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Sample records for improve diabetes risk

  1. Improving diabetes prevention with benefit based tailored treatment: risk based reanalysis of Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kent, David M; Nelson, Jason P; Hayward, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether some participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program were more or less likely to benefit from metformin or a structured lifestyle modification program. Design Post hoc analysis of the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized controlled trial. Setting Ambulatory care patients. Participants 3060 people without diabetes but with evidence of impaired glucose metabolism. Intervention Intervention groups received metformin or a lifestyle modification program with the goals of weight loss and physical activity. Main outcome measure Development of diabetes, stratified by the risk of developing diabetes according to a diabetes risk prediction model. Results Of the 3081 participants with impaired glucose metabolism at baseline, 655 (21%) progressed to diabetes over a median 2.8 years’ follow-up. The diabetes risk model had good discrimination (C statistic=0.73) and calibration. Although the lifestyle intervention provided a sixfold greater absolute risk reduction in the highest risk quarter than in the lowest risk quarter, patients in the lowest risk quarter still received substantial benefit (three year absolute risk reduction 4.9% v 28.3% in highest risk quarter; numbers needed to treat of 20.4 and 3.5, respectively). The benefit of metformin, however, was seen almost entirely in patients in the top quarter of risk of diabetes. No benefit was seen in the lowest risk quarter. Participants in the highest risk quarter averaged a 21.4% three year absolute risk reduction (number needed to treat 4.6). Conclusions Patients at high risk of diabetes have substantial variation in their likelihood of receiving benefit from diabetes prevention treatments. Using this knowledge could decrease overtreatment and make prevention of diabetes far more efficient, effective, and patient centered, provided that decision making is based on an accurate risk prediction tool. PMID:25697494

  2. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M.; Ingul, Charlotte B.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min-1·kg-1, 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min-1·kg-1 (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key points Low volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetes The weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  3. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key pointsLow volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetesThe weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes.However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  4. Diabetic foot risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, M Gail

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic disease that results in foot complications for many people world-wide. In 2014, the World Health Organization estimated the global prevalence of diabetes in adults to be 9%. To ascertain the risk that an individual patient might develop a diabetic foot ulcer that could lead to an amputation, clinicians are strongly encouraged to perform a risk assessment. Monteiro-Soares and Dinis-Ribeiro have presented a new DIAbetic FOot Risk Assessment with the acronym DIAFORA. It is different from other risk assessments in that it predicts the risk of developing both diabetic foot ulcers and amputation specifically. The risk variables were derived by regression analysis based on a data set of 293 patients from a high-risk setting, a Hospital Diabetic Foot Clinic, who had diabetes and a diabetic foot ulcers. Clear descriptions of the risk variables are provided as well as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the risk categories. As an added benefit, likelihood ratios are provided that will help clinicians determine the risk of amputation for individual patients. Having a risk assessment form is important for clinician use and examples exist. A question is raised about the effectiveness of risk assessment and how effectiveness might be determined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26825436

  5. Improving Employee Health: Evaluation of a Worksite Lifestyle Change Program to Decrease Risk Factors for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, M; Molenaar, D; Arena, V; Venditti, E; Meehan, R; Miller, R; Vanderwood, K; Eaglehouse, Y; Kriska, Andrea M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if an evidence-based, behavioral lifestyle intervention program delivered at a worksite setting is effective in improving type 2 diabetes and CVD risk factors. Methods A randomized six-month delayed control design was utilized, with two-thirds of the participants assigned to begin intervention immediately and one-third beginning six months later. The year-long program (weekly for 3 months transitioning to monthly) focused on weight loss and increasing physical activity. Results The immediate intervention group had greater mean weight loss (−10.4 lbs., 5.1%, vs. −2.3 lbs., 1%, p=0.0001) than the delayed control group at 6 months and relatively greater improvements in activity, HbA1c and other risk factors. The delayed group experienced similar improvements after completing the intervention program. Conclusions A worksite behavioral lifestyle intervention is feasible and effective in significantly improving risk factors for diabetes and CVD. PMID:25742535

  6. Benefits of modest weight loss in improving cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese individuals with Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overweight and obese individuals are encouraged to lose 5–10% of their body weight to improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but data supporting this recommendation are limited, particularly for individuals with type 2 diabetes. We conducted an observational analysis of participants in the Look ...

  7. mHealth Intervention to Improve Diabetes Risk Behaviors in India: A Prospective, Parallel Group Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Saligram, Nalini; Davé, Raj; Gowda, Arun; Blais, Linelle; Arora, Monika; Ranjani, Harish; Ganda, Om; Hedeker, Donald; Reddy, Sethu; Ramalingam, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    Background In low/middle income countries like India, diabetes is prevalent and health care access limited. Most adults have a mobile phone, creating potential for mHealth interventions to improve public health. To examine the feasibility and initial evidence of effectiveness of mDiabetes, a text messaging program to improve diabetes risk behaviors, a global nonprofit organization (Arogya World) implemented mDiabetes among one million Indian adults. Objective A prospective, parallel cohort design was applied to examine whether mDiabetes improved fruit, vegetable, and fat intakes and exercise. Methods Intervention participants were randomly selected from the one million Nokia subscribers who elected to opt in to mDiabetes. Control group participants were randomly selected from non-Nokia mobile phone subscribers. mDiabetes participants received 56 text messages in their choice of 12 languages over 6 months; control participants received no contact. Messages were designed to motivate improvement in diabetes risk behaviors and increase awareness about the causes and complications of diabetes. Participant health behaviors (exercise and fruit, vegetable, and fat intake) were assessed between 2012 and 2013 via telephone surveys by blinded assessors at baseline and 6 months later. Data were cleaned and analyzed in 2014 and 2015. Results 982 participants in the intervention group and 943 in the control group consented to take the phone survey at baselne. At the end of the 6-month period, 611 (62.22%) in the intervention and 632 (67.02%) in the control group completed the follow-up telephone survey. Participants receiving texts demonstrated greater improvement in a health behavior composite score over 6 months, compared with those who received no messages F(1, 1238) = 30.181, P<.001, 95% CI, 0.251-0.531. Fewer intervention participants demonstrated health behavior decline compared with controls. Improved fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption (P<.01) but not exercise were

  8. Iron and Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Judith A.; McClain, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload is a risk factor for diabetes. The link between iron and diabetes was first recognized in pathologic conditions—hereditary hemochromatosis and thalassemia—but high levels of dietary iron also impart diabetes risk. Iron plays a direct and causal role in diabetes pathogenesis mediated both by β-cell failure and insulin resistance. Iron is also a factor in the regulation of metabolism in most tissues involved in fuel homeostasis, with the adipocyte in particular serving an iron-sensing role. The underlying molecular mechanisms mediating these effects are numerous and incompletely understood, but include oxidant stress and modulation of adipokines and intracellular signal transduction pathways. PMID:23473030

  9. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... Volunteer Center American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  10. Combining Information from Common Type 2 Diabetes Risk Polymorphisms Improves Disease Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Weedon, Michael N; McCarthy, Mark I; Hitman, Graham; Walker, Mark; Groves, Christopher J; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Rayner, N. William; Shields, Beverley; Owen, Katharine R; Hattersley, Andrew T; Frayling, Timothy M

    2006-01-01

    Background A limited number of studies have assessed the risk of common diseases when combining information from several predisposing polymorphisms. In most cases, individual polymorphisms only moderately increase risk (~20%), and they are thought to be unhelpful in assessing individuals' risk clinically. The value of analyzing multiple alleles simultaneously is not well studied. This is often because, for any given disease, very few common risk alleles have been confirmed. Methods and Findings Three common variants (Lys23 of KCNJ11, Pro12 of PPARG, and the T allele at rs7903146 of TCF7L2) have been shown to predispose to type 2 diabetes mellitus across many large studies. Risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.30 to 0.88 in controls. To assess the combined effect of multiple susceptibility alleles, we genotyped these variants in a large case-control study (3,668 controls versus 2,409 cases). Individual allele odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 1.23) to 1.48 (95% CI, 1.36 to 1.60). We found no evidence of gene-gene interaction, and the risks of multiple alleles were consistent with a multiplicative model. Each additional risk allele increased the odds of type 2 diabetes by 1.28 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.35) times. Participants with all six risk alleles had an OR of 5.71 (95% CI, 1.15 to 28.3) compared to those with no risk alleles. The 8.1% of participants that were double-homozygous for the risk alleles at TCF7L2 and Pro12Ala had an OR of 3.16 (95% CI, 2.22 to 4.50), compared to 4.3% with no TCF7L2 risk alleles and either no or one Glu23Lys or Pro12Ala risk alleles. Conclusions Combining information from several known common risk polymorphisms allows the identification of population subgroups with markedly differing risks of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those obtained using single polymorphisms. This approach may have a role in future preventative measures for common, polygenic diseases. PMID:17020404

  11. Postdinner resistance exercise improves postprandial risk factors more effectively than predinner resistance exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Heden, Timothy D.; Winn, Nathan C.; Mari, Andrea; Booth, Frank W.; Rector, R. Scott; Thyfault, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormally elevated postprandial glucose and triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations are risk factors for cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. The most effective time to exercise to lower postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations is unknown. Thus the aim of this study was to determine what time is more effective, either pre- or postdinner resistance exercise (RE), at improving postprandial risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen obese patients with type 2 diabetes completed three trials in a random order in which they consumed a dinner meal with 1) no RE (NoRE), 2) predinner RE (RE → M), and 3) postdinner RE beginning 45 min after dinner (M → RE). Clinical outcome measures included postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations. In addition, postprandial acetaminophen (gastric emptying), endocrine responses, free fatty acids, and β-cell function (mathematical modeling) were measured to determine whether these factors were related to changes in glucose and TAG. The TAG incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was ∼92% lower (P ≤ 0.02) during M → RE compared with NoRE and RE → M, an effect due in part to lower very-low-density lipoprotein-1 TAG concentrations. The glucose iAUC was reduced (P = 0.02) by ∼18 and 30% during the RE → M and M → RE trials, respectively, compared with NoRE, with no difference between RE trials. RE → M and M → RE reduced the insulin iAUC by 35 and 48%, respectively, compared with NoRE (P < 0.01). The glucagon-like peptide-1 iAUC was ∼50% lower (P ≤ 0.02) during M → RE compared with NoRE and RE → M. Given that predinner RE only improves postprandial glucose concentrations, whereas postdinner RE improves both postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations, postdinner RE may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease more effectively. PMID:25539939

  12. EQ-5D visual analog scale and utility index values in individuals with diabetes and at risk for diabetes: Findings from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD)

    PubMed Central

    Grandy, Susan; Fox, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    Background The EQ-5D was used to compare burden experienced by respondents with diabetes and those at risk for diabetes. Methods A survey including the EQ-5D was mailed to individuals with self-reported diabetes, as well as those without diabetes but with the following risk factors (RFs): (1) abdominal obesity, (2) body mass index ≥ 28 kg/m2, (3) dyslipidemia, (4) hypertension, and (5) cardiovascular disease. Non-diabetes respondents were combined into 0–2 RFs and 3–5 RFs. Mean EQ-5D scores were compared across groups using analysis of variance. Multivariable linear regression modeling identified factors affecting respondents' EQ-5D scores. Results Complete responses were available from >75% of each cohort. Mean EQ-5D index scores were significantly lower for respondents with type 2 diabetes and 3–5 RFs (0.778 and 0.792, respectively) than for those with 0–2 RFs (0.870, p < 0.001 for each); score for respondents with type 2 diabetes was also significantly lower than for those with 3–5 RFs (p < 0.001). Similar patterns were seen for visual analog scale (VAS). For both VAS and index scores, after adjusting for other characteristics, respondents reported decreasing EQ-5D scores as status moved from low to high risk (-6.49 for VAS score and -0.045 for index score) to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (-9.75 for VAS score and -0.054 for index score; p < 0.001 vs. 0–2 RFs for all). Conclusion High-risk and type 2 diabetes groups had similar EQ-5D scores, and both were substantially lower than in low-risk respondents. PMID:18304340

  13. Diabetes Device Interoperability for Improved Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Silk, Alain D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific and technological advancements have led to the increasing availability and use of sophisticated devices for diabetes management, with corresponding improvements in public health. These devices are often capable of sharing data with a few other specific devices but are generally not broadly interoperable; they cannot work together with a wide variety of other devices. As a result of limited interoperability, benefits of modern diabetes devices and potential for development of innovative new diabetes technologies are not being fully realized. Here we discuss diabetes device interoperability in general, then focus on 4 examples that show how diabetes management could benefit from enhanced interoperability: remote monitoring and data sharing, integrating data from multiple devices to better inform diabetes management strategies, device consolidation, and artificial pancreas development. PMID:26178738

  14. Risk taking among diabetic clients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D H; Schwartz-Barcott, D; Patterson, B

    1992-01-01

    Diabetic clients must make daily decisions about their health care needs. Observational and anecdotal evidence suggests that vast differences exist between the kinds of choices diabetic clients make and the kinds of chances they are willing to take. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a diabetic risk-assessment tool. This instrument, which is based on subjective expected utility theory, measures risk-prone and risk-averse behavior. Initial findings from a pilot study of 18 women clients who are on insulin indicate that patterns of risk behavior exist in the areas of exercise, skin care, and diet. PMID:1729123

  15. Statins and Risk of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Danaei, Goodarz; García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Fernandez Cantero, Oscar; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Two meta-analyses of randomized trials of statins found increased risk of type 2 diabetes. One possible explanation is bias due to differential survival when patients who are at higher risk of diabetes survive longer under statin treatment. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used electronic medical records from 500 general practices in the U.K. and included data from 285,864 men and women aged 50–84 years from January 2000 to December 2010. We emulated the design and analysis of a hypothetical randomized trial of statins, estimated the observational analog of the intention-to-treat effect, and adjusted for differential survival bias using inverse-probability weighting. RESULTS During 1.2 million person-years of follow-up, there were 13,455 cases of type 2 diabetes and 8,932 deaths. Statin initiation was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The hazard ratio (95% CI) of diabetes was 1.45 (1.39–1.50) before adjusting for potential confounders and 1.14 (1.10–1.19) after adjustment. Adjusting for differential survival did not change the estimates. Initiating atorvastatin and simvastatin was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS In this sample of the general population, statin therapy was associated with 14% increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Differential survival did not explain this increased risk. PMID:23248196

  16. Effect of Improved Fitness beyond Weight Loss on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes in the Look AHEAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Brancati, Frederick L.; Chen, Haiying; Coday, Mace; Jakicic, John M.; Lewis, Cora; Stewart, Kerry J.; Clark, Jeanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Because lifestyle-induced improvements in cardiovascular risk factors vary substantially across individuals with type 2 diabetes, we investigated the extent to which increases in fitness explain cardiovascular risk factor improvements independent of weight loss in a lifestyle intervention. Methods We studied 1-year changes in Look AHEAD, a randomized trial comparing an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) to a diabetes support and education control group (DSE) in adults with type 2 diabetes. Assessments included weight, fitness, blood pressure (BP), glucose, HbA1c, and lipids. We evaluated the effects of changes in weight and fitness on changes in cardiovascular risk factors by study arm, using R2 from multiple linear regression. Results Analyses included participants with fitness data at baseline and 1-year (n=4,408; 41% male, 36% non-White, mean age 58.7± 6.8 years). Weight change alone improved R2 for explaining changes in risk factors up to 8.2% in ILI and 1.7% in DSE. Fitness change alone improved R2 up to 3.9% in ILI and 0.8% in DSE. After adjusting for weight change, fitness was independently associated (p<0.05) with improvements in R2 for glucose (+0.7%), HbA1c (+1.1 %), HDL cholesterol (+0.4%) and triglycerides (+0.2%) in ILI and DBP (+0.3%), glucose (+0.3%), HbA1c (+0.4%), and triglycerides (+0.1%) in DSE. Taken together, weight and fitness changes explained from 0.1–9.3% of the variability in cardiovascular risk factor changes. Conclusion Increased fitness explained statistically significant but small improvements in several cardiovascular risk factors beyond weight loss. Further research identifying other factors that explain cardiovascular risk factor change is needed. PMID:23012688

  17. Changes in Physical Fitness Predict Improvements in Modifiable Cardiovascular Risk Factors Independently of Body Weight Loss in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Participating in the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES)

    PubMed Central

    Balducci, Stefano; Zanuso, Silvano; Cardelli, Patrizia; Salvi, Laura; Mazzitelli, Giulia; Bazuro, Alessandra; Iacobini, Carla; Nicolucci, Antonio; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Physical fitness is inversely related to mortality in the general population and in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Here, we present data concerning the relationship between changes in physical fitness and modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes from the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 606) were enrolled in 22 outpatient diabetes clinics and randomized to twice-a-week supervised aerobic and resistance training plus exercise counseling versus counseling alone for 12 months. Baseline to end-of-study changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, and flexibility, as assessed by Vo2max estimation, a 5–8 maximal repetition test, and a hip/trunk flexibility test, respectively, were calculated in the whole cohort, and multiple regression analyses were applied to assess the relationship with cardiovascular risk factors. RESULTS Changes in Vo2max, upper and lower body strength, and flexibility were significantly associated with the variation in the volume of physical activity, HbA1c, BMI, waist circumference, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), coronary heart disease (CHD) risk score, and inversely, HDL cholesterol. Changes in fitness predicted improvements in HbA1c, waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, hs-CRP, and CHD risk score, independent of study arm, BMI, and in case of strength, also waist circumference. CONCLUSIONS Physical activity/exercise-induced increases in fitness, particularly muscular, predict improvements in cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes independently of weight loss, thus indicating the need for targeting fitness in these individuals, particularly in subjects who struggle to lose weight. PMID:22399699

  18. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of people who have diabetes die of some type of cardiovascular disease. Diabetic women are at especially high risk for dying ... aware of my risk factors, such as being diabetic and having a family history of heart ... levels—you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. But you can take steps to ...

  19. Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159557.html Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death Study points to need for better coordinated care, ... people with diabetes have a higher risk of death after a heart attack. "We knew that following ...

  20. Improving foot self-care knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors in patients with type 2 diabetes at low risk for foot ulceration: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lifeng; Sidani, Souraya; Cooper-Brathwaite, Angela; Metcalfe, Kelly

    2014-12-01

    The pilot study aimed to explore the effects of an educational intervention on patients' foot self-care knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors in adult patients with type 2 diabetes at low risk for foot ulceration. The intervention consisted of three sessions and was given over a 3-week period. A total of 70 eligible consenting participants were recruited for this pilot study. Fifty-six participants completed the study. The outcomes were assessed at pretest, following the first two sessions, and 3-month follow-up. The findings indicated that the foot self-care educational intervention was effective in improving foot self-care knowledge, self-efficacy and behaviors in adult patients with type 2 diabetes at low risk for foot ulceration. The findings support the effects of the intervention. Future research should evaluate its efficacy using a randomized clinical trial design, and a large sample of patients with type 2 diabetes at low risk for foot ulcerations. PMID:23823459

  1. A human virus improves diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single inoculation of mice with Ad36, a human adenovirus, lastingly improved high fat diet-induced-diabetes (DID), while Ad2, another human adenovirus did not. The study objective in these 2 studies was to determine if Ad36 could be used as a tool to reveal novel pathways for improving dysglycemia...

  2. Improving diabetes care in developing countries: the example of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Basit, Abdul; Riaz, Musarrat; Fawwad, Asher

    2015-02-01

    Pakistan is a developing country with limited recourses and diverse economic social patterns. Pakistan has high prevalence of diabetes and its complication, which is a huge challenge to the existing health care system. The major contributing risk factors are urbanization and change in lifestyle, maternal and fetal malnutrition and genetic factors. National action plans for control of diabetes have been made since 1995 but actions in this regard were not perfect. Training of primary care physicians and development of multidisciplinary diabetes care teams was initiated. Prioritization strategies were defined according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) guidance, mainly focusing on diabetic foot, diabetes education and children with diabetes. Researches for better understanding and management of diabetes in Pakistan were undertaken. Collaboration between various stakeholders was promoted at national and international level. In summary, public private relationships and development of multifaceted approaches is expected to improve the lives of millions of diabetics of Pakistan. PMID:25467615

  3. Women at High Risk for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 173-199. 3 Dabelea D, Crume T. Maternal environment and the transgenerational cycle of obesity and diabetes. Diabetes Care , 2011;60:1849-1855. 4 Kitzmiller JL, Dang-Kilduff L, Taslimi MM. Gestational diabetes after delivery: short-term management and long-term risks. Diabetes Care. 2007;30: ...

  4. Obesity, diabetes, and coronary risk in women.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Aruna D; Skerrett, Patrick J; Manson, JoAnn E

    2002-12-01

    The latter half of the twentieth century has witnessed rapid advances in cardiovascular epidemiology and medicine. Concurrently, secular trends in lifestyle practices and general improvements in standards of living have resulted in several alarming trends for cardiovascular disease prevention and health promotion. The adoption of unhealthy dietary patterns, growing socio-economic and racial disparities in chronic disease prevalence, low levels of physical activity, and other as yet unidentified genetic and environmental determinants have led to burgeoning rates of both pediatric and adult obesity and diabetes mellitus. Women appear to be at particular risk as the gender advantage for coronary heart disease (CHD) is counterbalanced by an increased incidence of obesity and diabetes. In order to further examine these complex associations, we review the available epidemiological data regarding the impact of obesity and diabetes on cardiovascular health in women. PMID:12478201

  5. Improving Diabetes Care for Hospice Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei J; Jacobson, Margaret A; Johnston, C Bree

    2016-07-01

    Although type 2 diabetes guidelines recommend less aggressive glycemic control for patients with limited life expectancy, many hospice patients continue their glucose-lowering medications, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. Three common reasons for overly tight glycemic control in hospice patients include (1) discussions about reducing or stopping chronic medications are uncomfortable; (2) many patients and families believe that mild hyperglycemia can cause symptoms; and (3) until 2014, Healthcare Information and Data Information Set (HEDIS) quality indicators for glycemic control included hospice patients. To address these issues, we recommend (1) providers discuss with patients and families upon hospice enrollment that diabetes medications can be reduced or discontinued as their life-limiting disease progresses; (2) keeping blood glucose levels between 200 and 300 mg/dL; and (3) educate providers that HEDIS measures now exclude hospice patients. Implementing these recommendations should decrease the risk of hypoglycemia in hospice patients and improve their quality of life. PMID:25852204

  6. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Crandall, Jill P.; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Montez, Maria G.; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopausal status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. Methods The study population included women in premenopause (n=708), natural postmenopause (n=328), and bilateral oophorectomy (n=201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy (HT) use. Results After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04, 0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of HT use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63, 2.64) or placebo arms (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.74, 2.55). Conclusions Among women at high-risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:21709591

  7. [Improvement in glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric data in type 2 diabetic patients after the switch from biphasic human insulin to biphasic premix analog insulin aspart].

    PubMed

    Gero, László; Gyimesi, András; Hidvégi, Tibor; Jánosi, István

    2009-08-30

    Long-term studies involving large number of type 2 diabetic patients supplied evidence that constant adequate metabolic control may prevent the late (micro- and macrovascular) diabetic complications. In the present non-interventional, retrospective study, authors performed an analysis of type 2 diabetic patients who had been previously treated with biphasic human insulin (BHI) and their therapy was changed to biphasic analog insulin aspart 30/70 (BIAsp = NovoMix 30). The switch of the insulin therapy was carried out in years 2007 and 2008 with the cooperation of 50 accredited diabetes centers. Data were obtained at the time of therapeutical change and six months later. The number of suitable patients was 2898 with an age of 66.20 +/- 10.10 year, and the duration of diabetes was >10 years in 43% of the patients. After the six-month therapy with NovoMix 30, the mean HbA 1c level decreased statistically significantly from the initial value of 9.10 +/- 1.44% to 7.62 +/- 1.00% ( p < 0.001). The lipid profile also improved although target values were not always attained. A reduction was also observed in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Mean body weight decreased from 84.2 +/- 14.9 kg to 82.6 +/- 13.9 kg ( p < 0.01). All these changes occurred in spite of a significantly reduced daily insulin dose (48.4 +/- 17.6 IU) as compared with the initial value (49.0 +/- 17.4 IU, p < 0.001). A marked decrement was also observed in the frequency of hypoglycemic reactions. These results confirm that treatment with NovoMix 30 insulin leads to a significant amelioration of glycemic control as reflected by the decreased level of HbA 1c and the higher proportion of patients attaining the target value, as well as the lower frequency of hypoglycemic episodes. The significant improvements in cardiovascular risk factors are also important, but the explanation is still missing and would require the accomplishment of prospective, controlled studies. PMID:19692308

  8. Psychosocial Factors in Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Ruth A; Steptoe, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that is increasing in prevalence globally. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in diabetes, and lifestyle and clinical risk factors do not fully account for the link between the conditions. This article provides an overview of the evidence concerning the role of psychosocial stress factors in diabetes risk, as well as in cardiovascular complications in people with existing diabetes. Several types of psychosocial factors are discussed including depression, other types of emotional distress, exposure to stressful conditions, and personality traits. The potential behavioral and biological pathways linking psychosocial factors to diabetes are presented and implications for patient care are highlighted. PMID:27566328

  9. Insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes: what is 'double diabetes' and what are the risks?

    PubMed

    Cleland, S J; Fisher, B M; Colhoun, H M; Sattar, N; Petrie, J R

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we explore the concept of 'double diabetes', a combination of type 1 diabetes with features of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. After considering whether double diabetes is a useful concept, we discuss potential mechanisms of increased insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes before examining the extent to which double diabetes might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We then go on to consider the proposal that weight gain from intensive insulin regimens may be associated with increased CV risk factors in some patients with type 1 diabetes, and explore the complex relationships between weight gain, insulin resistance, glycaemic control and CV outcome. Important comparisons and contrasts between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are highlighted in terms of hepatic fat, fat partitioning and lipid profile, and how these may differ between type 1 diabetic patients with and without double diabetes. In so doing, we hope this work will stimulate much-needed research in this area and an improvement in clinical practice. PMID:23613085

  10. A group randomized trial of a complexity-based organizational intervention to improve risk factors for diabetes complications in primary care settings: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Parchman, Michael L; Pugh, Jacqueline A; Culler, Steven D; Noel, Polly H; Arar, Nedal H; Romero, Raquel L; Palmer, Raymond F

    2008-01-01

    Background Most patients with type 2 diabetes have suboptimal control of their glucose, blood pressure (BP), and lipids – three risk factors for diabetes complications. Although the chronic care model (CCM) provides a roadmap for improving these outcomes, developing theoretically sound implementation strategies that will work across diverse primary care settings has been challenging. One explanation for this difficulty may be that most strategies do not account for the complex adaptive system (CAS) characteristics of the primary care setting. A CAS is comprised of individuals who can learn, interconnect, self-organize, and interact with their environment in a way that demonstrates non-linear dynamic behavior. One implementation strategy that may be used to leverage these properties is practice facilitation (PF). PF creates time for learning and reflection by members of the team in each clinic, improves their communication, and promotes an individualized approach to implement a strategy to improve patient outcomes. Specific objectives The specific objectives of this protocol are to: evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of PF to improve risk factor control in patients with type 2 diabetes across a variety of primary care settings; assess the implementation of the CCM in response to the intervention; examine the relationship between communication within the practice team and the implementation of the CCM; and determine the cost of the intervention both from the perspective of the organization conducting the PF intervention and from the perspective of the primary care practice. Intervention The study will be a group randomized trial conducted in 40 primary care clinics. Data will be collected on all clinics, with 60 patients in each clinic, using a multi-method assessment process at baseline, 12, and 24 months. The intervention, PF, will consist of a series of practice improvement team meetings led by trained facilitators over 12 months. Primary hypotheses

  11. As Fitness Levels Rise, Diabetes Risk Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158889.html As Fitness Levels Rise, Diabetes Risk Drops But change requires dedication ... TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A higher level of heart-lung fitness may reduce your risk ...

  12. A Combination of Prebiotic Inulin and Oligofructose Improve Some of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Khalili, Mohammad; Mirtaheri, Elham; Pourghassem Gargari, Bahram; Tavakoli, Farnaz; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Babaei, Hossein; Dehghan, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of oligofructose-enriched inulin on some of cardiovascular disease risk factors in women with type 2 diabetes. Methods: 52 females (25diabetes were randomly assigned to two groups. Participants received 10g/d oligofructose-enriched inulin (n=27) or 10g/d placebo (n=25) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood samples were taken to measure metabolic profiles, malondialdehyd and antioxidant enzymes at baseline and after the 8 weeks intervention. Paired, unpaired sample t-test and analysis of covariance were used to comparison of quantitative variables. Results: After 8 weeks, in the oligofructose-enriched inulin group there was a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity (0.2 mmol/l, 20.0%) and a significant decrease in fasting plasma glucose (19.2 mg/dL, 9.4%) HbA1c (0.5%, 8.4%), total cholesterol (TC) (28.0 mg/dL, 14.1%), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) (22.0 mg/dL, 21.7%), TC/HDL-c ratio (0.73, 20.7%), LDL-c/HDL-c ratio (0.55, 27.5%) and malondialdehyd (1.7 nmol/ml, 39.7%) compared to the placebo group. Changes in concentrations of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were not significant in oligofructose-enriched inulin group compared to the placebo group. Conclusion: Oligofructose-enriched inulin may improve glycemic indices, lipid profile, antioxidant status and malondialdehyd in women with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26819923

  13. Association of Weight Loss and Medication Adherence Among Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: SHIELD (Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes)☆

    PubMed Central

    Grandy, Susan; Fox, Kathleen M.; Hardy, Elise

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to prescribed diabetes medications is suboptimal, which can lead to poor glycemic control and diabetic complications. Treatment-related weight gain is a side effect of some oral antidiabetic agents and insulin, which may negatively affect adherence to therapy. Objective This study investigated whether adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who lost weight had better medication adherence than those who gained weight. Methods Weight change over 1 year (2007 to 2008) was assessed among respondents in the US Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD). Weight loss of >1.0%, ≥3%, and ≥5% of weight was compared with weight gain of ≥1.0%. Medication adherence was assessed using the Morisky 4-item questionnaire for medication-taking behavior, with lower scores representing better adherence. Results There were 746 T2DM respondents who lost >1.0%, 483 who lost ≥3%, 310 who lost ≥5%, and 670 who gained ≥1.0% of weight. Each weight-loss group had significantly lower Morisky scores than the weight-gain group; mean scores of 0.389 versus 0.473 (P = 0.050) for the >1.0% weight-loss group, 0.365 versus 0.473 (P = 0.026) for the ≥3% weight-loss group, and 0.334 versus 0.473 (P = 0.014) for the ≥5% weight-loss group. Significantly fewer respondents who lost weight had received insulin, sulfonylurea, or thiazolidinedione therapy (57%) compared with respondents who gained weight (64%) (P = 0.002). Demographics, exercise habits, and dieting were similar between weight-loss and weight-gain groups. Conclusions T2DM respondents with weight loss had significantly better medication adherence and were less likely to be on treatment regimens that increase weight than T2DM respondents with weight gain. These findings suggest that strategies that lead to weight loss, including use of diabetes medications associated with weight loss, may improve medication adherence. PMID:24465048

  14. [Diabetes and cancer risk: oncologic considerations].

    PubMed

    Rosta, András

    2011-07-17

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and malignant tumors are frequent diseases worldwide. The incidence of these two diseases is growing continuously and causes serious health care problem. Population based epidemiologic studies show that the coexistence of type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors is more frequent than expected by the age-corrected incidence and prevalence of each disease. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses show that type 2 diabetes increases the risk and tumor specific mortality of certain cancers. The overlapping risk factors of the diseases suggest a relationship between type 2 diabetes and malignant tumors, with a significant role of obesity as a major risk factor. In the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes there are several biological processes, which may explain the higher cancer risk in type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments, and in vivo animal studies show that the mitotic effect of hyperinsulinemia plays an important role in the relationship of cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent studies show that the different treatment modalities, antidiabetic drugs and their combinations used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes can modify cancer risk. The majority of the data show that metformin therapy decreases, while insulin secretagog drugs slightly increase the risk of certain types of cancers in type 2 diabetes. Metformin can decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines. Endogenous and exogenous (therapy induced) hyperinsulinemia may be mitogenic and may increase the risk of cancer in type 2 diabetes. Human studies showed that the analogue insulin glargin increases the risk of certain cancers. As a result of conceptual weaknesses in study design, data collection, and statistical methods the results of these studies are questionable. According to present knowledge, obtaining and maintaining optimal metabolic target values with the appropriate choice of treatment modality is the aim of treatment in type 2 diabetes

  15. The growing prevalence of type 2 diabetes: increased incidence or improved survival?

    PubMed

    Maruthur, Nisa M

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 347 million persons were estimated to have diabetes worldwide in 2008, an increase of 194 million cases from 1980. Diabetes now affects both high- and low-income countries, with low-income countries bearing the majority of the burden. The epidemiologic transition from traditional health risks, such as poor hygiene, to modern health risks, such as sedentary lifestyle, has facilitated the increase in incidence in diabetes, especially in developing countries. The effect of these risk factors may be especially pronounced in some racial and ethnic populations. Increased surveillance for diabetes has contributed to increased diabetes prevalence in higher-income countries. Survival with and some risk factors for diabetes have improved in developed countries, but global diabetes mortality has increased by 20 % since 1990. Population growth and aging will only increase the burden of diabetes, and public health interventions are needed to address diabetes risk factors to stem the tide of this epidemic. PMID:24072478

  16. Diabetes and Risk of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samy L.; Rojna, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer represent two complex, diverse, chronic, and potentially fatal diseases. Cancer is the second leading cause of death, while diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death with the latter still likely underreported. There is a growing body of evidence published in recent years that suggest substantial increase in cancer incidence in diabetic patients. The worldwide prevalence of diabetes was estimated to rise from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. About 26.9% of all people over 65 have diabetes and 60% have cancer. Overall, 8–18% of cancer patients have diabetes. In the context of epidemiology, the burden of both diseases, small association between diabetes and cancer will be clinically relevant and should translate into significant consequences for future health care solutions. This paper summarizes most of the epidemiological association studies between diabetes and cancer including studies relating to the general all-site increase of malignancies in diabetes and elevated organ-specific cancer rate in diabetes as comorbidity. Additionally, we have discussed the possible pathophysiological mechanisms that likely may be involved in promoting carcinogenesis in diabetes and the potential of different antidiabetic therapies to influence cancer incidence. PMID:23476808

  17. Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159557.html Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death Study points to need for better coordinated ... are much more likely to die after a heart attack than people without the blood sugar condition, a ...

  18. As Fitness Levels Rise, Diabetes Risk Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158889.html As Fitness Levels Rise, Diabetes Risk Drops But change ... of the overall population, the study author's explained. "As this benefit remained significant even when adjusting for ...

  19. Diabetes risk: antioxidants or lifestyle?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global prevalence of type-2 diabetes and its associated cardiovascular disease is increasing, possibly due to the present pandemic of obesity and overweight. It is projected that by the year 2025, more than 300 million people worldwide will have diabetes. In the United States, between the two NH...

  20. Risk Assessment Tools for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Buijsse, Brian; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Griffin, Simon J.; Schulze, Matthias B.

    2011-01-01

    Trials have demonstrated the preventability of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modifications or drugs in people with impaired glucose tolerance. However, alternative ways of identifying people at risk of developing diabetes are required. Multivariate risk scores have been developed for this purpose. This article examines the evidence for performance of diabetes risk scores in adults by 1) systematically reviewing the literature on available scores and 2) their validation in external populations; and 3) exploring methodological issues surrounding the development, validation, and comparison of risk scores. Risk scores show overall good discriminatory ability in populations for whom they were developed. However, discriminatory performance is more heterogeneous and generally weaker in external populations, which suggests that risk scores may need to be validated within the population in which they are intended to be used. Whether risk scores enable accurate estimation of absolute risk remains unknown; thus, care is needed when using scores to communicate absolute diabetes risk to individuals. Several risk scores predict diabetes risk based on routine noninvasive measures or on data from questionnaires. Biochemical measures, in particular fasting plasma glucose, can improve prediction of such models. On the other hand, usefulness of genetic profiling currently appears limited. PMID:21622851

  1. [Statins and the risk of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Gábor

    2013-10-27

    Statins have a relevant role in decreasing cardiovascular mortality. Statins are effective in primary and secondary prevention. Recently, it has been suggested that statins may have a diabetogenic effect, because a moderate increase in the risk of newly developed diabetes mellitus was observed. The diabetogenic effect of statins is a group effect and it is dose-dependent, too. The effect of statins which lower the cardiovascular risk attenuates the risk of developing diabetes during statin therapy, too. Hence, statins remain the first line therapy of reaching LDL-cholesterol targets. PMID:24140507

  2. Diabetes May Raise Risk for Dangerous Staph Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... 157736.html Diabetes May Raise Risk for Dangerous Staph Infection Researchers believe the disease might dampen immune system, ... News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Diabetes Complications Staphylococcal Infections About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  3. Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chogtu, Bharti; Magazine, Rahul; Bairy, K L

    2015-03-15

    The 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, statins, are widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases to lower serum cholesterol levels. As type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by dyslipidemia, statins have a major role in preventing the long term complications in diabetes and are recommended for diabetics with normal low density lipoprotein levels as well. In 2012, United States Food and Drug Administration released changes to statin safety label to include that statins have been found to increase glycosylated haemoglobin and fasting serum glucose levels. Many studies done on patients with cardiovascular risk factors have shown that statins have diabetogenic potential and the effect varies as per the dosage and type used. The various mechanisms for this effect have been proposed and one of them is downregulation of glucose transporters by the statins. The recommendations by the investigators are that though statins can have diabetogenic risk, they have more long term benefits which can outweigh the risk. In elderly patients and those with metabolic syndrome, as the risk of diabetes increase, the statins should be used cautiously. Other than a subset of population with risk for diabetes; statins still have long term survival benefits in most of the patients. PMID:25789118

  4. Cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Slim, Ines Ben Hadj Slama

    2013-01-01

    Commonly cardiovascular risk (CVR) is linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus as this type is known to be part of the metabolic syndrome, which includes other cardiovascular factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia. Inversely, CVR of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is currently being debated apart from the occurrence of diabetic nephropathy (DN). For this, we did a review of CVR in patients with T1DM complicated or not with DN. The place of novel non-invasive techniques in screening of subclinical vascular damage is also discussed in this review. PMID:24251225

  5. Exercise improves cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Voulgari, Christina; Pagoni, Stamatina; Vinik, Aaron; Poirier, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Physical activity is a key element in the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes. Regular physical activity efficiently supports diet-induced weight loss, improves glycemic control, and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Furthermore, physical activity positively affects lipid profile, blood pressure, reduces the rate of cardiovascular events and associated mortality, and restores the quality of life in type 2 diabetes. However, recent studies have documented that a high percentage of the cardiovascular benefits of exercise cannot be attributed solely to enhanced cardiovascular risk factor modulation. Obesity in concert with diabetes is characterized by sympathetic overactivity and the progressive loss of cardiac parasympathetic influx. These are manifested via different pathogenetic mechanisms, including hyperinsulinemia, visceral obesity, subclinical inflammation and increased thrombosis. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy is an underestimated risk factor for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and diabetes. The same is true for the role of physical exercise in the restoration of the heart cardioprotective autonomic modulation in these individuals. This review addresses the interplay of cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes, and focuses on the importance of exercise in improving cardiac autonomic dysfunction. PMID:23084034

  6. Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohini; Dent, Tom; Meads, Catherine; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but not all risk models or scores had robust statistical properties (for example, good discrimination and calibration) and had been externally validated on a different population. Genetic markers added nothing to models over clinical and sociodemographic factors. Most authors described their score as “simple” or “easily implemented,” although few were specific about the intended users and under what circumstances. Ten mechanisms were identified by which measuring diabetes risk might improve outcomes. Follow-on studies that applied a risk score as part of an

  7. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica M.; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Williams, Gail M.; Doi, Suhail A.

    2014-01-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia stands out as a major factor contributing to the association between DM and cancer, and modulation of circulating insulin levels by DM medications appears to play an important role in altering cancer risk. Drugs that increase circulating insulin, including exogenous insulin, insulin analogs, and insulin secretagogues, are generally associated with an increased cancer risk. In contrast, drugs that regulate insulin signaling without increasing levels, especially metformin, appear to be associated with a decreased cancer risk. In addition to hyperinsulinemia, the effect of DM medications on other shared risk factors including hyperglycemia, obesity, and oxidative stress as well as demographic factors that may influence the use of certain DM drugs in different populations are described. Further elucidation of the mechanisms behind the association between DM, cancer, and the role of DM medications in modulating cancer risk may aid in the development of better prevention and treatment options for both DM and cancer. Additionally, incorporation of DM medication use into cancer prediction models may lead to the development of improved risk assessment tools for diabetic patients. PMID:22527174

  8. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  9. Meat consumption as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  10. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  11. Health Behaviors Among Pregnant Latina Women at Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common complication of pregnancy, increases the risk of subsequent diabetes and obesity. Latina women have over twice the risk for developing GDM as compared to non-Latina white women. Health-promoting practices during pregnancy may improve metabolic status an...

  12. [Epidemiology of Diabetes and Risk of Dementia].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Tomoyuki

    2016-07-01

    The association between diabetes and the risk of developing dementia has received much attention in epidemiological studies. An accurate population-based prospective cohort study has been conducted in the elderly population of the town of Hisayama in Japan since 1985 aiming to elucidate the secular trends in the prevalence of dementia and examine risk and protective factors for dementia in the Japanese population. The prevalence of all-cause dementia significantly increased from 1985 to 2012. In regard to subtypes of dementia, a similar trend was observed for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a prospective study of risk factors for dementia in Hisayama elder residents without dementia, diabetes was identified as a significant risk factor for developing all-cause dementia, especially AD. Moreover, 2-hour post-load glucose levels were closely associated with increased risk of all-cause dementia, AD, and vascular dementia. In a pathological study of Hisayama residents, higher levels of 2-hour post-load glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were significantly associated with increased risk of neuritic plaques. The steep increase in the frequency of diabetes could lead to the increasing trend in the prevalence of dementia, especially AD, in the Japanese elderly. PMID:27395456

  13. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Emily Jane; LeRoith, Derek

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  14. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    LeRoith, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  15. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  16. Epigenetic Changes in Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Keating, Samuel T; Plutzky, Jorge; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-05-27

    Cardiovascular complications remain the leading causes of morbidity and premature mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Studies in humans and preclinical models demonstrate lasting gene expression changes in the vasculopathies initiated by previous exposure to high glucose concentrations and the associated overproduction of reactive oxygen species. The molecular signatures of chromatin architectures that sensitize the genome to these and other cardiometabolic risk factors of the diabetic milieu are increasingly implicated in the biological memory underlying cardiovascular complications and now widely considered as promising therapeutic targets. Atherosclerosis is a complex heterocellular disease where the contributing cell types possess distinct epigenomes shaping diverse gene expression. Although the extent that pathological chromatin changes can be manipulated in human cardiovascular disease remains to be established, the clinical applicability of epigenetic interventions will be greatly advanced by a deeper understanding of the cell type-specific roles played by writers, erasers, and readers of chromatin modifications in the diabetic vasculature. This review details a current perspective of epigenetic mechanisms of macrovascular disease in diabetes mellitus and highlights recent key descriptions of chromatinized changes associated with persistent gene expression in endothelial, smooth muscle, and circulating immune cells relevant to atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we discuss the challenges associated with pharmacological targeting of epigenetic networks to correct abnormal or deregulated gene expression as a strategy to alleviate the clinical burden of diabetic cardiovascular disease. PMID:27230637

  17. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    In the late 1980s all Danish children with type 1 diabetes were invited for a nationwide evaluation of glycemic control. Approximately 75% (n = 720) participated and have later been referred to as The Danish Cohort of Pediatric Diabetes 1987 (DCPD1987). The results were surprisingly poor glycemic control among these young patients which lead to a great emphasis on glycemic control in the Danish Pediatric Departments. In 1995 the participants were invited for yet another evaluation but this time with main focus on early signs of microvascular complications - 339 participated. The mean HbA1c had remained at high levels (9.6%) and 60% of the participants had some level of Diabetic Retinopathy (DR). However, as the patients with DR mostly had the very milder forms it was believed that stricter glycemic control would reverse or at least stop progression of the disease in accordance with results from the large intervention study DCCT. This was investigated further at follow-up in 2011. The first study in the present thesis aimed to describe the 16-year incidence, progression and regression of DR in 185 participants from the DCPD1987 cohort. The 16-year incidence of proliferative retinopathy (PDR), 2-step progression and regression of DR was 31.0, 64.4, and 0.0%, respectively. As expected, the participants with PDR at follow-up had significantly higher HbA1c-values at both baseline and follow-up than those without PDR. However; a significantly larger decrease in HbA1c was also observed in the group with PDR over the study period, which in accordance with DCCT should have prevented the development of PDR to some extent. A surprisingly high incidence of proliferative retinopathy amongst young patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark was found despite improvements in HbA1c over time. The improvement in HbA1c was either too small or happened too late. This study highlights that sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy remain a major concern in type 1 diabetes and the importance

  18. Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association Cardiology Patient Page Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Ravi V. Shah and Allison ... most common adverse effects, and recent concerns about new-onset diabetes mellitus to help patients and providers ...

  19. Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alexandria, Virginia October 10, 2013 Early puberty ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  20. Interactive Multimedia Tailored to Improve Diabetes Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G; Alley, Elizabeth; Baer, Spencer; Johnson, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    A pilot program was initiated to improve self-management of type 2 diabetes by rural adults. Using an iOS-based, individually tailored pre-/postintervention to improve diabetes self-management, undergraduate students developed a native mobile application to help participants effectively manage their diabetes. Brief quizzes assessed diabetes knowledge. A diabetes dictionary and physical activity assessment provided additional support to users of the app. On completion of the pilot, data analysis indicated increased diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and ease of use of the technology. Native app technology permits ready access to important information for those living with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26333610

  1. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Segura-Galindo, Amparo; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin. Compared with individuals without diabetes, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients. However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors. Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events. Many of these risk factors could be common history for both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from “common soil”. The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients. PMID:25126392

  2. Increased Risk of Diabetes and Likelihood of Receiving Diabetes Treatment in Patients with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Azfar, Rahat S.; Seminara, Nicole M.; Shin, Daniel B.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Margolis, David J.; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disorder that has been mechanistically linked to type II diabetes mellitus. We sought to assess the risk of incident diabetes in patients with psoriasis and to evaluate diabetes treatment patterns among patients with psoriasis and incident diabetes. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting UK-based electronic medical records. Patients We matched 108,132 psoriasis patients aged 18–90 years to 430,716 unexposed patients based on practice and time of visit. For our nested study, only patients who developed incident diabetes during our study time were included. Main Outcome Measure(s) Incident diabetes and adjusted risk of pharmacotherapy among those with incident diabetes. Results The fully adjusted HRs (95% CI) for incident diabetes were 1.14 (1.10–1.18), 1.11 (1.07, 1.15), and 1.46 (1.30, 1.65) in the overall, mild and severe psoriasis groups, respectively. Among those with incident diabetes and severe psoriasis, the adjusted risk for receiving diabetes pharmacotherapy was 1.55 (1.15–2.10). Conclusions Our results suggest that psoriasis is an independent risk factor for the development of type II diabetes mellitus in a dose dependent manner, and that patients with severe psoriasis who develop diabetes are more likely to receive systemic diabetic therapies in comparison to diabetics without psoriasis. PMID:22710320

  3. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the center for epidemiological studies depression scale (CES-D scale) and the problem areas in diabetes (PAID) questionnaire were used to assess depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress in 1200 newly diagnosed male adult patients with type 2 diabetes before and after a two-week diabetes education by professionally trained nurses. Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to analyze the factors related to depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results: The incidence of depression in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes was 28%, and the rate of diabetes-specific emotional distress was 65.5%. High education levels, low income were correlated to depression in individuals with diabetes. After two weeks of diabetes education, the incidence of depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress decreased significantly to 20.5% (P < 0.05) and 11% (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The incidence of depression, especially diabetes-specific emotional distress, was relatively high in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. The depression state could be improved by diabetes education. PMID:24353709

  4. Natural Products for the Prevention and Alleviation of Risk Factors for Diabetes: Chromium and Cinnamon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are widespread for the alleviation and prevention of the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We have shown that glucose, insulin, cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c levels are all improved in people with type 2 diabetes following chromium supplementation in a double-b...

  5. Comparison of Accuracy of Diabetes Risk Score and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Assessing Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Inter99 Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Shafizadeh, Tracy B.; Moler, Edward J.; Kolberg, Janice A.; Nguyen, Uyen Thao; Hansen, Torben; Jorgensen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2011-01-01

    Background Given the increasing worldwide incidence of diabetes, methods to assess diabetes risk which would identify those at highest risk are needed. We compared two risk-stratification approaches for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and a previously developed diabetes risk score, PreDx® Diabetes Risk Score (DRS). DRS assesses 5 yr risk of incident T2DM based on the measurement of 7 biomarkers in fasting blood. Methodology/Principal Findings DRS was evaluated in baseline serum samples from 4,128 non-diabetic subjects in the Inter99 cohort (Danes aged 30–60) for whom diabetes outcomes at 5 years were known. Subjects were classified as having MetS based on the presence of at least 3 MetS risk factors in baseline clinical data. The sensitivity and false positive rate for predicting diabetes using MetS was compared to DRS. When the sensitivity was fixed to match MetS, DRS had a significantly lower false positive rate. Similarly, when the false positive rate was fixed to match MetS, DRS had a significantly higher specificity. In further analyses, subjects were classified by presence of 0–2, 3 or 4–5 risk factors with matching proportions of subjects distributed among three DRS groups. Comparison between the two risk stratification schemes, MetS risk factors and DRS, were evaluated using Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI). Comparing risk stratification by DRS to MetS factors in the total population, the NRI was 0.146 (p = 0.008) demonstrating DRS provides significantly improved stratification. Additionally, the relative risk of T2DM differed by 15 fold between the low and high DRS risk groups, but only 8-fold between the low and high risk MetS groups. Conclusions/Significance DRS provides a more accurate assessment of risk for diabetes than MetS. This improved performance may allow clinicians to focus preventive strategies on those most in need of urgent intervention. PMID:21829540

  6. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Eren, Mehmet Ali; Sabuncu, Tevfik; Karaaslan, Hüseyin

    2016-04-25

    In manuscript named "Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus" by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study. PMID:27114756

  7. Lipid profiling identifies a triacylglycerol signature of insulin resistance and improves diabetes prediction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Eugene P.; Cheng, Susan; Larson, Martin G.; Walford, Geoffrey A.; Lewis, Gregory D.; McCabe, Elizabeth; Yang, Elaine; Farrell, Laurie; Fox, Caroline S.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Carr, Steven A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Florez, Jose C.; Clish, Clary B.; Wang, Thomas J.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, although exactly which of the many plasma lipids contribute to this remains unclear. We therefore investigated whether lipid profiling can inform diabetes prediction by performing liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry–based lipid profiling in 189 individuals who developed type 2 diabetes and 189 matched disease-free individuals, with over 12 years of follow up in the Framingham Heart Study. We found that lipids of lower carbon number and double bond content were associated with an increased risk of diabetes, whereas lipids of higher carbon number and double bond content were associated with decreased risk. This pattern was strongest for triacylglycerols (TAGs) and persisted after multivariable adjustment for age, sex, BMI, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, total triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol. A combination of 2 TAGs further improved diabetes prediction. To explore potential mechanisms that modulate the distribution of plasma lipids, we performed lipid profiling during oral glucose tolerance testing, pharmacologic interventions, and acute exercise testing. Levels of TAGs associated with increased risk for diabetes decreased in response to insulin action and were elevated in the setting of insulin resistance. Conversely, levels of TAGs associated with decreased diabetes risk rose in response to insulin and were poorly correlated with insulin resistance. These studies identify a relationship between lipid acyl chain content and diabetes risk and demonstrate how lipid profiling could aid in clinical risk assessment. PMID:21403394

  8. Intraocular surgery in a large diabetes patient population: risk factors and surgical results.

    PubMed

    Ostri, Christoffer

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in developed countries. Accordingly, the prevention and treatment of vision-threatening diabetic eye complications is assuming greater importance. The overall aim of this thesis is to analyse risk factors for intraocular surgery in a large diabetes population and to report surgical results. The specific objectives are to (1) estimate the incidence of diabetic vitrectomy and analyse risk factors (Study I), (2) report long-term results, prognostic factors and incidence of cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy (Study II), (3) report results and prognostic factors after cataract surgery in diabetes patients (Study III) and (4) analyse risk factors for diabetic papillopathy with emphasis on metabolic control variability (Study IV). All studies are based on a close-to-complete national surgery register and a large, closely followed diabetic retinopathy screening population. Study I (cohort study, 3980 type 1 diabetes patients) illustrates that diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a diabetes patient population with varying degrees of diabetic retinopathy. The risk of reaching diabetic vitrectomy increases fourfold with poor metabolic control, defined as glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol (~9%), which points to good metabolic control as an important preventive measure. Study II (cohort study, 167 diabetes patients) shows that most diabetic vitrectomy patients stand to gain visual acuity ≥0.3 after surgery. Visual acuity is stable after 1 year, and the stability is maintained through 10 years of follow-up. The use of silicone oil for endotamponade is a consistent long-term predictor of low vision after surgery. The risk of requiring cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy is substantial, and the risk increases if silicone oil is used. Study III (cohort study, 285 diabetes patients) shows, on the other hand, that diabetes patients can expect a significant improvement in visual acuity after cataract

  9. A Qualitative Study of Acculturation and Diabetes Risk among Urban, Immigrant Latinas: Implications for Diabetes Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Shuman, Sara J.; Barrios, Dulce M.; Alos, Victor A.; Whitaker, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how acculturation influences diabetes risk among urban, immigrant Latinas (Hispanic women). Methods Five focus groups were conducted with 26 urban, immigrant Latinas who were at high clinical risk for developing diabetes. The focus group sessions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The authors independently analyzed transcripts using an inductive method of open coding, and themes were established by consensus among authors. Results All of the participants were foreign-born and had low levels of acculturation. During the acculturation process, they noted changes in their lifestyle behaviors and the family context in which those behaviors are shaped. They reported that since living in the U.S., their improved economic circumstances led to increased consumption of less healthy foods and beverages and a more sedentary lifestyle. They also described changing family roles and responsibilities, including working outside the home, which constrained healthy food choices. However, they perceived that their position of influence within the family offered opportunities to help family members prevent diabetes. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes in Latinas should address their acculturation experiences, which impact family functioning and health behaviors related to diabetes risk. For example, given the perceived link between Latinas’ improved economic circumstances and their diabetes risk, prevention programs should incorporate strategies to help Latinas avoid adopting less healthy lifestyle behaviors that become affordable during the acculturation process. PMID:24872386

  10. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Lars J.; Leirgul, Elisabeth; Boyd, Heather A.; Priest, James; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.; Quertermous, Thomas; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Background— Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. Methods and Results— In a national cohort study, we identified 2 025 727 persons born from 1978 to 2011; among them were 7296 (0.36%) persons exposed to maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus. Pregestational diabetes mellitus was identified by using the National Patient Register and individual-level information on all prescriptions filled in Danish pharmacies. Persons with CHD (n=16 325) were assigned to embryologically related cardiac phenotypes. The CHD prevalence in the offspring of mothers with pregestational diabetes mellitus was 318 per 10 000 live births (n=232) in comparison with a baseline risk of 80 per 10 000; the adjusted relative risk for CHD was 4.00 (95% confidence interval, 3.51–4.53). The association was not modified by year of birth, maternal age at diabetes onset, or diabetes duration, and CHD risks associated with type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 (insulin-independent) diabetes mellitus did not differ significantly. Persons born to women with previous acute diabetes complications had a higher CHD risk than those exposed to maternal diabetes mellitus without complications (relative risk, 7.62; 95% confidence interval, 5.23–10.6, and relative risk, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.91–4.13, respectively; P=0.0004). All specific CHD phenotypes were associated with maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus (relative risk range, 2.74–13.8). Conclusions— The profoundly increased CHD risk conferred by maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus neither changed over time nor differed by diabetes subtype. The association with acute pregestational diabetes complications was particularly strong, suggesting a role for glucose in the causal pathway. PMID:27166384

  11. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Megan L.; Garnett, Sarah P.; Baur, Louise A.; Lister, Natalie B.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  12. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth.

    PubMed

    Gow, Megan L; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A; Lister, Natalie B

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  13. Pre-Diabetes Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pre-diabetes Non-modifiable Risk Factors Updated:Nov 9,2015 ... This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? Intro ...

  14. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  15. How paclitaxel can improve results in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Cafasso, D; Schneider, P

    2012-02-01

    Despite advances in endovascular techniques, the success of these revascularization procedures is limited by neointimal hyperplasia and subsequent restenosis or occlusion. Infrainguinal interventions have higher rates of restenosis after intervention in comparison to other vascular beds, and this is likely due to a host of anatomic, mechanical, biological and rheological factors that create a relatively hostile environment for the restoration of lower extremity perfusion through endovascular means. In addition, outcomes in the diabetic subpopulation are even worse, with a higher risk of amputation, re-interventions, and failed procedures in critical limb ischemia. Novel techniques for antiproliferative drug release into the vessel wall at the site of endovascular intervention have shown promising results in combating restenosis in the coronary arteries and data are accumulating to suggest promise in the infrainguinal arteries as well. The application of paclitaxel, delivered either through drug coated balloons or drug-eluting stents, has demonstrated benefit in enhanced durability of lower extremity endovascular procedures, and may be of particular advantage concerning diabetic limb salvage. This review presents an overview of the current literature and ongoing trials with the use of paclitaxel in diabetic lower extremity occlusive disease. PMID:22231525

  16. Innovative strategies to improve diabetes outcomes in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, J S; Poindexter, M; Gary-Webb, T L; Walker, E A; Davis, N J

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes disproportionately affects disadvantaged populations. Eighty percent of deaths directly caused by diabetes occurred in low- and middle-income countries. In high-income countries, there are marked disparities in diabetes control among racial/ethnic minorities and those with low socio-economic status. Innovative, effective and cost-effective strategies are needed to improve diabetes outcomes in these populations. Technological advances, peer educators and community health workers have expanded methodologies to reach, educate and monitor individuals with diabetes. In the present manuscript we review the outcomes of these strategies, and describe the barriers to and facilitators of these approaches for improving diabetes outcomes. PMID:27194172

  17. One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Martha Nydia; Valenzuela, Fabrizio; Robles, Alma E.; Artalejo, Elizabeth; Aguilar, David; Andersen, Catherine J.; Valdez, Herlindo; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2015-01-01

    There is concern that egg intake may increase blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we have previously shown that eggs reduce inflammation in patients at risk for T2DM, including obese subjects and those with metabolic syndrome. Thus, we hypothesized that egg intake would not alter plasma glucose in T2DM patients when compared to oatmeal intake. Our primary endpoints for this clinical intervention were plasma glucose and the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6). As secondary endpoints, we evaluated additional parameters of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemias, oxidative stress and inflammation. Twenty-nine subjects, 35–65 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values <9% were recruited and randomly allocated to consume isocaloric breakfasts containing either one egg/day or 40 g of oatmeal with 472 mL of lactose-free milk/day for five weeks. Following a three-week washout period, subjects were assigned to the alternate breakfast. At the end of each period, we measured all primary and secondary endpoints. Subjects completed four-day dietary recalls and one exercise questionnaire for each breakfast period. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose, our primary endpoint, plasma lipids, lipoprotein size or subfraction concentrations, insulin, HbA1c, apolipoprotein B, oxidized LDL or C-reactive protein. However, after adjusting for gender, age and body mass index, aspartate amino-transferase (AST) (p < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p < 0.01), one of our primary endpoints were significantly reduced during the egg period. These results suggest that compared to an oatmeal-based breakfast, eggs do not have any detrimental effects on lipoprotein or glucose metabolism in T2DM. In contrast, eggs reduce AST and TNF-α in this population characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. PMID:25970149

  18. One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Martha Nydia; Valenzuela, Fabrizio; Robles, Alma E; Artalejo, Elizabeth; Aguilar, David; Andersen, Catherine J; Valdez, Herlindo; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2015-05-01

    There is concern that egg intake may increase blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we have previously shown that eggs reduce inflammation in patients at risk for T2DM, including obese subjects and those with metabolic syndrome. Thus, we hypothesized that egg intake would not alter plasma glucose in T2DM patients when compared to oatmeal intake. Our primary endpoints for this clinical intervention were plasma glucose and the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6). As secondary endpoints, we evaluated additional parameters of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemias, oxidative stress and inflammation. Twenty-nine subjects, 35-65 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values <9% were recruited and randomly allocated to consume isocaloric breakfasts containing either one egg/day or 40 g of oatmeal with 472 mL of lactose-free milk/day for five weeks. Following a three-week washout period, subjects were assigned to the alternate breakfast. At the end of each period, we measured all primary and secondary endpoints. Subjects completed four-day dietary recalls and one exercise questionnaire for each breakfast period. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose, our primary endpoint, plasma lipids, lipoprotein size or subfraction concentrations, insulin, HbA1c, apolipoprotein B, oxidized LDL or C-reactive protein. However, after adjusting for gender, age and body mass index, aspartate amino-transferase (AST) (p < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p < 0.01), one of our primary endpoints were significantly reduced during the egg period. These results suggest that compared to an oatmeal-based breakfast, eggs do not have any detrimental effects on lipoprotein or glucose metabolism in T2DM. In contrast, eggs reduce AST and TNF-α in this population characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. PMID:25970149

  19. Diabetes mellitus and extrapulmonary tuberculosis: site distribution and risk of mortality.

    PubMed

    Magee, M J; Foote, M; Ray, S M; Gandhi, N R; Kempker, R R

    2016-07-01

    Scarce data exist on the relationship between diabetes and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB). We evaluated whether diabetes impacts site of TB and risk of death in patients with EPTB. We evaluated a cohort of TB cases from the state of Georgia between 2009 and 2012. Patients aged ⩾16 years were classified by diabetes status according to medical records. Site of EPTB was determined by culture and/or state TB classification. Death was defined by all-cause mortality. Of 1325 eligible reported TB cases, 369 (27·8%) had any EPTB including 258 (19·5%) with only EPTB and 111 (8·4%) with pulmonary TB and EPTB. Of all TB cases, 158 had diabetes (11·9%). In multivariable analysis, the odds of any EPTB was similar in patients with and without diabetes [adjusted odds ratio 1·04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·70-1·56]. The risk of death was 23·8% in patients with EPTB and diabetes vs. 9·8% in those with no diabetes (P < 0·01); after adjusting for covariates the difference was not significant (aRR 1·19, 95% CI 0·54-2·63). Diabetes was common in patients with EPTB and risk of death was high. Improved understanding of the relationship between diabetes and EPTB is critical to determine the extent that diabetes affects TB diagnosis and clinical management. PMID:26926092

  20. Anti-diabetic therapies affect risk of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui; Yeung, Sai-Ching J.; Hassan, Manal M.; Konopleva, Marina; Abbruzzese, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Anti-diabetic drugs have been found to have various effects on cancer in experimental systems and in epidemiological studies, although the association between these therapeutics and the risk of human pancreatic cancer has not been explored. We investigated the effect of anti-diabetic therapies on the risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods A hospital-based, case-control study was conducted at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2004 through 2008 involving 973 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (including 259 diabetics) and 863 controls (including 109 diabetics). Information on diabetes history and other risk factors was collected by personal interview. The frequencies of use of insulin, insulin secretagogues, thiazolidinediones, metformin and other antidiabetic medications among diabetics were compared between cases and controls. The risk of pancreatic cancer was estimated using unconditional logistic regression analysis. Results Diabetics that had taken metformin had a significantly lower risk of pancreatic cancer, compared with those that had not taken metformin (OR=0.38; 95% CI, 0.22–0.69; P=0.001) with adjustments for demographic, clinical and risk factors. This difference remained statistically significant when the analysis was restricted to patients with a duration of diabetes >2 years or those never used insulin. In contrast, diabetics that had taken insulin or insulin secretagogues had a significantly higher risk of pancreatic cancer, compared with diabetics that had not take these drugs. Use of thiazolidinediones did not significantly modify pancreatic cancer risk. Conclusions Metformin use was associated with reduced risk, and insulin or insulin secretagogues use were associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics. PMID:19375425

  1. Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score: a novel tool to discriminate monogenic and type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K A; Oram, R A; Flanagan, S E; De Franco, E; Colclough, K; shepherd, M; Ellard, S

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing patients with monogenic diabetes from Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is important for correct diagnosis, treatment and to select patients for gene discovery studies. We assessed whether a T1D genetic risk score (T1D-GRS) generated from T1D-associated common genetic variants provides a novel way to discriminate monogenic diabetes from T1D. The T1D-GRS was highly discriminative of proven MODY (n=805) and T1D (n=1963) (ROC-AUC=0.87). A T1D-GRS of >0.280 (>50th T1D centile) was indicative of T1D (94% specificity, 50% sensitivity). We then analyzed the T1D-GRS in 242 White-European patients with neonatal diabetes (NDM) who had been tested for all known neonatal diabetes genes. Monogenic NDM was confirmed in 90%, 59% and 8% in patients with GRS <5th T1D centile, 50-75th T1D centile and >75th T1D centile, respectively. Applying a GRS 50th T1D centile cut-off in 48 NDM patients with no known genetic cause, identified those most likely to have a novel monogenic etiology by highlighting patients with probable early-onset T1D (GRS >50th T1D centile) who were diagnosed later, had less syndromic presentation but had additional autoimmune features compared to proven monogenic NDM. The T1D-GRS is a novel tool to improve the use of biomarkers in the discrimination of monogenic diabetes from T1D. PMID:27207547

  2. Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score: A Novel Tool to Discriminate Monogenic and Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kashyap A; Oram, Richard A; Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Colclough, Kevin; Shepherd, Maggie; Ellard, Sian; Weedon, Michael N; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2016-07-01

    Distinguishing patients with monogenic diabetes from those with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is important for correct diagnosis, treatment, and selection of patients for gene discovery studies. We assessed whether a T1D genetic risk score (T1D-GRS) generated from T1D-associated common genetic variants provides a novel way to discriminate monogenic diabetes from T1D. The T1D-GRS was highly discriminative of proven maturity-onset diabetes of young (MODY) (n = 805) and T1D (n = 1,963) (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve 0.87). A T1D-GRS of >0.280 (>50th T1D centile) was indicative of T1D (94% specificity, 50% sensitivity). We then analyzed the T1D-GRS of 242 white European patients with neonatal diabetes (NDM) who had been tested for all known NDM genes. Monogenic NDM was confirmed in 90, 59, and 8% of patients with GRS <5th T1D centile, 50-75th T1D centile, and >75th T1D centile, respectively. Applying a GRS 50th T1D centile cutoff in 48 NDM patients with no known genetic cause identified those most likely to have a novel monogenic etiology by highlighting patients with probable early-onset T1D (GRS >50th T1D centile) who were diagnosed later and had less syndromic presentation but additional autoimmune features compared with those with proven monogenic NDM. The T1D-GRS is a novel tool to improve the use of biomarkers in the discrimination of monogenic diabetes from T1D. PMID:27207547

  3. A school-based intervention for diabetes risk reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effects of a multicomponent, school-based program, addressing risk factors for diabetes among children whose race, or ethnic group and socioeconomic status placed them at high risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 42 schools to either a mu...

  4. Closed-loop insulin delivery: towards improved diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Kumareswaran, Kavita; Evans, Mark L; Hovorka, Roman

    2012-02-01

    The prevalence of type 1 diabetes is escalating worldwide. Novel therapies and management strategies are needed to reduce associated morbidity. Aggressive blood glucose lowering using conventional insulin replacement regimens is limited by the risk of hypoglycemia. Even the most motivated patients may struggle to manage day-to-day variability in insulin requirements. The artificial pancreas or closed-loop insulin delivery may improve outcomes, building on recent technological progress and combining continuous glucose monitoring with insulin pump therapy. So far, closed-loop prototypes have been evaluated under controlled conditions suggesting improved glucose control and a reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Limitations include suboptimal accuracy and reliability of continuous glucose monitors and delays associated with subcutaneous insulin delivery. Outpatient evaluation is required as the next step, leading to deployment into clinical practice. PMID:22369975

  5. Risk of Cancer in Diabetes: The Effect of Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Mojtaba; Emami, Zahra; Khamseh, Mohammad E.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death. Association of diabetes as a growing and costly disease with cancer is a major health concern. Meanwhile, preexisting diabetes is associated with an increased risk of all-cause and cancer-specific mortalities. Presence of diabetes related comorbidities, poorer response to cancer treatment, and excess mortality related to diabetes are among the most important explanations. Although diabetes appear to be a risk factor for cancer and is associated with the mortality risk in cancer patients, several factors such as diabetes duration, multiple drug therapy, and the presence of diabetes comorbidities make the assessment of the effect of diabetes treatment on cancer risk and mortality difficult. Metformin is the drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The available evidence from basic science, clinical, and population-based research supports the anticancer effect of metformin. However, randomized controlled clinical trials do not provide enough evidence for a strong protective effect of metformin on cancer incidence or mortality. One of the most important limitations of these trials is the short duration of the followup. Further long-term randomized controlled clinical trials specifically designed to determine metformin effect on cancer risk are needed to provide the best answer to this challenge. PMID:24224094

  6. Risk stratification of Ramadan fasting in person with diabetes.

    PubMed

    AlArouj, Monira

    2015-05-01

    The world population comprises of 23% Muslims. Ramadan is the holy month of the Islamic year during which all healthy Muslims observe fasts. Although children and sick people are exempted from fasting but many of this group, want to observe fasts despite the medical advice against it. This includes a subset of people with diabetes which carries a considerable risk. Hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia are among the main hazards. Majority of Muslims with diabetes can fast safely during Ramadan; However some are placed at a greater risk. Pre-Ramadan risk assessment, structured education and selection of appropriate medication has shown to minimize the risks associated with fasting among people with diabetes. PMID:26013777

  7. Effects of Physical Activity on Diabetes Management and Lowering Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Connie L.; Soros, Arlette; Sothern, Melinda S.; Vargas, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity is a proven form of diabetes management and is considered a cornerstone in the prevention of diabetes. In children with diabetes, physical activity may improve insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Aerobic-based physical activity lasting 40-60 minutes daily for a minimum of four months is shown to enhance…

  8. Environmental contaminants as risk factors for developing diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David O

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to the incidence of diabetes has received little attention until recently. A number of reports have emerged, however, concerning elevated diabetes in persons occupationally exposed to dioxin. United States (US) Air Force personnel in Vietnam who sprayed Agent Orange containing dioxin as a contaminant had elevated rates of diabetes, leading to US government compensation for diabetes in these veterans. Recent studies in populations exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides found a dose-dependent elevated risk of diabetes. An elevation in risk of diabetes in relation to levels of several POPs has been demonstrated by two different groups using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a random sampling of US citizens. The strong associations seen in quite different studies suggest the possibility that exposure to POPs could cause diabetes. One striking observation is that obese persons that do not have elevated POPs are not at elevated risk of diabetes, suggesting that the POPs rather than the obesity per se is responsible for the association. Although a specific mechanism is not known, most POPs induce a great number and variety of genes, including several that alter insulin action. Because diabetes is a dangerous disease that is increasing in frequency throughout the world, further study of the possibility that exposure to POPs contributes to the etiology of diabetes is critical. PMID:18557598

  9. Risk of new-onset diabetes associated with statin use

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Robert D; Schepers, Sarah M; Gordon, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify and assess studies investigating the association between statins and new-onset diabetes and determine the clinical significance of this risk. Data sources: A MEDLINE (1977–April 2015), Google Scholar (1997–April 2015), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1977–April 2015) search was performed using the search terms hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors/adverse effects, statins, adverse effects, diabetes mellitus, diabetes mellitus/etiology, and drug-induced. Citations of identified articles and clinical practice guidelines were also reviewed. Study selection and data extraction: Articles describing results from original investigations or meta-analyses specifically designed to assess the association between statins and new-onset diabetes and published in English were included. Data synthesis: A total of 13 cohort studies and seven meta-analyses were included. In all, 11 were retrospective cohort studies and reported some degree of increased risk of new-onset diabetes associated with statins. The two prospective cohort studies differed. One identified increased risk of new-onset diabetes, but the other did not. Increased risk was not identified when any statin was compared to placebo alone, individual statins were compared, or in the single meta-analysis that included observational studies. Overall, the meta-analyses suggest that statin therapy is associated with an increased risk of new-onset diabetes when compared to placebo or active control, and when intensive therapy is compared to moderate therapy. Conclusion: Statins have been associated with a small, but statistically significant risk of new-onset diabetes. Patients with risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus may be at higher risk. This risk is likely outweighed by the benefits of reducing cardiovascular risk. PMID:26770803

  10. Smoking and Diabetes: Does the Increased Risk Ever Go Away?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Juhua; Rossouw, Jacques; Tong, Elisa; Giovino, Gary A.; Lee, Cathy C.; Chen, Chu; Ockene, Judith K.; Qi, Lihong; Margolis, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies reported that smoking cessation leads to higher short-term risk of type 2 diabetes than continuing to smoke. However, the duration of increased diabetes risk following smoking cessation needs further investigation. We followed 135,906 postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative between September 1, 1993, and December 31, 1998, over an average of 11 years to examine the association between smoking cessation and risk of diabetes using Cox proportional hazard multivariable-adjusted regression models. Compared with that for never smokers, the risk for diabetes was significantly elevated in current smokers (hazard ratio = 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.20, 1.36) but was even higher in women who quit smoking during the first 3 years of follow-up (hazard ratio = 1.43, 95% confidence interval: 1.26, 1.63). Among former smokers, the risk of diabetes decreased significantly as the time since quitting increased and was equal to that of never smokers following a cessation period of 10 years. In new quitters with low cumulative exposure (<20 pack-years), diabetes risk was not elevated following smoking cessation. In conclusion, the risk of diabetes in former smokers returns to that in never smokers 10 years after quitting, and even more quickly in lighter smokers. PMID:23817918

  11. Diabetic Retinopathy Risk Factors: Plasma Erythropoietin as a Risk Factor for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gholamhossein, Yaghoobi; Asghar, Zarban

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether any stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is associated with levels of plasma erythropoietin and other plasma parameters. Methods It was examined a representative sample of 180 type 2 diabetes patients aged 40 to 79 years. Ophthalmic examination including a funduscopic examination, performed by an experienced ophthalmologist and the retinal finding were classified according to the grading system for diabetic retinopathy of ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study). It was measured the levels of plasma erythropoietin, cholesterol, triglyceride, apolipoproteins A and B, C-reactive protein, fasting blood glucose and hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) in 88 DR patients and 92 controls without DR. Risk factors correlated with DR were compared between groups. Results The study group of 180 patients included 72 males and 108 females. The mean age of the patients with and without DR was 57.36 ± 8.87 years and 55.33 ± 8.28 years, respectively. Of the 88 patients with DR, only 9 (10%) had proliferative DR and the rest suffered from non-proliferative DR. The mean plasma levels of erythropoietin in proliferative DR group showed a significant difference in comparison to other groups. The mean plasma levels of cholesterol, triglyceride, apolipoproteins A and B, C-reactive protein, and fasting blood glucose were not significantly different in the three groups except for HbA1C. The absolute relative risk (ARR) also showed that erythropoietin was an increasing risk for proliferative DR (ARR, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.060 to 1.420; odds ratio,1.060). Conclusions Of the factors studied, erythropoietin level showed significant increase in proliferative DR group. The stepwise raised in mean plasma erythropoietin level which demonstrates significant correlation with proliferative DR versus remaining two groups, will be an indication of its role in proliferative DR. PMID:25276078

  12. Ambient air pollution: an emerging risk factor for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Montresor-Lopez, Jessica; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Brook, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    Growing evidence supports that air pollution has become an important risk factor for developing diabetes mellitus. Understanding the contributing effect of air pollution in population studies, elucidating the potential mechanisms involved, and identifying the most responsible pollutants are all required in order to promulgate successful changes in policy and to help formulate preventive measures in an effort to reduce the risk for diabetes. This review summarizes recent findings from epidemiologic studies and mechanistic insights that provide links between exposure to air pollution and a heightened risk for diabetes. PMID:25894943

  13. The role of exercise in reducing the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus in obese women.

    PubMed

    Artal, Raul

    2015-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic continues unabated, now rapidly expanding to developing countries. Multiple comorbidities and premature mortality are associated with obesity, most frequently diabetes. The associated financial and economical burden is escalating as well. The sedentary lifestyle adopted by many pregnant women because of traditional practices and the current recommendation for gestational weight gain are contributing factors to the obesity and diabetes epidemic. Physical inactivity is recognized as an independent risk factor for obesity insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; the physiological and hormonal changes associated with pregnancy magnify this risk. Conversely, evidence and accumulated experience indicate that antenatal lifestyle interventions that include physical activity and judicious dieting could improve the pregnancy outcome and reduce the risk of gestational diabetes and is effective as an adjunctive therapy for diabetes in pregnancy. All major professional organizations, among them American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), American Diabetes Association (ADA), Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), and Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), recommend lifestyle interventions that include diet and exercise to prevent or manage gestational diabetes or diabetes mellitus. PMID:25240421

  14. Tips for Kids: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Today, more kids have type 2 diabetes than ever before. This colorful, easy-to-read tip sheet encourages young people to take steps to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. A list of warning signs and a healthy eating guide is offered, along with a list of websites to learn more. [This brochure was prepared by the Department of Health and Human…

  15. Type 1 Diabetes Linked to Epilepsy Risk, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158067.html Type 1 Diabetes Linked to Epilepsy Risk, Study Suggests But the ... Hypoglycemia Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Type 1 Epilepsy Hypoglycemia About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  16. A comparative approach to using the diabetes prevention program to reduce diabetes risk in a worksite setting.

    PubMed

    Dallam, George M; Foust, Carol P

    2013-03-01

    The rapidly increasing rate of non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) among both market economy and developing countries is a worldwide health phenomenon. The number of diabetics worldwide has been projected to increase from 135 million in 1995 to 300 million in 2025. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effectiveness of three different approaches to the implementation of the Diabetes Prevention Program, a standardized diabetes prevention curriculum, in various worksite organizations within a single community. The methods of implementation selected included an intensive one-on-one counseling approach, a support group meeting approach, and a passive transfer of information approach. The intervention was successful in creating significant mean improvements overall in the participants who completed the 26-week program as follows: (a) reduction in overall mean body weight and mean body mass index, (b) reduction in overall average mean arterial blood pressure, (c) reduction in overall mean diabetes risk score, and (d) increase in overall mean physical activity level. Although the largest proportion of these changes occurred in the one-on-one intervention group, significant changes in some factors were found in all groups. This illustrates the utility of an on-site and incentive-driven approach to diabetes risk factor modification in the workplace. PMID:22763893

  17. Quantification of Diabetes Comorbidity Risks across Life Using Nation-Wide Big Claims Data

    PubMed Central

    Klimek, Peter; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Chmiel, Anna; Schiller-Frühwirth, Irmgard; Thurner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in the study of diabetes, important questions remain about its comorbidities and clinical heterogeneity. To explore these issues, we develop a framework allowing for the first time to quantify nation-wide risks and their age- and sex-dependence for each diabetic comorbidity, and whether the association may be consequential or causal, in a sample of almost two million patients. This study is equivalent to nearly 40,000 single clinical measurements. We confirm the highly controversial relation of increased risk for Parkinson’s disease in diabetics, using a 10 times larger cohort than previous studies on this relation. Detection of type 1 diabetes leads detection of depressions, whereas there is a strong comorbidity relation between type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia, suggesting similar pathogenic or medication-related mechanisms. We find significant sex differences in the progression of, for instance, sleep disorders and congestive heart failure in diabetic patients. Hypertension is a highly sex-sensitive comorbidity with females being at lower risk during fertile age, but at higher risk otherwise. These results may be useful to improve screening practices in the general population. Clinical management of diabetes must address age- and sex-dependence of multiple comorbid conditions. PMID:25855969

  18. Quantification of diabetes comorbidity risks across life using nation-wide big claims data.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Peter; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Chmiel, Anna; Schiller-Frühwirth, Irmgard; Thurner, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Despite substantial progress in the study of diabetes, important questions remain about its comorbidities and clinical heterogeneity. To explore these issues, we develop a framework allowing for the first time to quantify nation-wide risks and their age- and sex-dependence for each diabetic comorbidity, and whether the association may be consequential or causal, in a sample of almost two million patients. This study is equivalent to nearly 40,000 single clinical measurements. We confirm the highly controversial relation of increased risk for Parkinson's disease in diabetics, using a 10 times larger cohort than previous studies on this relation. Detection of type 1 diabetes leads detection of depressions, whereas there is a strong comorbidity relation between type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia, suggesting similar pathogenic or medication-related mechanisms. We find significant sex differences in the progression of, for instance, sleep disorders and congestive heart failure in diabetic patients. Hypertension is a highly sex-sensitive comorbidity with females being at lower risk during fertile age, but at higher risk otherwise. These results may be useful to improve screening practices in the general population. Clinical management of diabetes must address age- and sex-dependence of multiple comorbid conditions. PMID:25855969

  19. Identifying patients at risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Savill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At present there are nearly 3 million people with diabetes in the UK. It is predicted that this number will almost double by 2025. Nine out of ten of these individuals will have type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that one in seven adults have impaired glucose regulation and up to 12% of these will develop type 2 diabetes each year. The impact of obesity on the development of type 2 diabetes cannot be overemphasised, with a 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI raising the risk of impaired fasting glycaemia by 9.5% and of developing new-onset type 2 diabetes by 8.4%. A 1 cm increase in waist circumference increases the risks by 3.2% and 3.5% respectively. NICE advises using a validated risk assessment tool to identify patients at risk of diabetes. Risk factors used by such tools include: age; ethnicity; weight; first-degree relative with type 2 diabetes; low birthweight and sedentary lifestyle. Certain comorbidities increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, these include: cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease; polycystic ovary syndrome; a history of gestational diabetes; and mental health problems. The initial screening blood test could be a fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or an oral glucose tolerance test, according to WHO criteria. NICE recommends that high-risk patients should be offered a programme encouraging them to undertake a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week, gradually lose weight to reach and maintain a BMI within the healthy range, increase consumption of whole grains, vegetables, and other foods that are high in dietary fibre, reduce the total amount of fat in their diet and eat less saturated fat. PMID:22988703

  20. Fatty Fish May Curb Eye Risks for Diabetics, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160495.html Fatty Fish May Curb Eye Risks for Diabetics, Study Finds ... Aug. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Two servings of fish a week may be enough to lower the ...

  1. Obesity and type 2 diabetes: which patients are at risk?

    PubMed

    Garber, A J

    2012-05-01

    An estimated 72.5 million American adults are obese, and the growing US obesity epidemic is responsible for substantial increase in morbidity and mortality, as well as increased health care costs. Obesity results from a combination of personal and societal factors, but is often viewed as a character flaw rather than a medical condition. This leads to stigma and discrimination towards obese individuals and decreases the likelihood of effective intervention. Conditions related to obesity are increasingly common, such as metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), all of which indicate high risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This paper reviews the progression from obesity to diabetes, identifying physiological changes that occur along this path as well as opportunities for patient identification and disease prevention. Patients with prediabetes (defined as having IFG, IGT or both) and/or metabolic syndrome require interventions designed to preserve insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, both of which start to deteriorate prior to T2DM diagnosis. Lifestyle modification, including both healthy eating choices and increased physical activity, is essential for weight management and diabetes prevention. Although sustained weight loss is often considered by patients and physicians as being impossible to achieve, effective interventions do exist. Specifically, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and programs modelled along its parameters have shown repeated successes, even with long-term maintenance. Recent setbacks in the development of medications for weight loss further stress the importance of lifestyle management. By viewing obesity as a metabolic disorder rather than a personal weakness, we can work with patients to address this increasingly prevalent condition and improve long-term health outcomes. PMID:22074144

  2. Risk factors for occurrence and recurrence of diabetic foot ulcers among Iraqi diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Samer I.; Mikhael, Ehab M.; Ahmed, Fadia T.; Al-Tukmagi, Haydar F.; Jasim, Ali L.

    2016-01-01

    There are a few studies that discuss the medical causes for diabetic foot (DF) ulcerations in Iraq, one of them in Wasit province. The aim of our study was to analyze the medical, therapeutic, and patient risk factors for developing DF ulcerations among diabetic patients in Baghdad, Iraq. PMID:26983600

  3. Registry-based diabetes risk detection schema for the systematic identification of patients at risk for diabetes in West Virginia primary care centers.

    PubMed

    Baus, Adam; Wood, Gina; Pollard, Cecil; Summerfield, Belinda; White, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 466,000 West Virginians, or about 25 percent of the state population, have prediabetes and are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Appropriate lifestyle intervention can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes if individuals at risk are identified and treated early. The West Virginia Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the West Virginia University Office of Health Services Research are developing a systematic approach to diabetes prevention within primary care. This study aims to demonstrate the viability of patient registry software for the analysis of disparate electronic health record (EHR) data sets and standardized identification of at-risk patients for early detection and intervention. Preliminary analysis revealed that of 94,283 patients without a documented diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes, 10,673 (11.3 percent) meet one or more of the risk criteria. This study indicates that EHR data can be repurposed into an actionable registry for prevention. This model supports meaningful use of EHRs, the Patient-Centered Medical Home program, and improved care through enhanced data management. PMID:24159274

  4. Does type 2 diabetes influence the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Neale, R E; Doecke, J D; Pandeya, N; Sadhegi, S; Green, A C; Webb, P M; Whiteman, D C

    2009-01-01

    Since hyperinsulinaemia may promote obesity-linked cancers, we compared type 2 diabetes prevalence among oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) patients and population controls. Diabetes increased the risk of OAC (adjusted odds ratio 1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–2.43), although the risk was attenuated after further adjusting for body mass index (1.32, 95% CI 0.85–2.05). PMID:19190630

  5. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p < 0.0001 for differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion

  6. Diabetes Mellitus, Arterial Wall, and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, Michaela; Palombo, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes. The two major features of diabetes, i.e., hyperglycemia and insulin-resistance, trigger arterial stiffening and increase the susceptibility of the arterial wall to atherosclerosis at any given age. These pathological changes in the arterial wall may provide a functional and structural background for cardiovascular events. The present paper provides a critical overview of the clinical evidence linking diabetes-related metabolic abnormalities to cardiovascular risk, debates the pathophysiologic mechanisms through which insulin resistance and hyperglycemia may affect the arterial wall, and discusses the associations between vascular biomarkers, metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular events. PMID:26861377

  7. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... glucose or pre-diabetes. These levels are risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) test: Normal is less than 5.7%; prediabetes is 5.7 to 6.4%; and diabetes is 6.5% or higher. Oral ...

  8. Diabetic foot risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot is a serious condition in patients with a long lasting diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot treated improperly may lead not only to delayed ulceration healing, generalized inflammation, unnecessary surgical intervention, but also to the lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to compare diabetic foot risk factors in population with type 2 diabetes and risk factors for diabetes in healthy subjects. Methods The study included 900 subjects: 145 with diabetic foot, 293 with type 2 diabetes without diabetic foot and 462 healthy controls matched in terms of mean age, gender structure and cardiovascular diseases absence. Study was conducted in Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. In statistical analysis a logistic regression model, U Mann-Whitney’s and t-Student test were used. Results The binomial logit models analysis showed that the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type 2 diabetes was decreased by patient’s age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.96; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.36-0.81; p = 0.01). In contrast, male gender (OR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.86-4.28; p = 0.00001) diabetes duration (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.0003), weight (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.00001), height (OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11; p = 0.00001) and waist circumference (OR = 1.028; 95% CI: 1.007-1.050; p = 0.006) increase the risk of diabetic foot. The onset of type 2 diabetes in healthy subjects was increased by weight (OR = 1.035; 95% CI: 1.024-1.046; p = 0.00001), WC (OR = 1.075; 95% CI: 1.055-1.096; p = 00001), hip circumference (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05; p = 0.005), overweight defined with body mass index (BMI) above 24,9 kg/m2 (OR = 2.49; 95% CI: 1.77-3.51; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 3.53; 95% CI: 2.57-4.84; p = 0.00001). Conclusions Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and diabetic foot are only partially common. Study proved

  9. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    PubMed

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. PMID:26478562

  10. Applying Quality Improvement into Systems-based Learning to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Moreo, Kathleen; Sapir, Tamar; Greene, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    did not participate in the QI program. For brevity, this article presents outcomes of the 30 primary care physicians. Baseline to post-education improvements were observed for percentages of charts with documented assessment of medication side effects (+11%) and counseling about medication risks/benefits (+28%), medication adherence (+13%), and lifestyle modifications (+8%). Improvements were also observed for documented adherence to diabetes medications (+24%) and first-to-last visit changes in A1C (−0.16%) and BMI (−2.1). The findings indicate a positive influence of QI education on primary care physicians’ performance of patient-centered quality measures and patient outcomes. PMID:26734436

  11. Applying Quality Improvement into Systems-based Learning to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Moreo, Kathleen; Sapir, Tamar; Greene, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    not participate in the QI program. For brevity, this article presents outcomes of the 30 primary care physicians. Baseline to post-education improvements were observed for percentages of charts with documented assessment of medication side effects (+11%) and counseling about medication risks/benefits (+28%), medication adherence (+13%), and lifestyle modifications (+8%). Improvements were also observed for documented adherence to diabetes medications (+24%) and first-to-last visit changes in A1C (-0.16%) and BMI (-2.1). The findings indicate a positive influence of QI education on primary care physicians' performance of patient-centered quality measures and patient outcomes. PMID:26734436

  12. Am I at Risk for Gestational Diabetes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... level is: High 1 Average 0 Low Your health care provider: Will test you as soon as you know you are ... their lifetime. If you had gestational diabetes, your health care provider will test you for diabetes 6 weeks after you give ...

  13. Diabetic retinopathy and the associated risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Razia A.; Khalil, Shamsun N.; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the proportion and grades of retinopathy and its risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 401 type 2 diabetic patients. A questionnaire and checklist were used to collect the data. Retinopathy was diagnosed and graded by fundus photographs and slit lamp examination. The duration of diabetes, age of patients, age at onset of diabetes, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c level, blood pressure, and complications were noted. Results: The mean age of male and female patients was 54.93 and 54.25 years; 57.6% were males. The mean age of onset and mean duration of diabetes were 43.91 and 13.4 years, respectively. The proportion of retinopathy was 36.4%. Grades of retinopathy were: Mild 57.5%, moderate 19.9%, severe nonproliferative 11%, and proliferative retinopathy 11.6%; 7.2% of patients had maculopathy. Retinopathy was significantly associated with older age, younger age at onset, longer duration of disease, poorly controlled blood sugar, hypertension, insulin use; the presence of neuropathy and nephropathy appeared as a significant risk. Younger age at onset, longer duration, and insulin use appeared as the strongest predictors for diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions: More than a third (36.4%) of the diabetic patients attending a diabetic center had retinopathy. The control of the risk factors may reduce both prevalence and consequences of retinopathy. PMID:26929725

  14. Type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery and the risk of subsequent gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Steven, S; Woodcock, S; Small, P K; Taylor, R

    2011-01-01

    Women with pre-existing abnormal glucose regulation are certain to develop gestational diabetes in pregnancy and pre-gestational type 2 diabetes will become more difficult to control. However, an increasing number of women with type 2 diabetes have had bariatric surgery. In this group, the effect of pregnancy on glucose metabolism is unknown. We report two women with type 2 diabetes who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery with normalization of plasma glucose levels. During subsequent pregnancy, maternal blood glucose levels remained completely normal throughout. This is remarkable given the predisposition to abnormal glucose tolerance and the ongoing obesity, in the face of the insulin resistance of pregnancy. Women with prior type 2 diabetes reversed by gastric bypass surgery are not at high risk for gestational diabetes.

  15. Modified lipoproteins as biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José Luis; Pérez, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Prevention of high incidence of cardiovascular disease in diabetes is one of the challenges of endocrinology. Validation of new biomarkers that may contribute to a better assessment of cardiovascular risk and help implement treatment strategies is one of the promising approaches in research on prevention and reduction of cardiovascular risk. Modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key element in development of atherosclerotic lesions. Several pathophysiological characteristics of diabetes are crucial for the LDL of these patients to have higher modification rates as compared to the healthy population. Diabetic dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidative stress synergistically promote the occurrence of lipoperoxidation, glycosylation and glycoxidation processes, which will generate modified lipoproteins that stimulate development of atherosclerosis. This article reviews the role of different types of modified LDL in development of atherosclerosis in diabetes, as well as the possibility of using its quantification in cardiovascular risk prediction. PMID:23545115

  16. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Risks and Management during and after Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Thomas A.; Xiang, Anny H.; Page, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) represents glucose levels in the high end of the population distribution during pregnancy. GDM carries a small but potentially important risk of adverse perinatal outcomes and a longer-term risk of obesity and glucose intolerance in offspring. Mothers with GDM have an excess of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy and a high risk of diabetes mellitus thereafter. Diagnosing and treating GDM can reduce perinatal complications, but only a small fraction of pregnancies benefit. Nutritional management is the cornerstone of treatment; insulin, glyburide and metformin can be used to intensify treatment. Fetal measurements compliment maternal glucose measurements in identifying pregnancies that need such intensification. Glucose testing shortly after pregnancy can stratify the near-term diabetes risk in mothers, Thereafter, annual glucose and HbA1C testing can detect deteriorating glycaemic control, a harbinger of future diabetes, usually type 2. Interventions that mitigate obesity or its metabolic effects are most potent in preventing or delaying diabetes. Lifestyle modification is the primary approach; use of medications for diabetes prevention after GDM remains controversial. Family planning allows optimization of health in subsequent pregnancies. Breastfeeding may reduce obesity in children and is recommended. Families should be encouraged to help children adopt lifestyles that reduce the risk of obesity. PMID:22751341

  17. Urban and rural prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and risk factors associated with diabetes in Tanzania and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Chiwanga, Faraja S.; Njelekela, Marina A.; Diamond, Megan B.; Bajunirwe, Francis; Guwatudde, David; Nankya-Mutyoba, Joan; Kalyesubula, Robert; Adebamowo, Clement; Ajayi, IkeOluwapo; Reid, Todd G.; Volmink, Jimmy; Laurence, Carien; Adami, Hans-Olov; Holmes, Michelle D.; Dalal, Shona

    2016-01-01

    Background The increase in prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa underlines the importance of understanding its magnitude and causes in different population groups. We analyzed data from the Africa/Harvard Partnership for Cohort Research and Training (PaCT) studies to determine the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and risk factors associated with diabetes. Methodology Participants were randomly selected from peri-urban (n=297) and rural (n=200) communities in Uganda, and teachers were recruited from schools (n=229) in urban Tanzania. We used a standardized questionnaire to collect socio-demographic and self-reported disease status including diabetes status. Blood glucose was also measured after participants fasted for 8 h. We used standard protocols for anthropometric and blood pressure measurement. Results The overall prevalence of diabetes was 10.1% and was highest in rural Ugandan residents (16.1%) compared to teachers in Tanzania (8.3%) and peri-urban Ugandan residents (7.6%). The prevalence of pre-diabetes was 13.8%. The prevalence of self-reported diabetes was low across all sites, where 68% of participants with diabetes were not captured by self-report. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, family history (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 5.6) and hypertension (OR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 5.2) were significantly associated with diabetes. Conclusions The prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in Uganda and Tanzania is high, differs markedly between population groups, and remains undiagnosed in an alarmingly high proportion of individuals. These findings highlight the need for large-scale, prospective studies to accurately quantify the burden and identify effective intervention and treatment strategies across diverse African populations. PMID:27221531

  18. CHROMIUM PICOLINATE IMPROVES BLOOD GLUCOSE: A SIX-YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY OF 1,056 PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  19. Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rewers, Marian; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen considerably in the past 30 years due to changes in the environment that have been only partially identified. In this Series paper, we critically discuss candidate triggers of islet autoimmunity and factors thought to promote progression from autoimmunity to overt type 1 diabetes. We revisit previously proposed hypotheses to explain the growth in the incidence of type 1 diabetes in light of current data. Finally, we suggest a unified model in which immune tolerance to β cells can be broken by several environmental exposures that induce generation of hybrid peptides acting as neoautoantigens. PMID:27302273

  20. Diabetes Risk Factor Knowledge Varies Among Multiracial College Students.

    PubMed

    Mongiello, Lorraine Laccetti; Freudenberg, Nicholas; Jones, Hollie

    2016-10-01

    All racial/ethnic groups are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to whites, but it is unknown if young adults recognize their risk. Risk knowledge and individual risk perception were examined in 1579 multiracial urban college students. Students have little knowledge of diabetes risk factors; identifying less than three of ten. Considerable variation exists in the understanding of risk; only .02 % of Asian, 14.0 % of Hispanic and 22.8 % of black students recognized that their race increased risk. Among those with ≥3 risk factors (n = 541) only 39 % perceived their risk. These under-estimators had lower knowledge scores (p = .03) than those who acknowledged their risk; indicating that the cause of under-estimating risk may be, at least, in part due to a lack of information. There is a pressing need to heighten understanding of type 2 diabetes risk among young adults to decrease the future burden of this disease. PMID:26169506

  1. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russell, Colin A; Kasson, Peter M; Donis, Ruben O; Riley, Steven; Dunbar, John; Rambaut, Andrew; Asher, Jason; Burke, Stephen; Davis, C Todd; Garten, Rebecca J; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Hay, Simon I; Herfst, Sander; Lewis, Nicola S; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Macken, Catherine A; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Neuhaus, Elizabeth; Parrish, Colin R; Pepin, Kim M; Shepard, Samuel S; Smith, David L; Suarez, David L; Trock, Susan C; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; George, Dylan B; Lipsitch, Marc; Bloom, Jesse D

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the pandemic risk posed by specific non-human influenza A viruses is an important goal in public health research. As influenza virus genome sequencing becomes cheaper, faster, and more readily available, the ability to predict pandemic potential from sequence data could transform pandemic influenza risk assessment capabilities. However, the complexities of the relationships between virus genotype and phenotype make such predictions extremely difficult. The integration of experimental work, computational tool development, and analysis of evolutionary pathways, together with refinements to influenza surveillance, has the potential to transform our ability to assess the risks posed to humans by non-human influenza viruses and lead to improved pandemic preparedness and response. PMID:25321142

  2. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Colin A; Kasson, Peter M; Donis, Ruben O; Riley, Steven; Dunbar, John; Rambaut, Andrew; Asher, Jason; Burke, Stephen; Davis, C Todd; Garten, Rebecca J; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Hay, Simon I; Herfst, Sander; Lewis, Nicola S; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Macken, Catherine A; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Neuhaus, Elizabeth; Parrish, Colin R; Pepin, Kim M; Shepard, Samuel S; Smith, David L; Suarez, David L; Trock, Susan C; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; George, Dylan B; Lipsitch, Marc; Bloom, Jesse D

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the pandemic risk posed by specific non-human influenza A viruses is an important goal in public health research. As influenza virus genome sequencing becomes cheaper, faster, and more readily available, the ability to predict pandemic potential from sequence data could transform pandemic influenza risk assessment capabilities. However, the complexities of the relationships between virus genotype and phenotype make such predictions extremely difficult. The integration of experimental work, computational tool development, and analysis of evolutionary pathways, together with refinements to influenza surveillance, has the potential to transform our ability to assess the risks posed to humans by non-human influenza viruses and lead to improved pandemic preparedness and response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03883.001 PMID:25321142

  3. Depression, neighborhood deprivation and risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mezuk, Briana; Chaikiat, Åsa; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Neighborhood characteristics have been associated with both depression and diabetes, but to date little attention has been paid to whether the association between depression and diabetes varies across different types of neighborhoods. This prospective study examined the relationship between depression, neighborhood deprivation, and risk of type 2 diabetes among 336,340 adults from a national-representative sample of primary care centers in Sweden (2001–2007). Multi-level logistic regression models were used to assess associations between depression and risk of type 2 diabetes across affluent and deprived neighborhoods. After accounting for demographic, individual-level socioeconomic, and health characteristics, depression was significantly associated with risk of diabetes (odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06–1.14), as was neighborhood deprivation (OR for high vs. low deprivation: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.22–1.34). The interaction term between depression and neighborhood deprivation was non-significant, indicating that the relationship between depression and diabetes risk is similar across levels of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation. PMID:23771166

  4. Effects of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Communication for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes on Risk Perception in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Welschen, Laura M.C.; Bot, Sandra D.M.; Kostense, Piet J.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Timmermans, Daniëlle R.M.; van der Weijden, Trudy; Nijpels, Giel

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) underestimate their risk of developing severe complications, and they do not always understand the risk communication by their caregivers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an intervention focused on the communication of the absolute 10-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with T2DM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A randomized controlled trial was performed in T2DM patients newly referred to the Diabetes Care System (DCS) West-Friesland, a managed-care system in the Netherlands. The intervention group (n = 131) received a six-step CVD risk communication. Control subjects (n = 130) received standard managed care. The primary outcome measure was appropriateness of risk perception (difference between actual CVD risk calculated by the UK Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine and risk perception). Secondary outcome measures were illness perceptions, attitude and intention to change behavior, satisfaction with the communication, and anxiety and worry about CVD risk. Patients completed questionnaires at baseline, at 2 weeks (immediately after the intervention), and at 12 weeks. RESULTS Appropriateness of risk perception improved between the intervention and control groups at 2 weeks. This effect disappeared at 12 weeks. No effects were found on illness perceptions, attitude and intention to change behavior, or anxiety and worry about CVD risk. Patients in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied with the communication. CONCLUSIONS This risk communication method improved patients’ risk perception at 2 weeks but not at 12 weeks. Negative effects were not found, as patients did not become anxious or worried after the CVD risk communication. PMID:22923669

  5. Cluster Randomized Trial Assessing the Effect on Diabetes Control of Personalized Diabetes Complication Risk Assessment during Ophthalmology Exams

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Importance Optimization of glycemic control is critical to reduce diabetes related complications, but long-term success is challenging. Although vision loss is among the greatest fears of individuals with diabetes, comprehensive personalized diabetes education and risk assessments are not consistently employed in ophthalmology settings. Objective To determine whether point-of-care measurement of HbA1c and personalized diabetes complication risk assessments performed during retinal ophthalmology visits improve glycemic control as assessed by HA1c. Design/Setting Ophthalmologist office based clinical trial where investigators from 42 sites were randomly assigned to provide either study-prescribed augmented diabetes assessment and education, or usual care. Participants Adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes enrolled into two cohorts: “more frequent” than annual follow-up (502 control and 488 intervention participants) and “annual” follow-up (368 and 388 participants). Intervention(s) Point-of-care measurement of HbA1c, blood pressure, and retinopathy severity; individualized estimate of retinopathy progression risk derived from the visit findings; structured comparison and review of past and current clinical findings; and structured education with immediate assessment and feedback regarding participant understanding. Intervention was performed at enrollment and routine ophthalmic follow-up visits scheduled at least 12 weeks apart. Main Outcome Measure(s) Mean change in HbA1c from baseline to 1 year. Secondary outcomes included body mass index, blood pressure, and diabetes self-management practices and attitudes surveys. Results In the “more frequent” cohort, mean (SD) change in HbA1c at 1 year was −0.1% (1.5%) in the control group and −0.3% (1.4%) in the intervention group (adjusted mean difference −0.09%, 95% confidence interval −0.29% to +0.12%, P=0.35). In the “annual” cohort, mean (SD) change in HBA1c was 0.0% (1.1%) and −0.1% (1

  6. Special Diabetes Program for Indians: Retention in Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manson, Spero M.; Jiang, Luohua; Zhang, Lijing; Beals, Janette; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the associations between participant and site characteristics and retention in a multisite cardiovascular disease risk reduction project. Design and Methods: Data were derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project, an intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk among American…

  7. The Guyana Diabetes and Foot Care Project: Improved Diabetic Foot Evaluation Reduces Amputation Rates by Two-Thirds in a Lower Middle Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Sibbald, R. Gary; Martin, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes is the fourth leading cause of death in Guyana, South America. A complex, interprofessional, quality improvement intervention to improve foot and diabetes care was rolled out in two phases. Methods & Findings. Phase 1: Establishment of an Interprofessional Diabetic Foot Center (DFC) of Excellence to improve foot care and reduce diabetes-related amputations at the national referral hospital. Phase 2: Regionalization to cover 90% of the Guyanese population and expansion to include improved management of diabetes and hypertension. Fourteen key opinion leaders were educated and 340 health care professionals from 97 facilities trained. Eight centers for the evaluation and treatment of foot ulcers were established and 7567 people with diabetes evaluated. 3452 participants had foot screening and 48% were deemed high risk; 10% of these had undocumented foot ulcers. There was a 68% reduction in rate of major amputations (P < 0.0001); below knee amputations were decreased by 80%, while above knee amputations were unchanged. An increased association of diabetes with women (F/M = 2.09) and increased risk of major amputation in men [odds ratio 2.16 (95% CI 1.83, 2.56)] were documented. Conclusions. This intervention improved foot care with reduction in major amputations sustained over 5 years. PMID:26089901

  8. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  9. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D.; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies. PMID:26501420

  10. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Yamamura, Yuko; Wu, Xifeng; Strom, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans. Mexican-Americans are genetically diverse, with a highly variable distribution of Native American, European, and African ancestries. Here, we evaluate the role of Native American ancestry on BMI and diabetes risk in a well-defined Mexican-American population. Participants were randomly selected among individuals residing in the Houston area who are enrolled in the Mexican-American Cohort study. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate Panel, we genotyped DNA from 4,662 cohort participants for 87 Ancestry-Informative Markers. On average, the participants were of 50.2% Native American ancestry, 42.7% European ancestry and 7.1% African ancestry. Using multivariate linear regression, we found BMI and Native American ancestry were inversely correlated; individuals with <20% Native American ancestry were 2.5 times more likely to be severely obese compared to those with >80% Native American ancestry. Furthermore, we demonstrated an interaction between BMI and Native American ancestry in diabetes risk among women; Native American ancestry was a strong risk factor for diabetes only among overweight and obese women (OR = 1.190 for each 10% increase in Native American ancestry). This study offers new insight into the complex relationship between obesity, genetic ancestry, and their respective effects on diabetes risk. Findings from this study may improve the diabetes risk prediction among Mexican-American individuals thereby facilitating targeted prevention strategies. PMID:26501420

  11. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  12. AB230. Calpain inhibition improves diabetic erectile dysfunction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Wang, Tao; Liu, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diabetic erectile dysfunction is an intractable disease which results from both vascular and nervous dysfunction in penis. Calpain mediates the vascular dysfunction during hyperglycemia and is involved in some neurodegenerative diseases. This study was designed to investigate the role of calpain inhibition in improving diabetic erectile dysfunction in rats. Methods Type 1 diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin at the dose of 60 mg/kg in rats. After 2 months, diabetic erectile dysfunction was confirmed by apomorphine test. Then the animals were divided into three groups: (I) nondiabetic control groups, (II) diabetic rats + vehicle and (III) diabetic rats + MDL28170. Two weeks later the erectile function was measured by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve and the ratio between intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MAP) at the peak of erectile response was calculated. After that penis tissue was harvested. Calpain activity in corpus cavernosum was measured by western blot. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were observed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. The endothelial content in the cavernosum was measured by immunohistochemistry. Results The calpain activity was increased in diabetic rats and inhibited by MDL28170. The erectile function was improved by MDL28170 treatment. The expression of nNOS and eNOS, as well as the content of endothelium in corpus cavernosum were also increased by inhibition of calpain. Conclusions Calpain activation may play a role in the erectile dysfunction of diabetic rats. Inhibition of calpain could improve diabetic erectile dysfunction by increasing expression of nNOS and eNOS in the corpus cavernosum. This could be a novel therapeutic target to protect the erectile function in diabetic patient.

  13. Pharmacists' Role in Improving Diabetes Medication Management

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Today there are significant gaps between reaching the goal of “optimal medication therapy” and the current state of medication use in the United States. Pharmacists are highly accessible and well-trained—yet often underutilized—key health care professionals who can move us closer toward achieving better medication therapy outcomes for patients. Diabetes medication management programs led by pharmacists are described. This is consistent with the “medical home” concept of care that promotes primary care providers working collaboratively to coordinate patient-centered care. Pharmacists utilize their clinical expertise in monitoring and managing diabetes medication plans to positively impact health outcomes and empower patients to actively manage their health. In addition, pharmacists can serve as a resource to other health care providers and payers to assure safe, appropriate, cost-effective diabetes medication use. PMID:20046662

  14. Improving diabetes management with electronic health records and patients' health records.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, P-Y

    2011-12-01

    The lack of patient engagement and clinical inertia both contribute to suboptimal diabetes care. However, both obstacles are amenable to informatics- and Internet-based interventions. The use of electronic medical records (EMRs) is now established as being useful for improving diabetes care. Intelligent records that integrate computerized decision-support systems are now able to recommend care protocols tailored to risk levels. Web-based personal health record (PHR) systems, shared with healthcare providers, could also provide added value by promoting self-management of the behaviours related to diabetes. These Web-based programmes include patients' access to EMRs, uploading of glucose monitoring results, a glucose diary, secure e-mail with providers, manual or automated feedback on blood glucose readings and other risk factors, an educational website, and an online diary for entering personal information on exercise, diet and medication. The integration of Web-based patients' systems into the EMR used by physicians is the next frontier. In addition, the input from "smartphones" that are able to provide real-time support to patients could contribute to the reorganization of diabetes care. Convincing data on HbA(1c) improvements with such systems are available for type 2 diabetes, but are still equivocal for type 1 diabetes. Obstacles include patients' compliance with the technology, their ergonomic design and the need to reimburse providers for their care. Designing appropriate electronic tools and tailoring them to the conditions in France merits our attention. PMID:22208711

  15. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  16. Alcohol consumption and diabetes risk in the Diabetes Prevention Program1234

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Sarit; Howard, Andrea A; Perreault, Leigh; Bray, George A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Brown-Friday, Janet; Whittington, Tracy; Foo, Sandra; Ma, Yong; Edelstein, Sharon L

    2009-01-01

    Background: Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population, but little is known about the effects in individuals at high risk of diabetes. Objectives: The objectives were to determine associations between alcohol consumption and diabetes risk factors and whether alcohol consumption was a predictor of incident diabetes in individuals enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Design: DPP participants (n = 3175) had impaired glucose tolerance (2-h glucose: 7.8–11.1 mmol/L), elevated fasting glucose (5.3–7.0 mmol/L), and a body mass index (in kg/m2) ≥24. Participants were randomly assigned to placebo, metformin, or lifestyle modification and were followed for a mean of 3.2 y. Alcohol intake was assessed at baseline and year 1 by using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Diabetes was diagnosed by annual oral-glucose-tolerance testing and semiannual fasting plasma glucose measurement. Results: Participants who reported higher alcohol consumption tended to be male, older, white, and less obese and to have a higher calorie intake and a higher HDL-cholesterol concentration. Higher alcohol consumption was associated with lower insulin secretion at any level of insulin sensitivity. We found lower incidence rates of diabetes with higher alcohol consumption in the metformin (P < 0.01 for trend) and lifestyle modification (P = 0.02 for trend) groups, which remained significant after adjustment for multiple baseline covariates. No similar association was observed in the placebo group. Conclusions: Despite overall low rates of alcohol consumption, there was a reduced risk of incident diabetes in those who reported modest daily alcohol intake and were assigned to metformin or lifestyle modification. Moderate daily alcohol intake is associated with lower insulin secretion—an effect that warrants further investigation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00038727. PMID

  17. A2B Adenosine Receptor Agonist Improves Erectile Function in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiaming; Wang, Bohan; Du, Chuanjun; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Zhewei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for erectile dysfunction (ED). Recent studies have indicated that A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling is essential for penile erection. Thus, we hypothesize that diabetic ED may be attributed to impaired A2B adenosine signaling. To test this hypothesis, we generated diabetic rats by injecting streptozocin as animal model. After 12 weeks, immunohistochemistry staining was used to localize the expression of ADORA2B. Western Blot and quantitative PCR were employed to determine ADORA2B expression level. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) measurement was used to evaluate erectile function. Diabetic rats received a single intravenous injection of BAY 60-6583, an ADORA2B agonist, or vehicle solution, at 60 min before the ICP measurement. The results showed that ADORA2B expressed in the nerve bundle, smooth muscle, and endothelium in penile tissue of control mice. Western Blot and quantitative PCR results indicated that the expression levels of ADORA2B protein and mRNA were significantly reduced in penile tissues of diabetic rats. Functional studies showed that the erectile response induced by electrical stimulation was remarkably decreased in diabetic rats, compared with age-matched control rats. However, at 60 min after BAY 60-6583 treatment, the erectile function was improved in diabetic rats, suggesting that enhancement of ADORA2B signaling may improve erectile function in diabetic ED. This preclinical study has revealed a previously unrecognized therapeutic possibility of BAY 60-6583 as an effective and mechanism-based drug to treat diabetic ED. In conclusion, we propose that impaired A2B adenosine signaling is one of the pathological mechanisms of diabetic ED. PMID:26447087

  18. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and risk of type 2 diabetes in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D may modify risk of type 2 diabetes; however, the association between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes is uncertain. To determine prospectively the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and risk of incident type 2 diabetes, independent of obesity and other known diabet...

  19. I Can Lower My Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide for American Indians

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Can Lower My Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide for American Indians Research Gives Hope Diabetes Can Be Prevented "After I started exercising and ... other risk factors for heart disease. What is diabetes? Diabetes causes blood glucose levels to be above ...

  20. Berberine chloride improved synaptic plasticity in STZ induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Hamid Kalalian; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad; Goshadrou, Fatemeh; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that diabetes affects synaptic transmission in the hippocampus, leading to impairments of synaptic plasticity and defects in learning and memory. Although berberine treatment ameliorates memory impairment and improves synaptic plasticity in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats, it is not clear if the effects are pre- or post-synaptic or both. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of berberine chloride on short-term plasticity in inhibitory interneurons in the dentate gyrus of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Experimental groups included: The control, control berberine treated (100 mg/kg), diabetic and diabetic berberine treated (50,100 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks) groups. The paired pulse paradigm was used to stimulate the perforant pathway and field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSP) were recorded in dentate gyrus (DG). In comparison with control, paired pulse facilitation in the diabetic group was significantly increased (P < 0.01) and this effect prevented by chronic berberine treatment (50,100 mg/kg). However, there were no differences between responses of the control berberine 100 mg/kg treated and diabetes berberine treated (50 and 100 mg/kg) groups as compared to the control group. The present results suggest that the pre-synaptic component of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus is affected under diabetic conditions and that berberine prevents this effect. PMID:23640014

  1. Risk perception and unrecognized type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Janine; Lawson, Margaret L; Gaboury, Isabelle; Keely, Erin

    2009-01-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) following the index pregnancy, however, little is known of women's perception of this risk. The objectives were to (1) determine women's perception of risk of future development of T2DM following a GDM pregnancy and (2) describe the prevalence of undetected dysglycaemia in a Canadian population. The study was designed as a 9–11 year follow-up study of women previously enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of tight versus minimal intervention for GDM. Women's perception of future risk of diabetes was determined by questionnaire. Fasting lipid profile, height and weight were performed on all participants. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed on all women without prior history of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The study was conducted at Ottawa Hospital General Campus and Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, in Ottawa, Canada. Eighty-nine of 299 (30%) of the original cohort were recruited. Eighty-eight women completed the questionnaire and 77 women without known diabetes underwent two hour glucose tolerance testing. Twenty-three (30%) felt their risk was no different than other women or did not know, 27 (35%) felt risk was increased a little and 27 (35%) felt risk was increased a lot. Only 52% (40/77) had normal glucose tolerance. Of all, 25/88 (28%) patients had diabetes (11 previously diagnosed and 14 diagnosed within the study). Of those newly diagnosed with DM2, four (29%) were diagnosed by fasting glucose, six (42%) by two hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) alone and four (29%) by both. Twenty-four of the women (27%) had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Of those with IGT, 12 (57%) had a fasting food glucose < 5.6 mmol/L. In the high-risk perception group with newly diagnosed diabetes, two were overweight, seven were obese, four had a family history of DM2, and all had a waist circumference >88 cm. In conclusion the

  2. Diabetes and Age-Related Demographic Differences in Risk Factor Control

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Brent M.; Li, Jiexiang; Wolfman, Tamara E.; Sinopoli, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Background Disparate vascular outcomes in diabetes by race/ethnicity may reflect differential risk factor control, especially pre-Medicare. Methods Assess concurrent target attainment for glycohemoglobin <7%, non-HDL-cholesterol <130 mg/dL, and blood pressure <140/<90 mmHg in white, black, and Hispanic diabetics <65 (younger) and ≥65 (older) years. NHANES 1999–2010 data were analyzed on diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetics ≥18 years. Results Concurrent target attainment was higher in whites (18.7%) than blacks (13.4% [p=0.02] and Hispanics (10.3%, p<0.001) <65 but not ≥65 years (20.0% vs. 15.9% [p=0.13], 19.5% [p=0.88]). Disparities in healthcare insurance among younger whites, blacks, and Hispanics, respectively, (87.4% vs. 81.1% (p<0.01), 68.0% (p<0.001) and infrequent healthcare (0–1 visits/year; 14.3% vs. 15.0% (p=NS), 32.0% (p<0.001) declined with age. Cholesterol treatment predicted concurrent control in both age groups (multivariable odds ratio >2, p<0.001). Risk factor awareness and treatment were lower in Hispanics than whites. When treated, diabetes and hypertension control were greater in whites than blacks or Hispanics. Conclusions Concurrent risk factor control is low in all diabetics and could improve with greater statin use. Insuring younger adults, especially Hispanic, could raise risk factor awareness and treatment. Improving treatment effectiveness in younger black and Hispanic diabetics could promote equitable risk factor control. PMID:24952652

  3. Adherence to insulin treatment in diabetes: can it be improved?

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila Anne; Chan, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Insulin is used in all subjects with Type 1 diabetes, and when Type 2 diabetes is not controlled by oral anti-diabetic medicines, insulin is also used in Type 2 diabetes. However, despite this use, there is still increased mortality and morbidity in subjects with diabetes, compared to subjects without diabetes. One of the factors, which may be involved in this increased mortality and morbidity in subjects with diabetes, is nonadherence to insulin. Nonadherence rates to insulin are in the range of 20-38%, and many factors contribute to the nonadherence. The major aim of the review was to determine whether interventions to improve adherence to insulin do actually improve adherence to insulin. Most studies have shown that adherence to insulin was improved by changing from the vial-and-syringe approach to prefilled insulin pens, but not all studies have shown that this translated into better glycemic control and clinical outcomes. The results of studies using automatic telephone messages to improve adherence to insulin to date are inconclusive. There is limited and variable evidence that an intervention by a nurse/educator, which discusses adherence to medicines, does improve adherence to insulin. In contrast, there is little or no evidence that an extra intervention by a doctor or an intervention by a pharmacist, which discusses adherence to insulin, does actually improve the measured adherence to insulin. In conclusion, rather than assuming that an intervention by a health professional discussing adherence to insulin actually improves adherence to insulin, long-term studies investigating this are required. PMID:25195971

  4. Preventing amputation in adults with diabetes: identifying the risks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eleanor

    2015-06-01

    Good management of diabetes can reduce the risk of complications of the disease. When not well managed, diabetes is associated with the complications of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to the feet and cause a loss of feeling. As a result, foot injuries do not heal well and the person may not realise that their foot is sore or injured. Damage to the foot may lead to the development of foot ulcers, which if left untreated may result in amputation of the limb. Preventive care is a priority, but when complications occur the next step is to halt progression. Therefore, effective foot care and timely treatment of foot ulcers are important in preserving foot function and mobility, and preventing amputation in adults with diabetes. PMID:26036406

  5. Strength training and risk of type 2 diabetes in a Japanese working population: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Keisuke; Honda, Toru; Nakagawa, Tohru; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Nanri, Akiko; Kurotani, Kayo; Hayashi, Takeshi; Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Muscle strength training has been suggested to improve glucose metabolism; however, epidemiological evidence regarding strength training's effects on diabetes risk is scarce. We prospectively examined the association between strength training and the risk of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men and women. Materials and Methods The sample included health checkups on 26,630 Japanese male and female workers aged 30–64 years without diabetes at baseline. Weekly time spent on strength training was elicited using a self-reported questionnaire. Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed based on hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, random plasma glucose and self-report in an annual health checkup. Hazard ratio (HR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) for incident diabetes was estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results During a mean follow up of 5.2 years with 139,748 person-years, 1,770 individuals developed diabetes. Age- and sex-adjusted HR for diabetes was 0.58 (95% CI 0.42–0.79) in those who engaged in strength training compared with those who engaged in no strength training. After further adjusting for potential confounders, the corresponding HR was 0.66 (95% CI 0.48–0.90). Additional adjustment for body mass index did not materially change the result; the HR was 0.70 (95% CI 0.51–0.96). The association was more pronounced in individuals aged 50 years or older than those aged <50 years, although the difference in the association by age was not significant. Conclusions These results suggest that engagement in strength training could help to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in a Japanese working population. PMID:26543539

  6. Widely Used Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Reduce Cancer Death Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Used Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Reduce Cancer Death Risk Older women taking metformin saw a boost ... a risk factor for cancer and cancer-related death, and metformin therapy, compared to other diabetes medications, ...

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Improving Function and Reducing Risk.

    PubMed

    Servey, Jessica T; Stephens, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program individually tailored to the needs of patients with cardiovascular disease. The overall goals focus on improving daily function and reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiac rehabilitation includes interventions aimed at lowering blood pressure and improving lipid and diabetes mellitus control, with tobacco cessation, behavioral counseling, and graded physical activity. The physical activity component typically involves 36 sessions over 12 weeks, during which patients participate in supervised exercise under cardiac monitoring. There are also intensive programs that include up to 72 sessions lasting up to 18 weeks, although these programs are not widely available. Additional components of cardiac rehabilitation include counseling on nutrition, screening for and managing depression, and assuring up-to-date immunizations. Cardiac rehabilitation is covered by Medicare and recommended for patients following myocardial infarction, bypass surgery, and stent placement, and for patients with heart failure, stable angina, and several other conditions. Despite proven benefits in mortality rates, depression, functional capacity, and medication adherence, rates of referral for cardiac rehabilitation are suboptimal. Groups less likely to be referred are older adults, women, patients who do not speak English, and persons living in areas where cardiac rehabilitation is not locally available. Additionally, primary care physicians refer patients less often than cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:27386722

  8. Diabetes among Ethiopian Immigrants to Israel: Exploring the Effects of Migration and Ethnicity on Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Giveon, Shmuel; Wulffhart, Liat; Oberman, Bernice; Freedman, Laurence; Ziv, Arnona; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diabetes prevalence among ethnic minorities and immigrants often differs from the majority indigenous population. We compared diabetes prevalence, incidence and risk among Ethiopian and non-Ethiopian Jews. Within these main groups, we controlled for the effect of migration on diabetes risk by comparing the subgroups of Ethiopian and former Soviet Union (FSU) immigrants, and compared both with Israeli-born non-Ethiopian Jews. Methods The study cohort included adult Ethiopian (n = 8,398) and age-matched non-Ethiopian Jews (n = 15,977) and subgroups: Ethiopian immigrants (n = 7,994), FSU immigrants (n = 1,541) and Israeli-born non-Ethiopian Jews (n = 10,828). Diabetes prevalence, annual incidence, and hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for sex and metabolic syndrome (MetS)-components, were determined in three age groups (<50yrs, 50-59yrs, and ≥60yrs). Comparisons of body mass index (BMI) at diabetes incidence were made. Results Younger (<50yrs) Ethiopians had higher prevalence rates, 3.6% (95%CI: 3.1–4.1) and annual incidence, 0.9% (95%CI: 0.8–1.0) than non-Ethiopians, 2.7% (95%CI: 2.3–3.0) and 0.5% (95%CI: 0.4–0.6), respectively. These differences were particularly pronounced among Ethiopian women. Diabetes risk among Ethiopians was higher and adjustment for MetS-components was important only for BMI, which further increased hazard ratio (HR) estimates associated with Ethiopian ethnicity from 1.81 (95% CI:1.50–2.17) to 2.31 (95% CI:1.91–2.79). The same differences were seen when comparing Ethiopian to FSU immigrants. BMI before incident diabetes was lower among younger Ethiopian immigrants than younger FSU immigrants and Israeli-born. Conclusions Ethiopian ethnicity is associated with increased diabetes risk, which is age and BMI dependent. Young Ethiopians<50yrs, particularly women, had the greatest increase in risk. Lower BMI cut-offs should be defined to reflect diabetes risk among Ethiopians. PMID:27300299

  9. Mobile Applications for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Estimation: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fijacko, Nino; Brzan, Petra Povalej; Stiglic, Gregor

    2015-10-01

    Screening for chronical diseases like type 2 diabetes can be done using different methods and various risk tests. This study present a review of type 2 diabetes risk estimation mobile applications focusing on their functionality and availability of information on the underlying risk calculators. Only 9 out of 31 reviewed mobile applications, featured in three major mobile application stores, disclosed the name of risk calculator used for assessing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Even more concerning, none of the reviewed applications mentioned that they are collecting the data from users to improve the performance of their risk estimation calculators or offer users the descriptive statistics of the results from users that already used the application. For that purpose the questionnaires used for calculation of risk should be upgraded by including the information on the most recent blood sugar level measurements from users. Although mobile applications represent a great future potential for health applications, developers still do not put enough emphasis on informing the user of the underlying methods used to estimate the risk for a specific clinical condition. PMID:26303152

  10. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Changing the focus from glycemic control to improving the long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cecilia C. Low; Reusch, Jane EB

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and contributes to leading causes of death, cancer and cardiovascular disease including coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and other vascular disease. While glycemic management remains a cornerstone of diabetes care, the co-management of hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk reduction and prevention of long-term consequences associated with diabetes are now well recognized as essential to improve long-term survival. Clinical trial evidence substantiates the importance of glycemic control, LDL-cholesterol lowering therapy, blood-pressure lowering, control of albuminuria, and comprehensive approaches targeting multiple risk factors to reduce cardiovascular risk. This article presents a review of the role of diabetes in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction, recent evidence regarding degree of glycemic control and mortality, and available evidence for a multi-faceted approach to improve long-term outcomes for patients. PMID:23062569

  11. Therapies for type 2 diabetes: lowering HbA1c and associated cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To summarize data supporting the effects of antidiabetes agents on glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Studies reporting on the effects of antidiabetes agents on glycemic control, body weight, lipid levels, and blood pressure parameters are reviewed and summarized for the purpose of selecting optimal therapeutic regimens for patients with type 2 diabetes. Results National guidelines recommend the aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes, including weight loss and achieving lipid and blood pressure treatment goals. All antidiabetes pharmacotherapies lower glucose; however, effects on cardiovascular risk factors vary greatly among agents. While thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, and insulin are associated with weight gain, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are considered weight neutral and metformin can be weight neutral or associated with a small weight loss. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylinomimetics (e.g. pramlintide) result in weight loss. Additionally, metformin, thiazolidinediones, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and blood pressure parameters. Conclusion Management of the cardiovascular risk factors experienced by patients with type 2 diabetes requires a multidisciplinary approach with implementation of treatment strategies to achieve not only glycemic goals but to improve and/or correct the underlying cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20804556

  12. When Diabetes Strikes, Get Moving to Lower Risk to Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... day. For each 60-minute daily increase in physical inactivity, the risk for mild or more severe diabetic retinopathy rose by 16 percent, said Loprinzi, who's an assistant professor of health, exercise science and recreation at the university. Loprinzi believes the ...

  13. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  14. Reducing the modifiable risks of cardiovascular disease in Turkish patients with type 2 diabetes: the effectiveness of training.

    PubMed

    Bayındır Çevik, Ayfer; Özcan, Şeyda; Satman, İlhan

    2015-06-01

    Our goal was to reduce the number of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) through providing lifestyle adjustment training and counseling to patients with type 2 diabetes. In this pre-post intervention study, 139 patients with diabetes were provided with training to reduce the modifiable risks of CVD. One hundred three patients attended the post-training evaluation. Two phone counseling sessions were provided with 1-month intervals. Consumption of red meat and processed food decreased and water consumption, carrying on the recommended diet, and the frequency of exercise increased (p = .000), A1C decreased (p = .05), and the use of aspirin increased (p = .03). Thus, a contribution to the reduction of CVD risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes was achieved. The training program for reducing CVD risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes was effective in improving nutrition and lifestyle behaviors and decreasing glycemic control. PMID:24789940

  15. Effect of Intensive Nursing Education on the Prevention of Diabetic Foot Ulceration Among Patients with High-Risk Diabetic Foot: A Follow-Up Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Meng; Yang, Chuan; Lin, Diao Zhu; Xiao, Hui Sheng; Mai, Li Fang; Guo, Yi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to discuss the effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. One hundred eighty-five diabetes patients at high risk for foot diseases were enrolled in this study and provided with intensive nursing education, including individualized education about diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot diseases, instruction in podiatric care (the right way of washing the foot, the care of foot skin, appropriate choice of shoes and socks, intense examinations and records of feet by patients themselves every day, and the assistant management of calluses). Study subjects were followed up for 2 years. Once the foot ulceration developed, the inducing factors of foot ulceration were inquired about, the ulcers were evaluated, and the incidence of foot ulceration was analyzed before and after the intensive nursing education according to self-paired data. Results showed there were highly statistically significant improvements in the intensive treatment group compared with the control group in plasma glucose, blood pressure, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. More important is that intensive nursing education helps to prevent diabetic foot ulceration and to decrease the rate of amputation among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. PMID:25004241

  16. Effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients with high-risk diabetic foot: a follow-up analysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Meng; Yang, Chuan; Lin, Diao Zhu; Xiao, Hui Sheng; Mai, Li Fang; Guo, Yi Chen; Yan, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to discuss the effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. One hundred eighty-five diabetes patients at high risk for foot diseases were enrolled in this study and provided with intensive nursing education, including individualized education about diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot diseases, instruction in podiatric care (the right way of washing the foot, the care of foot skin, appropriate choice of shoes and socks, intense examinations and records of feet by patients themselves every day, and the assistant management of calluses). Study subjects were followed up for 2 years. Once the foot ulceration developed, the inducing factors of foot ulceration were inquired about, the ulcers were evaluated, and the incidence of foot ulceration was analyzed before and after the intensive nursing education according to self-paired data. Results showed there were highly statistically significant improvements in the intensive treatment group compared with the control group in plasma glucose, blood pressure, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. More important is that intensive nursing education helps to prevent diabetic foot ulceration and to decrease the rate of amputation among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. PMID:25004241

  17. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that occurs when an imbalance ... to form on the ovaries. Women who have PCOS are at an increased risk of developing type ...

  18. Improving Information Security Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Anand

    2009-01-01

    manaOptimizing risk to information to protect the enterprise as well as to satisfy government and industry mandates is a core function of most information security departments. Risk management is the discipline that is focused on assessing, mitigating, monitoring and optimizing risks to information. Risk assessments and analyses are critical…

  19. A requirements engineering approach for improving the quality of diabetes education websites.

    PubMed

    Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a major chronic disease with multi-organ involvement and high-cost complications. Although it has been proved that structured education can control the risk of developing these complications, there is big room for improvement in the educational services for these patients. e-learning can be a good solution to fill this gap. Most of the current e-learning solutions for diabetes were designed by computer experts and healthcare professionals but the patients, as end-users of these systems, haven't been deeply involved in the design process. Considering the expectations of the patients, this article investigates a requirement engineering process comparing the level of importance given to different attributes of the e-learning by patients and healthcare professionals. The results of this comparison can be used for improving the currently developed online diabetes education systems. PMID:21335721

  20. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O.; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. Methods The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. Conclusions The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a “superior” score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. PMID:26647414

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Berg, Richard L; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by prolonged hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and progressive hyperglycemia. Disease management relies on glycemic control through diet, exercise, and pharmacological intervention. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of glycemic control and the use of glucose-lowering medication on the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=9486) between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2009 were identified and data on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, glucose), glucose-lowering medication use (insulin, metformin, sulfonylurea), age, BMI, date of diabetes diagnosis, insurance status, comorbidities, smoking history, location of residence, and cancer diagnoses were electronically abstracted. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between glycemic control, including medication use, and cancer risk. The results varied by cancer type and medication exposure. There was no association between glycemic control and breast or colon cancer; however, prostate cancer risk was significantly higher with better glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c ≤ 7.0%). Insulin use was associated with increased colon cancer incidence in women, but not with colon cancer in men or breast or prostate cancer risk. Metformin exposure was associated with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence, but had no association with colon cancer risk. Sulfonylurea exposure was not associated with risk of any type of cancer. The data reported here support hyperinsulinemia, rather than hyperglycemia, as a major diabetes-related factor associated with increased risk of breast and colon cancer. In contrast, hyperglycemia appears to be protective in the case of prostate cancer. PMID:23962874

  2. Cardiovascular disease risk in young people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequent cause of death in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), despite modern advances in glycemic control and CVD risk factor modification. CVD risk identification is essential in this high-risk population, yet remains poorly understood. This review discusses the risk factors for CVD in young people with T1D, including hyperglycemia, traditional CVD risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, hypertension), as well as novel risk factors such as insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypoglycemia. We present evidence that adverse changes in cardiovascular function, arterial compliance, and atherosclerosis are present even during adolescence in people with T1D, highlighting the need for earlier intervention. The methods for investigating cardiovascular risk are discussed and reviewed. Finally, we discuss the observational studies and clinical trials which have thus far attempted to elucidate the best targets for early intervention in order to reduce the burden of CVD in people with T1D. PMID:22528676

  3. Air pollution and diabetes association: Modification by type 2 diabetes genetic risk score.

    PubMed

    Eze, Ikenna C; Imboden, Medea; Kumar, Ashish; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Stolz, Daiana; Gerbase, Margaret W; Künzli, Nino; Pons, Marco; Kronenberg, Florian; Schindler, Christian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution (AP) exposure has been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Evidence on the impact of T2D genetic variants on AP susceptibility is lacking. Compared to single variants, joint genetic variants contribute substantially to disease risk. We investigated the modification of AP and diabetes association by a genetic risk score (GRS) covering 63 T2D genes in 1524 first follow-up participants of the Swiss cohort study on air pollution and lung and heart diseases in adults. Genome-wide data and covariates were available from a nested asthma case-control study design. AP was estimated as 10-year mean residential particulate matter <10μm (PM10). We computed count-GRS and weighted-GRS, and applied PM10 interaction terms in mixed logistic regressions, on odds of diabetes. Analyses were stratified by pathways of diabetes pathology and by asthma status. Diabetes prevalence was 4.6% and mean exposure to PM10 was 22μg/m(3). Odds of diabetes increased by 8% (95% confidence interval: 2, 14%) per T2D risk allele and by 35% (-8, 97%) per 10μg/m(3) exposure to PM10. We observed a positive interaction between PM10 and count-GRS on diabetes [ORinteraction=1.10 (1.01, 1.20)], associations being strongest among participants at the highest quartile of count-GRS [OR: 1.97 (1.00, 3.87)]. Stronger interactions were observed with variants of the GRS involved in insulin resistance [(ORinteraction=1.22 (1.00, 1.50)] than with variants related to beta-cell function. Interactions with count-GRS were stronger among asthma cases. We observed similar results with weighted-GRS. Five single variants near GRB14, UBE2E2, PTPRD, VPS26A and KCNQ1 showed nominally significant interactions with PM10 (P<0.05). Our results suggest that genetic risk for T2D may modify susceptibility to air pollution through alterations in insulin sensitivity. These results need confirmation in diabetes cohort consortia. PMID:27281273

  4. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  5. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk. PMID:25987904

  6. Diabetic Nephropathy and Its Risk Factors in a Society with a Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic: A Saudi National Diabetes Registry-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ahmad, Najlaa A.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Al-Mutlaq, Hind M.; David, Satish K.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra

    2014-01-01

    Aims The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors have not been studied in a society known to have diabetes epidemic like Saudi Arabia. Using a large data base registry will provide a better understanding and accurate assessment of this chronic complication and its related risk factors. Methodology A total of 54,670 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥25 years were selected from the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) and analyzed for the presence of diabetic nephropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) criterion was used to identify cases with microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria and end stage renal disease (ESRD) for prevalence estimation and risk factor assessment. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was 10.8%, divided into 1.2% microalbuminuria, 8.1%macroalbuninuria and 1.5% ESRD. Age and diabetes duration as important risk factors have a strong impact on the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, ranging from 3.7% in patients aged 25–44 years and a duration of >5 years, to 21.8% in patients ≥65 years with a diabetes duration of ≥15 years. Diabetes duration, retinopathy, neuropathy, hypertension, age >45 years, hyperlipidemia, male gender, smoking, and chronologically, poor glycemic control has a significantly high risk for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is underestimated as a result of a shortage of screening programs. Risk factors related to diabetic nephropathy in this society are similar to other societies. There is thus an urgent need for screening and prevention programs for diabetic nephropathy among the Saudi population. PMID:24586457

  7. Risk assessment and management of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-10-01

    The success rate of organ transplantation has been increasing with advances in surgical and pharmacological techniques. However, the number of solid organ transplant recipients who require metabolic disease management is also growing. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation and is associated with risks of graft loss, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Other risk factors for PTDM include older age, genetic background, obesity, hepatitis C virus infection, hypomagnesemia, and use of immunosuppressant agents (corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor). Management of PTDM should be started before the transplantation plan to properly screen high-risk patients. Even though PTDM management is similar to that of general type 2 diabetes, therapeutic approaches must be made with consideration of drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents, glucose-lowering medications, and graft rejection and function. PMID:27621191

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814

  9. Skeletal Metabolism, Fracture Risk, and Fracture Outcomes in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Civitelli, Roberto; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Khosla, Sundeep; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-07-01

    Fracture risk is significantly increased in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and individuals with diabetes experience worse fracture outcomes than normoglycemic individuals. Factors that increase fracture risk include lower bone mass in type 1 diabetes and compromised skeletal quality and strength despite preserved bone density in type 2 diabetes, as well as the effects of comorbidities such as diabetic macro- and microvascular complications. In this Perspective, we assess the developing scientific knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of skeletal fragility in patients with diabetes and the emerging data on the prediction, treatment, and outcomes of fractures in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27329951

  10. Low-Volume Insulin Degludec 200 Units/mL Once Daily Improves Glycemic Control Similarly to Insulin Glargine With a Low Risk of Hypoglycemia in Insulin-Naïve Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Stephen C.L.; Bhargava, Anuj; Jain, Rajeev; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Søren; Bergenstal, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The 200 units/mL formulation of insulin degludec (IDeg 200 units/mL) contains equal units of insulin in half the volume compared with the 100 units/mL formulation. We compared the efficacy and safety of IDeg 200 units/mL once daily with 100 units/mL insulin glargine (IGlar) in insulin-naïve subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this 26-week, open-label, treat-to-target trial, subjects (n = 457; mean HbA1c 8.3% [67 mmol/mol], BMI 32.4 kg/m2, and fasting plasma glucose [FPG] 9.6 mmol/L [173.2 mg/dL]) were randomized to IDeg 200 units/mL or IGlar, both given once daily in combination with metformin with or without a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor. Basal insulin was initiated at 10 units/day and titrated weekly to an FPG target of <5 mmol/L (<90 mg/dL) according to mean prebreakfast self-measured blood glucose values from the preceding 3 days. RESULTS By 26 weeks, IDeg reduced HbA1c by 1.30% and was not inferior to IGlar. Mean observed FPG reductions were significantly greater with IDeg than IGlar (−3.7 vs. −3.4 mmol/L [–67 vs. –61 mg/dL]; estimated treatment difference: −0.42 [95% CI −0.78 to −0.06], P = 0.02). Despite this difference, rates of overall confirmed hypoglycemia were not higher with IDeg than with IGlar (1.22 and 1.42 episodes/patient-year, respectively), as were rates of nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia (0.18 and 0.28 episodes/patient-year, respectively). Mean daily basal insulin dose was significantly lower by 11% with IDeg 200 units/mL compared with IGlar. IDeg was well-tolerated, and the rate of treatment-emergent adverse events was similar across groups. CONCLUSIONS In this treat-to-target trial in insulin-naïve patients with T2DM, IDeg 200 units/mL improved glycemic control similarly to IGlar with a low risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:23715753

  11. Particulate matter pollutants and risk of type 2 diabetes: a time for concern?

    PubMed

    Esposito, Katherine; Petrizzo, Michela; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Giugliano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that worldwide in 2012 around 7 million deaths occurred prematurely due to air pollution, which is now the world's largest single environmental health risk. The higher premature mortality associated with air pollution is due to exposure to small particulate matter of 10 microns (PM10) or less in diameter. Exposure to air pollution has also been suggested as a contributing to diabetes incidence and progression. There are a number of possible biological pathways linking air pollutants to diabetes, including endothelial dysfunction, dysregulation of the visceral adipose tissue through inflammation, hepatic insulin resistance, elevated hemoglobin A1c level, elevated blood pressure, and alterations in autonomic tone, which may increase insulin resistance. The risk of future diabetes associated with exposure to 10 μg/m(3) increase of PM2.5 has been quantified in the range of 10 to 27%; the risk of diabetes mortality associated with PM2.5 appears to be quite lower, around 1% for each increment exposure of 10 μg/m(3) of both PM2.5 and PM10. Limitations of the current epidemiological evidence include the complex mixture of pollutants, the different design of the studies, the limited data available for non Western populations, and the lack of demonstration that improvement of air quality is associated with a decrease incidence of type 2 diabetes. Although the most sources of outdoor air pollution are well beyond the control of individuals, people should be informed that there are means to reduce the burden of air pollutants on diabetes risk, including avoidance of passive smoking, adoption of an healthy diet, and increasing leisure-time physical activity. PMID:26024974

  12. Tipping the balance: Haemoglobinopathies and the risk of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Henry J; Green, Aislinn E; Spellar, Kayleigh M; Arthur, Philip J; Phillips, Hannah G; Patel, Jeetesh V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a link between the risk of diabetes with haemoglobinopathies by examining available evidence of the effects of iron and blood glucose homeostasis from molecular to epidemiological perspectives. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed using electronic literature databases using various search terms. The International Diabetes Federation World Atlas was used to generate a list of populations with high rates of diabetes. PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar were used to identify which of these populations also had a reported prevalence of haemoglobin abnormalities. RESULTS: Abnormalities in iron homeostasis leads to increases in reactive oxygen species in the blood. This promotes oxidative stress which contributes to peripheral resistance to insulin in two ways: (1) reduced insulin/insulin receptor interaction; and (2) β-cell dysfunction. Hepcidin is crucial in terms of maintaining appropriate amounts of iron in the body and is in turn affected by haemoglobinopathies. Hepcidin also has other metabolic effects in places such as the liver but so far the extent of these is not well understood. It does however directly control the levels of serum ferritin. High serum ferritin is found in obese patients and those with diabetes and a meta-analysis of the various studies shows that high serum ferritin does indeed increase diabetes risk. CONCLUSION: From an epidemiological standpoint, it is plausible that the well-documented protective effects of haemoglobinopathies with regard to malaria may have also offered other evolutionary advantages. By contributing to peripheral insulin resistance, haemoglobinopathies may have helped to sculpt the so-called “thrifty genotype”, which hypothetically is advantageous in times of famine. The prevalence data however is not extensive enough to provide concrete associations between diabetes and haemoglobinopathies - more precise studies are required. PMID:26788262

  13. A Peer-led Diabetes Education Program in a Homeless Community to Improve Diabetes Knowledge and Empowerment.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sage; Keep, Suzanne; Edie, Alison; Couzens, Suzan; Pereira, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Peer-led diabetes education has been shown to be as effective, or more effective, than traditional education in improving glycemic control and diabetes self-care measures. A 4-week peer-led diabetes education program was conducted in a homeless community in Grand Rapids, Michigan to increase diabetes knowledge and empowerment. Knowledge scores increased significantly during sessions covering signs, symptoms, and complications of diabetes and diabetes medications (ps <.05). Empowerment scores after attending the 4-week program were significantly increased when compared to scores prior to the first session (p = .027). Field notes and postimplementation focus group support increased empowerment and knowledge among participants. PMID:27074403

  14. Exendin-4 improves resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in diabetic db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsien Yueh; Chung, Chih-Yao; Yang, Wen-Chin; Liang, Chih-Lung; Wang, Chi-Young; Chang, Chih-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus is increasing among companion animals. This disease has similar characteristics in both humans and animals. Diabetes is frequently identified as an independent risk factor for infections associated with increased mortality. In the present study, homozygous diabetic (db/db) mice were infected with Listeria (L.) monocytogenes and then treated with the anti-diabetic drug exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue. In aged db/db mice, decreased CD11b+ macrophage populations with higher lipid content and lower phagocytic activity were observed. Exendin-4 lowered high lipid levels and enhanced phagocytosis in macrophages from db/db mice infected with L. monocytogenes. Exendin-4 also ameliorated obesity and hyperglycemia, and improved ex vivo bacteria clearance by macrophages in the animals. Liver histology examined during L. monocytogenes infection indicated that abscess formation was much milder in exendin-4-treated db/db mice than in the control animals. Moreover, mechanistic studies demonstrated that expression of ATP binding cassette transporter 1, a sterol transporter, was higher in macrophages isolated from the exendin-4-treated db/db mice. Overall, our results suggest that exendin-4 decreases the risk of infection in diabetic animals by modifying the interaction between intracellular lipids and phagocytic macrophages. PMID:23000581

  15. Novel Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ranee; Maruthur, Nisa M; Edelman, David

    2015-12-01

    In the USA, compared to whites, African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by the diabetes epidemic. Traditional diabetes risk factors, such as obesity, are more common among African-Americans, but these traditional risk factors do not explain all of the disparity in diabetes risk. Recent research has identified novel environmental, lifestyle, physiologic, and genetic risk factors for diabetes, some of which appear to impact African-Americans more than whites. This manuscript reviews the recent literature to highlight some of these novel risk factors that may be contributing to the racial disparity in diabetes risk. Further study is needed of the modifiable risk factors for development of interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes in African-Americans, as well as other high-risk populations. PMID:26458374

  16. Minimization of the Risk of Diabetic Microangiopathy in Rats by Nigella sativa

    PubMed Central

    Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Yusuksawad, Mariem; Keelawat, Somboon; Thongruay, Sirima; Poumsuk, Ubon

    2016-01-01

    membrane thickening and a decreased capillary luminal diameterNigella sativa treatment of diabetic rats enlarged the capillary lumens and tended to attenuate dermal capillary basement membrane thickeningN. sativa treatment of diabetic rats reduced the mean glycosylated hemoglobin concentration by 1.4%, which exceeds the necessary reduction previously described to decrease the risk of diabetic microangiopathy, without affecting the lipid profile or tumor necrosis factor-alpha levelN. sativa improves rat diabetic microangiopathy, potentially due in part to its glycemic control activity. Abbreviations used: H and E: Hematoxylin and eosin, HbA1c: Glycosylated hemoglobin, HDL-C: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol, LDL-C: Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, PAS: Periodic acid-Schiff, STZ: Streptozotocin, PMID:27279704

  17. Association of a Dietary Score with Incident Type 2 Diabetes: The Dietary-Based Diabetes-Risk Score (DDS)

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Ligia J.; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Basterra-Gortari, Francisco Javier; Gea, Alfredo; Barbagallo, Mario; Martínez-González, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Strong evidence supports that dietary modifications may decrease incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Numerous diabetes risk models/scores have been developed, but most do not rely specifically on dietary variables or do not fully capture the overall dietary pattern. We prospectively assessed the association of a dietary-based diabetes-risk score (DDS), which integrates optimal food patterns, with the risk of developing T2DM in the SUN (“Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra”) longitudinal study. Methods We assessed 17,292 participants initially free of diabetes, followed-up for a mean of 9.2 years. A validated 136-item FFQ was administered at baseline. Taking into account previous literature, the DDS positively weighted vegetables, fruit, whole cereals, nuts, coffee, low-fat dairy, fiber, PUFA, and alcohol in moderate amounts; while it negatively weighted red meat, processed meats and sugar-sweetened beverages. Energy-adjusted quintiles of each item (with exception of moderate alcohol consumption that received either 0 or 5 points) were used to build the DDS (maximum: 60 points). Incident T2DM was confirmed through additional detailed questionnaires and review of medical records of participants. We used Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for socio-demographic and anthropometric parameters, health-related habits, and clinical variables to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of T2DM. Results We observed 143 T2DM confirmed cases during follow-up. Better baseline conformity with the DDS was associated with lower incidence of T2DM (multivariable-adjusted HR for intermediate (25–39 points) vs. low (11–24) category 0.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21, 0.89]; and for high (40–60) vs. low category 0.32 [95% CI: 0.14, 0.69]; p for linear trend: 0.019). Conclusions The DDS, a simple score exclusively based on dietary components, showed a strong inverse association with incident T2DM. This score may be applicable in clinical practice to improve

  18. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher’s exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ2=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ2=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. PMID:26823865

  19. Diabetes mellitus: an important risk factor for reactivation of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Carmen; Mangual, Michelle; Martinez, José; Rivera, Kelvin; Fernandez, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diabetes mellitus was identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis (TB) infection, and relapse after therapy. The risk of acquiring TB is described as comparable to that of HIV population. The fact that diabetics are 3× times more prone to develop pulmonary TB than nondiabetics cannot be overlooked. With DM recognized as global epidemic, and TB affecting one-third of the world population, physicians must remain vigilant. We present a 45-year-old woman born in Dominican Republic (DR), with 10-year history of T2DM treated with metformin, arrived to our Urgency Room complaining of dry cough for the past 3months. Interview unveiled unintentional 15lbs weight loss, night sweats, occasional unquantified fever, and general malaise but denied bloody sputum. She traveled to DR 2years before, with no known ill exposure. Physical examination showed a thin body habitus, otherwise well appearing woman with stable vital signs, presenting solely right middle lung field ronchi. LDH, ESR, hsCRP and Hg A1C were elevated. Imaging revealed a right middle lobe cavitation. Sputum for AFB disclosed active pulmonary TB. Our case portrays that the consideration of TB as differential diagnosis in diabetics should be exercised with the same strength, as it is undertaken during the evaluation of HIV patients with lung cavitation. Inability to recognize TB will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace. Learning points Diabetes mellitus should be considered an important risk factor for the reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis. High clinical suspicious should be taken into consideration as radiological findings for pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with diabetes mellitus may be atypical, involving middle and lower lobes. Inability to recognize pulmonary tuberculosis will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace. PMID:27482384

  20. History of gestational diabetes, insulin resistance and coronary risk.

    PubMed

    Davis, C L; Gutt, M; Llabre, M M; Marks, J B; O'Sullivan, M J; Potter, J E; Landel, J L; Kumar, M; Schneiderman, N; Gellman, M; Skyler, J S

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine characteristics associated with the insulin metabolic syndrome, including insulin resistance, abnormal glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, obesity, and elevated blood pressure, among women who have experienced gestational diabetes. 39 nondiabetic, young (20-42 years), postpartum (3-18 months) white women were recruited from obstetrical clinics. Twenty-one women had a history of gestational diabetes; 18 had uncomplicated pregnancies. Multivariate analyses revealed a significant difference between groups in insulin resistance (M, measured by euglycemic clamp) and insulin levels (from an oral glucose tolerance test), with insulin resistance showing a statistically stronger difference than insulin levels. Groups also differed significantly when compared on a set of variables associated with insulin metabolic syndrome: glucose tolerance, triglycerides, blood pressure, and body-mass index. Using insulin resistance as a covariate eliminated these group differences, suggesting that insulin resistance is the key factor underlying insulin metabolic syndrome. The higher risk of later developing type 2 diabetes and hypertension in women who have a history of gestational diabetes is explicable by their poorer profile on variables associated with insulin metabolic syndrome, and appears to be attributable to insulin resistance. Thus, insulin resistance appears to distinguish young women at risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:10616862

  1. Implications of Type 2 Diabetes on Adolescent Reproductive Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Julie S.; Arslanian, Silva; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Copeland, Valire Carr; Doswell, Willa; Herman, William; Lain, Kristine; Mansfield, Joan; Murray, Pamela J.; White, Neil; Charron-Prochownik, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article was to summarize scientific knowledge from an expert panel on reproductive health among adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Using a mental model approach, a panel of experts—representing perspectives on diabetes, adolescents, preconception counseling, and reproductive health—was convened to discuss reproductive health issues for female adolescents with T2D. Results Several critical issues emerged. Compared with adolescents with type 1 diabetes, (1) adolescents with T2D may perceive their disease as less severe and have less experience managing it, putting them at risk for complications; (2) T2D is more prevalent among African Americans, who may be less trusting of the medical establishment; (3) T2D is associated with obesity, and it is often difficult to change one’s lifestyle within family environments practicing sedentary and dietary behaviors leading to obesity; (4) teens with T2D could be more fertile, because obesity is related to earlier puberty; (5) although obese teens with T2D have a higher risk of polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with infertility, treatment with metformin can increase fertility; and (6) women with type 2 diabetes are routinely transferred to insulin before or during pregnancy to allow more intensive management. Conclusions Findings from the expert panel provide compelling reasons to provide early, developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive preconception counseling for teens with T2D. PMID:20944055

  2. ASSESSMENT OF RISK FACTORS FOR DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2

    PubMed Central

    Begic, Edin; Arnautovic, Amira; Masic, Izet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia, and represents a disease of the modern age, disease of the 21st century. Prevention of this disease is listed as imperative. Aim of this article was to evaluate questionnaires on the assessment of risk factors for Diabetes Mellitus type 2. Material and Methods: A total of 540 questionnaires handed out randomly to citizens of Canton Sarajevo of all ages, sexes and educational levels (in January 2016) were analyzed. Results: Analyzed questionnaires showed relatively low risk of getting diabetes in the next ten years in the majority of the population. These results are rather encouraging but may in some way be in confrontation with the statistics which show a rapid outburst of diabetes. Conclusion: The life-style is the main reason for such a thing to happen, and looking at these questionnaires, we might get the feeling that we really do live in a, conditionally speaking, physically active society. That, from our everyday experience is not entirely true. It would be wise to continue doing research on this topic on the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:27482159

  3. Walking vs running for hypertension, cholesterol, & diabetes risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Background To test whether equivalent energy expenditure by moderate-intensity (e.g., walking) and vigorous-intensity exercise (e.g., running) provides equivalent health benefits. Methods and Results We used the National Runners’ (n=33,060) and Walkers’ (n=15,945) Health Study cohorts to examine the effect of differences in exercise mode and thereby exercise intensity on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. Baseline expenditure (METhr/d) was compared to self-reported, physician-diagnosed incident hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and CHD during 6.2 years follow-up. Running significantly decreased the risks for incident hypertension by 4.2% (P<10-7), hypercholesterolemia by 4.3% (P<10-14), diabetes by 12.1% (P<10-5), and CHD by 4.5% per METh/d run (P=0.05). The corresponding reductions for walking were 7.2% (P<10-6), 7.0% (P<10-8), 12.3% (P<10-4), and 9.3% (P=0.01). Relative to <1.8 METh/d, the risk reductions for 1.8 to 3.6, 3.6 to 5.4, 5.4 to 7.2, and ≥ 7.2 METh/d were: 1) 10.1%, 17.7%, 25.1% and 34.9% from running and 14.0%, 23.8%, 21.8% and 38.3% from walking for hypercholesterolemia; 2) 19.7%, 19.4%, 26.8% and 39.8% from running and 14.7%, 19.1%, 23.6% and 13.3% from walking for hypertension; 3) 43.5%, 44.1%, 47.7% and 68.2% from running and 34.1%, 44.2%, and 23.6% from walking for diabetes (too few cases for diabetes for walking >5.4 METh/d). The risk reductions were not significantly greater for running than walking for diabetes (P=0.94) or CHD (P=0.26), and only marginally greater for walking than running for hypertension (P=0.06) and hypercholesterolemia (P=0.04). Conclusion Equivalent energy expenditures by moderate (walking) and vigorous (running) exercise produced similar risk reductions for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and CHD, but there is limited statistical power to evaluate CHD conclusively. PMID:23559628

  4. Glycemia Determines the Effect of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Genes on Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Heni, Martin; Ketterer, Caroline; Thamer, Claus; Herzberg-Schäfer, Silke A.; Guthoff, Martina; Stefan, Norbert; Machicao, Fausto; Staiger, Harald; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in diabetes risk genes reduce glucose- and/or incretin-induced insulin secretion. Here, we investigated interactions between glycemia and such diabetes risk polymorphisms. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin secretion was assessed by insulinogenic index and areas under the curve of C-peptide/glucose in 1,576 subjects using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Participants were genotyped for 10 diabetes risk SNPs associated with β-cell dysfunction: rs5215 (KCNJ11), rs13266634 (SLC30A8), rs7754840 (CDKAL1), rs10811661 (CDKN2A/2B), rs10830963 (MTNR1B), rs7903146 (TCF7L2), rs10010131 (WFS1), rs7923837 (HHEX), rs151290 (KCNQ1), and rs4402960 (IGF2BP2). Furthermore, the impact of the interaction between genetic variation in TCF7L2 and glycemia on changes in insulin secretion was tested in 315 individuals taking part in a lifestyle intervention study. RESULTS For the SNPs in TCF7L2 and WFS1, we found a significant interaction between glucose control and insulin secretion (all P ≤ 0.0018 for glucose × genotype). When plotting insulin secretion against glucose at 120 min OGTT, the compromising SNP effects on insulin secretion are most apparent under high glucose. In the longitudinal study, rs7903146 in TCF7L2 showed a significant interaction with baseline glucose tolerance upon change in insulin secretion (P = 0.0027). Increased glucose levels at baseline predicted an increase in insulin secretion upon improvement of glycemia by lifestyle intervention only in carriers of the risk alleles. CONCLUSIONS For the diabetes risk genes TCF7L2 and WFS1, which are associated with impaired incretin signaling, the level of glycemia determines SNP effects on insulin secretion. This indicates the increasing relevance of these SNPs during the progression of prediabetes stages toward clinically overt type 2 diabetes. PMID:20802253

  5. Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM. PMID:25628401

  6. Improving Care in Older Patients with Diabetes: A Focus on Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric A; Gibbs, Nancy E; Martin, John; Ziel, Fred; Polzin, Jennifer K; Palmer-Toy, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 25% of Americans older than age 65 years. The medical care of older patients must differ from the care of their younger counterparts. Older patients are at high risk of drug toxicity. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% has historically been the goal of all patients with diabetes, regardless of age. Recent research has demonstrated that using medications to achieve such tight glycemic control is not necessary and is often not safe. This article discusses the seminal research findings that strongly suggest that HbA1c goals should be relaxed in older patients. The authors then recommend an age-specific and functionally appropriate HbA1c reference range for patients receiving medications to improve glycemic control. Other interventions are suggested that should make diabetes care safer in older patients receiving hypoglycemic medications. PMID:27352408

  7. Improving Care in Older Patients with Diabetes: A Focus on Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Gibbs, Nancy E; Martin, John; Ziel, Fred; Polzin, Jennifer K; Palmer-Toy, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 25% of Americans older than age 65 years. The medical care of older patients must differ from the care of their younger counterparts. Older patients are at high risk of drug toxicity. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% has historically been the goal of all patients with diabetes, regardless of age. Recent research has demonstrated that using medications to achieve such tight glycemic control is not necessary and is often not safe.This article discusses the seminal research findings that strongly suggest that HbA1c goals should be relaxed in older patients. The authors then recommend an age-specific and functionally appropriate HbA1c reference range for patients receiving medications to improve glycemic control. Other interventions are suggested that should make diabetes care safer in older patients receiving hypoglycemic medications. PMID:27352408

  8. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing the pandemic risk posed by specific non-human influenza A viruses remains a complex challenge. As influenza virus genome sequencing becomes cheaper, faster and more readily available, the ability to predict pandemic potential from sequence data could transform pandemic influenza risk asses...

  9. Adolescent BMI Trajectory and Risk of Diabetes versus Coronary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh, Amir; Shai, Iris; Afek, Arnon; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Ayalon, Nir; Gordon, Barak; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Shamis, Ari; Vinker, Shlomo; Rudich, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    currently considered to be normal — constitutes a substantial risk factor for obesity-related disorders in midlife. Although the risk of diabetes is mainly associated with increased BMI close to the time of diagnosis, the risk of coronary heart disease is associated with an elevated BMI both in adolescence and in adulthood, supporting the hypothesis that the processes causing incident coronary heart disease, particularly atherosclerosis, are more gradual than those resulting in incident diabetes. (Funded by the Chaim Sheba Medical Center and the Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps.) PMID:21470009

  10. Case-control study on risk factors associated with fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vannasaeng, S; Nitiyanant, W; Vichayanrat, A

    1988-12-01

    We investigated the relation between fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes and cassava consumption in a case-control study, in which 31 cases of pancreatic diabetes were compared with 45 non-diabetic control subjects who had no pancreatic calcification. Risk of diabetes was not related to cassava consumption. We also observed no increased risk of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes associated with alcohol consumption, history of gallbladder and biliary tract diseases, ascariasis, and family history of diabetes. Lower monthly income, farmer occupation, rural residence, and low BMI were significantly (p less than 0.05) related to pancreatic diabetes. Our data suggest that consumption of cassava may not be an important risk factor for pancreatic diabetes. With limited sample size, however, cassava consumption could not be excluded as one possible cause of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes. PMID:2976643

  11. Depression and Risk of Mortality in Individuals with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijung; Katon, Wayne J.; Wolf, Fredric M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To estimate risk of comorbid depression on all-cause mortality over time among individuals with diabetes METHODS Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase, and Science Direct database were searched through September. 30, 2012. We limited our search to longitudinal or prospective studies reporting all-cause mortality among those having depression and diabetes, compared with those having diabetes alone that used hazard ratios as the main outcome. Two reviewers independently extracted primary data and evaluated quality of studies using predetermined criteria. The pooled random effects adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using meta-analysis. The impact of moderator variables on study effect size was examined with meta-regression. RESULTS A total of 42,363 respondents from 10 studies were included in the analysis. Depression was significantly associated with risk of mortality (Pooled HRs: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.35, 1.66). Little evidence for heterogeneity was found across the studies (Cochran Q: 13.52, p-value: 0.20, I2: 26.03). No significant possibility of publication bias was detected (Egger’s regression intercept: 0.98, p-value: 0.23). CONCLUSION Depression significantly increases the risk of mortality among individuals with diabetes. Early detection and treatment of depression may improve health outcomes in this population. PMID:23415577

  12. Prevalence of Gestational Diabetes and Risk of Progression to Type 2 Diabetes: a Global Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yeyi; Zhang, Cuilin

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing epidemic of diabetes mellitus affecting populations at different life stages, the global burden of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is not well assessed. Systematically synthesized data on global prevalence estimates of GDM are lacking, particularly among developing countries. The hyperglycemic intrauterine environment as exemplified in pregnancies complicated by GDM might not only reflect but also fuel the epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We comprehensively reviewed available data in the past decade in an attempt to estimate the contemporary global prevalence of GDM by country and region. We reviewed the risk of progression from GDM to T2DM as well. Synthesized data demonstrate wide variations in both prevalence estimates of GDM and the risk of progression from GDM to T2DM. Direct comparisons of GDM burden across countries or regions are challenging given the great heterogeneity in screening approaches, diagnostic criteria, and underlying population characteristics. In this regard, collaborative efforts to estimate global GDM prevalence would be a large but important leap forward. Such efforts may have substantial public health implications in terms of informing health policy makers and healthcare providers for disease burden and for developing more targeted and effective diabetes prevention and management strategies globally. PMID:26742932

  13. Community-Based Diabetes Screening and Risk Assessment in Rural West Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ranjita; Fitch, Cindy; Roberts, David; Wright, Dana

    2016-01-01

    This project utilized a cross-sectional study design to assess diabetes risk among 540 individuals from 12 counties using trained extension agents and community organizations in West Virginia. Individuals were screened for diabetes using (1) the validated 7-item diabetes risk assessment survey and (2) hemoglobin A1c tests. Demographic and lifestyle behaviors were also collected. The average age, body mass index, and A1c were 51.2 ± 16.4, 31.1 ± 7.5, and 5.8 ± 0.74, respectively. The majority were females, Non-Hispanic Whites with no prior diagnosis of diabetes. Screenings showed that 61.8% of participants were at high risk for diabetes. Family history of diabetes (siblings or parents), overweight or obese status, sedentary lifestyle, and older age were commonly prevalent risk factors. Higher risk scores computed from the 7-item questions correlated positively with higher A1c (r = 0.221, P < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, higher diabetes risk was predicted by obesity, older age, family history of hypertension, and gestational diabetes. Females were 4 times at higher risk than males. The findings indicated that community-based screenings were an effective way to assess diabetes risk in rural West Virginia. Linking diabetes screenings with referrals to lifestyle programs for high risk individuals can help reduce the burden of diabetes in the state. PMID:26881242

  14. Targeting the Diabetic Chaperome to Improve Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2016-08-01

    The chaperome constitutes a broad family of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones that facilitate the folding, refolding, and degradation of the proteome. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) promotes the folding of numerous oncoproteins to aid survival of malignant phenotypes, and small molecule inhibitors of the Hsp90 chaperone complex offer a viable approach to treat certain cancers. One therapeutic attribute of this approach is the selectivity of these molecules to target high affinity oncogenic Hsp90 complexes present in tumor cells, which are absent in nontransformed cells. This selectivity has given rise to the idea that disease may contribute to forming a stress chaperome that is functionally distinct in its ability to interact with small molecule Hsp90 modulators. Consistent with this premise, modulating Hsp90 improves clinically relevant endpoints of diabetic peripheral neuropathy but has little impact in nondiabetic nerve. The concept of targeting the "diabetic chaperome" to treat diabetes and its complications is discussed. PMID:27318486

  15. Aldose reductase inhibition improves nerve conduction velocity in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Judzewitsch, R G; Jaspan, J B; Polonsky, K S; Weinberg, C R; Halter, J B; Halar, E; Pfeifer, M A; Vukadinovic, C; Bernstein, L; Schneider, M; Liang, K Y; Gabbay, K H; Rubenstein, A H; Porte, D

    1983-01-20

    To assess the potential role of polyol-pathway activity in diabetic neuropathy, we measured the effects of sorbinil--a potent inhibitor of the key polyol-pathway enzyme aldose reductase--on nerve conduction velocity in 39 stable diabetics in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. During nine weeks of treatment with sorbinil (250 mg per day), nerve conduction velocity was greater than during a nine-week placebo period for all three nerves tested: the peroneal motor nerve (mean increase [+/- S.E.M.], 0.70 +/- 0.24 m per second, P less than 0.008), the median motor nerve (mean increase, 0.66 +/- 0.27, P less than 0.005), and the median sensory nerve (mean increase, 1.16 +/- 0.50, P less than 0.035). Conduction velocity for all three nerves declined significantly within three weeks after cessation of the drug. These effects of sorbinil were not related to glycemic control, which was constant during the study. Although the effect of sorbinil in improving nerve conduction velocity in diabetics was small, the findings suggest that polyol-pathway activity contributes to slowed nerve conduction in diabetics. The clinical applicability of these observations remains to be determined, but they encourage further exploration of this approach to the treatment or prevention of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:6401351

  16. Metformin use and lung cancer risk in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Lori C.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Achacoso, Ninah S.; Peng, Tiffany; Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2015-01-01

    Methodologic biases may explain why observational studies examining metformin use in relation to lung cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a cohort study to further investigate this relationship, accounting for potential biases. For 47,351 patients with diabetes aged ≥40 years, who completed a health-related survey administered between 1994 and 1996, data on prescribed diabetes medications were obtained from electronic pharmacy records. Follow-up for incident lung cancer occurred from January 1, 1997, until June 30, 2012. Using Cox regression, we estimated lung cancer risk associated with new use of metformin, along with total duration, recency, and cumulative dose (all modeled as time-dependent covariates), adjusting for potential confounding factors. During 428,557 person-years of follow-up, 747 patients were diagnosed with lung cancer. No association was found with duration, dose, or recency of metformin use and overall lung cancer risk. Among never smokers, however, ever use was inversely associated with lung cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR) 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.33-0.99), and risk appeared to decrease monotonically with longer use (≥5 years: HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.21-1.09). Among current smokers, corresponding risk estimates were >1.0, although not statistically significant. Consistent with this variation in effect by smoking history, longer use was suggestively associated with lower adenocarcinoma risk (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.40-1.17), but higher small cell carcinoma risk (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 0.85-3.91). In this population, we found no evidence that metformin use affects overall lung cancer risk. The observed variation in association by smoking history and histology requires further confirmation. PMID:25644512

  17. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  18. A School-Based Intervention for Diabetes Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We examined the effects of a multicomponent, school-based program addressing risk factors for diabetes among children whose race or ethnic group and socioeconomic status placed them at high risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. METHODS Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 42 schools to either a multicomponent school-based intervention (21 schools) or assessment only (control, 21 schools). A total of 4603 students participated (mean [±SD] age, 11.3±0.6 years; 54.2% Hispanic and 18.0% black; 52.7% girls). At the beginning of 6th grade and the end of 8th grade, students underwent measurements of body-mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and fasting glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS There was a decrease in the primary outcome — the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity — in both the intervention and control schools, with no significant difference between the school groups. The intervention schools had greater reductions in the secondary outcomes of BMI z score, percentage of students with waist circumference at or above the 90th percentile, fasting insulin levels (P = 0.04 for all comparisons), and prevalence of obesity (P = 0.05). Similar findings were observed among students who were at or above the 85th percentile for BMI at baseline. Less than 3% of the students who were screened had an adverse event; the proportions were nearly equivalent in the intervention and control schools. CONCLUSIONS Our comprehensive school-based program did not result in greater decreases in the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity than those that occurred in control schools. However, the intervention did result in significantly greater reductions in various indexes of adiposity. These changes may reduce the risk of childhood-onset type 2 diabetes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00458029.) PMID:20581420

  19. Is the risk and nature of CVD the same in type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Duca, Lindsey; Sippl, Rachel; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, most likely explained by environmental changes, such as changing exposures to foods, viruses, and toxins, and by increasing obesity. While cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has been declining recently, this global epidemic of diabetes threatens to stall this trend. CVD is the leading cause of death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with at least a two- to fourfold increased risk in patients with diabetes. In this review, the risk factors for CVD are discussed in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity are greater in type 2 patients than in type 1 diabetes, they explain only about half of the increased CVD risk. The role for diabetes-specific risk factors, including hyperglycemia and kidney complications, is discussed in the context of new study findings. PMID:23519720

  20. Human parechovirus and the risk of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, P; Koskiniemi, M; Oikarinen, S; Veijola, R; Simell, O; Ilonen, J; Knip, M; Hyöty, H; Tauriainen, S

    2013-09-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) are RNA viruses associated mainly with mild gastrointestinal and respiratory infections in children and also cause neonatal sepsis and CNS infections. Human enteroviruses, close relatives of HPeVs, associate with the development of type 1 diabetes. In this study, the potential role of HPeV infections in promoting beta cell autoimmunity was investigated by analyzing stool samples of 54 prediabetic case and 134 healthy control children for the presence of HPeV RNA and comparing the derived infection frequencies. All 188 children were participants of the Finnish prospective Diabetes Prediction and Prevention study. Viral RNA was screened for using an HPeV-specific RT-PCR method coupled to liquid hybridization of the PCR product. The overall HPeV infection frequency did not differ between prediabetic case and control children. However, case boys had more HPeV positive samples in the 6-month period before becoming autoantibody positive, when compared to the matching time-period in controls (P < 0.01). HPeV infection at a young age does not appear to play a major role in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity. In boys, however, HPeVs showed time-dependent association with the first detection of diabetes-associated autoantibodies. Thus, in boys, HPeV infections cannot be excluded as a gender-specific risk factor which promotes the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:23852688

  1. Lowering plasma 1-deoxysphingolipids improves neuropathy in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Othman, Alaa; Bianchi, Roberto; Alecu, Irina; Wei, Yu; Porretta-Serapiglia, Carla; Lombardi, Raffaella; Chiorazzi, Alessia; Meregalli, Cristina; Oggioni, Norberto; Cavaletti, Guido; Lauria, Giuseppe; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    1-Deoxysphingolipids (1-deoxySLs) are atypical neurotoxic sphingolipids that are formed by the serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT). Pathologically elevated 1-deoxySL concentrations cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1), an axonal neuropathy associated with several missense mutations in SPT. Oral L-serine supplementation suppressed the formation of 1-deoxySLs in patients with HSAN1 and preserved nerve function in an HSAN1 mouse model. Because 1-deoxySLs also are elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, L-serine supplementation could also be a therapeutic option for diabetic neuropathy (DN). This was tested in diabetic STZ rats in a preventive and therapeutic treatment scheme. Diabetic rats showed significantly increased plasma 1-deoxySL concentrations, and L-serine supplementation lowered 1-deoxySL concentrations in both treatment schemes (P < 0.0001). L-serine had no significant effect on hyperglycemia, body weight, or food intake. Mechanical sensitivity was significantly improved in the preventive (P < 0.01) and therapeutic schemes (P < 0.001). Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) significantly improved in only the preventive group (P < 0.05). Overall NCV showed a highly significant (P = 5.2E-12) inverse correlation with plasma 1-deoxySL concentrations. In summary, our data support the hypothesis that 1-deoxySLs are involved in the pathology of DN and that an oral L-serine supplementation could be a novel therapeutic option for treating DN. PMID:25277395

  2. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhi-Peng; Ma, Jing-Xue

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed between May 2011 and April 2012. A total of 1100 patients (male/female, 483/617) were included in this study. DR was defined following the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) severity scale. All included patients accepted a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including retinal photographs. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) after adjusting for age and gender. RESULTS Retinopathy was present in 307 patients with a prevalence of 27.9%. In univariate logistic analysis, presence of DR was associated with longer duration of diabetes (OR, 5.70; 95%CI, 2.91-12.56), higher concentration of fasting blood glucose (OR, 12.94; 95%CI, 2.40-67.71), higher level of glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c (OR, 5.50; 95%CI, 3.78-11.97) and insulin treatment (OR, 6.99; 95%CI, 1.39-35.12). The lifestyle of patients with T2DM including smoking, alcohol consumption and regular exercise seemed not associated with the development of DR. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that fasting serum glucose concentration, HbA1c level, duration of diabetes and insulin treatment are potential risk factors for DR in northern Chinese patients with T2DM, while the lifestyle of included patients seems not associated with DR. PMID:27588275

  3. Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies to Uncovering Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes: Diet, Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Sylvia H.; Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Sun, Qi; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Zhang, Cuilin; Qi, Lu; Willett, Walter C.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the NHS II to addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Methods. We carried out a narrative review of 1976 to 2016 NHS and NHS II publications. Results. The NHS and NHS II have uncovered important roles in type 2 diabetes for individual nutrients, foods, dietary patterns, and physical activity independent of excess body weight. Up to 90% of type 2 diabetes cases are potentially preventable if individuals follow a healthy diet and lifestyle. The NHS investigations have also identified novel biomarkers for diabetes, including adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, nutrition metabolites, and environmental pollutants, offering new insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. Global collaborative efforts have uncovered many common genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes and improved our understanding of gene–environment interactions. Continued efforts to identify epigenetic, metagenomic, and metabolomic risk factors for type 2 diabetes have the potential to reveal new pathways and improve prediction and prevention. Conclusions. Over the past several decades, the NHS and NHS II have made major contributions to public health recommendations and strategies designed to reduce the global burden of diabetes. PMID:27459454

  4. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  5. Theophylline improves hypoglycemia unawareness in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Galan, Bastiaan E; Tack, Cees J; Lenders, Jacques W; Pasman, Jaco W; Elving, Lammy D; Russel, Frans G; Lutterman, Jos A; Smits, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Iatrogenic hypoglycemias and the subsequent occurrence of hypoglycemia unawareness are well-known complications of intensive insulin therapy in type 1 diabetic patients that limit glycemic management. From a pharmacological point of view, the adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline might be beneficial in the management of hypoglycemia unawareness. Theophylline stimulates the release of catecholamines and reduces cerebral blood flow, thereby facilitating stronger metabolic responses to and a prompter perception of decreasing glucose levels. To test the effect of theophylline on responses to hypoglycemia, we performed paired hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp studies in 15 diabetic patients with hypoglycemia unawareness and 15 matched healthy control subjects. In random order, we concurrently infused either theophylline or placebo. Measurements included counterregulatory hormones, symptoms, hemodynamic parameters, and sweat detection using a dew-point electrode. Additionally, middle cerebral artery velocities (V(MCA)) using transcranial Doppler were monitored as an estimate of cerebral blood flow. When compared with placebo, theophylline significantly enhanced responses of plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol levels in both diabetic patients and control subjects. Because of the theophylline, sweat production started at approximately 0.3 mmol/l higher glucose levels in both groups (P < 0.01), and symptom scores in diabetic patients approached those in control subjects. Theophylline decreased V(MCA) in both groups (P < 0.001), but significantly greater in diabetic patients (P < 0.01), and prevented the hypoglycemia-induced increase of V(MCA) that occurred during the placebo studies. We conclude that theophylline improves counterregulatory responses to and perception of hypoglycemia in diabetic patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. PMID:11872681

  6. Beyond HbA1c: Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nwanyanwu, Kristen Harris; Newman-Casey, Paula-Anne; Gardner, Thomas W; Lim, Jennifer I

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy affects 4.2 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of blindness in working-aged people. As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, cost-effective interventions to decrease blindness from diabetic retinopathy will be paramount. While HbA1c and duration of disease are known risk factors, they account for only 11% of the risk of developing microvascular complications from the disease. The assessment of environmental risk factors for diabetic eye disease allows for the determination of modifiable population-level challenges that may be addressed to facilitate the end of blindness from diabetes. PMID:26973797

  7. Perceived risk of developing diabetes in early adulthood: beliefs about inherited and behavioral risk factors across the life course.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Justin B; Smith, Matthew Lee; Sosa, Erica; McKyer, E Lisako; Ory, Marcia G

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to determine how college students perceive their risk of developing diabetes over their life course, with specific emphasis on their beliefs about the influence of inherited versus behavioral risk factors. A bivariate ordered probit regression model was used to simultaneously predict perceived risk for 10-year absolute risk of diabetes and lifetime absolute risk of diabetes. Ten-year and lifetime absolute risk were both increased when the respondent self-identified with a race/ethnicity other than non-Hispanic white (β = 0.42, p < .001 and β = 0.33, p = .004, respectively), and when the respondent had an increasing number of family members with diabetes (β = 0.33, p < .001 and β = 0.45, p < .001, respectively). Beliefs linking behavioral risk factors to perceived risk of developing diabetes across the life course were not statistically significant. The absence of significant association between perceptions of behavioral risk as factors for developing diabetes and perceived risk for diabetes over the life course supports the need for educational interventions about behavioral and genetic causes of diabetes among the college-aged population. PMID:21708872

  8. Risks of rapid decline renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Yi-Jing; Sheu, Wayne HH

    2014-01-01

    Progressive rising population of diabetes and related nephropathy, namely, diabetic kidney disease and associated end stage renal disease has become a major global public health issue. Results of observational studies indicate that most diabetic kidney disease progresses over decades; however, certain diabetes patients display a rapid decline in renal function, which may lead to renal failure within months. Although the definition of rapid renal function decline remained speculative, in general, it is defined by the decrease of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in absolute rate of loss or percent change. Based on the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes 2012 clinical practice guidelines, a rapid decline in renal function is defined as a sustained decline in eGFR of > 5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 per year. It has been reported that potential factors contributing to a rapid decline in renal function include ethnic/genetic and demographic causes, smoking habits, increased glycated hemoglobin levels, obesity, albuminuria, anemia, low serum magnesium levels, high serum phosphate levels, vitamin D deficiency, elevated systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity values, retinopathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. This article reviews current literatures in this area and provides insight on the early detection of diabetic subjects who are at risk of a rapid decline in renal function in order to develop a more aggressive approach to renal and cardiovascular protection. PMID:25512785

  9. Peer support for self-management of diabetes improved outcomes in international settings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Edwin B; Boothroyd, Renée I; Coufal, Muchieh Maggy; Baumann, Linda C; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Sanguanprasit, Boosaba; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2012-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes is essential to reducing the risks of associated disabilities. But effective self-management is often short-lived. Peers can provide the kind of ongoing support that is needed for sustained self-management of diabetes. In this context, peers are nonprofessionals who have diabetes or close familiarity with its management. Key functions of effective peer support include assistance in daily management, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and ongoing availability of support. Using these four functions as a template of peer support, project teams in Cameroon, South Africa, Thailand, and Uganda developed and then evaluated peer support interventions for adults with diabetes. Our initial assessment found improvements in symptom management, diet, blood pressure, body mass index, and blood sugar levels for many of those taking part in the programs. For policy makers, the broader message is that by emphasizing the four key peer support functions, diabetes management programs can be successfully introduced across varied cultural settings and within diverse health systems. PMID:22232103

  10. Obesity, Diabetes, the Cardiorenal Syndrome, and Risk for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Forte, Victoria; Pandey, Abhishek; Abdelmessih, Rita; Forte, Giovanna; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R; McFarlane, Samy I

    2012-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies confirm that the prevalence of obesity and the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS) is extraordinarily high and that the rates have increased dramatically in the last three decades. In addition, epidemiological data demonstrate that obesity, the CRS, and diabetes are inextricably linked and are all associated with an increased incidence of a number of solid tissue cancers. The mechanisms for this association have been examined, including, but not limited to, higher levels of insulin and free levels of insulin-like growth factor and insulin resistance in obesity and the CRS. Mortality, morbidity, and the associated health care costs which are the link between obesity, the CRS, and diabetes are just beginning to be examined. In addition, we review the advantages of implementing lifestyle and surgical changes to modify obesity, lessening the development of the CRS, diabetes, and associated cancers. Epidemiological data regarding the general mechanisms of the pathogenesis of cancers associated with obesity, the CRS, and diabetes (specifically colon, pancreas, esophageal, liver, breast, prostate, thyroid, and renal carcinomas) are reviewed. The mechanisms by which obesity and other components of the CRS contribute to the pathogenesis of these cancers, such as hormone alterations and insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-dependent pathways of tumor pathogenesis, include the attending roles of inflammation and oxidative stress. Emphasis has been placed on obesity as a modifiable risk factor which, when addressed, provides a reduction in the rate of cancer deaths. In a second part to be published in the next issue of this journal, the relationship between diabetes and cancer will be reviewed in detail. PMID:22851963

  11. Obesity, Diabetes, the Cardiorenal Syndrome, and Risk for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Victoria; Pandey, Abhishek; Abdelmessih, Rita; Forte, Giovanna; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R.; McFarlane, Samy I.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies confirm that the prevalence of obesity and the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS) is extraordinarily high and that the rates have increased dramatically in the last three decades. In addition, epidemiological data demonstrate that obesity, the CRS, and diabetes are inextricably linked and are all associated with an increased incidence of a number of solid tissue cancers. The mechanisms for this association have been examined, including, but not limited to, higher levels of insulin and free levels of insulin-like growth factor and insulin resistance in obesity and the CRS. Mortality, morbidity, and the associated health care costs which are the link between obesity, the CRS, and diabetes are just beginning to be examined. In addition, we review the advantages of implementing lifestyle and surgical changes to modify obesity, lessening the development of the CRS, diabetes, and associated cancers. Epidemiological data regarding the general mechanisms of the pathogenesis of cancers associated with obesity, the CRS, and diabetes (specifically colon, pancreas, esophageal, liver, breast, prostate, thyroid, and renal carcinomas) are reviewed. The mechanisms by which obesity and other components of the CRS contribute to the pathogenesis of these cancers, such as hormone alterations and insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-dependent pathways of tumor pathogenesis, include the attending roles of inflammation and oxidative stress. Emphasis has been placed on obesity as a modifiable risk factor which, when addressed, provides a reduction in the rate of cancer deaths. In a second part to be published in the next issue of this journal, the relationship between diabetes and cancer will be reviewed in detail. PMID:22851963

  12. Petalonia improves glucose homeostasis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Seong-Il; Jin, Young-Jun; Ko, Hee-Chul; Choi, Soo-Youn; Hwang, Joon-Ho; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Moo-Han; Shin, Hye-Sun; Jeong, Hyung-Bok; Kim, Se-Jae

    2008-08-22

    The anti-diabetic potential of Petalonia binghamiae extract (PBE) was evaluated in vivo. Dietary administration of PBE to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice significantly lowered blood glucose levels and improved glucose tolerance. The mode of action by which PBE attenuated diabetes was investigated in vitro using 3T3-L1 cells. PBE treatment stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation as evidenced by increased triglyceride accumulation. At the molecular level, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and terminal marker protein aP2, as well as the mRNA of GLUT4 were up-regulated by PBE. In mature adipocytes, PBE significantly stimulated the uptake of glucose and the expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Furthermore, PBE increased PPAR{gamma} luciferase reporter gene activity in COS-1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo anti-diabetic effect of PBE is mediated by both insulin-like and insulin-sensitizing actions in adipocytes.

  13. Community-based primary care: improving and assessing diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Meghan; Qaseem, Amir; Snow, Vincenza

    2010-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes make it a prime target for quality improvement research. Quality gaps and racial/gender disparities persist throughout this population of patients necessitating a sustainable improvement in the clinical management of diabetes. The authors of this study sought (1) to provide a population perspective on diabetes management, and (2) to reinforce evidence-based clinical guidelines through a Web-based educational module.The project also aimed to gain insight into working remotely with a community of rural physicians. This longitudinal pre-post intervention study involved 18 internal medicine physicians and included 3 points of medical record data abstraction over 24 months. A Web-based educational module was introduced after the baseline data abstraction. This module contained chapters on clinical education, practice tools, and self-assessment. The results showed a sustained improvement in most clinical outcomes and demonstrated the effectiveness of using Web-based mediums to reinforce clinical guidelines and change physician behavior. PMID:19786594

  14. Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Risk in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Linda

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection and its treatment have been associated with adipose tissue changes and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism. The proportion of HIV-infected adults over the age of 50 is also growing placing HIV-infected adults at particular risk for metabolic perturbations and cardiovascular disease. The metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected adults has been increasingly studied but whether HIV is associated with greater risk remains unclear, likely because of the interplay of host, viral and antiretroviral factors that are associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome. While the Framingham Risk Score is a well-accepted measure of 10-year cardiovascular risk in the general population, it may not accurately predict risk in the HIV setting due to HIV-related factors such as inflammation that are not accounted for. The relationship between HIV and diabetes mellitus (DM) risk has also been debated. We summarize the recent literature on metabolic syndrome, DM, and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected adults. PMID:25027062

  15. Impact of Diabetes on Stroke Risk and Outcomes: Two Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Chang; Shih, Chun-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Several limitations existed in previous studies which suggested that diabetic patients have increased risk of stroke. We conducted this study to better understand the stroke risk and poststroke outcomes in patients with diabetes.From the claims data of Taiwan's National Health Insurance, we identified 24,027 adults with new-diagnosed diabetes and 96,108 adults without diabetes between 2000 and 2003 in a retrospective cohort study. Stroke events (included hemorrhage, ischemia, and other type of stroke) during the follow-up period of 2000 to 2008 were ascertained and adjusted risk of stroke associated with diabetes was calculated. A nested cohort study of 221,254 hospitalized stroke patients (included hemorrhage, ischemia, and other type of stroke) between 2000 and 2009 was conducted. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for adverse events after stroke hospitalization in patients with and without diabetes.The incidences of stroke in cohorts with and without diabetes were 10.1 and 4.5 per 1000 person-years, respectively. During the follow-up period, diabetic patients had an increased risk of stroke (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.75; 95% CI: 1.64-1.86) than those without diabetes. Associations between diabetes and stroke risk were significant in both sexes and all age groups. Previous diabetes was associated with poststroke mortality (OR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.19-1.49), pneumonia (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.20-1.42), and urinary tract infection (OR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.55-1.77). The impact of diabetes on adverse events after stroke was investigated particularly in those with diabetes-related complications.Diabetes was associated with stroke risk, and diabetic patients had more adverse events and subsequent mortality after stroke. PMID:26717365

  16. An Integrated Multi-Institutional Diabetes Prevention Program Improves Knowledge and Healthy Food Acquisition in Northwestern Ontario First Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Lara S.; Gittelsohn, Joel; Rimal, Rajiv; Treuth, Margarita S.; Sharma, Sangita; Rosecrans, Amanda; Harris, Stewart B.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the impact results of a feasibility study in Canada for prevention of risk factors for diabetes in seven northwestern Ontario First Nations. Baseline and follow-up data were collected before and after the 9-month intervention program in schools, stores, and communities that aimed to improve diet and increase physical activity…

  17. Changes in ideal cardiovascular health status and risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes: The Kailuan prospective study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxue; Shi, Jihong; Wang, Anxin; Song, Qiaofeng; Huang, Zhe; Zhu, Chenrui; Du, Xin; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Shuohua; Wang, Xizhu; Wu, Shouling

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the altered ideal cardiovascular health status (ΔCHS) and the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in the Kailuan population of China.We included 50,656 Chinese adults aged 18 years or older (11,704 men and 38,952 women) without baseline diabetes mellitus in this study. Information about 7 individual components of the cardiovascular health metrics during 2006 to 2008 was collected. A ΔCHS score was defined as the changes of ideal cardiovascular health status (CHS) from the year 2006 to 2008. New-onset diabetes was identified based on the history of diabetes, currently treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents, or having a fasting blood glucose concentration ≥7.0 mmol/L during the 2010 to 2011 and 2012 to 2013 surveys. After a mean follow-up period of 3.80 years, a total of 3071 (6.06%) participants developed diabetes mellitus. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the CHS change and new-onset diabetes.A strong inverse association between the positive CHS changes and lower risks of developing diabetes mellitus was observed. After adjusting for age, sex, alcohol consumption, and other potential confounders, the hazard ratios for new-onset diabetes were 0.73, 0.59, 0.49, and 0.42 (95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.82; P trend <0.001) for those who met ΔCHS = -1, 0, 1, and ≥2, respectively, compared with the participants with ΔCHS ≤-2.The study concluded that the improved CHS was associated with the reduced risk of developing diabetes mellitus in this investigated Chinese population. PMID:27559955

  18. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Cambodian Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Grant N.; Schell, Terry L.; Wong, Eunice C.; Berthold, S. Megan; Hambarsoomian, Katrin; Elliott, Marc N.; Bardenheier, Barbara H.; Gregg, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine rates of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in Cambodian refugees, and to assess the proportion whose conditions are satisfactorily managed in comparison to the general population. Methods Self-report and laboratory/physical health assessment data obtained from a household probability sample of U.S.-residing Cambodian refugees (N = 331) in 2010-2011 were compared to a probability sample of the adult U.S. population (N = 6360) from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results Prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia in Cambodian refugees greatly exceeded rates found in the age- and gender-adjusted U.S. population. Cambodian refugees with diagnosed hypertension or hyperlipidemia were less likely than their counterparts in the general U.S. population to have blood pressure and total cholesterol within recommended levels. Conclusions Increased attention should be paid to prevention and management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the Cambodian refugee community. Research is needed to determine whether this pattern extends to other refugee groups. PMID:25651882

  19. Improved Metabolic Control in Diabetes, HSP60, and Proinflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, Claudio; Kim, Eunjung; Knowlton, Anne A.

    2012-01-01

    The diabetes-atherosclerosis relationship remains to be fully defined. Repeated prolonged hyperglycemia, increased ROS production and endothelial dysfunction are important factors. One theory is that increased blood levels of heat shock protein (HSP)60 are proinflammatory, through activation of innate immunity, and contribute to the progression of vascular disease. It was hypothesized that improvement of diabetes control in patients presenting with metabolic syndrome would lower HSP60, and anti-HSP60 antibody levels and decrease inflammatory markers. Paired sera of 17 Italian patients, before and after intensive treatment, were assayed for cytokines, HSP60 and anti-HSP60 antibodies. As expected, intensive treatment was associated with a decrease in HgbA1C (P < 0.001) and BMI (P < 0.001). After treatment, there was a significant decrease in IL-6 (P < 0.05). HSP60 levels were before treatment −6.9 + 1.9, after treatment −7.1 + 2.0 ng/mL (P = ns). Overall HSP60 concentrations were lower than published reports. Anti-HSP60 antibody titers were high and did not decrease with treatment. In conclusion, improvement of diabetic control did not alter HSP60 concentrations or antiHSP60 antibody titers, but led to a reduction of IL-6 levels. PMID:22924123

  20. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and progression to diabetes in patients at risk for diabetes: an ancillary analysis in the diabetes prevention program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. The research design and methods were a prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multi-center trial co...

  1. RADIOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT/IMPROVEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The office is developing improved methodologies and guidance for evaluating human health risks associated with exposure to environmental radiological contaminants. These activities involve coordination with numerous federal agencies and the development and communication of vari...

  2. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  3. Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: A Risk Factor for the Global Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Chiha, Maguy; Njeim, Mario; Chedrawy, Edgar G.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in the United States and the world. In this we will paper focus on type 2 diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for coronary heart disease, review the mechanisms of atherogenesis in diabetics, the impact of hypertension and the treatment goals in diabetics, the guidelines for screening, and review the epidemiologic consequences of diabetes and heart disease on a global scale. The underlying premise to consider diabetes a cardiovascular disease equivalent will be explored as well as the recommendations for screening and cardiac testing for asymptomatic diabetic patients. PMID:23119148

  4. Strategies for improving cardiovascular health in women with diabetes mellitus: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajesh K; Laiteerapong, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about cardiovascular (CV) disease in women with diabetes mellitus (DM) has changed substantially over the past 20 years. Coronary artery disease, strokes, and peripheral vascular disease affect women with DM at higher rates than the general population of women. Lifestyle therapies, such as dietary changes, physical activity, and smoking cessation, offer substantial benefits to women with DM. Of the pharmacotherapies, statins offer the most significant benefits, but may not be well tolerated in some women. Aspirin may also benefit high-risk women. Other pharmacotherapies, such as fibrates, ezetimibe, niacin, fish oil, and hormone replacement therapy, remain unproven and, in some cases, potentially dangerous to women with DM. To reduce CV events, risks to women with DM must be better publicized and additional research must be done. Finally, advancements in health care delivery must target high-risk women with DM to lower risk factors and effectively improve cardiovascular health. PMID:26391392

  5. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lauren E.; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Methods Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. Results At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Conclusion Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes in the present study. PMID:23148808

  6. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126–200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <8.5. Insulin is recommended when blood glucose is >200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis. PMID:25941651

  7. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  8. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  9. A Pilot Food Bank Intervention Featuring Diabetes-Appropriate Food Improved Glycemic Control Among Clients In Three States.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Hilary K; Lyles, Courtney; Marshall, Michelle B; Prendergast, Kimberly; Smith, Morgan C; Headings, Amy; Bradshaw, Georgiana; Rosenmoss, Sophie; Waxman, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Food insecurity--defined as not having adequate quantity and quality of food at all times for all household members to have an active, healthy life--is a risk factor for poor diabetes control, yet few diabetes interventions address this important factor. Food pantries, which receive food from food banks and distribute it to clients in need, may be ideal sites for diabetes self-management support because they can provide free diabetes-appropriate food to people in low-income communities. Between February 2012 and March 2014, we enrolled 687 food pantry clients with diabetes in three states in a six-month pilot intervention that provided them with diabetes-appropriate food, blood sugar monitoring, primary care referral, and self-management support. Improvements were seen in pre-post analyses of glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c decreased from 8.11 percent to 7.96 percent), fruit and vegetable intake (which increased from 2.8 to 3.1 servings per day), self-efficacy, and medication adherence. Among participants with elevated HbA1c (at least 7.5 percent) at baseline, HbA1c improved from 9.52 percent to 9.04 percent. Although food pantries are nontraditional settings for diabetes support, this pilot study suggests a promising health promotion model for vulnerable populations. Policies supporting such interventions may be particularly effective because of food pantries' food access and distribution capacity. PMID:26526255

  10. Metabolic correction in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy: improving clinical results beyond symptom control.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Massari, J R; Gonzalez, M J; Jimenez, F J; Allende-Vigo, M Z; Duconge, J

    2011-11-01

    Current Clinical Management Guidelines of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) are based on adequate glucose control and symptomatic pain relief. However, meticulous glycemic control could delay the onset or slow the progression of diabetic neuropathy in patients with DM type 2, but it does not completely prevent the progression of the disease. Complications of DPN as it continues its natural course, produce increasing pain and discomfort, loss of sensation, ulcers, infections, amputations and even death. In addition to the increased suffering, disability and loss of productivity, there is a very significant economic impact related to the treatment of DPN and its complications. In USA alone, it has been estimated that there are more than 5,000,000 patients suffering from DPN and the total annual cost of treating the disease and its complications is over $10,000 million dollars. In order to be able to reduce complications of DPN, it is crucial to improve or correct the metabolic conditions that lead to the pathology present in this condition. Pathophysiologic mechanisms implicated in diabetic neuropathy include: increased polyol pathway with accumulation of sorbitol and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity, microvascular damage and hypoxia due to nitric oxide deficit and increased oxygen free radical activity. Moreover, there is a decrease in glutathione and increase in homocysteine. Clinical trials in the last two decades have demonstrated that the use of specific nutrients can correct some of these metabolic derangements, improving symptom control and providing further benefits such as improved sensorium, blood flow and nerve regeneration. We will discuss the evidence on lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, benfotiamine and the combination of active B vitamins L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin and piridoxal-6-phosphate. In addition, we discuss the role of metformin, an important drug in the management of diabetes, and the presence of specific polymorphic genes, in the risk of

  11. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  12. Analyzing treatment aggressiveness and identifying high-risk patients in diabetic foot ulcer return to care.

    PubMed

    Remington, Austin C; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Warstadt, Nicholus M; Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Kwong, Jereen Z; Curtin, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Rates of diabetes and its associated comorbidities have been increasing in the United States, with diabetic foot ulcer treatment representing a large cost to the patient and healthcare system. These ulcers often result in multiple hospital admissions. This study examined readmissions following inpatient care for a diabetic foot ulcer and identified modifiable factors associated with all-cause 30-day readmissions to the inpatient or emergency department (ED) setting. We hypothesized that patients undergoing aggressive treatment would have lower 30-day readmission rates. We identified patient discharge records containing International Classification of Disease ninth revision codes for both diabetes mellitus and distal foot ulcer in the State Inpatient and Emergency Department databases from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project in Florida and New York, 2011-2012. All-cause 30-day return to care visits (ED or inpatient) were analyzed. Patient demographics and treatment characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multivariable regression models. The cohort included 25,911 discharges, having a mean age of 63 and an average of 3.8 comorbidities. The overall rate of return to care was 30%, and 21% of subjects underwent a toe or midfoot amputation during their index stay. The most common diagnosis codes upon readmission were diabetes mellitus (19%) and infection (13%). Patients with a toe or midfoot amputation procedure were less likely to be readmitted within 30 days (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% confidence interval: 0.73, 0.84). Presence of comorbidities, black and Hispanic ethnicities, and Medicare and Medicaid payer status were also associated with higher odds of readmission following initial hospitalization (p < 0.05). The study suggests that there are many factors that affect readmission rates for diabetic foot ulcer patients. Understanding patients at high-risk for readmission can improve counseling and

  13. Mucosal Tolerance to Prevent Type 1 Diabetes: Can the Outcome Be Improved in Humans?

    PubMed Central

    Hanninen, Arno; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2004-01-01

    The results of trials in which autoantigens have been fed to individuals affected by autoimmune diseases - multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes - have been disappointing in terms of clinical improvement. This is in striking contrast to the results in experimental rodent models of these diseases. The outcome of the recent DPT-1 trial testing oral insulin in individuals at risk of type 1 diabetes was also disappointing, in contrast to the effects of oral insulin in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes. However, it is premature to conclude that mucosal tolerance works only in in-bred rodents and not in humans with autoimmune disease. Except for oral insulin in DPT-1, the human trials were performed in individuals with end-stage disease when this form of immune regulation might not be expected to be effective. Importantly, in no trial was an immune response to the autoantigen documented, to demonstrate that the dose was at least bioavailable. Furthermore, mucosal autoantigen administration is a 'double-edged sword' and in rodents can lead not only to regulatory and protective immunity but also to pathogenic, tissue-destructive immunity and exacerbation of autoimmune disease. When suppression of autoimmune disease is observed it may be because autoantigen was administered under conditions which minimize induction of pathogenic immunity. Thus, clinical protocols for mucosal autoantigen administration may need to be modified to favor induction of regulatory immunity. In this short review, we discuss recent studies in autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice indicating that with novel modifications mucosal autoantigen administration could be harnessed to prevent type 1 diabetes in humans. PMID:17491673

  14. Diabetes and Risk of Surgical Site Infection: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Knott, Caitlin; Nguyen, Huong; Santarossa, Maressa; Evans, Richard; Bertran, Elizabeth; Jaber, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the independent association between diabetes and SSI across multiple surgical procedures. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Studies indexed in PubMed published between December 1985 and through July 2015 were identified through the search terms “risk factors” or “glucose” and “surgical site infection”. A total of 3,631 abstracts were identified through the initial search terms. Full texts were reviewed for 522 articles. Of these, 94 articles met the criteria for inclusion. Standardized data collection forms were used to extract study-specific estimates for diabetes, blood glucose levels, and body mass index (BMI). Random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate pooled estimates and meta-regression was used to evaluate specific hypothesized sources of heterogeneity. Results The primary outcome was SSI, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria. The overall effect size for the association between diabetes and SSI was OR=1.53 (95% Predictive Interval 1.11, 2.12, I2: 57.2%). SSI class, study design, or patient BMI did not significantly impact study results in a meta-regression model. The association was higher for cardiac surgery 2.03 (95% Predictive Interval 1.13, 4.05) compared to surgeries of other types (p=0.001). Conclusion These results support the consideration of diabetes as an independent risk factor for SSIs for multiple surgical procedure types. Continued efforts are needed to improve surgical outcomes for diabetic patients. PMID:26503187

  15. Special Diabetes Program for Indians: Retention in Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Spero M.; Jiang, Luohua; Zhang, Lijing; Beals, Janette; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the associations between participant and site characteristics and retention in a multisite cardiovascular disease risk reduction project. Design and Methods: Data were derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project, an intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk among American Indians and Alaska Natives with diabetes. In 2006, a total of 1,072 participants from 30 participating sites completed baseline questionnaires measuring demographics and sociobehavioral factors. They also underwent a medical examination at baseline and were reassessed annually after baseline. A Provider Annual Questionnaire was administered to staff members of each grantee site at the end of each year to assess site characteristics. Generalized estimating equation models were used to evaluate the relationships between participant and site characteristics and retention 1 year after baseline. Results: Among enrolled participants, 792 (74%) completed their first annual assessment. Participants who completed the first annual assessment tended to be older and had, at baseline, higher body mass index and higher level of physical activity. Site characteristics associated with retention included average age of staff, proportion of female staff members, and percentage of staff members having completed graduate or professional school. Implications: Understanding successful retention must reach beyond individual characteristics of participants to include features of the settings that house the interventions. PMID:21565816

  16. Challenges and Opportunities in the Management of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: Lifestyle and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michelle; Giani, Elisa; Laffel, Lori

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Specific risk factors associated with diabetes, such as hyperglycemia and kidney disease, have been demonstrated to increase the incidence and progression of CVD. Nevertheless, few data exist on the effects of traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, obesity, and hypertension on CVD risk in youth with T1D. Improvements in understanding and approaches to the evaluation and management of CVD risk factors, specifically for young persons with T1D, are desirable. Recent advances in noninvasive techniques to detect early vascular damage, such as the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction and aortic or carotid intima-media thickness, provide new tools to evaluate the progression of CVD in childhood. In the present review, current CVD risk factor management, challenges, and potential therapeutic interventions in youth with T1D are described. PMID:26520142

  17. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: is comprehensive treatment required?].

    PubMed

    Nadal, Josep Franch; Gutiérrez, Pedro Conthe

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2, is a metabolic disease involving the coexistence of several cardiovascular risk factors. Affected patients are therefore at high cardiovascular risk (2-3 times higher than that of men in the general population and 2-6 times higher than that of women). Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the diabetic population, followed by cancer. Cardiovascular risk cannot be compared between diabetic patients and persons who have already shown one or more manifestations of cardiovascular disease (such as myocardial infarction). Single risk factors should be evaluated in combination with other risk factors and a person's cardiovascular risk should be individually assessed. Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with diabetes through current calculations methods is complex because their ability to predict risk in individuals is very low. Studies such as that by Steno have demonstrated the validity of a comprehensive strategy to control all the risk factors present in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can reduce the development of micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality by almost 50%. The present article reviews each of the classical cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, sedentariness) in relation to diabetes, as well as their recommended targets and the benefits of their control. In view of the above, a comprehensive approach is recommended to control the multiple risk factors that can coexist in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24444518

  18. GAD65 Autoantibodies Detected by Electrochemiluminescence Assay Identify High Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Dongmei; Guyer, K. Michelle; Dong, Fran; Jiang, Ling; Steck, Andrea K.; Rewers, Marian; Eisenbarth, George S.; Yu, Liping

    2013-01-01

    The identification of diabetes-relevant islet autoantibodies is essential for predicting and preventing type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of the current study was to evaluate a newly developed electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-GAD antibody (GADA) assay and compare its sensitivity and disease relevance with standard radioassay. The assay was validated with serum samples from 227 newly diagnosed diabetic children; 68 prediabetic children who were prospectively followed to T1D; 130 nondiabetic children with confirmed islet autoantibodies to insulin, GAD65, IA-2, and/or ZnT8 longitudinally followed for 12 ± 3.7 years; and 181 age-matched, healthy, antibody-negative children. The ECL-GADA assay had a sensitivity similar to that of the standard GADA radioassay in children newly diagnosed with T1D, prediabetic children, and high-risk children with multiple positive islet autoantibodies. On the other hand, only 9 of 39 nondiabetic children with only a single islet autoantibody (GADA only) by radioassay were positive for ECL-GADA. GADA not detectable by ECL assay is shown to be of low affinity and likely not predictive of future diabetes. In conclusion, the new ECL assay identifies disease-relevant GADA by radioassay. It may help to improve the prediction and correct diagnosis of T1D among subjects positive only for GADA and no other islet autoantibodies. PMID:23974918

  19. Chloroquine improves left ventricle diastolic function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xun; Xiao, Yi-Chuan; Zhang, Gui-Ping; Hou, Ning; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Wen-Liang; Luo, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Gen-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a potent risk factor for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Autophagy can be activated under pathological conditions, including diabetic cardiomyopathy. The therapeutic effects of chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, on left ventricle function in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were investigated. The cardiac function, light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I ratio, p62, beclin 1, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and fibrosis were measured 14 days after CQ (ip 60 mg/kg/d) administration. In STZ-induced mice, cardiac diastolic function was decreased significantly with normal ejection fraction. CQ significantly ameliorated cardiac diastolic function in diabetic mice with HFpEF. In addition, CQ decreased the autophagolysosomes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac fibrosis but increased LC3-II and p62 expressions. These results suggested that CQ improved the cardiac diastolic function by inhibiting autophagy in STZ-induced HFpEF mice. Autophagic inhibitor CQ might be a potential therapeutic agent for HFpEF. PMID:27621594

  20. Chloroquine improves left ventricle diastolic function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xun; Xiao, Yi-Chuan; Zhang, Gui-Ping; Hou, Ning; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Wen-Liang; Luo, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Gen-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a potent risk factor for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Autophagy can be activated under pathological conditions, including diabetic cardiomyopathy. The therapeutic effects of chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, on left ventricle function in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were investigated. The cardiac function, light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I ratio, p62, beclin 1, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and fibrosis were measured 14 days after CQ (ip 60 mg/kg/d) administration. In STZ-induced mice, cardiac diastolic function was decreased significantly with normal ejection fraction. CQ significantly ameliorated cardiac diastolic function in diabetic mice with HFpEF. In addition, CQ decreased the autophagolysosomes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac fibrosis but increased LC3-II and p62 expressions. These results suggested that CQ improved the cardiac diastolic function by inhibiting autophagy in STZ-induced HFpEF mice. Autophagic inhibitor CQ might be a potential therapeutic agent for HFpEF. PMID:27621594

  1. Time Spent Walking and Risk of Diabetes in Japanese Adults: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Kabeya, Yusuke; Goto, Atsushi; Kato, Masayuki; Matsushita, Yumi; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Isogawa, Akihiro; Inoue, Manami; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between time spent walking and risk of diabetes was investigated in a Japanese population-based cohort. Methods Data from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Diabetes cohort were analyzed. The surveys of diabetes were performed at baseline and at the 5-year follow-up. Time spent walking per day was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire (<30 minutes, 30 minutes to <1 hour, 1 to <2 hours, or ≥2 hours). A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 26 488 adults in the baseline survey. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between time spent walking and the presence of unrecognized diabetes. We then performed a longitudinal analysis that was restricted to 11 101 non-diabetic adults who participated in both the baseline and 5-year surveys. The association between time spent walking and the incidence of diabetes during the 5 years was examined. Results In the cross-sectional analysis, 1058 participants had unrecognized diabetes. Those with time spent walking of <30 minutes per day had increased odds of having diabetes in relation to those with time spent walking of ≥2 hours (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02–1.48). In the longitudinal analysis, 612 participants developed diabetes during the 5 years of follow-up. However, a significant association between time spent walking and the incidence of diabetes was not observed. Conclusions Increased risk of diabetes was implied in those with time spent walking of <30 minutes per day, although the longitudinal analysis failed to show a significant result. PMID:26725285

  2. Addressing risk factors, screening, and preventative treatment for diabetic retinopathy in developing countries: a review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Stephanie; Ramulu, Pradeep; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-05-01

    The number of people with diabetic retinopathy (DR) has increased with the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus worldwide, especially in developing countries. In recent years, the successful implementation of public health programs in developed countries has been thought to contribute to decreases in blindness from DR. Developing countries, however, have not seen the same improvements, and their public health interventions still face significant challenges. In this review we describe the current state of public health approaches including risk factor control, screening and treatment techniques for DR in developing countries, and suggest recommendations. While the awareness of DR is variable, specific knowledge about DR is low, such that many patients have already experienced vision loss by the time they are screened. Attempts to improve rates of screening, in particular through non-mydriatic cameras and tele-screening, are ongoing and promising, although challenges include collaboration with healthcare systems and technology failures. Laser treatment is the most readily available, with anti-VEGF therapy and vitreo-retinal surgery increasingly sought after and provided. Recommendations include the use of 'targeted mydriasis' for fundus imaging to address high rates of ungradable images, increased communication with diabetes management services to improve patient retention and mobilization of access to DR treatments. PMID:26991970

  3. Patient reactions to a web-based cardiovascular risk calculator in type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Tom; Dack, Charlotte; Pal, Kingshuk; Ross, Jamie; Stevenson, Fiona A; Peacock, Richard; Pearson, Mike; Spiegelhalter, David; Sweeting, Michael; Murray, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of risk calculators for specific diseases is increasing, with an underlying assumption that they promote risk reduction as users become better informed and motivated to take preventive action. Empirical data to support this are, however, sparse and contradictory. Aim To explore user reactions to a cardiovascular risk calculator for people with type 2 diabetes. Objectives were to identify cognitive and emotional reactions to the presentation of risk, with a view to understanding whether and how such a calculator could help motivate users to adopt healthier behaviours and/or improve adherence to medication. Design and setting Qualitative study combining data from focus groups and individual user experience. Adults with type 2 diabetes were recruited through website advertisements and posters displayed at local GP practices and diabetes groups. Method Participants used a risk calculator that provided individualised estimates of cardiovascular risk. Estimates were based on UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) data, supplemented with data from trials and systematic reviews. Risk information was presented using natural frequencies, visual displays, and a range of formats. Data were recorded and transcribed, then analysed by a multidisciplinary group. Results Thirty-six participants contributed data. Users demonstrated a range of complex cognitive and emotional responses, which might explain the lack of change in health behaviours demonstrated in the literature. Conclusion Cardiovascular risk calculators for people with diabetes may best be used in conjunction with health professionals who can guide the user through the calculator and help them use the resulting risk information as a source of motivation and encouragement. PMID:25733436

  4. Mechanisms of Diabetes Improvement Following Bariatric/Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Batterham, Rachel L; Cummings, David E

    2016-06-01

    More than 20 years ago, Pories et al. published a seminal article, "Who Would Have Thought It? An Operation Proves to Be the Most Effective Therapy for Adult-Onset Diabetes Mellitus." This was based on their observation that bariatric surgery rapidly normalized blood glucose levels in obese people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 10 years later, almost 90% remained diabetes free. Pories et al. suggested that caloric restriction played a key role and that the relative contributions of proximal intestinal nutrient exclusion, rapid distal gut nutrient delivery, and the role of gut hormones required further investigation. These findings of T2DM improvement/remission after bariatric surgery have been widely replicated, together with the observation that bariatric surgery prevents or delays incident T2DM. Over the ensuing two decades, important glucoregulatory roles of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract have been firmly established. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial glycemic effects of bariatric surgery remain incompletely understood. In addition to the mechanisms proposed by Pories et al., changes in bile acid metabolism, GI tract nutrient sensing and glucose utilization, incretins, possible anti-incretin(s), and the intestinal microbiome are implicated. These changes, acting through peripheral and/or central pathways, lead to reduced hepatic glucose production, increased tissue glucose uptake, improved insulin sensitivity, and enhanced β-cell function. A constellation of factors, rather than a single overarching mechanism, likely mediate postoperative glycemic improvement, with the contributing factors varying according to the surgical procedure. Thus, different bariatric/metabolic procedures provide us with experimental tools to probe GI tract physiology. Embracing this approach through the application of detailed phenotyping, genomics, metabolomics, and gut microbiome studies will enhance our understanding of

  5. Effect of genotype on success of lifestyle intervention in subjects at risk for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, Peter; Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Laakso, Markku; Fritsche, Andreas

    2007-02-01

    Lifestyle intervention programs including increased physical activity and healthy nutrition have been proven to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. This is achieved mainly by reducing body weight and improving insulin sensitivity. However, response to lifestyle or dietary interventions does differ between individuals, and the genetic or environmental factors that may account for these differences are not yet precisely characterized. Identification of these factors would be desirable in order to provide an individually tailored preventive strategy for patients at risk of developing diabetes. This review summarizes the so far known genetic variations, which determine responders and nonresponders to a lifestyle intervention. In addition, general methodological approaches to study gene-lifestyle interactions are described. PMID:17165091

  6. Melatonin ameliorates metabolic risk factors, modulates apoptotic proteins, and protects the rat heart against diabetes-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali H; El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Othman, Azza I

    2015-01-15

    The present study investigated the ability of melatonin in reducing metabolic risk factors and cardiac apoptosis induced by diabetes. Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into male rats, and after diabetic induction melatonin (10mg/kg i.g.) was administered orally for 21 days. Diabetic hearts showed increased number of apoptotic cells with downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of p53 and CD95 as well as the caspases 9, 8 and 3. In addition, there was a significant decrease in insulin level, hyperglycemia, elevated HOMA-IR, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low and very low-density lipoprotein and decreased high-density lipoprotein. These changes were coupled with a significant increase in the activities of creatin kinase-MB (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the serum of the diabetic rats indicating myocardium injury. Oral administration of melatonin for 3 weeks after diabetes induction ameliorated the levels of hyperglycemia, insulin, HbA1c, lipids profile and HOMA-IR. The oral melatonin treatment of diabetic rats significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the heart compared to diabetic rats. It enhanced Bcl-2 expression and blocked the activation of CD95 as well as caspases 9, 8 and 3. These changes were accompanied with significant improvement of CK-MB and LDH in the serum indicating the ameliorative effect of melatonin on myocardium injury. Melatonin effectively ameliorated diabetic myocardium injury, apoptosis, reduced the metabolic risk factors and modulated important steps in both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Thus, melatonin may be a promising pharmacological agent for ameliorating potential cardiomyopathy associated with diabetes. PMID:25510232

  7. Evaluation of Major Online Diabetes Risk Calculators and Computerized Predictive Models

    PubMed Central

    Stiglic, Gregor; Pajnkihar, Majda

    2015-01-01

    Classical paper-and-pencil based risk assessment questionnaires are often accompanied by the online versions of the questionnaire to reach a wider population. This study focuses on the loss, especially in risk estimation performance, that can be inflicted by direct transformation from the paper to online versions of risk estimation calculators by ignoring the possibilities of more complex and accurate calculations that can be performed using the online calculators. We empirically compare the risk estimation performance between four major diabetes risk calculators and two, more advanced, predictive models. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999–2012 was used to evaluate the performance of detecting diabetes and pre-diabetes. American Diabetes Association risk test achieved the best predictive performance in category of classical paper-and-pencil based tests with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.699 for undiagnosed diabetes (0.662 for pre-diabetes) and 47% (47% for pre-diabetes) persons selected for screening. Our results demonstrate a significant difference in performance with additional benefits for a lower number of persons selected for screening when statistical methods are used. The best AUC overall was obtained in diabetes risk prediction using logistic regression with AUC of 0.775 (0.734) and an average 34% (48%) persons selected for screening. However, generalized boosted regression models might be a better option from the economical point of view as the number of selected persons for screening of 30% (47%) lies significantly lower for diabetes risk assessment in comparison to logistic regression (p < 0.001), with a significantly higher AUC (p < 0.001) of 0.774 (0.740) for the pre-diabetes group. Our results demonstrate a serious lack of predictive performance in four major online diabetes risk calculators. Therefore, one should take great care and consider optimizing the online versions of questionnaires that were

  8. Improvement of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care by the Development of Educational Programs

    PubMed Central

    Vissarion, Bakalis; Malliarou, Maria; Theofilou, Paraskevi; Zyga, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion educational programs help patients with diabetes to obtain information about their condition and improve their self-care skills. PMID:26973922

  9. Risk factors for gestational diabetes: is prevention possible?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Rawal, Shristi; Chong, Yap Seng

    2016-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common pregnancy complication, continues to be a significant public health and clinical problem. It carries significant short-term and long-term adverse health outcomes for both mother and offspring, which reinforces the significance of understanding risk factors, in particular modifiable factors, for GDM and of preventing the condition. Research in the past decade from observational studies has identified a few diet and lifestyle factors that are associated with GDM risk and demonstrated that time frames both before and during pregnancy may be relevant to the development of GDM. Findings from intervention studies on the effect of diet and lifestyle on the prevention of GDM have been largely controversial and inconsistent. Variations in study population, types of intervention, timing and duration of intervention and diagnostic criteria for GDM may all at least partly account for the large heterogeneity in the findings from these intervention studies. This review provides an overview of emerging diet, lifestyle, and other factors that may help to prevent GDM, and the challenges associated with prevention. It also discusses major methodological concerns about the available epidemiological studies on GDM risk factors. Findings from both observational and intervention studies are discussed. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Gestational diabetes: what's up?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Peter Damm and Colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3985-5 , and by Marja Vääräsmäki, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3976-6 ) and an overview by the Session Chair, Kerstin Berntorp (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3975-7 ). PMID:27165093

  10. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Increase the Risks of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to examine whether poor glycemic control, measured by glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) and other cardiovascular risk factors, can predict diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients aged ≥30 years with type 2 DM, enrolled in the National Diabetes Care Management Program, and free of DPN (n = 37,375) in the period 2002 to 2004 were included and followed up until 2011. The related factors were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. For an average follow-up of 7.00 years, 8379 cases of DPN were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 32.04/1000 person-years. After multivariate adjustment, patients with HbA1c levels 7 to 8%, 8 to 9%, 9 to 10%, and ≥10% exhibited higher risk of DPN (adjusted HR: 1.11 [1.04–1.20], 1.30 [1.21–1.40], 1.32 [1.22–1.43], and 1.62 [1.51–1.74], respectively) compared with patients with HbA1c level 6 to 7%. There was a significant linear trend in DPN incidence with increasing HbA1c (P < 0.001) and significant HRs of DPN for patients with HbA1c level ≥7%, blood pressure ≥130/85 mm Hg, triglycerides (TG) ≥150 mg/dL, high density of lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) <40 mg/dL in males and <50 mg/dL in females, low density of lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥100 mg/dL, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Patients with type 2 DM and HbA1c ≥7.0% exhibit increased risk of DPN, demonstrating a linear relationship. The incidence of DPN is also associated with poor glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension, hyper-triglyceridemia, low HDL-C, high LDL-C, and decreased eGFR. PMID:26496307