andrew J; Jones, E Yvonne; Crump, Matthew P; Hassan, A Bassim

    2012-11-30

    Placental development and genomic imprinting coevolved with parental conflict over resource distribution to mammalian offspring. The imprinted genes IGF2 and IGF2R code for the growth promoter insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and its inhibitor, mannose 6-phosphate (M6P)/IGF2 receptor (IGF2R), respectively. M6P/IGF2R of birds and fish do not recognize IGF2. In monotremes, which lack imprinting, IGF2 specifically bound M6P/IGF2R via a hydrophobic CD loop. We show that the DNA coding the CD loop in monotremes functions as an exon splice enhancer (ESE) and that structural evolution of binding site loops (AB, HI, FG) improved therian IGF2 affinity. We propose that ESE evolution led to the fortuitous acquisition of IGF2 binding by M6P/IGF2R that drew IGF2R into parental conflict; subsequent imprinting may then have accelerated affinity maturation. PMID:23197533

  1. Generation of Five Human Lactoferrin Transgenic Cloned Goats Using Fibroblast Cells and Their Methylation Status of Putative Differential Methylation Regions of IGF2R and H19 Imprinted Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Ziyu; Song, Yang; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technique to produce transgenic cloned mammalian, including transgenic goats which may produce Human Lactoferrin (hLF). However, success percentage of SCNT is low, because of gestational and neonatal failure of transgenic embryos. According to the studies on cattle and mice, DNA methylation of some imprinted genes, which plays a vital role in the reprogramming of embryo in NT maybe an underlying mechanism. Methodology/Principal Findings Fibroblast cells were derived from the ear of a two-month-old goat. The vector expressing hLF was constructed and transfected into fibroblasts. G418 selection, EGFP expression, PCR, and cell cycle distribution were applied sequentially to select transgenic cells clones. After NT and embryo transfer, five transgenic cloned goats were obtained from 240 cloned transgenic embryos. These transgenic goats were identified by 8 microsatellites genotyping and southern blot. Of the five transgenic goats, 3 were lived after birth, while 2 were dead during gestation. We compared differential methylation regions (DMR) pattern of two paternally imprinted genes (H19 and IGF2R) of the ear tissues from the lived transgenic goats, dead transgenic goats, and control goats from natural reproduction. Hyper-methylation pattern appeared in cloned aborted goats, while methylation status was relatively normal in cloned lived goats compared with normal goats. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we generated five hLF transgenic cloned goats by SCNT. This is the first time the DNA methylation of lived and dead transgenic cloned goats was compared. The results demonstrated that the methylation status of DMRs of H19 and IGF2R were different in lived and dead transgenic goats and therefore this may be potentially used to assess the reprogramming status of transgenic cloned goats. Understanding the pattern of gene imprinting may be useful to improve cloning techniques in future. PMID:24204972

  2. CREB Negatively Regulates IGF2R Gene Expression and Downstream Pathways to Inhibit Hypoxia-Induced H9c2 Cardiomyoblast Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Kung; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Chang, Hsin-Nung; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lin, Kuan-Ho; Pan, Lung-Fa; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    During hypoxia, gene expression is altered by various transcription factors. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF2) is known to be induced by hypoxia, which binds to IGF2 receptor IGF2R that acts like a G protein-coupled receptor, might cause pathological hypertrophy or activation of the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is central to second messenger-regulated transcription and plays a critical role in the cardiomyocyte survival pathway. In this study, we found that IGF2R level was enhanced in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia in a time-dependent manner but was down-regulated by CREB expression. The over-expression of CREB in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts suppressed the induction of hypoxia-induced IGF2R expression levels and reduced cell apoptosis. Gel shift assay results further indicated that CREB binds to the promoter sequence of IGF2R. With a luciferase assay method, we further observed that CREB represses IGF2R promoter activity. These results suggest that CREB plays an important role in the inhibition of IGF2R expression by binding to the IGF2R promoter and further suppresses H9c2 cardiomyoblast cell apoptosis induced by IGF2R signaling under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26610485

  3. Abnormal expression of DNA methyltransferases and genomic imprinting in cloned goat fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yongjie; Deng, Mingtian; Zhang, Guomin; Ren, Caifang; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful way to produce cloned animals. However, SCNT animals exhibit DNA methylation and genomic imprinting abnormalities. These abnormalities may be due to the faulty epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. To investigate the consequence of SCNT on the genomic imprinting and global methylation in the donor cells, growth patterns and apoptosis of cloned goat fibroblast cells (CGFCs) at passage 7 were determined. Growth patterns in CGFCs were similar to the controls; however, the growth rate in log phase was lower and apoptosis in CGFCs were significantly higher (P < 0.01). In addition, quantitative expression analysis of three DNA methyltransferases (Dnmt) and two imprinted genes (H19, IGF2R) was conducted in CGFCs: Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b expression was significantly reduced (P < 0.01), and H19 expression was decreased sixfold (P < 0.01); however, the expression of Dnmt3a was unaltered and IGF2R expression was significantly increased (P < 0.05). Finally, we used bisulfite sequencing PCR to compare the DNA methylation patterns in differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of H19 and IGF2R. The DMRs of H19 (P < 0.01) and IGF2R (P < 0.01) were both highly methylated in CGFCs. These results indicate that the global genome might be hypomethylated. Moreover, there is an aberrant expression of imprinted genes and DMR methylation in CGFCs. PMID:26314395

  4. Alteration in Expression and Methylation of IGF2/H19 in Placenta and Umbilical Cord Blood Are Associated with Macrosomia Exposed to Intrauterine Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Su, Rina; Wang, Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Li; Liu, Xinyue; Wei, Yumei; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Macrosomia is one of the most common complications in gestational diabetes mellitus. Insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 are two of the imprinted candidate genes that are involved in fetal growth and development. Change in methylation at differentially methylated region of the insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 has been proved to be an early event related to the programming of metabolic profile, including macrosomia and small for gestational age in offspring. Here we hypothesize that alteration in methylation at differentially methylated region of the insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 is associated with macrosomia induced by intrauterine hyperglycemia. Results The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 is significant higher in gestational diabetes mellitus group (GDM group) compared to normal glucose tolerance group (NGT group) both in umbilical cord blood and placenta, while the expression of H19 is significant lower in GDM group in umbilical cord blood. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 is significant higher in normal glucose tolerance with macrosomia group (NGT-M) compared to normal glucose tolerance with normal birthweight group (NGT-NBW group) both in placenta and umbilical cord blood. A model with interaction term of gene expression of IGF2 and H19 found that IGF2 and the joint action of IGF2 and H19 in placenta showed significantly relationship with GDM/NGT and GDM-NBW/NGT-NBW. A borderline significant association was seen among IGF2 and H19 in cord blood and GDM-M/NGT-M. The methylation level at different CpG sites of insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 in umbilical cord blood was also significantly different among groups. Based on the multivariable linear regression analysis, the methylation of the insulin-like growth factor 2 / H19 is closely related to birth weight and intrauterine hyperglycemia. Conclusions We confirmed the existence of alteration in DNA methylation in umbilical cord blood exposed to intrauterine

  5. Association of maternal and nutrient supply line factors with DNA methylation at the imprinted IGF2/H19 locus in multiple tissues of newborn twins.

    PubMed

    Loke, Yuk Jing; Galati, John C; Morley, Ruth; Joo, Eric Ji-Hoon; Novakovic, Boris; Li, Xin; Weinrich, Blaise; Carson, Nicole; Ollikainen, Miina; Ng, Hong-Kiat; Andronikos, Roberta; Aziz, Nur Khairunnisa Abdul; Saffery, Richard; Craig, Jeffrey M

    2013-10-01

    Epigenetic events are crucial for early development, but can be influenced by environmental factors, potentially programming the genome for later adverse health outcomes. The insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2)/H19 locus is crucial for prenatal growth and the epigenetic state at this locus is environmentally labile. Recent studies have implicated maternal factors, including folate intake and smoking, in the regulation of DNA methylation at this locus, although data are often conflicting in the direction and magnitude of effect. Most studies have focused on single tissues and on one or two differentially-methylated regions (DMRs) regulating IGF2/H19 expression. In this study, we investigated the relationship between multiple shared and non-shared gestational/maternal factors and DNA methylation at four IGF2/H19 DMRs in five newborn cell types from 67 pairs of monozygotic and 49 pairs of dizygotic twins. Data on maternal and non-shared supply line factors were collected during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and DNA methylation was measured via mass spectrometry using Sequenom MassArray EpiTyper analysis. Our exploratory approach showed that the site of umbilical cord insertion into the placenta in monochorionic twins has the strongest positive association with methylation in all IGF2/H19 DMRs (p<0.05). Further, evidence for tissue- and locus-specific effects were observed, emphasizing that responsiveness to environmental exposures in utero cannot be generalized across genes and tissues, potentially accounting for the lack of consistency in previous findings. Such complexity in responsiveness to environmental exposures in utero has implications for all epigenetic studies investigating the developmental origins of health and disease. PMID:23917818

  6. Butyrate Induced IGF2 Activation Correlated with Distinct Chromatin Signatures Due to Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joo Heon; Li, Robert W; Gao, Yuan; Bickhart, Derek M; Liu, George E; Li, Weizhong; Wu, Sitao; Li, Cong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Histone modification has emerged as a very important mechanism regulating the transcriptional status of the genome. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone controlling various cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis. H19 gene is closely linked to IGF2 gene, and IGF2 and H19 are reciprocally regulated imprinted genes. The epigenetic signature of H19 promoter (hypermethylation) on the paternal allele plays a vital role in allowing the expression of the paternal allele of IGF2.46 Our previous studies demonstrate that butyrate regulates the expression of IGF2 as well as genes encoding IGF Binding proteins. To obtain further understanding of histone modification and its regulatory potentials in controlling IGF2/H19 gene expression, we investigated the histone modification status of some key histones associated with the expression of IGF2/H19 genes in bovine cells using RNA-seq in combination with Chip-seq technology. A high-resolution map of the major chromatin modification at the IGF2/H19 locus induced by butyrate was constructed to illustrate the fundamental association of the chromatin modification landscape that may play a role in the activation of the IGF2 gene. High-definition epigenomic landscape mapping revealed that IGF2 and H19 have distinct chromatin modification patterns at their coding and promoter regions, such as TSSs and TTSs. Moreover, the correlation between the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of IGF2/H19 locus and histone modification (acetylation and methylation) indicated that epigenetic signatures/markers of DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation were differentially distributed on the expressed IGF2 and silenced H19 genes. Our evidence also suggests that butyrate-induced regional changes of histone acetylation statusin the upstream regulation domain of H19 may be related to the reduced expression of H19 and strong activation of IGF2. Our results provided insights into the mechanism

  7. IGF-2/IGF-1R signaling has distinct effects on Sox1, Irx3, and Six3 expressions during ES cell derived-neuroectoderm development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takata, Nozomu; Sakakura, Eriko; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2016-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are involved in growth and tissue development, including diseases such as type-2 diabetes and cancers. However, their roles in lineage specification, especially in early mammalian neural development, are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the protein expression of IGF-2 in early mouse embryo, and it was preferentially detected in anterior mesodermal tissue, adjacent to the neural plate. We utilized a self-organizing neural tissue culture system and analyzed the direct effect of IGF-2 on the general neural marker Sox1. Interestingly, using recombinant IGF-2 and a chemical inhibitor of its receptor (IGF-1R), we found that the IGF-2/IGF-1R pathway positively regulated Sox1 expression in embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural tissue. Furthermore, to visualize the expression patterns of other neural markers, we used reporter ES cell lines and we found that the IGF-2/IGF-1R signaling upregulated the expression of the posterior neural marker Irx3. In contrast, the anterior neural marker Six3 was downregulated by IGF-2/IGF-1R signaling. Together, our results demonstrate that IGF-2/IGF-1R signaling has different effects on neural marker expression, which may influence the early regional identity of ES cell-derived neural tissues. PMID:26956358

  8. Expression of intronic miRNAs and their host gene Igf2 in a murine unilateral ureteral obstruction model

    PubMed Central

    Li, N.Q.; Yang, J.; Cui, L.; Ma, N.; Zhang, L.; Hao, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the expression of miR-483 and miR-483* and the relationship among them, their host gene (Igf2), and other cytokines in a murine model of renal fibrosis. The extent of renal fibrosis was visualized using Masson staining, and fibrosis was scored 3 days and 1 and 2 weeks after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Expression of miR-483, miR-483* and various cytokine mRNAs was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression of miR-483 and miR-483* was significantly upregulated in the UUO model, particularly miR-483 expression was the greatest 2 weeks after surgery. Additionally, miR-483 and miR-483* expression negatively correlated with Bmp7 expression and positively correlated with Igf2, Tgfβ, Hgf, and Ctgf expression, as determined by Pearson's correlation analysis. Hgf expression significantly increased at 1 and 2 weeks after the surgery compared to the control group. This study showed that miR-483 and miR-483* expression was upregulated in a murine UUO model. These data suggest that miR-483 and miR-483* play a role in renal fibrosis and that miR-483* may interact with miR-483 in renal fibrosis. Thus, these miRNAs may play a role in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis and coexpression of their host gene Igf2. PMID:25831208

  9. Deletions and rearrangements of the H19/IGF2 enhancer region in patients with Silver-Russell syndrome and growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Grønskov, Karen; Poole, Rebecca L; Hahnemann, Johanne M D; Thomson, Jennifer; Tümer, Zeynep; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Murphy, Rinki; Ravn, Kirstine; Melchior, Linea; Dedic, Alma; Dolmer, Birgitte; Temple, I Karen; Boonen, Susanne E; Mackay, Deborah J G

    2011-05-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is characterised by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and body asymmetry. In 35-60% of SRS cases the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR) upstream of the H19 gene (H19-ICR) is hypomethylated, leading to downregulation of IGF2 and bi-allelic expression of H19. H19 and IGF2 are reciprocally imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15. The expression is regulated by the imprinted methylation of the ICR, which modulates the transcription of H19 and IGF2 facilitated by enhancers downstream of H19. A promoter element of IGF2, IGF2P0, is differentially methylated equivalently to the H19-ICR, though in a small number of SRS cases this association is disrupted--that is, hypomethylation affects either H19-ICR or IGF2P0. Three pedigrees associated with hypomethylation of IGF2P0 in the probands are presented here, two with paternally derived deletions, and one with a balanced translocation of inferred paternal origin. They all have a breakpoint within the H19/IGF2 enhancer region. One proband has severe growth retardation, the others have SRS. This is the first report of paternally derived structural chromosomal mutations in 11p15 causing SRS. These cases define a novel aetiology of the growth retardation in SRS, namely, dissociation of IGF2 from its enhancers. PMID:21278389

  10. Tissue-specific imprinting of the mouse insulin-like growth factor II receptor gene correlates with differential allele-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Hu, J F; Oruganti, H; Vu, T H; Hoffman, A R

    1998-02-01

    Imprinted genes may be expressed uniparentally in a tissue- and development-specific manner. The insulin-like growth factor II receptor gene (Igf2r), one of the first imprinted genes to be identified, is an attractive candidate for studying the molecular mechanism of genomic imprinting because it is transcribed monoallelically in the mouse but biallelically in humans. To identify the factors that control genomic imprinting, we examined allelic expression of Igf2r at different ages in interspecific mice. We found that Igf2r is not always monoallelically expressed. Paternal imprinting of Igf2r is maintained in peripheral tissues, including liver, kidney, heart, spleen, intestine, bladder, skin, bone, and skeletal muscle. However, in central nervous system (CNS), Igf2r is expressed from both parental alleles. Southern analysis of the Igf2r promoter (region 1) revealed that, outside of the CNS where Igf2r is monoallelically expressed, the suppressed paternal allele is fully methylated while the expressed maternal allele is completely unmethylated. In CNS, however, both parental alleles are unmethylated in region 1. The importance of DNA methylation in the maintenance of the genomic imprint was also confirmed by the finding that Igf2r imprinting was relaxed by 5-azacytidine treatment. The correlation between genomic imprinting and allelic Igf2r methylation in CNS and other tissues thus suggests that the epigenetic modification in the promoter region may function as one of the major factors in maintaining the monoallelic expression of Igf2r. PMID:9482664

  11. IGF2BP1 promotes mesenchymal cell properties and migration of tumor-derived cells by enhancing the expression of LEF1 and SNAI2 (SLUG)

    PubMed Central

    Zirkel, Anne; Lederer, Marcell; Stöhr, Nadine; Pazaitis, Nikolaos; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The oncofetal IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 1 (IGF2BP1) controls the migration and invasiveness of primary as well as tumor-derived cells in vitro. Whether the protein also modulates epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), a hallmark of tumor progression involved in tumor cell dissemination, remained elusive. In this study, we reveal that IGF2BP1 enhances mesenchymal-like cell properties in tumor-derived cells by promoting the expression of the transcriptional regulators LEF1 and SLUG (SNAI2). IGF2BP1 associates with LEF1 transcripts and prevents their degradation in a 3′-UTR-dependent manner resulting in an upregulation of LEF1 expression. LEF1 promotes transcription of the mesenchymal marker fibronectin by associating with the fibronectin 1 promoter. Moreover, LEF1 enforces the synthesis of the ‘EMT-driving’ transcriptional regulator SNAI2. Accordingly, IGF2BP1 knockdown causes MET-like (mesenchymal-epithelial-transition) morphological changes, enhances the formation of cell–cell contacts and reduces cell migration in various mesenchymal-like tumor-derived cells. However, in epithelial-like tumor-derived cells characterized by a lack or low abundance of IGF2BP1, the protein fails to induce EMT. These findings identify IGF2BP1 as a pro-mesenchymal post-transcriptional determinant, which sustains the synthesis of ‘EMT-driving’ transcriptional regulators, mesenchymal markers and enhances tumor cell motility. This supports previous reports, suggesting a role of IGF2BP1 in tumor cell dissemination. PMID:23677615

  12. Switch from monoallelic to biallelic human IGF2 promoter methylation during aging and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Issa, J P; Vertino, P M; Boehm, C D; Newsham, I F; Baylin, S B

    1996-01-01

    We have previously linked aging, carcinogenesis, and de novo methylation within the promoter of the estrogen receptor (ER) gene in human colon. We now examine the dynamics of this process for the imprinted gene for insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2). In young individuals, the P2-4 promoters of IGF2 are methylated exclusively on the silenced maternal allele. During aging, this promoter methylation becomes more extensive and involves the originally unmethylated allele. Most adult human tumors, including colon, breast, lung, and leukemias, exhibit increased methylation at the P2-4 IGF2 promoters, suggesting further spreading during the neoplastic process. In tumors, this methylation is associated with diminished or absent IGF2 expression from the methylated P3 promoter but maintained expression from P1, an upstream promoter that is not contained within the IGF2 CpG island. Our results demonstrate a remarkable evolution of methylation patterns in the imprinted promoter of the IGF2 gene during aging and carcinogenesis, and provide further evidence for a potential link between aberrant methylation and diseases of aging. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8876210

  13. Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome, imprinting, IGF2, and H19: Implications for hemihyperplasia, associated neoplasms, and overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.M. Jr.

    1994-08-15

    By now there are some 450 reported cases of the Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS). Patients generally fit into one of three categories: those that occur sporadically and who have normal chromosomes; those with chromosome anomalies, most commonly duplication involving the 11p15.5 region; and those with autosomal dominant pedigrees and expression almost exclusively in individuals born to female carriers. Linkage to the 11p15.5 region has been demonstrated in families with informative RFLP markers. Research has progressed rapidly in this area and a number of explanations for the three categories of WBS are possible. Further studies are essential. Here I review one possible explanation which, if true, raises questions about hemihyperplasia, associated neoplasms, and high birth weights in WBS. 17 refs.

  14. Retrograde fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) signaling regulates insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) expression for activity-dependent synapse stabilization in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Akiko; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M; Bullock, Brenna; Lehtinen, Maria K; Umemori, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Communication between pre- and postsynaptic cells promotes the initial organization of synaptic specializations, but subsequent synaptic stabilization requires transcriptional regulation. Here we show that fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22), a target-derived presynaptic organizer in the mouse hippocampus, induces the expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) for the stabilization of presynaptic terminals. FGF22 is released from CA3 pyramidal neurons and organizes the differentiation of excitatory nerve terminals formed onto them. Local application of FGF22 on the axons of dentate granule cells (DGCs), which are presynaptic to CA3 pyramidal neurons, induces IGF2 in the DGCs. IGF2, in turn, localizes to DGC presynaptic terminals and stabilizes them in an activity-dependent manner. IGF2 application rescues presynaptic defects of Fgf22(-/-) cultures. IGF2 is dispensable for the initial presynaptic differentiation, but is required for the following presynaptic stabilization both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal a novel feedback signal that is critical for the activity-dependent stabilization of presynaptic terminals in the mammalian hippocampus. PMID:27083047

  15. Retrograde fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) signaling regulates insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) expression for activity-dependent synapse stabilization in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Akiko; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M; Bullock, Brenna; Lehtinen, Maria K; Umemori, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Communication between pre- and postsynaptic cells promotes the initial organization of synaptic specializations, but subsequent synaptic stabilization requires transcriptional regulation. Here we show that fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22), a target-derived presynaptic organizer in the mouse hippocampus, induces the expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) for the stabilization of presynaptic terminals. FGF22 is released from CA3 pyramidal neurons and organizes the differentiation of excitatory nerve terminals formed onto them. Local application of FGF22 on the axons of dentate granule cells (DGCs), which are presynaptic to CA3 pyramidal neurons, induces IGF2 in the DGCs. IGF2, in turn, localizes to DGC presynaptic terminals and stabilizes them in an activity-dependent manner. IGF2 application rescues presynaptic defects of Fgf22-/- cultures. IGF2 is dispensable for the initial presynaptic differentiation, but is required for the following presynaptic stabilization both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal a novel feedback signal that is critical for the activity-dependent stabilization of presynaptic terminals in the mammalian hippocampus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12151.001 PMID:27083047

  16. Igf2 ligand dependency of Pten(+/-) developmental and tumour phenotypes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Church, D N; Phillips, B R; Stuckey, D J; Barnes, D J; Buffa, F M; Manek, S; Clarke, K; Harris, A L; Carter, E J; Hassan, A B

    2012-08-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN is a key negative regulator of the PI3K-Akt pathway, and is frequently either reduced or lost in human tumours. Murine genetic studies have confirmed that reduction of Pten promotes tumourigenesis in multiple organs, and demonstrated dependency of tumour development on the activation of downstream components such as Akt. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) act via IGF1R to activate the PI3K-Akt pathway, and are commonly upregulated in cancer. A context-dependent interplay between IGFs and PTEN exists in normal tissue and tumours; increased IGF2 ligand supply induces Pten expression creating an autoregulatory negative feedback loop, whereas complete loss of PTEN may either cooperate with IGF overexpression in tumour promotion, or result in desensitisation to IGF ligand. However, it remains unknown whether neoplasia associated with Pten loss is dependent on upstream IGF ligand supply in vivo. We evaluated this by generation of Pten(+/-) mice with differing allelic dosage of Igf2, an imprinted gene encoding the potent embryonic and tumour growth factor Igf2. We show that biallelic Igf2 supply potentiates a previously unreported Pten(+/-) placental phenotype and results in strain-dependent cardiac hyperplasia and neonatal lethality. Importantly, we also show that the effects of Pten loss in vivo are modified by Igf2 supply, as lack of Igf2 results in extended survival and delayed tumour development while biallelic supply is associated with reduced lifespan and accelerated neoplasia in females. Furthermore, we demonstrate that reduction of PTEN protein to heterozygote levels in human MCF7 cells is associated with increased proliferation in response to IGF2, and does not result in desensitisation to IGF2 signalling. These data indicate that the effects of Pten loss at heterozygote levels commonly observed in human tumours are modified by Igf2 ligand, and emphasise the importance of the evaluation of upstream pathways in tumours with Pten loss

  17. The cell type-specific IGF2 expression during early human development correlates to the pattern of overgrowth and neoplasia in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hedborg, F.; Holmgren, L.; Sandstedt, B.; Ohlsson, R.

    1994-01-01

    Overstimulation by insulin-like growth factor II is implied in several overgrowth conditions and childhood cancers. We have therefore studied spatial and temporal expression patterns of the insulin-like growth factor II gene (IGF2) and the insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor gene during normal human development (5.5 to 23.0 weeks postfertilization). The set of cell types with the most abundant IGF2 expression correlated strikingly to the organomegaly and tumor predisposition of the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Intrauterine growth and postnatal organ weights of a prematurely born child with a full-blown syndrome are presented. The cell type-specific IGF2 expression of these organs and of multifocal Wilms' tumors from two other children affected by the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome were also studied. The results clarify and extend previous findings concerning human prenatal IGF2 expression and are consistent with a short range overstimulatory role of locally produced IGF II ensuing after the first trimester in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7943172

  18. Methylation of IGF2 regulatory regions to diagnose adrenocortical carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Creemers, S G; van Koetsveld, P M; van Kemenade, F J; Papathomas, T G; Franssen, G J H; Dogan, F; Eekhoff, E M W; van der Valk, P; de Herder, W W; Janssen, J A M J L; Feelders, R A; Hofland, L J

    2016-09-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. Discrimination of ACCs from adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs) is challenging on both imaging and histopathological grounds. High IGF2 expression is associated with malignancy, but shows large variability. In this study, we investigate whether specific methylation patterns of IGF2 regulatory regions could serve as a valuable biomarker in distinguishing ACCs from ACAs. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse methylation percentages in DMR0, DMR2, imprinting control region (ICR) (consisting of CTCF3 and CTCF6) and the H19 promoter. Expression of IGF2 and H19 mRNA was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Analyses were performed in 24 ACCs, 14 ACAs and 11 normal adrenals. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, we evaluated which regions showed the best predictive value for diagnosis of ACC and determined the diagnostic accuracy of these regions. In ACCs, the DMR0, CTCF3, CTCF6 and the H19 promoter were positively correlated with IGF2 mRNA expression (P<0.05). Methylation in the most discriminating regions distinguished ACCs from ACAs with a sensitivity of 96%, specificity of 100% and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.997±0.005. Our findings were validated in an independent cohort of 9 ACCs and 13 ACAs, resulting in a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 92%. Thus, methylation patterns of IGF2 regulatory regions can discriminate ACCs from ACAs with high diagnostic accuracy. This proposed test may become the first objective diagnostic tool to assess malignancy in adrenal tumours and facilitate the choice of therapeutic strategies in this group of patients. PMID:27535174

  19. Extensive investigation of the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region reveals novel OCT4/SOX2 binding site defects associated with specific methylation patterns in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abi Habib, Walid; Azzi, Salah; Brioude, Frédéric; Steunou, Virginie; Thibaud, Nathalie; Das Neves, Cristina; Le Jule, Marilyne; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Keren, Boris; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Michot, Caroline; Rossi, Massimiliano; Pasquier, Laurent; Gicquel, Christine; Rossignol, Sylvie; Le Bouc, Yves; Netchine, Irène

    2014-11-01

    Isolated gain of methylation (GOM) at the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) accounts for about 10% of patients with BWS. A subset of these patients have genetic defects within ICR1, but the frequency of these defects has not yet been established in a large cohort of BWS patients with isolated ICR1 GOM. Here, we carried out a genetic analysis in a large cohort of 57 BWS patients with isolated ICR1 GOM and analyzed the methylation status of the entire domain. We found a new point mutation in two unrelated families and a 21 bp deletion in another unrelated child, both of which were maternally inherited and affected the OCT4/SOX2 binding site in the A2 repeat of ICR1. Based on data from this and previous studies, we estimate that cis genetic defects account for about 20% of BWS patients with isolated ICR1 GOM. Methylation analysis at eight loci of the IGF2/H19 domain revealed that sites surrounding OCT4/SOX2 binding site mutations were fully methylated and methylation indexes declined as a function of distance from these sites. This was not the case in BWS patients without genetic defects identified. Thus, GOM does not spread uniformly across the IGF2/H19 domain, suggesting that OCT4/SOX2 protects against methylation at local sites. These findings add new insights to the mechanism of the regulation of the ICR1 domain. Our data show that mutations and deletions within ICR1 are relatively common. Systematic identification is therefore necessary to establish appropriate genetic counseling for BWS patients with isolated ICR1 GOM. PMID:24916376

  20. Decreased IDE and IGF2 expression but increased Aβ40 in the cerebral cortex of mouse pups by early life lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Yang, Guojun; Wang, Yueying; Qiao, Mingwu; Zhang, Pingan; Shao, Jianfeng; Yang, Guoyu

    2016-03-01

    As the abbreviation of plumbum and a chemical symbol for lead, Pb produces neurotoxic effects, which result into an impairment of learning and memory and other neurological dysfunctions. However, the mechanism of neurotoxicity of Pb exposure is unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of maternal lead exposure on expression of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE),insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and beta amyloid protein 40 (Aβ40) in the cerebral cortex of mice offspring. Lead exposure initiated from beginning of gestation to weaning. Lead acetate administered in drinking solutions was dissolved in distilled deionized water at the concentrations of 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.5% groups respectively. On the 21st postnatal day, On the PND21, the learning and memory ability were tested by water maze test and the Pb levels were also determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The expression of IDE, IGF2 and Aβ40 in cerebral cortex was examined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and western blotting. The lead levels in blood and cerebral cortex of all lead exposure groups were significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). In water maze test, the performances of 0.5% and 1% lead exposure groups were worse than that of the control group (P<0.05).The expression of IDE and IGF2 was decreased, but Aβ40 was increased in lead exposed groups than that of the control group (P<0.05). The decreased expression of IDE and IGF2 and increased expression of Aβ40 in the cerebral cortex of pups may contribute to the neurotoxicity associated with maternal Pb exposure. PMID:26791739

  1. Phylogenetic footprint analysis of IGF2 in extant mammals.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Jennifer R; Murphy, Susan K; Nolan, Catherine M; Dietrich, Fred S; Jirtle, Randy L

    2004-09-01

    Genomic imprinting results in monoallelic gene transcription that is directed by cis-acting regulatory elements epigenetically marked in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. We performed phylogenetic sequence and epigenetic comparisons of IGF2 between the nonimprinted platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and imprinted opossum (Didelphis virginiana), mouse (Mus musculus), and human (Homo sapiens) to determine if their divergent imprint status would reflect differences in the conservation of genomic elements important in the regulation of imprinting. We report herein that IGF2 imprinting does not correlate evolutionarily with differential intragenic methylation, nor is it associated with motif 13, a reported IGF2-specific "imprint signature" located in the coding region. Instead, IGF2 imprinting is strongly associated with both the lack of short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs) and an intragenic conserved inverted repeat that contains candidate CTCF-binding sites, a role not previously ascribed to this particular sequence element. Our results are the first to demonstrate that comparative footprint analysis of species from evolutionarily distant mammalian clades, and exhibiting divergent imprint status is a powerful bioinformatics-based approach for identifying cis-acting elements potentially involved not only in the origins of genomic imprinting, but also in its maintenance in humans. PMID:15342558

  2. Integrin alpha 11 regulates IGF2 expression in fibroblasts to enhance tumorigenicity of human non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Qi; Popova, Svetlana N; Brown, Ewan R S; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Navab, Roya; Shih, Warren; Li, Ming; Lu, Ming; Jurisica, Igor; Penn, Linda Z; Gullberg, Donald; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2007-07-10

    Integrin alpha11 (ITGA11/alpha11) is localized to stromal fibroblasts and commonly overexpressed in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We hypothesized that stromal alpha11 could be important for the tumorigenicity of NSCLC cells. SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts established from wild-type (WT) and Itga11-deficient [knockout (KO)] mice were tested for their tumorigenicity in immune-deficient mice when implanted alone or coimplanted with the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. A549 coimplanted with the fibroblasts showed a markedly enhanced tumor growth rate compared with A549, WT, or KO, which alone formed only small tumors. Importantly, the growth was significantly greater for A549+WT compared with A549+KO tumors. Reexpression of human alpha11 cDNA in KO cells rescued a tumor growth rate to that comparable with the A549+WT tumors. These findings were validated in two other NSCLC cell lines, NCI-H460 and NCI-H520. Gene expression profiling indicated that IGF2 mRNA expression level was >200 times lower in A549+KO compared with A549+WT tumors. Stable short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) down-regulation of IGF2 in WT (WT(shIGF2)) fibroblasts resulted in a decreased growth rate of A549+WT(shIGF2), compared with A549+WT tumors. The results indicate that alpha11 is an important stromal factor in NSCLC and propose a paradigm for carcinoma-stromal interaction indirectly through interaction between the matrix collagen and stromal fibroblasts to stimulate cancer cell growth. PMID:17600088

  3. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15.5

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, R.; Perlikowski, S.; Squire, J.

    1994-09-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a syndrome characterized by generalized and regional overgrowth as well as a predisposition to specific embryonal tumors. We have previously reported biallelic expression of insulin like growth factor 2 (IGF2) in fibroblasts from sporadic cases of BWS. In these cells, the normal expression pattern for IGF2 is allele-specific and derived from the paternal allele. To determine whether biallelic expression of IGF2 in BWS patients results from aberrant regulation of a single gene or multiple genes in an imprinted domain, we undertook the study of a second gene in the 11p15.5 imprinted region. H19 is normally stringently regulated, expressed primarily from the maternal allele, and in many tissues reciprocal expression of H19 and IGF2 has been documented. Since no protein product for H19 has been identified, the RNA itself may be biologically active and it may have a tumor suppressor function. Moreover, H19 has been suggested as a candidate gene in BWS, especially in autosomal dominant pedigrees. Using an Rsa1 polymorphism in the transcribed region of H19, we found that the expression of H19 in 8 patients with sporadic BWS is consistently nonallelic and in the informative cases is always from the maternal allele. This is also true for the two cases of BWS where biallelic IGF2 expression has been documented. We conclude that IGF2 biallelic expression does not represent a general loss of imprint control. If H19 and IGF2 do normally respond to common signals within an imprinted domain at 11p15.5, we suggest that BWS patients with biallelic IGF2 expression can escape from such imprinting constraints. To study this region in more detail, we have developed a replication timing assay for IGF2 and H19 to determine whether loss of asynchronous replication accompanies biallelic IGF2 expression.

  4. Cell type and context-specific function of PLAG1 for IGF2 P3 promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Monira; Holmgren, Claes; Göndör, Anita; Vesterlund, Mattias; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar; Larsson, Catharina; Ekström, Tomas J

    2012-12-01

    The fetal transcription factor PLAG1 is found to be overexpressed in cancers, and has been suggested to bind the insulin like growth factor 2 (IGF2) P3 promoter, and to activate the IGF2 gene. The expression of IGF2 has partly been linked to loss of CTCF-dependent chromatin insulator function at the H19 imprinting control region (ICR). We investigated the role of PLAG1 for IGF2 regulation in Hep3B and JEG-3 cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed cell type-specific binding of PLAG1 to the IGF2 P3 promoter, which was substantially insensitive to recombinant PLAG1 overexpression in the endogenous context. We hypothesized that the H19 chromatin insulator may be involved in the cell type-specific PLAG1 response. By using a GFP reporter gene/insulator assay plasmid construct with and without the H19 ICR and/or an SV40 enhancer, we confirm that the effect of the insulator is specifically associated with the activity of the IGF2 P3 promoter in the GFP reporter system, and furthermore, that the reporter insulator is functional in JEG-3 but not in Hep3B cells. FACS analysis was used to assess the function of PLAG1 in low endogenously expressing, but Zn-inducible stable PLAG1 expressing JEG-3 cell clones. Considerable increase in IGF2 expression upon PLAG1 induction with a partial insulator overriding activity was found using the reporter constructs. This is in contrast to the effect of the endogenous IGF2 gene which was insensitive to PLAG1 expression in JEG-3, while modestly induced the already highly expressed IGF2 gene in Hep3B cells. We suggest that the PLAG1 binding to the IGF2 P3 promoter and IGF2 expression is cell type-specific, and that the PLAG1 transcription factor acts as a transcriptional facilitator that partially overrides the insulation by the H19 ICR. PMID:23023303

  5. Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Expression in the Rat Brain Both in Basal Condition and following Learning Predominantly Derives from the Maternal Allele

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaojing; Kohtz, Amy; Pollonini, Gabriella; Riccio, Andrea; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2) is known as a maternally imprinted gene involved in growth and development. Recently, Igf2 was found to also be regulated and required in the adult rat hippocampus for long-term memory formation, raising the question of its allelic regulation in adult brain regions following experience and in cognitive processes. We show that, in adult rats, Igf2 is abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in cognitive functions, like hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, compared to the peripheral tissues. In contrast to its maternal imprinting in peripheral tissues, Igf2 is mainly expressed from the maternal allele in these brain regions. The training-dependent increase in Igf2 expression derives proportionally from both parental alleles, and, hence, is mostly maternal. Thus, Igf2 parental expression in the adult rat brain does not follow the imprinting rules found in peripheral tissues, suggesting differential expression regulation and functions of imprinted genes in the brain. PMID:26495851

  6. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues.

    PubMed

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K; Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S; Kukurba, Kim R; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Burchard, Esteban G; Seibold, Max A; MacArthur, Daniel G; Montgomery, Stephen B; Zaitlen, Noah A; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  7. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Seibold, Max A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  8. Copy number variations alter methylation and parallel IGF2 overexpression in adrenal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How-Kit, Alexandre; Guerin, Carole; Castinetti, Frederic; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; De Micco, Catherine; Daunay, Antoine; Taieb, David; Van Loo, Peter; Besse, Celine; Kristensen, Vessela N; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Barlier, Anne; Sebag, Frederic; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of insulin growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a hallmark of adrenocortical carcinomas and pheochromocytomas. Previous studies investigating the IGF2/H19 locus have mainly focused on a single molecular level such as genomic alterations or altered DNA methylation levels and the causal changes underlying IGF2 overexpression are still not fully established. In the current study, we analyzed 62 tumors of the adrenal gland from patients with Conn's adenoma (CA, n=12), pheochromocytomas (PCC, n=10), adrenocortical benign tumors (ACBT, n=20), and adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC, n=20). Gene expression, somatic copy number variation of chr11p15.5, and DNA methylation status of three differential methylated regions of the IGF2/H19 locus including the H19 imprinting control region were integratively analyzed. IGF2 overexpression was found in 85% of the ACCs and 100% of the PCCs compared to 23% observed in CAs and ACBTs. Copy number aberrations of chr11p15.5 were abundant in both PCCs and ACCs but while PCCs retained a diploid state, ACCs were frequently tetraploid (7/19). Loss of either a single allele or loss of two alleles of the same parental origin in tetraploid samples resulted in a uniparental disomy-like genotype. These copy number changes correlated with hypermethylation of the H19 ICR suggesting that the lost alleles were the unmethylated maternal alleles. Our data provide conclusive evidence that loss of the maternal allele correlates with IGF2 overexpression in adrenal tumors and that hypermethylation of the H19 ICR is a consequence thereof. PMID:26400872

  9. Copy number variations alter methylation and parallel IGF2 overexpression in adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How-Kit, Alexandre; Guerin, Carole; Castinetti, Frederic; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; De Micco, Catherine; Daunay, Antoine; Taieb, David; Van Loo, Peter; Besse, Celine; Kristensen, Vessela N; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Barlier, Anne; Sebag, Frederic; Tost, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Overexpression of insulin growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a hallmark of adrenocortical carcinomas and pheochromocytomas. Previous studies investigating the IGF2/H19 locus have mainly focused on a single molecular level such as genomic alterations or altered DNA methylation levels and the causal changes underlying IGF2 overexpression are still not fully established. In the current study, we analyzed 62 tumors of the adrenal gland from patients with Conn's adenoma (CA, n=12), pheochromocytomas (PCC, n=10), adrenocortical benign tumors (ACBT, n=20), and adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC, n=20). Gene expression, somatic copy number variation of chr11p15.5, and DNA methylation status of three differential methylated regions of the IGF2/H19 locus including the H19 imprinting control region were integratively analyzed. IGF2 overexpression was found in 85% of the ACCs and 100% of the PCCs compared to 23% observed in CAs and ACBTs. Copy number aberrations of chr11p15.5 were abundant in both PCCs and ACCs but while PCCs retained a diploid state, ACCs were frequently tetraploid (7/19). Loss of either a single allele or loss of two alleles of the same parental origin in tetraploid samples resulted in a uniparental disomy-like genotype. These copy number changes correlated with hypermethylation of the H19 ICR suggesting that the lost alleles were the unmethylated maternal alleles. Our data provide conclusive evidence that loss of the maternal allele correlates with IGF2 overexpression in adrenal tumors and that hypermethylation of the H19 ICR is a consequence thereof. PMID:26400872

  10. A Complex Deoxyribonucleic Acid Looping Configuration Associated with the Silencing of the Maternal Igf2 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xinwen; Vu, Thanh H.; Lu, Qiucheng; Ling, Jian Qun; Li, Tao; Hou, Aiju; Wang, Shu Kui; Chen, Hui Ling; Hu, Ji Fan; Hoffman, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    Alternate interactions between the H19 imprinting control region (ICR) and one of the two Igf2 differentially methylated regions has been proposed as a model regulating the reciprocal imprinting of Igf2 and H19. To study the conformation of this imprint switch, we performed a systematic structural analysis across the 140 kb of the mouse Igf2-H19 region, which includes enhancers located both between the two genes as well as downstream of H19, by using a scanning chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique. Our results suggest that on the active paternal Igf2 allele, the various enhancers have direct access to the Igf2 promoters, whereas the imprinted silent maternal Igf2 allele assumes a complex three-dimensional knotted loop that keeps the enhancers away from the Igf2 promoters and allows them to interact with the H19 promoter. This complex DNA looping of the maternal allele is formed by interactions involving differentially methylated region 1, the ICR, and enhancers. Binding of CTC-binding factor to the maternal, unmethylated ICR in conjunction with the presence of multicomplex components including interchromosomal interactions, create a barrier blocking the access of all enhancers to Igf2, thereby silencing the maternal Igf2. This silencing configuration exists in newborn liver, mouse embryonic fibroblast, and embryonic stem cells and persists during mitosis, conferring a mechanism for epigenetic memory. PMID:18356289

  11. Wilms' tumour-suppressor protein isoforms have opposite effects on Igf2 expression in primary embryonic cells, independently of p53 genotype.

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, A.; Caricasole, A.; Graham, C. F.; Ward, A.

    1998-01-01

    The p53 protein has been proposed as a modulator of the Wilms' tumour-suppressor protein (WT1) transcriptional regulation activity. To investigate this putative p53 role, the promoter P3 of the mouse insulin-like growth factor II gene (Igf2) was used as a target for WT1 regulation in primary cell cultures derived from p53 wild-type (p53+/+) and knock-out (p53-/-) mouse embryos. In these cells, the WT1 transcriptional activity was observed to be independent of p53 genotype. Furthermore, the two WT1 zinc finger (ZF) isoforms were for the first time found to have opposite effects on gene expression from a single promoter in the same cell type, WT1[-KTS] activating Igf2 P3, whereas WT1[+KTS] repressed its activity. In addition, we have mapped the WT1 binding sites and investigated the effect on WT1 binding activity of individual ZF deletions and Denys-Drash syndrome point mutations to this target. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9460996

  12. Effects of endocrine disruptors on imprinted gene expression in the mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Diana A; Rivas, Guillermo E; Singh, Purnima; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2011-01-01

    Environmental endocrine disruptors (EDs) are synthetic chemicals that resemble natural hormones and are known to cause epigenetic perturbations. EDs have profound effects on development and fertility. Imprinted genes had been identified as candidate susceptibility loci to environmental insults because they are functionally haploid, and because the imprints undergo epigenetic resetting between generations. To screen for possible epigenetic perturbations caused by EDs at imprinted loci, we treated pregnant mice daily between 8.5 and 12.5 days post coitum (dpc) with di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP), bisphenol A (BPA), vinclozolin (VZ) or control oil vehicle. After isolating RNA from the placenta, yolk sac, amnion, head, body, heart, liver, lung, stomach and intestines of 13.5 dpc embryos we measured the allele-specific expression of 39 imprinted transcripts using multiplex single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) assays. In this representative data set we identified only a small number of transcripts that exhibited a substantial relaxation of imprinted expression with statistical significance: Slc22a18 with 10% relaxation in the embryo after BPA treatment; Rtl1as with 11 and 16% relaxation in the lung and placenta, respectively after BPA treatment; and Rtl1 with 12% relaxation in the yolk sac after DEHP treatment. Additionally, the standard deviation of allele-specificity increased in various organs after ED treatment for several transcripts including Igf2r, Rasgrf1, Usp29, Slc38a4 and Xist. Our data suggest that the maintenance of strongly biased monoallelic expression of imprinted genes is generally insensitive to EDs in the 13.5 dpc embryo and extra-embryonic organs, but is not immune to those effects. PMID:21636974

  13. Rapidly generating knockout mice from H19-Igf2 engineered androgenetic haploid embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meili; Liu, Yufang; Liu, Guang; Li, Xin; Jia, Yuyan; Sun, Lihong; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi; Huang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Haploid mammalian embryonic stem cells (ESCs) hold great promise for functional genetic studies and assisted reproduction. Recently, rodent androgenetic haploid ESCs (AG-haESCs) were generated from androgenetic blastocysts and functioned like sperm to produce viable offspring via the intracytoplasmic AG-haESCs injection into oocytes. However, the efficiency of this reproduction was very low. Most pups were growth-retarded and died shortly after birth, which is not practical for producing knockout animals. Further investigation suggested a possible link between the low birthrate and aberrant expression of imprinted genes. Here, we report the high-frequency generation of healthy, fertile mice from H19-Igf2 imprinting-locus modified AG-haESCs, which maintained normal paternal imprinting and pluripotency. Moreover, it is feasible to perform further genetic manipulations in these AG-haESCs. Our study provides a reliable and efficient tool to rapidly produce gene-modified mouse models and will benefit reproductive medicine in the future.

  14. Butyrate induced IGF2 activation correlated with distinct chromatin landscapes due to histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histone modification has emerged as a very important mechanism regulating the transcriptional status of the genome. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone controlling various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 and H19 are reciprocally regulated imprinted ...

  15. Oppositely imprinted genes H19 and insulin-like growth factor 2 are coexpressed in human androgenetic trophoblast.

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, G L; Stewart, C L; Chaponot, M L; Pomponio, R J

    1993-01-01

    Human uniparental gestations such as gynogenetic ovarian teratomas and androgenetic complete hydatidiform moles provide a model to evaluate the integrity of parent-specific gene expression--i.e., imprinting--in the absence of a complementary parental genetic contribution. We studied expression, in these tissues, of the oppositely imprinted genes H19, which is an embryonic nontranslated RNA, and insulin-like growth factor type 2 (IGF2). Normal gestations only express H19 from the maternal allele and express IGF2 from the paternal allele, whereas neither is expressed from the maternal genome of gynogenetic gestations, and both are expressed from the paternal genome of androgenetic gestations. Coexpression of H19 and IGF2 in the androgenetic tissues was in a single population of cells, mononuclear trophoblast--the same cell type expressing these genes in biparental placentas. These results demonstrate that a biparental genome may be required for expression of the reciprocal IGF2/H19 imprint. Alternatively, biparental expression may be a normal feature of some imprinted genes in specific cell types. Additional experiments with other imprinted genes will clarify whether this reflects global failure of the imprinting process or a change specific to the IGF2/H19 locus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7692725

  16. Maternal low protein diet and postnatal high fat diet increases adipose imprinted gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal and postnatal diet can alter Igf2 gene expression and DNA methylation. To test whether maternal low protein and postnatal high fat (HF) diet result in alteration in Igf2 expression and obesity, we fed obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats 8% (LP) or 20% (NP) protein for 3 wk prior to breeding and...

  17. The hepatic Igf2/H19 locus is not altered in 1-day old pups born to obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats fed a low protein diet containing adequate folic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gong et al. (Epigenetics, 2010) found, using diets low in folic acid, that compared to an 18% protein diet a 9% protein diet fed to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats resulted in increased Igf2 and H19 gene expression in the liver of day 0 male offspring. In addition DNA methylation in the Imprinting Cont...

  18. Monoallelic expression of the insulin-like growth factor-2 gene in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Yun, K.; Fukumoto, M.; Jinno, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is defined as a gamete-specific modification causing differential expression of the two alleles of a gene in somatic cells and is becoming increasingly recognized as playing an important role in a number of human diseases including cancer. We have reported that the loss of the insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF2) gene imprinting results in the deregulation of both IGF2 alleles, which may contribute to the onset of Wilms tumor. It is important to see whether such abnormal genomic imprinting is implicated in the etiology of common adulthood cancers. In the present study we have examined the expression level and imprinting status of the IGF2 gene in human ovaries and ovarian cancers. We confirm that IGF2 is significantly expressed in ovaries and ovarian cancers. In normal ovaries, both surface epithelium and the ovary proper demonstrate monoallelic IGF2 expression. Among 27 tumors, all 11 heterozygous for the IGF2 locus show monoallelic IGF2 expression (2 of them are proven to be from the paternal allele). The data suggest that the increased IGF2 gene expression in ovarian cancer may be achieved by a mechanism other than loss of imprinting. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8644850

  19. Paternally Inherited IGF2 Mutation and Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Matthias; Zirn, Birgit; Santen, Gijs; Wirthgen, Elisa; Soellner, Lukas; Büttel, Hans-Martin; Schweizer, Roland; van Workum, Wilbert; Binder, Gerhard; Eggermann, Thomas

    2015-07-23

    In humans, mutations in IGF1 or IGF1R cause intrauterine and postnatal growth restriction; however, data on mutations in IGF2, encoding insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II, are lacking. We report an IGF2 variant (c.191C→A, p.Ser64Ter) with evidence of pathogenicity in a multigenerational family with four members who have growth restriction. The phenotype affects only family members who have inherited the variant through paternal transmission, a finding that is consistent with the maternal imprinting status of IGF2. The severe growth restriction in affected family members suggests that IGF-II affects postnatal growth in addition to prenatal growth. Furthermore, the dysmorphic features of affected family members are consistent with a role of deficient IGF-II levels in the cause of the Silver-Russell syndrome. (Funded by Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung and the European Union.). PMID:26154720

  20. IGF2/H19 hypomethylation in a patient with very low birthweight, preocious pubarche and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is an imprinted gene, which has an important role in fetal growth as established in mice models. IGF2 is downregulated through hypomethylation of a differentially methylated region (DMR) in Silver Russell syndrome (SRS), characterised by growth restriction. We have previously reported that severe pre- and post-natal growth restriction associated with insulin resistance and precocious pubarche in a woman without body asymmetry or other SRS features resulted from a balanced translocation affecting the regulation of her IGF2 gene expression. We hypothesised that severe pre- and post-natal growth restriction associated with insulin resistance and precocious pubarche in the absence of SRS are also caused by downregulation of IGF2 through hypomethylation, gene mutation or structural chromosomal abnormalities. Methods We performed routine karyotyping, IGF2 gene sequencing and investigated DNA methylation of the IGF2 differentially methylated region (DMR)0 and H19 DMR using pyrosequencing, in four women selected for very low birth weight (<−3 SDS for gestational age), precocious pubarche, short adult stature (<−2 SDS), and insulin resistance (defined as HOMA-IS < 80%); and compared their methylation results to those of 95 control subjects. Results We identified a 20 year old woman with severe hypomethylation at both DMRs. She was the smallest at birth (birthweight SDS,-3.9), and had the shortest adult height (143 cm). The patient was diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome at the age of 15 years, and had impaired fasting glucose in the presence of a low BMI (19.2 kg/m2). Conclusions Our case of growth restriction, premature pubarche and insulin resistance in the absence of body asymmetry or other features of SRS adds to the expanding phenotype of IGF2/H19 methylation abnormalities. Further studies are needed to confirm whether growth restriction in association with premature pubarche and insulin resistance

  1. Altered Methylation of IGF2 Locus 20 Years after Preterm Birth at Very Low Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Wehkalampi, Karoliina; Muurinen, Mari; Wirta, Sara Bruce; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Hovi, Petteri; Järvenpää, Anna-Liisa; Eriksson, Johan G.; Andersson, Sture; Kere, Juha; Kajantie, Eero

    2013-01-01

    Introduction People born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW, ≤1500g) have higher rates of risk factors for adult-onset diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. These risks may be mediated through epigenetic modification of genes that are critical to normal growth and development. Methods We measured the methylation level of an imprinted insulin-like-growth-factor 2 (IGF2) locus (IGF2/H19) in young adults born preterm at VLBW and in their peers born at term. We studied 158 VLBW and 161 control subjects aged 18 to 27 years from the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults. Methylation fraction at two IGF2 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) – IGF2 antisense transcript (IGF2AS, also known as IGF2 DMR0) and last exon of IGF2 (IGF2_05, also known as IGF2 DMR2) – were measured with Sequenom Epityper. We used linear regression and adjustment for covariates to compare methylation fractions at these DMRs between VLBW and control subjects. Results At one IGF2AS CpG site, methylation was significantly lower in VLBW than in control subjects, mean difference −0.017 (95% CI; −0.028, −0.005), P = 0.004. Methylation at IGF2_05 was not different between the groups. Conclusions Methylation of IGF2AS is altered 20 years after preterm birth at VLBW. Altered methylation may be a mechanism of later increased disease risk but more data are needed to indicate causality. PMID:23840686

  2. IGF2 DNA methylation is a modulator of newborn’s fetal growth and development

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Julie; Hivert, Marie-France; Perron, Patrice; Poirier, Paul; Guay, Simon-Pierre; Brisson, Diane; Bouchard, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene, located within a cluster of imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15, encodes a fetal and placental growth factor affecting birth weight. DNA methylation variability at the IGF2 gene locus has been previously reported but its consequences on fetal growth and development are still mostly unknown in normal pediatric population. We collected one hundred placenta biopsies from 50 women with corresponding maternal and cord blood samples and measured anthropometric indices, blood pressure and metabolic phenotypes using standardized procedures. IGF2/H19 DNA methylation and IGF2 circulating levels were assessed using sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing and ELISA, respectively. Placental IGF2 (DMR0 and DMR2) DNA methylation levels were correlated with newborn’s fetal growth indices, such as weight, and with maternal IGF2 circulating concentration at the third trimester of pregnancy, whereas H19 (DMR) DNA methylation levels were correlated with IGF2 levels in cord blood. The maternal genotype of a known IGF2/H19 polymorphism (rs2107425) was associated with birth weight. Taken together, we showed that IGF2/H19 epigenotype and genotypes independently account for 31% of the newborn’s weight variance. No association was observed with maternal diabetic status, glucose concentrations or prenatal maternal body mass index. This is the first study showing that DNA methylation at the IGF2/H19 genes locus may act as a modulator of IGF2 newborn’s fetal growth and development within normal range. IGF2/H19 DNA methylation could represent a cornerstone in linking birth weight and fetal metabolic programming of late onset obesity. PMID:22907587

  3. IGF2BP3 modulates the interaction of invasion-associated transcripts with RISC

    PubMed Central

    Ennajdaoui, Hanane; Howard, Jonathan M.; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Coyne, Doyle J.; Uren, Philip J.; Dargyte, Marija; Katzman, Sol; Draper, Jolene M.; Wallace, Andrew; Cazarez, Oscar; Burns, Suzanne C.; Qiao, Mei; Hinck, Lindsay; Smith, Andrew D.; Toloue, Masoud M.; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Penalva, Luiz O.F.; Sanford, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) expression correlates with malignancy. But its role(s) in pathogenesis remain enigmatic. Here, we interrogated the IGF2BP3-RNA interaction network in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Using a combination of genome-wide approaches we identify 164 direct mRNA targets of IGF2BP3. These transcripts encode proteins enriched for functions such as cell migration, proliferation and adhesion. Loss of IGF2BP3 reduced PDAC cell invasiveness and remodeled focal adhesion junctions. Individual-nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) revealed significant overlap of IGF2BP3 and miRNA binding sites. IGF2BP3 promotes association of the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC) with specific transcripts. Our results show that IGF2BP3 influences a malignancy-associated RNA regulon by modulating miRNA-mRNA interactions. PMID:27210763

  4. IGF2BP3 Modulates the Interaction of Invasion-Associated Transcripts with RISC.

    PubMed

    Ennajdaoui, Hanane; Howard, Jonathan M; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Coyne, Doyle J; Uren, Philip J; Dargyte, Marija; Katzman, Sol; Draper, Jolene M; Wallace, Andrew; Cazarez, Oscar; Burns, Suzanne C; Qiao, Mei; Hinck, Lindsay; Smith, Andrew D; Toloue, Masoud M; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Penalva, Luiz O F; Sanford, Jeremy R

    2016-05-31

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) expression correlates with malignancy, but its role(s) in pathogenesis remains enigmatic. We interrogated the IGF2BP3-RNA interaction network in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Using a combination of genome-wide approaches, we have identified 164 direct mRNA targets of IGF2BP3. These transcripts encode proteins enriched for functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and adhesion. Loss of IGF2BP3 reduced PDAC cell invasiveness and remodeled focal adhesion junctions. Individual nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) revealed significant overlap of IGF2BP3 and microRNA (miRNA) binding sites. IGF2BP3 promotes association of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) with specific transcripts. Our results show that IGF2BP3 influences a malignancy-associated RNA regulon by modulating miRNA-mRNA interactions. PMID:27210763

  5. The IGF2 mRNA binding protein p62/IGF2BP2-2 induces fatty acid elongation as a critical feature of steatosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Laggai, Stephan; Kessler, Sonja M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Lebrun, Valérie; Gemperlein, Katja; Lederer, Eva; Leclercq, Isabelle A.; Mueller, Rolf; Hartmann, Rolf W.; Haybaeck, Johannes; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2014-01-01

    Liver-specific overexpression of the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA binding protein p62/IGF2BP2-2 induces a fatty liver, which highly expresses IGF2. Because IGF2 expression is elevated in patients with steatohepatitis, the aim of our study was to elucidate the role and interconnection of p62 and IGF2 in lipid metabolism. Expression of p62 and IGF2 highly correlated in human liver disease. p62 induced an elevated ratio of C18:C16 and increased fatty acid elongase 6 (ELOVL6) protein, the enzyme catalyzing the elongation of C16 to C18 fatty acids and promoting nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in mice and humans. The p62 overexpression induced the activation of the ELOVL6 transcriptional activator sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1). Recombinant IGF2 induced the nuclear translocation of SREBF1 and a neutralizing IGF2 antibody reduced ELOVL6 and mature SREBF1 protein levels. Concordantly, p62 and IGF2 correlated with ELOVL6 in human livers. Decreased palmitoyl-CoA levels, as found in p62 transgenic livers, can explain the lipogenic action of ELOVL6. Accordingly, p62 represents an inducer of hepatic C18 fatty acid production via a SREBF1-dependent induction of ELOVL6. These findings underline the detrimental role of p62 in liver disease. PMID:24755648

  6. Adaptation of nutrient supply to fetal demand in the mouse involves interaction between the Igf2 gene and placental transporter systems

    PubMed Central

    Constância, Miguel; Angiolini, Emily; Sandovici, Ionel; Smith, Paul; Smith, Rachel; Kelsey, Gavin; Dean, Wendy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne; Sibley, Colin P.; Reik, Wolf; Fowden, Abigail

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian fetus is unique in its dependence during gestation on the supply of maternal nutrients through the placenta. Maternal supply and fetal demand for nutrients need to be fine tuned for healthy growth and development of the fetus along its genetic trajectory. An altered balance between supply and demand can lead to deviations from this trajectory with long-term consequences for health. We have previously shown that in a knockout lacking the imprinted placental-specific Igf2 transcript (P0), growth of the placenta is compromised from early gestation but fetal growth is normal until late gestation, suggesting functional adaptation of the placenta to meet the fetal demands. Here, we show that placental transport of glucose and amino acids are increased in the Igf2 P0+/- null and that this up-regulation of transport occurs, at least in part, through increased expression of the transporter genes Slc2a3 and Slc38a4, the imprinted member of the System A amino acid transporter gene family. Decreasing fetal demand genetically by removal of fetal Igf2 abolished up-regulation of both transport systems and reduced placental System A amino acid transport activity and expression of Slc38a2 in late gestation. Our results provide direct evidence that the placenta can respond to fetal demand signals through regulation of expression of specific placental transport systems. Thus, crosstalk between an imprinted growth demand gene (Igf2) and placental supply transporter genes (Slc38a4, Slc38a2, and Slc2a3) may be a component of the genetic control of nutrient supply and demand during mammalian development. PMID:16365304

  7. Detection of IGF2BP3, HOXB7, and NEK2 mRNA Expression in Brush Cytology Specimens as a New Diagnostic Tool in Patients with Biliary Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Schmitz, Volker; Luda, Carolin; Aldenhoff, Katharina; Berger, Cordula; Feldmann, Georg; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich; Nattermann, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Introduction It is a challenging task to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions in patients with biliary strictures. Here we analyze whether determination of target gene mRNA levels in intraductal brush cytology specimens may be used to improve the diagnosis of bile duct carcinoma. Materials and Methods Brush cytology specimens from 119 patients with biliary strictures (malignant: n = 72; benign: n = 47) were analyzed in a retrospective cohort study. mRNA of IGF-II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3), homeobox B7 (HOXB7), Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), kinesin family member 2C (KIF2C) and serine/threonine kinase NEK2 was determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR using the ΔCt method. Results IGF2BP3 (p<0.0001), HOXB7 (p<0.0001), and NEK2 (p<0.0001) mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in patients with cholangiocarcinoma or pancreatic cancer. Median ΔCt values differed by 3.5 cycles (IGF2BP3), 2.8 cycles (HOXB7) and 1.3 cycles (NEK2) corresponding to 11-fold, 7-fold and 2.5-fold increased mRNA levels in malignant versus benign samples. Sensitivity to detect biliary cancer was 76.4% for IGF2BP3 (80.9% specificity); 72.2% for HOXB7 (78.7% specificity) and 65.3% for NEK2 (72.3% specificity), whereas routine cytology reached only 43.1% sensitivity (85.4% specificity). Diagnostic precision was further improved, when all three molecular markers were assessed in combination (77.8% sensitivity, 87.2% specificity) and achieved 87.5% sensitivity and 87.2% specificity when molecular markers were combined with routine cytology. Conclusions Our data suggest that measuring IGF2BP3, HOXB7 and NEK2 mRNA levels by RT-PCR in addition to cytology has the potential to improve detection of malignant biliary disorders from brush cytology specimens. PMID:22879911

  8. Expression and genomic imprinting of the porcine Rasgrf1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue-Yun; Liu, Li-Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Long; Zhang, Shu-Jing; Yin, Zong-Jun

    2014-02-25

    Imprinted genes play important roles in mammalian growth, development and behavior. The Rasgrf1 (Ras protein-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1) gene has been identified as an imprinted gene in mouse and rat. In the present study, we detected its sequence, imprinting status and expression pattern in the domestic pigs. A 228 bp partial sequence located in exon 14 and a 193 bp partial sequence located in exon 1 of the Rasgrf1 gene in domestic pigs were obtained. A G/A transition, was identified in Rasgrf1 exon 14, and then, the reciprocal Berkshire × Wannan black F1 hybrid model and the RT-PCR-RFLP method were used to detect the imprinting status of porcine Rasgrf1 gene at the developmental stage of 1-day-old. The expression profile results indicated that the porcine Rasgrf1 mRNA was highly expressed in brain, pituitary and pancreas, followed by kidney, stomach, lung, testis, small intestine, ovary, spleen and liver, and at low levels of expression in longissimus dorsi, heart, and backfat. The expression levels of Rasgrf1 gene in brain, pituitary and pancreas tissues were significantly different between the two reciprocal F1 hybrids. Imprinting analysis showed that porcine Rasgrf1 gene was maternally expressed in the liver, small intestine, paternally expressed in the lung, but biallelically expressed in brain, heart, spleen, kidney, stomach, pancreas, backfat, testis, ovary, longissimus dorsi and pituitary tissues. PMID:24342659

  9. Comparisons of mRNA expression for insulin-like growth factor (IGF) type 2 receptor (IGF2R) and IGF-1 in small ovarian follicles between cattle selected and not selected for twin ovulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both IGF-1 and -2 stimulate ovarian follicular cell proliferation and antral follicle development. Actions of IGF-1 and -2 are mediated through the IGF type 1 receptor, whereas binding of IGF-2 to the IGF2R results in its degradation. Information on the role of IGF2R in regulating bovine follicula...

  10. Activation of an imprinted allele of the insulin-like growth factor II gene implicated in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, S; Shapiro, D N; Helman, L J

    1994-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) gene is exclusively silent at the maternal allele in the mouse as well as in normal human tissues and is expressed at a high level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). We report here that the normally imprinted allele of the IGF2 gene is activated in RMS tumors as well as in one RMS cell line. Since overexpression of IGF2 has been shown to be important in the pathogenesis of RMS, our data suggest that loss of imprinting (LOI) may lead to overexpression of IGF2 and play an important role in the onset of RMS. Furthermore, embryonal RMS usually has loss of heterozygosity (LOH) with paternal disomy of the IGF2 locus. One informative embryonal RMS tumor evaluated in this study was heterozygous at the IGF2 allele and had LOI, raising the possibility that LOI may be the functional equivalent of LOH in this tumor with both events leading to overexpression of IGF2. Images PMID:8040287

  11. Interruption of intrachromosomal looping by CCCTC binding factor decoy proteins abrogates genomic imprinting of human insulin-like growth factor II

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, He; Niu, Beibei; Ge, Shengfang; Wang, Haibo; Li, Tao; Ling, Jianqun; Steelman, Brandon N.; Qian, Guanxiang

    2011-01-01

    Monoallelic expression of IGF2 is regulated by CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) binding to the imprinting control region (ICR) on the maternal allele, with subsequent formation of an intrachromosomal loop to the promoter region. The N-terminal domain of CTCF interacts with SUZ12, part of the polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2), to silence the maternal allele. We synthesized decoy CTCF proteins, fusing the CTCF deoxyribonucleic acid–binding zinc finger domain to CpG methyltransferase Sss1 or to enhanced green fluorescent protein. In normal human fibroblasts and breast cancer MCF7 cell lines, the CTCF decoy proteins bound to the unmethylated ICR and to the IGF2 promoter region but did not interact with SUZ12. EZH2, another part of PRC2, was unable to methylate histone H3-K27 in the IGF2 promoter region, resulting in reactivation of the imprinted allele. The intrachromosomal loop between the maternal ICR and the IGF2 promoters was not observed when IGF2 imprinting was lost. CTCF epigenetically governs allelic gene expression of IGF2 by orchestrating chromatin loop structures involving PRC2. PMID:21536749

  12. Imprinting genes associated with endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Much work has been carried out to investigate the genetic and epigenetic basis of endometriosis and proposed that endometriosis has been described as an epigenetic disease. The purpose of this study was to extract the imprinting genes that are associated with endometriosis development. Methods: The information on the imprinting genes can be accessed publicly from a web-based interface at http://www.geneimprint.com/site/genes-by-species. Results: In the current version, the database contains 150 human imprinted genes derived from the literature. We searched gene functions and their roles in particular biological processes or events, such as development and pathogenesis of endometriosis. From the genomic imprinting database, we picked 10 genes that were highly associated with female reproduction; prominent among them were paternally expressed genes (DIRAS3, BMP8B, CYP1B1, ZFAT, IGF2, MIMT1, or MIR296) and maternally expressed genes (DVL1, FGFRL1, or CDKN1C). These imprinted genes may be associated with reproductive biology such as endometriosis, pregnancy loss, decidualization process and preeclampsia. Discussion: This study supports the possibility that aberrant epigenetic dysregulation of specific imprinting genes may contribute to endometriosis predisposition. PMID:26417259

  13. A Survey of Imprinted Gene Expression in Mouse Trophoblast Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, J. Mauro; Starmer, Joshua; Schertzer, Megan D.; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Several hundred mammalian genes are expressed preferentially from one parental allele as the result of a process called genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is prevalent in extra-embryonic tissue, where it plays an essential role during development. Here, we profiled imprinted gene expression via RNA-Seq in a panel of six mouse trophoblast stem lines, which are ex vivo derivatives of a progenitor population that gives rise to the placental tissue of the mouse. We found evidence of imprinted expression for 48 genes, 31 of which had been described previously as imprinted and 17 of which we suggest as candidate imprinted genes. An equal number of maternally and paternally biased genes were detected. On average, candidate imprinted genes were more lowly expressed and had weaker parent-of-origin biases than known imprinted genes. Several known and candidate imprinted genes showed variability in parent-of-origin expression bias between the six trophoblast stem cell lines. Sixteen of the 48 known and candidate imprinted genes were previously or newly annotated noncoding RNAs and six encoded for a total of 60 annotated microRNAs. Pyrosequencing across our panel of trophoblast stem cell lines returned levels of imprinted expression that were concordant with RNA-Seq measurements for all eight genes examined. Our results solidify trophoblast stem cells as a cell culture-based experimental model to study genomic imprinting, and provide a quantitative foundation upon which to delineate mechanisms by which the process is maintained in the mouse. PMID:25711832

  14. Two Isoforms of the RNA Binding Protein, Coding Region Determinant-binding Protein (CRD-BP/IGF2BP1), Are Expressed in Breast Epithelium and Support Clonogenic Growth of Breast Tumor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Fakhraldeen, Saja A.; Clark, Rod J.; Roopra, Avtar; Chin, Emily N.; Huang, Wei; Castorino, John; Wisinski, Kari B.; Kim, TaeWon; Spiegelman, Vladimir S.; Alexander, Caroline M.

    2015-01-01

    CRD-BP/IGF2BP1 has been characterized as an “oncofetal” RNA binding protein typically highly expressed in embryonic tissues, suppressed in normal adult tissues, but induced in many tumor types. In this study, we show that adult breast tissues express ubiquitous but low levels of CRD-BP protein and mRNA. Although CRD-BP mRNA expression is induced in breast tumor cells, levels remain ∼1000-fold lower than in embryonic tissues. Despite low expression levels, CRD-BP is required for clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells. We reveal that because the most common protein isoform in normal adult breast and breast tumors has an N-terminal deletion (lacking two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains) and is therefore missing antibody epitopes, CRD-BP expression has been under-reported by previous studies. We show that a CRD-BP mutant mouse strain retains expression of the shorter transcript (ΔN-CRD-BP), which originates in intron 2, suggesting that the impact of complete ablation of this gene in mice is not yet known. Either the full-length CRD-BP or the N-terminally truncated version can rescue the clonogenicity of CRD-BP knockdown breast cancer cells, suggesting that clonogenic function is served by either CRD-BP isoform. In summary, although CRD-BP expression levels are low in breast cancer cells, this protein is necessary for clonogenic activity. PMID:25861986

  15. IGF-2 is necessary for retinoblastoma-mediated enhanced adaptation after small-bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pamela M; Sun, Raphael C; Sommovilla, Josh; Diaz-Miron, Jose; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R; Warner, Brad W

    2014-11-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that genetically disrupting retinoblastoma protein (Rb) expression in enterocytes results in taller villi, mimicking resection-induced adaption responses. Rb deficiency also results in elevated insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2) expression in villus enterocytes. We propose that postoperative disruption of Rb results in enhanced adaptation which is driven by IGF-2. Inducible, intestine-specific Rb-null mice (iRbIKO) and wild-type (WT) littermates underwent a 50% proximal small-bowel resection (SBR) at 7-9 weeks of age. They were then given tamoxifen on postoperative days (PODs) 4-6 and harvested on POD 28. The experiment was then repeated on double knockouts of both IGF-2 and Rb (IGF-2 null/iRbIKO). iRbIKO mice demonstrated enhanced resection-induced adaptive villus growth after SBR and increased IGF-2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in ileal villus enterocytes compared to their WT littermates. In the IGF-2 null/iRbIKO double-knockout mice, there was no additional villus growth beyond what was expected of normal resection-induced adaptation. Adult mice in which Rb is inducibly deleted from the intestinal epithelium following SBR have augmented adaptive growth. IGF-2 expression is necessary for enhanced adaptation associated with acute intestinal Rb deficiency. PMID:25002022

  16. IGF-2 is necessary for Retinoblastoma-mediated enhanced adaptation after small bowel resection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Pamela M.; Sun, Raphael C.; Sommovilla, Josh; Diaz-Miron, Jose; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Warner, Brad W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previously, we have demonstrated that genetically disrupting retinoblastoma protein (Rb) expression in enterocytes results in taller villi, mimicking resection-induced adaption responses. Rb deficiency also results in elevated IGF-2 expression in villus enterocytes. We propose that postoperative disruption of Rb results in enhanced adaptation which is driven by IGF-2. Methods Inducible, intestine-specific Rb-null mice (iRbIKO) and wild-type littermates (WT) underwent a 50% proximal small bowel resection (SBR) at 7–9 weeks of age. They were then were given tamoxifen on POD 4–6, and harvested on POD 28. The experiment was then repeated on double knockouts of both IGF-2 and Rb (IGF-2 null/iRbIKO). Results iRbIKO mice demonstrated enhanced resection-induced adaptive villus growth after SBR and increased IGF-2 mRNA in ileal villus enterocytes compared to their WT littermates. In the IGF-2 null/iRbIKO double knockout mice, there was no additional villus growth beyond what was expected of normal resection-induced adaptation. Conclusions Adult mice in which Rb is inducibly deleted from the intestinal epithelium following SBR have augmented adaptive growth. IGF-2 expression is necessary for enhanced adaptation associated with acute intestinal Rb deficiency. PMID:25002022

  17. Germline and somatic imprinting in the nonhuman primate highlights species differences in oocyte methylation

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Clara Y.; Chng, Keefe; Ng, Shilen; Chew, Siew Boom; Chan, Louiza; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism resulting in parental allele-specific gene expression. Defects in normal imprinting are found in cancer, assisted reproductive technologies, and several human syndromes. In mouse models, germline-derived DNA methylation is shown to regulate imprinting. Though imprinting is largely conserved between mammals, species- and tissue-specific domains of imprinted expression exist. Using the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) to assess primate-specific imprinting, we present a comprehensive view of tissue-specific imprinted expression and DNA methylation at established imprinted gene clusters. For example, like mouse and unlike human, macaque IGF2R is consistently imprinted, and the PLAGL1, INPP5F transcript variant 2, and PEG3 imprinting control regions are not methylated in the macaque germline but acquire this post-fertilization. Methylome data from human early embryos appear to support this finding. These suggest fundamental differences in imprinting control mechanisms between primate species and rodents at some imprinted domains, with implications for our understanding of the epigenetic programming process in humans and its influence on disease. PMID:25862382

  18. Transgenerational glucose intolerance with Igf2/H19 epigenetic alterations in mouse islet induced by intrauterine hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guo-Lian; Wang, Fang-Fang; Shu, Jing; Tian, Shen; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Ning; Luo, Qiong; Zhang, Yu; Jin, Fan; Leung, Peter C K; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been shown to be associated with high risk of diabetes in offspring. However, the mechanisms involved and the possibilities of transgenerational transmission are still unclear. We intercrossed male and female adult control and first-generation offspring of GDM (F1-GDM) mice to obtain the second-generation (F2) offspring in four groups: C♂-C♀, C♂-GDM♀, GDM♂-C♀, and GDM♂-GDM♀. We found that birth weight significantly increased in F2 offspring through the paternal line with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Regardless of birth from F1-GDM with or without IGT, high risk of IGT appeared as early as 3 weeks in F2 offspring and progressed through both parental lineages, especial the paternal line. IGT in male offspring was more obvious than that in females, with parental characteristics and sex-specific transmission. In both F1 and F2 offspring of GDM, the expression of imprinted genes Igf2 and H19 was downregulated in pancreatic islets, caused by abnormal methylation status of the differentially methylated region, which may be one of the mechanisms for impaired islet ultrastructure and function. Furthermore, altered Igf2 and H19 gene expression was found in sperm of adult F1-GDM, regardless of the presence of IGT, indicating that changes of epigenetics in germ cells contributed to transgenerational transmission. PMID:22447856

  19. IGF-2R-Gαq signaling and cardiac hypertrophy in the low-birth-weight lamb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Tosh, Darran N; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Duffield, Jaime A; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-04-01

    The cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF-2R) can induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in a heterotrimeric G protein receptor-coupled manner involving αq (Gαq) or αs (Gαs). We have previously shown increased left ventricular weight and cardiac IGF-2 and IGF-2R gene expression in low-birth-weight (LBW) compared with average-birth-weight (ABW) lambs. Here, we have investigated the cardiac expression of IGF-2 gene variants, the degree of histone acetylation, and the abundance of proteins in the IGF-2R downstream signaling pathway in ABW and LBW lambs. Samples from the left ventricle of ABW and LBW lambs were collected at 21 days of age. There was increased phospho-CaMKII protein with decreased HDAC 4 abundance in the LBW compared with ABW lambs. There was increased GATA 4 and decreased phospho-troponin I abundance in LBW compared with ABW lambs, which are markers of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and impaired or reduced contractility, respectively. There was increased histone acetylation of H3K9 at IGF-2R promoter and IGF-2R intron 2 differentially methylated region in the LBW lamb. In conclusion, histone acetylation of IGF-2R may lead to increased IGF-2R mRNA expression and subsequently mediate Gαq signaling early in life via CaMKII, resulting in an increased risk of left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular disease in adult life. PMID:25632020

  20. IGF-2R-Gαq signaling and cardiac hypertrophy in the low-birth-weight lamb

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kimberley C. W.; Tosh, Darran N.; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I. Caroline; Duffield, Jaime A.; Brooks, Doug A.

    2015-01-01

    The cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF-2R) can induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in a heterotrimeric G protein receptor-coupled manner involving αq (Gαq) or αs (Gαs). We have previously shown increased left ventricular weight and cardiac IGF-2 and IGF-2R gene expression in low-birth-weight (LBW) compared with average-birth-weight (ABW) lambs. Here, we have investigated the cardiac expression of IGF-2 gene variants, the degree of histone acetylation, and the abundance of proteins in the IGF-2R downstream signaling pathway in ABW and LBW lambs. Samples from the left ventricle of ABW and LBW lambs were collected at 21 days of age. There was increased phospho-CaMKII protein with decreased HDAC 4 abundance in the LBW compared with ABW lambs. There was increased GATA 4 and decreased phospho-troponin I abundance in LBW compared with ABW lambs, which are markers of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and impaired or reduced contractility, respectively. There was increased histone acetylation of H3K9 at IGF-2R promoter and IGF-2R intron 2 differentially methylated region in the LBW lamb. In conclusion, histone acetylation of IGF-2R may lead to increased IGF-2R mRNA expression and subsequently mediate Gαq signaling early in life via CaMKII, resulting in an increased risk of left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular disease in adult life. PMID:25632020

  1. Loss of imprinting of the insulin-like growth factor II gene in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ooasa, T; Karasaki, H; Kanda, H; Nomura, K; Kitagawa, T; Ogawa, K

    1998-12-01

    We investigated expression of insulin-like growth factor II (Igf2) in primary cultured hepatocytes, liver epithelial (LE) cell lines derived from normal hepatocytes, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines from crosses between C3H/HeJ (C3H) and Mus musculus molossinus mice (MSM). Igf2 mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in primary cultured hepatocytes from 5 d after the start of cultivation and in all 12 LE and 16 HCC cell lines. Analysis of the untranslated region of Igf2 exon 6, which contains polymorphic CA repeats, revealed that 13 of the 16 HCC cell lines had biallelic expression, whereas monoallelic expression was retained in the primary cultured hepatocytes and all 12 LE cell lines. The Igf2 transcripts contained exons 1-3 in all the HCC cell lines but only exons 2 and 3 in cultures of hepatocytes and LE cell lines, indicating difference in promoter use. However, the biallelic HCC cell lines did not have larger amounts of Igf2 mRNA and protein than did the monoallelic lines, suggesting that loss of imprinting may not be directly related to the level of Igf2 expression. PMID:9869454

  2. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M.; Howard, Jonathan M.; Contreras, Jorge R.; Fernando, Thilini R.; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Sanford, Jeremy R.; Rao, Dinesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia–rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:26974154

  3. IGF2BP2 promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation and survival through interfering with RAF-1 degradation by miR-195.

    PubMed

    Ye, Song; Song, Wei; Xu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Xinyi; Yang, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2) is a post-transcriptional regulatory factor implicated in mRNA localization, stability, and translational control. However, the role of IGF2BP2 regulation in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. In this study, we found that IGF2BP2 expression is markedly increased in CRC tissues. Notably, IGF2BP2 overexpression strikingly enhanced the proliferation and survival of CRC cells in vitro, whereas its shRNA-mediated silencing resulted in the opposite. Molecular function analyses revealed that IGF2BP2 regulates RAF1 expression through blocking its degradation by miR-195. These results identify IGF2BP2 as a post-transcriptional regulatory mRNA-binding factor that contributes to CRC carcinogenesis. PMID:27153315

  4. Allelic expression of mammalian imprinted genes in a matrotrophic lizard, Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Oliver W; Brandley, Matthew C; Belov, Katherine; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that results in the differential expression of genes depending on their parent of origin. It occurs in both plants and live-bearing mammals, with imprinted genes typically regulating the ability of an embryo to manipulate the maternal provision of nutrients. Genomic imprinting increases the potential for selection to act separately on paternally and maternally expressed genes, which increases the number of opportunities that selection can facilitate embryonic control over maternal nutrient provision. By looking for imprinting in an independent matrotrophic lineage, the viviparous lizard Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii (Scincidae), we test the hypothesis that genomic imprinting facilitates the evolution of substantial placental nutrient transport to embryos (matrotrophy). We sequenced transcriptomes from the embryonic component of lizard placentae to determine whether there are parent-of-origin differences in expression of genes that are imprinted in mammals. Of these genes, 19 had sufficiently high expression in the lizard to identify polymorphisms in transcribed sequences. We identified bi-allelic expression in 17 genes (including insulin-like growth factor 2), indicating that neither allele was imprinted. These data suggest that either genomic imprinting has not evolved in this matrotrophic skink or, if it has, it has evolved in different genes to mammals. We outline how these hypotheses can be tested. This study highlights important differences between mammalian and reptile pregnancy and the absence of any shared imprinting genes reflects fundamental differences in the way that pregnancy has evolved in these two lineages. PMID:26943808

  5. The role and interaction of imprinted genes in human fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gudrun E.; Ishida, Miho; Demetriou, Charalambos; Al-Olabi, Lara; Leon, Lydia J.; Thomas, Anna C.; Abu-Amero, Sayeda; Frost, Jennifer M.; Stafford, Jaime L.; Chaoqun, Yao; Duncan, Andrew J.; Baigel, Rachel; Brimioulle, Marina; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Apostolidou, Sophia; Aggarwal, Reena; Whittaker, John C.; Syngelaki, Argyro; Nicolaides, Kypros H.; Regan, Lesley; Monk, David; Stanier, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the genetic input for fetal growth will help to understand common, serious complications of pregnancy such as fetal growth restriction. Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic process that silences one parental allele, resulting in monoallelic expression. Imprinted genes are important in mammalian fetal growth and development. Evidence has emerged showing that genes that are paternally expressed promote fetal growth, whereas maternally expressed genes suppress growth. We have assessed whether the expression levels of key imprinted genes correlate with fetal growth parameters during pregnancy, either early in gestation, using chorionic villus samples (CVS), or in term placenta. We have found that the expression of paternally expressing insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), its receptor IGF2R, and the IGF2/IGF1R ratio in CVS tissues significantly correlate with crown–rump length and birthweight, whereas term placenta expression shows no correlation. For the maternally expressing pleckstrin homology-like domain family A, member 2 (PHLDA2), there is no correlation early in pregnancy in CVS but a highly significant negative relationship in term placenta. Analysis of the control of imprinted expression of PHLDA2 gave rise to a maternally and compounded grand-maternally controlled genetic effect with a birthweight increase of 93/155 g, respectively, when one copy of the PHLDA2 promoter variant is inherited. Expression of the growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (GRB10) in term placenta is significantly negatively correlated with head circumference. Analysis of the paternally expressing delta-like 1 homologue (DLK1) shows that the paternal transmission of type 1 diabetes protective G allele of rs941576 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in significantly reduced birth weight (−132 g). In conclusion, we have found that the expression of key imprinted genes show a strong correlation with fetal growth and that for both genetic and genomics data analyses

  6. Global assessment of imprinted gene expression in the bovine conceptus by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Hagen, Darren E.; Wang, Juanbin; Elsik, Christine G.; Ji, Tieming; Siqueira, Luiz G.; Hansen, Peter J.; Rivera, Rocío M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parental-allele-specific gene expression. Approximately 150 imprinted genes have been identified in humans and mice but less than 30 have been described as imprinted in cattle. For the purpose of de novo identification of imprinted genes in bovine, we determined global monoallelic gene expression in brain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and placenta of day ∼105 Bos taurus indicus × Bos taurus taurus F1 conceptuses using RNA sequencing. To accomplish this, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify parent-specific single nucleotide polymorphism alleles after filtering adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing sites. We identified 53 genes subject to monoallelic expression. Twenty three are genes known to be imprinted in the cow and an additional 7 have previously been characterized as imprinted in human and/or mouse that have not been reported as imprinted in cattle. Of the remaining 23 genes, we found that 10 are uncharacterized or unannotated transcripts located in known imprinted clusters, whereas the other 13 genes are distributed throughout the bovine genome and are not close to any known imprinted clusters. To exclude potential cis-eQTL effects on allele expression, we corroborated the parental specificity of monoallelic expression in day 86 Bos taurus taurus × Bos taurus taurus conceptuses and identified 8 novel bovine imprinted genes. Further, we identified 671 candidate A-to-I RNA editing sites and describe random X-inactivation in day 15 bovine extraembryonic membranes. Our results expand the imprinted gene list in bovine and demonstrate that monoallelic gene expression can be the result of cis-eQTL effects. PMID:27245094

  7. Global assessment of imprinted gene expression in the bovine conceptus by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Hagen, Darren E; Wang, Juanbin; Elsik, Christine G; Ji, Tieming; Siqueira, Luiz G; Hansen, Peter J; Rivera, Rocío M

    2016-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that leads to parental-allele-specific gene expression. Approximately 150 imprinted genes have been identified in humans and mice but less than 30 have been described as imprinted in cattle. For the purpose of de novo identification of imprinted genes in bovine, we determined global monoallelic gene expression in brain, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney and placenta of day ∼105 Bos taurus indicus × Bos taurus taurus F1 conceptuses using RNA sequencing. To accomplish this, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify parent-specific single nucleotide polymorphism alleles after filtering adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing sites. We identified 53 genes subject to monoallelic expression. Twenty three are genes known to be imprinted in the cow and an additional 7 have previously been characterized as imprinted in human and/or mouse that have not been reported as imprinted in cattle. Of the remaining 23 genes, we found that 10 are uncharacterized or unannotated transcripts located in known imprinted clusters, whereas the other 13 genes are distributed throughout the bovine genome and are not close to any known imprinted clusters. To exclude potential cis-eQTL effects on allele expression, we corroborated the parental specificity of monoallelic expression in day 86 Bos taurus taurus × Bos taurus taurus conceptuses and identified 8 novel bovine imprinted genes. Further, we identified 671 candidate A-to-I RNA editing sites and describe random X-inactivation in day 15 bovine extraembryonic membranes. Our results expand the imprinted gene list in bovine and demonstrate that monoallelic gene expression can be the result of cis-eQTL effects. PMID:27245094

  8. Known unknowns for allele-specific expression and genomic imprinting effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for non-canonical imprinting effects that are associated with allele-specific expression biases at the tissue level in mice. These imprinting effects have features that are distinct from canonical imprinting effects that involve allele silencing. Here, I discuss some of the evidence for non-canonical imprinting effects in the context of random X-inactivation and epigenetic allele-specific expression effects on the autosomes. I propose several mechanisms that may underlie non-canonical imprinting effects and outline future directions and approaches to study these effects at the cellular level in vivo. The growing evidence for complex allele-specific expression effects that are cell- and developmental stage-specific has opened a new frontier for study. Currently, the function of these effects and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. PMID:25343032

  9. Brain-expressed imprinted genes and adult behaviour: the example of Nesp and Grb10.

    PubMed

    Dent, Claire L; Isles, Anthony R

    2014-02-01

    Imprinted genes are defined by their parent-of-origin-specific monoallelic expression. Although the epigenetic mechanisms regulating imprinted gene expression have been widely studied, their functional importance is still unclear. Imprinted genes are associated with a number of physiologies, including placental function and foetal growth, energy homeostasis, and brain and behaviour. This review focuses on genomic imprinting in the brain and on two imprinted genes in particular, Nesp and paternal Grb10, which, when manipulated in animals, have been shown to influence adult behaviour. These two genes are of particular interest as they are expressed in discrete and overlapping neural regions, recognised as key "imprinting hot spots" in the brain. Furthermore, these two genes do not appear to influence placental function and/or maternal provisioning of offspring. Consequently, by understanding their behavioural function we may begin to shed light on the evolutionary significance of imprinted genes in the adult brain, independent of the recognised role in maternal care. In addition, we discuss the potential future directions of research investigating the function of these two genes and the behavioural role of imprinted genes more generally. PMID:23974804

  10. The effects of maternal anxiety during pregnancy on IGF2/H19 methylation in cord blood.

    PubMed

    Mansell, T; Novakovic, B; Meyer, B; Rzehak, P; Vuillermin, P; Ponsonby, A-L; Collier, F; Burgner, D; Saffery, R; Ryan, J

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that maternal mental health in pregnancy can influence fetal development. The imprinted genes, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and H19, are involved in fetal growth and each is regulated by DNA methylation. This study aimed to determine the association between maternal mental well-being during pregnancy and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of IGF2 (DMR0) and the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR) in newborn offspring. Maternal depression, anxiety and perceived stress were assessed at 28 weeks of pregnancy in the Barwon Infant Study (n=576). DNA methylation was measured in purified cord blood mononuclear cells using the Sequenom MassArray Platform. Maternal anxiety was associated with a decrease in average ICR methylation (Δ=-2.23%; 95% CI=-3.68 to -0.77%), and across all six of the individual CpG units in anxious compared with non-anxious groups. Birth weight and sex modified the association between prenatal anxiety and infant methylation. When stratified into lower (⩽3530 g) and higher (>3530 g) birth weight groups using the median birth weight, there was a stronger association between anxiety and ICR methylation in the lower birth weight group (Δ=-3.89%; 95% CI=-6.06 to -1.72%), with no association in the higher birth weight group. When stratified by infant sex, there was a stronger association in female infants (Δ=-3.70%; 95% CI=-5.90 to -1.51%) and no association in males. All the linear regression models were adjusted for maternal age, smoking and folate intake. These findings show that maternal anxiety in pregnancy is associated with decreased IGF2/H19 ICR DNA methylation in progeny at birth, particularly in female, low birth weight neonates. ICR methylation may help link poor maternal mental health and adverse birth outcomes, but further investigation is needed. PMID:27023171

  11. Lack of imprinting of the human dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cichon, S.; Noethen, M.M.; Propping, P.; Wolf, H.K.

    1996-04-09

    The term genomic imprinting has been used to refer to the differential expression of genetic material depending on whether it has come from the male or female parent. In humans, the chromosomal region 11p15.5 has been shown to contain 2 imprinted genes (H19 and IGF2). The gene for the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4), which is of great interest for research into neuropsychiatric disorders and psychopharmacology, is also located in this area. In the present study, we have examined the imprinting status of the DRD4 gene in brain tissue of an epileptic patient who was heterozygous for a 12 bp repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the DRD4 gene. We show that both alleles are expressed in equivalent amounts. We therefore conclude that the DRD4 gene is not imprinted in the human brain. 30 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Critical evaluation of imprinted gene expression by RNA-Seq: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    DeVeale, Brian; van der Kooy, Derek; Babak, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to existing estimates of approximately 200 murine imprinted genes, recent work based on transcriptome sequencing uncovered parent-of-origin allelic effects at more than 1,300 loci in the developing brain and two adult brain regions, including hundreds present in only males or females. Our independent replication of the embryonic brain stage, where the majority of novel imprinted genes were discovered and the majority of previously known imprinted genes confirmed, resulted in only 12.9% concordance among the novel imprinted loci. Further analysis and pyrosequencing-based validation revealed that the vast majority of the novel reported imprinted loci are false-positives explained by technical and biological variation of the experimental approach. We show that allele-specific expression (ASE) measured with RNA-Seq is not accurately modeled with statistical methods that assume random independent sampling and that systematic error must be accounted for to enable accurate identification of imprinted expression. Application of a robust approach that accounts for these effects revealed 50 candidate genes where allelic bias was predicted to be parent-of-origin-dependent. However, 11 independent validation attempts through a range of allelic expression biases confirmed only 6 of these novel cases. The results emphasize the importance of independent validation and suggest that the number of imprinted genes is much closer to the initial estimates. PMID:22479196

  13. Critical Evaluation of Imprinted Gene Expression by RNA–Seq: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    DeVeale, Brian; van der Kooy, Derek; Babak, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to existing estimates of approximately 200 murine imprinted genes, recent work based on transcriptome sequencing uncovered parent-of-origin allelic effects at more than 1,300 loci in the developing brain and two adult brain regions, including hundreds present in only males or females. Our independent replication of the embryonic brain stage, where the majority of novel imprinted genes were discovered and the majority of previously known imprinted genes confirmed, resulted in only 12.9% concordance among the novel imprinted loci. Further analysis and pyrosequencing-based validation revealed that the vast majority of the novel reported imprinted loci are false-positives explained by technical and biological variation of the experimental approach. We show that allele-specific expression (ASE) measured with RNA–Seq is not accurately modeled with statistical methods that assume random independent sampling and that systematic error must be accounted for to enable accurate identification of imprinted expression. Application of a robust approach that accounts for these effects revealed 50 candidate genes where allelic bias was predicted to be parent-of-origin–dependent. However, 11 independent validation attempts through a range of allelic expression biases confirmed only 6 of these novel cases. The results emphasize the importance of independent validation and suggest that the number of imprinted genes is much closer to the initial estimates. PMID:22479196

  14. The RNA Binding Protein Igf2bp1 Is Required for Zebrafish RGC Axon Outgrowth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gaynes, John A.; Otsuna, Hideo; Campbell, Douglas S.; Manfredi, John P.; Levine, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Attractive growth cone turning requires Igf2bp1-dependent local translation of β-actin mRNA in response to external cues in vitro. While in vivo studies have shown that Igf2bp1 is required for cell migration and axon terminal branching, a requirement for Igf2bp1 function during axon outgrowth has not been demonstrated. Using a timelapse assay in the zebrafish retinotectal system, we demonstrate that the β-actin 3’UTR is sufficient to target local translation of the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede in growth cones of pathfinding retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vivo. Igf2bp1 knockdown reduced RGC axonal outgrowth and tectal coverage and retinal cell survival. RGC-specific expression of a phosphomimetic Igf2bp1 reduced the density of axonal projections in the optic tract while sparing RGCs, demonstrating for the first time that Igf2bp1 is required during axon outgrowth in vivo. Therefore, regulation of local translation mediated by Igf2bp proteins may be required at all stages of axon development. PMID:26325373

  15. Disproportionate growth in mice with Igf-2 transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, A; Bates, P; Fisher, R; Richardson, L; Graham, C F

    1994-01-01

    Injection transgenesis was used to study the long-term effects of excess insulin-like growth factor II on mouse growth and differentiation. By using a construct in which the coding region of the mouse insulin like growth factor II gene (Igf-2) was placed under the control of a keratin gene promoter, four transgenic lines were established, all of which displayed overgrowth of the skin as judged by wrinkling. In addition to high levels of expression in the skin, transgene transcripts were also present in the alimentary canal and uterus. At most of the sites of transgene expression the cell number (DNA content) was greatly increased, indicating a local action of the excess insulin-like growth factor II on cell multiplication. Adult total live weight was slightly increased and there was no macroscopic evidence of tumor formation. The characteristics of these transgenic mice indicate distinct local and systemic actions for insulin-like growth factor II. Images PMID:7524092

  16. Placental expression of imprinted genes varies with sampling site and mode of delivery

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, A.B.; Tunster, S.J.; Savory, N.; Holmes, A.; Beasley, J.; Parveen, S.A.R.; Penketh, R.J.A.; John, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Imprinted genes, which are monoallelically expressed by virtue of an epigenetic process initiated in the germline, are known to play key roles in regulating fetal growth and placental development. Numerous studies are investigating the expression of these imprinted genes in the human placenta in relation to common complications of pregnancy such as fetal growth restriction and preeclampsia. This study aimed to determine whether placental sampling protocols or other factors such as fetal sex, gestational age and mode of delivery may influence the expression of imprinted genes predicted to regulate placental signalling. Methods Term placentas were collected from Caucasian women delivering at University Hospital of Wales or Royal Gwent Hospital within two hours of delivery. Expression of the imprinted genes PHLDA2, CDKN1C, PEG3 and PEG10 was assayed by quantitative real time PCR. Intraplacental gene expression was analysed (N = 5). Placental gene expression was compared between male (N = 11) and female (N = 11) infants, early term (N = 8) and late term (N = 10) deliveries and between labouring (N = 13) and non-labouring (N = 21) participants. Results The paternally expressed imprinted genes PEG3 and PEG10 were resilient to differences in sampling site, fetal sex, term gestational age and mode of delivery. The maternally expressed imprinted gene CDKN1C was elevated over 2-fold (p < 0.001) in placenta from labouring deliveries compared with elective caesarean sections. In addition, the maternally expressed imprinted gene PHLDA2 was elevated by 1.8 fold (p = 0.01) in samples taken at the distal edge of the placenta compared to the cord insertion site. Conclusion These findings support the reinterpretation of existing data sets on these genes in relation to complications of pregnancy and further reinforce the importance of optimising and unifying placental collection protocols for future studies. PMID:26162698

  17. Association of chromosome arm 16q loss with loss of imprinting of insulin-like growth factor-II in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Stephanie K; Lobanenkov, Victor A; Feinberg, Andrew P

    2005-06-01

    The most common known molecular defect in Wilms tumor (WT) of the kidney, the most frequent solid tumor of childhood, is loss of imprinting (LOI) of the insulin-like growth factor-II gene (IGF2), which involves activation of the normally silent maternal allele of the gene and hypermethylation of a differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene. Hypermethylation impairs binding of the insulator protein CTCF, allowing activation of IGF2 by an enhancer shared between IGF2 and H19. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 16q22.1 is found in 15% of WTs, and 16q22.1 harbors CTCF, raising the possibility that reduced CTCF could lead to LOI of IGF2 in some cases. We hypothesized that there is an association between LOH of 16q and LOI of IGF2 in WT. In 40 WTs examined, LOH of 16q was found in five, one of which also showed LOH of 11p15. All of the remaining four tumors showed LOI of IGF2, compared to 13 of 32 WTs without LOH of 16q or 11p (P = 0.040). When published data not previously analyzed in this manner were included, 6 of 6 tumors with 16q LOH (and without LOH of 11p) showed LOI of IGF2, compared to 24 of 52 without LOH (P = 0.015). Thus, a genetic (16q LOH) and an epigenetic (LOI of IGF2) alteration in WT are linked, the first such association described. Finally, haploinsufficiency of CTCF may be the basis of this association, given that CTCF expression in tumors with 16q LOH was 48% that of tumors without LOH. PMID:15761865

  18. Functional evolution of IGF2:IGF2R domain 11 binding generates novel structural interactions and a specific IGF2 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Frago, Susana; Nicholls, Ryan D; Strickland, Madeleine; Hughes, Jennifer; Williams, Christopher; Garner, Lee; Surakhy, Mirvat; Maclean, Rory; Rezgui, Dellel; Prince, Stuart N; Zaccheo, Oliver J; Ebner, Daniel; Sanegre, Sabina; Yu, Sheng; Buffa, Francesca M; Crump, Matthew P; Hassan, Andrew Bassim

    2016-05-17

    Among the 15 extracellular domains of the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor (M6P/IGF2R), domain 11 has evolved a binding site for IGF2 to negatively regulate ligand bioavailability and mammalian growth. Despite the highly evolved structural loops of the IGF2:domain 11 binding site, affinity-enhancing AB loop mutations suggest that binding is modifiable. Here we examine the extent to which IGF2:domain 11 affinity, and its specificity over IGF1, can be enhanced, and we examine the structural basis of the mechanistic and functional consequences. Domain 11 binding loop mutants were selected by yeast surface display combined with high-resolution structure-based predictions, and validated by surface plasmon resonance. We discovered previously unidentified mutations in the ligand-interacting surface binding loops (AB, CD, FG, and HI). Five combined mutations increased rigidity of the AB loop, as confirmed by NMR. When added to three independently identified CD and FG loop mutations that reduced the koff value by twofold, these mutations resulted in an overall selective 100-fold improvement in affinity. The structural basis of the evolved affinity was improved shape complementarity established by interloop (AB-CD) and intraloop (FG-FG) side chain interactions. The high affinity of the combinatorial domain 11 Fc fusion proteins functioned as ligand-soluble antagonists or traps that depleted pathological IGF2 isoforms from serum and abrogated IGF2-dependent signaling in vivo. An evolved and reengineered high-specificity M6P/IGF2R domain 11 binding site for IGF2 may improve therapeutic targeting of the frequent IGF2 gain of function observed in human cancer. PMID:27140600

  19. Effects of Gold Nanorods on Imprinted Genes Expression in TM-4 Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Beilei; Gu, Hao; Xu, Bo; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Ji, Xiaoli; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Wang, Xinru

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) are among the most commonly used nanomaterials. However, thus far, little is known about their harmful effects on male reproduction. Studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that GNRs could decrease glycine synthesis, membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential and disrupt blood-testis barrier factors in TM-4 Sertoli cells. Imprinted genes play important roles in male reproduction and have been identified as susceptible loci to environmental insults by chemicals because they are functionally haploid. In this original study, we investigated the extent to which imprinted genes become deregulated in TM-4 Sertoli cells when treated with low dose of GNRs. The expression levels of 44 imprinted genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR in TM-4 Sertoli cells after a low dose of (10 nM) GNRs treatment for 24 h. We found significantly diminished expression of Kcnq1, Ntm, Peg10, Slc22a2, Pwcr1, Gtl2, Nap1l5, Peg3 and Slc22a2, while Plagl1 was significantly overexpressed. Additionally, four (Kcnq1, Slc22a18, Pwcr1 and Peg3) of 10 abnormally expressed imprinted genes were found to be located on chromosome 7. However, no significant difference of imprinted miRNA genes was observed between the GNRs treated group and controls. Our study suggested that aberrant expression of imprinted genes might be an underlying mechanism for the GNRs-induced reproductive toxicity in TM-4 Sertoli cells. PMID:26938548

  20. Epigenetic and genetic alterations of the imprinting disorder Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Hidenobu; Higashimoto, Ken

    2013-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that leads to parent-specific differential expression of a subset of genes. Most imprinted genes form clusters, or imprinting domains, and are regulated by imprinting control regions. As imprinted genes have an important role in growth and development, aberrant expression of imprinted genes due to genetic or epigenetic abnormalities is involved in the pathogenesis of human disorders, or imprinting disorders. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a representative imprinting disorder characterized by macrosomia, macroglossia and abdominal wall defects, and exhibits a predisposition to tumorigenesis. The relevant imprinted chromosomal region in BWS is 11p15.5, which consists of two imprinting domains, IGF2/H19 and CDKN1C/KCNQ1OT1. BWS has five known causative epigenetic and genetic alterations: loss of methylation (LOM) at KvDMR1, gain of methylation (GOM) at H19DMR, paternal uniparental disomy, CDKN1C mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. Opposite methylation defects, GOM and LOM, at H19DMR are known to cause clinically opposite disorders: BWS and Silver-Russell syndrome, respectively. Interestingly, a recent study discovered that loss of function or gain of function of CDKN1C also causes clinically opposite disorders, BWS and IMAGe (intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and genital anomalies) syndrome, respectively. Furthermore, several clinical studies have suggested a relationship between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and the risk of imprinting disorders, along with the existence of trans-acting factors that regulate multiple imprinted differentially methylated regions. In this review, we describe the latest knowledge surrounding the imprinting mechanism of 11p15.5, in addition to epigenetic and genetic etiologies of BWS, associated childhood tumors, the effects of ART and multilocus hypomethylation disorders. PMID:23719190

  1. The nucleotides responsible for the direct physical contact between the chromatin insulator protein CTCF and the H19 imprinting control region manifest parent of origin-specific long-distance insulation and methylation-free domains

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Vinod; Mariano, Piero; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar; Mattsson, Anita; Lobanenkov, Victor; Heuchel, Rainer; Ohlsson, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    The repression of the maternally inherited Igf2 allele has been proposed to depend on a methylation-sensitive chromatin insulator organized by the 11 zinc finger protein CTCF at the H19 imprinting control region (ICR). Here we document that point mutations of the nucleotides in physical contact with CTCF within the endogenous H19 ICR lead to loss of CTCF binding and Igf2 imprinting only when passaged through the female germline. This effect is accompanied by a significant loss of methylation protection of the maternally derived H19 ICR. Because CTCF interacts with other imprinting control regions, it emerges as a central factor responsible for interpreting and propagating gamete-derived epigenetic marks and for organizing epigenetically controlled expression domains. PMID:12629040

  2. mRNA Levels of Imprinted Genes in Bovine In Vivo Oocytes, Embryos and Cross Species Comparisons with Humans, Mice and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zongliang; Dong, Hong; Zheng, Xinbao; Marjani, Sadie L.; Donovan, David M.; Chen, Jingbo; Tian, Xiuchun (Cindy)

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-six imprinted genes were quantified in bovine in vivo produced oocytes and embryos using RNA-seq. Eighteen were detectable and their transcriptional patterns were: largely decreased (MEST and PLAGL1); first decreased and then increased (CDKN1C and IGF2R); peaked at a specific stage (PHLDA2, SGCE, PEG10, PEG3, GNAS, MEG3, DGAT1, ASCL2, NNAT, and NAP1L5); or constantly low (DIRAS3, IGF2, H19 and RTL1). These patterns reflect mRNAs that are primarily degraded, important at a specific stage, or only required at low quantities. The mRNAs for several genes were surprisingly abundant. For instance, transcripts for the maternally imprinted MEST and PLAGL1, were high in oocytes and could only be expressed from the maternal allele suggesting that their genomic imprints were not yet established/recognized. Although the mRNAs detected here were likely biallelically transcribed before the establishment of imprinted expression, the levels of mRNA during these critical stages of development have important functional consequences. Lastly, we compared these genes to their counterparts in mice, humans and pigs. Apart from previously known differences in the imprinting status, the mRNA levels were different among these four species. The data presented here provide a solid reference for expression profiles of imprinted genes in embryos produced using assisted reproductive biotechnologies. PMID:26638780

  3. Imprinted expression in cystic embryoid bodies shows an embryonic and not an extra-embryonic pattern

    PubMed Central

    Kulinski, Tomasz M.; Casari, M. Rita T.; Guenzl, Philipp M.; Wenzel, Daniel; Andergassen, Daniel; Hladik, Anastasiya; Datlinger, Paul; Farlik, Matthias; Theussl, H. -Christian; Penninger, Josef M.; Knapp, Sylvia; Bock, Christoph; Barlow, Denise P.; Hudson, Quanah J.

    2015-01-01

    A large subset of mammalian imprinted genes show extra-embryonic lineage (EXEL) specific imprinted expression that is restricted to placental trophectoderm lineages and to visceral yolk sac endoderm (ysE). Isolated ysE provides a homogenous in vivo model of a mid-gestation extra-embryonic tissue to examine the mechanism of EXEL-specific imprinted gene silencing, but an in vitro model of ysE to facilitate more rapid and cost-effective experiments is not available. Reports indicate that ES cells differentiated into cystic embryoid bodies (EBs) contain ysE, so here we investigate if cystic EBs model ysE imprinted expression. The imprinted expression pattern of cystic EBs is shown to resemble fetal liver and not ysE. To investigate the reason for this we characterized the methylome and transcriptome of cystic EBs in comparison to fetal liver and ysE, by whole genome bisulphite sequencing and RNA-seq. Cystic EBs show a fetal liver pattern of global hypermethylation and low expression of repeats, while ysE shows global hypomethylation and high expression of IAPEz retroviral repeats, as reported for placenta. Transcriptome analysis confirmed that cystic EBs are more similar to fetal liver than ysE and express markers of early embryonic endoderm. Genome-wide analysis shows that ysE shares epigenetic and repeat expression features with placenta. Contrary to previous reports, we show that cystic EBs do not contain ysE, but are more similar to the embryonic endoderm of fetal liver. This explains why cystic EBs reproduce the imprinted expression seen in the embryo but not that seen in the ysE. PMID:25912690

  4. Differential neuronal vulnerability identifies IGF-2 as a protective factor in ALS.

    PubMed

    Allodi, Ilary; Comley, Laura; Nichterwitz, Susanne; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Benitez, Julio Aguila; Cao, Ming; Corti, Stefania; Hedlund, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The fatal disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by the loss of somatic motor neurons leading to muscle wasting and paralysis. However, motor neurons in the oculomotor nucleus, controlling eye movement, are for unknown reasons spared. We found that insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) was maintained in oculomotor neurons in ALS and thus could play a role in oculomotor resistance in this disease. We also showed that IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), which mediates survival pathways upon IGF binding, was highly expressed in oculomotor neurons and on extraocular muscle endplate. The addition of IGF-2 induced Akt phosphorylation, glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation and β-catenin levels while protecting ALS patient motor neurons. IGF-2 also rescued motor neurons derived from spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients from degeneration. Finally, AAV9::IGF-2 delivery to muscles of SOD1(G93A) ALS mice extended life-span by 10%, while preserving motor neurons and inducing motor axon regeneration. Thus, our studies demonstrate that oculomotor-specific expression can be utilized to identify candidates that protect vulnerable motor neurons from degeneration. PMID:27180807

  5. Differential neuronal vulnerability identifies IGF-2 as a protective factor in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Allodi, Ilary; Comley, Laura; Nichterwitz, Susanne; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Benitez, Julio Aguila; Cao, Ming; Corti, Stefania; Hedlund, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The fatal disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by the loss of somatic motor neurons leading to muscle wasting and paralysis. However, motor neurons in the oculomotor nucleus, controlling eye movement, are for unknown reasons spared. We found that insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) was maintained in oculomotor neurons in ALS and thus could play a role in oculomotor resistance in this disease. We also showed that IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), which mediates survival pathways upon IGF binding, was highly expressed in oculomotor neurons and on extraocular muscle endplate. The addition of IGF-2 induced Akt phosphorylation, glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation and β-catenin levels while protecting ALS patient motor neurons. IGF-2 also rescued motor neurons derived from spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients from degeneration. Finally, AAV9::IGF-2 delivery to muscles of SOD1G93A ALS mice extended life-span by 10%, while preserving motor neurons and inducing motor axon regeneration. Thus, our studies demonstrate that oculomotor-specific expression can be utilized to identify candidates that protect vulnerable motor neurons from degeneration. PMID:27180807

  6. The origin and evolution of genomic imprinting and viviparity in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Renfree, Marilyn B.; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is widespread in eutherian mammals. Marsupial mammals also have genomic imprinting, but in fewer loci. It has long been thought that genomic imprinting is somehow related to placentation and/or viviparity in mammals, although neither is restricted to mammals. Most imprinted genes are expressed in the placenta. There is no evidence for genomic imprinting in the egg-laying monotreme mammals, despite their short-lived placenta that transfers nutrients from mother to embryo. Post natal genomic imprinting also occurs, especially in the brain. However, little attention has been paid to the primary source of nutrition in the neonate in all mammals, the mammary gland. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs) play an important role as imprinting control centres in each imprinted region which usually comprises both paternally and maternally expressed genes (PEGs and MEGs). The DMR is established in the male or female germline (the gDMR). Comprehensive comparative genome studies demonstrated that two imprinted regions, PEG10 and IGF2-H19, are conserved in both marsupials and eutherians and that PEG10 and H19 DMRs emerged in the therian ancestor at least 160 Ma, indicating the ancestral origin of genomic imprinting during therian mammal evolution. Importantly, these regions are known to be deeply involved in placental and embryonic growth. It appears that most maternal gDMRs are always associated with imprinting in eutherian mammals, but emerged at differing times during mammalian evolution. Thus, genomic imprinting could evolve from a defence mechanism against transposable elements that depended on DNA methylation established in germ cells. PMID:23166401

  7. Paternally expressed imprinted genes establish postzygotic hybridization barriers in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Philip; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Guifeng; Santos-González, Juan; Köhler, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon causing parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. While many imprinted genes have been identified in plants, the functional roles of most of them are unknown. In this study, we systematically examine the functional requirement of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) during seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana. While none of the 15 analyzed peg mutants has qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of seed development, we identify three PEGs that establish postzygotic hybridization barriers in the endosperm, revealing that PEGs have a major role as speciation genes in plants. Our work reveals that a subset of PEGs maintains functional roles in the inbreeding plant Arabidopsis that become evident upon deregulated expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10074.001 PMID:26344545

  8. Paternally expressed imprinted genes establish postzygotic hybridization barriers in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Philip; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Guifeng; Santos-González, Juan; Köhler, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon causing parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. While many imprinted genes have been identified in plants, the functional roles of most of them are unknown. In this study, we systematically examine the functional requirement of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) during seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana. While none of the 15 analyzed peg mutants has qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of seed development, we identify three PEGs that establish postzygotic hybridization barriers in the endosperm, revealing that PEGs have a major role as speciation genes in plants. Our work reveals that a subset of PEGs maintains functional roles in the inbreeding plant Arabidopsis that become evident upon deregulated expression. PMID:26344545

  9. The effects of maternal anxiety during pregnancy on IGF2/H19 methylation in cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, T; Novakovic, B; Meyer, B; Rzehak, P; Vuillermin, P; Ponsonby, A-L; Collier, F; Burgner, D; Saffery, R; Ryan, J; Vuillermin, Peter; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Carlin, John B; Allen, Katie J; Tang, Mimi L; Saffery, Richard; Ranganathan, Sarath; Burgner, David; Dwyer, Terry; Jachno, Kim; Sly, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that maternal mental health in pregnancy can influence fetal development. The imprinted genes, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and H19, are involved in fetal growth and each is regulated by DNA methylation. This study aimed to determine the association between maternal mental well-being during pregnancy and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of IGF2 (DMR0) and the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR) in newborn offspring. Maternal depression, anxiety and perceived stress were assessed at 28 weeks of pregnancy in the Barwon Infant Study (n=576). DNA methylation was measured in purified cord blood mononuclear cells using the Sequenom MassArray Platform. Maternal anxiety was associated with a decrease in average ICR methylation (Δ=−2.23% 95% CI=−3.68 to −0.77%), and across all six of the individual CpG units in anxious compared with non-anxious groups. Birth weight and sex modified the association between prenatal anxiety and infant methylation. When stratified into lower (⩽3530 g) and higher (>3530 g) birth weight groups using the median birth weight, there was a stronger association between anxiety and ICR methylation in the lower birth weight group (Δ=−3.89% 95% CI=−6.06 to −1.72%), with no association in the higher birth weight group. When stratified by infant sex, there was a stronger association in female infants (Δ=−3.70% 95% CI=−5.90 to −1.51%) and no association in males. All the linear regression models were adjusted for maternal age, smoking and folate intake. These findings show that maternal anxiety in pregnancy is associated with decreased IGF2/H19 ICR DNA methylation in progeny at birth, particularly in female, low birth weight neonates. ICR methylation may help link poor maternal mental health and adverse birth outcomes, but further investigation is needed. PMID:27023171

  10. Oncofetal protein IGF2BP3 facilitates the activity of proto-oncogene protein eIF4E through the destabilization of EIF4E-BP2 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, R; Imamachi, N; Suzuki, Y; Yoshida, H; Tochigi, N; Oonishi, T; Suzuki, Y; Akimitsu, N

    2016-07-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have important roles in tumorigenesis. Although IGF2BP3, an evolutionally conserved RBP, has been reported as a useful diagnostic marker for various cancers and has been considered a regulator of tumorigenesis, little is known of the function of IGF2BP3 because of lack of information regarding IGF2BP3 target mRNAs. Here, we report the identification of IGF2BP3 target mRNAs and IGF2BP3 function in cancer proliferation. We identified mRNAs with altered expression in IGF2BP3-depleted cells by massive sequencing analysis and IGF2BP3-binding RNAs by immunoprecipitation of IGF2BP3 followed by massive sequencing analysis, resulting in the identification of 110 candidates that are negatively regulated by IGF2BP3. We found that IGF2BP3 destabilized EIF4E-BP2 and MEIS3 mRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed the interaction between IGF2BP3 and ribonucleases such as XRN2 and exosome component. The retarded proliferation of IGF2BP3-depleted cells was partially rescued by the depletion of EIF4E-BP2, which negatively regulates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), an activator of translation and a well-known proto-oncogene. Consistent with this observation, IGF2BP3 depletion reduced phosphorylated eIF4E, the active form, and translational efficiency of eIF4E target transcripts. Reduction of phosphorylated eIF4E by IGF2BP3 depletion was rescued by EIF4E-BP2 depletion. At last, we found an inverse correlation between the expression level of IGF2BP3 and EIF4E-BP2 in human lung adenocarcinoma tissues. Together, these results suggest that IGF2BP3 promotes eIF4E-mediated translational activation through the reduction of EIF4E-BP2 via mRNA degradation, leading to enhanced cell proliferation. This is the first report demonstrating that IGF2BP3 is an RNA-destabilizing factor. Notably, here we provide the first evidence for the functional linkage between two previously well-known cancer biomarkers, IGF2BP3 and eIF4E. PMID:26522719

  11. Early embryonic failure: Expression and imprinted status of candidate genes on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.S.; Bennett, P.R.; Moore, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two cases of maternal uniparental (hetero)disomy for human chromosome 21 (mUPD21) have been identified in a systematic search for UPD in 23 cases of early embryonic failure (EEF). Bi-parental origin of the other chromosome pairs was confirmed using specific VNTR probes or dinucleotide repeat analysis. Both maternally and paternally derived isochromosomes 21q have previously been identified in two individuals with normal phenotypes. Full UPD21 has a different mechanism of origin than uniparental isochromosome 21q and its effect on imprinted genes and phenotypic outcome will therefore not necessarily be the same. EEF associated with mUPD21 suggests that developmentally important genes on HSA 21 may be imprinted such that they are only expressed from either the maternally or paternally derived alleles. We have searched for monoallelic expression of candidate genes on HSA 21 in human pregnancy (CBS, IFNAR, COL6A1) using intragenic DNA polymorphisms. These genes were chosen either because their murine homologues lie in imprinted regions or because they are potentially important in embryogenesis. Once imprinted candidate genes have been identified, their methylation status and expression in normal, early embryonic failure and uniparental disomy 21 pregnancies will be studied. At the same time, a larger number of cases of EEF are being examined to further investigate the incidence of UPD21 in this group.

  12. Up-Regulation of microRNA-210 is Associated with Spermatogenesis by Targeting IGF2 in Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dongdong; Huang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Weiqun; Zhang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in spermatogenesis. MicroRNA-210 (miR-210) expression was up-regulated in the testes of sterile men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). However, the underlying mechanisms of miR-210 involved in the spermatogenesis in patients with NOA are unknown. Material/Methods Expression of miR-210 and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) in the testes of NOA cases (only including maturation arrest and hypospermatogenesis) were detected in this study. We carried out in vitro experiments to determine if IGF2 was directly targeted by miR-210 in NT2 cells. Results Compared with obstructive azoospermia (OA) as normal control, our results suggest that miR-210 was significantly up-regulated in testis of patients with NOA (P<0.05), and IGF2 was down-regulated, but without a significant difference. The results also indicated that IGF2 was directly targeted by miR-210 in NT2 cells. Conclusions The results showed that miR-210 was involved in spermatogenesis by targeting IGF2 in male infertility. PMID:27535712

  13. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE) is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA) and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes) remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%). Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes in the human term

  14. Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Bajrami, Emirjeta; Spiroski, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic imprinting is the inheritance out of Mendelian borders. Many of inherited diseases and human development violates Mendelian law of inheritance, this way of inheriting is studied by epigenetics. AIM: The aim of this review is to analyze current opinions and options regarding to this way of inheriting. RESULTS: Epigenetics shows that gene expression undergoes changes more complex than modifications in the DNA sequence; it includes the environmental influence on the gametes before conception. Humans inherit two alleles from mother and father, both are functional for the majority of the genes, but sometimes one is turned off or “stamped” and doesn’t show in offspring, that gene is imprinted. Imprinting means that that gene is silenced, and gene from other parent is expressed. The mechanisms for imprinting are still incompletely defined, but they involve epigenetic modifications that are erased and then reset during the creation of eggs and sperm. Genomic imprinting is a process of silencing genes through DNA methylation. The repressed allele is methylated, while the active allele is unmethylated. The most well-known conditions include Prader-Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome. Both of these syndromes can be caused by imprinting or other errors involving genes on the long arm of chromosome 15. CONCLUSIONS: Genomic imprinting and other epigenetic mechanisms such as environment is shown that plays role in offspring neurodevelopment and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:27275355

  15. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) overexpression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma correlates with poor survival

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of 4% and typically presents in an advanced stage. In this setting, prognostic markers identifying the more agrressive tumors could aid in managment decisions. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3, also known as IMP3 or KOC) is an oncofetal RNA-binding protein that regulates targets such as insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2) and ACTB (beta-actin). Methods We evaluated the expression of IGF2BP3 by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray of 127 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas with tumor grade 1, 2 and 3 according to WHO criteria, and the prognostic value of IGF2BP3 expression. Results IGF2BP3 was found to be selectively overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues but not in benign pancreatic tissues. Nine (38%) patient samples of tumor grade 1 (n = 24) and 27 (44%) of tumor grade 2 (n = 61) showed expression of IGF2BP3. The highest rate of expression was seen in poorly differentiated specimen (grade 3, n = 42) with 26 (62%) positive samples. Overall survival was found to be significantly shorter in patients with IGF2BP3 expressing tumors (P = 0.024; RR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.8). Conclusions Our data suggest that IGF2BP3 overexpression identifies a subset of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas with an extremely poor outcome and supports the rationale for developing therapies to target the IGF pathway in this cancer. PMID:20178612

  16. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint

    PubMed Central

    Zapala, Matthew A.; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A.; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S.; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S.; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J.; Reilly, John F.; Young, Warren G.; Bloom, Floyd E.; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-01-01

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional “imprint” consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior–posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org). PMID:16002470

  17. Maternal distress associates with placental genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure and IGF2: Role of obesity and sex.

    PubMed

    Mina, Theresia H; Räikkönen, Katri; Riley, Simon C; Norman, Jane E; Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2015-09-01

    Maternal emotional distress symptoms, including life satisfaction, anxiety and depressed mood, are worse in Severely Obese (SO) than lean pregnancy and may alter placental genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure and placental growth. We hypothesised that the associations between increased maternal distress symptoms and changes in placental gene expression including IGF2 and genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure are more pronounced in SO pregnancy. We also considered whether there were sex-specific effects. Placental mRNA levels of 11β-HSDs, NR3C1-α, NR3C2, ABC transporters, mTOR and the IGF2 family were measured in term placental samples from 43 lean (BMI≤25kg/m(2)) and 50 SO (BMI≥40kg/m(2)) women, in whom distress symptoms were prospectively evaluated during pregnancy. The mRNA levels of genes with a similar role in regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure were strongly inter-correlated. Increased maternal distress symptoms associated with increased NR3C2 and IGF2 isoform 1(IGF2-1) in both lean and SO group (p≤0.05). Increased distress was associated with higher ABCB1 and ABCG2 mRNA levels in SO but lower ABCB1 and higher 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels in lean (p≤0.05) suggesting a protective adaptive response in SO placentas. Increased maternal distress associated with reduced mRNA levels of ABCB1, ABCG2, 11β-HSD2, NR3C1-α and IGF2-1 in placentas of female but not male offspring. The observed sex differences in placental responses suggest greater vulnerability of female fetuses to maternal distress with potentially greater fetal glucocorticoid exposure and excess IGF2. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings and to test whether this translates to potentially greater negative outcomes of maternal distress in female offspring in early childhood. PMID:26056743

  18. Otx2 expression and implications for olfactory imprinting in the anemonefish, Amphiprion percula.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Heather D; Van Herwerden, Lynne; Cole, Nicholas J; Don, Emily K; De Santis, Christian; Dixson, Danielle L; Wenger, Amelia S; Munday, Philip L

    2013-01-01

    The otx2 gene encodes a transcription factor (OTX2) essential in the formation of the brain and sensory systems. Specifically, OTX2-positive cells are associated with axons in the olfactory system of mice and otx2 is upregulated in odour-exposed zebrafish, indicating a possible role in olfactory imprinting. In this study, otx2 was used as a candidate gene to investigate the molecular mechanisms of olfactory imprinting to settlement cues in the coral reef anemonefish, Amphiprion percula. The A. percula otx2 (Ap-otx2) gene was elucidated, validated, and its expression tested in settlement-stage A. percula by exposing them to behaviourally relevant olfactory settlement cues in the first 24 hours post-hatching, or daily throughout the larval phase. In-situ hybridisation revealed expression of Ap-otx2 throughout the olfactory epithelium with increased transcript staining in odour-exposed settlement-stage larval fish compared to no-odour controls, in all scenarios. This suggests that Ap-otx2 may be involved in olfactory imprinting to behaviourally relevant settlement odours in A. percula. PMID:24143277

  19. Otx2 expression and implications for olfactory imprinting in the anemonefish, Amphiprion percula

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, Heather D.; Van Herwerden, Lynne; Cole, Nicholas J.; Don, Emily K.; De Santis, Christian; Dixson, Danielle L.; Wenger, Amelia S.; Munday, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The otx2 gene encodes a transcription factor (OTX2) essential in the formation of the brain and sensory systems. Specifically, OTX2-positive cells are associated with axons in the olfactory system of mice and otx2 is upregulated in odour-exposed zebrafish, indicating a possible role in olfactory imprinting. In this study, otx2 was used as a candidate gene to investigate the molecular mechanisms of olfactory imprinting to settlement cues in the coral reef anemonefish, Amphiprion percula. The A. percula otx2 (Ap-otx2) gene was elucidated, validated, and its expression tested in settlement-stage A. percula by exposing them to behaviourally relevant olfactory settlement cues in the first 24 hours post-hatching, or daily throughout the larval phase. In-situ hybridisation revealed expression of Ap-otx2 throughout the olfactory epithelium with increased transcript staining in odour-exposed settlement-stage larval fish compared to no-odour controls, in all scenarios. This suggests that Ap-otx2 may be involved in olfactory imprinting to behaviourally relevant settlement odours in A. percula. PMID:24143277

  20. Dynamic expression of imprinted genes associates with maternally controlled nutrient allocation during maize endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Xin, Mingming; Yang, Ruolin; Li, Guosheng; Chen, Hao; Laurie, John; Ma, Chuang; Wang, Dongfang; Yao, Yingyin; Larkins, Brian A; Sun, Qixin; Yadegari, Ramin; Wang, Xiangfeng; Ni, Zhongfu

    2013-09-01

    In angiosperms, the endosperm provides nutrients for embryogenesis and seed germination and is the primary tissue where gene imprinting occurs. To identify the imprintome of early developing maize (Zea mays) endosperm, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of whole kernels at 0, 3, and 5 d after pollination (DAP) and endosperms at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, using B73 by Mo17 reciprocal crosses. We observed gradually increased expression of paternal transcripts in 3- and 5-DAP kernels. In 7-DAP endosperm, the majority of the genes tested reached a 2:1 maternal versus paternal ratio, suggesting that paternal genes are nearly fully activated by 7 DAP. A total of 116, 234, and 63 genes exhibiting parent-specific expression were identified at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, respectively. The largest proportion of paternally expressed genes was at 7 DAP, mainly due to the significantly deviated parental allele expression ratio of these genes at this stage, while nearly 80% of the maternally expressed genes (MEGs) were specific to 10 DAP and were primarily attributed to sharply increased expression levels compared with the other stages. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of the imprinted genes suggested that 10-DAP endosperm-specific MEGs are involved in nutrient uptake and allocation and the auxin signaling pathway, coincident with the onset of starch and storage protein accumulation. PMID:24058158

  1. 3-M syndrome: a growth disorder associated with IGF2 silencing.

    PubMed

    Murray, P G; Hanson, D; Coulson, T; Stevens, A; Whatmore, A; Poole, R L; Mackay, D J; Black, G C M; Clayton, P E

    2013-01-01

    3-M syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by pre- and post-natal growth restriction, facial dysmorphism, normal intelligence and radiological features (slender long bones and tall vertebral bodies). It is known to be caused by mutations in the genes encoding cullin 7, obscurin-like 1 and coiled-coil domain containing 8. The mechanisms through which mutations in these genes impair growth are unclear. The aim of this study was to identify novel pathways involved in the growth impairment in 3-M syndrome. RNA was extracted from fibroblast cell lines derived from four 3-M syndrome patients and three control subjects, hybridised to Affymetrix HU 133 plus 2.0 arrays with quantitative real-time PCR used to confirm changes found on microarray. IGF-II protein levels in conditioned cell culture media were measured by ELISA. Of the top 10 downregulated probesets, three represented IGF2 while H19 was identified as the 23rd most upregulated probeset. QRT-PCR confirmed upregulation of H19 (P<0.001) and downregulation of IGF2 (P<0.001). Levels of IGF-II secreted into conditioned cell culture medium were higher for control fibroblasts than those for 3-M fibroblasts (10.2±2.9 vs 0.6±0.9 ng/ml, P<0.01). 3-M syndrome is associated with a gene expression profile of reduced IGF2 expression and increased H19 expression similar to that found in Silver-Russell syndrome. Loss of autocrine IGF-II in the growth plate may be associated with the short stature seen in children with 3-M syndrome. PMID:24148222

  2. Imprinting defects at human 14q32 locus alters gene expression and is associated with the pathobiology of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jingmin; Li, Lihua; Sarver, Anne E; Pope, Emily A; Varshney, Jyotika; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Spector, Logan; Largaespada, David A; Steer, Clifford J; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-04-19

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy affecting children and adolescents. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with osteosarcoma, our understanding of its pathobiology is rather limited. Here we show that, first, an imprinting defect at human 14q32-locus is highly prevalent (87%) and specifically associated with osteosarcoma patients < 30 years of age. Second, the average demethylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the 14q32-locus varied significantly compared to genome-wide demethylation. Third, the 14q32-locus was enriched in both H3K4-me3 and H3K27-me3 histone modifications that affected expression of all imprinted genes and miRNAs in this region. Fourth, imprinting defects at 14q32 - DMRs are present in triad DNA samples from affected children and their biological parents. Finally, imprinting defects at 14q32-DMRs were also observed at higher frequencies in an Rb1/Trp53 mutation-induced osteosarcoma mouse model. Further analysis of normal and tumor tissues from a Sleeping Beauty mouse model of spontaneous osteosarcoma supported the notion that these imprinting defects may be a key factor in osteosarcoma pathobiology. In conclusion, we demonstrate that imprinting defects at the 14q32 locus significantly alter gene expression, may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and could be predictive of survival outcomes. PMID:26802029

  3. Imprinting defects at human 14q32 locus alters gene expression and is associated with the pathobiology of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jingmin; Li, Lihua; Sarver, Anne E.; Pope, Emily A.; Varshney, Jyotika; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Spector, Logan; Largaespada, David A.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy affecting children and adolescents. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with osteosarcoma, our understanding of its pathobiology is rather limited. Here we show that, first, an imprinting defect at human 14q32-locus is highly prevalent (87%) and specifically associated with osteosarcoma patients < 30 years of age. Second, the average demethylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the 14q32-locus varied significantly compared to genome-wide demethylation. Third, the 14q32-locus was enriched in both H3K4-me3 and H3K27-me3 histone modifications that affected expression of all imprinted genes and miRNAs in this region. Fourth, imprinting defects at 14q32 - DMRs are present in triad DNA samples from affected children and their biological parents. Finally, imprinting defects at 14q32-DMRs were also observed at higher frequencies in an Rb1/Trp53 mutation-induced osteosarcoma mouse model. Further analysis of normal and tumor tissues from a Sleeping Beauty mouse model of spontaneous osteosarcoma supported the notion that these imprinting defects may be a key factor in osteosarcoma pathobiology. In conclusion, we demonstrate that imprinting defects at the 14q32 locus significantly alter gene expression, may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and could be predictive of survival outcomes. PMID:26802029

  4. miR-506 inhibits the proliferation and invasion by targeting IGF2BP1 in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yonggang; Sun, Ranran; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Tongwen; Liu, Xianzhi; Yang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play an essential role in cancers. Deregulation of miR-506 was reported in several cancers. However, the expression and function of miR-506 in glioblastoma remain unclear. Our data showed that the level of miR-506 was downregulated in glioblastoma tissues and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-506 repressed cell growth, blocked G1/S transition, and suppressed cell invasion in glioblastoma cell. Moreover, IGF2BP1 was a direct target of miR-506 in glioblastoma cells. Knockdown of IGF2BP1 recapitulated the anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of miR-506, whereas IGF2BP1 overexpression antagonized the tumor-suppressive function of miR-506. Our data showed that miRNA-506 played a tumor suppressor gene role in human glioblastoma by regulating IGF2BP1 gene and might be a new therapeutic target of human glioblastoma. PMID:26692944

  5. [Imprinted genes in plants].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Geng; Yang, Ruo-Fei; Fu, Feng-Ling; Li, Wan-Chen

    2010-12-01

    The expression of imprinted genes is regulated by epigenetic mechanism. In plant endosperm, the allele of imprinted genes is expressed in a pattern of parent-of-origin-dependent. The expression of imprinted genes plays essential roles in the development of embryos and their annexe structures, as well as seed size, reproductive barriers and apomixis. Along with the progress of plant epigenetic research, the exploration of imprinted genes is becoming hotspot in epigenetic research. This review focused on the parental conflict theory about the origin of imprinted genes, and the latest research advances in expression regulation mechanism of plant imprinted genes, using the examples of the important imprinted genes MEA, FIS2, FWA, MPC, and PHE1 in Arabidopsis, and FIEI and FIE2 in maize. PMID:21513148

  6. IGF2 and IGF1R in pediatric adrenocortical tumors: roles in metastasis and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Peixoto Lira, Régia Caroline; Fedatto, Paola Fernanda; Marco Antonio, David Santos; Leal, Letícia Ferro; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo; de Castro, Margaret; Tucci, Silvio; Neder, Luciano; Ramalho, Leandra; Seidinger, Ana Luiza; Cardinalli, Izilda; Mastellaro, Maria José; Yunes, José Andres; Brandalise, Silvia Regina; Tone, Luiz Gonzaga; Rauber Antonini, Sonir Roberto; Scrideli, Carlos Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Deregulation of the IGF system observed in human tumors indicates a role in malignant cell transformation and in tumor cell proliferation. Although overexpression of the IGF2 and IGF1R genes was described in adrenocortical tumors (ACTs), few studies reported their profiles in pediatric ACTs. In this study, the IGF2 and IGF1R expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR according to the patient's clinical/pathological features in 60 pediatric ACT samples, and IGF1R protein was investigated in 45 samples by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Whole transcriptome and functional assays were conducted after IGF1R inhibition with OSI-906 in NCI-H295A cell line. Significant IGF2 overexpression was found in tumor samples when compared with non-neoplastic samples (P<0.001), significantly higher levels of IGF1R in patients with relapse/metastasis (P=0.031) and moderate/strong IGF1R immunostaining in 62.2% of ACTs, but no other relationship with patient survival and clinical/pathological features was observed. OSI-906 treatment downregulated genes associated with MAPK activity, induced limited reduction of cell viability and increased the apoptosis rate. After 24h, the treatment also decreased the expression of genes related to the steroid biosynthetic process, the protein levels of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), and androgen secretion in cell medium, supporting the role of IGF1R in steroidogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Our data showed that the IGF1R overexpression could be indicative of aggressive ACTs in children. However, in vitro treatments with high concentrations of OSI-906 (>1μM) showed limited reduction of cell viability, suggesting that OSI-906 alone could not be a suitable therapy to abolish carcinoma cell growth. PMID:27185872

  7. The oncogenic triangle of HMGA2, LIN28B and IGF2BP1 antagonizes tumor-suppressive actions of the let-7 family

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Bianca; Bley, Nadine; Müller, Simon; Glaß, Markus; Misiak, Danny; Lederer, Marcell; Vetter, Martina; Strauß, Hans-Georg; Thomssen, Christoph; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The tumor-suppressive let-7 microRNA family targets various oncogene-encoding mRNAs. We identify the let-7 targets HMGA2, LIN28B and IGF2BP1 to form a let-7 antagonizing self-promoting oncogenic triangle. Surprisingly, 3′-end processing of IGF2BP1 mRNAs is unaltered in aggressive cancers and tumor-derived cells although IGF2BP1 synthesis was proposed to escape let-7 attack by APA-dependent (alternative polyadenylation) 3′ UTR shortening. However, the expression of the triangle factors is inversely correlated with let-7 levels and promoted by LIN28B impairing let-7 biogenesis. Moreover, IGF2BP1 enhances the expression of all triangle factors by recruiting the respective mRNAs in mRNPs lacking AGO proteins and let-7 miRNAs. This indicates that the downregulation of let-7, largely facilitated by LIN28B upregulation, and the protection of let-7 target mRNAs by IGF2BP1-directed shielding in mRNPs synergize in enhancing the expression of triangle factors. The oncogenic potential of this triangle was confirmed in ovarian cancer (OC)-derived ES-2 cells transduced with let-7 targeting decoys. In these, the depletion of HMGA2 only diminishes tumor cell growth under permissive conditions. The depletion of LIN28B and more prominently IGF2BP1 severely impairs tumor cell viability, self-renewal and 2D as well as 3D migration. In conclusion, this suggests the targeting of the HMGA2-LIN28B-IGF2BP1 triangle as a promising strategy in cancer treatment. PMID:26917013

  8. The oncogenic triangle of HMGA2, LIN28B and IGF2BP1 antagonizes tumor-suppressive actions of the let-7 family.

    PubMed

    Busch, Bianca; Bley, Nadine; Müller, Simon; Glaß, Markus; Misiak, Danny; Lederer, Marcell; Vetter, Martina; Strauß, Hans-Georg; Thomssen, Christoph; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The tumor-suppressive let-7 microRNA family targets various oncogene-encoding mRNAs. We identify the let-7 targets HMGA2, LIN28B and IGF2BP1 to form a let-7 antagonizing self-promoting oncogenic triangle. Surprisingly, 3'-end processing of IGF2BP1 mRNAs is unaltered in aggressive cancers and tumor-derived cells although IGF2BP1 synthesis was proposed to escape let-7 attack by APA-dependent (alternative polyadenylation) 3' UTR shortening. However, the expression of the triangle factors is inversely correlated with let-7 levels and promoted by LIN28B impairing let-7 biogenesis. Moreover, IGF2BP1 enhances the expression of all triangle factors by recruiting the respective mRNAs in mRNPs lacking AGO proteins and let-7 miRNAs. This indicates that the downregulation of let-7, largely facilitated by LIN28B upregulation, and the protection of let-7 target mRNAs by IGF2BP1-directed shielding in mRNPs synergize in enhancing the expression of triangle factors. The oncogenic potential of this triangle was confirmed in ovarian cancer (OC)-derived ES-2 cells transduced with let-7 targeting decoys. In these, the depletion of HMGA2 only diminishes tumor cell growth under permissive conditions. The depletion of LIN28B and more prominently IGF2BP1 severely impairs tumor cell viability, self-renewal and 2D as well as 3D migration. In conclusion, this suggests the targeting of the HMGA2-LIN28B-IGF2BP1 triangle as a promising strategy in cancer treatment. PMID:26917013

  9. Maintenance of Paternal Methylation and Repression of the Imprinted H19 Gene Requires MBD3

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Kimberly J; Lin, Shu; Verona, Raluca I; Schultz, Richard M; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2007-01-01

    Paternal repression of the imprinted H19 gene is mediated by a differentially methylated domain (DMD) that is essential to imprinting of both H19 and the linked and oppositely imprinted Igf2 gene. The mechanisms by which paternal-specific methylation of the DMD survive the period of genome-wide demethylation in the early embryo and are subsequently used to govern imprinted expression are not known. Methyl-CpG binding (MBD) proteins are likely candidates to explain how these DMDs are recognized to silence the locus, because they preferentially bind methylated DNA and recruit repression complexes with histone deacetylase activity. MBD RNA and protein are found in preimplantation embryos, and chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that MBD3 is bound to the H19 DMD. To test a role for MBDs in imprinting, two independent RNAi-based strategies were used to deplete MBD3 in early mouse embryos, with the same results. In RNAi-treated blastocysts, paternal H19 expression was activated, supporting the hypothesis that MBD3, which is also a member of the Mi-2/NuRD complex, is required to repress the paternal H19 allele. RNAi-treated blastocysts also have reduced levels of the Mi-2/NuRD complex protein MTA-2, which suggests a role for the Mi-2/NuRD repressive complex in paternal-specific silencing at the H19 locus. Furthermore, DNA methylation was reduced at the H19 DMD when MBD3 protein was depleted. In contrast, expression and DNA methylation were not disrupted in preimplantation embryos for other imprinted genes. These results demonstrate new roles for MBD3 in maintaining imprinting control region DNA methylation and silencing the paternal H19 allele. Finally, MBD3-depleted preimplantation embryos have reduced cell numbers, suggesting a role for MBD3 in cell division. PMID:17708683

  10. IGF2 is an actionable target that identifies a distinct subpopulation of colorectal cancer patients with marginal response to anti-EGFR therapies.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Eugenia R; Galimi, Francesco; Sassi, Francesco; Migliardi, Giorgia; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M; Lupo, Barbara; Erriquez, Jessica; Isella, Claudio; Comoglio, Paolo M; Medico, Enzo; Tejpar, Sabine; Budinská, Eva; Trusolino, Livio; Bertotti, Andrea

    2015-01-28

    Among patients with colorectal cancer who benefit from therapy targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), stable disease (SD) occurs more frequently than massive regressions. Exploring the mechanisms of this incomplete sensitivity to devise more efficacious treatments will likely improve patients' outcomes. We tested therapies tailored around hypothesis-generating molecular features in patient-derived xenografts ("xenopatients"), which originated from 125 independent samples that did not harbor established resistance-conferring mutations. Samples from xenopatients that responded to cetuximab, an anti-EGFR agent, with disease stabilization displayed high levels of EGFR family ligands and receptors, indicating high EGFR pathway activity. Five of 21 SD models (23.8%) characterized by particularly high expression of EGFR and EGFR family members regressed after intensified EGFR blockade by cetuximab and a small-molecule inhibitor. In addition, a subset of cases in which enhanced EGFR inhibition was unproductive (6 of 16, 37.5%) exhibited marked overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2). Enrichment of IGF2 overexpressors among cases with SD was demonstrated in the entire xenopatient collection and was confirmed in patients by mining clinical gene expression data sets. In functional studies, IGF2 overproduction attenuated the efficacy of cetuximab. Conversely, interception of IGF2-dependent signaling in IGF2-overexpressing xenopatients potentiated the effects of cetuximab. The clinical implementation of IGF inhibitors awaits reliable predictors of response, but the results of this study suggest rational combination therapies for colorectal cancer and provide evidence for IGF2 as a biomarker of reduced tumor sensitivity to anti-EGFR therapy and a determinant of response to combined IGF2/EGFR targeting. PMID:25632036

  11. Conversion of genomic imprinting by reprogramming and redifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Choi, Hyun Woo; Jang, Hyo Jin; Chung, Hyung Min; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Schöler, Hans R; Do, Jeong Tae

    2013-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), generated from somatic cells by overexpression of transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc have the same characteristics as pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). iPSCs reprogrammed from differentiated cells undergo epigenetic modification during reprogramming, and ultimately acquire a similar epigenetic state to that of ESCs. In this study, these epigenetic changes were observed in reprogramming of uniparental parthenogenetic somatic cells. The parthenogenetic pattern of imprinted genes changes during the generation of parthenogenetic maternal iPSCs (miPSCs), a process referred to as pluripotent reprogramming. We determined whether altered imprinted genes are maintained or revert to the parthenogenetic state when the reprogrammed cells are redifferentiated into specialized cell types. To address this question, we redifferentiated miPSCs into neural stem cells (miPS-NSCs) and compared them with biparental female NSCs (fNSCs) and parthenogenetic NSCs (pNSCs). We found that pluripotent reprogramming of parthenogenetic somatic cells could reset parthenogenetic DNA methylation patterns in imprinted genes, and that alterations in DNA methylation were maintained even after miPSCs were redifferentiated into miPS-NSCs. Notably, maternally methylated imprinted genes (Peg1, Peg3, Igf2r, Snrpn and Ndn), whose differentially methylated regions were fully methylated in pNSCs, were demethylated and their expression levels were found to be close to the levels in normal biparental fNSCs after reprogramming and redifferentiation. Our findings suggest that pluripotent reprogramming of parthenogenetic somatic cells followed by redifferentiation leads to changes in DNA methylation of imprinted genes and the reestablishment of gene expression levels to those of normal biparental cells. PMID:23525019

  12. Development of anxiety-like behavior via hippocampal IGF-2 signaling in the offspring of parental morphine exposure: effect of enriched environment.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Qi; Luo, Yan-Wei; Bi, Fang-Fang; Cui, Tao-Tao; Song, Ling; Cao, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Yi; Li, Fang; Xu, Jun-Mei; Hao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Fiona H; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Dai, Ru-Ping

    2014-11-01

    Opioid addiction is a major social, economic, and medical problem worldwide. Long-term adverse consequences of chronic opiate exposure not only involve the individuals themselves but also their offspring. Adolescent maternal morphine exposure results in behavior and morphologic changes in the brain of their adult offspring. However, few studies investigate the effect of adult opiate exposure on their offspring. Furthermore, the underlying molecular signals regulating the intergenerational effects of morphine exposure are still elusive. We report here that morphine exposure of adult male and female rats resulted in anxiety-like behavior and dendritic retraction in the dentate gyrus (DG) region of the hippocampus in their adult offspring. The behavior and morphologic changes were concomitant with the downregulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-2 signaling in the granular zone of DG. Overexpression of hippocampal IGF-2 by bilateral intra-DG injection of lentivirus encoding the IGF-2 gene prevented anxiety-like behaviors in the offspring. Furthermore, exposure to an enriched environment during adolescence corrected the reduction of hippocampal IGF-2 expression, normalized anxiety-like behavior and reversed dendritic retraction in the adult offspring. Thus, parental morphine exposure can lead to the downregulation of hippocampal IGF-2, which contributed to the anxiety and hippocampal dendritic retraction in their offspring. An adolescent-enriched environment experience prevented the behavior and morphologic changes in their offspring through hippocampal IGF-2 signaling. IGF-2 and an enriched environment may be a potential intervention to prevention of anxiety and brain atrophy in the offspring of parental opioid exposure. PMID:24889368

  13. Activation of tumor suppressor p53 gene expression by magnetic thymine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Thomas, James L; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Jan, Jeng-Shiung; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan is a natural biodegradable polysaccharide that has been used to enhance gene delivery, owing to the ease with which chitosan nanoparticles enter the nucleus of cells. To study the effects of nuclear delivery of telomeric gene sequences, which contain thymine, we formed magnetic thymine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (TIPs) by the precipitation of chitosan, mixed with thymine and magnetic nanoparticles (to aid in separations). The mean size of the TIPS was 116 ± 18 nm; the dissociation constant for thymine was 21.8 mg mL(-1). We then treated human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) with TIPs nanoparticles bearing bound thymine or a bound telomeric DNA sequence. The expression of the tumor suppressor p53 gene increased when TIPs were applied and decreased when telomere-bound TIPs were applied. PMID:26693943

  14. Paternal BPA exposure in early life alters Igf2 epigenetic status in sperm and induces pancreatic impairment in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhenxing; Xia, Wei; Chang, Huailong; Huo, Wenqian; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Shunqing

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to endocrine disruptors in utero appears to alter epigenetics in the male germ-line and subsequently promote adult-onset disease in subsequent generations. Fetal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a highly prevalent endocrine disruptor in environment, has been shown to alter epigenetic modification and result in glucose intolerance in adulthood. However, whether fetal exposure to BPA can induce epigenetic modification and phenotypic changes in their subsequent offspring are still unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether exposure to BPA in early life induced glucose intolerance in the offspring through male germ line, and the underlying epigenetic molecular basis. F0 pregnant SD rats were received corn oil or 40 μg/kg/day of BPA during gestation and lactation. F1 male rats were maintained to generate F2 offspring by mating with untreated female rats. Both the F1 rats after weaning and the F2 offspring were not received any other treatments. Our results showed that male F2 offspring in the BPA group exhibited glucose intolerance and β-cell dysfunction. Decreased expression of Igf2 and associated hypermethylation of Igf2 were observed in islets of male F2 offspring. In addition, similar effects were observed in female F2 animals, but the effects were more pronounced in males. Moreover, abnormal expression and methylation of Igf2 was observed in sperm of adult F1 male rats, indicating that epigenetic modification in germ cells can be partly progressed to the next generation. Overall, our study suggests that BPA exposure during early life can result in generational transmission of glucose intolerance and β-cell dysfunction in the offspring through male germ line, which is associated with hypermethylation of Igf2 in islets. The changes of epigenetics in germ cells may contribute to this generational transmission. PMID:26276081

  15. Genomic Imprinting in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Denise P.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals and results in a monoallelic, parental-specific expression pattern. Most of these genes are located in clusters that are regulated through the use of insulators or long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). To distinguish the parental alleles, imprinted genes are epigenetically marked in gametes at imprinting control elements through the use of DNA methylation at the very least. Imprinted gene expression is subsequently conferred through lncRNAs, histone modifications, insulators, and higher-order chromatin structure. Such imprints are maintained after fertilization through these mechanisms despite extensive reprogramming of the mammalian genome. Genomic imprinting is an excellent model for understanding mammalian epigenetic regulation. PMID:24492710

  16. Genomic Imprinting and the Expression of Affect in Angelman Syndrome: What's in the Smile?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; Horsler, Kate; Berg, Katy; Bellamy, Gail; Dick, Katie; Griffiths, Emily

    2007-01-01

    Background: Kinship theory (or the genomic conflict hypothesis) proposes that the phenotypic effects of genomic imprinting arise from conflict between paternally and maternally inherited alleles. A prediction arising for social behaviour from this theory is that imbalance in this conflict resulting from a deletion of a maternally imprinted gene,…

  17. Evidence for possible involvement of IGF type II receptors (IGF2R) in regulating growth of two concomitant dominant follicles in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regulation of multiple ovulations in monotocous species such as cattle is not well understood. Gene expression of the FSH receptor (FSHR) in granulosa (GC), and LH receptor (LHR) and IGF2R in GC and theca (TC) cells, as well as estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) levels in follicular fluid (FF) wer...

  18. Gene structure, DNA methylation, and imprinted expression of the human SNRPN gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Jong, T.C.; Filbrandt, M.M.

    1996-02-01

    The human SNRPN (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N) gene is one of a gene family that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing and maps to the smallest deletion region involved in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) within chromosome 15q11-q13. Paternal only expression of SNRPN has previously been demonstrated by use of cell lines from PWS patients (maternal allele only) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients (paternal allele only). We have characterized two previously unidentified 5{prime} exons of the SNRPN gene and demonstrate that exons -1 and 0 are included in the full-length transcript. This gene is expressed in a wide range of somatic tissues and at high, approximately equal levels in all regions of the brain. Both the first exon of SNRPN (exon -1) and the putative transcription start site are embedded within a CpG island. This CpG island is extensively methylated on the repressed maternal allele and is unmethylated on the expressed paternal allele, in a wide range of fetal and adult somatic cells. This provides a quick and highly reliable diagnostic assay for PWS and AS, which is based on DNA-methylation analysis that has been tested on >100 patients in a variety of tissues. Conversely, several CpG sites {approximately}22 kb downstream of the transcription start site in intron 5 are preferentially methylated on the expressed paternal allele in somatic tissues and male germ cells, whereas these same sites are unmethylated in fetal oocytes. These findings are consistent with a key role for DNA methylation in the imprinted inheritance and subsequent gene expression of the human SNRPN gene. 59 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Non-additive effects of RBP4, ESR1 and IGF2 polymorphisms on litter size at different parities in a Chinese-European porcine line

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this work was to study the effects on litter size of variants of the porcine genes RBP4, ESR1 and IGF2, currently used in genetic tests for different purposes. Moreover, we investigated a possible effect of the interaction between RBP4-MspI and ESR1-PvuII polymorphisms. The IGF2-intron3-G3072A polymorphism is actually used to select lean growth, but other possible effects of this polymorphism on reproductive traits need to be evaluated. Methods Detection of polymorphisms in the genomic and cDNA sequences of RBP4 gene was carried out. RBP4-MspI and IGF2-intron3-G3072A were genotyped in a hyperprolific Chinese-European line (Tai-Zumu) and three new RBP4 polymorphisms were genotyped in different pig breeds. A bivariate animal model was implemented in association analyses considering the number of piglets born alive at early (NBA12) and later parities (NBA3+ ) as different traits. A joint analysis of RBP4-MspI and ESR1-PvuII was performed to test their possible interaction. In the IGF2 analysis, paternal or maternal imprinting effects were also considered. Results Four different RBP4 haplotypes were detected (TGAC, GGAG, GAAG and GATG) in different pig breeds and wild boars. A significant interaction effect between RBP4-MspI and ESR1-PvuII polymorphisms of 0.61 ± 0.29 piglets was detected on NBA3+. The IGF2 analysis revealed a significant increase on NBA3+ of 0.74 ± 0.37 piglets for the paternally inherited allele A. Conclusions All the analyzed pig and wild boar populations shared one of the four detected RBP4 haplotypes. This suggests an ancestral origin of the quoted haplotype. The joint use of RBP4-MspI and ESR1-PvuII polymorphisms could be implemented to select for higher prolificacy in the Tai-Zumu line. In this population, the paternal allele IGF2-intron3-3072A increased litter size from the third parity. The non-additive effects on litter size reported here should be tested before implementation in other pig breeding schemes. PMID

  20. Autocrine Action of IGF2 Regulates Adult β-Cell Mass and Function.

    PubMed

    Modi, Honey; Jacovetti, Cecile; Tarussio, David; Metref, Salima; Madsen, Ole D; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Rantakari, Pia; Poutanen, Matti; Nef, Serge; Gorman, Tracy; Regazzi, Romano; Thorens, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), produced and secreted by adult β-cells, functions as an autocrine activator of the β-cell insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling pathway. Whether this autocrine activity of IGF2 plays a physiological role in β-cell and whole-body physiology is not known. Here, we studied mice with β-cell-specific inactivation of Igf2IGF2KO mice) and assessed β-cell mass and function in aging, pregnancy, and acute induction of insulin resistance. We showed that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was markedly reduced in old female βIGF2KO mice; glucose tolerance was, however, normal because of increased insulin sensitivity. While on a high-fat diet, both male and female βIGF2KO mice displayed lower GSIS compared with control mice, but reduced β-cell mass was observed only in female βIGF2KO mice. During pregnancy, there was no increase in β-cell proliferation and mass in βIGF2KO mice. Finally, β-cell mass expansion in response to acute induction of insulin resistance was lower in βIGF2KO mice than in control mice. Thus, the autocrine action of IGF2 regulates adult β-cell mass and function to preserve in vivo GSIS in aging and to adapt β-cell mass in response to metabolic stress, pregnancy hormones, and acute induction of insulin resistance. PMID:26384384

  1. Dynamic Expression of Imprinted Genes Associates with Maternally Controlled Nutrient Allocation during Maize Endosperm Development[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mingming; Yang, Ruolin; Li, Guosheng; Chen, Hao; Laurie, John; Ma, Chuang; Wang, Dongfang; Yao, Yingyin; Larkins, Brian A.; Sun, Qixin; Yadegari, Ramin; Wang, Xiangfeng; Ni, Zhongfu

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, the endosperm provides nutrients for embryogenesis and seed germination and is the primary tissue where gene imprinting occurs. To identify the imprintome of early developing maize (Zea mays) endosperm, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of whole kernels at 0, 3, and 5 d after pollination (DAP) and endosperms at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, using B73 by Mo17 reciprocal crosses. We observed gradually increased expression of paternal transcripts in 3- and 5-DAP kernels. In 7-DAP endosperm, the majority of the genes tested reached a 2:1 maternal versus paternal ratio, suggesting that paternal genes are nearly fully activated by 7 DAP. A total of 116, 234, and 63 genes exhibiting parent-specific expression were identified at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, respectively. The largest proportion of paternally expressed genes was at 7 DAP, mainly due to the significantly deviated parental allele expression ratio of these genes at this stage, while nearly 80% of the maternally expressed genes (MEGs) were specific to 10 DAP and were primarily attributed to sharply increased expression levels compared with the other stages. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of the imprinted genes suggested that 10-DAP endosperm-specific MEGs are involved in nutrient uptake and allocation and the auxin signaling pathway, coincident with the onset of starch and storage protein accumulation. PMID:24058158

  2. Doubly Reactive INS-IGF2 Autoantibodies in Children with Newly Diagnosed Autoimmune (type 1) Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kanatsuna, N; Delli, A; Andersson, C; Nilsson, A-L; Vaziri-Sani, F; Larsson, K; Carlsson, A; Cedervall, E; Jönsson, B; Neiderud, J; Elding Larsson, H; Ivarsson, S-A; Törn, C; Fex, M; Lernmark, Å

    2015-10-01

    The splice variant INS-IGF2 entails the preproinsulin signal peptide, the insulin B-chain, eight amino acids of the C-peptide and 138 unique amino acids from an ORF in the IGF2 gene. The aim of this study was to determine whether levels of specific INS-IGF2 autoantibodies (INS-IGF2A) were related to age at diagnosis, islet autoantibodies, HLA-DQ or both, in patients and controls with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. Patients (n = 676), 0-18 years of age, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1996-2005 and controls (n = 363) were analysed for specific INS-IGF2A after displacement with both cold insulin and INS-IGF2 to correct for non-specific binding and identify double reactive sera. GADA, IA-2A, IAA, ICA, ZnT8RA, ZnT8WA, ZnT8QA and HLA-DQ genotypes were also determined. The median level of specific INS-IGF2A was higher in patients than in controls (P < 0.001). Irrespective of age at diagnosis, 19% (126/676) of the patients had INS-IGF2A when the cut-off was the 95th percentile of the controls (P < 0.001). The risk of INS-IGF2A was increased among HLA-DQ2/8 (OR = 1.509; 95th CI 1.011, 2.252; P = 0.045) but not in 2/2, 2/X, 8/8, 8/X or X/X (X is neither 2 nor 8) patients. The association with HLA-DQ2/8 suggests that this autoantigen may be presented on HLA-DQ trans-heterodimers, rather than cis-heterodimers. Autoantibodies reactive with both insulin and INS-IGF2A at diagnosis support the notion that INS-IGF2 autoimmunity contributes to type 1 diabetes. PMID:26073034

  3. Fluid shear promotes chondrosarcoma cell invasion by activating matrix metalloproteinase 12 via IGF-2 and VEGF signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Chen, S-H; Hung, W-C; Paul, C; Zhu, F; Guan, P-P; Huso, D L; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, A; Konstantopoulos, K

    2015-08-27

    Interstitial fluid flow in and around the tumor tissue is a physiologically relevant mechanical signal that regulates intracellular signaling pathways throughout the tumor. Yet, the effects of interstitial flow and associated fluid shear stress on the tumor cell function have been largely overlooked. Using in vitro bioengineering models in conjunction with molecular cell biology tools, we found that fluid shear (2 dyn/cm(2)) markedly upregulates matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP-12) expression and its activity in human chondrosarcoma cells. MMP-12 expression is induced in human chondrocytes during malignant transformation. However, the signaling pathway regulating MMP-12 expression and its potential role in human chondrosarcoma cell invasion and metastasis have yet to be delineated. We discovered that fluid shear stress induces the synthesis of insulin growth factor-2 (IGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) B and D, which in turn transactivate MMP-12 via PI3-K, p38 and JNK signaling pathways. IGF-2-, VEGF-B- or VEGF-D-stimulated chondrosarcoma cells display markedly higher migratory and invasive potentials in vitro, which are blocked by inhibiting MMP-12, PI3-K, p38 or JNK activity. Moreover, recombinant human MMP-12 or MMP-12 overexpression can potentiate chondrosarcoma cell invasion in vitro and the lung colonization in vivo. By reconstructing and delineating the signaling pathway regulating MMP-12 activation, potential therapeutic strategies that interfere with chondrosarcoma cell invasion may be identified. PMID:25435370

  4. IGF-2R-mediated signaling results in hypertrophy of cultured cardiomyocytes from fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Brooks, Doug A; Botting, Kimberley J; Morrison, Janna L

    2012-06-01

    Activation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is known to play a role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. While IGF-2R is understood to be a clearance receptor for IGF-2, there is also evidence that it may play a role in the induction of pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. It is not known whether IGF-2R activates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy during growth of the fetal heart. Fetal sheep hearts (125 ± 0.4 days gestation) were dissected, and the cardiomyocytes isolated from the left and right ventricles for culturing. Cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with either LONG R(3)IGF-1, an IGF-1R agonist; picropodophyllin, an IGF-1R autophosphorylation inhibitor; U0126, an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK); Leu(27)IGF-2, an IGF-2R agonist; Gö6976, a protein kinase C inhibitor; KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII); or KN-92, an L-type calcium channel inhibitor and negative control for KN-93. The cross-sectional area of cultured cardiomyocytes was determined relative to control cardiomyocytes treated with serum-free culture medium. IGF-1R and IGF-2R activation each resulted in ERK signaling, but IGF-2R activation alone induced CaMKII signaling, resulting in hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes in the late gestation sheep fetus. These data suggest that changes in the intrauterine environment that result in increased cardiac IGF-2R may also lead to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in the fetus and potentially an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adult life. PMID:22441800

  5. MicroRNAs-491-5p suppresses cell proliferation and invasion by inhibiting IGF2BP1 in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Fangchao; Ren, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Jindong; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs-491-5p (miR-491-5p) has been found to involve in tumor initiation and development in several tumors. However, the biological function and underlying molecular mechanism of miR-491-5p in non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. This study was therefore to investigate biological role of and underlying molecular mechanisms of in NSCLC. It was found that miR-491-5p expression was significantly downregulated in NSCLC tissues when compared with corresponding adjacent normal tissues (P<0.01), and the value was negatively related to advanced and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and lymph node metastasis (both P<0.01). We also demonstrate that restoration of miR-491-5p suppressed NSCLC cell proliferation by arresting NSCLC cells in the G1/G0 phase and accelerating apoptosis. miR-491-5p also inhibited cell migration and invasion in NSCLC cells. Mechanically, IGF2BP1 was identified as direct targets of miR-491-5p. And IGF2BP1 expression was significantly upregulated, and correlated negative with miR-491-5p expression in NSCLC tissues. In vivo assay showed thatmiR-491-5p suppressed tumor growth in nude model by repressing IGF2BP1 expression. Collectively, miR-491-5p functioned as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC by targeting IGF2BP1. Restoration of miR-491-5p expression may represent a promising therapeutic approach for targeting malignant NSCLC. PMID:27158341

  6. H19 controls reactivation of the imprinted gene network during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Clémence; Monnier, Paul; Louault, Yann; Benard, Matthieu; Gabory, Anne; Dandolo, Luisa

    2016-03-15

    The H19 locus controls fetal growth by regulating expression of several genes from the imprinted gene network (IGN). H19 is fully repressed after birth, except in skeletal muscle. Using loss-of-function H19(Δ3) mice, we investigated the function of H19 in adult muscle. Mutant muscles display hypertrophy and hyperplasia, with increased Igf2 and decreased myostatin (Mstn) expression. Many imprinted genes are expressed in muscle stem cells or satellite cells. Unexpectedly, the number of satellite cells was reduced by 50% in H19(Δ3) muscle fibers. This reduction occurred after postnatal day 21, suggesting a link with their entry into quiescence. We investigated the biological function of these mutant satellite cells in vivo using a regeneration assay induced by multiple injections of cardiotoxin. Surprisingly, despite their reduced number, the self-renewal capacity of these cells is fully retained in the absence of H19. In addition, we observed a better regeneration potential of the mutant muscles, with enhanced expression of several IGN genes and genes from the IGF pathway. PMID:26980793

  7. G Allele of the IGF2 ApaI Polymorphism Is Associated With Judo Status.

    PubMed

    Itaka, Toshio; Agemizu, Kenichiro; Aruga, Seiji; Machida, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    Itaka, T, Agemizu, K, Aruga, S, and Machida, S. G allele of the IGF2 ApaI polymorphism is associated with judo status. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2043-2048, 2016-Previous studies have reported that the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) ApaI polymorphism is associated with body mass index, fat mass, and grip strength. Competitive judo requires high levels of strength and power. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the IGF2 ApaI and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and judo status. The subjects were 156 male judo athletes from a top-level university in Japan. They were divided into 3 groups based on their competitive history: international-level athletes, national-level athletes, and others. Genomic DNA was extracted from the saliva of each athlete, and the maximal isometric strength of the trunk muscles and handgrip strength were measured. Genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to detect IGF2 (rs680) and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) (rs1815739) gene polymorphisms. The genotype frequencies of the 2 gene polymorphisms were compared among the 3 groups of judo athletes and controls. International-level judo athletes showed a higher frequency of the GG + GA genotype of the IGF2 gene than that of the national-level athletes and others. There was an inverse linear correlation between the frequency of the IGF2 AA genotype and level of judo performance (p = 0.041). Back muscle strength relative to height and weight was higher in subjects with the GG + GA genotype than in those with the AA genotype. Conversely, the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism was not associated with judo status. Additionally, no differences were found in back muscle or handgrip strength among the ACTN3 genotypes. In conclusion, the results indicate that the IGF2 gene polymorphism may be associated with judo status. PMID:26677828

  8. Environmental Influences on Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kappil, Maya; Lambertini, Luca; Chen, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the epigenetic mechanism that results in the mono-allelic expression of a subset of genes in a parent-of-origin manner. These haploid genes are highly active in the placenta and are functionally implicated in the appropriate development of the fetus. Furthermore, the epigenetic marks regulating imprinted expression patterns are established early in development. These characteristics make genomic imprinting a potentially useful biomarker for environmental insults, especially during the in utero or early development stages, and for health outcomes later in life. Herein, we critically review the current literature regarding environmental influences on imprinted genes and summarize findings that suggest that imprinted loci are sensitive to known teratogenic agents, such as alcohol and tobacco, as well as less established factors with the potential to manipulate the in utero environment, including assisted reproductive technology. Finally, we discuss the potential of genomic imprinting to serve as an environmental sensor during early development. PMID:26029493

  9. Evolution and function of genomic imprinting in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jessica A.; Zilberman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, an inherently epigenetic phenomenon defined by parent of origin-dependent gene expression, is observed in mammals and flowering plants. Genome-scale surveys of imprinted expression and the underlying differential epigenetic marks have led to the discovery of hundreds of imprinted plant genes and confirmed DNA and histone methylation as key regulators of plant imprinting. However, the biological roles of the vast majority of imprinted plant genes are unknown, and the evolutionary forces shaping plant imprinting remain rather opaque. Here, we review the mechanisms of plant genomic imprinting and discuss theories of imprinting evolution and biological significance in light of recent findings. PMID:26680300

  10. Silver-Russell syndrome due to paternal H19/IGF2 hypomethylation in a twin girl born after in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Cocchi, Guido; Marsico, Concetta; Cosentino, Anita; Spadoni, Chiara; Rocca, Alessandro; De Crescenzo, Agostina; Riccio, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous syndrome characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, facial dysmorphism and body asymmetry. One of the main molecular mechanisms leading to the syndrome involves methylation abnormalities of chromosome 11p15. In the last decades, an increase of imprinting disorders have been reported in children born from assisted reproductive technology (ART); however there is currently little evidence linking SRS and ART. Only few infants with SRS born using ART, supported by molecular analysis, have been described. We report on a twin-girl conceived using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) diagnosed with SRS. Molecular studies revealed a hypomethylation of the paternal H19/IGF2 Imprinting Control Region. Her twin sister had a normal prenatal and postnatal growth and a normal methylation pattern of the chromosome 11p15. This is the second reported case of a twin infant with SRS conceived using ART with hypomethylation of H19/IGF2; it provides additional evidence of a possible relationship between ART procedures and methylation defects observed in SRS. Given the clinical heterogeneity of SRS, and the increased risk of multiple and preterm births in the ART-conceived children, it is possible that a number of cases of SRS remains undiagnosed in this population. Future studies should investigate the possible link between ART and SRS, in order to better understand the causes of epimutations in ART pregnancies, and to help clinicians to adequately counsel parents who approach to ART and to assess the opportunity of a long-term follow-up of children conceived using ART. PMID:24038823

  11. A search for imprinted quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for birth weight

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, A.; Llewellyn, B.; Schieken, R.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies have generally provided strong evidence that maternal effects are a much more important determinant of birth weight than the genes of the fetus. In the past, these findings have been interpreted as reflecting a genetically determined maternal constraint on fetal growth. However, the recognition that the expression of a gene can be influenced by its parental origin has provided an alternative explanation for apparent maternal effects. In the mouse, a growing number of imprinted genes have been identified which can profoundly influence birth weight or body size including IGF-1, IGF-2, and their respective receptor loci. To determine whether any of the loci are QTLs for body size in man, we have used parental typing data to classify dizygotic twins according to their identity by descent (IBD) for polymorphic markers at or near the candidate loci. The contrast between the correlations of DZ pairs sharing both alleles IBD and no alleles IBD can provide evidence for a candidate gene effect while the contrast between twins sharing one maternal or one paternal allele IBD can provide evidence for any effect of imprinting that may exist at the locus. Finally, the inclusion of data on MZ twins in an overall analysis permits the resolution of the imprinting and marker gene effects from other sources of genetic and environmental variation. We have applied this model to birth weight data on 181 pairs of twins who were classified according to their allele sharing at the IGF-1 locus. In keeping with other observations, the data show no evidence that the IGF-1 locus is imprinted in man. Although our results are consistent with the possibility that this locus may account for 15-20% of the genetic variation, the apparent effect is not statistically significant. Partitioned twin analysis appears to be a useful method for detecting the effects of specific candidate gene on continuously distributed traits.

  12. Comprehensive profiling of novel microRNA-9 targets and a tumor suppressor role of microRNA-9 via targeting IGF2BP1 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongfeng; Li, Xiaojun; Xie, Qing; Jia, Junqiao; Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhengyang; Gao, Jian; Yao, Mingjie; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-9 (miR-9) dysregulation is implicated in a variety of human malignancies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but its role remains contradictory. In this study, we explored the expression and methylation status of miR-9 in HCC samples, as well as the tumor-related functions of miR-9 in vitro. Bioinformatics analysis, array-based RNA expression profile, and literature retrieval were used to identify miR-9 targets in HCC. The potential downstream candidates were then validated by luciferase reporter assay, real-time quantitative PCR, and western blot or enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression status and clinicopathologic significances of miR-9 target genes in clinical samples were further explored. The results showed that miR-9 was frequently downregulated in primary HCC. Its silencing was largely contributed by a high frequency (42.5%) of mir-9-1 hypermethylation, which was correlated with bigger tumor size (P = 0.0234). In vitro functional studies revealed that miR-9 restoration retarded HCC cell proliferation and migration. IL-6, AP3B1, TC10, ONECUT2, IGF2BP1, MYO1D, and ANXA2 were confirmed to be miR-9 targets in HCC. Among them, ONECUT2, IGF2BP1, and ANXA2 were confirmed to be aberrantly upregulated in HCC. Moreover, upregulation of ONECUT2, IGF2BP1, and IL-6 were significantly associated with poor post-surgery prognosis (P = 0.0458, P = 0.0037 and P = 0.0461, respectively). Mechanically, miR-9 plays a tumor suppressive role partially through a functional miR-9/IGF2BP1/AKT&ERK axis. Our study suggests that miR-9 functions as a tumor suppressor in HCC progression by inhibiting a series of target genes, including the newly validated miR-9/IGF2BP1/AKT&ERK axis, thus providing potential therapeutic targets and novel prognostic biomarkers for HCC patients. PMID:26547929

  13. Oncogenic Fusion Gene CD74-NRG1 Confers Cancer Stem Cell-like Properties in Lung Cancer through a IGF2 Autocrine/Paracrine Circuit.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takahiko; Nakaoku, Takashi; Enari, Masato; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Tominaga, Kana; Nakata, Asuka; Tojo, Arinobu; Sugano, Sumio; Kohno, Takashi; Gotoh, Noriko

    2016-02-15

    The CD74-Neuregulin1 (NRG1) fusion gene was recently identified as novel driver of invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma, a malignant form of lung cancer. However, the function of the CD74-NRG1 fusion gene in adenocarcinoma pathogenesis and the mechanisms by which it may impart protumorigenic characteristics to cancer stem cells (CSC) is still unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of the CD74-NRG1 fusion gene increased the population of lung cancer cells with CSC-like properties. CD74-NRG1 expression facilitated sphere formation not only of cancer cells, but also of nonmalignant lung epithelial cells. Using a limiting dilution assay in a xenograft model, we further show that the CD74-NRG1 fusion gene enhanced tumor initiation. Mechanistically, we found that CD74-NRG1 expression promoted the phosphorylation of ErbB2/3 and activated the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, the expression of the secreted insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and phosphorylation of its receptor, IGF1R, were enhanced in an NF-κB-dependent manner in cells expressing CD74-NRG1. These findings suggest that CD74-NRG1-induced NF-κB activity promotes the IGF2 autocrine/paracrine circuit. Moreover, inhibition of ErbB2, PI3K, NF-κB, or IGF2 suppressed CD74-NRG1-induced tumor sphere formation. Therefore, our study provides a preclinical rationale for developing treatment approaches based on these identified pathways to suppress CSC properties that promote tumor progression and recurrence. PMID:26837769

  14. Active and Repressive Chromatin Are Interspersed without Spreading in an Imprinted Gene Cluster in the Mammalian Genome

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Sloane, Mathew A.; Huang, Ru; Pauler, Florian M.; Warczok, Katarzyna E.; Melikant, Balázs; Radolf, Martin; Martens, Joost H.A.; Schotta, Gunnar; Jenuwein, Thomas; Barlow, Denise P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Igf2r imprinted cluster is an epigenetic silencing model in which expression of a ncRNA silences multiple genes in cis. Here, we map a 250 kb region in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells to show that histone modifications associated with expressed and silent genes are mutually exclusive and localized to discrete regions. Expressed genes were modified at promoter regions by H3K4me3 + H3K4me2 + H3K9Ac and on putative regulatory elements flanking active promoters by H3K4me2 + H3K9Ac. Silent genes showed two types of nonoverlapping profile. One type spread over large domains of tissue-specific silent genes and contained H3K27me3 alone. A second type formed localized foci on silent imprinted gene promoters and a nonexpressed pseudogene and contained H3K9me3 + H4K20me3 ± HP1. Thus, mammalian chromosome arms contain active chromatin interspersed with repressive chromatin resembling the type of heterochromatin previously considered a feature of centromeres, telomeres, and the inactive X chromosome. PMID:17679087

  15. Sex- and Diet-Specific Changes of Imprinted Gene Expression and DNA Methylation in Mouse Placenta under a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Tost, Jörg; Karimi, Mohsen; Mayeur, Sylvain; Lesage, Jean; Boudadi, Elsa; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Taurelle, Julien; Vigé, Alexandre; Breton, Christophe; Reusens, Brigitte; Remacle, Claude; Vieau, Didier; Ekström, Tomas J.; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Junien, Claudine

    2010-01-01

    Background Changes in imprinted gene dosage in the placenta may compromise the prenatal control of nutritional resources. Indeed monoallelic behaviour and sensitivity to changes in regional epigenetic state render imprinted genes both vulnerable and adaptable. Methods and Findings We investigated whether a high-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy modified the expression of imprinted genes and local and global DNA methylation patterns in the placenta. Pregnant mice were fed a HFD or a control diet (CD) during the first 15 days of gestation. We compared gene expression patterns in total placenta homogenates, for male and female offspring, by the RT-qPCR analysis of 20 imprinted genes. Sexual dimorphism and sensitivity to diet were observed for nine genes from four clusters on chromosomes 6, 7, 12 and 17. As assessed by in situ hybridization, these changes were not due to variation in the proportions of the placental layers. Bisulphite-sequencing analysis of 30 CpGs within the differentially methylated region (DMR) of the chromosome 17 cluster revealed sex- and diet-specific differential methylation of individual CpGs in two conspicuous subregions. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that these differentially methylated CpGs might lie within recognition elements or binding sites for transcription factors or factors involved in chromatin remodelling. Placental global DNA methylation, as assessed by the LUMA technique, was also sexually dimorphic on the CD, with lower methylation levels in male than in female placentae. The HFD led to global DNA hypomethylation only in female placenta. Bisulphite pyrosequencing showed that neither B1 nor LINE repetitive elements could account for these differences in DNA methylation. Conclusions A HFD during gestation triggers sex-specific epigenetic alterations within CpG and throughout the genome, together with the deregulation of clusters of imprinted genes important in the control of many cellular, metabolic and physiological functions

  16. Genomic imprinting and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, J A; Schofield, P N

    1998-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is the phenomenon by which individual alleles of certain genes are expressed differentially according to their parent of origin. The alleles appear to be differentially marked during gametogenesis or during the early part of development. This mark is heritable but reversible from generation to generation, implying a stable epigenetic modification. Approximately 25 imprinted genes have been identified to date, and dysregulation of a number of these has been implicated in tumour development. The normal physiological role of many imprinted genes is in the control of cell proliferation and fetal growth, indicating potential mechanisms of action in tumour formation. Both dominant and recessive modes of action have been postulated for the role of imprinted genes in neoplasia, as a result of effective gene dosage alterations by epigenetic modification of the normal pattern of allele specific transcription. The aim of this review is to assess the importance of imprinted genes in generating tumours and to discuss the implications for novel mechanisms of transforming mutation. PMID:9893743

  17. Antagonist Xist and Tsix co-transcription during mouse oogenesis and maternal Xist expression during pre-implantation development calls into question the nature of the maternal imprint on the X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Deuve, Jane Lynda; Bonnet-Garnier, Amélie; Beaujean, Nathalie; Avner, Philip; Morey, Céline

    2015-01-01

    During the first divisions of the female mouse embryo, the paternal X-chromosome is coated by Xist non-coding RNA and gradually silenced. This imprinted X-inactivation principally results from the apposition, during oocyte growth, of an imprint on the X-inactivation master control region: the X-inactivation center (Xic). This maternal imprint of yet unknown nature is thought to prevent Xist upregulation from the maternal X (XM) during early female development. In order to provide further insight into the XM imprinting mechanism, we applied single-cell approaches to oocytes and pre-implantation embryos at different stages of development to analyze the expression of candidate genes within the Xic. We show that, unlike the situation pertaining in most other cellular contexts, in early-growing oocytes, Xist and Tsix sense and antisense transcription occur simultaneously from the same chromosome. Additionally, during early development, Xist appears to be transiently transcribed from the XM in some blastomeres of late 2-cell embryos concomitant with the general activation of the genome indicating that XM imprinting does not completely suppress maternal Xist transcription during embryo cleavage stages. These unexpected transcriptional regulations of the Xist locus call for a re-evaluation of the early functioning of the maternal imprint on the X-chromosome and suggest that Xist/Tsix antagonist transcriptional activities may participate in imprinting the maternal locus as described at other loci subject to parental imprinting. PMID:26267271

  18. A Novel Mutation in the Maternally Imprinted PEG3 Domain Results in a Loss of MIMT1 Expression and Causes Abortions and Stillbirths in Cattle (Bos taurus)

    PubMed Central

    Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Venhoranta, Heli; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; McKay, Stephanie D.; Flyckt, Antti; Taponen, Juhani; Schnabel, Robert; Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Szczerbal, Izabela; Lohi, Hannes; Fries, Ruedi; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Switonski, Marek; Andersson, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Congenital malformations resulting in late abortions and stillbirths affect the economic wellbeing of producers and the welfare of cattle in breeding programs. An extremely high incidence of stillbirths of “half-sized” calves of normal karyotype and uninflated lungs was diagnosed in the progeny of the Finnish Ayrshire (Bos taurus) bull - YN51. No other visible anatomical abnormalities were apparent in the stillborn calves. We herein describe the positional identification of a 110 kb microdeletion in the maternally imprinted PEG3 domain that results in a loss of paternal MIMT1 expression and causes late term abortion and stillbirth in cattle. Using the BovineSNP50 BeadChip we performed a genome-wide half-sib linkage analysis that identified a 13.3 Mb associated region on BTA18 containing the maternally imprinted PEG3 domain. Within this cluster we found a 110 kb microdeletion that removes a part of the non-protein coding MER1 repeat containing imprinted transcript 1 gene (MIMT1). To confirm the elimination of gene expression in calves inheriting this deletion, we examined the mRNA levels of the three maternally imprinted genes within the PEG3 domain, in brain and cotyledon tissue collected from eight fetuses sired by the proband. None of the fetuses that inherited the microdeletion expressed MIMT1 in either tissue. The mutation, when inherited from the sire, is semi-lethal for his progeny with an observed mortality rate of 85%. The survival of 15% is presumably due to the incomplete silencing of maternally inherited MIMT1 alleles. We designed a PCR-based assay to confirm the existence of the microdeletion in the MIMT1 region that can be used to assist cattle breeders in preventing the stillbirths. PMID:21152099

  19. Comprehensive analysis of imprinted genes in maize reveals allelic variation for imprinting and limited conservation with other species.

    PubMed

    Waters, Amanda J; Bilinski, Paul; Eichten, Steven R; Vaughn, Matthew W; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Gehring, Mary; Springer, Nathan M

    2013-11-26

    In plants, a subset of genes exhibit imprinting in endosperm tissue such that expression is primarily from the maternal or paternal allele. Imprinting may arise as a consequence of mechanisms for silencing of transposons during reproduction, and in some cases imprinted expression of particular genes may provide a selective advantage such that it is conserved across species. Separate mechanisms for the origin of imprinted expression patterns and maintenance of these patterns may result in substantial variation in the targets of imprinting in different species. Here we present deep sequencing of RNAs isolated from reciprocal crosses of four diverse maize genotypes, providing a comprehensive analysis that allows evaluation of imprinting at more than 95% of endosperm-expressed genes. We find that over 500 genes exhibit statistically significant parent-of-origin effects in maize endosperm tissue, but focused our analyses on a subset of these genes that had >90% expression from the maternal allele (69 genes) or from the paternal allele (108 genes) in at least one reciprocal cross. Over 10% of imprinted genes show evidence of allelic variation for imprinting. A comparison of imprinting in maize and rice reveals that 13% of genes with syntenic orthologs in both species exhibit conserved imprinting. Genes that exhibit conserved imprinting between maize and rice have elevated nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution ratios compared with other imprinted genes, suggesting a history of more rapid evolution. Together, these data suggest that imprinting only has functional relevance at a subset of loci that currently exhibit imprinting in maize. PMID:24218619

  20. mRNA levels of imprinted genes in bovine in vivo oocytes, embryos and cross species comparisons in humans, mice and pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-six confirmed imprinted genes in the bovine were quantified in in vivo produced oocytes and embryos. Eighteen were detectable and their transcriptional abundance were categorized into five patterns: largely decreased (MEST and PLAGL1); first decreased and then increased (CDKN1C and IGF2R); p...

  1. M6P/IGF2R loss of heterozygosity in head and neck cancer associated with poor patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Timothy A; Brizel, David M; Killian, J Keith; Oka, Yoshihiko; Jang, Hong-Seok; Fu, Xiaolong; Clough, Robert W; Vollmer, Robin T; Anscher, Mitchell S; Jirtle, Randy L

    2003-01-01

    Background The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (M6P/IGF2R) encodes for a multifunctional receptor involved in lysosomal enzyme trafficking, fetal organogenesis, cytotoxic T cell-induced apoptosis and tumor suppression. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the M6P/IGF2R tumor suppressor gene is mutated in human head and neck cancer, and if allelic loss is associated with poor patient prognosis. Methods M6P/IGF2R loss of heterozygosity in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was assessed with six different gene-specific nucleotide polymorphisms. The patients studied were enrolled in a phase 3 trial of twice daily radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy; median follow-up for surviving patients is 76 months. Results M6P/IGF2R was polymorphic in 64% (56/87) of patients, and 54% (30/56) of the tumors in these informative patients had loss of heterozygosity. M6P/IGF2R loss of heterozygosity was associated with a significantly reduced 5 year relapse-free survival (23% vs. 69%, p = 0.02), locoregional control (34% vs. 75%, p = 0.03) and cause specific survival (29% vs. 75%, p = 0.02) in the patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Concomitant chemotherapy resulted in a better outcome when compared to radiotherapy alone only in those patients whose tumors had M6P/IGF2R loss of heterozygosity. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that M6P/IGF2R loss of heterozygosity predicts for poor therapeutic outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Our findings also indicate that head and neck cancer patients with M6P/IGF2R allelic loss benefit most from concurrent chemotherapy. PMID:12589712

  2. IGF2BP2 Alternative Variants Associated with Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies Negative Diabetes in Malaysian Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Sameer D.; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Ismail, Ikram S.; Al-Hamodi, Zaid; Poh, Rozaida; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2012-01-01

    Background The association of Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2) common variants (rs4402960 and rs1470579) with type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been performed in different populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of alternative variants of IGF2BP2; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) negative diabetes in Malaysian Subjects. Methods/Principal Findings IGF2BP2; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 1107 GADA negative diabetic patients and 620 control subjects of Asian from Malaysia. The additive genetic model adjusted for age, race, gender and BMI showed that alternative variants; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 of IGF2BP2 associated with GADA negative diabetes (OR = 1.21; 1.36; 1.35, P = 0.03; 0.0004; 0.0002, respectively). In addition, the CCG haplotype and diplotype CCG-TCG increased the risk of diabetes (OR = 1.51, P = 0.01; OR = 2.36, P = 0.009, respectively). Conclusions/Significance IGF2BP2 alternative variants were associated with GADA negative diabetes. The IGF2BP2 haplotypes and diplotypes increased the risk of diabetes in Malaysian subject. PMID:23029108

  3. Birth Weight, Working Memory and Epigenetic Signatures in IGF2 and Related Genes: A MZ Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Alemany, Silvia; Fatjó-Vilas, Mar; Goldberg, Ximena; Leza, Juan Carlos; González-Pinto, Ana; Nenadic, Igor; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disruptions caused by obstetric complications play a role in the etiology of several phenotypes associated with neuropsychiatric diseases and cognitive dysfunctions. Importantly, it has been noticed that epigenetic processes occurring early in life may mediate these associations. Here, DNA methylation signatures at IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) and IGF2BP1-3 (IGF2-binding proteins 1-3) were examined in a sample consisting of 34 adult monozygotic (MZ) twins informative for obstetric complications and cognitive performance. Multivariate linear regression analysis of twin data was implemented to test for associations between methylation levels and both birth weight (BW) and adult working memory (WM) performance. Familial and unique environmental factors underlying these potential relationships were evaluated. A link was detected between DNA methylation levels of two CpG sites in the IGF2BP1 gene and both BW and adult WM performance. The BW-IGF2BP1 methylation association seemed due to non-shared environmental factors influencing BW, whereas the WM-IGF2BP1 methylation relationship seemed mediated by both genes and environment. Our data is in agreement with previous evidence indicating that DNA methylation status may be related to prenatal stress and later neurocognitive phenotypes. While former reports independently detected associations between DNA methylation and either BW or WM, current results suggest that these relationships are not confounded by each other. PMID:25171170

  4. Inter- and Intra-Individual Variation in Allele-Specific DNA Methylation and Gene Expression in Children Conceived using Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Nahid; Katari, Sunita; Gerson, Leigh F.; Chalian, Raffi; Foster, Michael W.; Gaughan, John P.; Coutifaris, Christos; Sapienza, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported a higher incidence of rare disorders involving imprinted genes among children conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART), suggesting that ART procedures may be disruptive to imprinted gene methylation patterns. We examined intra- and inter-individual variation in DNA methylation at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of the IGF2/H19 and IGF2R loci in a population of children conceived in vitro or in vivo. We found substantial variation in allele-specific methylation at both loci in both groups. Aberrant methylation of the maternal IGF2/H19 DMR was more common in the in vitro group, and the overall variance was also significantly greater in the in vitro group. We estimated the number of trophoblast stem cells in each group based on approximation of the variance of the binomial distribution of IGF2/H19 methylation ratios, as well as the distribution of X chromosome inactivation scores in placenta. Both of these independent measures indicated that placentas of the in vitro group were derived from fewer stem cells than the in vivo conceived group. Both IGF2 and H19 mRNAs were significantly lower in placenta from the in vitro group. Although average birth weight was lower in the in vitro group, we found no correlation between birth weight and IGF2 or IGF2R transcript levels or the ratio of IGF2/IGF2R transcript levels. Our results show that in vitro conception is associated with aberrant methylation patterns at the IGF2/H19 locus. However, very little of the inter- or intra-individual variation in H19 or IGF2 mRNA levels can be explained by differences in maternal DMR DNA methylation, in contrast to the expectations of current transcriptional imprinting models. Extraembryonic tissues of embryos cultured in vitro appear to be derived from fewer trophoblast stem cells. It is possible that this developmental difference has an effect on placental and fetal growth. PMID:20661447

  5. Imprinting in rice: the role of DNA and histone methylation in modulating parent-of-origin specific expression and determining transcript start sites.

    PubMed

    Du, Miru; Luo, Ming; Zhang, Ruofang; Finnegan, E Jean; Koltunow, Anna M G

    2014-07-01

    Over 200 imprinted genes in rice endosperm are known, but the mechanisms modulating their parental allele-specific expression are poorly understood. Here we use three imprinted genes, OsYUCCA11, yellow2-like and ubiquitin hydrolase, to show that differential DNA methylation and tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3 ) in the promoter and/or gene body influences allele-specific expression or the site of transcript initiation. Paternal expression of OsYUCCA11 required DNA methylation in the gene body whereas the gene body of the silenced maternal allele was hypomethylated and marked with H3K27me3 . These differential markings mirror those proposed to modulate paternal expression of two Arabidopsis genes, PHERES1 and a YUCCA homolog, indicating conservation of imprinting mechanisms. At yellow2-like, DNA hypomethylation in the upstream flanking region resulted in maternal transcripts that were longer than paternal transcripts; the maternal transcript initiation site was marked by DNA methylation in the paternal allele, and transcription initiated ~700 bp downstream. The paternal allele of an ubiquitin hydrolase gene exhibited gene body DNA methylation and produced full-length transcripts, while the maternal allele was hypomethylated in the 5' gene body and transcripts initiated from a downstream promoter. Inhibition of DNA methylation by 5-azacytidine or zebularine activated the long transcripts from yellow2-like and enhanced expression of the short transcripts from the ubiquitin hydrolase in seedlings, indicating that DNA methylation prevents transcript initiation from cryptic promoters. These observations suggest a paradigm whereby maternal genome hypomethylation is associated with the production of distinct transcripts, potentially diversifying the gene products from the two alleles. PMID:24819479

  6. Serum IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Katki, Hormuzd; Graubard, Barry; Pollak, Michael; Martin, Michael; Tao, Yuzhen; Schoen, Robert E; Church, Timothy; Hayes, Richard B; Greene, Mark H; Berndt, Sonja I

    2012-07-15

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Elevated serum IGF1 levels have been associated with increased colorectal cancer risk; however, studies of this association with colorectal adenoma are inconclusive. We examined serum IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 levels in relation to risk of advanced colorectal adenoma in a case-control study within the prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer screening trial. A total of 764 advanced, left-sided colorectal adenoma cases and 775 controls frequency-matched on gender and ethnicity, without evidence of a left-sided polyp on sigmoidoscopy were included in the current study. Serum levels of IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in serum samples collected at baseline. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations adjusting for age, race, sex, year of blood draw, body mass index, smoking and education. Higher IGF1 levels were associated with increased adenoma risk: ORs = 1.58 (95% CI = 1.16-2.16), 1.42 (95% CI = 1.04-1.93), and 1.80 (95% CI = 1.30-2.47) for the second, third and fourth quartiles, respectively (p(trend) = 0.002). Elevated IGF2 levels were also associated with increased adenoma risk (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.05-1.96 for the fourth vs. first quartile, p(trend) = 0.02), but the association was no longer significant after adjustment for IGF1 (p(trend) = 0.28). IGFBP3 levels were not associated with adenoma risk. Our analysis showed a significant positive association between circulating IGF1 levels and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma, suggesting that IGF1 is associated with the pivotal precursor to colorectal cancer. PMID:21932422

  7. Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome: Genomic imprinting revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, R.

    1994-08-15

    In the study of genetic diseases involving genomic imprinting, Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS) has become an important paradigm. Genetic heterogeneity is demonstrated in this condition by the variety of cytogenetic and molecular alterations of the 11p15.5 region. These involve several different patient subgroups with specific parent-of-origin findings. Several lines of evidence suggest that more than one locus underlies the WBS phenotype. This was based on the assumption that the WBS phenotype is caused by a loss-of-function mutation. Although this might be true, an alternative and more parsimonious explanation can account for the autosomal dominant pedigrees using only one locus, e.g., IGF2. 15 refs.

  8. Imprinted control of gene activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Golic, K G; Golic, M M; Pimpinelli, S

    1998-11-19

    Genetic imprinting is defined as a reversible, differential marking of genes or chromosomes that is determined by the sex of the parent from whom the genetic material is inherited [1]. Imprinting was first observed in insects where, in some species, most notably among the coccoids (scale insects and allies), the differential marking of paternally and maternally transmitted chromosome sets leads to inactivation or elimination of paternal chromosomes [2]. Imprinting is also widespread in plants and mammals [3,4], in which paternally and maternally inherited alleles may be differentially expressed. Despite imprinting having been discovered in insects, clear examples of parental imprinting are scarce in the model insect species Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a case of imprint-mediated control of gene expression in Drosophila. The imprinted gene - the white+ eye-color gene - is expressed at a low level when transmitted by males, and at a high level when transmitted by females. Thus, in common with coccoids, Drosophila is capable of generating an imprint, and can respond to that imprint by silencing the paternal allele. PMID:9822579

  9. Genomic imprinting: mechanism and role in human pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, B.

    1994-01-01

    Most genes are expressed from two alleles, one maternal and the other paternal. The term "genomic imprinting" refers to a genetic phenomenon which produces some interesting exceptions to this rule. Genes which are subject to imprinting are molecularly marked before fertilization such that they are transcriptionally silenced at one of the parental alleles in the offspring. A growing body of evidence implicates genomic imprinting in the pathogenesis of certain human genetic diseases, inherited tumor syndromes, and sporadic tumors. This review discusses examples of imprinting, theories as to why the phenomenon exists, possible molecular mechanisms of imprinting, and our current understanding of the role of imprinting in human pathology. PMID:8129028

  10. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Genomic Imprinting: Common Themes in the Regulation of Imprinted Regions in Mammals, Plants, and Insects

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a form of epigenetic inheritance whereby the regulation of a gene or chromosomal region is dependent on the sex of the transmitting parent. During gametogenesis, imprinted regions of DNA are differentially marked in accordance to the sex of the parent, resulting in parent-specific expression. While mice are the primary research model used to study genomic imprinting, imprinted regions have been described in a broad variety of organisms, including other mammals, plants, and insects. Each of these organisms employs multiple, interrelated, epigenetic mechanisms to maintain parent-specific expression. While imprinted genes and imprint control regions are often species and locus-specific, the same suites of epigenetic mechanisms are often used to achieve imprinted expression. This review examines some examples of the epigenetic mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting in mammals, plants, and insects. PMID:22567394

  11. Genomic imprinting as a probable explanation for variable intrafamilial phenotypic expression of an unusual chromosome 3 abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Fryburg, J.S.; Shashi, V.; Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    We present a 4 generation family in which an abnormal chromosome 3 with dup(3)(q25) segregated from great-grandmother to grandmother to son without phenotypic effect. The son`s 2 daughters have dysmorphic features, mild developmental delays and congenital heart disease. Both girls have the abnormal chr. 3 but are the only family members with the abnormality to have phenotypic effects. An unaffected son of the father has normal chromosomes. FISH with whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, and 22 excluded these as the origin of the extra material. Chromosome 3-specific paint revealed a uniform pattern, suggesting that the extra material is from chromosome 3. Comparative genomic hybridization and DNA studies are pending. Possible explanations for the discordance in phenotypes between the 4th generation offspring and the first 3 generations include: an undetected rearrangement in the previous generations that is unbalanced in the two affected individuals; the chromosome abnormality may be a benign variant and unrelated to the phenotype; or, most likely, genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is suggested by the observation that a phenotypic effect was only seen after the chromosome was inherited from the father. The mothers in the first two generations appear to have passed the abnormal chr. 3 on without effect. This is an opportunity to delineate a region of the human genome affected by paternal imprinting.

  12. Post-natal imprinting: evidence from marsupials.

    PubMed

    Stringer, J M; Pask, A J; Shaw, G; Renfree, M B

    2014-08-01

    Genomic imprinting has been identified in therian (eutherian and marsupial) mammals but not in prototherian (monotreme) mammals. Imprinting has an important role in optimising pre-natal nutrition and growth, and most imprinted genes are expressed and imprinted in the placenta and developing fetus. In marsupials, however, the placental attachment is short-lived, and most growth and development occurs post-natally, supported by a changing milk composition tailor-made for each stage of development. Therefore there is a much greater demand on marsupial females during post-natal lactation than during pre-natal placentation, so there may be greater selection for genomic imprinting in the mammary gland than in the short-lived placenta. Recent studies in the tammar wallaby confirm the presence of genomic imprinting in nutrient-regulatory genes in the adult mammary gland. This suggests that imprinting may influence infant post-natal growth via the mammary gland as it does pre-natally via the placenta. Similarly, an increasing number of imprinted genes have been implicated in regulating feeding and nurturing behaviour in both the adult and the developing neonate/offspring in mice. Together these studies provide evidence that genomic imprinting is critical for regulating growth and subsequently the survival of offspring not only pre-natally but also post-natally. PMID:24595366

  13. The role of imprinted genes in humans.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Miho; Moore, Gudrun E

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, a process of epigenetic modification which allows the gene to be expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner, has an essential role in normal growth and development. Imprinting is found predominantly in placental mammals, and has potentially evolved as a mechanism to balance parental resource allocation to the offspring. Therefore, genetic and epigenetic disruptions which alter the specific dosage of imprinted genes can lead to various developmental abnormalities often associated with fetal growth and neurological behaviour. Over the past 20 years since the first imprinted gene was discovered, many different mechanisms have been implicated in this special regulatory mode of gene expression. This review includes a brief summary of the current understanding of the key molecular events taking place during imprint establishment and maintenance in early embryos, and their relationship to epigenetic disruptions seen in imprinting disorders. Genetic and epigenetic causes of eight recognised imprinting disorders including Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), and also their association with Assisted reproductive technology (ART) will be discussed. Finally, the role of imprinted genes in fetal growth will be explored by investigating their relationship to a common growth disorder, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and also their potential role in regulating normal growth variation. PMID:22771538

  14. Possible role of IGF2 receptors in regulating selection of 2 dominant follicles in cattle selected for twin ovulations and births

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundance of IGF-2 receptor (IGF2R), FSH receptor (FSHR), and LH receptor (LHCGR) mRNA in granulosa cells (GCs) or theca cells (TCs) or both cells as well as estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione concentrations in follicular fluid were compared in cows genetically selected (Twinner)...

  15. PGC Reversion to Pluripotency Involves Erasure of DNA Methylation from Imprinting Control Centers followed by Locus-Specific Re-methylation.

    PubMed

    Oliveros-Etter, Marisabel; Li, Ziwei; Nee, Kevin; Hosohama, Linzi; Hargan-Calvopina, Joseph; Lee, Serena A; Joti, Prakash; Yu, Juehua; Clark, Amander T

    2015-09-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are fate restricted to differentiate into gametes in vivo. However, when removed from their embryonic niche, PGCs undergo reversion to pluripotent embryonic germ cells (EGCs) in vitro. One of the major differences between EGCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is variable methylation at imprinting control centers (ICCs), a phenomenon that is poorly understood. Here we show that reverting PGCs to EGCs involved stable ICC methylation erasure at Snrpn, Igf2r, and Kcnqot1. In contrast, the H19/Igf2 ICC undergoes erasure followed by de novo re-methylation. PGCs differentiated in vitro from ESCs completed Snrpn ICC erasure. However, the hypomethylated state is highly unstable. We also discovered that when the H19/Igf2 ICC was abnormally hypermethylated in ESCs, this is not erased in PGCs differentiated from ESCs. Therefore, launching PGC differentiation from ESC lines with appropriately methylated ICCs is critical to the generation of germline cells that recapitulate endogenous ICC erasure. PMID:26278040

  16. The H19 Imprinting Control Region Mediates Preimplantation Imprinted Methylation of Nearby Sequences in Yeast Artificial Chromosome Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Eiichi; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Sakaguchi, Ryuuta; Takahashi, Takuya; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse Igf2/H19 imprinted locus, differential methylation of the imprinting control region (H19 ICR) is established during spermatogenesis and is maintained in offspring throughout development. Previously, however, we observed that the paternal H19 ICR, when analyzed in yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice (YAC-TgM), was preferentially methylated only after fertilization. To identify the DNA sequences that confer methylation imprinting, we divided the H19 ICR into two fragments (1.7 and 1.2 kb), ligated them to both ends of a λ DNA fragment into which CTCF binding sites had been inserted, and analyzed this in YAC-TgM. The maternally inherited λ sequence, normally methylated after implantation in the absence of H19 ICR sequences, became hypomethylated, demonstrating protective activity against methylation within the ICR. Meanwhile, the paternally inherited λ sequence was hypermethylated before implantation only when a 1.7-kb fragment was ligated. Consistently, when two subfragments of the H19 ICR were individually investigated for their activities in YAC-TgM, only the 1.7-kb fragment was capable of introducing paternal allele-specific DNA methylation. These results show that postfertilization methylation imprinting is conferred by a paternal allele-specific methylation activity present in a 1.7-kb DNA fragment of the H19 ICR, while maternal allele-specific activities protect the allele from de novo DNA methylation. PMID:23230275

  17. Association of in vitro fertilization with global and IGF2/H19 methylation variation in newborn twins.

    PubMed

    Loke, Y J; Galati, J C; Saffery, R; Craig, J M

    2015-04-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) and its subset intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), are widely used medical treatments for conception. There has been controversy over whether IVF is associated with adverse short- and long-term health outcomes of offspring. As with other prenatal factors, epigenetic change is thought to be a molecular mediator of any in utero programming effects. Most studies focused on DNA methylation at gene-specific and genomic level, with only a few on associations between DNA methylation and IVF. Using buccal epithelium from 208 twin pairs from the Peri/Postnatal Epigenetic Twin Study (PETS), we investigated associations between IVF and DNA methylation on a global level, using the proxies of Alu and LINE-1 interspersed repeats in addition to two locus-specific regulatory regions within IGF2/H19, controlling for 13 potentially confounding factors. Using multiple correction testing, we found strong evidence that IVF-conceived twins have lower DNA methylation in Alu, and weak evidence of lower methylation in one of the two IGF2/H19 regulatory regions and LINE-1, compared with naturally conceived twins. Weak evidence of a relationship between ICSI and DNA methylation within IGF2/H19 regulatory region was found, suggesting that one or more of the processes associated with IVF/ICSI may contribute to these methylation differences. Lower within- and between-pair DNA methylation variation was also found in IVF-conceived twins for LINE-1, Alu and one IGF2/H19 regulatory region. Although larger sample sizes are needed, our results provide additional insight to the possible influence of IVF and ICSI on DNA methylation. To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date investigating the association of IVF and DNA methylation. PMID:25857739

  18. Lead Exposure during Early Human Development and DNA Methylation of Imprinted Gene Regulatory Elements in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Xie, Changchun; Murphy, Susan K.; Skaar, David; Nye, Monica; Vidal, Adriana C.; Cecil, Kim M.; Dietrich, Kim N.; Puga, Alvaro; Jirtle, Randy L.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lead exposure during early development causes neurodevelopmental disorders by unknown mechanisms. Epidemiologic studies have focused recently on determining associations between lead exposure and global DNA methylation; however, such approaches preclude the identification of loci that may alter human disease risk. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal, postnatal, and early childhood lead exposure can alter the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that control the monoallelic expression of imprinted genes involved in metabolism, growth, and development. Methods: Questionnaire data and serial blood lead levels were obtained from 105 participants (64 females, 41 males) of the Cincinnati Lead Study from birth to 78 months. When participants were adults, we used Sequenom EpiTYPER assays to test peripheral blood DNA to quantify CpG methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes at DMRs of 22 human imprinted genes. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear regression. Results: Mean blood lead concentration from birth to 78 months was associated with a significant decrease in PEG3 DMR methylation (β = –0.0014; 95% CI: –0.0023, –0.0005, p = 0.002), stronger in males (β = –0.0024; 95% CI: –0.0038, –0.0009, p = 0.003) than in females (β = –0.0009; 95% CI: –0.0020, 0.0003, p = 0.1). Elevated mean childhood blood lead concentration was also associated with a significant decrease in IGF2/H19 (β = –0.0013; 95% CI: –0.0023, –0.0003, p = 0.01) DMR methylation, but primarily in females, (β = –0.0017; 95% CI: –0.0029, –0.0006, p = 0.005) rather than in males, (β = –0.0004; 95% CI: –0.0023, 0.0015, p = 0.7). Elevated blood lead concentration during the neonatal period was associated with higher PLAGL1/HYMAI DMR methylation regardless of sex (β = 0.0075; 95% CI: 0.0018, 0.0132, p = 0.01). The magnitude of associations between cumulative lead exposure and CpG methylation remained unaltered from

  19. A comparative study on expression profile of developmentally important genes during pre-implantation stages in buffalo hand-made cloned embryos derived from adult fibroblasts and amniotic fluid derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Em, Sadeesh; Shah, Fozia; Kataria, Meena; Yadav, P S

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal gene expression in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos due to aberrant epigenetic modifications of the donor nucleus may account for much of the observed diminished viability and developmental abnormalities. The present study compared the developmentally important gene expression pattern at 4-cell, 8- to 16-cell, morula, and blastocyst stages of buffalo nuclear transfer (NT) embryos from adult fibroblasts (AFs) and amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs). In vitro fertilized embryos were used as control embryos. Alterations in the expression pattern of genes implicated in transcription and pluripotency (OCT4, STAT3, NANOG), DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3A), histone deacetylation (HDAC2), growth factor signaling, and imprinting (IGF2, IGF2R), apoptosis (BAX, BCL2), oxidative stress (MnSOD), metabolism (GLUT1) regulation were observed in cloned embryos. The expression of transcripts in AFSC-NT embryos more closely followed that of the in vitro fertilized embryos compared with AF-NT embryos. It is concluded that AFSCs with a relatively undifferentiated genome may serve as suitable donors which could be reprogrammed more efficiently to reactivate expression of early embryonic genes in buffalo NT. PMID:26224482

  20. Alteration of imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 miRNA cluster expression in the entorhinal cortex induced by maternal immune activation and adolescent cannabinoid exposure.

    PubMed

    Hollins, S L; Zavitsanou, K; Walker, F R; Cairns, M J

    2014-01-01

    A significant feature of the cortical neuropathology of schizophrenia is a disturbance in the biogenesis of short non-coding microRNA (miRNA) that regulate translation and stability of mRNA. While the biological origin of this phenomenon has not been defined, it is plausible that it relates to major environmental risk factors associated with the disorder such as exposure to maternal immune activation (MIA) and adolescent cannabis use. To explore this hypothesis, we administered the viral mimic poly I:C to pregnant rats and further exposed some of their maturing offsprings to daily injections of the synthetic cannabinoid HU210 for 14 days starting on postnatal day 35. Whole-genome miRNA expression analysis was then performed on the left and right hemispheres of the entorhinal cortex (EC), a region strongly associated with schizophrenia. Animals exposed to either treatment alone or in combination exhibited significant differences in the expression of miRNA in the left hemisphere, whereas the right hemisphere was less responsive. Hemisphere-associated differences in miRNA expression were greatest in the combined treatment and highly over-represented in a single imprinted locus on chromosome 6q32. This observation was significant as the syntenic 14q32 locus in humans encodes a large proportion of miRNAs differentially expressed in peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that interaction of early and late environmental insults may affect miRNA expression, in a manner that is relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:25268256

  1. Alteration of imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 miRNA cluster expression in the entorhinal cortex induced by maternal immune activation and adolescent cannabinoid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hollins, S L; Zavitsanou, K; Walker, F R; Cairns, M J

    2014-01-01

    A significant feature of the cortical neuropathology of schizophrenia is a disturbance in the biogenesis of short non-coding microRNA (miRNA) that regulate translation and stability of mRNA. While the biological origin of this phenomenon has not been defined, it is plausible that it relates to major environmental risk factors associated with the disorder such as exposure to maternal immune activation (MIA) and adolescent cannabis use. To explore this hypothesis, we administered the viral mimic poly I:C to pregnant rats and further exposed some of their maturing offsprings to daily injections of the synthetic cannabinoid HU210 for 14 days starting on postnatal day 35. Whole-genome miRNA expression analysis was then performed on the left and right hemispheres of the entorhinal cortex (EC), a region strongly associated with schizophrenia. Animals exposed to either treatment alone or in combination exhibited significant differences in the expression of miRNA in the left hemisphere, whereas the right hemisphere was less responsive. Hemisphere-associated differences in miRNA expression were greatest in the combined treatment and highly over-represented in a single imprinted locus on chromosome 6q32. This observation was significant as the syntenic 14q32 locus in humans encodes a large proportion of miRNAs differentially expressed in peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that interaction of early and late environmental insults may affect miRNA expression, in a manner that is relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:25268256

  2. Partial Loss of Genomic Imprinting Reveals Important Roles for Kcnq1 and Peg10 Imprinted Domains in Placental Development

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, Erik; Himes, Katherine P.; Chaillet, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in imprinted genes or their imprint control regions (ICRs) produce changes in imprinted gene expression and distinct abnormalities in placental structure, indicating the importance of genomic imprinting to placental development. We have recently shown that a very broad spectrum of placental abnormalities associated with altered imprinted gene expression occurs in the absence of the oocyte–derived DNMT1o cytosine methyltransferase, which normally maintains parent-specific imprinted methylation during preimplantation. The absence of DNMT1o partially reduces inherited imprinted methylation while retaining the genetic integrity of imprinted genes and their ICRs. Using this novel system, we undertook a broad and inclusive approach to identifying key ICRs involved in placental development by correlating loss of imprinted DNA methylation with abnormal placental phenotypes in a mid-gestation window (E12.5-E15.5). To these ends we measured DNA CpG methylation at 15 imprinted gametic differentially methylated domains (gDMDs) that overlap known ICRs using EpiTYPER-mass array technology, and linked these epigenetic measurements to histomorphological defects. Methylation of some imprinted gDMDs, most notably Dlk1, was nearly normal in mid-gestation DNMT1o-deficient placentas, consistent with the notion that cells having lost methylation on these DMDs do not contribute significantly to placental development. Most imprinted gDMDs however showed a wide range of methylation loss among DNMT1o-deficient placentas. Two striking associations were observed. First, loss of DNA methylation at the Peg10 imprinted gDMD associated with decreased embryonic viability and decreased labyrinthine volume. Second, loss of methylation at the Kcnq1 imprinted gDMD was strongly associated with trophoblast giant cell (TGC) expansion. We conclude that the Peg10 and Kcnq1 ICRs are key regulators of mid-gestation placental function. PMID:26241757

  3. GRB10 imprinting is eutherian mammal specific.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jessica M; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-12-01

    GRB10 is an imprinted gene differently expressed from two promoters in mouse and human. Mouse Grb10 is maternally expressed from the major promoter in most tissues and paternally expressed from the brain-specific promoter within specific regions of the fetal and adult central nervous system. Human GRB10 is biallelically expressed from the major promoter in most tissues except in the placental villus trophoblast where it is maternally expressed, whereas the brain-specific promoter is paternally expressed in the fetal brain. This study characterized the ortholog of GRB10 in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) to investigate the origin and evolution of imprinting at this locus. The protein coding exons and predicted amino acid sequence of tammar GRB10 were highly conserved with eutherian GRB10. The putative first exon, which is located in the orthologous region to the eutherian major promoter, was found in the tammar, but no exon was found in the downstream region corresponding to the eutherian brain-specific promoter, suggesting that marsupials only have a single promoter. Tammar GRB10 was widely expressed in various tissues including the brain but was not imprinted in any of the tissues examined. Thus, it is likely that GRB10 imprinting evolved in eutherians after the eutherian-marsupial divergence approximately 160 million years ago, subsequent to the acquisition of a brain-specific promoter, which resides within the imprinting control region in eutherians. PMID:22787282

  4. Genomic imprinting effects on complex traits in domesticated animal species

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, Alan M.; MacHugh, David E.; Spillane, Charles; Magee, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoallelically expressed genes that exert their phenotypic effect in a parent-of-origin specific manner are considered to be subject to genomic imprinting, the most well understood form of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in mammals. The observed differences in allele specific gene expression for imprinted genes are not attributable to differences in DNA sequence information, but to specific chemical modifications of DNA and chromatin proteins. Since the discovery of genomic imprinting some three decades ago, over 100 imprinted mammalian genes have been identified and considerable advances have been made in uncovering the molecular mechanisms regulating imprinted gene expression. While most genomic imprinting studies have focused on mouse models and human biomedical disorders, recent work has highlighted the contributions of imprinted genes to complex trait variation in domestic livestock species. Consequently, greater understanding of genomic imprinting and its effect on agriculturally important traits is predicted to have major implications for the future of animal breeding and husbandry. In this review, we discuss genomic imprinting in mammals with particular emphasis on domestic livestock species and consider how this information can be used in animal breeding research and genetic improvement programs. PMID:25964798

  5. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoon Hee

    2010-03-10

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferous tubule of W/W{sup v} mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.

  6. Expression and DNA methylation analysis of SNRPN in Prader-Willi patients

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Jong, M.T.C.; Driscoll, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    The human SNRPN gene is one of a gene family that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing and maps to the Prader-Willi syndrome critical region in 15q11-q13. We have previously demonstrated functional imprinting of SNRPN, with absent expression in PWS skin fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. We now show a similar lack of expression in blood of PWS patients, which appear to correlate with DNA methylation of NotI sites in the 5{prime} region of the gene. RNA and DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) deletion patients to be used for RT-PCR with SNRPN gene-specific primers and DNA methylation analysis. Either no or highly reduced levels of SNRPN RT-PCR product were detected in nine PWS samples but was present in normals, AS patients, and one clinically typical PWS patient. Parent-of-origin DNA methylation imprints are also present within the SNRPN gene. PWS patients having only a maternal contribution of SNRPN have several NotI restriction sites near the transcription start site which are methylated, while these same sites are unmethylated on the paternal chromosome (i.e., AS samples). Several CpG sites approximately 22 kb downstream of the transcription start site are methylated preferentially on the paternal allele. These observations for human SNRPN are similar to those of the mouse imprinted gene Igf2r, which exhibits DNA methylation of a CpG island 27 kb from the transcription start site on the expressed allele, and DNA methylation in the promoter region of the repressed allele. We suggest that RT-PCR and/or DNA methylation analysis from blood of PWS patients may be the most accurate means of diagnosing classical PWS. These results further indicate a role for SNRPN in the pathogenesis of PWS, and may serve as a model to study other human imprinted genes.

  7. Genome-wide prediction of imprinted murine genes

    PubMed Central

    Luedi, Philippe P.; Hartemink, Alexander J.; Jirtle, Randy L.

    2005-01-01

    Imprinted genes are epigenetically modified genes whose expression is determined according to their parent of origin. They are involved in embryonic development, and imprinting dysregulation is linked to cancer, obesity, diabetes, and behavioral disorders such as autism and bipolar disease. Herein, we train a statistical model based on DNA sequence characteristics that not only identifies potentially imprinted genes, but also predicts the parental allele from which they are expressed. Of 23,788 annotated autosomal mouse genes, our model identifies 600 (2.5%) to be potentially imprinted, 64% of which are predicted to exhibit maternal expression. These predictions allowed for the identification of putative candidate genes for complex conditions where parent-of-origin effects are involved, including Alzheimer disease, autism, bipolar disorder, diabetes, male sexual orientation, obesity, and schizophrenia. We observe that the number, type, and relative orientation of repeated elements flanking a gene are particularly important in predicting whether a gene is imprinted. PMID:15930497

  8. Natural epigenetic polymorphisms lead to intraspecific variation in Arabidopsis gene imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Pignatta, Daniela; Erdmann, Robert M; Scheer, Elias; Picard, Colette L; Bell, George W; Gehring, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted gene expression occurs during seed development in plants and is associated with differential DNA methylation of parental alleles, particularly at proximal transposable elements (TEs). Imprinting variability could contribute to observed parent-of-origin effects on seed development. We investigated intraspecific variation in imprinting, coupled with analysis of DNA methylation and small RNAs, among three Arabidopsis strains with diverse seed phenotypes. The majority of imprinted genes were parentally biased in the same manner among all strains. However, we identified several examples of allele-specific imprinting correlated with intraspecific epigenetic variation at a TE. We successfully predicted imprinting in additional strains based on methylation variability. We conclude that there is standing variation in imprinting even in recently diverged genotypes due to intraspecific epiallelic variation. Our data demonstrate that epiallelic variation and genomic imprinting intersect to produce novel gene expression patterns in seeds. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03198.001 PMID:24994762

  9. Characterization of Conserved and Nonconserved Imprinted Genes in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic imprinting results in the silencing of a subset of mammalian alleles due to parent-of-origin inheritance. Due to the nature of their expression patterns they play a critical role in placental and early embryonic development. In order to increase our understanding of imprinted genes specifi...

  10. Allele-specific deposition of macroH2A1 in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, J H; Kim, J D; Chung, J H; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-01-13

    In the current study, we analyzed the deposition patterns of macroH2A1 at a number of different genomic loci located in X chromosome and autosomes. MacroH2A1 is preferentially deposited at methylated CpG CpG-rich regions located close to promoters. The macroH2A1 deposition patterns at the methylated CpG islands of several imprinted domains, including the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) of Xist, Peg3, H19/Igf2 Igf2, Gtl2/Dlk1, and Gnas domains, show consistent allele-specificity towards inactive, methylated alleles. The macroH2A1 deposition levels at the ICRs and other Differentially Methylated Regions (DMRs) of these domains are also either higher or comparable to those observed at the inactive X chromosome of female mammals. Overall, our results indicate that besides DNA methylation macroH2A1 is another epigenetic component in the chromatin of ICRs displaying differential association with two parental alleles.

  11. Regulatory links between imprinted genes: evolutionary predictions and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Manus M.; Cowley, Michael; Oakey, Rebecca J.; Feil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is essential for development and growth and plays diverse roles in physiology and behaviour. Imprinted genes have traditionally been studied in isolation or in clusters with respect to cis-acting modes of gene regulation, both from a mechanistic and evolutionary point of view. Recent studies in mammals, however, reveal that imprinted genes are often co-regulated and are part of a gene network involved in the control of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, a subset of imprinted genes acts in trans on the expression of other imprinted genes. Numerous studies have modulated levels of imprinted gene expression to explore phenotypic and gene regulatory consequences. Increasingly, the applied genome-wide approaches highlight how perturbation of one imprinted gene may affect other maternally or paternally expressed genes. Here, we discuss these novel findings and consider evolutionary theories that offer a rationale for such intricate interactions among imprinted genes. An evolutionary view of these trans-regulatory effects provides a novel interpretation of the logic of gene networks within species and has implications for the origin of reproductive isolation between species. PMID:26842569

  12. Genomic imprinting and position-effect variegation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, V K; Sinclair, D A; Grigliatti, T A

    1999-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a phenomenon in which the expression of a gene or chromosomal region depends on the sex of the individual transmitting it. The term imprinting was first coined to describe parent-specific chromosome behavior in the dipteran insect Sciara and has since been described in many organisms, including other insects, plants, fish, and mammals. In this article we describe a mini-X chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster that shows genomic imprinting of at least three closely linked genes. The imprinting of these genes is observed as mosaic silencing when the genes are transmitted by the male parent, in contrast to essentially wild-type expression when the same genes are maternally transmitted. We show that the imprint is due to the sex of the parent rather than to a conventional maternal effect, differential mitotic instability of the mini-X chromosome, or an allele-specific effect. Finally, we have examined the effects of classical modifiers of position-effect variegation on the maintenance and the establishment of the imprint. Factors that modify position-effect variegation alter the somatic expression but not the establishment of the imprint. This suggests that chromatin structure is important in maintenance of the imprint, but a separate mechanism may be responsible for its initiation. PMID:10101173

  13. Genomic Imprinting and Epigenetic Control of Development

    PubMed Central

    Fedoriw, Andrew; Mugford, Joshua; Magnuson, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are extensively utilized during mammalian development. Specific patterns of gene expression are established during cell fate decisions, maintained as differentiation progresses, and often augmented as more specialized cell types are required. Much of what is known about these mechanisms comes from the study of two distinct epigenetic phenomena: genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. In the case of genomic imprinting, alleles are expressed in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner, whereas X-chromosome inactivation in females requires that only one X chromosome is active in each somatic nucleus. As model systems for epigenetic regulation, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation have identified and elucidated the numerous regulatory mechanisms that function throughout the genome during development. PMID:22687277

  14. Genomic imprinting and epigenetic control of development.

    PubMed

    Fedoriw, Andrew; Mugford, Joshua; Magnuson, Terry

    2012-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are extensively utilized during mammalian development. Specific patterns of gene expression are established during cell fate decisions, maintained as differentiation progresses, and often augmented as more specialized cell types are required. Much of what is known about these mechanisms comes from the study of two distinct epigenetic phenomena: genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. In the case of genomic imprinting, alleles are expressed in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner, whereas X-chromosome inactivation in females requires that only one X chromosome is active in each somatic nucleus. As model systems for epigenetic regulation, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation have identified and elucidated the numerous regulatory mechanisms that function throughout the genome during development. PMID:22687277

  15. Genomic imprinting is disrupted in interspecific Peromyscus hybrids.

    PubMed

    Vrana, P B; Guan, X J; Ingram, R S; Tilghman, S M

    1998-12-01

    Genomic imprinting, the unequal expression of gene alleles on the basis of parent of origin, is a major exception to mendelian laws of inheritance. By maintaining one allele of a gene in a silent state, imprinted genes discard the advantages of diploidy, and for this reason the rationale for the evolution of imprinting has been debated. One explanation is the parent-offspring conflict model, which proposes that imprinting arose in polyandrous mammals as the result of a parental conflict over the allocation of maternal resources to embryos. This theory predicts that there should be no selection for imprinting in a monogamous species. Crosses between the monogamous rodent species Peromyscus polionotus and the polyandrous Peromyscus maniculatus yield progeny with parent-of-origin growth defects that could be explained if imprinting was absent in the monogamous species. We find, however, that imprinting is maintained in P. polionotus, but there is widespread disruption of imprinting in the hybrids. We suggest that the signals governing genomic imprinting are rapidly evolving and that disruptions in the process may contribute to mammalian speciation. PMID:9843208

  16. Maternal Diet during Pregnancy Induces Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Changes in Fetal Tissues in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xianyong; Cretney, Evan C.; Kropp, Jenna; Khateeb, Karam; Berg, Mary A.; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Magness, Ronald; Radunz, Amy E.; Khatib, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Studies in rats and mice have established that maternal nutrition induces epigenetic modifications, sometimes permanently, that alter gene expression in the fetus, which in turn leads to phenotypic changes. However, limited data is available on the influence of maternal diet on epigenetic modifications and gene expression in sheep. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the impact of different maternal dietary energy sources on the expression of imprinted genes in fetuses in sheep. Ewes were naturally bred to a single sire and from days 67 ± 3 of gestation until necropsy (days 130 ± 1), they were fed one of three diets of alfalfa haylage (HY; fiber), corn (CN; starch), or dried corn distiller’s grains (DG; fiber plus protein plus fat). A total of 26 fetuses were removed from the dams and longissimus dorsi, semitendinosus, perirenal adipose depot, and subcutaneous adipose depot tissues were collected for expression and DNA methylation analyses. Expression analysis of nine imprinted genes and three DNA methyltransferase (DNMTs) genes showed significant effects of the different maternal diets on the expression of these genes. The methylation levels of CpG islands of both IGF2R and H19 were higher in HY and DG than CN fetuses in both males and females. This result is consistent with the low amino acid content of the CN diet, a source of methyl group donors, compared to HY and DG diets. Thus, results of this study provide evidence of association between maternal nutrition during pregnancy and transcriptomic and epigenomic alterations of imprinted genes and DNMTs in the fetal tissues. PMID:23577020

  17. Genomic imprinting and cancer.

    PubMed

    Brenton, J D; Viville, S; Surani, M A

    1995-01-01

    Imprinting is vital for normal development, and disruption of imprinting mechanisms on syntenic chromosomes gives very similar phenotypes in mouse and humans. In addition, disruption of normal imprinting provides a plausible explanation for preferential LOH in some embryonal tumours. Moreover, there is evidence that in Wilms' tumour, dysregulation of specific imprinted genes may give rise to the cancer phenotype. Many more questions regarding genomic imprinting need to be answered before the associations described in this review can be properly understood. The most basic issues, such as when and how the imprint is established, can still only be speculated upon. Further study of new imprinted genes and the relationship between their domains and differential replication may show us higher control mechanisms than methylation alone. It remains to be seen if these epigenetic modifications are amenable to therapeutic change in the treatment of inherited syndromes and cancer, or if they can be used to assess individuals at risk of disease. Until then it is probably unwise to speculate on a single unifying theory that explains why a subset of the genome shows such a peculiar non-Mendelian form of inheritance. PMID:8718517

  18. Effects of the porcine IGF2 intron 3-G3072A mutation on carcass cutability, meat quality, and bacon processing.

    PubMed

    Clark, D L; Bohrer, B M; Tavárez, M A; Boler, D D; Beever, J E; Dilger, A C

    2014-12-01

    A SNP in a regulatory region of intron 3 within the porcine IGF2 gene (IGF2-G3072A) is associated with increased lean deposition and decreased fat deposition in pigs with paternal A alleles (APat) compared with pigs with paternal G alleles (GPat). However, data regarding fresh and processed meat quality characteristics of pigs with different alleles for this polymorphism are limited. A single heterozygote (AG) boar was bred to homozygous (AA) commercial Yorkshire-cross sows producing F1 barrows and gilts with either GPat or APat. Two farrowing groups of barrows and gilts were group housed, provided ad libitum access to a diet that met or exceeded NRC nutrient recommendations throughout production, and slaughtered at 176 d (±4 d) of age. Fresh LM quality and estimated percent fat-free lean measurements were taken on the left side of carcasses, while carcass cutouts were completed with right sides. Fresh belly and bacon processing traits were characterized for only block 1 pigs. Pig was treated as the experimental unit for all analyses. Ending live weight and HCW were not affected by IGF2 allele; however, 10th rib backfat thickness was 0.41 cm less (P=0.01), loin eye area was 4.0 cm2 greater (P=0.01), and predicted fat-free lean was over 2 percentage units greater (P<0.01) in APat pigs compared with GPat pigs. Furthermore, boneless lean cuts from the shoulder, loin, and ham were heavier (P<0.05) in APat pigs compared with GPat pigs. Minolta L* value was 2.36 units greater (P=0.03) but cooking loss was 1.82 percentage units greater (P<0.01) in APat pigs compared with GPat pigs. Additionally, despite reductions in subcutaneous fat, extractable intramuscular lipid from the LM was 0.64 percentage units greater (P=0.02) in APat pigs compared with GPat pigs. Bellies were 7.17 mm thinner (P=0.01), had 7.27 cm less flop distance (P=0.05), and tended to have 1.34 units greater iodine value (P=0.09) in APat pigs compared with GPat pigs. While not statistically different (P=0

  19. Genomic imprinting in the Arabidopsis embryo is partly regulated by PRC2.

    PubMed

    Raissig, Michael T; Bemer, Marian; Baroux, Célia; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting results in monoallelic gene expression in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and is regulated by the differential epigenetic marking of the parental alleles. In plants, genomic imprinting has been primarily described for genes expressed in the endosperm, a tissue nourishing the developing embryo that does not contribute to the next generation. In Arabidopsis, the genes MEDEA (MEA) and PHERES1 (PHE1), which are imprinted in the endosperm, are also expressed in the embryo; whether their embryonic expression is regulated by imprinting or not, however, remains controversial. In contrast, the maternally expressed in embryo 1 (mee1) gene of maize is clearly imprinted in the embryo. We identified several imprinted candidate genes in an allele-specific transcriptome of hybrid Arabidopsis embryos and confirmed parent-of-origin-dependent, monoallelic expression for eleven maternally expressed genes (MEGs) and one paternally expressed gene (PEG) in the embryo, using allele-specific expression analyses and reporter gene assays. Genetic studies indicate that the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) but not the DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1) is involved in regulating imprinted expression in the embryo. In the seedling, all embryonic MEGs and the PEG are expressed from both parents, suggesting that the imprint is erased during late embryogenesis or early vegetative development. Our finding that several genes are regulated by genomic imprinting in the Arabidopsis embryo clearly demonstrates that this epigenetic phenomenon is not a unique feature of the endosperm in both monocots and dicots. PMID:24339783

  20. Genomic Imprinting in the Arabidopsis Embryo Is Partly Regulated by PRC2

    PubMed Central

    Raissig, Michael T.; Bemer, Marian; Baroux, Célia; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting results in monoallelic gene expression in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and is regulated by the differential epigenetic marking of the parental alleles. In plants, genomic imprinting has been primarily described for genes expressed in the endosperm, a tissue nourishing the developing embryo that does not contribute to the next generation. In Arabidopsis, the genes MEDEA (MEA) and PHERES1 (PHE1), which are imprinted in the endosperm, are also expressed in the embryo; whether their embryonic expression is regulated by imprinting or not, however, remains controversial. In contrast, the maternally expressed in embryo 1 (mee1) gene of maize is clearly imprinted in the embryo. We identified several imprinted candidate genes in an allele-specific transcriptome of hybrid Arabidopsis embryos and confirmed parent-of-origin-dependent, monoallelic expression for eleven maternally expressed genes (MEGs) and one paternally expressed gene (PEG) in the embryo, using allele-specific expression analyses and reporter gene assays. Genetic studies indicate that the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) but not the DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1) is involved in regulating imprinted expression in the embryo. In the seedling, all embryonic MEGs and the PEG are expressed from both parents, suggesting that the imprint is erased during late embryogenesis or early vegetative development. Our finding that several genes are regulated by genomic imprinting in the Arabidopsis embryo clearly demonstrates that this epigenetic phenomenon is not a unique feature of the endosperm in both monocots and dicots. PMID:24339783

  1. Methylation Alterations at Imprinted Genes Detected Among Long Term Shiftworkers

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Daniel I.; Hansen, Johnni; Fu, Alan; Stevens, Richard G.; Tjonneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla B.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to light at night through shiftwork has been linked to alterations in DNA methylation and increased risk of cancer development. Using an Illumina Infinium Methylation Assay, we analyzed methylation levels of 397 CpG sites in the promoter regions of 56 normally imprinted genes to investigate whether shiftwork is associated with alteration of methylation patterns. Methylation was significantly higher at 20 CpG sites and significantly lower at 30 CpG sites (P < 0.05) in 10 female long-term shiftworkers as compared to 10 female age- and folate intake-matched day workers. The strongest evidence for altered methylation patterns in shiftworkers was observed for DLX5, IGF2AS, and TP73 based on the magnitude of methylation change and consistency in the direction of change across multiple CpG sites, and consistent results were observed using quantitative DNA methylation analysis. We conclude that long-term shiftwork may alter methylation patterns at imprinted genes, which may be an important mechanism by which shiftwork has carcinogenic potential and warrants further investigation. PMID:23193016

  2. Retrotransposon silencing by DNA methylation can drive mammalian genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Ono, Ryuichi; Narita, Takanori; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoffrey; Wang, Changshan; Kohda, Takashi; Alsop, Amber E; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Kohara, Yuji; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Renfree, Marilyn B; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2007-04-13

    Among mammals, only eutherians and marsupials are viviparous and have genomic imprinting that leads to parent-of-origin-specific differential gene expression. We used comparative analysis to investigate the origin of genomic imprinting in mammals. PEG10 (paternally expressed 10) is a retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene that has an essential role for the formation of the placenta of the mouse. Here, we show that an orthologue of PEG10 exists in another therian mammal, the marsupial tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), but not in a prototherian mammal, the egg-laying platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), suggesting its close relationship to the origin of placentation in therian mammals. We have discovered a hitherto missing link of the imprinting mechanism between eutherians and marsupials because tammar PEG10 is the first example of a differentially methylated region (DMR) associated with genomic imprinting in marsupials. Surprisingly, the marsupial DMR was strictly limited to the 5' region of PEG10, unlike the eutherian DMR, which covers the promoter regions of both PEG10 and the adjacent imprinted gene SGCE. These results not only demonstrate a common origin of the DMR-associated imprinting mechanism in therian mammals but provide the first demonstration that DMR-associated genomic imprinting in eutherians can originate from the repression of exogenous DNA sequences and/or retrotransposons by DNA methylation. PMID:17432937

  3. Pervasive polymorphic imprinted methylation in the human placenta

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Courtney W.; Peñaherrera, Maria S.; Saadeh, Heba; Andrews, Simon; McFadden, Deborah E.; Kelsey, Gavin; Robinson, Wendy P.

    2016-01-01

    The maternal and paternal copies of the genome are both required for mammalian development, and this is primarily due to imprinted genes, those that are monoallelically expressed based on parent-of-origin. Typically, this pattern of expression is regulated by differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that are established in the germline and maintained after fertilization. There are a large number of germline DMRs that have not yet been associated with imprinting, and their function in development is unknown. In this study, we developed a genome-wide approach to identify novel imprinted DMRs in the human placenta and investigated the dynamics of these imprinted DMRs during development in somatic and extraembryonic tissues. DNA methylation was evaluated using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 array in 134 human tissue samples, publicly available reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in the human embryo and germ cells, and targeted bisulfite sequencing in term placentas. Forty-three known and 101 novel imprinted DMRs were identified in the human placenta by comparing methylation between diandric and digynic triploid conceptions in addition to female and male gametes. Seventy-two novel DMRs showed a pattern consistent with placental-specific imprinting, and this monoallelic methylation was entirely maternal in origin. Strikingly, these DMRs exhibited polymorphic imprinted methylation between placental samples. These data suggest that imprinting in human development is far more extensive and dynamic than previously reported and that the placenta preferentially maintains maternal germline-derived DNA methylation. PMID:26769960

  4. Theory of genomic imprinting conflict in social insects

    PubMed Central

    Queller, David C

    2003-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting refers to the differential expression of genes inherited from the mother and father (matrigenes and patrigenes). The kinship theory of genomic imprinting treats parent-specific gene expression as products of within-genome conflict. Specifically, matrigenes and patrigenes will be in conflict over treatment of relatives to which they are differently related. Haplodiploid females have many such relatives, and social insects have many contexts in which they affect relatives, so haplodiploid social insects are prime candidates for tests of the kinship theory of imprinting. Results Matrigenic and patrigenic relatednesses are derived for individuals affected in a variety of contexts, including queen competition, sex ratio, worker laying of male eggs and policing, colony fission, and adoption of new queens. Numerous predictions emerge for what contexts should elicit imprinting, which individuals and tissues will show it, and the direction of imprinting effects. The predictions often vary for different genetic structures (varying queen and mate number) and often contrast with predictions for diploids. Conclusion Because the contexts differ from the normal imprinting case, and because nothing is currently known about imprinting in social insects, these predictions can serve as a strong a priori test of the kinship theory of imprinting. If the predictions are correct, then social insects, which have long served as exemplars of cooperation between individuals, will also be shown to be extraordinary examples of competition within individual genomes. PMID:12871603

  5. Pervasive polymorphic imprinted methylation in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Courtney W; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Saadeh, Heba; Andrews, Simon; McFadden, Deborah E; Kelsey, Gavin; Robinson, Wendy P

    2016-06-01

    The maternal and paternal copies of the genome are both required for mammalian development, and this is primarily due to imprinted genes, those that are monoallelically expressed based on parent-of-origin. Typically, this pattern of expression is regulated by differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that are established in the germline and maintained after fertilization. There are a large number of germline DMRs that have not yet been associated with imprinting, and their function in development is unknown. In this study, we developed a genome-wide approach to identify novel imprinted DMRs in the human placenta and investigated the dynamics of these imprinted DMRs during development in somatic and extraembryonic tissues. DNA methylation was evaluated using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 array in 134 human tissue samples, publicly available reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in the human embryo and germ cells, and targeted bisulfite sequencing in term placentas. Forty-three known and 101 novel imprinted DMRs were identified in the human placenta by comparing methylation between diandric and digynic triploid conceptions in addition to female and male gametes. Seventy-two novel DMRs showed a pattern consistent with placental-specific imprinting, and this monoallelic methylation was entirely maternal in origin. Strikingly, these DMRs exhibited polymorphic imprinted methylation between placental samples. These data suggest that imprinting in human development is far more extensive and dynamic than previously reported and that the placenta preferentially maintains maternal germline-derived DNA methylation. PMID:26769960

  6. Imprinting in plants as a mechanism to generate seed phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fang; Settles, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Normal plant development requires epigenetic regulation to enforce changes in developmental fate. Genomic imprinting is a type of epigenetic regulation in which identical alleles of genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Deep sequencing of transcriptomes has identified hundreds of imprinted genes with scarce evidence for the developmental importance of individual imprinted loci. Imprinting is regulated through global DNA demethylation in the central cell prior to fertilization and directed repression of individual loci with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). There is significant evidence for transposable elements and repeat sequences near genes acting as cis-elements to determine imprinting status of a gene, implying that imprinted gene expression patterns may evolve randomly and at high frequency. Detailed genetic analysis of a few imprinted loci suggests an imprinted pattern of gene expression is often dispensable for seed development. Few genes show conserved imprinted expression within or between plant species. These data are not fully explained by current models for the evolution of imprinting in plant seeds. We suggest that imprinting may have evolved to provide a mechanism for rapid neofunctionalization of genes during seed development to increase phenotypic diversity of seeds. PMID:25674092

  7. Gene interactions in the evolution of genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J B; Brandvain, Y

    2014-08-01

    Numerous evolutionary theories have been developed to explain the epigenetic phenomenon of genomic imprinting. Here, we explore a subset of theories wherein non-additive genetic interactions can favour imprinting. In the simplest genic interaction--the case of underdominance--imprinting can be favoured to hide effectively low-fitness heterozygous genotypes; however, as there is no asymmetry between maternally and paternally inherited alleles in this model, other means of enforcing monoallelic expression may be more plausible evolutionary outcomes than genomic imprinting. By contrast, more successful interaction models of imprinting rely on an asymmetry between the maternally and paternally inherited alleles at a locus that favours the silencing of one allele as a means of coordinating the expression of high-fitness allelic combinations. For example, with interactions between autosomal loci, imprinting functionally preserves high-fitness genotypes that were favoured by selection in the previous generation. In this scenario, once a focal locus becomes imprinted, selection at interacting loci favours a matching imprint. Uniparental transmission generates similar asymmetries for sex chromosomes and cytoplasmic factors interacting with autosomal loci, with selection favouring the expression of either maternal or paternally derived autosomal alleles depending on the pattern of transmission of the uniparentally inherited factor. In a final class of models, asymmetries arise when genes expressed in offspring interact with genes expressed in one of its parents. Under such a scenario, a locus evolves to have imprinted expression in offspring to coordinate the interaction with its parent's genome. We illustrate these models and explore key links and differences using a unified framework. PMID:24619179

  8. Genomic imprinting in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Monk, David

    2015-10-01

    With the launch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/National Institutes of Health Human Placenta Project, the anticipation is that this often-overlooked organ will be the subject of much intense research. Compared with somatic tissues, the cells of the placenta have a unique epigenetic profile that dictates its transcription patterns, which when disturbed may be associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. One major class of genes that is dependent on strict epigenetic regulation in the placenta is subject to genomic imprinting, the parent-of-origin-dependent monoallelic gene expression. This review discusses the differences in allelic expression and epigenetic profiles of imprinted genes that are identified between different species, which reflect the continuous evolutionary adaption of this form of epigenetic regulation. These observations divulge that placenta-specific imprinted gene that is reliant on repressive histone signatures in mice are unlikely to be imprinted in humans, whereas intense methylation profiling in humans has uncovered numerous maternally methylated regions that are restricted to the placenta that are not conserved in mice. Imprinting has been proposed to be a mechanism that regulates parental resource allocation and ultimately can influence fetal growth, with the placenta being the key in this process. Furthermore, I discuss the developmental dynamics of both classic and transient placenta-specific imprinting and examine the evidence for an involvement of these genes in intrauterine growth restriction and placenta-associated complications. Finally, I focus on examples of genes that are regulated aberrantly in complicated pregnancies, emphasizing their application as pregnancy-related disease biomarkers to aid the diagnosis of at-risk pregnancies early in gestation. PMID:26428495

  9. Extensive, clustered parental imprinting of protein-coding and noncoding RNAs in developing maize endosperm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Zhao, Hainan; Xie, Shaojun; Chen, Jian; Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Keke; Zhao, Haiming; Guan, Haiying; Hu, Xiaojiao; Jiao, Yinping; Song, Weibin; Lai, Jinsheng

    2011-12-13

    Although genetic imprinting was discovered in maize 40 years ago, its exact extent in the triploid endosperm remains unknown. Here, we have analyzed global patterns of allelic gene expression in developing maize endosperms from reciprocal crosses between inbreds B73 and Mo17. We have defined an imprinted gene as one in which the relative expression of the maternal and paternal alleles differ at least fivefold in both hybrids of the reciprocal crosses. We found that at least 179 genes (1.6% of protein-coding genes) expressed in the endosperm are imprinted, with 68 of them showing maternal preferential expression and 111 paternal preferential expression. Additionally, 38 long noncoding RNAs were imprinted. The latter are transcribed in either sense or antisense orientation from intronic regions of normal protein-coding genes or from intergenic regions. Imprinted genes show a clear pattern of clustering around the genome, with a number of imprinted genes being adjacent to each other. Analysis of allele-specific methylation patterns of imprinted loci in the hybrid endosperm identified 21 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of several hundred base pairs in length, corresponding to both imprinted genes and noncoding transcripts. All DMRs identified are uniformly hypomethylated in maternal alleles and hypermethylated in paternal alleles, regardless of the imprinting direction of their corresponding loci. Our study indicates highly extensive and complex regulation of genetic imprinting in maize endosperm, a mechanism that can potentially function in the balancing of the gene dosage of this triploid tissue. PMID:22114195

  10. Epigenomic landscape modified by histone modification correlated with activation of IGF2 gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The links of histone post-translational modifications and chromatin structure to cell cycle progression, DNA replication, and overall chromosome functions are very clear. The modulation of genome expression as a consequence of chromatin structural changes is most likely a basic mechanism. The epige...

  11. Imprinting disorders: a group of congenital disorders with overlapping patterns of molecular changes affecting imprinted loci.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Thomas; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Maher, Eamonn R; Temple, I Karen; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Mackay, Deborah J G; Grønskov, Karen; Riccio, Andrea; Linglart, Agnès; Netchine, Irène

    2015-01-01

    Congenital imprinting disorders (IDs) are characterised by molecular changes affecting imprinted chromosomal regions and genes, i.e. genes that are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Recent years have seen a great expansion in the range of alterations in regulation, dosage or DNA sequence shown to disturb imprinted gene expression, and the correspondingly broad range of resultant clinical syndromes. At the same time, however, it has become clear that this diversity of IDs has common underlying principles, not only in shared molecular mechanisms, but also in interrelated clinical impacts upon growth, development and metabolism. Thus, detailed and systematic analysis of IDs can not only identify unifying principles of molecular epigenetics in health and disease, but also support personalisation of diagnosis and management for individual patients and families. PMID:26583054

  12. Transcriptional Profiles of Imprinted Genes in Human Embryonic Stem Cells During In vitro Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Wook; Do, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Dongkyu; Ko, Ji-Yun; Lee, Sang-Hun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Genomic imprinting is an inheritance phenomenon by which a subset of genes are expressed from one allele of two homologous chromosomes in a parent of origin-specific manner. Even though fine-tuned regulation of genomic imprinting process is essential for normal development, no other means are available to study genomic imprinting in human during embryonic development. In relation with this bottleneck, differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into specialized lineages may be considered as an alternative to mimic human development. Methods and Results: In this study, hESCs were differentiated into three lineage cell types to analyze temporal and spatial expression of imprinted genes. Of 19 imprinted genes examined, 15 imprinted genes showed similar transcriptional level among two hESC lines and two human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) lines. Expressional patterns of most imprinted genes were varied in progenitors and fully differentiated cells which were derived from hESCs. Also, no consistence was observed in the expression pattern of imprinted genes within an imprinting domain during in vitro differentiation of hESCs into three lineage cell types. Conclusions: Transcriptional expression of imprinted genes is regulated in a cell type- specific manner in hESCs during in vitro differentiation. PMID:25473448

  13. Detection of Loss of Imprinting by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Tabano, Silvia; Bonaparte, Eleonora; Miozzo, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetically regulated process determining allele-specific expression in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Altered expression of imprinted genes characterizes numerous congenital diseases including Beckwith-Wiedemann, Silver-Russell, Angelman, and Prader-Willi syndromes as well as acquired disorders such as cancer. The detection of imprinting alterations has important translational implications in clinics and the application of the Pyrosequencing(®) technology offers the possibility to identify accurately also subtle modifications in allele-specific expression and in DNA methylation levels.Here, we describe two methods to investigate genomic imprinting defects (loss of imprinting, LOI) using Pyrosequencing: (1) Allele-specific expression analysis based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and (2) quantification of DNA methylation.The protocol for the quantification of the allele-specific expression is carried out by analyzing an informative SNP located within the transcribed portion of an imprinted gene. The method includes the cDNA amplification of the region containing the SNP and the Pyrosequencing-based analysis for the quantitative allelic discrimination comparing the ratio of the two alleles.The second protocol allows the accurate quantification of the DNA methylation levels at the Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs). Imprinted genes are clustered in chromosomal regions and their expression is mainly regulated by DNA methylation at CpG sites located within the ICRs. After bisulfite modification of the genomic DNA, the region of interest is amplified by PCR and analyzed by Pyrosequencing. The methylation value at each CpG site is calculated by the CpG software, which determines the ratio of the incorporation of "C" and "T" and converts the value in methylation percentage. PMID:26103904

  14. Transcriptome-wide investigation of genomic imprinting in chicken.

    PubMed

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Gourichon, David; Dehais, Patrice; Cristobal, Magali San; Marsaud, Nathalie; Vignoles, Florence; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Coville, Jean-Luc; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Beaumont, Catherine; Zerjal, Tatiana; Vignal, Alain; Morisson, Mireille; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2014-04-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism by which alleles of some specific genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner. It has been observed in mammals and marsupials, but not in birds. Until now, only a few genes orthologous to mammalian imprinted ones have been analyzed in chicken and did not demonstrate any evidence of imprinting in this species. However, several published observations such as imprinted-like QTL in poultry or reciprocal effects keep the question open. Our main objective was thus to screen the entire chicken genome for parental-allele-specific differential expression on whole embryonic transcriptomes, using high-throughput sequencing. To identify the parental origin of each observed haplotype, two chicken experimental populations were used, as inbred and as genetically distant as possible. Two families were produced from two reciprocal crosses. Transcripts from 20 embryos were sequenced using NGS technology, producing ∼200 Gb of sequences. This allowed the detection of 79 potentially imprinted SNPs, through an analysis method that we validated by detecting imprinting from mouse data already published. However, out of 23 candidates tested by pyrosequencing, none could be confirmed. These results come together, without a priori, with previous statements and phylogenetic considerations assessing the absence of genomic imprinting in chicken. PMID:24452801

  15. Transcriptome-wide investigation of genomic imprinting in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Gourichon, David; Dehais, Patrice; Cristobal, Magali San; Marsaud, Nathalie; Vignoles, Florence; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Coville, Jean-Luc; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Beaumont, Catherine; Zerjal, Tatiana; Vignal, Alain; Morisson, Mireille; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism by which alleles of some specific genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner. It has been observed in mammals and marsupials, but not in birds. Until now, only a few genes orthologous to mammalian imprinted ones have been analyzed in chicken and did not demonstrate any evidence of imprinting in this species. However, several published observations such as imprinted-like QTL in poultry or reciprocal effects keep the question open. Our main objective was thus to screen the entire chicken genome for parental-allele-specific differential expression on whole embryonic transcriptomes, using high-throughput sequencing. To identify the parental origin of each observed haplotype, two chicken experimental populations were used, as inbred and as genetically distant as possible. Two families were produced from two reciprocal crosses. Transcripts from 20 embryos were sequenced using NGS technology, producing ∼200 Gb of sequences. This allowed the detection of 79 potentially imprinted SNPs, through an analysis method that we validated by detecting imprinting from mouse data already published. However, out of 23 candidates tested by pyrosequencing, none could be confirmed. These results come together, without a priori, with previous statements and phylogenetic considerations assessing the absence of genomic imprinting in chicken. PMID:24452801

  16. Loss of genomic imprinting in Drosophila clones.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Andrew J; Lloyd, Vett K

    2006-08-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that genetically distinguishes maternal and paternal genomes, and can result in parent-of-origin-dependent monoallelic expression of a gene that is dependent on the parent of origin. As such, an otherwise functional maternally inherited allele may be silenced so that the gene is expressed exclusively from the paternal allele, or vice versa. Once thought to be restricted to mammals, genomic imprinting has been documented in angiosperm plants (J.L. Kermicle. 1970. Genetics, 66: 69-85), zebrafish (C.C. Martin and R. McGowan. 1995. Genet. Res. 65: 21-28), insects, and C. elegans (C.J. Bean, C.E. Schaner, and W.G. Kelly. 2004. Nat. Genet. 36: 100-105.). In each case, it appears to rely on differential chromatin structure. Aberrant imprinting has been implicated in various human cancers and has been detected in a number of cloned mammals, potentially limiting the usefulness of somatic nuclear transfer. Here we show that genomic imprinting associated with a mini-X chromosome is lost in Drosophila melanogaster clones. PMID:17036079

  17. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  18. Selection in the Making: A Worldwide Survey of Haplotypic Diversity Around a Causative Mutation in Porcine IGF2

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, A.; Huang, L.-S.; Ren, J.; Angiolillo, A.; Cho, I.-C.; Soto, H.; Lemús-Flores, C.; Makuza, S. M.; Folch, J. M.; Pérez-Enciso, M.

    2008-01-01

    Domestic species allow us to study dramatic evolutionary changes at an accelerated rate due to the effectiveness of modern breeding techniques and the availability of breeds that have undergone distinct selection pressures. We present a worldwide survey of haplotype variability around a known causative mutation in porcine gene IGF2, which increases lean content. We genotyped 34 SNPs spanning 27 kb in 237 domestic pigs and 162 wild boars. Although the selective process had wiped out variability for at least 27 kb in the haplotypes carrying the mutation, there was no indication of an overall reduction in genetic variability of international vs. European local breeds; there was also no evidence of a reduction in variability caused by domestication. The haplotype structure and a plot of Tajima's D against the frequency of the causative mutation across breeds suggested a temporal pattern, where each breed corresponded to a different selective stage. This was observed comparing the haplotype neighbor-joining (NJ) trees of breeds that have undergone increasing selection pressures for leanness, e.g., European local breeds vs. Pietrain. These results anticipate that comparing current domestic breeds will decisively help to recover the genetic history of domestication and contemporary selective processes. PMID:18245828

  19. Imprinted genes as potential genetic and epigenetic toxicologic targets.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, S K; Jirtle, R L

    2000-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon in eutherian mammals that results in the differential expression of the paternally and maternally inherited alleles of a gene. Imprinted genes are necessary for normal mammalian development. This requirement has been proposed to have evolved because of an interparental genetic battle for the utilization of maternal resources during gestation and postnatally. The nonrandom requisite for monoallelic expression of a subset of genes has also resulted in the formation of susceptibility loci for neurobehavioral disorders, developmental disorders, and cancer. Since imprinting involves both cytosine methylation within CpG islands and changes in chromatin structure, imprinted genes are potential targets for dysregulation by epigenetic toxicants that modify DNA methylation and histone acetylation. PMID:10698719

  20. Maintaining memory of silencing at imprinted differentially methylated regions.

    PubMed

    Voon, Hsiao P J; Gibbons, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Imprinted genes are an exceptional cluster of genes which are expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent fashion. This allele-specific expression is dependent on differential DNA methylation which is established in the parental germlines in a sex-specific manner. The DNA methylation imprint is accompanied by heterochromatin modifications which must be continuously maintained through development. This review summarises the factors which are important for protecting the epigenetic modifications at imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs), including PGC7, ZFP57 and the ATRX/Daxx/H3.3 complex. We discuss how these factors maintain heterochromatin silencing, not only at imprinted DMRs, but also other heterochromatic regions in the genome. PMID:26883803

  1. The Wellcome Prize Lecture. Genetic imprinting: the battle of the sexes rages on.

    PubMed

    Reik, W

    1996-03-01

    Genomic imprinting in mammals is an important genetic mechanism by which genes are expressed or repressed depending on which parent they have been inherited from. Some properties of the imprinting mechanism are already established; notably, some of the effects of imprinting on mammalian development can be explained by the phenotypic effects of a number of specific imprinted genes, which include major fetal growth factors. An evolutionary explanation of imprinting has also been suggested. Some of the molecular mechanisms of imprinting are known, and these include the modification of DNA and chromosomes in the form of DNA methylation and possibly heritable chromatin structures. Loss of imprinting or altered imprinting is implicated in a large number of genetic diseases and cancers. Many important issues remain to be resolved; these include the precise molecular mechanisms and, in particular, the nature of the primary imprints that are inherited from the parental gametes, and the genes that control the imprinting process. Isolation of the majority of imprinted genes and the elucidation of their phenotypic effects and physiology are major goals for the future. These studies will provide important insights into human genetics, and will connect evolutionary understanding with physiology, genetic disease and human behaviour. PMID:8845132

  2. Long noncoding RNAs: Lessons from genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been a great resource for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional-based gene regulation by long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). In this article, I overview the functional role of intergenic lncRNAs (H19, IPW, and MEG3), antisense lncRNAs (Kcnq1ot1, Airn, Nespas, Ube3a-ATS), and enhancer lncRNAs (IG-DMR eRNAs) to understand the diverse mechanisms being employed by them in cis and/or trans to regulate the parent-of-origin-specific expression of target genes. Recent evidence suggests that some of the lncRNAs regulate imprinting by promoting intra-chromosomal higher-order chromatin compartmentalization, affecting replication timing and subnuclear positioning. Whereas others act via transcriptional occlusion or transcriptional collision-based mechanisms. By establishing genomic imprinting of target genes, the lncRNAs play a critical role in important biological functions, such as placental and embryonic growth, pluripotency maintenance, cell differentiation, and neural-related functions such as synaptic development and plasticity. An emerging consensus from the recent evidence is that the imprinted lncRNAs fine-tune gene expression of the protein-coding genes to maintain their dosage in cell. Hence, lncRNAs from imprinted clusters offer insights into their mode of action, and these mechanisms have been the basis for uncovering the mode of action of lncRNAs in several other biological contexts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26004516

  3. The evolution of genomic imprinting: theories, predictions and empirical tests

    PubMed Central

    Patten, M M; Ross, L; Curley, J P; Queller, D C; Bonduriansky, R; Wolf, J B

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic phenomenon of genomic imprinting has motivated the development of numerous theories for its evolutionary origins and genomic distribution. In this review, we examine the three theories that have best withstood theoretical and empirical scrutiny. These are: Haig and colleagues' kinship theory; Day and Bonduriansky's sexual antagonism theory; and Wolf and Hager's maternal–offspring coadaptation theory. These theories have fundamentally different perspectives on the adaptive significance of imprinting. The kinship theory views imprinting as a mechanism to change gene dosage, with imprinting evolving because of the differential effect that gene dosage has on the fitness of matrilineal and patrilineal relatives. The sexual antagonism and maternal–offspring coadaptation theories view genomic imprinting as a mechanism to modify the resemblance of an individual to its two parents, with imprinting evolving to increase the probability of expressing the fitter of the two alleles at a locus. In an effort to stimulate further empirical work on the topic, we carefully detail the logic and assumptions of all three theories, clarify the specific predictions of each and suggest tests to discriminate between these alternative theories for why particular genes are imprinted. PMID:24755983

  4. The evolution of genomic imprinting: theories, predictions and empirical tests.

    PubMed

    Patten, M M; Ross, L; Curley, J P; Queller, D C; Bonduriansky, R; Wolf, J B

    2014-08-01

    The epigenetic phenomenon of genomic imprinting has motivated the development of numerous theories for its evolutionary origins and genomic distribution. In this review, we examine the three theories that have best withstood theoretical and empirical scrutiny. These are: Haig and colleagues' kinship theory; Day and Bonduriansky's sexual antagonism theory; and Wolf and Hager's maternal-offspring coadaptation theory. These theories have fundamentally different perspectives on the adaptive significance of imprinting. The kinship theory views imprinting as a mechanism to change gene dosage, with imprinting evolving because of the differential effect that gene dosage has on the fitness of matrilineal and patrilineal relatives. The sexual antagonism and maternal-offspring coadaptation theories view genomic imprinting as a mechanism to modify the resemblance of an individual to its two parents, with imprinting evolving to increase the probability of expressing the fitter of the two alleles at a locus. In an effort to stimulate further empirical work on the topic, we carefully detail the logic and assumptions of all three theories, clarify the specific predictions of each and suggest tests to discriminate between these alternative theories for why particular genes are imprinted. PMID:24755983

  5. Different yet similar: evolution of imprinting in flowering plants and mammals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to a form of epigenetic gene regulation whereby alleles are differentially expressed in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. Imprinting evolved independently in flowering plants and in therian mammals in association with the elaboration of viviparity and a placental habit. Despite the striking differences in plant and animal reproduction, genomic imprinting shares multiple characteristics between them. In both groups, imprinted expression is controlled, at least in part, by DNA methylation and chromatin modifications in cis-regulatory regions, and many maternally and paternally expressed genes display complementary dosage-dependent effects during embryogenesis. This suggests that genomic imprinting evolved in response to similar selective pressures in flowering plants and mammals. Nevertheless, there are important differences between plant and animal imprinting. In particular, genomic imprinting has been shown to be more flexible and evolutionarily labile in plants. In mammals, imprinted genes are organized mainly in highly conserved clusters, whereas in plants they occur in isolation throughout the genome and are affected by local gene duplications. There is a large degree of intra- and inter-specific variation in imprinted gene expression in plants. These differences likely reflect the distinct life cycles and the different evolutionary dynamics that shape plant and animal genomes. PMID:25165562

  6. Regulation of supply and demand for maternal nutrients in mammals by imprinted genes

    PubMed Central

    Reik, Wolf; Constância, Miguel; Fowden, Abigail; Anderson, Neil; Dean, Wendy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne; Tycko, Benjamin; Sibley, Colin

    2003-01-01

    The placenta has evolved in eutherian mammals primarily to provide nutrients for the developing fetus. The genetic control of the regulation of supply and demand for maternal nutrients is not understood. In this review we argue that imprinted genes have central roles in controlling both the fetal demand for, and the placental supply of, maternal nutrients. Recent studies on Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) knockout mouse models provide experimental support for this hypothesis. These show effects on placental transport capacity consistent with a role of IGF-II in modulating both the placental supply and fetal demand for nutrients. Imprinting of genes with such functions may have coevolved with the placenta and new evidence suggests that transporter proteins, as well as the regulators themselves, may also be imprinted. These data and hypotheses are important, as deregulation of supply and demand affects fetal growth and has long term consequences for health in mammals both in the neonatal period and, as a result of fetal programming, in adulthood. PMID:12562908

  7. Association study of polymorphisms in FOXO3, AKT1 and IGF-2R genes with human longevity in a Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Luo, Huaichao; Liu, Xiaoqi; Ma, Shi; Lin, He; Chen, Rong; Hao, Fang; Zhang, Dingding

    2016-01-01

    FOXO3, AKT1 and IGF-2R are critical members of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Previous studies showed that polymorphisms (SNPs) in FOXO3, AKT1 and IGF-2R were associated with human longevity in Caucasian population. However, the association of these SNPs in different ethnic groups is often inconsistent. Here, we investigated the association of genetic variants in three genes with human longevity in Han Chinese population. Twelve SNPs from FOXO3, AKT1 and IGF-2R were selected and genotyped in 1202 long-lived individuals (nonagenarians and centenarians) and younger individuals. Rs9486902 of FOXO3 was found to be associated with human longevity in both genders combined in this study (allelic P = 0.002, corrected P = 0.024). The other eleven SNPs were not significantly associated with human longevity in Han Chinese population. The haplotypes TTCTT, CCTTC and CTCCT of FOXO3 as well as GGTCGG and GGTCAG of AKT1 were shown to have a significant difference between case and control (P =0.006, 2.78×10-5, 4.68×10-6, 0.003,0.005, respectively). The estimated prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes in long-lived individuals was significantly lower than in common adult populations (P = 0.001, 2.3×10-26) .Therefore, the search for longevity-associated genes provides the identification of new potential targets beneficial for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26683100

  8. IGF2BP2 rs11705701 polymorphisms are associated with prediabetes in a Chinese population: A population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liyuan; Li, Yuanyuan; Tang, Linlin; Chen, Zhongwei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Sihan; Liu, Shengyuan; Peng, Xiaolin; Mai, Yifeng; Zhuo, Renjie; Wang, Changyi; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Associations between insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2) rs11705701, insulin receptor substrate 1 rs7578326, gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor rs10423928 and transcription factor 7-like 2 rs12255372 gene polymorphisms with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have not been evaluated in the Han Chinese population. These four genetic variants were investigated for their associations with prediabetes and T2D among 490 unrelated patients with T2D, 471 patients with prediabetes and 575 healthy controls. Sequenom MassARRAY software was used to genotype the patients for these variants. The Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction method was used to analyze the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. A breakdown analysis by gender revealed a significant association of IGF2BP2 rs11705701 with prediabetes under the dominant genetic model in females following application of the Bonferroni correction (odds ratio = 0.26; 95% confidence interval = 0.10–0.67; P=0.005). However, no significant associations were reported between any of the other three polymorphisms and T2D under any genetic models. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant gene-gene or gene-environment interactions when evaluated with the above association tests. The present case-control study reveals a significant association between IGF2BP2 rs11705701 and prediabetes in female patients. PMID:27588103

  9. Association study of polymorphisms in FOXO3, AKT1 and IGF-2R genes with human longevity in a Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqi; Ma, Shi; Lin, He; Chen, Rong; Hao, Fang; Zhang, Dingding

    2016-01-01

    FOXO3, AKT1 and IGF-2R are critical members of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Previous studies showed that polymorphisms (SNPs) in FOXO3, AKT1 and IGF-2R were associated with human longevity in Caucasian population. However, the association of these SNPs in different ethnic groups is often inconsistent. Here, we investigated the association of genetic variants in three genes with human longevity in Han Chinese population. Twelve SNPs from FOXO3, AKT1 and IGF-2R were selected and genotyped in 1202 long-lived individuals (nonagenarians and centenarians) and younger individuals. Rs9486902 of FOXO3 was found to be associated with human longevity in both genders combined in this study (allelic P = 0.002, corrected P = 0.024). The other eleven SNPs were not significantly associated with human longevity in Han Chinese population. The haplotypes TTCTT, CCTTC and CTCCT of FOXO3 as well as GGTCGG and GGTCAG of AKT1 were shown to have a significant difference between case and control (P =0.006, 2.78×10−5, 4.68×10−6, 0.003,0.005, respectively). The estimated prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes in long-lived individuals was significantly lower than in common adult populations (P = 0.001, 2.3×10−26). Therefore, the search for longevity-associated genes provides the identification of new potential targets beneficial for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26683100

  10. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Song, Hyuk; Byun, Sung June; Uhm, Sang Jun; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner. PMID:27232503

  11. Genomic imprinting, methylation and parent-of-origin effects in reciprocal hybrid endosperm of castor bean

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Dai, Mengyuan; Li, Fei; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting often results in parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. In plants, the triploid endosperm is where gene imprinting occurs most often, but aside from studies on Arabidopsis, little is known about gene imprinting in dicotyledons. In this study, we inspected genomic imprinting in castor bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm, which persists throughout seed development. After mapping out the polymorphic SNP loci between accessions ZB306 and ZB107, we generated deep sequencing RNA profiles of F1 hybrid seeds derived from reciprocal crosses. Using polymorphic SNP sites to quantify allele-specific expression levels, we identified 209 genes in reciprocal endosperms with potential parent-of-origin specific expression, including 200 maternally expressed genes and 9 paternally expressed genes. In total, 57 of the imprinted genes were validated via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction sequencing, and analysis of the genomic DNA methylation distribution between embryo and endosperm tissues showed significant hypomethylation in the endosperm and an enrichment of differentially methylated regions around the identified genes. Curiously, the expression of the imprinted genes was not tightly linked to DNA methylation. These results largely extended gene imprinting information existing in plants, providing potential directions for further research in gene imprinting. PMID:24799438

  12. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  13. Imprinting artificial magnetic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Lohstroh, W.

    1998-09-25

    Recently we created La/Fe multilayers with a helical magnetic structure imprinted from the conditions of growth rather than by the magnetic interactions between layers. Each sublayer was 30{angstrom} thick, and during deposition the sample was rotated in an external field of 3 Oe. a field strong enough to magnetize the Fe layer being deposited but not sufficient to perturb the magnetization of the Fe layers already grown. As a result adjacent Fe layers formed a helical structure with a chirality and periodicity determined by the rotational direction and speed of the substrate and the rate of deposition. Following this discovery, an extensive set of experiments (mainly using Kerr effect magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectivity) was undertaken to ascertain the stability of imprinted magnetic structures, and to understand the onset of magnetization during growth. La/Fe imprinted helical magnetic structures (of different La and Fe thicknesses) were found to be stable in time and to be permanently erased only by magnetic fields larger than 90 Oe.

  14. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Obesity due to Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder due to errors in genomic imprinting with loss of imprinted genes that are paternally expressed from the chromosome 15q11-q13 region. Approximately 70% of individuals with PWS have a de novo deletion of the paternally derived 15q11-q13 region in which there are two subtypes (i.e., larger Type I or smaller Type II), maternal disomy 15 (both 15s from the mother) in about 25% of cases, and the remaining subjects have either defects in the imprinting center controlling the activity of imprinted genes or due to other chromosome 15 rearrangements. PWS is characterized by a particular facial appearance, infantile hypotonia, a poor suck and feeding difficulties, hypogonadism and hypogenitalism in both sexes, short stature and small hands and feet due to growth hormone deficiency, mild learning and behavioral problems (e.g., skin picking, temper tantrums) and hyperphagia leading to early childhood obesity. Obesity is a significant health problem, if uncontrolled. PWS is considered the most common known genetic cause of morbid obesity in children. The chromosome 15q11-q13 region contains approximately 100 genes and transcripts in which about 10 are imprinted and paternally expressed. This region can be divided into four groups: 1) a proximal non-imprinted region; 2) a PWS paternal-only expressed region containing protein-coding and non-coding genes; 3) an Angelman syndrome region containing maternally expressed genes and 4) a distal non-imprinted region. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic causes, the natural history and clinical presentation of individuals with PWS. PMID:22043168

  15. Cell Pluripotency Levels Associated with Imprinted Genes in Human

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Binyan; Ding, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are exhibited similarly in the morphology, gene expression, growth properties, and epigenetic modification with embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, it is still controversial that the pluripotency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is much inferior to ESC, and the differentiation capacity of iPSC and ESC can also be separated by transcriptome and epigenetics. miRNAs, which act in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are involved in many basic cellular processes, may reveal the answer. In this paper, we focused on identifying the hidden relationship between miRNAs and imprinted genes in cell pluripotency. Total miRNA expression patterns in iPSC and ES cells were comprehensively analysed and linked with human imprinted genes, which show a global picture of their potential function in pluripotent level. A new CPA4-KLF14 region which locates in chromosomal homologous segments (CHSs) within mammals and include both imprinted genes and significantly expressed miRNAs was first identified. Molecular network analysis showed genes interacted with imprinted genes closely and enriched in modules such as cancer, cell death and survival, and tumor morphology. This imprinted region may provide a new look for those who are interested in cell pluripotency of hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26504487

  16. Cell Pluripotency Levels Associated with Imprinted Genes in Human.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Binyan; Ding, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are exhibited similarly in the morphology, gene expression, growth properties, and epigenetic modification with embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, it is still controversial that the pluripotency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is much inferior to ESC, and the differentiation capacity of iPSC and ESC can also be separated by transcriptome and epigenetics. miRNAs, which act in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are involved in many basic cellular processes, may reveal the answer. In this paper, we focused on identifying the hidden relationship between miRNAs and imprinted genes in cell pluripotency. Total miRNA expression patterns in iPSC and ES cells were comprehensively analysed and linked with human imprinted genes, which show a global picture of their potential function in pluripotent level. A new CPA4-KLF14 region which locates in chromosomal homologous segments (CHSs) within mammals and include both imprinted genes and significantly expressed miRNAs was first identified. Molecular network analysis showed genes interacted with imprinted genes closely and enriched in modules such as cancer, cell death and survival, and tumor morphology. This imprinted region may provide a new look for those who are interested in cell pluripotency of hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26504487

  17. Bypassing genomic imprinting allows seed development.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Moritz K; Shirzadi, Reza; Dissmeyer, Nico; Dolf, Andreas; Endl, Elmar; Grini, Paul E; Schnittger, Arp

    2007-05-17

    In developing progeny of mammals the two parental genomes are differentially expressed according to imprinting marks, and embryos with only a uniparental genetic contribution die. Gene expression that is dependent on the parent of origin has also been observed in the offspring of flowering plants, and mutations in the imprinting machinery lead to embryonic lethality, primarily affecting the development of the endosperm-a structure in the seed that nourishes the embryo, analogous to the function of the mammalian placenta. Here we have generated Arabidopsis thaliana seeds in which the endosperm is of uniparental, that is, maternal, origin. We demonstrate that imprinting in developing seeds can be bypassed and viable albeit smaller seedlings can develop from seeds lacking a paternal contribution to the endosperm. Bypassing is only possible if the mother is mutant for any of the FIS-class genes, which encode Polycomb group chromatin-modifying factors. Thus, these data provide functional evidence that the action of the FIS complex balances the contribution of the paternal genome. As flowering plants have evolved a special reproduction system with a parallel fusion of two female with two male gametes, our findings support the hypothesis that only with the evolution of double fertilization did the action of the FIS genes become a requirement for seed development. Furthermore, our data argue for a gametophytic origin of endosperm in flowering plants, thereby supporting a hypothesis raised in 1900 by Eduard Strasburger. PMID:17468744

  18. Characterization of Conserved and Non-conserved Imprinted Genes in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to increase our understanding of the role of imprinted genes in swine reproduction we used two complementary approaches, analysis of imprinting by pyrosequencing, and expression profiling of parthenogenetic fetuses, to carry out a comprehensive analysis of this gene family in swine. Using A...

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymers for mycotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are a class of synthetic receptors capable of selective recognition of analytes. Recent developments in imprinting technology have made it possible to apply this technology in a range of applications, including mycotoxin detection. Structure-activity relations...

  20. Determination of allelic expression of h19 in pre- and peri-implantation mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Negrón-Pérez, Verónica M; Echevarría, Franklin D; Huffman, Sarah R; Rivera, Rocío Melissa

    2013-04-01

    H19 is a maternally expressed, imprinted, noncoding RNA with tumor-suppressor activity. During mouse preimplantation development, H19 is primarily expressed in the trophectoderm cells. The purpose of this project was to determine allelic expression of H19 in pre- and peri-implantation mouse embryos. We were further interested in determining if loss of imprinted H19 expression during blastocyst development occurred as a result of superovulation and/or culture. Our last goal was to ascertain if differential H19 allelic expression occurred between the inner cell mass (ICM)-containing half and the primary trophoblast giant cell (PTGC)-containing half of the embryo. C57BL/6J((Cast-7))xC57BL/6J F1 embryos were collected from the uterus at 84, 96, and 108 h following natural ovulation or superovulation. In vitro-cultured F1 embryos were harvested from the oviduct at the 2-cell stage and cultured in KSOM + aa supplemented with amino acids or Whitten media and collected at the above-mentioned times. Allele-specific H19 expression in single embryos was determined by qRT-PCR followed by fluorescence resonance electron transfer or RT-PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (RFLP-PAGE). Peri-implantation embryos were microdissected into two sections, one containing the ICM and the other containing the PTGC. TaqMan probes for Dek, Pou5f1, Itga7, H19, and Igf2 were used to ascertain gene expression enrichment in each section. Allele-specific H19 expression in embryo sections was determined by RFLP-PAGE. We found that as embryos advance through preimplantation development they start expressing H19 in a biallelic manner and this phenomenon was observed in the cultured and the in vivo-developed embryos. The PTGC-containing half of the embryo had greater expression of H19 when compared to the ICM-containing half of the embryo, as determined by qRT-PCR. In conclusion, loss of imprinting of H19 occurs in the PTGC

  1. Genomic imprinting, action, and interaction of maternal and fetal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keverne, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian viviparity (intrauterine development of the fetus) introduced a new dimension to brain development, with the fetal hypothalamus and fetal placenta developing at a time when the fetal placenta engages hypothalamic structures of the maternal generation. Such transgenerational interactions provide a basis for ensuring optimal maternalism in the next generation. This success has depended on genomic imprinting and a biased role of the matriline. Maternal methylation imprints determine parent of origin expression of genes fundamental to both placental and hypothalamic development. The matriline takes a further leading role for transgenerational reprogramming of these imprints. Developmental errors are minimized by the tight control that imprinted genes have on regulation of downstream evolutionary expanded gene families important for placental and hypothalamic development. Imprinted genes themselves have undergone purifying selection, providing a framework of stability for in utero development with most growth variance occurring postnatally. Mothers, not fathers, take the lead in the endocrinological and behavior adaptations that nurture, feed, and protect the infant. In utero coadaptive development of the placenta and hypothalamus has thus required a concomitant development to ensure male masculinization. Only placental male mammals evolved the sex determining SRY, which activates Sox9 for testes formation. SRY is a hybrid gene of Dgcr8 expressed in the developing placenta and Sox3 expressed in hypothalamic development. This hybridization of genes that take their origin from the placenta and hypothalamus has enabled critical in utero timing for the development of fetal Leydig cells, and hence testosterone production for hypothalamic masculinization. PMID:25404322

  2. Association between IGF2BP2 Polymorphisms and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case–Control Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ping; Wang, Hao; Fang, Honghong; Gao, Qing; Zhang, Jie; Song, Manshu; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Youxin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) found that IGF2BP2 rs4402960 and rs1470579 polymorphisms were associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk. Many studies have replicated this association, but yielded inconsistent results. Materials and Methods: A case-control study consisting of 461 T2DM patients and 434 health controls was conducted to detect the genetic susceptibility of IGF2BP2 in a northern Han Chinese population. A meta-analysis was to evaluate the association more precisely in Asians. Results: In the case-control study, the carriers of TT genotype at rs4402960 had a higher T2DM risk than the G carriers (TG + GG) (adjusted odd ratio (AOR) = 1.962, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.065–3.612, p = 0.031]; CC carriers at rs1470579 were more susceptible to T2DM than A carriers (CA + AA) (AOR = 2.014, 95% CI = 1.114–3.642, p = 0.021). The meta-analysis containing 36 studies demonstrated that the two polymorphisms were associated with T2DM under the allele comparison, genetic models of dominant and recessive in Asians (p < 0.05). The rs4402960 polymorphisms were significantly associated with the T2DM risk after stratification by diagnostic criterion, size of sample and average age and BMI of cases, while there’re no consistent results for rs1470579. Conclusions: Our data suggests that IGF2BP2 polymorphisms are associated with T2DM in Asian populations. PMID:27294943

  3. Molecular Cloning, Bioinformatics Analysis and Expression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 from Tianzhu White Yak, Bos grunniens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quanwei; Gong, Jishang; Wang, Xueying; Wu, Xiaohu; Li, Yalan; Ma, Youji; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Xingxu

    2014-01-01

    The IGF family is essential for normal embryonic and postnatal development and plays important roles in the immune system, myogenesis, bone metabolism and other physiological functions, which makes the study of its structure and biological characteristics important. Tianzhu white yak (Bos grunniens) domesticated under alpine hypoxia environments, is well adapted to survive and grow against severe hypoxia and cold temperatures for extended periods. In this study, a full coding sequence of the IGF2 gene of Tianzhu white yak was amplified by reverse transcription PCR and rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) for the first time. The cDNA sequence revealed an open reading frame of 450 nucleotides, encoding a protein with 179 amino acids. Its expression in different tissues was also studied by Real time PCR. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that yak IGF2 was similar to Bos taurus, and 3D structure showed high similarity with the human IGF2. The putative full CDS of yak IGF2 was amplified by PCR in five tissues, and cDNA sequence analysis showed high homology to bovine IGF2. Moreover the super secondary structure prediction showed a similar 3D structure with human IGF2. Its conservation in sequence and structure has facilitated research on IGF2 and its physiological function in yak. PMID:24394317

  4. Protein imprinting in polyacrylamide-based gels

    PubMed Central

    Zayats, Maya; Brenner, Andrew J.; Searson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein imprinting in hydrogels is a method to produce materials capable of selective recognition and capture of a target protein. Here we report on the imprinting of fluorescently-labeled maltose binding protein (MBP) in acrylamide (AAm)/N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) hydrogels. The targeting efficiency and selectivity of protein recognition is usually characterized by the imprinting factor, which in the simplest case is the ratio of protein uptake in an imprinted film divided by the uptake by the corresponding non-imprinted film. Our objective in this work is to study the dynamics of protein binding and elution in imprinted and non-imprinted films to elucidate the processes that control protein recognition. Protein elution from imprinted and non-imprinted films suggests that imprinting results in sites with a distribution of binding energies, and that only a relatively small fraction of these sites exhibit strong binding. PMID:25034963

  5. Protein imprinting in polyacrylamide-based gels.

    PubMed

    Zayats, Maya; Brenner, Andrew J; Searson, Peter C

    2014-10-01

    Protein imprinting in hydrogels is a method to produce materials capable of selective recognition and capture of a target protein. Here we report on the imprinting of fluorescently-labeled maltose binding protein (MBP) in acrylamide (AAm)/N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) hydrogels. The targeting efficiency and selectivity of protein recognition is usually characterized by the imprinting factor, which in the simplest case is the ratio of protein uptake in an imprinted film divided by the uptake by the corresponding non-imprinted film. Our objective in this work is to study the dynamics of protein binding and elution in imprinted and non-imprinted films to elucidate the processes that control protein recognition. Protein elution from imprinted and non-imprinted films suggests that imprinting results in sites with a distribution of binding energies, and that only a relatively small fraction of these sites exhibit strong binding. PMID:25034963

  6. Comparative Anatomy of Chromosomal Domains with Imprinted and Non-Imprinted Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L.; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM. PMID:24009515

  7. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Anupam; Temkin, Alexis M; Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM. PMID:24009515

  8. Xist imprinting is promoted by the hemizygous (unpaired) state in the male germ line

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sha; Payer, Bernhard; Namekawa, Satoshi; An, Jee Young; Press, William; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2015-01-01

    The long noncoding X-inactivation–specific transcript (Xist gene) is responsible for mammalian X-chromosome dosage compensation between the sexes, the process by which one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated in the female soma. Xist is essential for both the random and imprinted forms of X-chromosome inactivation. In the imprinted form, Xist is paternally marked to be expressed in female embryos. To investigate the mechanism of Xist imprinting, we introduce Xist transgenes (Tg) into the male germ line. Although ectopic high-level Xist expression on autosomes can be compatible with viability, transgenic animals demonstrate reduced fitness, subfertility, defective meiotic pairing, and other germ-cell abnormalities. In the progeny, paternal-specific expression is recapitulated by the 200-kb Xist Tg. However, Xist imprinting occurs efficiently only when it is in an unpaired or unpartnered state during male meiosis. When transmitted from a hemizygous father (+/Tg), the Xist Tg demonstrates paternal-specific expression in the early embryo. When transmitted by a homozygous father (Tg/Tg), the Tg fails to show imprinted expression. Thus, Xist imprinting is directed by sequences within a 200-kb X-linked region, and the hemizygous (unpaired) state of the Xist region promotes its imprinting in the male germ line. PMID:26489649

  9. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.; Talin, Albert A.

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  10. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  11. Genomic imprinting proposed as a surveillance mechanism for chromosome loss.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J H

    1995-01-01

    One consequence of genomic imprinting is that loss of the transcriptionally active chromosomal homologue causes a change in gene expression that might permit surveillance of chromosome-loss events. Possible selective advantages of such surveillance include protection against cancer and early elimination of monosomic and trisomic fetuses. Potential mechanisms for such surveillance are discussed. PMID:7831314

  12. CRITICAL EXPERIMENTS TO DETERMINE IF EARLY NUTRITIONAL INFLUENCES ON EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS CAUSE METABOLIC IMPRINTING IN HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic imprinting occurs when nutritional influences during critical periods of development cause specific metabolic adaptations that persist to adulthood. Epigenetic mechanisms, which regulate the broad diversity of tissue-specific gene expression, are established during development and largely ...

  13. Detection of imprinting mutations in Angelman syndrome using a probe for exon {alpha} of SNRPN

    SciTech Connect

    Beuten, J.; Sutcliffe, J.S.; Casey, B.M.

    1996-05-17

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct clinical disorders resulting from deficiency of paternal (PWS) or maternal (AS) expression of imprinted genes within chromosome 15q11-q13. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Genes Downregulated in Endometriosis Are Located Near the Known Imprinting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Higashiura, Yumi; Koike, Natsuki; Akasaka, Juria; Uekuri, Chiharu; Iwai, Kana; Niiro, Emiko; Morioka, Sachiko; Yamada, Yuki

    2014-01-01

    There is now accumulating evidence that endometriosis is a disease associated with an epigenetic disorder. Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon known to regulate DNA methylation of either maternal or paternal alleles. We hypothesize that hypermethylated endometriosis-associated genes may be enriched at imprinted gene loci. We sought to determine whether downregulated genes associated with endometriosis susceptibility are associated with chromosomal location of the known paternally and maternally expressed imprinting genes. Gene information has been gathered from National Center for Biotechnology Information database geneimprint.com. Several researchers have identified specific loci with strong DNA methylation in eutopic endometrium and ectopic lesion with endometriosis. Of the 29 hypermethylated genes in endometriosis, 19 genes were located near 45 known imprinted foci. There may be an association of the genomic location between genes specifically downregulated in endometriosis and epigenetically imprinted genes. PMID:24615936

  15. Coadaptation and conflict, misconception and muddle, in the evolution of genomic imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Haig, D

    2014-01-01

    Common misconceptions of the ‘parental conflict' theory of genomic imprinting are addressed. Contrary to widespread belief, the theory defines conditions for cooperation as well as conflict in mother–offspring relations. Moreover, conflict between genes of maternal and paternal origin is not the same as conflict between mothers and fathers. In theory, imprinting can evolve either because genes of maternal and paternal origin have divergent interests or because offspring benefit from a phenotypic match, or mismatch, to one or other parent. The latter class of models usually require maintenance of polymorphism at imprinted loci for the maintenance of imprinted expression. The conflict hypothesis does not require maintenance of polymorphism and is therefore a more plausible explanation of evolutionarily conserved imprinting. PMID:24129605

  16. Targeted methylation testing of a patient cohort broadens the epigenetic and clinical description of imprinting disorders.

    PubMed

    Poole, Rebecca L; Docherty, Louise E; Al Sayegh, Abeer; Caliebe, Almuth; Turner, Claire; Baple, Emma; Wakeling, Emma; Harrison, Lucy; Lehmann, Anna; Temple, I Karen; Mackay, Deborah J G

    2013-09-01

    Imprinting disorders are associated with mutations and epimutations affecting imprinted genes, that is those whose expression is restricted by parent of origin. Their diagnosis is challenging for two reasons: firstly, their clinical features, particularly prenatal and postnatal growth disturbance, are heterogeneous and partially overlapping; secondly, their underlying molecular defects include mutation, epimutation, copy number variation, and chromosomal errors, and can be further complicated by somatic mosaicism and multi-locus methylation defects. It is currently unclear to what extent the observed phenotypic heterogeneity reflects the underlying molecular pathophysiology; in particular, the molecular and clinical diversity of multilocus methylation defects remains uncertain. To address these issues we performed comprehensive methylation analysis of imprinted genes in a research cohort of 285 patients with clinical features of imprinting disorders, with or without a positive molecular diagnosis. 20 of 91 patients (22%) with diagnosed epimutations had methylation defects of additional imprinted loci, and the frequency of developmental delay and congenital anomalies was higher among these patients than those with isolated epimutations, indicating that hypomethylation of multiple imprinted loci is associated with increased diversity of clinical presentation. Among 194 patients with clinical features of an imprinting disorder but no molecular diagnosis, we found 15 (8%) with methylation anomalies, including missed and unexpected molecular diagnoses. These observations broaden the phenotypic and epigenetic definitions of imprinting disorders, and show the importance of comprehensive molecular testing for patient diagnosis and management. PMID:23913548

  17. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN'S MEDICAL IMPRINTS.

    PubMed

    CANTU, J Q

    1965-01-01

    The printing house of Benjamin Franklin produced several works of a medical nature in Colonial America at a time when very few medical treatises were being written or printed. Benjamin Franklin was also indirectly responsible for the founding of the first medical library in this country. For these reasons he was, in addition to his many other talents, an early contributor to American medical literature. Included in this bibliography are all the known medical books, pamphlets, and broadsides in English with Benjamin Franklin's name in the imprint, issued in America. These eighteen titles span the years 1732 to 1765 and are presented chronologically with indications of their relation to the practice and practitioners of Colonial medicine. Benjamin Franklin's press produced as wide a variety of contributions as did his versatile life, and the early history of medicine in this country bears the influence of both.I am pleased with your scheme of a Medical Library at the Hospital, and I fancy I can procure you some donations among my medical friends here, if you will send me a catalogue of what books you already have. Enclosed I send you the only book of the kind in my possession here, having just received it as a present from the author.-Benjamin Franklin to Dr. Cadwallader Evans, London, May 5, 1767 (1). PMID:14223741

  18. Benjamin Franklin's Medical Imprints

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Jane Quale

    1965-01-01

    The printing house of Benjamin Franklin produced several works of a medical nature in Colonial America at a time when very few medical treatises were being written or printed. Benjamin Franklin was also indirectly responsible for the founding of the first medical library in this country. For these reasons he was, in addition to his many other talents, an early contributor to American medical literature. Included in this bibliography are all the known medical books, pamphlets, and broadsides in English with Benjamin Franklin's name in the imprint, issued in America. These eighteen titles span the years 1732 to 1765 and are presented chronologically with indications of their relation to the practice and practitioners of Colonial medicine. Benjamin Franklin's press produced as wide a variety of contributions as did his versatile life, and the early history of medicine in this country bears the influence of both. I am pleased with your scheme of a Medical Library at the Hospital, and I fancy I can procure you some donations among my medical friends here, if you will send me a catalogue of what books you already have. Enclosed I send you the only book of the kind in my possession here, having just received it as a present from the author.—Benjamin Franklin to Dr. Cadwallader Evans, London, May 5, 1767 (1). PMID:14223741

  19. High Gestational Folic Acid Supplementation Alters Expression of Imprinted and Candidate Autism Susceptibility Genes in a sex-Specific Manner in Mouse Offspring.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Ted Brown, W; Junaid, Mohammed A

    2016-02-01

    Maternal nutrients play critical roles in modulating epigenetic events and exert long-term influences on the progeny's health. Folic acid (FA) supplementation during pregnancy has decreased the incidence of neural tube defects in newborns, but the influence of high doses of maternal FA supplementation on infants' brain development is unclear. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of a high dose of gestational FA on the expression of genes in the cerebral hemispheres (CHs) of 1-day-old pups. One week prior to mating and throughout the entire period of gestation, female C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet, containing FA at either 2 mg/kg (control diet (CD)) or 20 mg/kg (high maternal folic acid (HMFA)). At postnatal day 1, pups from different dams were sacrificed and CH tissues were collected. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed sex-specific alterations in the expression of several genes that modulate various cellular functions (P < 0.05) in pups from the HMFA group. Genomic DNA methylation analysis showed no difference in the level of overall methylation in pups from the HMFA group. These findings demonstrate that HMFA supplementation alters offsprings' CH gene expression in a sex-specific manner. These changes may influence infants' brain development. PMID:26547318

  20. Direct Imprinting of Liquid Silicon.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takashi; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Ken; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2016-04-20

    A polymeric precursor solution for semiconducting silicon called "liquid silicon" was synthesized and directly imprinted to form well-defined and fine amorphous silicon patterns. The spin-coated film was cured and imprinted followed by annealing at 380 °C to complete the polymer-to-silicon conversion. A pattern with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers or less was obtained on a substrate. We demonstrated that the curing step before imprinting is particularly important in the imprinting process. A curing temperature of 140-180 °C was found to be optimal in terms of the film's deformability and molding properties. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis clarified that the cross-linking of the polymer due to the 1,2-hydrogen shift reaction was induced exponentially with the release of a large amount of SiH4/H2 gases at temperatures between 140 and 220 °C, leading to the solidification of the film. Consequently, the film completely lost its deformability at higher temperatures. Despite a volume shrinkage as large as 53-56% during the polymer-to-silicon conversion, well-defined angular patterns were preserved. Fine silicon patterns were formed via the direct imprinting of liquid silicon with high resolution and high throughput, demonstrating the usefulness of this technique for the future manufacturing of silicon electronics. PMID:27028558

  1. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. The imprinting marks are protected from global demethylation taking place during pre-implantation development before being reset in primordial germ cells. However, it...

  2. Imprinting and evolution of two Kruppel-type zinc-finger genes, ZIM3 and ZNF264, located in the PEG3/USP29 imprinted domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Bergmann, A; Wehri, E; Lu, X; Stubbs, L

    2001-09-01

    We have isolated Kruppel-type (C2H2) zinc-finger genes, ZIM3 (zinc-finger gene 3 from imprinted domain) and ZNF264, located downstream of human and mouse USP29 genes (encoding ubiquitin-specific processing protease 29). In human, both ZIM3 and ZNF264 encode zinc-finger proteins with Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) A and B domains at the amino-terminal regions of the predicted proteins. In contrast, mouse Zim3 and Zfp264 seem to have lost protein-coding capability based on the lack of open reading frames (ORFs) in their cDNA sequences. In particular, the 3' end of the Zim3 transcript overlaps with the coding region of the adjacent gene Usp29 in an antisense orientation, indicating the conversion of mouse Zim3 into an antisense transcript gene for Usp29. The expression patterns of ZIM3 and ZNF264 have been largely conserved between human and mouse, with testis-specific expression of ZIM3 and ubiquitous expression of ZNF264, but high expression levels in adult testes in both species. Our studies also demonstrate that both mouse genes are imprinted with maternal expression of Zim3 in adult testes and paternal expression of Zfp264 in neonatal and adult brain. The reciprocal imprinting of two neighboring mouse genes, Zim3 and Zfp264, is consistent with a pattern observed frequently in other imprinted domains, and suggests that the imprinting of these two genes might be coregulated. PMID:11543637

  3. Imprinted Genes and the Environment: Links to the Toxic Metals Arsenic, Cadmium and Lead

    PubMed Central

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E.; Nye, Monica D.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology. PMID:24921406

  4. Characterization of the differentially methylated region of the Impact gene that exhibits Glires-specific imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kohji; Wintle, Richard F; Scherer, Stephen W

    2008-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes are exclusively expressed from one of the two parental alleles in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. In mammals, nearly 100 genes are documented to be imprinted. To understand the mechanism behind this gene regulation and to identify novel imprinted genes, common features of DNA sequences have been analyzed; however, the general features required for genomic imprinting have not yet been identified, possibly due to variability in underlying molecular mechanisms from locus to locus. Results We performed a thorough comparative genomic analysis of a single locus, Impact, which is imprinted only in Glires (rodents and lagomorphs). The fact that Glires and primates diverged from each other as recent as 70 million years ago makes comparisons between imprinted and non-imprinted orthologues relatively reliable. In species from the Glires clade, Impact bears a differentially methylated region, whereby the maternal allele is hypermethylated. Analysis of this region demonstrated that imprinting was not associated with the presence of direct tandem repeats nor with CpG dinucleotide density. In contrast, a CpG periodicity of 8 bp was observed in this region in species of the Glires clade compared to those of carnivores, artiodactyls, and primates. Conclusions We show that tandem repeats are dispensable, establishment of the differentially methylated region does not rely on G+C content and CpG density, and the CpG periodicity of 8 bp is meaningful to the imprinting. This interval has recently been reported to be optimal for de novo methylation by the Dnmt3a-Dnmt3L complex, suggesting its importance in the establishment of imprinting in Impact and other genes. PMID:19014519

  5. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. PMID:27516599

  6. Association analysis of IGF2BP2, KCNJ11, and CDKAL1 polymorphisms with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Moroccan population: a case-control study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Benrahma, Houda; Charoute, Hicham; Lasram, Khaled; Boulouiz, Redouane; Atig, Rym Kefi-Ben; Fakiri, Malika; Rouba, Hassan; Abdelhak, Sonia; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2014-10-01

    Associations with type 2 diabetes mellitus have been identified for variants CDKAL1 rs7756992, KCNJ11 rs5219, and IGF2BP2 rs4402960 in different populations. In a case-control study of 250 unrelated Moroccan diabetic patients and 250 healthy controls, we used TaqMan allelic discrimination assays to genotype the three SNPs and meta-analysis to investigate the association between the polymorphisms and diabetes in Arab populations. The results showed a significant diabetes association only with the variant rs4402960 of the IGF2BP2 gene under additive 2 (GG vs. TT; p = 0.009) and recessive (TT vs. GG+GT; p = 0.003) models. Meta-analysis indicated significant association between the IGF2BP2 rs4402960 and CDKAL1 rs7756992 polymorphisms and increased risk of diabetes in Arab populations. According to our results, the case-control study and meta-analysis revealed a significant association between the IGF2BP2 rs4402960 variant and type 2 diabetes in Moroccan and Arab populations. PMID:24898818

  7. Identification and Epigenetic Analysis of a Maternally Imprinted Gene Qpct

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; He, Hongjuan; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Fengwei; Lv, Jie; Zeng, Tiebo; Gu, Ning; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Most imprinted genes are concerned with embryonic development, especially placental development. Here, we identified a placenta-specific imprinted gene Qpct. Our results show that Qpct is widely expressed during early embryonic development and can be detected in the telecephalon, midbrain, and rhombencephalon at E9.5–E11.5. Moreover, Qpct is strikingly expressed in the brain, lung and liver in E15.5. Expression signals for Qpct achieved a peak at E15.5 during placental development and were only detected in the labyrinth layer in E15.5 placenta. ChIP assay results suggest that the modification of histone H3K4me3 can result in maternal activating of Qpct. PMID:26447138

  8. Methods for detecting interactions between imprinted genes and environmental exposures using birth cohort designs with mother-offspring pairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Yu, Zhaoxia; Miller, Rachel L; Tang, Deliang; Perera, Frederica P

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a form of epigenetic regulation in mammals in which the same allele of a gene is expressed differently depending on the parental origin of the allele. Traditionally, the detection of imprinted genes that affect complex diseases has been focused on linkage designs with pedigrees or case-parent designs with case-parent trios. In the past two decades, the birth cohort design with mother-offspring pairs has been applied to understand better the effect of environmental influences during pregnancy and beginning of life on the growth and development of children. No work has been done on the detection of imprinted genes using birth cohort designs. Moreover, although the importance of imprinting has been well recognized, no study has looked at how environmental exposures modify the effects of imprinted genes. In this study, we show that the proposed imprinting test using the birth cohort design with mother-offspring pairs is an efficient test for testing the interactions between imprinted genes and environmental exposures. Through extensive simulation studies and a real data application, the proposed imprinting test has demonstrated much improved power in detecting gene-environment interactions than that of a test assuming the Mendelian dominant model when the true underlying genetic model is imprinting. PMID:21778739

  9. Familiarity interferes with filial imprinting.

    PubMed

    van Kampen, H S; de Vos, G J

    1996-10-01

    The present study was performed to investigate whether and how pre-exposure to an object affects subsequent filial imprinting to that object. In Experiment 1 junglefowl chicks (Gallus gallus spadiceus) were first exposed to either a red object alone (control group), or a red and a yellow object simultaneously (experimental group; phase 1). Subsequently, all chicks were exposed to the yellow object in the presence of a black and blue one (phase 2). At the end of phase 1, most experimental chicks had developed a preference for the red object over the yellow one. At the end of phase 2, preferences of experimental chicks were shifted away from the yellow object towards the novel black and blue object, relative to preferences of control chicks. This shows that pre-exposure may interfere with imprinting. Experiment 2 revealed that when control chicks were tested with the yellow object at the end of phase 1, filial responses were as strong as in experimental chicks. This shows that the yellow object had not acquired control over filial behaviour during phase 1, and also that the relatively impaired imprinting on that object in phase 2 was not due to reduced generalization from the red object. One possible explanation why pre-exposure may interfere with imprinting is that familiarity alters the level of attention attracted by an object, a mechanism suggested to underlie 'latent inhibition' in conditioning. PMID:24897630

  10. Imprinted Polymers in Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Christopher; Goodrich, Scott; Gartner, Isabelle; Mueller, Anja

    2004-03-31

    In wastewater treatment, a method that specifically recognizes a variety of impurities in a flexible manner would be useful for treatment facilities with varying needs. Current purification techniques (i.e. bacteria, oxidation, reduction, precipitation and filtration) are nonspecific and difficult to control in complex mixtures. Heavy metal removal is particularly important in improving the efficiency of wastewater treatment, as they inhibit or even destroy the bacteria used for filtration. Imprinting polymerization is a technique that allows for the efficient removal of specific compounds and has been used in purification of enantiomers. It has potential to be applied in wastewater systems with the impurities acting as the template for the imprinting polymerization. The polymer with the bound impurities intact can then be removed via precipitation. After removal of the impurity the polymer can be reused. Data for the imprinting polymerization of polyacrylates and polyacrylamides for several metal complexes will be presented. Imprinting polymerization in combination with emulsion polymerization to improve the removal of hydrophobic contaminants will be described. Removal efficiencies will be presented and compared with conventional wastewater treatment methods.

  11. Clinical features associated with copy number variations of the 14q32 imprinted gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Fox, Joyce E; Descartes, Maria; Brewer, Fallon; Stroud, Tracy; Gorski, Jerome L; Upton, Sheila J; Moeschler, John B; Monteleone, Berrin; Neill, Nicholas J; Lamb, Allen N; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Ravnan, J Britt

    2015-02-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for imprinted chromosomes can cause abnormal phenotypes due to absent or overexpression of imprinted genes. UPD(14)pat causes a unique constellation of features including thoracic skeletal anomalies, polyhydramnios, placentomegaly, and limited survival; its hypothesized cause is overexpression of paternally expressed RTL1, due to absent regulatory effects of maternally expressed RTL1as. UPD(14)mat causes a milder condition with hypotonia, growth failure, and precocious puberty; its hypothesized cause is absence of paternally expressed DLK1. To more clearly establish how gains and losses of imprinted genes can cause disease, we report six individuals with copy number variations of the imprinted 14q32 region identified through clinical microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. Three individuals presented with UPD(14)mat-like phenotypes (Temple syndrome) and had apparently de novo deletions spanning the imprinted region, including DLK1. One of these deletions was shown to be on the paternal chromosome. Two individuals with UPD(14)pat-like phenotypes had 122-154kb deletions on their maternal chromosomes that included RTL1as but not the differentially methylated regions that regulate imprinted gene expression, providing further support for RTL1 overexpression as a cause for the UPD(14)pat phenotype. The sixth individual is tetrasomic for a 1.7Mb segment, including the imprinted region, and presents with intellectual disability and seizures but lacks significant phenotypic overlap with either UPD(14) syndrome. Therefore, the 14q32 imprinted region is dosage sensitive, with deletions of different critical regions causing UPD(14)mat- and UPD(14)pat-like phenotypes, while copy gains are likely insufficient to recapitulate these phenotypes. PMID:25756153

  12. Development of a Biosensor for Detection of Pleural Mesothelioma Cancer Biomarker Using Surface Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Aabhas; Blais, Steven; Goparaju, Chandra M. V.; Neubert, Thomas; Pass, Harvey; Levon, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan-linked protein 1 (HAPLN1) which has been shown to be highly expressed in malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPM), was detected in serum using an electrochemical surface-imprinting method. First, the detection method was optimized using Bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein to mimic the optimal conditions required to imprint the similar molecular weight protein HAPLN1. BSA was imprinted on the gold electrode with hydroxyl terminated alkane thiols, which formed a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) around BSA. The analyte (BSA) was then washed away and its imprint (empty cavity with shape-memory) was used for detection of BSA in a solution, using electrochemical open-circuit potential method, namely potentiometry. Factors considered to optimize the conditions include incubation time, protein concentration, limit of detection and size of electrode. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to confirm selectivity of imprints. With the obtained imprinting control parameters, HAPLN1 was imprinted in duplicate and the detection of spiked HAPLN1 was successfully conducted in serum. PMID:23516416

  13. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells. PMID:26948803

  14. G9a/GLP Complex Maintains Imprinted DNA Methylation in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tuo; Termanis, Ausma; Özkan, Burak; Bao, Xun X.; Culley, Jayne; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Ramsahoye, Bernard; Stancheva, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation at imprinting control regions (ICRs) is established in gametes in a sex-specific manner and has to be stably maintained during development and in somatic cells to ensure the correct monoallelic expression of imprinted genes. In addition to DNA methylation, the ICRs are marked by allele-specific histone modifications. Whether these marks are essential for maintenance of genomic imprinting is largely unclear. Here, we show that the histone H3 lysine 9 methylases G9a and GLP are required for stable maintenance of imprinted DNA methylation in embryonic stem cells; however, their catalytic activity and the G9a/GLP-dependent H3K9me2 mark are completely dispensable for imprinting maintenance despite the genome-wide loss of non-imprinted DNA methylation in H3K9me2-depleted cells. We provide additional evidence that the G9a/GLP complex protects imprinted DNA methylation by recruitment of de novo DNA methyltransferases, which antagonize TET dioxygenass-dependent erosion of DNA methylation at ICRs. PMID:27052169

  15. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells. PMID:26948803

  16. Polyandry, life-history trade-offs and the evolution of imprinting at Mendelian loci.

    PubMed

    Mills, Walter; Moore, Tom

    2004-12-01

    Genomic imprinting causes parental origin-dependent differential expression of a small number of genes in mammalian and angiosperm plant embryos, resulting in non-Mendelian inheritance of phenotypic traits. The "conflict" theory of the evolution of imprinting proposes that reduced genetic relatedness of paternally, relative to maternally, derived alleles in offspring of polygamous females supports parental sex-specific selection at gene loci that influence maternal investment. While the theory's physiological predictions are well supported by observation, the requirement of polyandry in the evolution of imprinting from an ancestral Mendelian state has not been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we use diallelic models to examine the influence of various degrees of polyandry on the evolution of both Mendelian and imprinted autosomal gene loci that influence trade-offs between maternal fecundity and offspring viability. We show that, given a plausible assumption on the physiological relationship between maternal fecundity and offspring viability, low levels of polyandry are sufficient to reinforce exclusively the fixation of "greedy" paternally imprinted alleles that increase offspring viability at the expense of maternal fecundity and "thrifty" maternally imprinted alleles of opposite effect. We also show that, for all levels of polyandry, Mendelian alleles at genetic loci that influence the trade-off between maternal fecundity and offspring viability reach an evolutionary stable state, whereas pairs of reciprocally imprinted alleles do not. PMID:15611195

  17. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells.

  18. IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 gene variants are associated with obesity-related risk phenotypes in Brazilian children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, E.M.; Cândido, A.P.C.; Castro, I.M.; Bastos, A.Q.A.; Machado-Coelho, G.L.L.; Freitas, R.N.

    2015-01-01

    Association studies of genetic variants and obesity and/or obesity-related risk factors have yielded contradictory results. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1genes with obesity or obesity-related risk phenotypes. This case-control study assessed overweight (n=192) and normal-weight (n=211) children and adolescents. The SNPs were analyzed using minisequencing assays, and variables and genotype distributions between the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and gender was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for selected phenotype risks in each group. No difference in SNP distribution was observed between groups. In children, POMC rs28932472(C) was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001), higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P=0.014), and higher risk in overweight children of altered total cholesterol (OR=7.35, P=0.006). In adolescents, IGF2 rs680(A) was associated with higher glucose (P=0.012) and higher risk in overweight adolescents for altered insulin (OR=10.08, P=0.005) and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (OR=6.34, P=0.010). PPARG rs1801282(G) conferred a higher risk of altered insulin (OR=12.31, P=0.003), and HOMA-IR (OR=7.47, P=0.005) in overweight adolescents. PARGC1 rs8192678(A) was associated with higher triacylglycerols (P=0.005), and LEPR rs1137101(A) was marginally associated with higher LDL cholesterol (P=0.017). LEPR rs1137101(A) conferred higher risk for altered insulin, and HOMA-IR in overweight adolescents. The associations observed in this population suggested increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and/or type 2 diabetes later in life for individuals carrying these alleles. PMID:25923461

  19. IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 gene variants are associated with obesity-related risk phenotypes in Brazilian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, E M; Cândido, A P C; Castro, I M; Bastos, A Q A; Machado-Coelho, G L L; Freitas, R N

    2015-07-01

    Association studies of genetic variants and obesity and/or obesity-related risk factors have yielded contradictory results. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 genes with obesity or obesity-related risk phenotypes. This case-control study assessed overweight (n=192) and normal-weight (n=211) children and adolescents. The SNPs were analyzed using minisequencing assays, and variables and genotype distributions between the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and gender was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for selected phenotype risks in each group. No difference in SNP distribution was observed between groups. In children, POMC rs28932472(C) was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001), higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P=0.014), and higher risk in overweight children of altered total cholesterol (OR=7.35, P=0.006). In adolescents, IGF2 rs680(A) was associated with higher glucose (P=0.012) and higher risk in overweight adolescents for altered insulin (OR=10.08, P=0.005) and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (OR=6.34, P=0.010). PPARG rs1801282(G) conferred a higher risk of altered insulin (OR=12.31, P=0.003), and HOMA-IR (OR=7.47, P=0.005) in overweight adolescents. PARGC1 rs8192678(A) was associated with higher triacylglycerols (P=0.005), and LEPR rs1137101(A) was marginally associated with higher LDL cholesterol (P=0.017). LEPR rs1137101(A) conferred higher risk for altered insulin, and HOMA-IR in overweight adolescents. The associations observed in this population suggested increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and/or type 2 diabetes later in life for individuals carrying these alleles. PMID:25923461

  20. Recognition of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by microcontact-imprinted poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Thomas, James L; Li, Ming-Huan; Shih, Ching-Ping; Jan, Jeng-Shiung; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2015-11-01

    The immobilization of cells or microorganisms is important for bioseparations, in bioreactors producing cellular metabolites, and as receptors for biosensing. Cell-imprinted polymers (CIPs) have been shown to have cavities with complementary shapes and also high affinities for the template cells or microorganisms. However, the effects of binding to CIPs on gene expression are only beginning to be studied. In this work, the purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides was employed as a model for the imprinting of microorganisms. R. sphaeroides was first adsorbed on a glass slide as the stamp and then microcontact-imprinted onto poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), EVAL. The surfaces of the R. sphaeroides-imprinted (RsIPs) and non-imprinted (NIPs) EVAL thin films were examined by Raman spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The expression of the nitrogenase (nitrogen fixation, nifH) gene of R. sphaeroides adsorbed on both the RsIPs and NIPs EVAL thin films was also measured by the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR); cells grown on imprinted polymer showed dramatic differences in gene expression compared to controls. PMID:26277714

  1. Rapid Evolution of Genomic Imprinting in Two Species of the Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Hatorangan, Marcelinus R; Laenen, Benjamin; Steige, Kim A; Slotte, Tanja; Köhler, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon occurring in mammals and flowering plants that causes genes to adopt a parent-of-origin-specific mode of expression. While the imprinting status of genes is well conserved in mammals, clear estimates for the degree of conservation were lacking in plants. We therefore analyzed the genome-wide imprinting status of Capsella rubella, which shared a common recent ancestor with Arabidopsis thaliana ∼10 to 14 million years ago. However, only ∼14% of maternally expressed genes (MEGs) and ∼29% of paternally expressed genes (PEGs) in C. rubella were commonly imprinted in both species, revealing that genomic imprinting is a rapidly evolving phenomenon in plants. Nevertheless, conserved PEGs exhibited signs of selection, suggesting that a subset of imprinted genes play an important functional role and are therefore maintained in plants. Like in Arabidopsis, PEGs in C. rubella are frequently associated with the presence of transposable elements that preferentially belong to helitron and MuDR families. Our data further reveal that MEGs and PEGs differ in their targeting by 24-nucleotide small RNAs and asymmetric DNA methylation, suggesting different mechanisms establishing DNA methylation at MEGs and PEGs. PMID:27465027

  2. Autoimmune Response to IGF2 mRNA-Binding Protein 2 (IMP2/p62) in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Li, Y; Wang, B; Dai, L; Qian, W; Zhang, J-Y

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the autoimmune response and immunogenicity of a tumour-associated antigen IMP2/p62 in breast cancer. Autoantibody responses to IMP2/p62 were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay in sera from patients with breast cancer, benign breast tumour and normal human individuals. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) study with breast cancer tissues was also performed to analyse protein expression of IMP2/p62. The results have demonstrated that IMP2/p62 can induce a relatively higher frequency of autoantibody response in breast cancer (14.3%, 7/49) compared to patients with benign breast tumour (5.6%, 2/36) and normal individuals (2.2%, 1/44). The frequency of IMP2/p62 expression in breast cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in normal tissues (P < 0.01). The data suggest that autoantibody against IMP2/p62 may be a useful serum biomarker for early-stage breast cancer screening and diagnosis. PMID:25721883

  3. Autoimmune Response to IGF2 mRNA-Binding Protein 2 (IMP2/p62) in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weihong; Li, Yang; Wang, Bo; Dai, Liping; Qian, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the autoimmune response and immunogenicity of a tumor-associated antigen IMP2/p62 in breast cancer. Autoantibody responses to IMP2/p62 were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay in sera from patients with breast cancer, benign breast tumor and normal human individuals. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) study with breast cancer tissues was also performed to analyze protein expression of IMP2/p62. The results have demonstrated that IMP2/p62 can induce a relatively higher frequency of autoantibody response in breast cancer (14.3%, 7/49) compared to patients with benign breast tumor (5.6%, 2/36) and normal individuals (2.2%, 1/44). The frequency of IMP2/p62 expression in breast cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in normal tissues (P<0.01). The data suggest that autoantibody against IMP2/p62 may be a useful serum biomarker for early stage breast cancer screening and diagnosis. PMID:25721883

  4. Epigenetic imprinting during assisted reproductive technologies: The effect of temporal and cumulative fluctuations in methionine cycling on the DNA methylation state.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Lianne; Kempe, Hermannus; Verschure, Pernette J

    2016-02-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) exposes gametes and embryos to an artificial environment that does not resemble the conditions of natural conception, and therefore might change epigenetic regulation of genes that are imprinted during development. In the present review, we discuss the relationship between susceptibility of specific genes to receive an altered epigenetic composition during ART processes, possibly via alterations in the biochemical folate and methionine cycle. We provide a comprehensive view of the current state of epigenetic patterning in ART-conceived healthy children and in Angelman syndrome (AS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) patients. We illustrate that similar genes--that is, MEST, KCNQ1OT1, and IGF2--possess an altered DNA methylation profile in animal models, ART-conceived healthy children, and AS and BWS patients. The developmental stage at which these genes receive their epigenetic imprint appears to coincide with the specific moment that ART takes place. We highlight that ART procedures affect physiological levels of enzymes and substrates involved in the folate and methionine cycle thereby altering the DNA methylation state. Moreover, although the DNA methylation rate appears to be robust: (i) temporal imbalances coinciding with defined moments of epigenetic imprinting of specific genes affect the eventual DNA methylation state of those genes and (ii) cumulative ART effects on methionine and folate cycling can alter DNA methylation rates. These observations underscore the necessity to further investigate consequences of ART treatments on the epigenetic profile. PMID:26660493

  5. Maternal Effects as the Cause of Parent-of-Origin Effects That Mimic Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Reinmar; Cheverud, James M.; Wolf, Jason B.

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic effects are increasingly recognized as an important source of variation in complex traits and have emerged as the focus of a rapidly expanding area of research. Principle among these effects is genomic imprinting, which has generally been examined in analyses of complex traits by testing for parent-of-origin-dependent effects of alleles. However, in most of these analyses maternal effects are confounded with genomic imprinting because they can produce the same patterns of phenotypic variation expected for various forms of imprinting. Distinguishing between the two is critical for genetic and evolutionary studies because they have entirely different patterns of gene expression and evolutionary dynamics. Using a simple single-locus model, we show that maternal genetic effects can result in patterns that mimic those expected under genomic imprinting. We further demonstrate how maternal effects and imprinting effects can be distinguished using genomic data from parents and offspring. The model results are applied to a genome scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting growth- and weight-related traits in mice to illustrate how maternal effects can mimic imprinting. This genome scan revealed five separate maternal-effect loci that caused a diversity of patterns mimicking those expected under various modes of genomic imprinting. These results demonstrate that the appearance of parent-of-origin-dependent effects (POEs) of alleles at a locus cannot be taken as direct evidence that the locus is imprinted. Moreover, they show that, in gene mapping studies, genetic data from both parents and offspring are required to successfully differentiate between imprinting and maternal effects as the cause of apparent parent-of-origin effects of alleles. PMID:18245362

  6. Maternal effects as the cause of parent-of-origin effects that mimic genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Hager, Reinmar; Cheverud, James M; Wolf, Jason B

    2008-03-01

    Epigenetic effects are increasingly recognized as an important source of variation in complex traits and have emerged as the focus of a rapidly expanding area of research. Principle among these effects is genomic imprinting, which has generally been examined in analyses of complex traits by testing for parent-of-origin-dependent effects of alleles. However, in most of these analyses maternal effects are confounded with genomic imprinting because they can produce the same patterns of phenotypic variation expected for various forms of imprinting. Distinguishing between the two is critical for genetic and evolutionary studies because they have entirely different patterns of gene expression and evolutionary dynamics. Using a simple single-locus model, we show that maternal genetic effects can result in patterns that mimic those expected under genomic imprinting. We further demonstrate how maternal effects and imprinting effects can be distinguished using genomic data from parents and offspring. The model results are applied to a genome scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting growth- and weight-related traits in mice to illustrate how maternal effects can mimic imprinting. This genome scan revealed five separate maternal-effect loci that caused a diversity of patterns mimicking those expected under various modes of genomic imprinting. These results demonstrate that the appearance of parent-of-origin-dependent effects (POEs) of alleles at a locus cannot be taken as direct evidence that the locus is imprinted. Moreover, they show that, in gene mapping studies, genetic data from both parents and offspring are required to successfully differentiate between imprinting and maternal effects as the cause of apparent parent-of-origin effects of alleles. PMID:18245362

  7. IGF2BP2/IMP2-Deficient mice resist obesity through enhanced translation of Ucp1 mRNA and Other mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhao, Liping; Wrighting, Diedra; Krämer, Dana; Majithia, Amit; Wang, Yanqun; Cracan, Valentin; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Mootha, Vamsi K; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Thorburn, David R; Minichiello, Liliana; Altshuler, David; Avruch, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Although variants in the IGF2BP2/IMP2 gene confer risk for type 2 diabetes, IMP2, an RNA binding protein, is not known to regulate metabolism. Imp2(-/-) mice gain less lean mass after weaning and have increased lifespan. Imp2(-/-) mice are highly resistant to diet-induced obesity and fatty liver and display superior glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure, and better defense of core temperature on cold exposure. Imp2(-/-) brown fat and Imp2(-/-) brown adipocytes differentiated in vitro contain more UCP1 polypeptide than Imp2(+/+) despite similar levels of Ucp1 mRNA; the Imp2(-/-)adipocytes also exhibit greater uncoupled oxygen consumption. IMP2 binds the mRNAs encoding Ucp1 and other mitochondrial components, and most exhibit increased translational efficiency in the absence of IMP2. In vitro IMP2 inhibits translation of mRNAs bearing the Ucp1 untranslated segments. Thus IMP2 limits longevity and regulates nutrient and energy metabolism in the mouse by controlling the translation of its client mRNAs. PMID:25863250

  8. Genome-wide histone state profiling of fibroblasts from the opossum, Monodelphis domestica, identifies the first marsupial-specific imprinted gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes have been extensively documented in eutherian mammals and found to exhibit significant interspecific variation in the suites of genes that are imprinted and in their regulation between tissues and developmental stages. Much less is known about imprinted loci in metatherian (marsupial) mammals, wherein studies have been limited to a small number of genes previously known to be imprinted in eutherians. We describe the first ab initio search for imprinted marsupial genes, in fibroblasts from the opossum, Monodelphis domestica, based on a genome-wide ChIP-seq strategy to identify promoters that are simultaneously marked by mutually exclusive, transcriptionally opposing histone modifications. Results We identified a novel imprinted gene (Meis1) and two additional monoallelically expressed genes, one of which (Cstb) showed allele-specific, but non-imprinted expression. Imprinted vs. allele-specific expression could not be resolved for the third monoallelically expressed gene (Rpl17). Transcriptionally opposing histone modifications H3K4me3, H3K9Ac, and H3K9me3 were found at the promoters of all three genes, but differential DNA methylation was not detected at CpG islands at any of these promoters. Conclusions In generating the first genome-wide histone modification profiles for a marsupial, we identified the first gene that is imprinted in a marsupial but not in eutherian mammals. This outcome demonstrates the practicality of an ab initio discovery strategy and implicates histone modification, but not differential DNA methylation, as a conserved mechanism for marking imprinted genes in all therian mammals. Our findings suggest that marsupials use multiple epigenetic mechanisms for imprinting and support the concept that lineage-specific selective forces can produce sets of imprinted genes that differ between metatherian and eutherian lines. PMID:24484454

  9. Gene Dosage Effects of the Imprinted Delta-Like Homologue 1 (Dlk1/Pref1) in Development: Implications for the Evolution of Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira da Rocha, Simao; Charalambous, Marika; Lin, Shau-Ping; Gutteridge, Isabel; Ito, Yoko; Gray, Dionne; Dean, Wendy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a normal process that causes genes to be expressed according to parental origin. The selective advantage conferred by imprinting is not understood but is hypothesised to act on dosage-critical genes. Here, we report a unique model in which the consequences of a single, double, and triple dosage of the imprinted Dlk1/Pref1, normally repressed on the maternally inherited chromosome, can be assessed in the growing embryo. BAC-transgenic mice were generated that over-express Dlk1 from endogenous regulators at all sites of embryonic activity. Triple dosage causes lethality associated with major organ abnormalities. Embryos expressing a double dose of Dlk1, recapitulating loss of imprinting, are growth enhanced but fail to thrive in early life, despite the early growth advantage. Thus, any benefit conferred by increased embryonic size is offset by postnatal lethality. We propose a negative correlation between gene dosage and survival that fixes an upper limit on growth promotion by Dlk1, and we hypothesize that trade-off between growth and lethality might have driven imprinting at this locus. PMID:19247431

  10. Gene dosage effects of the imprinted delta-like homologue 1 (dlk1/pref1) in development: implications for the evolution of imprinting.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Simao Teixeira; Charalambous, Marika; Lin, Shau-Ping; Gutteridge, Isabel; Ito, Yoko; Gray, Dionne; Dean, Wendy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C

    2009-02-01

    Genomic imprinting is a normal process that causes genes to be expressed according to parental origin. The selective advantage conferred by imprinting is not understood but is hypothesised to act on dosage-critical genes. Here, we report a unique model in which the consequences of a single, double, and triple dosage of the imprinted Dlk1/Pref1, normally repressed on the maternally inherited chromosome, can be assessed in the growing embryo. BAC-transgenic mice were generated that over-express Dlk1 from endogenous regulators at all sites of embryonic activity. Triple dosage causes lethality associated with major organ abnormalities. Embryos expressing a double dose of Dlk1, recapitulating loss of imprinting, are growth enhanced but fail to thrive in early life, despite the early growth advantage. Thus, any benefit conferred by increased embryonic size is offset by postnatal lethality. We propose a negative correlation between gene dosage and survival that fixes an upper limit on growth promotion by Dlk1, and we hypothesize that trade-off between growth and lethality might have driven imprinting at this locus. PMID:19247431

  11. Identification of the control region for tissue-specific imprinting of the stimulatory G protein α-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Chen, Min; Deng, Chuxia; Bourc'his, Déborah; Nealon, Julie G.; Erlichman, Beth; Bestor, Timothy H.; Weinstein, Lee S.

    2005-01-01

    Gnas is a complex gene with multiple imprinted promoters. The upstream Nesp and Nespas/Gnasxl promoters are paternally and maternally methylated, respectively. The downstream promoter for the stimulatory G protein α-subunit (Gsα) is unmethylated, although in some tissues (e.g., renal proximal tubules), Gsα is poorly expressed from the paternal allele. Just upstream of the Gsα promoter is a primary imprint mark (1A region) where maternal-specific methylation is established during oogenesis. Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1B, a disorder of renal parathyroid hormone resistance, is associated with loss of 1A methylation. Analysis of embryos of Dnmt3L–/– mothers (which cannot methylate maternal imprint marks) showed that Nesp, Nespas/Gnasxl, and 1A imprinting depend on one or more maternal primary imprint marks. We generated mice with deletion of the 1A differentially methylated region. These mice had normal Nesp-Nespas/Gnasxl imprinting, indicating that the Gnas locus contains two independent imprinting domains (Nespas-Nespas/Gnasxl and 1A-Gsα) controlled by distinct maternal primary imprint marks. Paternal, but not maternal, 1A deletion resulted in Gsα overexpression in proximal tubules and evidence for increased parathyroid hormone sensitivity but had no effect on Gsα expression in other tissues where Gsα is normally not imprinted. The 1A region is a maternal imprint mark that contains one or more methylation-sensitive cis-acting elements that suppress Gsα expression from the paternal allele in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:15811946

  12. Genomic imprinting and parent-of-origin effects on complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Heather A.; Cheverud, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects occur when the phenotypic effect of an allele depends on whether it is inherited from an individual’s mother or father. Several phenomena can cause parent-of-origin effects, with the best characterized being parent-of-origin dependent gene expression associated with genomic imprinting. Imprinting plays a critical role in a diversity of biological processes and in certain contexts it structures epigenetic relationships between DNA sequence and phenotypic variation. The development of new mapping approaches applied to the growing abundance of genomic data has demonstrated that imprinted genes can be important contributors to complex trait variation. Therefore, to understand the genetic architecture and evolution of complex traits, including complex diseases and traits of agricultural importance, it is crucial to account for these parent-of-origin effects. Here we discuss patterns of phenotypic variation associated with imprinting, evidence supporting its role in complex trait variation, and approaches for identifying its molecular signatures. PMID:23917626

  13. Characterization of global loss of imprinting in fetal overgrowth syndrome induced by assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Hagen, Darren E; Elsik, Christine G; Ji, Tieming; Morris, Collin James; Moon, Laura Emily; Rivera, Rocío Melissa

    2015-04-14

    Embryos generated with the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) can develop overgrowth syndromes. In ruminants, the condition is referred to as large offspring syndrome (LOS) and exhibits variable phenotypic abnormalities including overgrowth, enlarged tongue, and abdominal wall defects. These characteristics recapitulate those observed in the human loss-of-imprinting (LOI) overgrowth syndrome Beckwith-Wiedemann (BWS). We have recently shown LOI at the KCNQ1 locus in LOS, the most common epimutation in BWS. Although the first case of ART-induced LOS was reported in 1995, studies have not yet determined the extent of LOI in this condition. Here, we determined allele-specific expression of imprinted genes previously identified in human and/or mouse in day ∼105 Bos taurus indicus × Bos taurus taurus F1 hybrid control and LOS fetuses using RNAseq. Our analysis allowed us to determine the monoallelic expression of 20 genes in tissues of control fetuses. LOS fetuses displayed variable LOI compared with controls. Biallelic expression of imprinted genes in LOS was associated with tissue-specific hypomethylation of the normally methylated parental allele. In addition, a positive correlation was observed between body weight and the number of biallelically expressed imprinted genes in LOS fetuses. Furthermore, not only was there loss of allele-specific expression of imprinted genes in LOS, but also differential transcript amounts of these genes between control and overgrown fetuses. In summary, we characterized previously unidentified imprinted genes in bovines and identified misregulation of imprinting at multiple loci in LOS. We concluded that LOS is a multilocus LOI syndrome, as is BWS. PMID:25825726

  14. MicroRNAs 296 and 298 are imprinted and part of the GNAS/Gnas cluster and miR-296 targets IKBKE and Tmed9

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Joan E.; Eaton, Sally A.; Underhill, Peter; Williams, Debbie; Peters, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is the phenomenon whereby a subset of genes is differentially expressed according to parental origin. Imprinted genes tend to occur in clusters, and microRNAs are associated with the majority of well-defined clusters of imprinted genes. We show here that two microRNAs, miR-296 and miR-298, are part of the imprinted Gnas/GNAS clusters in both mice and humans. Both microRNAs show imprinted expression and are expressed from the paternally derived allele, but not the maternal allele. They arise from a long, noncoding antisense transcript, Nespas, with a promoter more than 27 kb away. Nespas had been shown previously to act in cis to regulate imprinted gene expression within the Gnas cluster. Using microarrays and luciferase assays, IKBKE, involved in many signaling pathways, and Tmed9, a protein transporter, were verified as new targets of miR-296. Thus, Nespas has two clear functions: as a cis-acting regulator within an imprinted gene cluster and as a precursor of microRNAs that modulate gene expression in trans. Furthermore, imprinted microRNAs, including miR-296 and miR-298, impose a parental specific modulation of gene expression of their target genes. PMID:22114321

  15. Imprinted Zac1 in neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Guillaume; Schmidt-Edelkraut, Udo; Spengler, Dietmar; Hoffmann, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) and imprinted genes play an important role in brain development. On historical grounds, these two determinants have been largely studied independently of each other. Recent evidence suggests, however, that NSCs can reset select genomic imprints to prevent precocious depletion of the stem cell reservoir. Moreover, imprinted genes like the transcriptional regulator Zac1 can fine tune neuronal vs astroglial differentiation of NSCs. Zac1 binds in a sequence-specific manner to pro-neuronal and imprinted genes to confer transcriptional regulation and furthermore coregulates members of the p53-family in NSCs. At the genome scale, Zac1 is a central hub of an imprinted gene network comprising genes with an important role for NSC quiescence, proliferation and differentiation. Overall, transcriptional, epigenomic, and genomic mechanisms seem to coordinate the functional relationships of NSCs and imprinted genes from development to maturation, and possibly aging. PMID:25815116

  16. An open-pollinated design for mapping imprinting genes in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lidan; Zhu, Xuli; Bo, Wenhao; Xu, Fang; Cheng, Tangren; Zhang, Qixiang; Wu, Rongling

    2015-05-01

    With the increasing recognition of its role in trait and disease development, it is crucial to account for genetic imprinting to illustrate the genetic architecture of complex traits. Genetic mapping can be innovated to test and estimate effects of genetic imprinting in a segregating population derived from experimental crosses. Here, we describe and assess a design for imprinting detection in natural plant populations. This design is to sample maternal plants at random from a natural population and collect open-pollinated (OP) seeds randomly from each maternal plant and germinate them into seedlings. A two-stage hierarchical platform is constructed to jointly analyze maternal and OP progeny markers. Through tracing the segregation and transmission of alleles from the parental to progeny generation, this platform allows parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression to be discerned, providing an avenue to estimate the effect of imprinting genes on a quantitative trait. The design is derived to estimate imprinting effects expressed at the haplotype level. Its usefulness and utilization were validated through computer simulation. This OP-based design provides a tool to detect the genomic distribution and pattern of imprinting genes as an important component of heritable variation that is neglected in traditional genetic studies of complex traits. PMID:24927940

  17. Discovery of a novel imprinted gene by transcriptional analysis of parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Ma, Hong; Clepper, Lisa; Gokhale, Sumita; Bogan, Randy; Hennebold, Jon; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (PESCs) may have future utilities in cell replacement therapies since they are closely related to the female from which the activated oocyte was obtained. Furthermore, the avoidance of parthenogenetic development in mammals provides the most compelling rationale for the evolution of genomic imprinting, and the biological process of parthenogenesis raises complex issues regarding differential gene expression. METHODS AND RESULTS We describe here homozygous rhesus monkey PESCs derived from a spontaneously duplicated, haploid oocyte genome. Since the effect of homozygosity on PESCs pluripotency and differentiation potential is unknown, we assessed the similarities and differences in pluripotency markers and developmental potential by in vitro and in vivo differentiation of homozygous and heterozygous PESCs. To understand the differences in gene expression regulation between parthenogenetic and biparental embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we conducted microarray analysis of genome-wide mRNA profiles of primate PESCs and ESCs derived from fertilized embryos using the Affymetrix Rhesus Macaque Genome array. Several known paternally imprinted genes were in the highly down-regulated group in PESCs compared with ESCs. Furthermore, allele-specific expression analysis of other genes whose expression is also down-regulated in PESCs, led to the identification of one novel imprinted gene, inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase F (INPP5F), which was exclusively expressed from a paternal allele. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that PESCs could be used as a model for studying genomic imprinting, and in the discovery of novel imprinted genes. PMID:20522441

  18. Laser imprint studies on Nike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawley, C. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Colombant, D.; Gardner, J. H.; Fyfe, D. E.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Chan, Y.; Deniz, A. V.

    2000-10-01

    The very uniform Nike laser drive is being used to measure laser imprint on cryogenic and non-cryogenic targets. New 3-d simulations are compared with experimental R-T growth images for the standard Nike cryo-target as well as plastic targets with a variety of surface conditions. The standard Nike cryo-target is 180 μm of RF foam (density 50 mg/cc) mounted on 1.5 μm of improved Kapton. Targets have also been manufactured with 20, 30, and 60 μm wavelength sine waves cast into the Kapton to provide an initial perturbation. Liquid deuterium is wicked up into the foam just before the laser drive. These cryo-targets are similar to the ablator portion of the direct drive pellet design for NIF. Competition between laser imprint and pre-imposed modes is measured in both cryogenic and plastic targets. The results are compared to simulations.

  19. Imprint Reduction with Shaped Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Skupsky, S.

    2000-10-01

    A novel technique for reducing laser imprint in OMEGA cryogenic targets has been developed. Standard ICF cryogenic targets consist of a shell of DT ice with a thin outer layer of CH. The presence of the CH layer gives rise to a brief period of early-time growth by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, which effectively increases the amount of laser imprint by about a factor of 2. Two-dimensional ORCHID simulations show that by introducing a short, high-intensity spike at the start of the implosion, this early-time growth can be significantly reduced with only a small change to the calculated 1-D neutron yield. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  20. Identification of imprinted genes using a novel screening method based on asynchronous DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kawame, H.; Hansen, R.S.; Gartler, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the process of epigenetic change that occurs during germ cell development that results in either maternal- or paternal-specific gene expression. Identification of imprinted genes is of primary importance to the understanding of imprinting mechanisms and the role of specific imprinted genes in human disease. Recently, it has been established that chromosomal regions known to contain imprinted genes replicate asynchronously. We propose a novel screening method to identify imprinted genes based on replication asynchrony as a marker for imprinted domains. Dividing human cells were pulse-labeled with BrdU and separated into different fractions of S-phase by flow cytometry. A library of late-replicating inter-Alu sequences should be enriched in gene-associated sequences that replicate early on one chromosome and late on the other homologue. Clones were analyzed for replication timing by hybridization to inter-Alu replication profiles. Candidates for replication asynchrony exhibited broad or biphasic replication timing, and these were analyzed for chromosomal location by hybridizations to inter-Alu products from a hybrid mapping panel. Initial screening of 123 clones resulted in 3 asynchronously-replicating clones that localized to single chromosomes. Chromosome 17 and chromosome 19 candidates might be located in regions thought to be imprinted by synteny with mouse chromosomes. A chromosome 15 clone was further characterized because of its possible localization to the Prader-Willi/Angelman locus. This sequence was localized outside the region deleted in Prader-Willi patients, and was found to be expressed in human cell lines. Replication asynchrony for this sequence appears to be polymorphic because cells derived from some individuals indicated synchronous replication. This appears to be the first example of a polymorphism in replication asynchrony.

  1. Genome-wide screen of genes imprinted in sorghum endosperm, and the roles of allelic differential cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meishan; Li, Ning; He, Wenan; Zhang, Huakun; Yang, Wei; Liu, Bao

    2016-02-01

    Imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon referring to allele-biased expression of certain genes depending on their parent of origin. Accumulated evidence suggests that, while imprinting is a conserved mechanism across kingdoms, the identities of the imprinted genes are largely species-specific. Using deep RNA sequencing of endosperm 14 days after pollination in sorghum, 5683 genes (29.27% of the total 19 418 expressed genes) were found to harbor diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms between two parental lines. The analysis of parent-of-origin expression patterns in the endosperm of a pair of reciprocal F1 hybrids between the two sorghum lines led to identification of 101 genes with ≥ fivefold allelic expression difference in both hybrids, including 85 maternal expressed genes (MEGs) and 16 paternal expressed genes (PEGs). Thirty of these genes were previously identified as imprinted in endosperm of maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa) or Arabidopsis, while the remaining 71 genes are sorghum-specific imprinted genes relative to these three plant species. Allele-biased expression of virtually all of the 14 tested imprinted genes (nine MEGs and five PEGs) was validated by pyrosequencing using independent sources of RNA from various developmental stages and dissected parts of endosperm. Forty-six imprinted genes (30 MEGs and 16 PEGs) were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR, and the majority of them showed endosperm-specific or preferential expression relative to embryo and other tissues. DNA methylation analysis of the 5' upstream region and gene body for seven imprinted genes indicated that, while three of the four PEGs were associated with hypomethylation of maternal alleles, no MEG was associated with allele-differential methylation. PMID:26718755

  2. Expression profile of IGF paralog genes in liver and muscle of a GH-transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nornberg, Bruna Felix; Figueiredo, Marcio Azevedo; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between IGFs produced in the liver and skeletal muscle with muscle hypertrophy previously observed in a line of GH-transgenic zebrafish. In this sense, we evaluated the expression of genes related to the IGF system in liver and muscle of transgenics, as well as the main intracellular signaling pathways used by GH/IGF axis. Our results showed an increase in expression of igf1a, igf2a, and igf2b genes in the liver. Moreover, there was a decrease in the expression of igf1ra and an increase in muscle igf2r of transgenics, indicating a negative response of muscle tissue with respect to excess circulating IGFs. Muscle IGFs expression analyses revealed a significant increase only for igf2b, accompanied by a parallel induction of igfbp5a gene. The presence of IGFBP5a may potentiate the IGF2 action in muscle cells differentiation. Regarding JAK/STAT-related genes, we observed an alteration in the expression profile of both stat3 and stat5a in transgenic fish liver. No changes were observed in the muscle, suggesting that both tissues respond differently to GH-transgenesis. Western blotting analyses indicated an imbalance between the phosphorylation levels of the proliferative (MEK/ERK) and hypertrophic (PI3K/Akt) pathways, in favor of the latter. In summary, the results of this study suggest that the hypertrophy caused by GH-transgenesis in zebrafish may be due to circulating IGFs produced by the liver, with an important participation of muscle IGF2b. This group of IGFs appears to be favoring the hypertrophic intracellular pathway in muscle tissue of transgenic zebrafish. PMID:26718079

  3. Long-Term Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Extract Induces Hypomethylation at the RUNX3 and IGF2-H19 Loci in Immortalized Human Urothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Mei; Nergard, Jennifer C.; Ni, Liqiang; Rosser, Charles J.; Chai, Karl X.

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the single most important epidemiological risk factor for bladder cancer but it is not known whether exposure of urothelial cells to the systemic soluble contents of cigarette smoke is directly causative to bladder cancer and the associated epigenetic changes such as tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation. We undertook this study to investigate if long-term treatment of human urothelial cells with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) results in tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation, a phenotype that was previously associated with long-term constant CSE treatment of airway epithelial cells. We chronically treated an immortalized human urothelial cell line UROtsa with CSE using a cyclic daily regimen but the cells were cultured in CSE-free medium between daily treatments. Bisulfite sequencing and real-time PCR array-based methylation profiling were employed to evaluate methylation changes at tumor suppressor gene loci in the chronically CSE-treated cells versus the passage-matched untreated control cells. The RUNX3 tumor suppressor gene promoter was hypomethylated with a significant increase in proportion of the completely unmethylated haplotype after the long-term CSE treatment; whereas RUNX3 promoter hypermethylation was previously reported for bladder cancers of smokers. Hypomethylation induced by the long-term CSE treatment was also observed for the IGF2-H19 locus. The methylation status at the PRSS8/prostasin and 16 additional loci however, was unaffected by the chronic CSE treatment. Transient CSE treatment over 1 daily regimen resulted in transcriptional down-regulation of RUNX3 and H19, but only the H19 transcription was down-regulated in the chronically CSE-treated urothelial cells. Transcription of a key enzyme in one-carbon metabolism, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was greatly reduced by the long-term CSE treatment, potentially serving as a mechanism for the hypomethylation phenotype via a reduced supply of methyl donor. In conclusion

  4. Prenatal low protein and postnatal high fat diets induce rapid adipose tissue growth by inducing Igf2 expression in Sprague Dawley rat offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal low protein diets during prenatal development contribute to the development of obesity and insulin resistance in offspring. In this study, obese-prone Sprague -Dawley rats were fed diets having either 8% (low protein, LP) or 20% (normal protein, NP) protein for 3-wk prior to conception and...

  5. DNMT1 and AIM1 Imprinting in human placenta revealed through a genome-wide screen for allele-specific DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting is an epigenetically regulated process wherein genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Many imprinted genes were initially identified in mice; some of these were subsequently shown not to be imprinted in humans. Such discrepancy reflects developmental, morphological and physiological differences between mouse and human tissues. This is particularly relevant for the placenta. Study of genomic imprinting thus needs to be carried out in a species and developmental stage-specific manner. We describe here a new strategy to study allele-specific DNA methylation in the human placenta for the discovery of novel imprinted genes. Results Using this methodology, we confirmed 16 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with known imprinted genes. We chose 28 genomic regions for further testing and identified two imprinted genes (DNMT1 and AIM1). Both genes showed maternal allele-specific methylation and paternal allele-specific transcription. Imprinted expression for AIM1 was conserved in the cynomolgus macaque placenta, but not in other macaque tissues or in the mouse. Conclusions Our study indicates that while there are many genomic regions with allele-specific methylation in tissues like the placenta, only a small sub-set of them are associated with allele-specific transcription, suggesting alternative functions for such genomic regions. Nonetheless, novel tissue-specific imprinted genes remain to be discovered in humans. Their identification may help us better understand embryonic and fetal development. PMID:24094292

  6. Recent acquisition of imprinting at the rodent Sfmbt2 locus correlates with insertion of a large block of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The proximal region of murine Chr 2 has long been known to harbour one or more imprinted genes from classic genetic studies involving reciprocal translocations. No imprinted gene had been identified from this region until our study demonstrated that the PcG gene Sfmbt2 is expressed from the paternally inherited allele in early embryos and extraembryonic tissues. Imprinted genes generally reside in clusters near elements termed Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs), suggesting that Sfmbt2 might represent an anchor for a new imprinted domain. Results We analyzed allelic expression of approximately 20 genes within a 3.9 Mb domain and found that Sfmbt2 and an overlapping non-coding antisense transcript are the only imprinted genes in this region. These transcripts represent a very narrow imprinted gene locus. We also demonstrate that rat Sfmbt2 is imprinted in extraembryonic tissues. An interesting feature of both mouse and rat Sfmbt2 genes is the presence of a large block of miRNAs in intron 10. Other mammals, including the bovine, lack this block of miRNAs. Consistent with this association, we show that human and bovine Sfmbt2 are biallelic. Other evidence indicates that pig Sfmbt2 is also not imprinted. Further strengthening the argument for recent evolution of Sfmbt2 is our demonstration that a more distant muroid rodent, Peromyscus also lacks imprinting and the block of miRNAs. Conclusions These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the block of miRNAs are driving imprinting at this locus. Our results are discussed in the context of ncRNAs at other imprinted loci. Accession numbers for Peromyscus cDNA and intron 10 genomic DNA are [Genbank:HQ416417 and Genbank:HQ416418], respectively. PMID:21510876

  7. Mitigation of initial imprinting with diamond ablator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiroki; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichirou; Terasaki, Hidenori; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Hosogi, Ryouta; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    In direct drive inertial confinement fusion, where laser light directly irradiates the target, surface perturbations on the target are seeded by initial imprint due to laser irradiation nonuniformity. It is the initial imprint that become the seed of the hydrodynamic instability, and decisive solutions for the mitigation of initial imprinting is required. We focused on material stiffness of ablator as an idea that was effective for mitigation of imprinting and adopted the diamond with low compressibility as an ablator material. In the imprint experiments, the diamond foils were irradiated with a foot pulse at an intensity of ~ 4.0 × 1012W/cm2 with 1.3 ns width, on which a stationary spatial nonuniformity with sinusoidal shape of 100 μm wavelength was imposed by implementing a grid mask. The foils were subsequently accelerated by a uniform main laser pulse of ~ 1.0 × 1014 W/cm2 and imprinted perturbation were observed to be amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor instability through face-on x-ray backlight measurements. We deduced the equivalent initial surface roughness for the imprinted foil. We verified the mitigation of initial imprinting with diamond from the quantitative evaluation.

  8. Distributed feedback imprinted electrospun fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Persano, Luana; Camposeo, Andrea; Del Carro, Pompilio; Fasano, Vito; Moffa, Maria; Manco, Rita; D'Agostino, Stefania; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-10-01

    Imprinted, distributed feedback lasers are demonstrated on individual, active electrospun polymer nanofibers. In addition to advantages related to miniaturization, optical confinement and grating nanopatterning lead to a significant threshold reduction compared to conventional thin-film lasers. The possibility of imprinting arbitrary photonic crystal geometries on electrospun lasing nanofibers opens new opportunities for realizing optical circuits and chips. PMID:25042888

  9. Astrobiological Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Murray, G. M.; van Houten, K. A.; Hofstra, A. A.

    2005-12-01

    Development of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP) sensors for astrobiology is intended to provide a new class of microlaboratory sensors compatible with other life or biomarker detection. Molecular imprinting is a process for making selective binding sites in synthetic polymers. The process may be approached by designing the recognition site or by simply choosing monomers that may have favorable interactions with the imprinting molecule. We are working to apply this methodology to astrobiology for development of a reliable, low cost, low mass, low power consumption sensor technology for quantitative in-situ analysis of biochemistry, biomarkers, and other indicators of astrobiological importance. Specific goals of the project are: 1) To develop a general methodology and specific methods for MIP-based sensor construction. The overall methodology will guide procedures for design and testing of any desired sensor. Specific methods will be applied to key families and specific species of astrobiological interest, i.e., alkanes (and Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - PAHs), amino acids, steroids, and hopanes; 2) To construct and characterize the general family and specific species sensors. We will test for accuracy, precision, interferences, and limitations of the sensor against blanks, standards, and known terrestrial biological environment samples. Additional testing will determine sturdiness and longevity of sensors after exposure to transit conditions (launch and space environment), and at potential target environments (pressure, temperature, pH, etc.); and 3) To construct and demonstrate the combination of multiple sensors into a viable prototype instrument, and roadmap the expansion of potential instrument capabilities and exploration of the ultimate environmental limitations of the technology, and the necessary changes and additions to create a mission-ready instrument. Initial work has resulted successful detection of aqueous alanine (D and L) with simple MIP

  10. Loss of Gnas Imprinting Differentially Affects REM/NREM Sleep and Cognition in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lassi, Glenda; Ball, Simon T.; Maggi, Silvia; Colonna, Giovanni; Nieus, Thierry; Cero, Cheryl; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Peters, Jo; Tucci, Valter

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that imprinted genes are important in the regulation of sleep. However, the fundamental question of whether genomic imprinting has a role in sleep has remained elusive up to now. In this work we show that REM and NREM sleep states are differentially modulated by the maternally expressed imprinted gene Gnas. In particular, in mice with loss of imprinting of Gnas, NREM and complex cognitive processes are enhanced while REM and REM–linked behaviors are inhibited. This is the first demonstration that a specific overexpression of an imprinted gene affects sleep states and related complex behavioral traits. Furthermore, in parallel to the Gnas overexpression, we have observed an overexpression of Ucp1 in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) and a significant increase in thermoregulation that may account for the REM/NREM sleep phenotypes. We conclude that there must be significant evolutionary advantages in the monoallelic expression of Gnas for REM sleep and for the consolidation of REM–dependent memories. Conversely, biallelic expression of Gnas reinforces slow wave activity in NREM sleep, and this results in a reduction of uncertainty in temporal decision-making processes. PMID:22589743

  11. No Evidence for Enrichment in Schizophrenia for Common Allelic Associations at Imprinted Loci

    PubMed Central

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Kirov, George; Rees, Elliott; Isles, Anthony R.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Most genetic studies assume that the function of a genetic variant is independent of the parent from which it is inherited, but this is not always true. The best known example of parent-of-origin effects arises with respect to alleles at imprinted loci. In classical imprinting, characteristically, either the maternal or paternal copy is expressed, but not both. Only alleles present in one of the parental copies of the gene, the expressed copy, is likely to contribute to disease. It has been postulated that imprinting is important in central nervous system development, and that consequently, imprinted loci may be involved in schizophrenia. If this is true, allowing for parent-of-origin effects might be important in genetic studies of schizophrenia. Here, we use genome-wide association data from one of the world’s largest samples (N = 695) of parent schizophrenia-offspring trios to test for parent-of-origin effects. To maximise power, we restricted our analyses to test two main hypotheses. If imprinting plays a disproportionate role in schizophrenia susceptibility, we postulated a) that alleles showing robust evidence for association to schizophrenia from previous genome-wide association studies should be enriched for parent-of-origin effects and b) that genes at loci imprinted in humans or mice should be enriched both for genome-wide significant associations, and in our sample, for parent-of-origin effects. Neither prediction was supported in the present study. We have shown, that it is unlikely that parent-of-origin effects or imprinting play particularly important roles in schizophrenia, although our findings do not exclude such effects at specific loci nor do they exclude such effects among rare alleles. PMID:26633303

  12. Methylation Defect in Imprinted Genes Detected in Patients with an Albright's Hereditary Osteodystrophy Like Phenotype and Platelet Gs Hypofunction

    PubMed Central

    Izzi, Benedetta; Francois, Inge; Labarque, Veerle; Thys, Chantal; Wittevrongel, Christine; Devriendt, Koen; Legius, Eric; Van den Bruel, Annick; D'Hooghe, Marc; Lambrechts, Diether; de Zegher, Francis; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) indicates a group of heterogeneous disorders whose common feature is represented by impaired signaling of hormones that activate Gsalpha, encoded by the imprinted GNAS gene. PHP-Ib patients have isolated Parathormone (PTH) resistance and GNAS epigenetic defects while PHP-Ia cases present with hormone resistance and characteristic features jointly termed as Albright's Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) due to maternally inherited GNAS mutations or similar epigenetic defects as found for PHP-Ib. Pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP) patients with an AHO phenotype and no hormone resistance and progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) cases have inactivating paternally inherited GNAS mutations. Methodology/Principal Findings We here describe 17 subjects with an AHO-like phenotype that could be compatible with having PPHP but none of them carried Gsalpha mutations. Functional platelet studies however showed an obvious Gs hypofunction in the 13 patients that were available for testing. Methylation for the three differentially methylated GNAS regions was quantified via the Sequenom EpiTYPER. Patients showed significant hypermethylation of the XL amplicon compared to controls (36±3 vs. 29±3%; p<0.001); a pattern that is reversed to XL hypomethylation found in PHPIb. Interestingly, XL hypermethylation was associated with reduced XLalphaS protein levels in the patients' platelets. Methylation for NESP and ExonA/B was significantly different for some but not all patients, though most patients have site-specific CpG methylation abnormalities in these amplicons. Since some AHO features are present in other imprinting disorders, the methylation of IGF2, H19, SNURF and GRB10 was quantified. Surprisingly, significant IGF2 hypermethylation (20±10 vs. 14±7%; p<0.05) and SNURF hypomethylation (23±6 vs. 32±6%; p<0.001) was found in patients vs. controls, while H19 and GRB10 methylation was normal. Conclusion/Significance In conclusion, this

  13. Imprinted polymer sensors for contamination detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, George M.; Arnold, Bradley R.; Kelly, Craig A.; Uy, O. Manuel

    2001-03-01

    Molecular imprinting is a useful technique for making a chemically selective binding site. The method involves building a synthetic polymeric scaffold of molecular complements containing the target molecule with subsequent removal of the target to leave a cavity with a structural "memory" of the target. Molecularly imprinted polymers can be employed as selective adsorbents of specific molecules or molecular functional groups. The imprinted polymers can be fashioned into membranes that can be used to form ion selective electrodes for an imprinted ion. By incorporating molecules or metal ions with useful optical properties in the binding sites of imprinted polymers, spectroscopic sensors for the imprinted molecule may be made. A variety of metal ion selective electrodes and a Pb2+ ion optrode based on imprinted polymers have been fabricated and tested.1-4 Additionally, a sensor for the hydrolysis product of the nerve agent Soman has been developed using a luminescent lanthanide ion, Eu(III), as optical transducer.5 Our research continues to explore other means to employ electrochemical and optical transduction.

  14. A Bayesian Method for Simultaneously Detecting Mendelian and Imprinted Quantitative Trait Loci in Experimental Crosses of Outbred Species

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Awata, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is interpreted as a phenomenon, in which some genes inherited from one parent are not completely expressed due to modification of the genome caused during gametogenesis. Subsequently, the expression level of an allele at the imprinted gene is changed dependent on the parental origin, which is referred to as the parent-of-origin effect. In livestock, some QTL for reproductive performance and meat productivity have been reported to be imprinted. So far, methods detecting imprinted QTL have been proposed on the basis of interval mapping, where only a single QTL was tested at a time. In this study, we developed a Bayesian method for simultaneously mapping multiple QTL, allowing the inference about expression modes of QTL in an outbred F2 family. The inference about whether a QTL is Mendelian or imprinted was made using Markov chain Monte Carlo estimation by comparing the goodness-of-fits between models, assuming the presence and the absence of parent-of-origin effect at a QTL. We showed by the analyses of simulated data sets that the Bayesian method can effectively detect both Mendelian QTL and imprinted QTL. PMID:18202392

  15. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  16. Imprinting analysis of porcine MAGEL2 gene in two fetal stages and association analysis with carcass traits.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Qiao, Mu; Wang, Chao; Zheng, Rong; Xiong, Yuan-Zhu; Deng, Chang-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Imprinted genes play an essential role in the regulation of fetal growth, development and function of the placenta, however only a limited number of imprinted genes have been studied in swine. In this study, we cloned and characterized porcine MAGEL2 (melanoma antigen-like gene 2), and also identified its imprinting status during porcine fetal development. The complete open reading frame (ORF) encoding 1,193 amino acids was isolated and two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (g.2592A>C and g.3277T>C) in the coding region were identified. The reciprocal Yorkshire×Meishan F1 hybrid model and the RT-PCR/RFLP method were used to detect the imprinting status of porcine MAGEL2 gene at two developmental stages of day 30 and 65 of gestation. Imprinting analysis showed that porcine MAGEL2 was paternally expressed in day 65 fetal tissues, including heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, small intestine, skeletal muscle, brain and placenta. Interestingly, we observed an imprinting variance of MAGEL2 gene in 30 dpc fetuses produced by the cross of Yorkshire boar×Meishan sow, in which seven heterozygous fetuses were monoallelically expressed from the paternal allele but two were biallelically expressed from both the paternal and maternal alleles. Association analysis in a Yorkshire×Meishan F2 resource population showed that the mutation of g.2592A>C was significantly associated with dressed carcass percentage (P<0.05) and buttock fat thickness (P<0.05). Our results suggest that MAGEL2, as a novel imprinted gene in pig, might be a candidate gene affecting carcass traits and could provide important information for the functional study of imprinted genes during porcine development. PMID:21633897

  17. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1. PMID:23226257

  18. A Mouse Model for Imprinting of the Human Retinoblastoma Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tasiou, Vasiliki; Hiber, Michaela; Steenpass, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to integration of the PPP1R26P1 pseudogene into intron 2. PPP1R26P1 harbors the gametic differentially methylated region of the RB1 gene, CpG85, which is methylated in the female germ line. The paternally unmethylated CpG85 acts as promoter for the alternative transcript 2B of RB1, which interferes with expression of full-length RB1 in cis. In mice, PPP1R26P1 is not present in the Rb1 gene and Rb1 is not imprinted. Assuming that the mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting are conserved, we investigated if imprinting of mouse Rb1 can be induced by transferring human PPP1R26P1 into mouse Rb1. We generated humanized Rb1_PPP1R26P1 knock-in mice that pass human PPP1R26P1 through the mouse germ line. We found that the function of unmethylated CpG85 as promoter for an alternative Rb1 transcript and as cis-repressor of the main Rb1 transcript is maintained in mouse tissues. However, CpG85 is not recognized as a gametic differentially methylated region in the mouse germ line. DNA methylation at CpG85 is acquired only in tissues of neuroectodermal origin, independent of parental transmission of PPP1R26P1. Absence of CpG85 methylation in oocytes and sperm implies a failure of imprint methylation establishment in the germ line. Our results indicate that site-specific integration of a proven human gametic differentially methylated region is not sufficient for acquisition of DNA methylation in the mouse germ line, even if promoter function of the element is maintained. This suggests a considerable dependency of DNA methylation induction on the surrounding sequence. However, our model is suited to determine the cellular function of the alternative Rb1 transcript. PMID:26275142

  19. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Present and Future Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Vasapollo, Giuseppe; Sole, Roberta Del; Mergola, Lucia; Lazzoi, Maria Rosaria; Scardino, Anna; Scorrano, Sonia; Mele, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Molecular Imprinting Technology (MIT) is a technique to design artificial receptors with a predetermined selectivity and specificity for a given analyte, which can be used as ideal materials in various application fields. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs), the polymeric matrices obtained using the imprinting technology, are robust molecular recognition elements able to mimic natural recognition entities, such as antibodies and biological receptors, useful to separate and analyze complicated samples such as biological fluids and environmental samples. The scope of this review is to provide a general overview on MIPs field discussing first general aspects in MIP preparation and then dealing with various application aspects. This review aims to outline the molecularly imprinted process and present a summary of principal application fields of molecularly imprinted polymers, focusing on chemical sensing, separation science, drug delivery and catalysis. Some significant aspects about preparation and application of the molecular imprinting polymers with examples taken from the recent literature will be discussed. Theoretical and experimental parameters for MIPs design in terms of the interaction between template and polymer functionalities will be considered and synthesis methods for the improvement of MIP recognition properties will also be presented. PMID:22016636

  20. Imprinting in the schizophrenia candidate gene GABRB2 encoding GABA(A) receptor β(2) subunit.

    PubMed

    Pun, F W; Zhao, C; Lo, W-S; Ng, S-K; Tsang, S-Y; Nimgaonkar, V; Chung, W S; Ungvari, G S; Xue, H

    2011-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex genetic disorder, the inheritance pattern of which is likely complicated by epigenetic factors yet to be elucidated. In this study, transmission disequilibrium tests with family trios yielded significant differences between paternal and maternal transmissions of the disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6556547 and its haplotypes. The minor allele (T) of rs6556547 was paternally undertransmitted to male schizophrenic offsprings, and this parent-of-origin effect strongly suggested that GABRB2 is imprinted. 'Flipping' of allelic expression in heterozygotes of SNP rs2229944 (C/T) in GABRB2 or rs2290732 (G/A) in the neighboring GABRA1 was compatible with imprinting effects on gene expression. Clustering analysis of GABRB2 mRNA expressions suggested that imprinting brought about the observed two-tiered distribution of expression levels in controls with heterozygous genotype at the disease-associated SNP rs1816071 (A/G). The deficit of upper-tiered expressions accounted for the lowered expression levels in the schizophrenic heterozygotes. The occurrence of a two-tiered distribution furnished support for imprinting, and also pointed to the necessity of differentiating between two kinds of heterozygotes of different parental origins in disease association studies on GABRB2. Bisulfite sequencing revealed hypermethylation in the neighborhood of SNP rs1816071, and methylation differences between controls and schizophrenia patients. Notably, the two schizophrenia-associated SNPs rs6556547 and rs1816071 overlapped with a CpG dinucleotide, thereby opening the possibility that CpG methylation status of these sites could have an impact on the risk of schizophrenia. Thus multiple lines of evidence pointed to the occurrence of imprinting in the GABRB2 gene and its possible role in the development of schizophrenia. PMID:20404824

  1. Transcriptional Truncation of the Long Coding Imprinted Gene Usp29

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongzhi; Ye, An; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-01-01

    Usp29 (Ubiquitin-specific protease 29) is a paternally expressed gene located upstream of another imprinted gene Peg3. In the current study, the transcription of this long coding gene spanning a 250-kb genomic distance was truncated using a knockin allele. According to the results, paternal transmission of the mutant allele resulted in reduced body and litter sizes whereas the maternal transmission caused no obvious effects. In the paternal mutant, the expression levels of Usp29 were reduced to 14–18% level of the wild-type littermates due to the Poly-A signal included in the knockin cassette. Expression analyses further revealed an unusual female-specific up-regulation of the adjacent imprinted gene Zfp264 in the mutant. Consistent with this, the promoter of Zfp264 was hypomethylated only in the female mutant. Interestingly, this female-specific hypomethylation by the knockin allele was not detected in the offspring of an interspecific crossing, indicating its sensitivity to genetic background. Overall, the results suggest that the transcription of Usp29 may be involved in DNA methylation setting of Zfp264 promoter in a sex-specific manner. PMID:27327533

  2. Loss of DNMT1o Disrupts Imprinted X Chromosome Inactivation and Accentuates Placental Defects in Females

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Josée; Cirio, M. Cecilia; de Zeeuw, Pauline; Mak, Winifred; Plass, Christoph; Bartolomei, Marisa S.; Chaillet, J. Richard; Trasler, Jacquetta M.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of key germline derived DNA methylation patterns during preimplantation development depends on stores of DNA cytosine methyltransferase-1o (DNMT1o) provided by the oocyte. Dnmt1omat−/− mouse embryos born to Dnmt1Δ1o/Δ1o female mice lack DNMT1o protein and have disrupted genomic imprinting and associated phenotypic abnormalities. Here, we describe additional female-specific morphological abnormalities and DNA hypomethylation defects outside imprinted loci, restricted to extraembryonic tissue. Compared to male offspring, the placentae of female offspring of Dnmt1Δ1o/Δ1o mothers displayed a higher incidence of genic and intergenic hypomethylation and more frequent and extreme placental dysmorphology. The majority of the affected loci were concentrated on the X chromosome and associated with aberrant biallelic expression, indicating that imprinted X-inactivation was perturbed. Hypomethylation of a key regulatory region of Xite within the X-inactivation center was present in female blastocysts shortly after the absence of methylation maintenance by DNMT1o at the 8-cell stage. The female preponderance of placental DNA hypomethylation associated with maternal DNMT1o deficiency provides evidence of additional roles beyond the maintenance of genomic imprints for DNA methylation events in the preimplantation embryo, including a role in imprinted X chromosome inactivation. PMID:24278026

  3. A Micro-Silicon Chip for in Vivo Cerebral Imprint in Monkey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Access to cerebral tissue is essential to better understand the molecular mechanisms associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we present, for the first time, a new tool designed to obtain molecular and cellular cerebral imprints in the striatum of anesthetized monkeys. The imprint is obtained during a spatially controlled interaction of a chemically modified micro-silicon chip with the brain tissue. Scanning electron and immunofluorescence microscopies showed homogeneous capture of cerebral tissue. Nano-liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) analysis of proteins harvested on the chip allowed the identification of 1158 different species of proteins. The gene expression profiles of mRNA extracted from the imprint tool showed great similarity to those obtained via the gold standard approach, which is based on post-mortem sections of the same nucleus. Functional analysis of the harvested molecules confirmed the spatially controlled capture of striatal proteins implicated in dopaminergic regulation. Finally, the behavioral monitoring and histological results establish the safety of obtaining repeated cerebral imprints in striatal regions. These results demonstrate the ability of our imprint tool to explore the molecular content of deep brain regions in vivo. They open the way to the molecular exploration of brain in animal models of neurological diseases and will provide complementary information to current data mainly restricted to post-mortem samples. PMID:23509975

  4. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A. ); Dittrich, B.; Buiting, K.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Horsthemke, B. ); Greger, V.; Lalande, M. ); Anvret, M. )

    1994-05-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. The authors have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, they have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. The authors propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Influence of mom and dad: quantitative genetic models for maternal effects and genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Santure, Anna W; Spencer, Hamish G

    2006-08-01

    The expression of an imprinted gene is dependent on the sex of the parent it was inherited from, and as a result reciprocal heterozygotes may display different phenotypes. In contrast, maternal genetic terms arise when the phenotype of an offspring is influenced by the phenotype of its mother beyond the direct inheritance of alleles. Both maternal effects and imprinting may contribute to resemblance between offspring of the same mother. We demonstrate that two standard quantitative genetic models for deriving breeding values, population variances and covariances between relatives, are not equivalent when maternal genetic effects and imprinting are acting. Maternal and imprinting effects introduce both sex-dependent and generation-dependent effects that result in differences in the way additive and dominance effects are defined for the two approaches. We use a simple example to demonstrate that both imprinting and maternal genetic effects add extra terms to covariances between relatives and that model misspecification may over- or underestimate true covariances or lead to extremely variable parameter estimation. Thus, an understanding of various forms of parental effects is essential in correctly estimating quantitative genetic variance components. PMID:16751674

  6. Genomic imprinting effects of the X-chromosome on brain morphology

    PubMed Central

    Lepage, Jean-Francois; Hong, David S.; Mazaika, Paul K.; Raman, Mira; Sheau, Kristen; Marzelli, Matthew J.; Hallmayer, Joachim; Reiss, Allan L.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genomic imprinting, a process by which certain genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner, can influence neurogenetic and psychiatric manifestations. While some data suggest possible imprinting effects of the X-chromosome on physical and cognitive characteristics in human, there is no compelling evidence that X-linked imprinting affects brain morphology. To address this issue, we investigated regional cortical volume, thickness and surface area in 27 healthy controls and 40 prepubescent girls with Turner syndrome (TS), a condition caused by the absence of one X-chromosome. Of the young girls with TS, 23 inherited their X-chromosome from their mother (Xm) and 17 from their father (Xp). Our results confirm the existence of significant differences in brain morphology between girls with TS and controls, and reveal the presence of a putative imprinting effect among the TS groups: girls with Xp demonstrated thicker cortex than those with Xm in the temporal regions bilaterally, while Xm individuals showed bilateral enlargement of gray matter volume in the superior frontal regions in comparison to Xp. These data suggest the existence of imprinting effects of the X-chromosome that influence both cortical thickness and volume during early brain development, and help to explain variability in cognitive and behavioral manifestations of TS with regard to the parental origin of the X-chromosome. PMID:23658194

  7. Evidence for local regulatory control of escape from imprinted X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Joshua W; Starmer, Joshua; Williams, Rex L; Calabrese, J Mauro; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2014-06-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an epigenetic process that almost completely inactivates one of two X chromosomes in somatic cells of mammalian females. A few genes are known to escape XCI and the mechanism for this escape remains unclear. Here, using mouse trophoblast stem (TS) cells, we address whether particular chromosomal interactions facilitate escape from imprinted XCI. We demonstrate that promoters of genes escaping XCI do not congregate to any particular region of the genome in TS cells. Further, the escape status of a gene was uncorrelated with the types of genomic features and gene activity located in contacted regions. Our results suggest that genes escaping imprinted XCI do so by using the same regulatory sequences as their expressed alleles on the active X chromosome. We suggest a model where regulatory control of escape from imprinted XCI is mediated by genomic elements located in close linear proximity to escaping genes. PMID:24653000

  8. Evidence for Local Regulatory Control of Escape from Imprinted X Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, Joshua W.; Starmer, Joshua; Williams, Rex L.; Calabrese, J. Mauro; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2014-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an epigenetic process that almost completely inactivates one of two X chromosomes in somatic cells of mammalian females. A few genes are known to escape XCI and the mechanism for this escape remains unclear. Here, using mouse trophoblast stem (TS) cells, we address whether particular chromosomal interactions facilitate escape from imprinted XCI. We demonstrate that promoters of genes escaping XCI do not congregate to any particular region of the genome in TS cells. Further, the escape status of a gene was uncorrelated with the types of genomic features and gene activity located in contacted regions. Our results suggest that genes escaping imprinted XCI do so by using the same regulatory sequences as their expressed alleles on the active X chromosome. We suggest a model where regulatory control of escape from imprinted XCI is mediated by genomic elements located in close linear proximity to escaping genes. PMID:24653000

  9. Transcription Driven Somatic DNA Methylation within the Imprinted Gnas Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Stuti; Williamson, Christine M.; Ball, Simon; Tibbit, Charlotte; Beechey, Colin; Fray, Martin; Peters, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Differential marking of genes in female and male gametes by DNA methylation is essential to genomic imprinting. In female gametes transcription traversing differentially methylated regions (DMRs) is a common requirement for de novo methylation at DMRs. At the imprinted Gnas cluster oocyte specific transcription of a protein-coding transcript, Nesp, is needed for methylation of two DMRs intragenic to Nesp, namely the Nespas-Gnasxl DMR and the Exon1A DMR, thereby enabling expression of the Gnas transcript and repression of the Gnasxl transcript. On the paternal allele, Nesp is repressed, the germline DMRs are unmethylated, Gnas is repressed and Gnasxl is expressed. Using mutant mouse models, we show that on the paternal allele, ectopic transcription of Nesp traversing the intragenic Exon1A DMR (which regulates Gnas expression) results in de novo methylation of the Exon1A DMR and de-repression of Gnas just as on the maternal allele. However, unlike the maternal allele, methylation on the mutant paternal allele occurs post-fertilisation, i.e. in somatic cells. This, to our knowledge is the first example of transcript/transcription driven DNA methylation of an intragenic CpG island, in somatic tissues, suggesting that transcription driven de novo methylation is not restricted to the germline in the mouse. Additionally, Gnasxl is repressed on a paternal chromosome on which Nesp is ectopically expressed. Thus, a paternally inherited Gnas cluster showing ectopic expression of Nesp is “maternalised” in terms of Gnasxl and Gnas expression. We show that these mice have a phenotype similar to mutants with two expressed doses of Gnas and none of Gnasxl. PMID:25659103

  10. Loss of inherited genomic imprints in mice leads to severe disruption in placental lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Himes, K. P.; Young, A.; Koppes, E.; Stolz, D.; Barak, Y.; Sadovsky, Y.; Chaillet, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Monoallelic expression of imprinted genes is necessary for placental development and normal fetal growth. Differentially methylated domains (DMDs) largely determine the parental-specific monoallelic expression of imprinted genes. Maternally derived DNA (cytosine-5-) -methyltransferase 1o (DNMT1o) maintains DMDs during the eight-cell stage of development. DNMT1o-deficient mouse placentas have a generalized disruption of genomic imprints. Previous studies have demonstrated that DNMT1o deficiency alters placental morphology and broadens the embryonic weight distribution in late gestation. Lipids are critical for fetal growth. Thus, we assessed the impact of disrupted imprinting on placental lipids. Methods Lipids were quantified from DNMT1o-deficient mouse placentas and embryos at E17.5 using a modified Folch method. Expression of select genes critical for lipid metabolism was quantified with RT-qPCR. Mitochondrial morphology was assessed by TEM and mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic citrate concentrations quantified. DMD methylation was determined by EpiTYPER. Results We found that DNMT1o deficiency is associated with increased placental triacylglycerol levels. Neither fetal triacylglycerol concentrations nor expression of select genes that mediate placental lipid transport were different from wild type. Placental triacylglycerol accumulation was associated with impaired beta-oxidation and abnormal citrate metabolism with decreased mitochondrial aconitase activity and increased cytoplasmic citrate concentrations. Loss of methylation at the MEST DMD was strongly associated with placental triacylglycerol accumulation. Discussion A generalized disruption of genomic imprints leads to triacylglycerol accumulation and abnormal mitochondrial function. This could stem directly from a loss of methylation at a given DMD, such as MEST, or represent a consequence of abnormal placental development. PMID:25662615

  11. Molecularly imprinted polymers for biomedical and biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, E. V.; Pyshnaya, I. A.; Martyanov, O. N.; Pyshnyi, D. V.

    2016-05-01

    This survey covers main advances in the preparation and application of molecularly imprinted polymers which are capable of specific recognition of biologically active compounds. The principles underlying the production of highly efficient and template-specific molecularly imprinted polymers are discussed. The focus is on the imprinting of highly structured macromolecular and supramolecular templates. The existing and potential applications of molecularly imprinted polymers in various fields of chemistry and molecular biology are considered. The bibliography includes 261 references.

  12. 21 CFR 206.10 - Code imprint required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL IMPRINTING OF SOLID ORAL DOSAGE FORM DRUG PRODUCTS FOR HUMAN USE § 206.10 Code imprint required... delivered for introduction into interstate commerce unless it is clearly marked or imprinted with a...

  13. 21 CFR 206.10 - Code imprint required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL IMPRINTING OF SOLID ORAL DOSAGE FORM DRUG PRODUCTS FOR HUMAN USE § 206.10 Code imprint required... delivered for introduction into interstate commerce unless it is clearly marked or imprinted with a...

  14. 21 CFR 206.10 - Code imprint required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL IMPRINTING OF SOLID ORAL DOSAGE FORM DRUG PRODUCTS FOR HUMAN USE § 206.10 Code imprint required... delivered for introduction into interstate commerce unless it is clearly marked or imprinted with a...

  15. Imprinting control regions (ICRs) are marked by mono-allelic bivalent chromatin when transcriptionally inactive

    PubMed Central

    Maupetit-Méhouas, Stéphanie; Montibus, Bertille; Nury, David; Tayama, Chiharu; Wassef, Michel; Kota, Satya K.; Fogli, Anne; Cerqueira Campos, Fabiana; Hata, Kenichiro; Feil, Robert; Margueron, Raphael; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes is mediated by imprinting control regions (ICRs) that are constitutively marked by DNA methylation imprints on the maternal or paternal allele. Mono-allelic DNA methylation is strictly required for the process of imprinting and has to be faithfully maintained during the entire life-span. While the regulation of DNA methylation itself is well understood, the mechanisms whereby the opposite allele remains unmethylated are unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse, at maternally methylated ICRs, the paternal allele, which is constitutively associated with H3K4me2/3, is marked by default by H3K27me3 when these ICRs are transcriptionally inactive, leading to the formation of a bivalent chromatin signature. Our data suggest that at ICRs, chromatin bivalency has a protective role by ensuring that DNA on the paternal allele remains unmethylated and protected against spurious and unscheduled gene expression. Moreover, they provide the proof of concept that, beside pluripotent cells, chromatin bivalency is the default state of transcriptionally inactive CpG island promoters, regardless of the developmental stage, thereby contributing to protect cell identity. PMID:26400168

  16. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo-Álvarez, P.; Ramos-Ibeas, P.; Park, K.E.; Powell, A. P.; Vansandt, L.; Derek, Bickhart; Ramirez, M. A.; Gutiérrez-Adán, A.; Telugu, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. Currently, it is unclear whether artificial reprogramming induced by the expression of Yamanaka factors disrupts these marks and whether cell type of origin affects the dynamics of reprogramming. In this study, spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) that harbor paternalized imprinting marks, and fibroblasts were reprogrammed to iPSC (SSCiPSC and fiPSC). The SSCiPSC were able to form teratomas and generated chimeras with a higher skin chimerism than those derived from fiPSC. RNA-seq revealed extensive reprogramming at the transcriptional level with 8124 genes differentially expressed between SSC and SSCiPSC and only 490 between SSCiPSC and fiPSC. Likewise, reprogramming of SSC affected 26 of 41 imprinting gene clusters known in the mouse genome. A closer look at H19 ICR revealed complete erasure in SSCiPSC in contrast to fiPSC. Imprinting erasure in SSCiPSC was maintained even after in vivo differentiation into teratomas. Reprogramming of SSC from Tet1 and Tet2 double knockout mice however lacked demethylation of H19 ICR. These results suggest that imprinting erasure during reprogramming depends on the epigenetic landscape of the precursor cell and is mediated by TETs at the H19 locus. PMID:26328763

  17. Monoallelic Loss of the Imprinted Gene Grb10 Promotes Tumor Formation in Irradiated Nf1+/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Huang, Brian; Braunstein, Steve; Firestone, Ari J.; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2015-01-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed from only one parental allele and heterozygous loss involving the expressed allele is sufficient to produce complete loss of protein expression. Genetic alterations are common in tumorigenesis but the role of imprinted genes in this process is not well understood. In earlier work we mutagenized mice heterozygous for the Neurofibromatosis I tumor suppressor gene (NF1) to model radiotherapy-associated second malignant neoplasms that arise in irradiated NF1 patients. Expression analysis of tumor cell lines established from our mouse models identified Grb10 expression as widely absent. Grb10 is an imprinted gene and polymorphism analysis of cell lines and primary tumors demonstrates that the expressed allele is commonly lost in diverse Nf1 mutant tumors arising in our mouse models. We performed functional studies to test whether Grb10 restoration or loss alter fundamental features of the tumor growth. Restoring Grb10 in Nf1 mutant tumors decreases proliferation, decreases soft agar colony formation and downregulates Ras signaling. Conversely, Grb10 silencing in untransformed mouse embryo fibroblasts significantly increased cell proliferation and increased Ras-GTP levels. Expression of a constitutively activated MEK rescued tumor cells from Grb10-mediated reduction in colony formation. These studies reveal that Grb10 loss can occur during in vivo tumorigenesis, with a functional consequence in untransformed primary cells. In tumors, Grb10 loss independently promotes Ras pathway hyperactivation, which promotes hyperproliferation, an early feature of tumor development. In the context of a robust Nf1 mutant mouse model of cancer this work identifies a novel role for an imprinted gene in tumorigenesis. PMID:26000738

  18. Roles of imprinted genes in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Anke; Daniel, Guillaume; Schmidt-Edelkraut, Udo; Spengler, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted genes and neural stem cells (NSC) play an important role in the developing and mature brain. A central theme of imprinted gene function in NSCs is cell survival and G1 arrest to control cell division, cell-cycle exit, migration and differentiation. Moreover, genomic imprinting can be epigenetically switched off at some genes to ensure stem cell quiescence and differentiation. At the genome scale, imprinted genes are organized in dynamic networks formed by interchromosomal interactions and transcriptional coregulation of imprinted and nonimprinted genes. Such multilayered networks may synchronize NSC activity with the demand from the niche resembling their roles in adjusting fetal size. PMID:25431944

  19. Genetic conflicts, multiple paternity and the evolution of genomic imprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, H G; Feldman, M W; Clark, A G

    1998-01-01

    We present nine diallelic models of genetic conflict in which one allele is imprintable and the other is not to examine how genomic imprinting may have evolved. Imprinting is presumed to be either maternal (i.e., the maternally derived gene is inactivated) or paternal. Females are assumed to be either completely monogamous or always bigamous, so that we may see any effect of multiple paternity. In contrast to previous verbal and quantitative genetic models, we find that genetic conflicts need not lead to paternal imprinting of growth inhibitors and maternal imprinting of growth enhancers. Indeed, in some of our models--those with strict monogamy--the dynamics of maternal and paternal imprinting are identical. Multiple paternity is not necessary for the evolution of imprinting, and in our models of maternal imprinting, multiple paternity has no effect at all. Nevertheless, multiple paternity favors the evolution of paternal imprinting of growth inhibitors and hinders that of growth enhancers. Hence, any degree of multiple paternity means that growth inhibitors are more likely to be paternally imprinted, and growth enhancers maternally so. In all of our models, stable polymorphism of imprinting status is possible and mean fitness can decrease over time. Neither of these behaviors have been predicted by previous models. PMID:9504935

  20. High Sensitivity Imprint Measurements on Nike Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max

    2005-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instability seeded by laser non-uniformity (laser imprint) is an important factor in performance of direct-drive ICF targets. Most of the imprint occurs during the initial low-intensity (``foot'') part of the pulse, necessary to compress the target to achieve high gain. Experiments are carried out on Nike KrF laser with induced spatial incoherence (ISI) smoothing. The amount of imprint is varied by changing the uniformity the foot of the pulse. The resulting Raleigh-Taylor (RT) amplified areal mass non-uniformity is measured by face-on x-ray radiography using Bragg reflection from a curved crystal coupled to an x-ray streak camera. The streak camera was recently retrofitted with a new high sensitivity CCD camera. The sensitivity of the CCD has enabled it to be fiberoptically coupled directly to the streak camera output, without an image intensifier and lens coupling. This gave an increased overall spatial resolution as well as lower noise. Because of the strong short wavelength component of RT amplified imprint, the increased resolution and lower noise resulted in much lower noise floor in the measurement. Experimental results are compared with 2D simulations using FAST hydrocode for a range of foot uniformities and intensities. Work supported by the U. S. DOE/NNSA.

  1. Atomic-Scale Imprinting into Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo; Li, Rui; Simon, Georg; Kinser, Emely; Liu, Ze; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Chao; Singer, Jonathan; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan

    Nanoimprinting by thermoplastic forming (TPF) has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its promise of low-cost fabrication of nanostructured devices. Usually performed using polymers, amorphous metals have been identified as a material class that might be even better suited for nanoimprinting due to a combination of mechanical properties and processing ability. Commonly referred to as metallic glasses, their featureless atomic structure suggests that there may not be an intrinsic size limit to the material's ability to replicate a mold. To study this hypothesis, we demonstrate atomic-scale imprinting into amorphous metals by TPF under ambient conditions. Atomic step edges of a SrTiO3 (STO) single crystal used as mold were successfully imprinted into Pt-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high fidelity. Terraces on the BMG replicas possess atomic smoothness with sub-Angstrom roughness that is identical to the one measured on the STO mold. Systematic studies revealed that the quality of the replica depends on the loading rate during imprinting, that the same mold can be used multiple times without degradation of mold or replicas, and that the atomic-scale features on as-imprinted BMG surfaces has impressive long-term stability (months).

  2. Plastic Antibodies: Molecular Recognition with Imprinted Polymers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Furmanski, Brian; Shimizu, Ken D.

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are prepared and tested in a study for their molecular recognition properties of an adenine derivative, ethyl adenine-9-acetate (EA9A), within two laboratory periods. The procedure introduces undergraduate chemistry students to noncovalent molecular imprinting as well as the analytical techniques for assessing their recognition…

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Can Be Used to Model the Genomic Imprinting Disorder Prader-Willi Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiayin; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Xianming; Li, Wen; Xu, Jianyong; Li, Feng; Guo, Xiangpeng; Deng, Kang; Zhong, Mei; Chen, Yonglong; Lai, Liangxue; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology provides an invaluable tool for creating in vitro representations of human genetic conditions. This is particularly relevant for those diseases that lack adequate animal models or where the species comparison is difficult, e.g. imprinting diseases such as the neurogenetic disorder Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). However, recent reports have unveiled transcriptional and functional differences between iPSCs and embryonic stem cells that in cases are attributable to imprinting errors. This has suggested that human iPSCs may not be useful to model genetic imprinting diseases. Here, we describe the generation of iPSCs from a patient with PWS bearing a partial translocation of the paternally expressed chromosome 15q11-q13 region to chromosome 4. The resulting iPSCs match all standard criteria of bona fide reprogramming and could be readily differentiated into tissues derived from the three germ layers, including neurons. Moreover, these iPSCs retain a high level of DNA methylation in the imprinting center of the maternal allele and show concomitant reduced expression of the disease-associated small nucleolar RNA HBII-85/SNORD116. These results indicate that iPSCs may be a useful tool to study PWS and perhaps other genetic imprinting diseases as well. PMID:20956530

  4. Imprinting of the MEDEA polycomb gene in the Arabidopsis endosperm.

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, T; Yadegari, R; Harada, J J; Goldberg, R B; Fischer, R L

    1999-01-01

    In flowering plants, two cells are fertilized in the haploid female gametophyte. Egg and sperm nuclei fuse to form the embryo. A second sperm nucleus fuses with the central cell nucleus that replicates to generate the endosperm, which is a tissue that supports embryo development. MEDEA (MEA) encodes an Arabidopsis SET domain Polycomb protein. Inheritance of a maternal loss-of-function mea allele results in embryo abortion and prolonged endosperm production, irrespective of the genotype of the paternal allele. Thus, only the maternal wild-type MEA allele is required for proper embryo and endosperm development. To understand the molecular mechanism responsible for the parent-of-origin effects of mea mutations on seed development, we compared the expression of maternal and paternal MEA alleles in the progeny of crosses between two Arabidopsis ecotypes. Only the maternal MEA mRNA was detected in the endosperm from seeds at the torpedo stage and later. By contrast, expression of both maternal and paternal MEA alleles was observed in the embryo from seeds at the torpedo stage and later, in seedling, leaf, stem, and root. Thus, MEA is an imprinted gene that displays parent-of-origin-dependent monoallelic expression specifically in the endosperm. These results suggest that the embryo abortion observed in mutant mea seeds is due, at least in part, to a defect in endosperm function. Silencing of the paternal MEA allele in the endosperm and the phenotype of mutant mea seeds supports the parental conflict theory for the evolution of imprinting in plants and mammals. PMID:10521524

  5. The essence of linkage-based imprinting detection: comparing power, type 1 error, and the effects of confounders in two different analysis approaches.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David A; Monti, Maria Cristina; Feenstra, Bjarke; Zhang, Junying; Hodge, Susan E

    2010-05-01

    Imprinting is critical to understanding disease expression. It can be detected using linkage information, but the effects of potential confounders (heterogeneity, sex-specific penetrance, and sex-biased ascertainment) have not been explored. We examine power and confounders in two imprinting detection approaches, and we explore imprinting-linkage interaction. One method (PP) models imprinting by maximising lod scores w.r.t. parent-specific penetrances. The second (DRF) approximates imprinting by maximising lods over differential male-female recombination fractions. We compared power, type 1 error, and confounder effects in these two methods, using computer-simulated data. We varied heterogeneity, penetrance, family and dataset size, and confounders that might mimic imprinting. Without heterogeneity, PP had more imprinting-detecting power than DRF. PP's power increased when parental affectedness status was ignored, but decreased with heterogeneity. With heterogeneity, type 1 error increased dramatically for both methods. However, DRF's power also increased under heterogeneity, more than was attributable to inflated type 1 error. Sex-specific penetrance could increase false positives for PP but not for DRF. False positives did not increase on ascertainment through an affected "mother". For PP, non-penetrant individuals increased information, arguing against using affected-only methods. The high type 1 error levels under some circumstances means these methods must be used cautiously. PMID:20374235

  6. Imprinting of the gene encoding a human cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p57KIP2, on chromosome 11p15.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, S; Thompson, J S; Edwards, M C; Bartletta, J M; Grundy, P; Kalikin, L M; Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Feinberg, A P

    1996-01-01

    Parental origin-specific alterations of chromosome 11p15 in human cancer suggest the involvement of one or more maternally expressed imprinted genes involved in embryonal tumor suppression and the cancer-predisposing Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p57KIP2, whose overexpression causes G1 phase arrest, was recently cloned and mapped to this band. We find that the p57KIP2 gene is imprinted, with preferential expression of the maternal allele. However, the imprint is not absolute, as the paternal allele is also expressed at low levels in most tissues, and at levels comparable to the maternal allele in fetal brain and some embryonal tumors. The biochemical function, chromosomal location, and imprinting of the p57KIP2 gene match the properties predicted for a tumor suppressor gene at 11p15.5. However, as the p57KIP2 gene is 500 kb centromeric to the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 2, it is likely to be part of a large domain containing other imprinted genes. Thus, loss of heterozygosity or loss of imprinting might simultaneously affect several genes at this locus that together contribute to tumor and/or growth- suppressing functions that are disrupted in BWS and embryonal tumors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610162

  7. [Spectroscopic Study of Salbutamol Molecularly Imprinted Polymers].

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui-peng; Guan, Yu-yu; Dai, Rong-hua; Liu, Guo-yan; Chai, Chun-yan

    2016-02-01

    In order to solve the problem of on-site rapid detection of salbutamol residues in feed and animal products, and develop a new method of fast detection of salbutamol on the basis of the molecular imprinting technology, this article uses the salbutamol (SAL) working as template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) working as functional monomer. On this basis, a new type of core-shell type salbutamol molecularly imprinted polymers were prepared with colloidal gold particles as triggering core. Superficial characteristics of the MIPs and the related compounds were investigated by ultraviolet (UV) spectra and infrared (IR) spectra, Raman spectra, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. The results indicated that a stable hydrogen bonding complex has been formed between the carboxyl groups of SAL and MA with a matching ratio of 1:1. The complex can be easily eluted by the reagent containing hydrogen bonding. The chemical binding constant K reaches -0.245 x 10⁶ L² · mol⁻². The possible binding sites of the hydrogen bonding was formed between the hydrogen atoms of -COOH in MA and the oxygen atoms of C==O in SAL. IR and Raman spectrum showed that, compared with MA, a significant red shift of -OH absorption peak was manifested in MIPs, which proved that SAL as template molecule occurred a specific bond between MA. Red shift of stretching vibration absorption peak of C==O was also detected in the un-eluted MIPs and obvious energy loss happened, which demonstrated a possible binding sites is SAL intramolecular of C==O atom of oxygen. If the hydrogen atoms of -COOH in MA wanted to generate hydrogen bond. However, the shapes of absorption peak of other functional groups including C==C, C==O, and -OH were very similar both in MIPs and NIPs. Specific cavities were formed after the template molecules in MIPs were removed. It was proved by the adsorption experiment that the specific sites in these cavities highly match with the chemical and space structure of SAL

  8. Identification of the imprinted KLF14 transcription factor undergoing human-specific accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Carson, Andrew R; Yamada, Takahiro; Arnaud, Philippe; Feil, Robert; Abu-Amero, Sayeda N; Moore, Gudrun E; Kaneda, Masahiro; Perry, George H; Stone, Anne C; Lee, Charles; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W

    2007-05-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner and are located in clusters throughout the genome. Aberrations in the expression of imprinted genes on human Chromosome 7 have been suggested to play a role in the etiologies of Russell-Silver Syndrome and autism. We describe the imprinting of KLF14, an intronless member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors located at Chromosome 7q32. We show that it has monoallelic maternal expression in all embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues studied, in both human and mouse. We examine epigenetic modifications in the KLF14 CpG island in both species and find this region to be hypomethylated. In addition, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation and find that the murine Klf14 CpG island lacks allele-specific histone modifications. Despite the absence of these defining features, our analysis of Klf14 in offspring from DNA methyltransferase 3a conditional knockout mice reveals that the gene's expression is dependent upon a maternally methylated region. Due to the intronless nature of Klf14 and its homology to Klf16, we suggest that the gene is an ancient retrotransposed copy of Klf16. By sequence analysis of numerous species, we place the timing of this event after the divergence of Marsupialia, yet prior to the divergence of the Xenarthra superclade. We identify a large number of sequence variants in KLF14 and, using several measures of diversity, we determine that there is greater variability in the human lineage with a significantly increased number of nonsynonymous changes, suggesting human-specific accelerated evolution. Thus, KLF14 may be the first example of an imprinted transcript undergoing accelerated evolution in the human lineage. PMID:17480121

  9. The product of the imprinted H19 gene is an oncofetal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, I.; Ayesh, S.; Perlman, E. J.; Pizov, G.; Tanos, V.; Schneider, T.; Erdmann, V. A.; Podeh, D.; Komitowski, D.; Quasem, A. S.; de Groot, N.; Hochberg, A.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: The H19 gene is an imprinted, maternally expressed gene in humans. It is tightly linked and coregulated with the imprinted, paternally expressed gene of insulin-like growth factor 2. The H19 gene product is not translated into protein and functions as an RNA molecule. Although its role has been investigated for more than a decade, its biological function is still not understood fully. H19 is abundantly expressed in many tissues from early stages of embryogenesis through fetal life, and is down regulated postnatally. It is also expressed in certain childhood and adult tumours. This study was designed to screen the expression of H19 in human cancer and its relation to the expression of H19 in the fetus. METHODS: Using in situ hybridisation with a [35S] labelled probe, H19 mRNA was detected in paraffin wax sections of fetal tissues from the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and of a large array of human adult and childhood tumours arising from these tissues. RESULTS: The H19 gene is expressed in tumours arising from tissues which express this gene in fetal life. Its expression in the fetus and in cancer is closely linked with tissue differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these and previous data, H19 is neither a tumour suppressor gene nor an oncogene. Its product is an oncofetal RNA. The potential use of this RNA as a tumour marker should be evaluated. Images PMID:9208812

  10. Imprinted survival genes preclude loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 7 in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Boot, Arnoud; Oosting, Jan; de Miranda, Noel Fcc; Zhang, Yinghui; Corver, Willem E; van de Water, Bob; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The genomes of a wide range of cancers, including colon, breast, and thyroid cancers, frequently show copy number gains of chromosome 7 and rarely show loss of heterozygosity. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Strikingly, oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinomas can display an extreme genomic profile, with homozygosity of all chromosomes except for chromosome 7. The observation that homozygosity of chromosome 7 is never observed suggests that retention of heterozygosity is essential for cells. We hypothesized that cell survival genes are genetically imprinted on either of two copies of chromosome 7, which thwarts loss of heterozygosity at this chromosome in cancer cells. By employing a DNA methylation screen and gene expression analysis, we identified six imprinted genes that force retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Subsequent knockdown of gene expression showed that CALCR, COPG2, GRB10, KLF14, MEST, and PEG10 were essential for cancer cell survival, resulting in reduced cell proliferation, G1 -phase arrest, and increased apoptosis. We propose that imprinted cell survival genes provide a genetic basis for retention of chromosome 7 heterozygosity in cancer cells. The monoallelically expressed cell survival genes identified in this study, and the cellular pathways that they are involved in, offer new therapeutic targets for the treatment of tumours showing retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27265324

  11. Mycotoxin Analysis Using Imprinted Materials Technology: Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Appell, Michael; Mueller, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imprinting technology is an attractive, cost-effective, and robust alternative to address the limitations of highly selective natural receptors, such as antibodies and aptamers. The field of molecular imprinting has seen a recent surge in growth, and several commercially available products are of great interest for sample cleanup to improve mycotoxin analysis. Current research trends are in specific applications of imprinting technology for small-molecule sensing and chromatographic cleanup procedures in new commodities. The choice of components and imprinting template are critical factors for mycotoxin recovery or detection optimization. Template mimics offer a means to reduce toxic exposure during polymer synthesis and address issues of leaching template from the imprinted polymer. Recent reports of molecularly imprinted polymers for aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, fusaric acid, citrinin, patulin, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol, and T-2 toxin are reviewed. PMID:27214609

  12. Bolt Cutter Blade's Imprint in Toolmarks Examination.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Nikolai; Finkelstein, Nir; Novoselsky, Yehuda; Tsach, Tsadok

    2015-11-01

    Bolt cutters are known as cutting tools which are used for cutting hard objects and materials, such as padlocks and bars. Bolt cutter blades leave their imprint on the cut objects. When receiving a cut object from a crime scene, forensic toolmarks examiners can determine whether the suspected cutting tool was used in a specific crime or not based on class characteristic marks and individual marks that the bolt cutter blades leave on the cut object. The paper presents preliminary results of a study on ten bolt cutters and suggests a quick preliminary examination-the comparison between the blade thickness and the width of the imprint left by the tool on the cut object. Based on the comparison result, if there is not a match, the examiner can eliminate the feasibility of the use of the suspected cutting tool in a specific crime. This examination simplifies and accelerates the comparison procedure. PMID:26257324

  13. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Bradley R.; Talley, Chad E.

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  14. 77 FR 25082 - Picture Permit Imprint Indicia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ...The Postal Service will revise Mailing Standards of the United States Postal Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM[supreg]) 604.5 to add picture permit imprint indicia standards allowing customers to include business-related color images, such as corporate logos, company brand or trademarks, in the permit indicia area of First-Class Mail[supreg] full-service automation letters and postcards, and......

  15. Affinity based and molecularly imprinted cryogels: Applications in biomacromolecule purification.

    PubMed

    Andaç, Müge; Galaev, Igor Yu; Denizli, Adil

    2016-05-15

    The publications in macro-molecularly imprinted polymers have increased drastically in recent years with the development of water-based polymer systems. The macroporous structure of cryogels has allowed the use of these materials within different applications, particularly in affinity purification and molecular imprinting based methods. Due to their high selectivity, specificity, efficient mass transfer and good reproducibility, molecularly imprinted cryogels (MICs) have become attractive for researchers in the separation and purification of proteins. In this review, the recent developments in affinity based cryogels and molecularly imprinted cryogels in protein purification are reviewed comprehensively. PMID:26454622

  16. Deletions of a differentially methylated CpG island at SNRPN define a putative imprinting control region

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, J.S.,; Nakao, M.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are associated with paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, of gene expression within human chromosome 15q11-q13, and are caused by deletion, uniparental disomy, or other mutations. Four transcripts designated PAR-5, PAR-7, PAR-1 and PAR-4 were isolated and localized to a region within 300 kb telomeric to the gene encoding small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N (SNRPN). Analysis of the transcripts in cultured fibroblasts and lymphoblasts from deletion patients demonstrated that SNRPN, PAR-5 and PAR-1 are expressed exclusively from the paternal chromosome, defining an imprinted domain that spans at least 200 kb. All three imprinted transcripts were absent in cells from three PWS patients (one pair of sibs and one sporadic case) with small deletions that involve a differentially methylated CpG island containing a previously undescribed 5{prime} untranslated exon ({alpha}) of SNRPN. Methylation of the CpG island is specific for the maternal chromosome consistent with paternal expression of the imprinted domain. One deletion, which is benign when maternally transmitted, extends upstream <30 kb from the CpG island, and is associated with altered methylation centromeric to SNRPN, and loss of transcription telomeric to SNRPN, implying the presence of an imprinting control region around the CpG island containing exon {alpha}.

  17. Mammalian viviparity: a complex niche in the evolution of genomic imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Keverne, E B

    2014-01-01

    Evolution of mammalian reproductive success has witnessed a strong dependence on maternal resources through placental in utero development. Genomic imprinting, which has an active role in mammalian viviparity, also reveals a biased role for matrilineal DNA in its regulation. The co-existence of three matrilineal generations as one (mother, foetus and post-meiotic oocytes) has provided a maternal niche for transgenerational co-adaptive selection pressures to operate. In utero foetal growth has required increased maternal feeding in advance of foetal energetic demands; the mammary glands are primed for milk production in advance of birth, while the maternal hypothalamus is hormonally primed by the foetal placenta for nest building and post-natal care. Such biological forward planning resulted from maternal–foetal co-adaptation facilitated by co-expression of the same imprinted allele in the developing hypothalamus and placenta. This co-expression is concurrent with the placenta interacting with the adult maternal hypothalamus thereby providing a transgenerational template on which selection pressures may operate ensuring optimal maternalism in this and the next generation. Invasive placentation has further required the maternal immune system to adapt and positively respond to the foetal allotype. Pivotal to these mammalian evolutionary developments, genomic imprinting emerged as a monoallelic gene dosage regulatory mechanism of tightly interconnected gene networks providing developmental genetic stability for in utero development. PMID:24569636

  18. Heat-Induced Release of Epigenetic Silencing Reveals the Concealed Role of an Imprinted Plant Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Diego H.; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms suppress the transcription of transposons and DNA repeats; however, this suppression can be transiently released under prolonged heat stress. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana imprinted gene SDC, which is silent during vegetative growth due to DNA methylation, is activated by heat and contributes to recovery from stress. SDC activation seems to involve epigenetic mechanisms but not canonical heat-shock perception and signaling. The heat-mediated transcriptional induction of SDC occurs particularly in young developing leaves and is proportional to the level of stress. However, this occurs only above a certain window of absolute temperatures and, thus, resembles a thermal-sensing mechanism. In addition, the re-silencing kinetics during recovery can be entrained by repeated heat stress cycles, suggesting that epigenetic regulation in plants may conserve memory of stress experience. We further demonstrate that SDC contributes to the recovery of plant biomass after stress. We propose that transcriptional gene silencing, known to be involved in gene imprinting, is also co-opted in the specific tuning of SDC expression upon heat stress and subsequent recovery. It is therefore possible that dynamic properties of the epigenetic landscape associated with silenced or imprinted genes may contribute to regulation of their expression in response to environmental challenges. PMID:25411840

  19. The preparation of magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles for the recognition of bovine hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Yuzhi; Jia, Xiaoping; He, Meizhi; Xu, Minli; Yang, Shan; Zhang, Cenjin

    2014-03-01

    The protein imprinted technique combining surface imprinting and nano-sized supports materials is an attractive strategy for protein recognition and rapid separation. In this work, we imprinted bovine hemoglobin (BHb) on magnetic nanoparticles. With itaconic acid (IA) and acrylamide (AAm) as the monomers, the experiment was carried out in aqueous media via surface-imprinting technique. The effects of initial concentration and adsorption time over the adsorption capacity of both imprinted and non-imprinted nanoparticles were analyzed. The maximum adsorption capability of imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 77.6 mg g(-1), which was 3.1-4.3 times higher than that of the non-imprinted nanoparticles prepared at the same conditions. This resulted in the successful formation of imprinting cavities. Moreover, in selective adsorption experiment and competitive batch rebinding test, imprinted nanoparticles exhibited a high specific recognition of the template protein over the non-imprinted protein. PMID:24468385

  20. Two progenitor cells for human oogonia inferred from pedigree data and the X-inactivation imprinting model of the fragile-X syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Laird, C D; Lamb, M M; Thorne, J L

    1990-01-01

    Laird has proposed that the human fragile-X syndrome is caused by abnormal chromosome imprinting. The analysis presented here supports and extends this proposal. Using published pedigrees that include DNA polymorphism (RFLP) data, we establish that the states of the fragile-X mutation termed "imprinted" and "nonimprinted" usually can be distinguished by the level of cytogenetic expression of the fragile-X chromosome. This information is then used to assess the state of the fragile-X allele in carrier progeny of individual women who inherited a nonimprinted fragile-X chromosome. From this assessment, an estimate is made of the frequency, in individual women, of primary oocytes with an imprinted fragile-X chromosome. The results of this analysis provide additional support for the specific model in which chromosome imprinting occurs in a female in, on average, half of her primary oocytes. This is the expected frequency if X-chromosome inactivation is the initial step in the imprinting of the mutant fragile-X allele. Moreover, this analysis suggests a biological explanation for peculiarities of fragile-X inheritance described by others as "clustering" and the "Sherman paradox." We interpret these peculiarities as consequences of a very small number of oogonial progenitor cells. Two progenitor cells for oogonia is the best integer estimate of the number of such cells at the time of the initial event that leads to chromosome imprinting. PMID:1969225

  1. Electrochemical sensor for sulfadimethoxine based on molecularly imprinted polypyrrole: study of imprinting parameters.

    PubMed

    Turco, Antonio; Corvaglia, Stefania; Mazzotta, Elisabetta

    2015-01-15

    The present work describes the development of a simple and cost-effective electrochemical sensor for sulfadimethoxine (SDM) based on molecularly imprinted overoxidized polypyrrole (PPy). An all electrochemical approach is used for sensor fabrication and application consisting in molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) galvanostatic deposition on a gold electrode and its overoxidation under different experimental conditions and in SDM amperometric detection. Several parameters influencing the imprinting effect are critically discussed and evaluated. A key role of the electrolyte used in electropolymerization (tetrabuthylammonium perchlorate and lithium perchlorate) has emerged demonstrating its effect on sensing performances of imprinted PPy and, related to this, on its morphology, as highlighted by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of different overoxidation conditions in removing template is evaluated by analyzing MIP films before and after the treatment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also evidencing the correlation between MIP chemical structure and its rebinding ability. MIP-template interaction is verified also by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Under the selected optimal conditions, MIP sensor shows a linear range from 0.15 to 3.7 mM SDM, a limit of detection of 70 μM, a highly reproducible response (RSD 4.2%) and a good selectivity in the presence of structurally related molecules. SDM was determined in milk samples spiked at two concentration levels: 0.2 mM and 0.4 mM obtaining a satisfactory recovery of (97±3)% and (96±8)%, respectively. PMID:25104433

  2. Mycotoxin analysis using imprinted materials technology: Recent developments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular imprinting technology is an attractive, cost effective, and robust alternative to address the limitations of highly selective natural receptors, such as antibodies and aptamers. The field of molecular imprinting has seen a recent surge in growth with several commercially available products...

  3. Imprinting can cause a maladaptive preference for infectious conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jessica F; Reynolds, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Recognizing and associating with specific individuals, such as conspecifics or kin, brings many benefits. One mechanism underlying such recognition is imprinting: the long-term memory of cues encountered during development. Typically, juveniles imprint on cues of nearby individuals and may later associate with phenotypes matching their 'recognition template'. However, phenotype matching could lead to maladaptive social decisions if, for instance, individuals imprint on the cues of conspecifics infected with directly transmitted diseases. To investigate the role of imprinting in the sensory ecology of disease transmission, we exposed juvenile guppies,Poecilia reticulata, to the cues of healthy conspecifics, or to those experiencing disease caused by the directly transmitted parasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli In a dichotomous choice test, adult 'disease-imprinted' guppies preferred to associate with the chemical cues of G. turnbulli-infected conspecifics, whereas 'healthy-imprinted' guppies preferred to associate with cues of uninfected conspecifics. These responses were only observed when stimulus fish were in late infection, suggesting imprinted fish responded to cues of disease, but not of infection alone. We discuss how maladaptive imprinting may promote disease transmission in natural populations of a social host. PMID:27072405

  4. Matrix molecularly imprinted mesoporous sol-gel sorbent for efficient solid-phase extraction of chloramphenicol from milk.

    PubMed

    Samanidou, Victoria; Kehagia, Maria; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-03-31

    Highly selective and efficient chloramphenicol imprinted sol-gel silica based inorganic polymeric sorbent (sol-gel MIP) was synthesized via matrix imprinting approach for the extraction of chloramphenicol in milk. Chloramphenicol was used as the template molecule, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) and triethoxyphenylsilane (TEPS) as the functional precursors, tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) as the cross-linker, isopropanol as the solvent/porogen, and HCl as the sol-gel catalyst. Non-imprinted sol-gel polymer (sol-gel NIP) was synthesized under identical conditions in absence of template molecules for comparison purpose. Both synthesized materials were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, which unambiguously confirmed their significant structural and morphological differences. The synthesized MIP and NIP materials were evaluated as sorbents for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) of chloramphenicol in milk. The effect of critical extraction parameters (flow rate, elution solvent, sample and eluent volume, selectivity coefficient, retention capacity) was studied in terms of retention and desorption of chloramphenicol. Competition and cross reactivity tests have proved that sol-gel MIP sorbent possesses significantly higher specific retention and enrichment capacity for chloramphenicol compared to its non-imprinted analogue. The maximum imprinting factor (IF) was found as 9.7, whereas the highest adsorption capacity of chloramphenicol by sol-gel MIP was 23 mg/g. The sol-gel MIP was found to be adequately selective towards chloramphenicol to provide the necessary minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of 0.3 μg/kg set forth by European Commission after analysis by LC-MS even without requiring time consuming solvent evaporation and sample reconstitution step, often considered as an integral part in solid phase extraction work-flow. Intra and

  5. Generalized disruption of inherited genomic imprints leads to wide-ranging placental defects and dysregulated fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Himes, K. P.; Koppes, E.; Chaillet, J. Richard

    2012-01-01

    Monoallelic expression of imprinted genes, including ones solely expressed in the placenta, is essential for normal placental development and fetal growth. To better understand the role of placental imprinting in placental development and fetal growth, we examined conceptuses developing in the absence of maternally derived DNA (cytosine-5-)- methyltransferase 1o (DNMT1o). Absence of DNMT1o results in the partial loss of methylation at imprinted differentially methylated domain (DMD) sequences in the embryo and the placenta. Mid-gestation E9.5 DNMT1o-deficient placentas exhibited structural abnormalities of all tissue layers. At E17.5, all examined placentas had aberrant placental morphology, most notably in the spongiotrophoblast and labyrinth layers. Abnormalities included an expanded volume fraction of spongiotrophoblast tissue with extension of the spongiotrophoblast layer into the labyrinth. Many mutant placentas also demonstrated migration abnormalities of glycogen cells. Additionally, the volume fraction of the labyrinth was reduced, as was the surface area for maternal fetal gas exchange. Despite these placental morphologic abnormalities, approximately one-half of DNMT1o-deficient fetuses survived to late gestation (E17.5). Furthermore, DNMT1o- deficient placentas supported a broad range of fetal growth. The ability of some DNMT1o-deficient and morphologically abnormal placentas to support fetal growth in excess of wild type demonstrates the importance of differential methylation of DMDs and proper imprinting of discrete gene clusters to placental morphogenesis and fetal growth. PMID:23085235

  6. High volume nanoscale roll-based imprinting using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Se Hyun; Miller, Michael; Yang, Shuqiang; Ganapathisubramanian, Maha; Menezes, Marlon; Singh, Vik; Wan, Fen; Choi, Jin; Xu, Frank; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Hofemann, Paul; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2014-03-01

    Extremely large-area roll-to-roll manufacturing on flexible substrates is ubiquitous for applications such as paper and plastic processing. The challenge is to extend this approach to the realm of nanopatterning and realize similar benefits. Display applications, including liquid crystal (LCD), organic light emitting diode (OLED) and flexible displays are particularly interesting because of the ability to impact multiple levels in the basic display. Of particular interest are the polarizer, DBEF, thin film transistor and color filter; roll-based imprinting has the opportunity to create high performance components within the display while improving the cost of ownership of the panel. Realization of these devices requires both a scalable imprinting technology and tool. In this paper, we introduce a high volume roll-based nanopatterning system, the LithoFlex 350TM. The LithoFlex 350 uses an inkjet based imprinting process similar to the technology demonstrator tool, the LithoFlex 100, introduced in 2012. The width of the web is 350mm and patterning width is 300mm. The system can be configured either for Plate-to-Roll (P2R) imprinting (in which a rigid template is used to pattern the flexible web material) or for Roll-to-Plate imprinting (R2P) (in which a web based template is used to pattern either wafers or panels). Also described in this paper are improvements to wire grid polarizer devices. By optimizing the deposition, patterning and etch processes, we have been able to create working WGPs with transmittance and extinction ratios as high as 44% and 50,000, respectively.

  7. Olfactory imprinting is triggered by MHC peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Cornelia; Namekawa, Iori; Namekawa, Ri; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca; Oppelt, Claus; Jaeschke, Aaron; Müller, Anke; Friedrich, Rainer W; Gerlach, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory imprinting on environmental, population- and kin-specific cues is a specific form of life-long memory promoting homing of salmon to their natal rivers and the return of coral reef fish to natal sites. Despite its ecological significance, natural chemicals for olfactory imprinting have not been identified yet. Here, we show that MHC peptides function as chemical signals for olfactory imprinting in zebrafish. We found that MHC peptides consisting of nine amino acids elicit olfactory imprinting and subsequent kin recognition depending on the MHC genotype of the fish. In vivo calcium imaging shows that some olfactory bulb neurons are highly sensitive to MHC peptides with a detection threshold at 1 pM or lower, indicating that MHC peptides are potent olfactory stimuli. Responses to MHC peptides overlapped spatially with responses to kin odour but not food odour, consistent with the hypothesis that MHC peptides are natural signals for olfactory imprinting. PMID:24077566

  8. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based imprinted monolith.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Xiu; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2015-12-18

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), naproxon (template), 4-vinylpyridine, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4). The influence of synthesis parameters on the retention factor and imprinting effect, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest imprinting factor on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was 22, about 10 times higher than that prepared in absence of POSS. The comparisons between MIP monoliths synthesized with POSS and without POSS were made in terms of permeability, column efficiency, surface morphology and pore size distribution. In addition, thermodynamic and Van Deemter analysis were used to evaluate the POSS-based MIP monolith. PMID:26627587

  9. Band structure controlled by chiral imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Adrian Reyes, J.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2007-09-01

    Using the configuration of an imprinted cholesteric elastomer immersed in a racemic solvent, the authors find the solution of the boundary-value problem for the reflection and transmission of incident optical waves due to the elastomer. They show a significant width reduction of the reflection band for certain values of nematic penetration depth, which depends on the volume fraction of molecules from the solvent, whose handedness is preferably absorbed. The appearance of nested band gaps of both handednesses during the sorting mixed chiral process is also obtained. This suggests the design of chemically controlled optical filters and optically monitored chiral pumps.

  10. Band Structure Controlled by Chiral Imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Cervantes, Adrian; Castro-Garay, P.; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben

    2008-03-01

    Using the configuration of an imprinted cholesteric elastomer immersed in a racemic solvent, we find the solution of the boundary--value problem for the reflection and transmission of incident optical waves due to the elastomer. We show a significant width reduction of the reflection band for certain values of nematic penetration depth, which depends on the volume fraction of molecules from the solvent, whose handedness is preferably absorbed. The appearance of nested bandgaps of both handednesses during the sorting mixed chiral process is also obtained. This suggests the design of chemically controlled optical filters and optically monitored chiral pumps.

  11. Genomic imprinting: A missing piece of the Multiple Sclerosis puzzle?

    PubMed

    Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Stridh, Pernilla; Kular, Lara; Jagodic, Maja

    2015-10-01

    Evidence for parent-of-origin effects in complex diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS) strongly suggests a role for epigenetic mechanisms in their pathogenesis. In this review, we describe the importance of accounting for parent-of-origin when identifying new risk variants for complex diseases and discuss how genomic imprinting, one of the best-characterized epigenetic mechanisms causing parent-of-origin effects, may impact etiology of complex diseases. While the role of imprinted genes in growth and development is well established, the contribution and molecular mechanisms underlying the impact of genomic imprinting in immune functions and inflammatory diseases are still largely unknown. Here we discuss emerging roles of imprinted genes in the regulation of inflammatory responses with a particular focus on the Dlk1 cluster that has been implicated in etiology of experimental MS-like disease and Type 1 Diabetes. Moreover, we speculate on the potential wider impact of imprinting via the action of imprinted microRNAs, which are abundantly present in the Dlk1 locus and predicted to fine-tune important immune functions. Finally, we reflect on how unrelated imprinted genes or imprinted genes together with non-imprinted genes can interact in so-called imprinted gene networks (IGN) and suggest that IGNs could partly explain observed parent-of-origin effects in complex diseases. Unveiling the mechanisms of parent-of-origin effects is therefore likely to teach us not only about the etiology of complex diseases but also about the unknown roles of this fascinating phenomenon underlying uneven genetic contribution from our parents. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Epigenetics dynamics in development and disease. PMID:26002250

  12. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1 μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3 μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4 months storage at 25 °C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8 °C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32 °C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. PMID:26883854

  13. A Proteomic Study of Memory After Imprinting in the Domestic Chick

    PubMed Central

    Meparishvili, Maia; Nozadze, Maia; Margvelani, Giorgi; McCabe, Brian J.; Solomonia, Revaz O.

    2015-01-01

    The intermediate and medial mesopallium (IMM) of the domestic chick forebrain has previously been shown to be a memory system for visual imprinting. Learning-related changes occur in certain plasma membrane and mitochondrial proteins in the IMM. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry has been employed to identify more comprehensively learning-related expression of proteins in the membrane-mitochondrial fraction of the IMM 24 h after training. We inquired whether amounts of these proteins in the IMM and a control region (posterior pole of the nidopallium, PPN) are correlated with a behavioral estimate of memory for the imprinting stimulus. Learning-related increases in amounts of the following proteins were found in the left IMM, but not the right IMM or the left or right PPN: (i) membrane cognin; (ii) a protein resembling the P32 subunit of splicing factor SF2; (iii) voltage-dependent anionic channel-1; (iv) dynamin-1; (v) heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1. Learning-related increases in some transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were also found, without significant change in mitochondrial DNA copy number. The results indicate that the molecular processes involved in learning and memory underlying imprinting include protein stabilization, increased mRNA trafficking, synaptic vesicle recycling, and specific changes in the mitochondrial proteome. PMID:26635566

  14. Sex-specific meiotic drive and selection at an imprinted locus.

    PubMed Central

    Ubeda, Francisco; Haig, David

    2004-01-01

    We present a one-locus model that breaks two symmetries of Mendelian genetics. Whereas symmetry of transmission is breached by allowing sex-specific segregation distortion, symmetry of expression is breached by allowing genomic imprinting. Simple conditions for the existence of at least one polymorphic stable equilibrium are provided. In general, population mean fitness is not maximized at polymorphic equilibria. However, mean fitness at a polymorphic equilibrium with segregation distortion may be higher than mean fitness at the corresponding equilibrium with Mendelian segregation if one (or both) of the heterozygote classes has higher fitness than both homozygote classes. In this case, mean fitness is maximized by complete, but opposite, drive in the two sexes. We undertook an extensive numerical analysis of the parameter space, finding, for the first time in this class of models, parameter sets yielding two stable polymorphic equilibria. Multiple equilibria exist both with and without genomic imprinting, although they occurred in a greater proportion of parameter sets with genomic imprinting. PMID:15342542

  15. Loss of Imprinting and Allelic Switching at the DLK1-MEG3 Locus in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Sumadi Lukman; Krech, Till; Hasemeier, Britta; Schipper, Elisa; Schweitzer, Nora; Vogel, Arndt; Kreipe, Hans; Lehmann, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Deregulation of imprinted genes is an important molecular mechanism contributing to the development of cancer in humans. However, knowledge about imprinting defects in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, is still limited. Therefore, a systematic meta-analysis of the expression of 223 imprinted loci in human HCC was initiated. This screen revealed that the DLK1-MEG3 locus is frequently deregulated in HCC. Deregulation of DLK1 and MEG3 expression accompanied by extensive aberrations in DNA methylation could be confirmed experimentally in an independent series of human HCC (n = 40) in more than 80% of cases. Loss of methylation at the DLK1-MEG3 locus correlates linearly with global loss of DNA methylation in HCC (r2 = 0.63, p<0.0001). Inhibition of DNMT1 in HCC cells using siRNA led to a reduction in MEG3-DMR methylation and concomitant increase in MEG3 RNA expression. Allele-specific expression analysis identified loss of imprinting in 10 out of 31 informative samples (32%), rendering it one of the most frequent molecular defects in human HCC. In 2 cases unequivocal gain of bi-allelic expression accompanied by substantial loss of methylation at the IG-DMR could be demonstrated. In 8 cases the tumour cells displayed allelic switching by mono-allelic expression of the normally imprinted allele. Allelic switching was accompanied by gains or losses of DNA methylation primarily at IG-DMR1. Analysis of 10 hepatocellular adenomas (HCA) and 5 cases of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) confirmed that this epigenetic instability is specifically associated with the process of malignant transformation and not linked to increased proliferation per se. This widespread imprint instability in human HCC has to be considered in order to minimize unwanted side-effects of therapeutic approaches targeting the DNA methylation machinery. It might also serve in the future as predictive biomarker and for monitoring response to

  16. Studies on molecular recognition of thymidines with molecularly imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-He; Luo, Ai-Qin; Sun, Li-Quan

    2009-07-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with excellent molecular recognition ability have been used in chemical sensors, chromatographic separation and biochemical analyses. Thymidine is an important part of DNA for biomolecular recognition and the intermediate of many medicines. The polymers imprinted with the template of thymidine and 5'-Otosylthymidine have been prepared, using a non-proton solvent, acetonitrile as the porogen. Direct imprinting with thymidine could not form strong molecular interaction sites in this system. Relative MIPs were obtained by bulk polymerization and their adsorption capacities were investigated. The adsorption capacities of MIP (P2) and nonimprinted polymer (P20) for thymidine are 0.120 mg•g-1and 0.103 mg•g-1, respectively. The imprinting factor is 1.17. As 5'-O-tosylthymidine is more soluble than thymidine moiety in acetonitrile and give rise to more sites of molecular recognition. The results demonstrated that the imprinted polymers were able to bind and recognize thymidine moderately in acetonitrile. MIPs imprinted with 5'-O-tosylthymidine like nature enzymes displayed some recognition ability to its analogues. The insoluble derivatives in the non-proton solvent can be an effective template to prepare efficient imprinting recognition sites.

  17. High Frequency of Imprinted Methylation Errors in Human Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    White, Carlee R.; Denomme, Michelle M.; Tekpetey, Francis R.; Feyles, Valter; Power, Stephen G. A.; Mann, Mellissa R. W.

    2015-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) represent the best chance for infertile couples to conceive, although increased risks for morbidities exist, including imprinting disorders. This increased risk could arise from ARTs disrupting genomic imprints during gametogenesis or preimplantation. The few studies examining ART effects on genomic imprinting primarily assessed poor quality human embryos. Here, we examined day 3 and blastocyst stage, good to high quality, donated human embryos for imprinted SNRPN, KCNQ1OT1 and H19 methylation. Seventy-six percent day 3 embryos and 50% blastocysts exhibited perturbed imprinted methylation, demonstrating that extended culture did not pose greater risk for imprinting errors than short culture. Comparison of embryos with normal and abnormal methylation didn’t reveal any confounding factors. Notably, two embryos from male factor infertility patients using donor sperm harboured aberrant methylation, suggesting errors in these embryos cannot be explained by infertility alone. Overall, these results indicate that ART human preimplantation embryos possess a high frequency of imprinted methylation errors. PMID:26626153

  18. DNA methylation errors in imprinting disorders and assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Hatsune; Hiura, Hitoshi; Okae, Hiroaki; Miyauchi, Naoko; Sato, Fumi; Sato, Akiko; Arima, Takahiro

    2013-10-01

    There have been increased incident reports of rare imprinting disorders associated with assisted reproductive technology (ART). ART is an important treatment for infertile people of reproductive age and is increasingly common. The identification of epigenetic changes at imprinted loci in ART infants has led to the suggestion that the techniques themselves may predispose embryos to acquisition of imprinting errors and disease. It is still unknown, however, at what point(s) these imprinting errors arise, or the risk factors. In this review it was hypothesized that the particular steps of the ART process may be prone to induction of imprinting methylation errors during gametogenesis, fertilization and early embryonic development. In addition, imprinting diseases and their causes are explained. Moreover, using a Japanese nationwide epidemiological study of imprinting diseases, their association with ART is determined. Epigenetic studies are required to understand the pathogenesis of this association; the ART-related risk factor(s); and the precautions that can be taken to prevent the occurrence of these syndromes. It is hoped that the constitution of children born after ART will indicate the safest and most ethical approach to use, which will be invaluable for the future development of standard ART treatment. PMID:23919517

  19. Characterization of the Binding Properties of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The defining characteristic of the binding sites of any particular molecularly imprinted material is heterogeneity: that is, they are not all identical. Nonetheless, it is useful to study their fundamental binding properties, and to obtain average properties. In particular, it has been instructive to compare the binding properties of imprinted and non-imprinted materials. This chapter begins by considering the origins of this site heterogeneity. Next, the properties of interest of imprinted binding sites are described in brief: affinity, selectivity, and kinetics. The binding/adsorption isotherm, the graph of concentration of analyte bound to a MIP versus concentration of free analyte at equilibrium, over a range of total concentrations, is described in some detail. Following this, the techniques for studying the imprinted sites are described (batch-binding assays, radioligand binding assays, zonal chromatography, frontal chromatography, calorimetry, and others). Thereafter, the parameters that influence affinity, selectivity and kinetics are discussed (solvent, modifiers of organic solvents, pH of aqueous solvents, temperature). Finally, mathematical attempts to fit the adsorption isotherms for imprinted materials, so as to obtain information about the range of binding affinities characterizing the imprinted sites, are summarized. PMID:25796622

  20. Aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of imprinted microRNA-127 and Rtl1 in cloned mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Xiangshun; Zhang Dingxiao; Ko, Yoeung-Gyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2009-02-06

    The microRNA (miRNA) genes mir-127 and mir-136 are located near two CpG islands in the imprinted mouse retrotransposon-like gene Rtl1, a key gene involved in placenta formation. These miRNAs appear to be involved in regulating the imprinting of Rtl1. To obtain insights into the epigenetic reprogramming of cloned embryos, we compared the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in fertilized mouse embryos, parthenotes, androgenotes and cloned embryos developing in vitro. We also examined the DNA methylation status of the promoter regions of Rtl1 and mir-127 in these embryos. Our data showed that mir-127 and mir-136 were highly expressed in parthenotes, but rarely expressed in androgenotes. Interestingly, the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in parthenotes were almost twice that seen in the fertilized embryos, but were much lower in the cloned embryos. The Rtl1 promoter region was hyper-methylated in blastocyst stage parthenotes (75.0%), moderately methylated (32.4%) in the fertilized embryos and methylated to a much lower extent ({approx}10%) in the cloned embryos. Conversely, the promoter region of mir-127 was hypo-methylated in parthenogenetically activated embryos (0.4%), moderately methylated (30.0%) in fertilized embryos and heavily methylated in cloned blastocysts (63-70%). These data support a role for mir-127 and mir-136 in the epigenetic reprogramming of the Rtl1 imprinting process. Analysis of the aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of mir-127 and Rtl1 in cloned embryos may help to explain the nuclear reprogramming procedures that occur in donor cells following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)

  1. Ube3a Imprinting Impairs Circadian Robustness in Angelman Syndrome Models

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-qun; Bichell, Terry Jo; Ihrie, Rebecca A.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The paternal allele of Ube3a is silenced by imprinting in neurons, and Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a disorder arising from a deletion or mutation of the maternal Ube3a allele, which thereby eliminates Ube3a neuronal expression. Sleep disorders such as short sleep duration and increased sleep onset latency are very common in AS. Results We found an unique link between neuronal imprinting of Ube3a and circadian rhythms in two mouse models of AS, including enfeebled circadian activity behavior and slowed molecular rhythms in ex vivo brain tissues. As a consequence of compromised circadian behavior, metabolic homeostasis is also disrupted in AS mice. Unsilencing the paternal Ube3a allele restores functional circadian periodicity in neurons deficient in maternal Ube3a, but does not affect periodicity in peripheral tissues that are not imprinted for uniparental Ube3a expression. The ubiquitin ligase encoded by Ube3a interacts with the central clock components BMAL1 and BMAL2. Moreover, inactivation of Ube3a expression elevates BMAL1 levels in brain regions that control circadian behavior of AS model mice, indicating an important role for Ube3a in modulating BMAL1 turnover. Conclusions Ube3a expression constitutes a direct mechanistic connection between symptoms of a human neurological disorder and the central circadian clock mechanism. The lengthened circadian period leads to delayed phase, which could explain the short sleep duration and increased sleep onset latency of AS subjects. Moreover, we report the pharmacological rescue of an AS phenotype, in this case, altered circadian period. These findings reveal potential treatments for sleep disorders in AS patients. PMID:25660546

  2. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2013-08-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called ``colloid antibodies'', were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating the targeted microbial cells. We successfully demonstrated the shape and size recognition between such colloidal imprints and matching microbial cells. High percentage of binding events of colloidal imprints with the size matching target particles was achieved. We demonstrated selective binding of colloidal imprints to target microbial cells in a binary mixture of cells of different shapes and sizes, which also resulted in high binding selectivity. We explored the role of the electrostatic interactions between the target cells and their colloid imprints by pre-coating both of them with polyelectrolytes. Selective binding occurred predominantly in the case of opposite surface charges of the colloid cell imprint and the targeted cells. The mechanism of the recognition is based on the amplification of the surface adhesion in the case of shape and size match due to the increased contact area between the target cell and the colloidal imprint. We also tested the selective binding for colloid imprints of particles of fixed shape and varying sizes. The concept of cell recognition by colloid imprints could be used for development of colloid antibodies for shape-selective binding of microbes. Such colloid antibodies could be additionally functionalized with surface groups to enhance their binding efficiency to cells of specific shape and deliver a drug payload directly to their surface or allow them to be manipulated using external fields. They could benefit the pharmaceutical industry in developing selective antimicrobial therapies and formulations.

  3. The Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus provides new paradigms for transient and dynamic genomic imprinting in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Duffié, Rachel; Ajjan, Sophie; Greenberg, Maxim V.; Zamudio, Natasha; Escamilla del Arenal, Martin; Iranzo, Julian; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Barbaux, Sandrine; Fauque, Patricia; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2014-01-01

    Many loci maintain parent-of-origin DNA methylation only briefly after fertilization during mammalian development: Whether this form of transient genomic imprinting can impact the early embryonic transcriptome or even have life-long consequences on genome regulation and possibly phenotypes is currently unknown. Here, we report a maternal germline differentially methylated region (DMR) at the mouse Gpr1/Zdbf2 (DBF-type zinc finger-containing protein 2) locus, which controls the paternal-specific expression of long isoforms of Zdbf2 (Liz) in the early embryo. This DMR loses parental specificity by gain of DNA methylation at implantation in the embryo but is maintained in extraembryonic tissues. As a consequence of this transient, tissue-specific maternal imprinting, Liz expression is restricted to the pluripotent embryo, extraembryonic tissues, and pluripotent male germ cells. We found that Liz potentially functions as both Zdbf2-coding RNA and cis-regulatory RNA. Importantly, Liz-mediated events allow a switch from maternal to paternal imprinted DNA methylation and from Liz to canonical Zdbf2 promoter use during embryonic differentiation, which are stably maintained through somatic life and conserved in humans. The Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus lacks classical imprinting histone modifications, but analysis of mutant embryonic stem cells reveals fine-tuned regulation of Zdbf2 dosage through DNA and H3K27 methylation interplay. Together, our work underlines the developmental and evolutionary need to ensure proper Liz/Zdbf2 dosage as a driving force for dynamic genomic imprinting at the Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus. PMID:24589776

  4. Genetic Differentiation of Hypothalamus Parentally Biased Transcripts in Populations of the House Mouse Implicate the Prader–Willi Syndrome Imprinted Region as a Possible Source of Behavioral Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Anna; Linnenbrink, Miriam; Montero, Inka; Schilhabel, Markus B.; Tautz, Diethard

    2014-01-01

    Parentally biased expression of transcripts (genomic imprinting) in adult tissues, including the brain, can influence and possibly drive the evolution of behavioral traits. We have previously found that paternally determined cues are involved in population-specific mate choice decisions between two populations of the Western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus). Here, we ask whether this could be mediated by genomically imprinted transcripts that are subject to fast differentiation between these populations. We focus on three organs that are of special relevance for mate choice and behavior: The vomeronasal organ (VNO), the hypothalamus, and the liver. To first identify candidate transcripts at a genome-wide scale, we used reciprocal crosses between M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus inbred strains and RNA sequencing of the respective tissues. Using a false discovery cutoff derived from mock reciprocal cross comparisons, we find a total of 66 imprinted transcripts, 13 of which have previously not been described as imprinted. The largest number of imprinted transcripts were found in the hypothalamus; fewer were found in the VNO, and the least were found in the liver. To assess molecular differentiation and imprinting in the wild-derived M. m. domesticus populations, we sequenced the RNA of the hypothalamus from individuals of these populations. This confirmed the presence of the above identified transcripts also in wild populations and allowed us to search for those that show a high genetic differentiation between these populations. Our results identify the Ube3a–Snrpn imprinted region on chromosome 7 as a region that encompasses the largest number of previously not described transcripts with paternal expression bias, several of which are at the same time highly differentiated. For four of these, we confirmed their imprinting status via single nucleotide polymorphism-specific pyrosequencing assays with RNA from reciprocal crosses. In addition, we find the

  5. Genetic differentiation of hypothalamus parentally biased transcripts in populations of the house mouse implicate the Prader-Willi syndrome imprinted region as a possible source of behavioral divergence.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Anna; Linnenbrink, Miriam; Montero, Inka; Schilhabel, Markus B; Tautz, Diethard

    2014-12-01

    Parentally biased expression of transcripts (genomic imprinting) in adult tissues, including the brain, can influence and possibly drive the evolution of behavioral traits. We have previously found that paternally determined cues are involved in population-specific mate choice decisions between two populations of the Western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus). Here, we ask whether this could be mediated by genomically imprinted transcripts that are subject to fast differentiation between these populations. We focus on three organs that are of special relevance for mate choice and behavior: The vomeronasal organ (VNO), the hypothalamus, and the liver. To first identify candidate transcripts at a genome-wide scale, we used reciprocal crosses between M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus inbred strains and RNA sequencing of the respective tissues. Using a false discovery cutoff derived from mock reciprocal cross comparisons, we find a total of 66 imprinted transcripts, 13 of which have previously not been described as imprinted. The largest number of imprinted transcripts were found in the hypothalamus; fewer were found in the VNO, and the least were found in the liver. To assess molecular differentiation and imprinting in the wild-derived M. m. domesticus populations, we sequenced the RNA of the hypothalamus from individuals of these populations. This confirmed the presence of the above identified transcripts also in wild populations and allowed us to search for those that show a high genetic differentiation between these populations. Our results identify the Ube3a-Snrpn imprinted region on chromosome 7 as a region that encompasses the largest number of previously not described transcripts with paternal expression bias, several of which are at the same time highly differentiated. For four of these, we confirmed their imprinting status via single nucleotide polymorphism-specific pyrosequencing assays with RNA from reciprocal crosses. In addition, we find the

  6. Tunable and stable in time ferroelectric imprint through polarization coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Guus

    2016-06-01

    Here we demonstrate a method to tune a ferroelectric imprint, which is stable in time, based on the coupling between the non-switchable polarization of ZnO and switchable polarization of PbZrxTi(1-x)O3. SrRuO3/PbZrxTi(1-x)O3/ZnO/SrRuO3 heterostructures were grown with different ZnO thicknesses. It is shown that the coercive voltages and ferroelectric imprint vary linearly with the thickness of ZnO. It is also demonstrated that the ferroelectric imprint remains stable with electric field cycling and electric field stress assisted aging.

  7. Hypothesis: gonadal temperature influences sex-specific imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Various explanations have been advanced for the evolution of genomic imprinting, the most popular of these being the parental conflict hypothesis. However, while this theory may explain why there has been selection for imprinting certain genes, it does not explain how the maternal and paternal genomes can be distinguished from each other. Here, we hypothesize that the temperature at which male and female gonads are physiologically exposed could be, at least for some loci, the primary factor leading to the different imprinting between the sexes. PMID:25202325

  8. A novel imprinted transgene located near a repetitive element that exhibits allelic imbalance in DNA methylation during early development.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Koji; Watanabe, Daisuke; Hayasaka, Michiko; Hanaoka, Kazunori

    2014-12-01

    A mouse line carrying a lacZ transgene driven by the human EEF1A1/EF1 alpha promoter was established. Although the promoter is known to show ubiquitous activity, only paternal transgene alleles were expressed, resulting in a transgene imprinting. At mid-gestation, the promoter sequence was differentially methylated, hypomethylated for paternal and hypermethylated for maternal alleles. In germline, the promoter was a typical differentially methylated region. After fertilization, however, both alleles were hypermethylated. Thus, the differential methylation of the promoter required for transgene imprinting was re-established during later embryonic development independently of the germline differential methylation. Furthermore, also a retroelement promoter closely-flanking imprinted transgene and its wild type counterpart displayed similar differential methylation during early development. The retroelement promoter was methylated differentially also in germline, but in an opposite pattern to the embryonic differential methylation. These results suggest that there might be an unknown epigenetic regulation inducing transgene imprinting independently of DNA methylation in the transgene insertion site. Then, besides CpG dinucleotides, non-CpG cytosines of the retroelement promoter were highly methylated especially in the transgene-active mid-gestational embryos, suggesting that an unusual epigenetic regulation might protect the active transgene against de novo methylation occurring generally in mid-gestational embryo. PMID:25389047

  9. Dummy molecularly imprinted mesoporous silica prepared by hybrid imprinting method for solid-phase extraction of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Hu, Xiaolei; Wei, Shoutai; Wang, Qiang; He, Chiyang; Liu, Shaorong

    2015-05-29

    A novel hybrid dummy imprinting strategy was developed to prepare a mesoporous silica for the solid-phase extraction (SPE) of bisphenol A (BPA). A new covalent template-monomer complex (BPAF-Si) was first synthesized with 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane (BPAF) as the template. The imprinted silica was obtained through the gelation of BPAF-Si with tetraethoxysilane and the subsequent removal of template by thermal cleavage, and then it was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. Results showed that the new silica had micron-level particle size and ordered mesoporous structure. The static binding test verified that the imprinted silica had much higher recognition ability for BPA than the non-imprinted silica. The imprinted silica also showed high extraction efficiencies and high enrichment factor for SPE of BPA. Using the imprinted silica, a SPE-HPLC-UV method was developed and successfully applied for detecting BPA in BPA-spiked tap water and lake water samples with a recovery of 99-105%, a RSD of 2.7-5.0% and a limit of detection (S/N=3) of 0.3ng/mL. The new imprinted silica avoided the interference of the residual template molecules and reduced the non-specific binding sites, and therefore it can be utilized as a good sorbent for SPE of BPA in environmental water samples. PMID:25892637

  10. Improvement of DNA recognition through molecular imprinting: hybrid oligomer imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs).

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, H; Poma, A; Pendergraff, H M; Watts, J K; Turner, N W

    2016-02-01

    High affinity and specific binding are cardinal properties of nucleic acids in relation to their biological function and their role in biotechnology. To this end, structural preorganization of oligonucleotides can significantly improve their binding performance, and numerous examples of this can be found in Nature as well as in artificial systems. Here we describe the production and characterization of hybrid DNA-polymer nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs) as a system in which we have preorganized the oligonucleotide binding by molecular imprinting technology. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are cost-effective "smart" polymeric materials capable of antibody-like detection, but characterized by superior robustness and the ability to work in extreme environmental conditions. Especially in the nanoparticle format, MIPs are dubbed as one of the most suitable alternatives to biological antibodies due to their selective molecular recognition properties, improved binding kinetics as well as size and dispersibility. Nonetheless, there have been very few attempts at DNA imprinting in the past due to structural complexity associated with these templates. By introducing modified thymine bases into the oligonucleotide sequences, which allow establishing covalent bonds between the DNA and the polymer, we demonstrate that such hybrid oligoMIP NPs specifically recognize their target DNA, and that the unique strategy of incorporating the complementary DNA strands as "preorganized selective monomers" improves the recognition properties without affecting the NPs physical properties such as size, shape or dispersibility. PMID:26509192

  11. Developmental Programming Mediated by Complementary Roles of Imprinted Grb10 in Mother and Pup

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Michael; Garfield, Alastair S.; Madon-Simon, Marta; Charalambous, Marika; Clarkson, Richard W.; Smalley, Matthew J.; Kendrick, Howard; Isles, Anthony R.; Parry, Aled J.; Carney, Sara; Oakey, Rebecca J.; Heisler, Lora K.; Moorwood, Kim; Wolf, Jason B.; Ward, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Developmental programming links growth in early life with health status in adulthood. Although environmental factors such as maternal diet can influence the growth and adult health status of offspring, the genetic influences on this process are poorly understood. Using the mouse as a model, we identify the imprinted gene Grb10 as a mediator of nutrient supply and demand in the postnatal period. The combined actions of Grb10 expressed in the mother, controlling supply, and Grb10 expressed in the offspring, controlling demand, jointly regulate offspring growth. Furthermore, Grb10 determines the proportions of lean and fat tissue during development, thereby influencing energy homeostasis in the adult. Most strikingly, we show that the development of normal lean/fat proportions depends on the combined effects of Grb10 expressed in the mother, which has the greater effect on offspring adiposity, and Grb10 expressed in the offspring, which influences lean mass. These distinct functions of Grb10 in mother and pup act complementarily, which is consistent with a coadaptation model of imprinting evolution, a model predicted but for which there is limited experimental evidence. In addition, our findings identify Grb10 as a key genetic component of developmental programming, and highlight the need for a better understanding of mother-offspring interactions at the genetic level in predicting adult disease risk. PMID:24586114

  12. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  13. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  14. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  15. Imprintable membranes from incomplete chiral coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhary, Mark J.; Gibaud, Thomas; Nadir Kaplan, C.; Barry, Edward; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Meyer, Robert B.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-01-01

    Coalescence is an essential phenomenon that governs the equilibrium behaviour in a variety of systems from intercellular transport to planetary formation. In this report, we study coalescence pathways of circularly shaped two-dimensional colloidal membranes, which are one rod-length-thick liquid-like monolayers of aligned rods. The chirality of the constituent rods leads to three atypical coalescence pathways that are not found in other simple or complex fluids. In particular, we characterize two pathways that do not proceed to completion but instead produce partially joined membranes connected by line defects—π-wall defects or alternating arrays of twisted bridges and pores. We elucidate the structure and energetics of these defects and ascribe their stability to a geometrical frustration inherently present in chiral colloidal membranes. Furthermore, we induce the coalescence process with optical forces, leading to a robust on-demand method for imprinting networks of channels and pores into colloidal membranes.

  16. Standardized pill imprint codes: a pharma fantasy.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Gordon

    2004-02-01

    To safely use medications, professionals and consumers need usable and reliable methods to identify tablets patients are prescribed and taking. Currently, each manufacturer assigns its own identifying codes and symbols. Standardization of the system for identifying solid dosage forms is a goal that has been widely advocated, yet stubbornly resistant to progress. Physicians, pharmacists, and consumers attempting to identify pills must use various methods which have shortcomings in ease of use, availability, and accuracy. Arguments have been advanced, particularly by pharmaceutical manufacturers, that evidence of unworkability of the current system is not compelling, and costs of retooling current manufacturing processes could be prohibitive. These issues are currently being explored by a task force led by the U.S. Pharmacopeia Safe Medication Use, and Pharmaceutical Forms Dosage Expert Committees. This paper presents a fictitious case study of an elderly patient succumbing to digoxin overdose illustrating the dilemmas posed in the tablet-imprint debate. PMID:15171065

  17. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: energy of the cell-imprint interaction.

    PubMed

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  18. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: Energy of the cell-imprint interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  19. A synthetic nanomaterial for virus recognition produced by surface imprinting.

    PubMed

    Cumbo, Alessandro; Lorber, Bernard; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Meier, Wolfgang; Shahgaldian, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Major stumbling blocks in the production of fully synthetic materials designed to feature virus recognition properties are that the target is large and its self-assembled architecture is fragile. Here we describe a synthetic strategy to produce organic/inorganic nanoparticulate hybrids that recognize non-enveloped icosahedral viruses in water at concentrations down to the picomolar range. We demonstrate that these systems bind a virus that, in turn, acts as a template during the nanomaterial synthesis. These virus imprinted particles then display remarkable selectivity and affinity. The reported method, which is based on surface imprinting using silica nanoparticles that act as a carrier material and organosilanes serving as biomimetic building blocks, goes beyond simple shape imprinting. We demonstrate the formation of a chemical imprint, comparable to the formation of biosilica, due to the template effect of the virion surface on the synthesis of the recognition material. PMID:23422671

  20. Evidence for a Peripheral Olfactory Memory in Imprinted Salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, Gabrielle A.; Dittman, Andrew H.; Quinn, Thomas P.; Moody, William J., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The remarkable homing ability of salmon relies on olfactory cues, but its cellular basis is unknown. To test the role of peripheral olfactory receptors in odorant memory retention, we imprinted coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to micromolar concentrations of phenyl ethyl alcohol during parr-smolt transformation. The following year, we measured phenyl ethyl alcohol responses in the peripheral receptor cells using patch clamp. Cells from imprinted fish showed increased sensitivity to phenyl ethyl alcohol compared either to cells from naive fish or to sensitivity to another behaviorally important odorant (L-serine). Field experiments verified an increased behavioral preference for phenyl ethyl alcohol by imprinted salmon as adults. Thus, some component of the imprinted olfactory homestream memory appears to be retained peripherally.

  1. Mechanical strains and electric fields applied to topologically imprinted elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, D. J.; Mao, Y.; Warner, M.

    2006-08-01

    We analyze and predict the behavior of a chirally imprinted elastomer under a mechanical strain and an electric field, applied along the helical axis. As the strain and/or field increases, the system is deformed from a conical or transverse imprinted state towards an ultimately nematic one. At a critical strain and/or field there is a first-order transition to a low imprinting efficiency state. This transition is accompanied by a discontinuous global rotation of the director toward the axis of the imprinted helix, measured by the cone angle, θ . We show that the threshold electric field required for switching this transition can be conveniently low, provided an appropriate prestrain is imposed. We suggest that these properties may give rise to a “chiral pump.”

  2. Rapid preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer by frontal polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dan-Dan; Liu, Xin; Pang, Qian-Qian; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    Frontal polymerization was successfully applied, for the first time, to obtain molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The method provides a solvent-free polymerization mode, and the reaction can be completed in 30 min. By this approach, MIPs were synthesized using a mixture of levofloxacin (template), methacrylic acid, and divinylbenzene. The effect of template concentration and the amount of comonomer on the imprinting effect of the resulting MIPs was investigated. The textural and morphological parameters of the MIP particles were also characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, and scanning electron microscopy, providing evidence concerning median pore diameter, pore volumes, and pore size distributions. The levofloxacin-imprinted polymer formed in frontal polymerization mode showed high selectivity, with an imprinting factor of 5.78. The results suggest that frontal polymerization provides an alternative means to prepare MIPs that are difficult to synthesize and may open up new perspectives in the field of MIPs. PMID:23392405

  3. 7. Underside of Roadbed (Interior beams cast horizontal, imprints of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Underside of Roadbed (Interior beams cast horizontal, imprints of timbers used as formwork visible on abutment walls and beams) - North Bridge, Spanning Quarton Lake branch of River Rouge, Birmingham, Oakland County, MI

  4. 7. Underside of Roadbed (Interior beams cast horizontal, imprints of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Underside of Roadbed (Interior beams cast horizontal, imprints of timbers used as formwork visible on abutment walls and beams) - South Bridge, Spanning Quarton Lake branch of River Rouge, Birmingham, Oakland County, MI

  5. Step and flash imprint lithography for manufacturing patterned media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Cynthia; Schmid, Gerard M.; Miller, Mike; Johnson, Steve; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2009-03-01

    The ever-growing demand for hard drives with greater storage density has motivated a technology shift from continuous magnetic media to patterned media hard disks, which are expected to be implemented in future generations of hard disk drives to provide data storage at densities exceeding 1012 bits per square inch. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL) technology has been employed to pattern the hard disk substrates. This paper discusses the infrastructure required to enable S-FIL in high-volume manufacturing; namely, fabrication of master templates, template replication, high-volume imprinting with precisely controlled residual layers, and dual-sided imprinting. Imprinting of disks is demonstrated with substrate throughput currently as high as 180 disks/hour (dualsided). These processes are applied to patterning hard disk substrates with both discrete tracks and bit-patterned designs.

  6. 21 CFR 206.10 - Code imprint required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... identification than a symbol or logo by itself. Homeopathic drug products are required only to bear an imprint... National Drug Code, or a mark, symbol, logo, or monogram, or a combination of letters, numbers, and...

  7. 21 CFR 206.10 - Code imprint required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... identification than a symbol or logo by itself. Homeopathic drug products are required only to bear an imprint... National Drug Code, or a mark, symbol, logo, or monogram, or a combination of letters, numbers, and...

  8. Transfers and transitions: Parent–offspring conflict, genomic imprinting, and the evolution of human life history

    PubMed Central

    Haig, David

    2010-01-01

    Human offspring are weaned earlier than the offspring of other great apes but take longer to reach nutritional independence. An analysis of human disorders of imprinted genes suggests genes of paternal origin, expressed in infants, have been selected to favor more intense suckling than genes of maternal origin. The same analysis suggests that genes of maternal origin may favor slower childhood growth but earlier sexual maturation. These observations are consistent with a hypothesis in which slow maturation was an adaptation of offspring that reduced maternal fitness, whereas early weaning was an adaptation of mothers that reduced the fitness of individual offspring. PMID:19666529

  9. UV imprinting for thin film solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escarré, J.; Battaglia, C.; Söderström, K.; Pahud, C.; Biron, R.; Cubero, O.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.

    2012-02-01

    UV imprinting is an interesting, low cost technique to produce large area thin film solar cells incorporating nanometric textures. Here, we review and present new results confirming that replicas of the most common textures used in photovoltaics can be obtained by UV imprinting with an excellent fidelity. The use of these replicas as substrates for amorphous and micromorph thin film silicon solar cells is also shown, together with a comparison with devices obtained on the original textures.

  10. Full-field imprinting of sub-40 nm patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL (R)) is a unique patterning method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay to enable multilevel device fabrication. A photocurable low viscosity resist is dispensed dropwise to match the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling patterning with a uniform residual layer thickness across a field and across multiple wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-50 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of imprint masks (templates). For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x imprint masks with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub-32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the imprint mask and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  11. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Based Sensor for the Detection of Theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Guilherme S.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.; del Valle, Manel

    2011-11-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) impedance-based sensor was employed to detect theophylline in distilled water. To evaluate its sensibility, impedance measurements were carried out in a diluted solution of theophylline (1 mM) and distilled water using MIP and NIP (reference non-imprinted polymer) sensors. MIP showed higher sensitivity to theophylline than the NIP. This feature shows their suitability for developing an electronic tongue system for determination of methylxanthines.

  12. Regeneration of imprint molds using vacuum ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Masanori; Yabu, Shintaro

    2011-04-01

    Etching characteristics of various resins by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, λ=172 nm) light have been examined under conditions of exposure time, substrate temperature, radiation distance and ambient oxygen concentration. The VUV light have used to clean the imprinted molds which are contaminated by organic substances such as ultraviolet-resins through many times of imprinting processes, and it has revealed that the VUV light has effectively regenerated the contaminated molds manufactured by quartz, silicon-carbide and nickel.

  13. Expression and functional characterization of intrafollicular GH-IGF system in the zebrafish ovary.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Yu, Susana Man Ying; Ge, Wei

    2016-06-01

    The somatotrophic axis plays important roles in influencing reproduction. All key members of this axis including growth hormone (GH, gh), GH receptors (ghra and ghrb), insulin-like growth factors (IGFs, igf1, igf2 and igf3) and IGF receptors (igf1ra and igf1rb) were detected in the zebrafish ovary. GH was exclusively expressed in the full-grown oocytes, while its receptors were detectable in both the follicle cells and oocytes. The IGFs and their receptors were all expressed in both compartments except igf3, which was expressed in the follicle cells only. During folliculogenesis, there was a sharp decrease of gh expression at follicle activation; however, the expression of its receptors increased significantly. The expression profiles of igf1, igf2a, and igf2b were similar to that of fshr, whereas igf3 expression was close to lhcgr, suggesting differential roles for different forms of IGFs in follicle development. To examine if the ovarian GH-IGF system is regulated by gonadotropins (e.g., hCG) and GH, we performed in vitro experiments using cultured zebrafish follicle cells. The expression of igf1 and igf1ra, but not others, was down-regulated by hCG (LH analog), whereas recombinant zebrafish GH stimulated igf1 expression. In addition, GH also increased the expression of activin βA subunit (inhbaa). In agreement with this, the stimulatory effect of GH but not IGF-I on oocyte maturation could be abolished by follistatin. In conclusion, the present study revealed an intrafollicular network involving GH-IGF mini-axis in the zebrafish ovary; however, it might not work in the same way as that of the systemic somatotrophic axis. PMID:26654745

  14. Synthesis of and recognition by ribonuclease A imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chung-Yi; Lin, Hung-Yin; Thomas, James L.; Chou, Tse-Chuan

    2006-02-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase), an enzyme which degrades RNA, is ubiquitous in living organisms, can renature after autoclaving, and is difficult to inactivate. The removal of RNase is especially necessary for the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and for in vitro transcription and translation. Typically, RNase inhibitors must be added to these reactions nowadays. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) could offer many advantages for removal of undesired enzymes, including high binding selectivity, stability, low cost, and facile synthesis. Surface imprinting, employing immobilized RNase, was used in this study to make the most effective use of the template molecules—clearly, inaccessible binding sites, no matter how well imprinted, are not useful for target binding. Different monomers and cross-linkers were used to synthesize RNase-templated MIPs, and the rebinding capacity of each composition was characterized. We found that using polyethylene glycol 400 dimethacrylate (PEG400DMA) gave the highest imprinting effectiveness (i.e. the highest RNase binding ratio between imprinted and non-imprinted polymers). However, including styrene monomer (50 wt%) gave polymers with the highest overall affinity for ribonuclease A (RNase A). Finally, isothermal titration calorimetry was used as an auxiliary tool to help elucidate the mechanisms of the binding of monomers to templates, and ligands to MIPs.

  15. Electropolymerized molecularly imprinted polypyrrole film for sensing of clofibric acid.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Bianca; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young Jun; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization rate with increasing clofibric acid concentration. XPS measurements indicated that clofibric acid could be removed after imprinting with an aqueous ethanol solution, which was further optimized by using PAD. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements revealed differences between molecularly imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) layers. Binding experiments with clofibric acid and other substances showed a pronounced selectivity of the MIP for clofibric acid vs. carbamazepine, but the response of MIP and NIP to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was higher than that for clofibric acid. A smooth surface, revealed by AFM measurements, with roughness of 6-8 nm for imprinted and non-imprinted layers, might be a reason for an excessively low density of specific binding sites for clofibric acid. Furthermore, the decreased polymerization rate in the presence of clofibric acid might not result in well-defined polymer structures, which could be the reason for the lower sensitivity. PMID:25730487

  16. Cell-Imprinted Substrates Modulate Differentiation, Redifferentiation, and Transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Shahin; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Montazeri, Leila; Taghipoor, Mojtaba; Bertsch, Arnaud; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Sharifi, Shahriar; Majidi, Mohammad; Mashinchian, Omid; Hamrang Sekachaei, Mohammad; Zolfaghari, Pegah; Renaud, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Differentiation of stem cells into mature cells through the use of physical approaches is of great interest. Here, we prepared smart nanoenvironments by cell-imprinted substrates based on chondrocytes, tenocytes, and semifibroblasts as templates and demonstrated their potential for differentiation, redifferentiation, and transdifferentiation. Analysis of shape and upregulation/downregulation of specific genes of stem cells, which were seeded on these cell-imprinted substrates, confirmed that imprinted substrates have the capability to induce specific shapes and molecular characteristics of the cell types that were used as templates for cell-imprinting. Interestingly, immunofluorescent staining of a specific protein in chondrocytes (i.e., collagen type II) confirmed that adipose-derived stem cells, semifibroblasts, and tenocytes can acquire the chondrocyte phenotype after a 14 day culture on chondrocyte-imprinted substrates. In summary, we propose that common polystyrene tissue culture plates can be replaced by this imprinting technique as an effective and promising way to regulate any cell phenotype in vitro with significant potential applications in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies. PMID:27196338

  17. Electropolymerized Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole Film for Sensing of Clofibric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Bianca; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young Jun; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization rate with increasing clofibric acid concentration. XPS measurements indicated that clofibric acid could be removed after imprinting with an aqueous ethanol solution, which was further optimized by using PAD. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements revealed differences between molecularly imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) layers. Binding experiments with clofibric acid and other substances showed a pronounced selectivity of the MIP for clofibric acid vs. carbamazepine, but the response of MIP and NIP to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was higher than that for clofibric acid. A smooth surface, revealed by AFM measurements, with roughness of 6–8 nm for imprinted and non-imprinted layers, might be a reason for an excessively low density of specific binding sites for clofibric acid. Furthermore, the decreased polymerization rate in the presence of clofibric acid might not result in well-defined polymer structures, which could be the reason for the lower sensitivity. PMID:25730487

  18. Molecular crowding-based imprinted monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Zong, Hai-Yan; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Zhao-Sheng; Huang, Yan-Ping

    2015-03-01

    Molecular crowding is a new approach to stabilizing binding sites and improving molecular recognition. In this work, the concept was applied to the preparation of imprinted monolithic columns for CEC. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized using a mixture of d-zopiclone (d-ZOP)(template), methacrylic acid, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) (molecular crowding agent). The resulting PMMA-based imprinted capillary was able to separate ZOP enantiomers in CEC mode. The resolution of enantiomer separation achieved on the d-ZOP-imprinted monolithic column was up to 2.09. Some polymerization factors, such as template-monomer molar ratio, functional monomer-cross-linker molar ratio and the composition of the porogen, on the imprinting effect of resulting molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolithic column were systematically investigated. Chromatographic parameters, including pH values, the content of acetonitrile and the salt concentration on chiral separation were also studied. The results indicated the addition of PMMA resulted in MIPs with superior retention properties and excellent selectivity for d-ZOP, as compared to the MIPs prepared without addition of the crowding-inducing agent. The results revealed that molecular crowding is an effective method for the preparation of a highly efficient MIP stationary phase for chiral separation in CEC. PMID:25404035

  19. Uniformity in Patterns Imprinted Using Photo-Curable Liquid Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroshima, Hiroshi; Inoue, Seiji; Kasahara, Nobuyuki; Taniguchi, Jun; Miyamoto, Iwao; Komuro, Masanori

    2002-06-01

    Imprint lithography is a candidate for high-resolution, high-throughput lithography using low-cost equipment. In particular, imprinting using photo-induced solidification is very attractive because it eliminates heat-up, cool-down time and avoids thermal expansion problems inherent in conventional thermal imprinting. We demonstrate the replication of uniform 100 nm line and space (L/S) patterns over a 5 mm× 5 mm area at a time, a 60 nm L/S pattern and a 90-nm-wide line with an aspect ratio of 2 by imprinting using photo-induced solidification. We studied the removal of a base layer by O2 reactive ion etching (RIE) and determined the criteria for the base layer and imprinted patterns. Change in line width through O2 RIE is not affected by the base layer thickness but is affected by etching time. We found that granules generated in polymer during O2 RIE are slowly etched and the resulting long removal time of granules degrades the quality of imprinted patterns or prevents patterns from standing. It is necessary to achieve a base layer which is less than 100 nm thick or to change the O2 RIE conditions so that the polymer dose not granulate and/or use granulation-resistant polymers.

  20. The imprinted SNRPN gene is associated with a polycistronic mRNA and an imprinting control element

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, S.; Nicholls, R.D.; Seip, J.

    1994-09-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated protein SmN (SNRPN) gene is located in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) critical region in chromosome 15q11-q13. We have previously shown that it is functionally imprinted in humans, being only expressed from the paternal allele and differentially methylated on parental alleles. Therefore, SNRPN may have a role in PWS, although genetic studies suggest that at least two genes may be necessary for the classical PWS phenotype. We have characterized the SNRPN genomic structure, and shown that it comprises ten exons. Surprisingly, we identified an open reading frame (ORF) in the first three exons, 190-bp 5{prime} to the SmN ORF. Notably, the majority of base substitutions bewteen human and rodents in the upstream ORF occurred in the wobble position of codons, suggesting selection for a protein coding function. This ORF, which we name SNURF (SNRPN upstream reading frame) encodes a putative polypeptide of 71 amino acids. By analogy to prokaryotic operons that encode proteins with related functions, it is possible that SNURF may have a role in pre-mRNA splicing.

  1. Synthesis of a molecularly imprinted sorbent for selective solid-phase extraction of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Pavel; Combes, Audrey; Petit, Julia; Nováková, Lucie; Pichon, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work was to synthesize a molecularly imprinted material for the selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-2-amino-3-methylpropionic acid; BMAA) from cyanobacterial extracts. BMAA and its structural analogs that can be used as template are small, polar and hydrophilic molecules. These molecules are poorly soluble in organic solvents that are commonly used for the synthesis of acrylic-based polymers. Therefore, a sol gel approach was chosen to carry out the synthesis and the resulting sorbents were evaluated with different extraction procedures in order to determine their ability to selectively retain BMAA. The presence of imprinted cavities in the sorbent was demonstrated by comparing elution profiles obtained by using molecularly imprinted silica (MIS) and non-imprinted silica (NIS) as a control. The molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) procedure was first developed in a pure medium (acetonitrile) and further optimized for the treatment of cyanobacterial samples. It was characterized by high elution recoveries (89% and 77% respectively in pure and in real media).The repeatability of the extraction procedure in pure medium, in real medium and the reproducibility of MIS synthesis all expressed as RSD values of extraction recovery of BMAA were equal to 3%, 12% and 5%, respectively. A MIS capacity of 0.34 µmol/g was measured. The matrix effects, which affected the quantification of BMAA when employing a mixed mode sorbent, were completely removed by adding a clean-up step of the mixed-mode sorbent extract on the MIS. PMID:26452922

  2. Preparation of a magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of parabens from fruit juices.

    PubMed

    You, Xiaoxiao; Piao, Chungying; Chen, Ligang

    2016-07-01

    A silica-based surface magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of parabens was prepared using a facile and general method that combined atom-transfer radical polymerization with surface imprinting technique. The prepared magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and physical property measurement. The isothermal adsorption experiment and kinetics adsorption experiment investigated the adsorption property of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer to template molecule. The four parabens including methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben were used to assess the rebinding selectivity. An extraction method, which used magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer as adsorbents coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of the four parabens in fruit juice samples was developed. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detections of the four parabens were 0.028, 0.026, 0.021, and 0.026 mg/L, respectively. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation ranging from 2.6 to 8.9% was obtained. In all three fortified levels, recoveries of parabens were in the range of 72.5-89.4%. The proposed method has been applied to different fruit juice samples including orange juice, grape juice, apple juice and peach juice, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:27214157

  3. Magnetic Zn (II) ion-imprinted polymer prepared by the surface imprinting technique and its adsorption properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-xin; Dou, Qian; Jin, Xiu-hong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Ting-ru; Han, Xu; Wang, Dong-dong

    2015-01-01

    A novel magnetic Zn (II) ion-imprinted polymer was prepared by the surface ion-imprinted technique by using magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 microspheres as supporter, methacrylic acid and salicylaldoxime as monomers, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, vibrating sample magnetometer and scanning electron microscope. The adsorption experiments showed that the imprinted polymer was employed successfully in comparison with non-imprinted polymer. When the temperature was in a range of 291-297 K, the maximum adsorption was about 52.69 mg g(-1) with an optimal pH 6.0 for an equilibrium time of 40 min. The imprinted polymer possessed high selectivity and specific recognition towards Zn (II). The Langmuir adsorption model was more favourable than the Freundlich or the Temkin adsorption model. Thermodynamic experiment showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process for Zn (II). The mechanism for Zn (II) adsorption on the imprinted polymer was investigated. PMID:25919981

  4. The disparate maternal aunt-uncle ratio in male transsexuals: an explanation invoking genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Green, R; Keverne, E B

    2000-01-01

    A significant skewing in the sex ratio in favour of females has been reported for the families of homosexual men such that there are fewer maternal uncles than aunts. This finding is repeated for a large series of transsexual families in this study. Four hundred and seventeen male-to-female transsexuals and 96 female-to-male transsexuals were assessed. Male-to-female transsexuals have a significant excess of maternal aunts vs. uncles. No differences from the expected parity were found for female-to-male transsexuals or on the paternal side. A posited explanation for these findings invokes X inactivation and genes on the X chromosome that escape inactivation but may be imprinted. Our hypothesis incorporates the known familial traits in the families of homosexuals and transsexuals by way of retention of the grand parental epigenotype on the X chromosome. Generation one would be characterized by a failure to erase the paternal imprints on the paternal X chromosome. Daughters of this second generation would produce sons that are XpY and XmY. Since XpY expresses Xist, the X chromosome is silenced and half of the sons are lost at the earliest stages of pregnancy because of the normal requirement for paternal X expression in extra-embryonic tissues. Females survive by virtue of inheriting two X chromosomes, and therefore the possibility of X chromosome counting and choice during embryonic development. In generation three, sons inheriting the paternal X after its second passage through the female germline survive, but half would inherit the feminizing Xp imprinted genes. These genes could pre-dispose the sons to feminization and subsequent development of either homosexuality or transsexualism. PMID:10623499

  5. Absence of Maternal Methylation in Biparental Hydatidiform Moles from Women with NLRP7 Maternal-Effect Mutations Reveals Widespread Placenta-Specific Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Delgado, Marta; Martin-Trujillo, Alejandro; Tayama, Chiharu; Vidal, Enrique; Esteller, Manel; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Deo, Nandita; Barney, Olivia; Maclean, Ken; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Fisher, Rosemary; Monk, David

    2015-01-01

    Familial recurrent hydatidiform mole (RHM) is a maternal-effect autosomal recessive disorder usually associated with mutations of the NLRP7 gene. It is characterized by HM with excessive trophoblastic proliferation, which mimics the appearance of androgenetic molar conceptuses despite their diploid biparental constitution. It has been proposed that the phenotypes of both types of mole are associated with aberrant genomic imprinting. However no systematic analyses for imprinting defects have been reported. Here, we present the genome-wide methylation profiles of both spontaneous androgenetic and biparental NLRP7 defective molar tissues. We observe total paternalization of all ubiquitous and placenta-specific differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in four androgenetic moles; namely gain of methylation at paternally methylated loci and absence of methylation at maternally methylated regions. The methylation defects observed in five RHM biopsies from NLRP7 defective patients are restricted to lack-of-methylation at maternal DMRs. Surprisingly RHMs from two sisters with the same missense mutations, as well as consecutive RHMs from one affected female show subtle allelic methylation differences, suggesting inter-RHM variation. These epigenotypes are consistent with NLRP7 being a maternal-effect gene and involved in imprint acquisition in the oocyte. In addition, bioinformatic screening of the resulting methylation datasets identified over sixty loci with methylation profiles consistent with imprinting in the placenta, of which we confirm 22 as novel maternally methylated loci. These observations strongly suggest that the molar phenotypes are due to defective placenta-specific imprinting and over-expression of paternally expressed transcripts, highlighting that maternal-effect mutations of NLRP7 are associated with the most severe form of multi-locus imprinting defects in humans. PMID:26544189

  6. Heat-transfer resistance measurement method (HTM)-based cell detection at trace levels using a progressive enrichment approach with highly selective cell-binding surface imprints.

    PubMed

    Bers, Karolien; Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Daemen, Mat; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Hendriks, Jerome J A; Bouwmans, Evelien E; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    Surface-imprinted polymers allow for specific cell detection based on simultaneous recognition of the cell shape, cell size, and cell membrane functionalities by macromolecular cell imprints. In this study, the specificity of detection and the detection sensitivity for target cells within a pool of non-target cells were analyzed for a cell-specific surface-imprinted polymer combined with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique (HTM). A modified Chinese hamster ovarian cell line (CHO-ldlD) was used as a model system on which the transmembrane protein mucin-1 (MUC1) could be excessively expressed and for which the occurrence of MUC1 glycosylation could be controlled. In specific cancer cells, the overexpressed MUC1 protein typically shows an aberrant apical distribution and glycosylation. We show that surface-imprinted polymers discriminate between cell types that (1) only differ in the expression of a specific membrane protein (MUC1) or (2) only differ in the membrane protein being glycosylated or not. Moreover, surface-imprinted polymers of cells carrying different glycoforms of the same membrane protein do target both types of cells. These findings illustrate the high specificity of cell detection that can be reached by the structural imprinting of cells in polymer layers. Competitiveness between target and non-target cells was proven to negatively affect the detection sensitivity of target cells. Furthermore, we show that the detection sensitivity can be increased significantly by repetitively exposing the surface to the sample and eliminating non-specifically bound cells by flushing between consecutive cell exposures. PMID:24606112

  7. Absence of Maternal Methylation in Biparental Hydatidiform Moles from Women with NLRP7 Maternal-Effect Mutations Reveals Widespread Placenta-Specific Imprinting.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Delgado, Marta; Martin-Trujillo, Alejandro; Tayama, Chiharu; Vidal, Enrique; Esteller, Manel; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Deo, Nandita; Barney, Olivia; Maclean, Ken; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Fisher, Rosemary; Monk, David

    2015-11-01

    Familial recurrent hydatidiform mole (RHM) is a maternal-effect autosomal recessive disorder usually associated with mutations of the NLRP7 gene. It is characterized by HM with excessive trophoblastic proliferation, which mimics the appearance of androgenetic molar conceptuses despite their diploid biparental constitution. It has been proposed that the phenotypes of both types of mole are associated with aberrant genomic imprinting. However no systematic analyses for imprinting defects have been reported. Here, we present the genome-wide methylation profiles of both spontaneous androgenetic and biparental NLRP7 defective molar tissues. We observe total paternalization of all ubiquitous and placenta-specific differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in four androgenetic moles; namely gain of methylation at paternally methylated loci and absence of methylation at maternally methylated regions. The methylation defects observed in five RHM biopsies from NLRP7 defective patients are restricted to lack-of-methylation at maternal DMRs. Surprisingly RHMs from two sisters with the same missense mutations, as well as consecutive RHMs from one affected female show subtle allelic methylation differences, suggesting inter-RHM variation. These epigenotypes are consistent with NLRP7 being a maternal-effect gene and involved in imprint acquisition in the oocyte. In addition, bioinformatic screening of the resulting methylation datasets identified over sixty loci with methylation profiles consistent with imprinting in the placenta, of which we confirm 22 as novel maternally methylated loci. These observations strongly suggest that the molar phenotypes are due to defective placenta-specific imprinting and over-expression of paternally expressed transcripts, highlighting that maternal-effect mutations of NLRP7 are associated with the most severe form of multi-locus imprinting defects in humans. PMID:26544189

  8. Express

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Express ; CASRN 101200 - 48 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  9. Expression-b