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Sample records for improve pregnancy outcome

  1. Improving maternal nutrition for better pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nnam, N M

    2015-11-01

    Much has been learned during the past several decades about the role of maternal nutrition in the outcome of pregnancy. While the bulk of the data is derived from animal models, human observations are gradually accumulating. There is need to improve maternal nutrition because of the high neonatal mortality rate especially in developing countries. The author used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors into account when interpreting study findings. Nutrition plays a vital role in reducing some of the health risks associated with pregnancy such as risk of fetal and infant mortality, intra-uterine growth retardation, low birth weight and premature births, decreased birth defects, cretinism, poor brain development and risk of infection. Adequate nutrition is essential for a woman throughout her life cycle to ensure proper development and prepare the reproductive life of the woman. Pregnant women require varied diets and increased nutrient intake to cope with the extra needs during pregnancy. Use of dietary supplements and fortified foods should be encouraged for pregnant women to ensure adequate supply of nutrients for both mother and foetus. The author concludes that nutrition education should be a core component of Mother and Child Health Clinics and every opportunity should be utilised to give nutrition education on appropriate diets for pregnant women. PMID:26264457

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  4. Improving pregnancy outcome during imprisonment: a model residential care program.

    PubMed

    Siefert, K; Pimlott, S

    2001-04-01

    The female prison population has increased dramatically in recent years. Most women prisoners are involved with drugs, and as many as 25 percent are pregnant or have delivered within the past year. Reproductive health and drug treatment services for women in prison are inadequate, if they are available at all, and although illicit drugs are readily available in prison, drug-involved pregnant women often are incarcerated to protect fetal health. Studies of pregnancy outcome among women prisoners have demonstrated high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. This article examines issues related to pregnancy among women prisoners and describes an innovative residential program designed for pregnant, drug-dependent women in a state adult corrections system. Social workers can play an important role in promoting policy reform and improved services for this underserved population. PMID:11329642

  5. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby's health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal-fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  6. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  7. Pregnancy Medical Home Care Pathways Improve Quality of Perinatal Care and Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Berrien, Kate; Ollendorff, Arthur; Menard, M Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The clinical leadership of the Pregnancy Medical Home (PMH) program develops and disseminates clinical pathways to promote evidence-based practice and to improve quality of care and outcomes. PMH pathways represent the first standardized clinical guidance for obstetric providers statewide across all care settings. PMID:26509523

  8. Methamphetamines and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Tricia E.; Schuetter, Renee; Tellei, Jacqueline; Sauvage, Lynnae

    2014-01-01

    during pregnancy. Stopping MA use at any time during pregnancy improves birth outcomes, thus resources should be directed towards providing treatment and prenatal care. PMID:25599434

  9. A complex intervention to improve pregnancy outcome in obese women; the UPBEAT randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread recognition that obesity in pregnant women is associated with adverse outcomes for mother and child, there is no intervention proven to reduce the risk of these complications. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial is to assess in obese pregnant women, whether a complex behavioural intervention, based on changing diet (to foods with a lower glycemic index) and physical activity, will reduce the risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) and delivery of a large for gestational age (LGA) infant. A secondary aim is to determine whether the intervention lowers the long term risk of obesity in the offspring. Methods/Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing a behavioural intervention designed to improve glycemic control with standard antenatal care in obese pregnant women. Inclusion criteria; women with a BMI ≥30 kg/m2 and a singleton pregnancy between 15+0 weeks and 18+6 weeks’ gestation. Exclusion criteria; pre-defined, pre-existing diseases and multiple pregnancy. Randomisation is on-line by a computer generated programme and is minimised by BMI category, maternal age, ethnicity, parity and centre. Intervention; this is delivered by a health trainer over 8 sessions. Based on control theory, with elements of social cognitive theory, the intervention is designed to improve maternal glycemic control. Women randomised to the control arm receive standard antenatal care until delivery according to local guidelines. All women have a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 27+0- 28+6 weeks’ gestation. Primary outcome; Maternal: diagnosis of GDM, according to the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) criteria. Neonatal; infant LGA defined as >90th customised birth weight centile. Sample size; 1546 women to provide 80% power to detect a 25% reduction in the incidence of GDM and a 30% reduction in infants large for gestational age. Discussion All aspects of this protocol have been

  10. Conservative surgical treatment of adenomyosis to improve fertility: Controversial values, indications, complications, and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Lee, Fa-Kung; Seow, Kok-Min; Chang, Wei-Chun; Wang, Jia-Wei; Chen, Shee-Uan; Chao, Hsiang-Tai; Yen, Min-Shyen; Wang, Peng-Hui

    2015-12-01

    treatment for adenomyosis to improve fertility, including controversial values, indications, complications, and pregnancy outcomes, might be very important, and might help physicians in managing these patients in the future. PMID:26700977

  11. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  12. Leaf Concentrate Fortification of Antenatal Protein-Calorie Snacks Improves Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Anjna; Joshi, Pallavi; Davys (Late), Glyn; Attlee, Amita; Mathur, Beena

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ready-to-eat (RTE) snacks are routinely distributed to pregnant women in India. These provide protein and calories but are low in micronutrients. We investigated whether RTE snacks fortified with leaf concentrate (LC) could improve pregnancy outcomes, including maternal haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations and infants’ birthweight. This randomized controlled two-arm trial was conducted over 18 months: control (sRTE) group received standard 120 g RTE snack (102 g wheat flour, 18 g soya flour); intervention (lcRTE) group received the same snack fortified with 7 g LC. The study was conducted in Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. One hundred and five pregnant women aged 18-35 years were studied. Among the 105 women randomized to the two arms of the trial, 2 (1.9%) were severely anaemic (Hb ≤6.0 g/dL); 55 (53.4%) were moderately anaemic (Hb 6.0-8.0 g/dL); 34 (33.0%) were mildly anaemic (Hb 8.6-10.9 g/dL); and 12 (11.7%) were not anaemic (Hb ≥11.0 g/dL). In the final month of pregnancy, 83.0% (39/47) of women in the sRTE group had Hb ≤8.5 g/dL compared to 37.8% (17/45) in the lcRTE group (p<0.001). After adjustment for age and baseline Hb concentration, the difference in Hb concentrations due to LC fortification was 0.94 g/dL (95% CI 6.8-12.0; p<0.001). Mean live birthweight in the lcRTE group was 2,695 g (SD 325 g) compared to 2,545 g (297 g) in the sRTE group (p=0.02). The lcRTE snacks increased infants’ birthweight by 133.7 g (95% CI 7.3-260.2; p=0.04) compared to sRTE snacks. Leaf concentrate fortification of antenatal protein-calorie snacks in a low-income setting in India protected against declining maternal haemoglobin concentrations and increased infants’ birthweight when compared with unfortified snacks. These findings require replication in a larger trial. PMID:25395906

  13. Effectiveness of Home Visits in Pregnancy as a Public Health Measure to Improve Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Kayoko; Fujiwara, Takeo; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Background Birth outcomes, such as preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW), and small for gestational age (SGA), are crucial indicators of child development and health. Purpose To evaluate whether home visits from public health nurses for high-risk pregnant women prevent adverse birth outcomes. Methods In this quasi-experimental cohort study in Kyoto city, Japan, high-risk pregnant women were defined as teenage girls (range 14–19 years old), women with a twin pregnancy, women who registered their pregnancy late, had a physical or mental illness, were of single marital status, non-Japanese women who were not fluent in Japanese, or elderly primiparas. We collected data from all high-risk pregnant women at pregnancy registration interviews held at a public health centers between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012, as well as birth outcomes when delivered from the Maternal and Child Health Handbook (N = 964), which is a record of prenatal check-ups, delivery, child development and vaccinations. Of these women, 622 women were selected based on the home-visit program propensity score-matched sample (pair of N = 311) and included in the analysis. Data were analyzed between January and June 2014. Results In the propensity score-matched sample, women who received the home-visit program had lower odds of preterm birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.98) and showed a 0.55-week difference in gestational age (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.92) compared to the matched controlled sample. Although the program did not prevent LBW and SGA, children born to mothers who received the program showed an increase in birth weight by 107.8 g (95% CI: 27.0 to 188.5). Conclusion Home visits by public health nurses for high-risk pregnant women in Japan might be effective in preventing preterm birth, but not SGA. PMID:26348847

  14. Traditional birth attendant training for improving health behaviours and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Lynn M; Sipe, Theresa Ann; Barry, Danika

    2014-01-01

    Background Between the 1970s and 1990s, the World Health Organization promoted traditional birth attendant (TBA) training as one strategy to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. To date, evidence in support of TBA training is limited but promising for some mortality outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of TBA training on health behaviours and pregnancy outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (18 June 2012), citation alerts from our work and reference lists of studies identified in the search. Selection criteria Published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCT), comparing trained versus untrained TBAs, additionally trained versus trained TBAs, or women cared for/living in areas served by TBAs. Data collection and analysis Three authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data in the original and first update review. Three authors and one external reviewer independently assessed study quality and two extracted data in this second update. Main results Six studies involving over 1345 TBAs, more than 32,000 women and approximately 57,000 births that examined the effects of TBA training for trained versus untrained TBAs (one study) and additionally trained TBA training versus trained TBAs (five studies) are included in this review. These studies consist of individual randomised trials (two studies) and cluster-randomised trials (four studies). The primary outcomes across the sample of studies were perinatal deaths, stillbirths and neonatal deaths (early, late and overall). Trained TBAs versus untrained TBAs: one cluster-randomised trial found a significantly lower perinatal death rate in the trained versus untrained TBA clusters (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.59 to 0.83), lower stillbirth rate (adjusted OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.83) and lower neonatal death rate (adjusted OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.82). This study also found the maternal death

  15. A multi-centre phase IIa clinical study of predictive testing for preeclampsia: improved pregnancy outcomes via early detection (IMPROvED)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 5% of first time pregnancies are complicated by pre-eclampsia, the leading cause of maternal death in Europe. No clinically useful screening test exists; consequentially clinicians are unable to offer targeted surveillance or preventative strategies. IMPROvED Consortium members have pioneered a personalised medicine approach to identifying blood-borne biomarkers through recent technological advancements, involving mapping of the blood metabolome and proteome. The key objective is to develop a sensitive, specific, high-throughput and economically viable early pregnancy screening test for pre-eclampsia. Methods/Design We report the design of a multicentre, phase IIa clinical study aiming to recruit 5000 low risk primiparous women to assess and refine innovative prototype tests based on emerging metabolomic and proteomic technologies. Participation involves maternal phlebotomy at 15 and 20 weeks’ gestation, with optional testing and biobanking at 11 and 34 weeks. Blood samples will be analysed using two innovative, proprietary prototype platforms; one metabolomic based and one proteomic based, both of which outperform current biomarker based screening tests at comparable gestations. Analytical and clinical data will be collated and analysed via the Copenhagen Trials Unit. Discussion The IMPROvED study is expected to refine proteomic and metabolomic panels, combined with clinical parameters, and evaluate clinical applicability as an early pregnancy predictive test for pre-eclampsia. If ‘at risk’ patients can be identified, this will allow stratified care with personalised fetal and maternal surveillance, early diagnosis, timely intervention, and significant health economic savings. The IMPROvED biobank will be accessible to the European scientific community for high quality research into the cause and prevention of adverse pregnancy outcome. Trial registration Trial registration number NCT01891240 The IMPROvED project is funded by the seventh framework

  16. First look: a cluster-randomized trial of ultrasound to improve pregnancy outcomes in low income country settings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In high-resource settings, obstetric ultrasound is a standard component of prenatal care used to identify pregnancy complications and to establish an accurate gestational age in order to improve obstetric care. Whether or not ultrasound use will improve care and ultimately pregnancy outcomes in low-resource settings is unknown. Methods/Design This multi-country cluster randomized trial will assess the impact of antenatal ultrasound screening performed by health care staff on a composite outcome consisting of maternal mortality and maternal near-miss, stillbirth and neonatal mortality in low-resource community settings. The trial will utilize an existing research infrastructure, the Global Network for Women’s and Children’s Health Research with sites in Pakistan, Kenya, Zambia, Democratic Republic of Congo and Guatemala. A maternal and newborn health registry in defined geographic areas which documents all pregnancies and their outcomes to 6 weeks post-delivery will provide population-based rates of maternal mortality and morbidity, stillbirth, neonatal mortality and morbidity, and health care utilization for study clusters. A total of 58 study clusters each with a health center and about 500 births per year will be randomized (29 intervention and 29 control). The intervention includes training of health workers (e.g., nurses, midwives, clinical officers) to perform ultrasound examinations during antenatal care, generally at 18–22 and at 32–36 weeks for each subject. Women who are identified as having a complication of pregnancy will be referred to a hospital for appropriate care. Finally, the intervention includes community sensitization activities to inform women and their families of the availability of ultrasound at the antenatal care clinic and training in emergency obstetric and neonatal care at referral facilities. Discussion In summary, our trial will evaluate whether introduction of ultrasound during antenatal care improves pregnancy

  17. Improving pregnancy outcomes: public versus private care for urban, low-income women.

    PubMed

    Handler, A; Rosenberg, D

    1992-09-01

    This study describes the characteristics of women who received maternity care from the Chicago Department of Health or from private practitioners in 1988 and the first half of 1989, and who delivered at the University of Illinois Hospital or Cook County Hospital. The risk of preterm low birthweight for the infants of these women was compared according to source of prenatal care. The likelihood of giving birth to a preterm, low-birthweight infant was significantly greater (odds ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval 2.3-4.0) for women who received care only from private physicians (n = 530) compared with those who received care entirely from the Chicago Department of Health (n = 2465). This relationship remained after adjustment for race, age, parity, history of adverse pregnancy outcomes, smoking, and use of drugs during pregnancy. We examined alternative explanations for these findings, and concluded that although the role of urban public health departments in the direct delivery of maternity care services continues to be a source of controversy, these institutions remain an important provider of such care for low-income women. PMID:1388438

  18. Women, work and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Huffman, S

    1988-01-01

    In developing countries, 1/3 of infants are born weighing less than 2500 grams. A study conducted in Ethiopia among women consuming about 1600 kcal/day, those who were very physically active during pregnancy bore smaller babies, and gained less weight during pregnancy, than those who were not so active. Average birth weight was 3068 grams for the 1st group, 3270 grams for the less active. The active group of women gained an average of 6.5 kilograms, and the less active 9.2 kilograms. Women who did not engage in heavy work during pregnancy, although they were undernourished, apparently did not bear growth-retarded babies. Indirect evidence for the effect of physical activity on pregnancy outcome comes from studies conducted in Taiwan, and the Gambia. These studies, and others from Malawi, Burkina Faso, and Kenya have shown that women's energy expenditures vary greatly with the agricultural season. Daily housekeeping tasks, however, also consume a lot of women's energy. Technologies that allow women to reduce energy expenditure can have beneficial effects, if they do not simultaneously reduce their incomes. For instance, programs improving water or fuel availability, or reducing fuel needs, reduce women's energy expenditures. Food processing mills can help too if women have access to them, and are thus not in danger of being displaced from their jobs and losing necessary income. Examples of technology improving women's tasks are pedal drying machines for nice in Bangladesh, using a greater and pressing machine to prepare gari in Ghana; but growing thicker rice stalks in Indonesia displaced women workers and reduced income. PMID:12342139

  19. Lifestyle interventions for overweight and obese pregnant women to improve pregnancy outcome: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity pose a big challenge to pregnancy as they are associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcome. Evidence of lifestyle intervention resulting in improved pregnancy outcome is conflicting. Hence the objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of antenatal dietary, activity, behaviour or lifestyle interventions in overweight and obese pregnant women to improve maternal and perinatal outcomes. Methods A systematic review and meta-analyses of randomised and non-randomised clinical trials following prior registration (CRD420111122 http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO) and PRISMA guidelines was employed. A search of the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Maternity and Infant care and eight other databases for studies published prior to January 2012 was undertaken. Electronic literature searches, study selection, methodology and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to Cochrane risk of bias tool. All appropriate randomised and non-randomised clinical trials were included while exclusions consisted of interventions in pregnant women who were not overweight or obese, had pre-existing diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome, and systematic reviews. Maternal outcome measures, including maternal gestational weight gain, gestational diabetes and Caesarean section, were documented. Fetal outcomes, including large for gestational age and macrosomia (birth weight > 4 kg), were also documented. Results Thirteen randomised and six non-randomised clinical trials were identified and included in the meta-analysis. The evidence suggests antenatal dietary and lifestyle intervention in obese pregnant women reduces maternal pregnancy weight gain (10 randomised clinical trials; n = 1228; -2.21 kg (95% confidence interval -2.86 kg to -1.59 kg)) and a trend towards a reduction in the prevalence of gestational diabetes (six randomised clinical trials; n

  20. Leptin and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Kratzsch, J; Höckel, M; Kiess, W

    2000-12-01

    Leptin, a recently discovered hormone that is involved in the regulation of body weight, appears to be one of the hormonal factors that signal the body's readiness for sexual maturation and reproduction to the brain. The present review focuses on clinical and experimental studies that describe the roles of maternal and foetal leptin as predictive factors for the physiological and pathophysiological development of the foetus during pregnancy, assisted reproduction and neonatal life. Through evaluating alterations of maternal serum leptin levels, a physiological hyperleptinaemia has been observed to occur, particularly during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, which is not associated with a decreased food intake or reduced metabolic activity in the pregnant women. This state of leptin resistance is comparable to the condition in obesity. In contrast, hypoleptinaemia is suggested to be an indicator for the cessation of pregnancy, either naturally at term or as a result of pathology at any time during gestation. Thus, an appropriate maternal leptin level seems to be a prerequisite for a normal pregnancy. The main source of foetal leptin is the still immature foetal adipose tissue. As intrauterine growth has been found to be independently associated with cord blood leptin level, it has been suggested that leptin plays a role as a regulator of foetal growth. During assisted reproduction cycles leptin levels in the follicular fluid of patients may be also of predictive value, with low levels predicting therapeutic failure. Finally, the relevance of leptin to postnatal development is reviewed; leptin may be important for regulation of satiety and peripheral metabolism. In summary, leptin appears to be an important permissive factor that is involved in female reproduction. PMID:11128413

  1. Pregnancy outcome and uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Parazzini, Fabio; Tozzi, Luca; Bianchi, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Myomas are observed in about 3-12% of pregnant women. Uterine fibroids may affect the outcome of pregnancy. The presence of myomas - in particular of myomas that distort the uterine cavity and larger intramural myomas - has been associated with infertility. In the case of pregnancy, it has been linked to an increased risk of spontaneous abortion, fetal malpresentation, placenta previa, preterm birth, cesarean section, and peripartum hemorrhage. Although fibroids may negatively affect pregnancy outcome, the impact of their treatment, particularly in quantitative terms, is unclear. Hysteroscopic myomectomy is the treatment of choice for submucous fibroids. The comparative efficacy of laparoscopic, laparotomic, or new modalities of treatment of intramural fibroids is not known. Up to date the choice and modalities of treatment of submucous fibroids should not be based on sound evidence but on clinical concerns and the skill of each center. PMID:26723475

  2. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long

  3. Improved pregnancy outcome in a patient with renal allograft nephropathy undergoing temporary hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Jayyousi, R; Carr, S; Hodgett, S; Scudamore, I; Howarth, E; Singlehurst, A; Brunskill, N

    2003-12-01

    We report a case of a woman with a poorly functioning renal allograft and a positive anti-cardiolipin antibody who was dialysis-independent and conceived 18 months following her transplant. She was electively maintained on hemodialysis during the pregnancy and delivered a live infant at 31 weeks gestation. Her renal function returned to prepregnancy levels post partum and she remained dialysis-independent. PMID:14690260

  4. Personality and adolescent pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harville, Emily W.; Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine the relationship between personality, pregnancy and birth outcomes in adolescents Background Personality has been shown to be a strong predictor of many health outcomes. Adolescents who become pregnant have worse birth outcomes than adults. Design Cross-sectional study using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (baseline, 1994-1995; follow-up, 2007-2008). Methods The study sample was 6529 girls, 820 of whom reported on pregnancy outcomes for a teenage birth. Personality data was taken from the Mini International Personality Item Pool personality tool, which measures the five-factor personality traits of neuroticism, conscientiousness, intellect/imagination, extraversion and agreeableness. Logistic regression was used to predict teen pregnancy and linear regression was used to predict birth weight and gestational age with adjustment for confounders and stratification by race. Results Agreeableness and intellect/imagination were associated with a reduced likelihood of becoming pregnant as an adolescent, while neuroticism, conscientiousness and extraversion were all associated with an increased likelihood of becoming pregnant. Higher neuroticism was associated with lower birth weight and gestational age among Black girls, but not non-Black. Conscientiousness was associated with lower gestational age among non-Black girls. No relationships were found with extraversion or agreeableness and birth outcomes. Receiving late or no prenatal care was associated with higher intellect/imagination. Conclusions Personality is understudied with respect to pregnancy and birth outcomes compared with other health outcomes. Such research could help professionals and clinicians design and target programs that best fit the characteristics of the population most likely to need them, such as those with high neuroticism. PMID:25040691

  5. Coeliac disease and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Butler, M M; Kenny, L C; McCarthy, F P

    2011-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy affecting up to 1% of the population. An accumulating body of evidence supports the association of coeliac disease with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including increased risk of miscarriage and intrauterine growth restriction. Reports differ regarding the extent and severity of these associations, in addition to the exact pathophysiology underlying these associations. Overall, coeliac disease is believed to be a significant condition in pregnancy and reproductive medicine with some advocating the screening of coeliac disease in all pregnant women or some specific high-risk groups.

  6. Born Too Soon: Care during pregnancy and childbirth to reduce preterm deliveries and improve health outcomes of the preterm baby

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pregnancy and childbirth represent a critical time period when a woman can be reached through a variety of mechanisms with interventions aimed at reducing her risk of a preterm birth and improving her health and the health of her unborn baby. These mechanisms include the range of services delivered during antenatal care for all pregnant women and women at high risk of preterm birth, services provided to manage preterm labour, and workplace, professional and other supportive policies that promote safe motherhood and universal access to care before, during and after pregnancy. The aim of this paper is to present the latest information about available interventions that can be delivered during pregnancy to reduce preterm birth rates and improve the health outcomes of the premature baby, and to identify data gaps. The paper also focuses on promising avenues of research on the pregnancy period that will contribute to a better understanding of the causes of preterm birth and ability to design interventions at the policy, health care system and community levels. At minimum, countries need to ensure equitable access to comprehensive antenatal care, quality childbirth services and emergency obstetric care. Antenatal care services should include screening for and management of women at high risk of preterm birth, screening for and treatment of infections, and nutritional support and counselling. Health workers need to be trained and equipped to provide effective and timely clinical management of women in preterm labour to improve the survival chances of the preterm baby. Implementation strategies must be developed to increase the uptake by providers of proven interventions such as antenatal corticosteroids and to reduce harmful practices such as non-medically indicated inductions of labour and caesarean births before 39 weeks of gestation. Behavioural and community-based interventions that can lead to reductions in smoking and violence against women need to be

  7. Evaluation of a mHealth Data Quality Intervention to Improve Documentation of Pregnancy Outcomes by Health Surveillance Assistants in Malawi: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Olga; Silva, Romesh; Amouzou, Agbessi; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Perin, Jamie; Bryce, Jennifer; Mullany, Luke C.

    2016-01-01

    Background While community health workers are being recognized as an integral work force with growing responsibilities, increased demands can potentially affect motivation and performance. The ubiquity of mobile phones, even in hard-to-reach communities, has facilitated the pursuit of novel approaches to support community health workers beyond traditional modes of supervision, job aids, in-service training, and material compensation. We tested whether supportive short message services (SMS) could improve reporting of pregnancies and pregnancy outcomes among community health workers (Health Surveillance Assistants, or HSAs) in Malawi. Methods and Findings We designed a set of one-way SMS that were sent to HSAs on a regular basis during a 12-month period. We tested the effectiveness of the cluster-randomized intervention in improving the complete documentation of a pregnancy. We defined complete documentation as a pregnancy for which a specific outcome was recorded. HSAs in the treatment group received motivational and data quality SMS. HSAs in the control group received only motivational SMS. During baseline and intervention periods, we matched reported pregnancies to reported outcomes to determine if reporting of matched pregnancies differed between groups and by period. The trial is registered as ISCTRN24785657. Conclusions Study results show that the mHealth intervention improved the documentation of matched pregnancies in both the treatment (OR 1.31, 95% CI: 1.10–1.55, p<0.01) and control (OR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11–1.91, p = 0.01) groups relative to the baseline period, despite differences in SMS content between groups. The results should be interpreted with caution given that the study was underpowered. We did not find a statistically significant difference in matched pregnancy documentation between groups during the intervention period (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.63–1.38, p = 0.74). mHealth applications have the potential to improve the tracking and data quality of

  8. Maternal periodontal disease, pregnancy, and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dasanayake, Ananda P; Gennaro, Susan; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D; Chhun, Nok

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the association between maternal periodontal disease and poor pregnancy and neonatal outcomes and outline the role nurses can play in improving the oral health of pregnant women. Maternal periodontal disease is linked to preterm birth, low birthweight, and preterm low birthweight, but treatment of periodontal disease during pregnancy has been shown to be safe and effective. Nurses, nurse practitioners, and nurse-midwives are in a position to educate pregnant women on the benefits of good oral health and identify and refer women who are in need of dental care for treatment. PMID:18158527

  9. Pregnancy outcomes at the Indiana Women's Prison.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Richard

    2010-07-01

    This article presents birth weight outcome data for 200 pregnancies at the Indiana Women's Prison (IWP) over the last 4 years. Overall, 5.5% of the pregnancies at IWP had low birth weight outcomes. The rate was only 2% for women who were incarcerated for more than 4 weeks and got prenatal care. These outcomes were better than the published outcomes for pregnancies in the State of Indiana. PMID:20466701

  10. Prepregnancy Nutrition and Early Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gaskins, Audrey J.; Toth, Thomas L.; Chavarro, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Implantation failure and pregnancy loss are estimated to affect up to 75% of fertilized ova; however as of yet there is limited empirical evidence, particularly at the population level, for understanding the environmental determinants of these losses. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on prepregnancy nutrition and early pregnancy outcomes with particular focus on the outcome of spontaneous abortion among pregnancies conceived naturally and early pregnancy end points among pregnancies conceived through in vitro fertilization. To date, there is limited evidence to support associations of prepregnancy vitamin D and caffeine intake with pregnancy loss. There is suggestive data supporting a link between a healthy diet and lower risk of pregnancy loss. High folate and minimal to no alcohol intake prior to conception have the most consistent evidence supporting an association with lower risk of pregnancy loss. PMID:26457232

  11. Successful outcome in preeclamptic rudimentary horn pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ruchi; Sachan, Shikha; Khanna, Anuradha

    2011-01-01

    Unicornuate uterus with rudimentary horn is an uncommon type of mullerian duct malformation associated with various gynecological and obstetrical complications. Rudimentary horn pregnancy is a rare entity and the majority have rupture of gravid horn leading to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. A case of rudimentary horn pregnancy at 32 weeks and 6 days with pregnancy induced hypertension is reported where proper management results in successful pregnancy outcome. PMID:24591959

  12. Successful outcome in preeclamptic rudimentary horn pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ruchi; Sachan, Shikha; Khanna, Anuradha

    2011-01-01

    Unicornuate uterus with rudimentary horn is an uncommon type of mullerian duct malformation associated with various gynecological and obstetrical complications. Rudimentary horn pregnancy is a rare entity and the majority have rupture of gravid horn leading to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. A case of rudimentary horn pregnancy at 32 weeks and 6 days with pregnancy induced hypertension is reported where proper management results in successful pregnancy outcome. PMID:24591959

  13. Placental Features of Late-Onset Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Lucy E.; Wareing, Mark; Greenwood, Susan L.; Jones, Rebecca L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Heazell, Alexander E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Currently, no investigations reliably identify placental dysfunction in late pregnancy. To facilitate the development of such investigations we aimed to identify placental features that differ between normal and adverse outcome in late pregnancy in a group of pregnancies with reduced fetal movement. Methods Following third trimester presentation with reduced fetal movement (N = 100), placental structure ex vivo was measured. Placental function was then assessed in terms of (i) chorionic plate artery agonist responses and length-tension characteristics using wire myography and (ii) production and release of placentally derived hormones (by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbant assay of villous tissue and explant conditioned culture medium). Results Placentas from pregnancies ending in adverse outcome (N = 23) were ~25% smaller in weight, volume, length, width and disc area (all p<0.0001) compared with those from normal outcome pregnancies. Villous and trophoblast areas were unchanged, but villous vascularity was reduced (median (interquartile range): adverse outcome 10 (10–12) vessels/mm2 vs. normal outcome 13 (12–15), p = 0.002). Adverse outcome pregnancy placental arteries were relatively insensitive to nitric oxide donated by sodium nitroprusside compared to normal outcome pregnancy placental arteries (50% Effective Concentration 30 (19–50) nM vs. 12 (6–24), p = 0.02). Adverse outcome pregnancy placental tissue contained less human chorionic gonadotrophin (20 (11–50) vs. 55 (24–102) mIU/mg, p = 0.007) and human placental lactogen (11 (6–14) vs. 27 (9–50) mg/mg, p = 0.006) and released more soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (21 (13–29) vs. 5 (2–15) ng/mg, p = 0.01) compared with normal outcome pregnancy placental tissue. Conclusion These data provide a description of the placental phenotype of adverse outcome in late pregnancy. Antenatal tests that accurately reflect elements of this phenotype may

  14. Maternal Dietary Patterns and Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuyang; Zhao, Diqi; Mao, Xun; Xia, Yinyin; Baker, Philip N.; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Maternal nutritional status during pregnancy will affect the outcomes for the mother and the baby. Many analyses of the relationship between diet and outcome are often based on a single or a few food items or nutrients. However, foods are not consumed in isolation and dietary patterns can be used to assess the whole diet consumed. The use of dietary pattern analysis to understand nutritional intake and pregnancy outcome is becoming more and more popular. Many published studies have showed the association between maternal dietary patterns and pregnancy outcome. This review examined articles about the relationship between maternal dietary patterns and pregnancy outcome. As a modifiable factor, dietary patterns may be more applicable to clinical and pregnant health interventions. PMID:27338455

  15. Pregnancy complications and neuropsychological outcomes: A review.

    PubMed

    Gerner, Gwendolyn; Baron, Ida Sue

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy complications elevate risk of associated adverse medical, socioenvironmental, and behavioral outcomes in children. These are likely to have a substantial impact on neuropsychological functioning and mental health across the child's lifespan. Thus, an understanding of the complex relationships between pregnancy complications and neuropsychological outcomes is critical for both practitioners and researchers. This review summarizes prevalent pregnancy complications and the associated psychological and neuropsychological findings, highlighting methodological challenges that have restricted investigations of these outcomes and identifying opportune areas for future study. PMID:24801883

  16. Outcome of pregnancy in mothers given bromocriptine.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, R W; Turkalj, I; Braun, P

    1978-01-01

    1 Information has been obtained on the outcome of 448 completed pregnancies in mothers who had been given bromocriptine at some stage in the early weeks of pregnancy. 2 The frequencies of spontaneous abortions, twin pregnancies and malformations have been compared with those reported for 'normal' populations. 3 Based on this limited material, we conclude that the use of bromocriptine to restore fertility in hyperprolactinaemic women is not associated with an increased risk of abortion, multiple pregnancy or the occurrence of malformations in the infants. PMID:656267

  17. Occurrence of pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes during isotretinoin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Henry, David; Dormuth, Colin; Winquist, Brandace; Carney, Greg; Bugden, Shawn; Teare, Gary; Lévesque, Linda E.; Bérard, Anick; Paterson, J. Michael; Platt, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Isotretinoin, a teratogen, is widely used to treat cystic acne. Although the risks of pregnancy during isotretinoin therapy are well recognized, there are doubts about the level of adherence with the pregnancy prevention program in Canada. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Canadian pregnancy prevention program in 4 provinces: British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario. Methods: Using administrative data, we identified 4 historical cohorts of female users of isotretinoin (aged 12–48 yr) for the period 1996 to 2011. We defined pregnancy using International Statistical Classification of Diseases and billing codes. One definition included only cases with documented pregnancy outcomes (high-specificity definition); the other definition also included individuals recorded as receiving prenatal care (high-sensitivity definition). We studied new courses of isotretinoin and detected pregnancies in 2 time windows: during isotretinoin treatment only and up to 42 weeks after treatment. Live births were followed for 1 year to identify congenital malformations. Results: A total of 59 271 female patients received 102 308 courses of isotretinoin. Between 24.3% and 32.9% of participants received prescriptions for oral contraceptives while they were taking isotretinoin, compared with 28.3% to 35.9% in the 12 months before isotretinoin was started. According to the high-specificity definition of pregnancy, there were 186 pregnancies during isotretinoin treatment (3.1/1000 isotretinoin users), compared with 367 (6.2/1000 users) according to the high-sensitivity definition. By 42 weeks after treatment, there were 1473 pregnancies (24.9/1000 users), according to the high-specificity definition. Of these, 1331 (90.4%) terminated spontaneously or were terminated by medical intervention. Among the 118 live births were 11 (9.3%) cases of congenital malformation. Pregnancy rates during isotretinoin treatment remained constant between 1996 and 2011

  18. Does the presence of a condition-specific obstetric protocol lead to detectable improvements in pregnancy outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Bailit, Jennifer L.; Grobman, William; McGee, Paula; Reddy, Uma M.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Thorp, John M.; Leveno, Kenneth J.; Iams, Jay D.; Tita, Alan T. N.; Saade, George; Sorokin, Yoram; Rouse, Dwight J.; Blackwell, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the presence of condition-specific obstetric protocols within a hospital was associated with better maternal and neonatal outcomes. Study Design Cohort study of a random sample of deliveries performed at 25 hospitals over three years. Condition-specific protocols were collected from all hospitals and categorized independently by two authors. Data on maternal and neonatal outcomes, as well as data necessary for risk adjustment were collected. Risk-adjusted outcomes were compared according to whether the patient delivered in a hospital with condition-specific obstetric protocols at the time of delivery. Results Hemorrhage-specific protocols were not associated with a lower rate of postpartum hemorrhage or with fewer cases of EBL >1000cc. Similarly, in the presence of a shoulder dystocia protocol, there were no differences in the frequency of shoulder dystocia or number of shoulder dystocia maneuvers used. Conversely, preeclampsia-specific protocols were associated with fewer ICU admissions (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.18–0.44) and fewer cases of severe maternal hypertension (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77–0.96). Conclusion The presence of condition-specific obstetric protocols was not consistently shown to be associated with improved risk-adjusted outcomes. Our study would suggest that the presence or absence of a protocol does not matter and regulations to require protocols are not fruitful. PMID:25659468

  19. Pregnancy outcomes following the use of thiocolchicoside.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Zeynep; Olmez, Ercument; Gurpinar, Tugba; Vural, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Thiocolchicoside is a commonly used muscle relaxant in orthopedic, rheumatologic or musculoskeletal disorders to treat painful muscle spasms. It is contraindicated in pregnancy and lactation. There is no previously published experience with thiocolchicoside exposure during pregnancy. In this observational study, we collected and evaluated 18 pregnancy outcomes of the women referred to our prenatal consultation service for thiocolchicoside exposure between 2007-2012, and offspring were followed up until 2 years of age. There were 16 live births, 1 spontaneous abortion and 1 elective termination of pregnancy. No major birth defect was observed. The mothers and their babies were free of perinatal complications. No growth or developmental abnormalities were found during follow-up period. Our findings add information on inadvertent use of thiocolchicoside in pregnancy. Further large prospective cohort studies are required to investigate this issue. PMID:26876142

  20. Early gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist start improves follicular synchronization and pregnancy outcome as compared to the conventional antagonist protocol

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Woo; Hwang, Yu Im; Koo, Hwa Seon; Kang, Inn Soo; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether an early GnRH antagonist start leads to better follicular synchronization and an improved clinical pregnancy rate (CPR). Methods A retrospective cohort study. A total of 218 infertile women who underwent IVF between January 2011 and February 2013. The initial cohort (Cohort I) that underwent IVF between January 2011 and March 2012 included a total of 68 attempted IVF cycles. Thirty-four cycles were treated with the conventional GnRH antagonist protocol, and 34 cycles with an early GnRH antagonist start protocol. The second cohort (Cohort II) that underwent IVF between June 2012 and February 2013 included a total of 150 embryo-transfer (ET) cycles. Forty-three cycles were treated with the conventional GnRH antagonist protocol, 34 cycles with the modified early GnRH antagonist start protocol using highly purified human menopause gonadotropin and an addition of GnRH agonist to the luteal phase support, and 73 cycles with the GnRH agonist long protocol. Results The analysis of Cohort I showed that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was significantly higher in the early GnRH antagonist start cycles than in the conventional antagonist cycles (11.9 vs. 8.2, p=0.04). The analysis of Cohort II revealed higher but non-significant CPR/ET in the modified early GnRH antagonist start cycles (41.2%) than in the conventional antagonist cycles (30.2%), which was comparable to that of the GnRH agonist long protocol cycles (39.7%). Conclusion The modified early antagonist start protocol may improve the mature oocyte yield, possibly via enhanced follicular synchronization, while resulting in superior CPR as compared to the conventional antagonist protocol, which needs to be studied further in prospective randomized controlled trials. PMID:25599038

  1. Resistance Exercise in Pregnancy and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Ruben; Perales, Maria

    2016-09-01

    As the health benefits of exercise are increasingly recognized, the traditional advice to rest during pregnancy has changed toward a more healthy and active pregnancy, therefore different forms of exercise have been integrated into the life of the pregnant woman. Although the benefits of using a combination of resistance and aerobic exercises are not yet determined, studies about resistance and strengthen training programs are few although no adverse outcomes were reported. PMID:27388962

  2. Caffeine Use Affects Pregnancy Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diego, Miguel; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Vera, Yanexy; Gil, Karla; Gonzalez-Garcia, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 750 women were interviewed during pregnancy on their depression and anxiety symptoms, substance use and demographic variables. A subsample was seen again at the neonatal stage (n = 152), and their infants were observed for sleep-wake behavior. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were related to caffeine use. Mothers who consumed more…

  3. The effects of imatinib on pregnancy outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Jorge; Ault, Patricia; Hatfield, Alan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Pilot, Richard; Rosti, Gianantonio; Apperley, Jane F.

    2008-01-01

    Imatinib has now been in use for almost 10 years. Despite this cumulative experience, little is known about its effects on pregnancy; as a result, there are few published data to facilitate the counseling of women who conceive while taking imatinib. The results we now present provide information which may be of use in such circumstances. Of 180 women exposed to imatinib during pregnancy, outcome data are available for 125 (69%). Of those with known outcomes, 50% delivered normal infants and 28% underwent elective terminations, 3 following the identification of abnormalities. There were a total of 12 infants in whom abnormalities were identified, 3 of which had strikingly similar complex malformations that are clearly a cause for concern. It appears that although most pregnancies exposed to imatinib are likely to have a successful outcome, there remains a risk that exposure may result in serious fetal malformations. PMID:18322153

  4. Chronic endometritis due to common bacteria is prevalent in women with recurrent miscarriage as confirmed by improved pregnancy outcome after antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Cicinelli, Ettore; Matteo, Maria; Tinelli, Raffaele; Pinto, Vincenzo; Marinaccio, Marco; Indraccolo, Ugo; De Ziegler, Dominique; Resta, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as 3 or more miscarriages before 20 weeks' pregnancy. In recent years, interest has been focused on chronic endometritis (CE), a subtle inflammation thought to be associated with RM. We aimed to evaluate the relationships between CE and RM. The records of 360 women with unexplained RM were retrospectively analyzed. Data from hysteroscopy, endometrial histology, endometrial culture, and polymerase chain reaction for chlamydia, performed before and after antibiotic treatment for CE, were analyzed. The occurrence of successful pregnancies within 1 year after treatment was also evaluated. Results showed that 208 (57.8%) women with RM showed CE at hysteroscopy; 190 (91.3%), positive at hysteroscopy, were also positive at histology, and 142 (68.3%) had positive cultures. Common bacteria were found in 110 (77.5%) patients. Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma were found in 36 (25.3%) patients and Chlamydia in 18 patients (12.7%). In 102 (71%) women, antibiogram-based antibiotic treatment normalized hysteroscopy, histology, and cultures (group 1); while in 40 (28.2%) patients, CE was still present at hysteroscopy (group 2). In 16 of the 66 patients positive at hysteroscopy, but not at cultures, the hysteroscopy becomes normal (group 3) after a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-based therapy; while in 50 women, CE was still present (group 4). One year after treatment, group 1 showed a significantly higher number of pregnancies (78.4%) compared to group 2 (17.5%; P < .001) and group 4 (15.3%; P = .005). The CE is frequent in women with RM. Antibiotic treatment seems to be associated with an improved reproductive outcome. PMID:24177713

  5. 77 FR 48995 - Draft National Toxicology Program (NTP) Monograph on Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes Associated With Cancer Chemotherapy Use During Pregnancy; Request... Pregnancy Outcomes Associated with Cancer Chemotherapy Use during Pregnancy (available by August 14, 2012... NTP Monograph on Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes Associated with Cancer Chemotherapy...

  6. Clinical characteristics and outcome of cancer diagnosed during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Min Hee; Mok, Chi-Won; Chang, Kylie Hae-Jin; Sung, Ji-Hee; Oh, Soo-young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and outcome of cancer diagnosed during pregnancy. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of women who were diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy at a tertiary academic hospital between 1995 and 2013. Maternal characteristics, gestational age at diagnosis, and type, stage, symptoms and signs of cancer for each patient were retrieved from the medical records. The cancer treatment, pregnancy management and the subsequent perinatal and maternal outcomes for each cancer were assessed. Results A total of 87 women were diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy (172.6 cases per 100,000 deliveries). The most common cancer was breast cancer (n=20), followed by gastrointestinal (n=17), hematologic (n=13), thyroid (n=11), central nervous system (n=7), cervical (n=7), ovarian (n=5), lung (n=3), and other cancers (n=4). Eighteen (20.7%) patients terminated their pregnancies. In the 69 (79.3%) patients who maintained their pregnancies, one patient miscarried and 34 patients delivered preterm. Of the preterm babies, 24 (70.6%) were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and 3 (8.8%) of those expired. The maternal mortality rate was 31.0%, with highest rate seen with lung cancers (66.7%), followed by gastrointestinal (50.0%), central nervous system (50.0%), hematologic (30.8%), breast (25.0%), ovarian (20.0%) cervical (14.3%), and thyroid cancers (0%). Conclusion The clinical characteristics and outcome of cancer during pregnancy were highly variable depending on the type of cancer. However, timely diagnosis and appropriate management of cancer during pregnancy may improve both maternal and neonatal outcome. PMID:26866029

  7. Arsenic in drinking water and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S A; Sayed, M H; Barua, S; Khan, M H; Faruquee, M H; Jalil, A; Hadi, S A; Talukder, H K

    2001-01-01

    We studied a group of women of reproductive age (15-49 years) who were chronically exposed to arsenic through drinking water to identify the pregnancy outcomes in terms of live birth, stillbirth, spontaneous abortion, and preterm birth. We compared pregnancy outcomes of exposed respondents with pregnancy outcomes of women of reproductive age (15-49 years) who were not exposed to arsenic-contaminated water. In a cross-sectional study, we matched the women in both exposed and nonexposed groups for age, socioeconomic status, education, and age at marriage. The total sample size was 192, with 96 women in each group (i.e., exposed and nonexposed). Of the respondents in the exposed group, 98% had been drinking water containing [Greater and equal to] 0.10 mg/L arsenic and 43.8% had been drinking arsenic-contaminated water for 5-10 years. Skin manifestation due to chronic arsenic exposure was present in 22.9% of the respondents. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in terms of spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, and preterm birth rates were significantly higher in the exposed group than those in the nonexposed group (p = 0.008, p = 0.046, and p = 0.018, respectively). PMID:11445518

  8. Organ-specific systemic lupus erythematosus activity during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Sara K; Guan, Hongshu; Fine, Alexander; Costenbader, Karen H; Bermas, Bonnie

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease of reproductive-age women, and thus questions regarding how disease influences pregnancy outcomes arise. We investigated whether five specific types of SLE activity during the 6 months before conception or during pregnancy (nephritis, cytopenias, skin disease, arthritis, serositis) were associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcomes among women with SLE at the Brigham and Women's Hospital Lupus Center. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included pre-eclampsia, pre-term delivery, elective termination due to SLE, spontaneous miscarriage at weeks 12-20, and stillbirth. SLE and obstetric history, laboratories, and medications were obtained from electronic medical records. Generalized linear mixed models adjusting for potential confounders were used to identify predictors of any adverse pregnancy outcome. Most pregnancies resulted in a live term delivery (76.5 %). After adjustment for Hispanic ethnicity, prior adverse pregnancy outcome and medication use 6 months before conception, nephritis during pregnancy (odds ratio (OR) 3.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-12.8), cytopenias during pregnancy (OR 3.9, 95 % CI 1.3-11.4), and serositis during pregnancy (OR 5.9, 95 % CI 1.0-34.0) were significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Specific types of SLE disease activity during pregnancy were related to adverse pregnancy outcome. Nephritis, cytopenias, and serositis carried a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, suggesting that these abnormalities should be carefully monitored during pregnancy. PMID:27166627

  9. Unintended pregnancy: worldwide levels, trends, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Susheela; Sedgh, Gilda; Hussain, Rubina

    2010-12-01

    Unintended pregnancy can carry serious consequences for women and their families. We estimate the incidence of pregnancy by intention status and outcome at worldwide, regional, and subregional levels for 2008, and we assess recent trends since 1995. Numbers of births are based on United Nations estimates. Induced abortions are estimated by projecting from recent trends. A model-based approach is used to estimate miscarriages. The planning status of births is estimated using nationally representative and small-scale surveys of 80 countries. Of the 208 million pregnancies that occurred in 2008, we estimate that 41 percent were unintended. The unintended pregnancy rate fell by 29 percent in developed regions and by 20 percent in developing regions. The highest unintended pregnancy rates were found for Eastern and Middle Africa and the lowest for Southern and Western Europe and Eastern Asia. North America is the only region in which overall and unintended pregnancy rates have not declined. We conclude with a brief discussion of global and regional program and policy implications. PMID:21465725

  10. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes Following Motor Vehicle Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Vladutiu, Catherine J.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Poole, Charles; Casteel, Carri; Menard, M. Kathryn; Weiss, Harold B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of serious trauma during pregnancy, but little is known about their relationships with pregnancy outcomes. Purpose To estimate the association between motor vehicle crashes and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 878,546 pregnant women, aged 16–46 years, who delivered a singleton infant in North Carolina (NC) from 2001 to 2008. Pregnant drivers in crashes were identified by probabilistic linkage of vital records and crash reports. Poisson regression modeled the association among crashes, vehicle safety features, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Analyses were conducted in 2012. Results In 2001–2008, 2.9% of pregnant NC women were drivers in one or more crashes. After a single crash, compared to not being in a crash, pregnant drivers had slightly elevated rates of preterm birth (adjusted rate ratio, aRR=1.23, 95% CI=1.19, 1.28); placental abruption (aRR=1.34, 95% CI=1.15, 1.56); and premature rupture of the membranes (PROM; aRR=1.32, 95% CI=1.21, 1.43). Following a second or subsequent crash, pregnant drivers had more highly elevated rates of preterm birth (aRR=1.54, 95% CI=1.24, 1.90); stillbirth (aRR=4.82, 95% CI=2.85, 8.14); placental abruption (aRR=2.97, 95% CI=1.60, 5.53); and PROM (aRR=1.95, 95% CI=1.27, 2.99). Stillbirth rates were elevated following crashes involving unbelted pregnant drivers (aRR=2.77, 95% CI=1.22, 6.28) compared to belted pregnant drivers. Conclusions Crashes while driving during pregnancy were associated with elevated rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes, and multiple crashes were associated with even higher rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Crashes were especially harmful if drivers were unbelted. PMID:24139777

  11. Pregnancy Outcomes After Myomectomy With Polytetrafluoroethylene Placement

    PubMed Central

    Milad, Magdy P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The aim of this study was to report preliminary data on pregnancy outcomes after myomectomy with placement of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene adhesion barrier membrane. Methods: In this retrospective case series, 68 women who underwent myomectomy with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane placement between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2009, were identified. Of these women, 15 subsequently had documented pregnancies and were included in the final dataset. Results: Eighteen pregnancies were documented among 15 women. There were no reported cases of preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, or uterine rupture. Conclusion: In this case series, there were no documented cases of preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, or uterine rupture after myomectomy with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane placement. PMID:25392651

  12. Marriage and Cohabitation Outcomes After Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Katherine J.; Sen, Ananda; Hayward, Rodney A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal was to evaluate marriage and cohabitation outcomes for couples who experienced a live birth or fetal death at any gestational age. METHODS For married and cohabitating women who experienced live births, miscarriages, or stillbirths, we conducted a survival analysis (median follow-up period: 7.8 years), by using data from the National Survey of Family Growth, to examine the association between birth outcomes and subsequent relationship survival. The Cox proportional-hazards models controlled for multiple independent risk factors known to affect relationship outcomes. The main outcome measure was the proportion of intact marriages or cohabitations over time. RESULTS Of 7770 eligible pregnancies, 82% ended in live births, 16% in miscarriages, and 2% in stillbirths. With controlling for known risk factors, women who experienced miscarriages (hazard ratio: 1.22 [95% confidence interval: 1.08–1.38]; P = .001) or stillbirths (hazard ratio: 1.40 [95% confidence interval: 1.10–1.79]; P = .007) had a significantly greater hazard of their relationship ending, compared with women whose pregnancies ended in live births. CONCLUSIONS This is the first national study to establish that parental relationships have a higher risk of dissolving after miscarriage or stillbirth, compared with live birth. Given the frequency of pregnancy loss, these findings might have significant societal implications if causally related. PMID:20368319

  13. Serum copeptin and pregnancy outcome in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Akinlade, Kehinde Sola; Adediji, Isaac Oluwole; Rahamon, Sheu Kadiri; Fawole, Adeniran Olubukola; Tongo, Olukemi Oluwatoyin

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of biochemical predictors of preeclampsia have been reported, but little is known about their possible relationship with maternal and fetal outcomes. This study determined serum copeptin in pregnant women with preeclampsia and assessed its relationship with pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with severe preeclampsia (SP), 30 with mild preeclampsia (MP), and 30 with uncomplicated pregnancy were enrolled into this study. Serum copeptin, creatinine, and liver function were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and colorimetry as appropriate. Pregnancy outcomes, both maternal and fetal, were taken using standard methods. Results: Copeptin was significantly elevated in preeclampsia subjects compared with controls and in SP compared with MP. Assessing the diagnostic property of copeptin for preeclampsia, the area under the curve for copeptin was 0.99. Nine (30%) and 3 (10%) of SP and MP, respectively had abruptio placenta while 6 (20%), 2 (6.7%), and 1 (3.3%) still births were recorded in SP, MP, and controls, respectively. Neonates of mothers with preeclampsia had significantly lower birth weight, infant length, ponderal index, and head circumference compared with neonates of the controls. Copeptin had a significant inverse relationship with birth weight, ponderal index, head circumference, Apgar score, and infant length in neonates of mothers with preeclampsia. Conclusion: Serum copeptin level in the third trimester could predict preeclampsia and its elevation is associated with adverse perinatal outcome. PMID:26778890

  14. A combined community- and facility-based approach to improve pregnancy outcomes in low-resource settings: a Global Network cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fetal and neonatal mortality rates in low-income countries are at least 10-fold greater than in high-income countries. These differences have been related to poor access to and poor quality of obstetric and neonatal care. Methods This trial tested the hypothesis that teams of health care providers, administrators and local residents can address the problem of limited access to quality obstetric and neonatal care and lead to a reduction in perinatal mortality in intervention compared to control locations. In seven geographic areas in five low-income and one middle-income country, most with high perinatal mortality rates and substantial numbers of home deliveries, we performed a cluster randomized non-masked trial of a package of interventions that included community mobilization focusing on birth planning and hospital transport, community birth attendant training in problem recognition, and facility staff training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies. The primary outcome was perinatal mortality at ≥28 weeks gestation or birth weight ≥1000 g. Results Despite extensive effort in all sites in each of the three intervention areas, no differences emerged in the primary or any secondary outcome between the intervention and control clusters. In both groups, the mean perinatal mortality was 40.1/1,000 births (P = 0.9996). Neither were there differences between the two groups in outcomes in the last six months of the project, in the year following intervention cessation, nor in the clusters that best implemented the intervention. Conclusions This cluster randomized comprehensive, large-scale, multi-sector intervention did not result in detectable impact on the proposed outcomes. While this does not negate the importance of these interventions, we expect that achieving improvement in pregnancy outcomes in these settings will require substantially more obstetric and neonatal care infrastructure than was available at the sites during this trial

  15. Pregnancy and child outcome after oocyte donation.

    PubMed

    Söderström-Anttila, V

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade oocyte donation has been highly successful for treating women previously thought to be hopelessly infertile. The pregnancy rate after oocyte donation is among the highest reported for any fertility-enhancing procedure. Most investigators have noted an increased rate of obstetric complications in these pregnancies. In particular, pregnancy-induced hypertension appears to occur more often than expected, and the Caesarean section rate is high. However, the majority of oocyte recipients experience a favourable pregnancy and perinatal outcome. When perinatal complications occur they are usually related to multiple gestation. The high frequency of multiple pregnancy after oocyte donation, as well as in all other fields of assisted reproduction, deserves attention, and efforts to avoid multi-fetal gestation must be made. There are only a few studies on post-natal growth and development of young children born after oocyte donation. The health of these children appears to be within normal ranges. The psychological consequences of the treatment on the child require further investigation. Thus far, studies have shown normal socio-emotional development in the child and a warm relationship between the parents and the child in oocyte donation families. PMID:11212070

  16. Intrapartum Cervical Laceration and Subsequent Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Luchin F.; Wilkes, Jacob; Korgenski, Kent; Varner, Michael W.; Manuck, Tracy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective  The objective of this study was to describe pregnancy outcomes, including cervical insufficiency and preterm birth, in the subsequent pregnancy following an intrapartum cervical laceration. Study Design  Retrospective cohort of women with their first two consecutive singleton pregnancies carried to ≥ 200/7 weeks' gestation within a tertiary health care system from 2002 to 2012. Cervical laceration cases were identified by ICD9 codes and included if suture repair was required. Results  In this study, 55 women were confirmed to have a cervical laceration in the first delivery; 43 lacerations after vaginal delivery (VD) and 12 after cesarean delivery (CD). The median gestational age of the first delivery was 400/7 weeks and the median birth weight 3,545 g; these did not differ between VD and CD. In the second pregnancy, 2 of 55 women (4.6%) had a prophylactic cerclage placed; 1 carried to term and the other delivered at 356/7 weeks. In total, four women (9.3%) delivered the second pregnancy < 37 weeks: three had a prior term VD and one had a prior 34 weeks VD. There was only one case of recurrent cervical laceration, occurring in the setting of vaginal deliveries. Conclusion  Obstetric cervical lacerations are uncommon. Complications in the following pregnancy were low, despite lack of additional prophylactic cerclage use. PMID:27621953

  17. Association of assisted reproductive technology with adverse pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Zhang; Yiling, Ding; Ling, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: More and more infertile patients have accepted the assisted reproductive technique (ART) therapy. Concerns have been raised over an increased risk of adverse maternal outcomes in ART populations as compared with natural conception (NC). Objective: The aim was to improve the ART in clinicial work and to reduce the incidence of pregnancy complications in ART group according to analyzing the reasons of high incidence of pregnancy complications in ART group, comparing the incidence of pregnancy complications in different controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) programs and evaluating the effects of ART which attribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this prospective population-based cohort study,3216 pregnant women with gestational age ≤12 weeks, regular antenatal examination,and ultrasound identification of intrauterine pregnancy were enrolled from January 2010 to June 2013. According to having ART history, the participantswere divided into two groups: ART group (contains fresh embryo transfer group or frozen-thawed embryo transfer group) and NC group. We compared the incidence of pregnancy complications between different groups and evaluated the factors which could affect the occurrence of these complications. Results: When compared to NC group, significantly increased rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (p<0.01), preeclampsia (PE) (p<0.01) and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) (p˂0.01) were observed in ART group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of birth defect between the two groups (p=0.07). Multiple pregnancies and Gonadotropin (Gn) were risk factors in GDM, PE, and ICP. The exogenous progesterone treatment had no effect on GDM, PE or ICP. Conclusion: ART increases the risk of adverse maternal complications such as GDM, PE and ICP. The dosages of Gn should be reduced to an extent and the number of embryo implantation should be controlled. Exogenous progesterone treatment is safe

  18. An outcomes evaluation of an emergency department early pregnancy assessment service and early pregnancy assessment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Kim; Crilly, Julia; May, Chris; Bates, Kym; Saxena, Rakhee

    2014-01-01

    Background Complications in early pregnancy, such as threatened or actual miscarriage is a common occurrence resulting in many women presenting to the emergency department (ED). Early pregnancy service delivery models described in the literature vary in terms of approach, setting and outcomes. Our objective was to determine outcomes of women who presented to an Australian regional ED with diagnoses consistent with early pregnancy complications following the implementation of an early pregnancy assessment service (EPAS) and early pregnancy assessment protocol (EPAP) in July 2011. Methods A descriptive, comparative (6 months before and after) study was undertaken. Data were extracted from the hospital ED information system and medical healthcare records. Outcome measures included: time to see a clinician, ED length of stay, admission rate, re-presentation rate, hospital admission and types of pathology tests ordered. Results Over the 12 -month period, 584 ED presentations were made to the ED with complications of early pregnancy (268 PRE and 316 POST EPAS–EPAP). Outcomes that improved statistically and clinically following implementation included: time to see a clinician (decreased by 6 min from 35 to 29 min), admission rate (decreased 6% from 14.5% to 8.5%), increase in β-human chorionic gonadotrophin ordering by 10% (up to 80% POST), increase in ultrasound (USS) performed by 10% (up to 73% POST) and increase in pain score documentation by 23% (up to 36% POST). Conclusions The results indicate that patient and service delivery improvements can be achieved following the implementation of targeted service delivery models such as EPAS and EPAP in the ED. PMID:24136123

  19. Surgery during pregnancy and fetal outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, J.B.; Cohen, E.N.; Brown, B.W.; Wu, M.L.; Whitcher, C.

    1988-01-01

    Information was sought on wives of dentists or female dental assistants who underwent surgery during their pregnancies to determine the effects of anesthesia and surgery on fetal outcome. Occupational exposure to inhalation anesthetics either directly (dental assistants) or indirectly (wives of exposed male dentists) was associated with a significant increase in spontaneous abortion rate over a comparison group during both trimesters. Anesthesia for surgery was also associated with increased fetal loss when administered during the first or second trimesters. The number of congenital abormalities in children born to women who had surgery during pregnancy was not increased. For women surgically exposed to anesthetics and occupationally exposed as well, either directly or indirectly, the risk of spontaneous abortion increased almost threefold above control lvels. The authors conclude that elective surgery should be deferred during early pregnanacy to minimize potential fetal loss.

  20. Do gravidity and age affect pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Santow, G; Bracher, M

    1989-01-01

    Fetal loss has generally been found to vary with gravidity, previous experience of fetal loss, and maternal age, but the literature is divided on the reasons for these associations. In this paper we examine pregnancy histories obtained retrospectively from a nationally representative one-in-one-thousand sample of women in Australia aged 20 to 59 years. The relations of fetal loss ratios with both gravidity and previous outcome are consistent with heterogeneity of risk over the study population and a stopping rule, whereby high-risk women undertake more pregnancies than low-risk women to achieve the same number of live births. Evidence is presented that elevated loss ratios in the teens indicate not higher risk but a selection for short gestation intervals, while loss ratios beyond the mid-thirties do not point unequivocally to a substantial increase in risk at the older reproductive ages. PMID:2814570

  1. Pregnancy outcomes associated with viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Reddick, K L B; Jhaveri, R; Gandhi, M; James, A H; Swamy, G K

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) to pregnancy-related complications including gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preterm birth (PTB), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), pre-eclampsia, antepartum haemorrhage and cholestasis. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for all pregnancy-related discharges, pregnancy complications and viral hepatitis from 1995 to 2005. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between HBV, HCV, HBV + HCV and pregnancy-related complications including GDM, PTB, IUGR, pre-eclampsia, antepartum haemorrhage, cholestasis and caesarean delivery. Model covariates included maternal age, race, insurance status, substance use and medical complications including liver complication, hypertension, HIV, anaemia, thrombocytopenia and sexually transmitted infections. Of 297 664 pregnant women data available for analysis, 1446 had a coded diagnosis of HBV, HCV or both. High-risk behaviours, such as smoking, alcohol and substance use were higher in women with either HBV or HCV. Women with HBV had an increased risk for PTB (aOR 1.65, CI [1.3, 2.0]) but a decreased risk for caesarean delivery (aOR 0.686, CI [0.53, 0.88]). Individuals with HCV had an increased risk for GDM (aOR 1.6, CI [1.0, 2.6]). Individuals with both HBV and HCV co-infection had an increased risk for antepartum haemorrhage (aOR 2.82, CI [1.1, 7.2]). There was no association of viral hepatitis with IUGR or pre-eclampsia. Women with hepatitis have an increased risk for complications during pregnancy. Research to determine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of counselling patients about potential risks for adverse outcomes is warranted. PMID:21692952

  2. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of macrosomic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Weisz, Boaz; Achiron, Reuven; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of term macrosomic and adequate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all term singleton macrosomic (birth weight ≥4000 g) and AGA (birth weight >10th percentile and <4000 g) pregnancies delivered at our hospital between 2004 and 2008. Data collected included maternal age, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, fetal gender, maternal and neonatal complications. Comparisons were made between macrosomic and AGA pregnancies and between different severities of macrosomia (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g). Results The study population comprised of 34,685 pregnancies. 2077 neonates had birth weight ≥4000 g. Maternal age and gestational age at delivery were significantly higher for macrosomic neonates. Significantly more macrosomic neonates were born by cesarean section, and were complicated with shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and had longer hospitalization period (both in vaginal and cesarean deliveries). Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) relative to AGA pregnancies for each macrosomic category (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g) of shoulder dystocia was 2.37, 2.24, 7.61, respectively, and for neonatal hypoglycemia 4.24, 4.41, 4.15, respectively. The risk of post partum hemorrhage was statistically increased when birth weight was >4500 g (OR=5.23) but not for birth weight between 4000–4500 g. No differences were found in the rates of extensive perineal lacerations between AGA and the different macrosomic groups. Conclusions Macrosomia is associated with increased rate of cesarean section, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and longer hospitalization, but not associated with excessive perineal tears. Increased risk of PPH was found in the >4500g group. PMID:22936200

  3. Delayed childbearing and the outcome of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, G S; Skovron, M L; Lapinski, R H; Berkowitz, R L

    1990-03-01

    Whether women who delay childbearing are at increased risk for adverse outcomes of pregnancy is of concern because of the growing proportion of first births to older women. We assessed the effect of advancing maternal age on the outcome of pregnancy in first births in a hospital-based cohort study of 3917 private patients who were 20 years of age or older with a singleton gestation. There was a slight elevation in the risk of having a low-birth-weight infant among women who were 35 years of age or older (adjusted odds ratio, 1.3; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.9 to 1.9) as compared with the risk among women 20 to 29 years of age. However, there was no evidence that women between 30 and 34 or those 35 and older had an increased risk of having a preterm delivery or of having an infant who was small for gestational age, had a low Apgar score, or died in the perinatal period. In contrast, even after controlling for sociodemographic and medical risk factors, we found that women who were 35 or older were significantly more likely to have specific antepartum and intrapartum complications and those who were 30 or older were significantly more likely to have both cesarean sections and infants who were admitted to the newborn intensive care unit. This study suggests that although older primiparous women have higher rates of complications of pregnancy and delivery, their risk of a poor neonatal outcome is not appreciably increased. PMID:2304491

  4. Pregnancy outcome in women with prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Hall, D R; Olivier, J; Rossouw, G J; Grové, D; Doubell, A F

    2001-03-01

    The pregnancy outcome of 59 pregnancies in 38 women with prosthetic heart valves, managed at a tertiary referral centre from 1989-98 were reviewed. Ten women underwent valve replacement during pregnancy. The main outcome measures were major maternal complications and perinatal outcome. The maternal mortality rate for pregnancies following valve replacement surgery was 6.1%, with a 21% pregnancy loss before viability and a perinatal loss of 8%. Major morbidity in this group was as follows: haemorrhage 29.8%, cardiac failure 12.8%, thromboembolism 8.5%, infective endocarditis 6.4% and valve thrombosis 4.3%. No maternal mortality occurred among those who underwent valve replacement during pregnancy but their perinatal loss was 25%. We conclude that although maternal mortality and morbidity rates in women with prosthetic heart valves who became pregnant were high, the perinatal outcome was good except for women who underwent valve replacement during pregnancy who experienced a high perinatal loss rate. PMID:12521884

  5. Improving Asthma during Pregnancy with Dietary Antioxidants: The Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Grieger, Jessica A.; Wood, Lisa G.; Clifton, Vicki L.

    2013-01-01

    The complication of asthma during pregnancy is associated with a number of poor outcomes for the mother and fetus. This may be partially driven by increased oxidative stress induced by the combination of asthma and pregnancy. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways associated with systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, which contributes to worsening asthma symptoms. Pregnancy alone also intensifies oxidative stress through the systemic generation of excess reactive oxidative species (ROS). Antioxidants combat the damaging effects of ROS; yet antioxidant defenses are reduced in asthma. Diet and nutrition have been postulated as potential factors to combat the damaging effects of asthma. In particular, dietary antioxidants may play a role in alleviating the heightened oxidative stress in asthma. Although there are some observational and interventional studies that have shown protective effects of antioxidants in asthma, assessment of antioxidants in pregnancy are limited and there are no antioxidant intervention studies in asthmatic pregnancies on asthma outcomes. The aims of this paper are to (i) review the relationships between oxidative stress and dietary antioxidants in adults with asthma and asthma during pregnancy, and (ii) provide the rationale for which dietary management strategies, specifically increased dietary antioxidants, might positively impact maternal asthma outcomes. Improving asthma control through a holistic antioxidant dietary approach might be valuable in reducing asthma exacerbations and improving asthma management during pregnancy, subsequently impacting perinatal health. PMID:23948757

  6. Early Childhood Adversity and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Megan V.; Gotman, Nathan; Yonkers, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and pregnancy outcomes; to explore mediators of this association including psychiatric illness and health habits. Methods Exposure to ACEs was determined by the Early Trauma Inventory Self Report Short Form; psychiatric diagnoses were generated by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview administered in a cohort of 2303 pregnant women. Linear regression and structural equation modeling bootstrapping approaches tested for multiple mediators. Results Each additional ACE decreased birth weight by 16.33 g and decreased gestational age by 0.063. Smoking was the strongest mediator of the effect on gestational age. Conclusions ACEs have an enduring effect on maternal reproductive health, as manifested by mothers’ delivery of offspring that were of reduced birth weight and shorter gestational age. PMID:26762511

  7. Early Childhood Adversity and Pregnancy Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan V; Gotman, Nathan; Yonkers, Kimberly A

    2016-04-01

    Objectives To examine the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and pregnancy outcomes; to explore mediators of this association including psychiatric illness and health habits. Methods Exposure to ACEs was determined by the Early Trauma Inventory Self Report Short Form; psychiatric diagnoses were generated by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview administered in a cohort of 2303 pregnant women. Linear regression and structural equation modeling bootstrapping approaches tested for multiple mediators. Results Each additional ACE decreased birth weight by 16.33 g and decreased gestational age by 0.063. Smoking was the strongest mediator of the effect on gestational age. Conclusions ACEs have an enduring effect on maternal reproductive health, as manifested by mothers' delivery of offspring that were of reduced birth weight and shorter gestational age. PMID:26762511

  8. Validating Evidence and Using Standard Outcomes for Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Tests and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Scott, James R

    2016-09-01

    Unproven diagnostic tests and treatments for recurrent pregnancy loss patients can no longer be justified. The use of accepted study guidelines for conducting randomized trials, observational studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, diagnostic tests, animal research, and the development of standardized consensus derived outcomes would greatly improve the quality of recurrent pregnancy loss studies and their reporting. PMID:27380206

  9. Essential pre-pregnancy and pregnancy interventions for improved maternal, newborn and child health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The statistics related to pregnancy and its outcomes are staggering: annually, an estimated 250000-280000 women die during childbirth. Unfortunately, a large number of women receive little or no care during or before pregnancy. At a period of critical vulnerability, interventions can be effectively delivered to improve the health of women and their newborns and also to make their pregnancy safe. This paper reviews the interventions that are most effective during preconception and pregnancy period and synergistically improve maternal and neonatal outcomes. Among pre-pregnancy interventions, family planning and advocating pregnancies at appropriate intervals; prevention and management of sexually transmitted infections including HIV; and peri-conceptual folic-acid supplementation have shown significant impact on reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. During pregnancy, interventions including antenatal care visit model; iron and folic acid supplementation; tetanus Immunisation; prevention and management of malaria; prevention and management of HIV and PMTCT; calcium for hypertension; anti-Platelet agents (low dose aspirin) for prevention of Pre-eclampsia; anti-hypertensives for treating severe hypertension; management of pregnancy-induced hypertension/eclampsia; external cephalic version for breech presentation at term (>36 weeks); management of preterm, premature rupture of membranes; management of unintended pregnancy; and home visits for women and children across the continuum of care have shown maximum impact on reducing the burden of maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality. All of the interventions summarized in this paper have the potential to improve maternal mortality rates and also contribute to better health care practices during preconception and periconception period. PMID:25178042

  10. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients’ characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  11. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  12. The effect of a very short interpregnancy interval and pregnancy outcomes following a previous pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    WONG, Luchin F.; SCHLIEP, Karen C.; SILVER, Robert M.; MUMFORD, Sunni L.; PERKINS, Neil J.; YE, Aijun; GALAI, Noya; WACTAWSKI-WENDE, Jean; LYNCH, Anne M.; TOWNSEND, Janet M.; FARAGGI, David; SCHISTERMAN, Enrique F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We sought to assess the relationship between a short interpregnancy interval (IPI) following a pregnancy loss and subsequent live birth and pregnancy outcomes. Study Design A secondary analysis of women enrolled in the Effects of Aspirin in Gestation and Reproduction trial with an hCG-positive pregnancy test and whose last reproductive outcome was a loss were included in this analysis (n=677). IPI was defined as the time between last pregnancy loss and last menstrual period of the current pregnancy and categorized by 3-month intervals. Pregnancy outcomes include live birth, pregnancy loss, and any pregnancy complications. These were compared between IPI groups using multivariate relative risk estimation by Poisson regression. Results Demographic characteristics were similar between IPI groups. The mean gestational age of prior pregnancy loss was 8.6 ± 2.8 weeks. The overall live birth rate was 76.5%, with similar live birth rates between those with IPI ≤ 3 months as compared to IPI > 3 months, aRR=1.07 (95% CI 0.98–1.16). Rates were also similar for peri-implantation loss (aRR=0.95; 95% CI 0.51–1.80), clinically confirmed loss, (aRR=0.75; 95% CI 0.51–1.10), and any pregnancy complication (aRR=0.88; 95% CI 0.71–1.09) for those with IPI ≤ 3 months as compared to IPI > 3 months. Conclusion Live birth rates and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pregnancy loss, were not associated with a very short IPI after a prior pregnancy loss. The traditional recommendation to wait at least 3 months after a pregnancy loss before attempting a new pregnancy may not be warranted. PMID:25246378

  13. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  14. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients' assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  15. Pregnancy Outcome after Office Microhysteroscopy in Women with Unexplained Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Seyam, Emaduldin Mostafa; Hassan, Momen Mohamed; Mohamed Sayed Gad, Mohamed Tawfeek; Mahmoud, Hazem Salah; Ibrahim, Mostafa Gamal

    2015-01-01

    make the proposed office microhysteroscopy an ideal and routine procedure in order to diagnose and to treat missed intrauterine abnormalities, especially in cases with un- explained infertility, with additional improvement of the pregnancy outcome after the procedure. PMID:26246874

  16. Simulation: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abi; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Crofts, Joanna; Draycott, Tim

    2013-06-01

    Effective training has been shown to improve perinatal care and outcome, decrease litigation claims and reduce midwifery sick leave. To be effective, training should be incentivised, in a realistic context, and delivered to inter-professional teams similar to those delivering actual care. Teamwork training is a useful addition, but it should be based on the characteristics of effective teamwork as derived from the study of frontline teams. Implementation of simulation and teamwork training is challenging, with constraints on staff time, facilities and finances. Local adoption and adaptation of effective programmes can help keep costs down, and make them locally relevant whilst maintaining effectiveness. Training programmes need to evolve continually in line with new evidence. To do this, it is vital to monitor outcomes and robustly evaluate programmes for their impact on patient care and outcome, not just on participants. PMID:23721770

  17. Pregnancy Outcome in Women with Threatened Miscarriage: a Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Salah Roshdy; El-Sammani, Mohamed El-Khatem; Al-Sheeha, Muneera Al-Alaziz; Aitallah, Abdou Saeed; Jabin Khan, Farhat; Ahmed, Salah Roshdy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with threatened miscarriage associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes because of associated pregnancy and labor complications. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of threatened miscarriage on early and late pregnancy outcome. Methods: A retrospective case–controlled study was performed on 89 women with threatened miscarriage (study group) at Maternity and Children Hospital Buraidah, KSA from January 2010 to December 2010. They were matched for age and parity to 45 cases (control group) attending route antenatal clinic at the same time. Data recorded included, demographic characteristics and detailed pregnancy outcome and ultrasound finding including gestational age, cardiac activity and subchorionic hematoma. Results: The overall adverse pregnancy outcome was significantly higher in the studied cases compared to the control group (p=015).The miscarriage rate was significantly higher in study group compared to the controls group, (16.9%vs 2.2%, p=0000). Preterm delivery, babies with low birth weight and premature rupture of membranes were significantly higher in the miscarriage group compared to the controls group, (15.7% vs 2.2%, p=0.001), (15.7% vs 2.2%), p=0.001) and (6.7%) vs 4.45), p=0.016). There were no significant differences in other pregnancy outcomes. Conclusion: threatened miscarriage is associated with increased incidence of adverse pregnancy outcome. The risk is specially increased in premature rupture of the membranes, preterm delivery and neonatal birth weight. PMID:23678307

  18. Racial disparities in economic and clinical outcomes of pregnancy among Medicaid recipients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shun; Cardarelli, Kathryn; Shim, Ruth; Ye, Jiali; Booker, Karla L; Rust, George

    2013-10-01

    To explore racial-ethnic disparities in adverse pregnancy outcomes among Medicaid recipients, and to estimate excess Medicaid costs associated with the disparities. Cross-sectional study of adverse pregnancy outcomes and Medicaid payments using data from Medicaid Analytic eXtract files on all Medicaid enrollees in fourteen southern states. Compared to other racial and ethnic groups, African American women tended to be younger, more likely to have a Cesarean section, to stay longer in the hospital and to incur higher Medicaid costs. African-American women were also more likely to experience preeclampsia, placental abruption, preterm birth, small birth size for gestational age, and fetal death/stillbirth. Eliminating racial disparities in adverse pregnancy outcomes (not counting infant costs), could generate Medicaid cost savings of $114 to $214 million per year in these 14 states. Despite having the same insurance coverage and meeting the same poverty guidelines for Medicaid eligibility, African American women have a higher rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes than White or Hispanic women. Racial disparities in adverse pregnancy outcomes not only represent potentially preventable human suffering, but also avoidable economic costs. There is a significant financial return-on-investment opportunity tied to eliminating racial disparities in birth outcomes. With the Affordable Care Act expansion of Medicaid coverage for the year 2014, Medicaid could be powerful public health tool for improving pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23065298

  19. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy: Impact on pregnancy complications and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-05-01

    Asthma is common among pregnant women, and the incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is high. This literature review provides an overview of the impact of exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy on pregnancy-related complications. The majority of published retrospective studies reveal that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care unit and longer postpartum hospital stay. Asthma has been associated with increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, small-for-gestational age, low birth weight, infant hypoglycaemia and preterm birth, but more recent prospective studies have not revealed significant associations with regard to these outcomes. In conclusion, asthma exacerbations during pregnancy are associated with complications of pregnancy, labour and delivery. Prevention of exacerbations is essential to reduce the risk of complications and poor outcome. PMID:26467747

  20. Pregnancy and Infants' Outcome: Nutritional and Metabolic Implications.

    PubMed

    Berti, C; Cetin, I; Agostoni, C; Desoye, G; Devlieger, R; Emmett, P M; Ensenauer, R; Hauner, H; Herrera, E; Hoesli, I; Krauss-Etschmann, S; Olsen, S F; Schaefer-Graf, U; Schiessl, B; Symonds, M E; Koletzko, B

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex period of human growth, development, and imprinting. Nutrition and metabolism play a crucial role for the health and well-being of both mother and fetus, as well as for the long-term health of the offspring. Nevertheless, several biological and physiological mechanisms related to nutritive requirements together with their transfer and utilization across the placenta are still poorly understood. In February 2009, the Child Health Foundation invited leading experts of this field to a workshop to critically review and discuss current knowledge, with the aim to highlight priorities for future research. This paper summarizes our main conclusions with regards to maternal preconceptional body mass index, gestational weight gain, placental and fetal requirements in relation to adverse pregnancy and long-term outcomes of the fetus (nutritional programming). We conclude that there is an urgent need to develop further human investigations aimed at better understanding of the basis of biochemical mechanisms and pathophysiological events related to maternal-fetal nutrition and offspring health. An improved knowledge would help to optimize nutritional recommendations for pregnancy. PMID:24628089

  1. Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine associations of neonatal adiposity with maternal glucose levels and cord serum C-peptide in a multicenter multinational study, the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study, thereby assessing the Pederson hypothesis linking maternal glycemia and fetal hyperinsulinemia to neonatal adiposity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Eligible pregnant women underwent a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test between 24 and 32 weeks gestation (as close to 28 weeks as possible). Neonatal anthropometrics and cord serum C-peptide were measured. Associations of maternal glucose and cord serum C-peptide with neonatal adiposity (sum of skin folds >90th percentile or percent body fat >90th percentile) were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses, with adjustment for potential confounders, including maternal age, parity, BMI, mean arterial pressure, height, gestational age at delivery, and the baby's sex. RESULTS—Among 23,316 HAPO Study participants with glucose levels blinded to caregivers, cord serum C-peptide results were available for 19,885 babies and skin fold measurements for 19,389. For measures of neonatal adiposity, there were strong statistically significant gradients across increasing levels of maternal glucose and cord serum C-peptide, which persisted after adjustment for potential confounders. In fully adjusted continuous variable models, odds ratios ranged from 1.35 to 1.44 for the two measures of adiposity for fasting, 1-h, and 2-h plasma glucose higher by 1 SD. CONCLUSIONS—These findings confirm the link between maternal glucose and neonatal adiposity and suggest that the relationship is mediated by fetal insulin production and that the Pedersen hypothesis describes a basic biological relationship influencing fetal growth. PMID:19011170

  2. Pregnancy outcome of the obese in Ilorin

    PubMed Central

    Adesina, K; Aderibigbe, S; Fawole, A; Ijaiya, M; Olarinoye, A

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is a nutritional disorder that is fast becoming a public health issue in the developing world. It is associated with increased incidence of maternal complications and adverse perinatal outcome. Methods and results This is a case-control study of obesity in pregnancy carried out in the maternity wing of University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. The subjects and controls were 156 obese and 80 non-obese women booked at this hospital for antenatal care. The controls were matched for age and parity. Obesity occurred more commonly among the well educated (P = 0.00) and those in social classes I and II (P = 0.00). The occurrence of other medical conditions was not significantly different. The obese women also had more caesarean sections (P = 0.00), more assisted vaginal deliveries (P = 0.00) and fewer spontaneous vaginal deliveries (P = 0.00) than the non-obese parturients. The mean birth weight of infants of the obese mothers was 4.06 ± 0.13 kg (mean±SD) while the mean for the controls was 3.36 ± 0.49 kg. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.000). Also, the obese parturients had more macrosomic babies (defined as birth weight >4.2 kg) than the non-obese (P = 0.00). The risks of perinatal asphyxia, birth trauma, neonatal admission and low birth weight were not increased among obese women in this study. Conclusion This study suggests that in our community, obesity occurs more commonly among women of high socioeconomic status and is a risk factor for maternal and fetal complications.

  3. The effects of maternal exercise on early pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Clapp, J F

    1989-12-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that vigorous aerobic exercise during both the periconceptional period and early pregnancy increases the incidence of abnormal early pregnancy outcome. Exercise performance was prospectively monitored before and during pregnancy in 47 recreational runners, 40 aerobic dancers, and 28 physically active, fit controls. Pregnancy was diagnosed by an early test for beta-subunit human chorionic gonadotropin and viability was confirmed by ultrasonography at 40 days' conceptional age. Spontaneous abortion occurred in 19% of the pregnancies. The incidence was 17% in the runners, 18% in the aerobic dancers, and 25% in the controls. At term, one congenital abnormality was detected in each of the three groups. Late pregnancy events, potentially related to abnormalities of placentation, were limited to two cases of mild pregnancy-induced hypertension. We conclude that, in physically fit women, continuation of these types of aerobic activity at intensities between 50% and 85% of maximum during the periconceptional period and early pregnancy does not appreciably alter early pregnancy outcome. PMID:2603898

  4. Pregnancy planning, smoking behaviour during pregnancy, and neonatal outcome: UK millennium cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pre-pregnancy health and care are important for the health of the future generations. Smoking during pregnancy has been well-researched and there is clear evidence of harm. But there has been little research on the health impact of planning for pregnancy. This study aims to investigate the independent effects of pregnancy planning and smoking during pregnancy on neonatal outcome. Methods This analysis made use of data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. The study sample consisted of 18,178 singleton babies born in UK between 2000 and 2001. The neonatal outcomes of interest were low birthweight (<2.5 Kg) and pre-term birth (<37 completed weeks gestation). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between pregnancy planning and/or smoking and neonatal outcome. Adjusted odds ratios were used to calculate population attributable risk fractions (PAFs). Results 43% of mothers did not plan their pregnancy and 34% were smoking just before and/or during pregnancy. Planners were half as likely to be smokers just before pregnancy, and more likely to give up or reduce the amount smoked if smokers. Unplanned pregnancies had 24% increased odds of low birth weight and prematurity compared to planned pregnancies (AORLBW1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.48; AORPREM1.24, 95% CI 1.05-1.45), independent of smoking status. The odds of low birth weight for babies of mothers who were smoking just before pregnancy was 91% higher than that of mothers who were not (AORLBW1.91, 95% CI 1.56-2.34). Women who quit or reduced the amount smoked during pregnancy lowered the risk of a low birth weight baby by one third (AORLBW0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.85) compared with women whose smoking level did not change. Smaller effects were found for prematurity. If all women planned their pregnancy and did not smoke before or during pregnancy, 30% of low birthweight and 14% of prematurity could, in theory, be avoided. Conclusions Planning a pregnancy and avoiding smoking during pregnancy has clear

  5. Sleep Disordered Breathing and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cain, Mary Ashley; Louis, Judette M

    2016-06-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) occurs in 0.6% to 15% of reproductive-aged women. Because of an overlap in symptoms of SDB and normal pregnancy findings, the diagnosis of SDB in pregnancy is challenging. The repetitive arousals, sleep fragmentation, and hypoxias experienced by patients with SDB lead to an increase in oxidative stress and inflammation. In the nonpregnant population SDB is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and stroke. Increasing evidence identifies an association between SDB in pregnancy and gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and fetal growth abnormalities. PMID:27235923

  6. The Assessment of Diet Quality and Its Effects on Health Outcomes Pre-pregnancy and during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julie C; Zhou, Shao J; Flynn, Angela C; Malek, Lenka; Greco, Rebecca; Moran, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Overweight and obesity pre pregnancy or during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for maternal obstetric and fetal complications. Diet is one modifiable risk factor that women may be motivated to improve. General healthy eating guidelines, micronutrient sufficiency and macronutrient quantity and quality are important nutrition considerations pre and during pregnancy. With regards to specific nutrients, health authorities have recommendations for folate and/or iodine supplementation; but not consistently for iron and omega-3 despite evidence for their association with health outcomes. There are modest additional requirements for energy and protein, but not fat or carbohydrate, in mid-late pregnancy. Diet indices and dietary pattern analysis are additional tools or methodologies used to assess diet quality. These tools have been used to determine dietary intakes and patterns and their association with pregnancy complications and birth outcomes pre or during pregnancy. Women who may unnecessarily resist foods due to fear of food contamination from listeriosis and methylmercury may limit their diet quality and a balanced approached is required. Dietary intake may also vary according to certain population characteristics. Additional support for women who are younger, less educated, overweight and obese, from socially disadvantaged areas, smokers and those who unnecessarily avoid healthy foods, is required to achieve a higher quality diet and optimal lifestyle peri conception. PMID:26886241

  7. Maternal nutrition--effect on fetal growth and outcome of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Prema

    2002-05-01

    During the first half of the 20th century, chronic energy undernutrition due to low dietary intake, repeated infections, and rapid succession of pregnancy were the factors most responsible for maternal undernutrition and consequent adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Efforts to improve dietary intake, treatment of infections, and provision of contraceptive care were the major focuses of intervention from 1950 to 1990. These interventions resulted in reduction in severe grades of undernutrition. However, there was no reduction in mild and moderate degrees of undernutrition and anemia during pregnancy and there was no significant improvement in the course and outcome of pregnancy, or in birth weight. During the 1990s, among the middle- and upper-income groups, there has been a progressive rise in obesity and consequent adverse effects. The advent of HIV infection in India in the 1980s will inevitably lead to increases in severe undernutrition associated with HIV infection in pregnancy and an adverse impact of maternal HIV infection on the fetus. Practicing physicians and nutritionists in the new millennium will therefore have to assess each person individually and provide appropriate advice regarding diet, exercise, fertility, and infection prevention and control in order to achieve optimum health and nutrition status during pregnancy and to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:12035855

  8. Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes among Women with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Wyszynski, Diego F.; Carman, Wendy J.; Cantor, Alan B.; Graham, John M.; Kunz, Liza H.; Slavotinek, Anne M.; Kirby, Russell S.; Seeger, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine pregnancy and birth outcomes among women with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or chronic ITP (cITP) diagnosed before or during pregnancy. Methods. A linkage of mothers and babies within a large US health insurance database that combines enrollment data, pharmacy claims, and medical claims was carried out to identify pregnancies in women with ITP or cITP. Outcomes included preterm birth, elective and spontaneous loss, and major congenital anomalies. Results. Results suggest that women diagnosed with ITP or cITP prior to their estimated date of conception may be at higher risk for stillbirth, fetal loss, and premature delivery. Among 446 pregnancies in women with ITP, 346 resulted in live births. Women with cITP experienced more adverse outcomes than those with a pregnancy-related diagnosis of ITP. Although 7.8% of all live births had major congenital anomalies, the majority were isolated heart defects. Among deliveries in women with cITP, 15.2% of live births were preterm. Conclusions. The results of this study provide further evidence that cause and duration of maternal ITP are important determinants of the outcomes of pregnancy. PMID:27092275

  9. Prenatal Diagnosis and Pregnancy Outcome Analysis of Polyhydramnios.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Ling; Pang, Li-Hong; Deng, Bi-Ye

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the etiology and pregnancy outcomes in mothers with polyhydramnios through prenatal diagnosis and pregnancy outcome analysis of pregnant women with polyhydramnios. One hundred and thirty women were enrolled. Fifty pregnant women with polyhydramnios were categorized as the case group, and 80 pregnant women with normal amniotic fluid were categorized as the control group. The causes of polyhydramnios and the pregnancy outcomes were analyzed. Two cases had chromosomal abnormalities, seven had severe α-thalassemia, 15 had fetal anomalies, four had maternal-fetal diseases and 22 had unexplained idiopathic polyhydramnios. Significantly, higher occurrences of cesarean section, preterm birth, fetal anomaly, fetal distress, fetal macrosomia and female fetuses occurred in patients with polyhydramnios than in patients without polyhydramnios. Polyhydramnios is associated with a higher occurrence of adverse perinatal outcomes. Intensive monitoring of the maternal-fetal condition and prenatal diagnosis is important in patients with polyhydramnios. PMID:26720631

  10. Obstetrics and perinatal outcomes of dichorionic twin pregnancy following ART compared with spontaneous pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pourali, Leila; Ayati, Sedigheh; Jelodar, Shahrzad; Zarifian, Ahmadreza; Sheikh Andalibi, Mohammad Sobhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Regarding to the recent advances in assisted reproductive techniques (ART), twin and multiple pregnancies have increased during past years. Objective: This study was performed to compare obstetrics and perinatal outcomes of dichorionic twin pregnancy following ART with spontaneous pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study which was performed in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, 107 dichorionic twin pregnancy were enrolled in two groups: spontaneous group (n=96) and ART group (n=31). Basic criteria and obstetrics and neonatal outcomes information including demographic data, gestational age, mode of delivery, pregnancy complications (preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, preterm labor, and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), postpartum hemorrhage), neonatal outcomes (weight, first and fifth minute Apgar score, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admission, mortality, respiratory distress, and icterus) were recorded using a questionnaire. Results: Preterm labor, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia were significantly higher in ART group compared to spontaneous pregnancy group. However, other factors such as anemia, IUGR, postpartum hemorrhage, and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) were not significantly different between groups. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of neonatal outcomes (weight, 1st and 5th min Apgar score <7, NICU hospitalization, mortality, respiratory distress, and icterus). Conclusion: With regard of significantly higher poor outcomes such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes and preterm labor in ART group, the couples should be aware of these potential risks before choosing ART. PMID:27326416

  11. Neurocysticercosis in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Rebecca F; Ng, Sher M; Dassan, Pooja

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection with the larvae of Taenia solium from contaminated pork. It is a leading cause of seizures in the developing world. Symptoms may be secondary to live or degenerating cysts, or previous infection causing calcification or gliosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, radiological confirmation of intracranial lesions and immunological testing. Management involves symptom control with antiepileptics and antiparasitic agents. Few cases have been described of maternal NCC during pregnancy. We describe a 25-year-old female presenting to a London hospital with secondary generalized seizures. MRI of the brain confirmed a calcified lesion in the right parietal lobe, and she gave a corroborative history of NCC during her childhood in India. She was stabilized initially on antiepileptics, but during her pregnancy presented with breakthrough seizures and radiological evidence of NCC reactivation. She was managed symptomatically with antiepileptics and completed the pregnancy to term with no fetal complications. PMID:27471595

  12. Neurocysticercosis in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    D'Cruz, Rebecca F.; Ng, Sher M.; Dassan, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection with the larvae of Taenia solium from contaminated pork. It is a leading cause of seizures in the developing world. Symptoms may be secondary to live or degenerating cysts, or previous infection causing calcification or gliosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, radiological confirmation of intracranial lesions and immunological testing. Management involves symptom control with antiepileptics and antiparasitic agents. Few cases have been described of maternal NCC during pregnancy. We describe a 25-year-old female presenting to a London hospital with secondary generalized seizures. MRI of the brain confirmed a calcified lesion in the right parietal lobe, and she gave a corroborative history of NCC during her childhood in India. She was stabilized initially on antiepileptics, but during her pregnancy presented with breakthrough seizures and radiological evidence of NCC reactivation. She was managed symptomatically with antiepileptics and completed the pregnancy to term with no fetal complications. PMID:27471595

  13. Asymptomatic trichomonas and candida colonization and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Hay, Phillip; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2007-06-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted surface pathogen of the lower urogenital tract, and may be associated with asymptomatic vaginal colonization or intensely symptomatic vaginitis. In pregnancy it is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery. However, a randomized trial of treatment of asymptomatic trichomonas colonization in pregnancy showed an increase in the risk of preterm delivery in treated women. The reasons for this paradox are yet to be fully elucidated. Candida species, on the other hand, may be present--usually in the yeast form--in the vaginal flora of up to 40% of healthy pregnant women. Although candidiasis is not usually associated with chorioamnionitis or preterm delivery, there is some emerging evidence to suggest that screening for and eradication of candida during pregnancy may reduce the risk of preterm delivery. This chapter reviews the impact of these common vaginal infections on pregnancy outcome and appraises the recent evidence on the role of treatment during pregnancy. PMID:17512254

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Pregnancy: The Global Challenge of Preventing Adverse Pregnancy and Infant Outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Kristina; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Screening and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in pregnancy represents an overlooked opportunity to improve the health outcomes of women and infants worldwide. Although Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common treatable bacterial STI, few countries have routine pregnancy screening and treatment programs. We reviewed the current literature surrounding Chlamydia trachomatis in pregnancy, particularly focusing on countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. We discuss possible chlamydial adverse pregnancy and infant health outcomes (miscarriage, stillbirth, ectopic pregnancy, preterm birth, neonatal conjunctivitis, neonatal pneumonia, and other potential effects including HIV perinatal transmission) and review studies of chlamydial screening and treatment in pregnancy, while simultaneously highlighting research from resource-limited countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. PMID:27144177

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Pregnancy: The Global Challenge of Preventing Adverse Pregnancy and Infant Outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kristina; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Screening and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in pregnancy represents an overlooked opportunity to improve the health outcomes of women and infants worldwide. Although Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common treatable bacterial STI, few countries have routine pregnancy screening and treatment programs. We reviewed the current literature surrounding Chlamydia trachomatis in pregnancy, particularly focusing on countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. We discuss possible chlamydial adverse pregnancy and infant health outcomes (miscarriage, stillbirth, ectopic pregnancy, preterm birth, neonatal conjunctivitis, neonatal pneumonia, and other potential effects including HIV perinatal transmission) and review studies of chlamydial screening and treatment in pregnancy, while simultaneously highlighting research from resource-limited countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. PMID:27144177

  16. [Mood stabilisers and pregnancy outcomes - a review].

    PubMed

    Costoloni, Giulia; Pierantozzi, Elisa; Goracci, Arianna; Bolognesi, Simone; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to give useful information to guide clinicians when treating pregnant women affected by bipolar disorder. This review focuses on mood stabilizers including lithium, sodium valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine and topiramate. Data have been extracted from a MEDLINE search. Data from prospective, retrospective and case-control studies as well as systematic reviews, meta-analysis and data from Pregnancy Registry were included. Major congenital malformations as well as specific malformations were reported for each drug. Preliminary findings seem to identify lamotrigine as one ofthe safest antiepileptic drugs to be used in pregnancy. Teratogenity risk oftopiramate is still largely unknown and there are not enough studies to draw even preliminary conclusions. Preliminary studies failed to report an increased risk for major congenital malformations among gabapentin or.oxcarbazepine exposed pregnancies. Even if raising less concern when compared to valproate, carbamazepine should be avoided for its documented teratogenity risk. Valproate seems to be the worst considering major congenital malformations, specific malformations as,well as its detrimental effects on neurodevelopment. On the other hand, lithium might be considered a good option when treating pregnant women affected by bipolar disorder. Given the limited research on mood stabilizers in pregnancy, clinicians need to be very careful when treating child bearing age women. Clinicians have to balance the potential teratogenityrisk against that of untreated mental illness considering individual circumstances such as severity of illness and risk of relapse. PMID:25639010

  17. Pregnancy and Neonatal Diabetes Outcomes in Remote Australia (PANDORA) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes in pregnancy carries an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes for both the mother and foetus, but it also provides an excellent early opportunity for intervention in the life course for both mother and baby. In the context of the escalating epidemic of chronic diseases among Indigenous Australians, it is vital that this risk is reduced as early as possible in the life course of the individual. The aims of the PANDORA Study are to: (i) accurately assess rates of diabetes in pregnancy in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia, where 38% of babies are born to Indigenous mothers; (ii) assess demographic, clinical, biochemical, anthropometric, socioeconomic and early life development factors that may contribute to key maternal and neonatal birth outcomes associated with diabetes in pregnancy; and (iii) monitor relevant post-partum clinical outcomes for both the mothers and their babies. Methods/Design Eligible participants are all NT women with diabetes in pregnancy aged 16 years and over. Information collected includes: standard antenatal clinical information, diagnosis and management of diabetes in pregnancy, socio-economic status, standard clinical birth information (delivery, gestational age, birth weight, adverse antenatal and birth outcomes). Cord blood is collected at the time of delivery and detailed neonatal anthropometric measurements performed within 72 hours of birth. Information will also be collected regarding maternal post-partum glucose tolerance and cardio-metabolic risk factor status, breastfeeding and growth of the baby up to 2 years post-partum in the first instance. Discussion This study will accurately document rates and outcomes of diabetes in pregnancy in the NT of Australia, including the high-risk Indigenous Australian population. The results of this study should contribute to policy and clinical guidelines with the goal of reducing the future risk of obesity and diabetes in both mothers and their offspring. PMID

  18. Allopregnanolone in the brain: protecting pregnancy and birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Paula J; Russell, John A; Hirst, Jonathan J

    2014-02-01

    A successful pregnancy requires multiple adaptations in the mother's brain that serve to optimise foetal growth and development, protect the foetus from adverse prenatal programming and prevent premature delivery of the young. Pregnancy hormones induce, organise and maintain many of these adaptations. Steroid hormones play a critical role and of particular importance is the progesterone metabolite and neurosteroid, allopregnanolone. Allopregnanolone is produced in increasing amounts during pregnancy both in the periphery and in the maternal and foetal brain. This review critically examines a role for allopregnanolone in both the maternal and foetal brain during pregnancy and development in protecting pregnancy and birth outcomes, with particular emphasis on its role in relation to stress exposure at this time. Late pregnancy is associated with suppressed stress responses. Thus, we begin by considering what is known about the central mechanisms in the maternal brain, induced by allopregnanolone, that protect the foetus(es) from exposure to harmful levels of maternal glucocorticoids as a result of stress during pregnancy. Next we discuss the central mechanisms that prevent premature secretion of oxytocin and consider a role for allopregnanolone in minimising the risk of preterm birth. Allopregnanolone also plays a key role in the foetal brain, where it promotes development and is neuroprotective. Hence we review the evidence about disruption to neurosteroid production in pregnancy, through prenatal stress or other insults, and the immediate and long-term adverse consequences for the offspring. Finally we address whether progesterone or allopregnanolone treatment can rescue some of these deficits in the offspring. PMID:24012715

  19. Delayed childbearing: effects on fertility and the outcome of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balasch, Juan; Gratacós, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    In modern societies, the proportion of women who delay childbearing beyond the age of 35 years has greatly increased in recent decades. They are falsely reassured by popular beliefs that advances in new reproductive technologies can compensate for the age-related decline in fertility. Yet age remains the single most important determinant of male and female fertility, either natural or treated. The consequences of advancing maternal age are not only relevant for the risk of natural and assisted conception, but also for the outcome of pregnancy. Although the absolute rate of poor pregnancy outcomes may be low from an individual standpoint, the impact of delaying childbearing from a public health perspective cannot be overestimated and should be in the agenda of public health policies for the years to come. This review summarizes available evidence regarding the impact of delaying childbearing on fertility and pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21228557

  20. Pregnancy outcome after use of cranberry in pregnancy – the Norwegian mother and child cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cranberry is one of the most commonly used herbs during pregnancy. The herb has been used traditionally against urinary tract infections. No studies are found that specifically address the risk of malformations after use of cranberry during pregnancy. The aim of the study was to investigate the safety of cranberry use during pregnancy, including any effects on congenital malformations and selected pregnancy outcomes. Methods The study is based on data from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study including more than 100,000 pregnancies from 1999 to 2008. Information on use of cranberry and socio-demographic factors was retrieved from three self-administered questionnaires completed by the women in pregnancy weeks 17 and 30, and 6 months after birth. Information on pregnancy outcomes was retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Results Among the 68,522 women in the study, 919 (1.3%) women had used cranberry while pregnant. We did not detect any increased risk of congenital malformations after use of cranberry. Furthermore, the use of cranberry was also not associated with increased risk for stillbirth/neonatal death, low birth weight, small for gestational age, preterm birth, low Apgar score (<7), neonatal infections or maternal vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy. Although an association was found between use of cranberry in late pregnancy and vaginal bleeding after pregnancy week 17, further sub-analyses of more severe bleeding outcomes did not support a significant risk. Conclusions The findings of this study, revealing no increased risk of malformations nor any of the following pregnancy outcomes; stillbirth/neonatal death, preterm delivery, low birth weight, small for gestational age, low Apgar score and neonatal infections are reassuring. However, maternal vaginal bleeding should be investigated further before any firm conclusion can be drawn. Treatment guidelines on asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy recommend antimicrobial

  1. Outcome of pregnancy in survivors of Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Gimbrere, K.; Gelber, R.D.; Sallan, S.E.; Flamant, F.; Green, D.M.; Heyn, R.M.; Meadows, A.T.

    1987-01-09

    Outcome of pregnancy was reported by 99 patients who were cured of childhood Wilms' tumor at seven pediatric cancer centers during 1931 to 1979. These patients carried or sired 191 singleton pregnancies of at least 20 weeks in duration. Among the 114 pregnancies in women who had received abdominal radiotherapy for Wilms' tumor, an adverse outcome occurred in 34 (30%). There were 17 perinatal deaths (five in premature low-birth-weight infants) and 17 other low-birth-weight infants. Compared with white women in the United States, the irradiated women had an increased perinatal mortality rate (relative risk, 7.9) and an excess of low-birth-weight infants (relative risk, 4.0). In contrast, an adverse outcome was found in two (3%) of the 77 pregnancies in nonirradiated female patients with Wilms' tumor and wives of male patients. The high risk of adverse pregnancy outcome should be considered in the counseling and prenatal care of women who have received abdominal radiotherapy for Wilms' tumor.

  2. Improving Outcomes for Teenage Pregnancy and Early Parenthood for Young People in Out-of-Home Care: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Young people leaving out-of-home care are overrepresented among teenage parents. This paper examines the research literature and identifies key factors that contribute to early pregnancy and parenthood for care leavers, the challenges of early parenting and the positive effects of early parenting. The implications for out-of-home care policy and…

  3. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, respiratory outcomes and atopy in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Seif O; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Lawlor, Debbie A; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Few epidemiological studies have investigated the role of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in the aetiology of childhood respiratory and atopic outcomes. In the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children we examined associations of maternal gestational hypertension, hypertension before pregnancy and preeclampsia with wheezing at 18 months, wheezing and asthma at 7 years, and lung function at 8-9 years, after controlling for potential confounders (N=5322-8734, depending on outcome). Gestational hypertension was not associated with any outcome. There was weak evidence for a positive association between preeclampsia and early wheezing (adjusted odds ratio compared to normotensive pregnancies 1.31 (95% CI: 0.94 to 1.82)) and for negative associations between preeclampsia and Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (adjusted mean difference in standard deviation score -0.14 (-0.33 to 0.06)) and Maximal Mid-Expiratory Flow (-0.15 (-0.34 to 0.04)). Hypertension before pregnancy was positively associated with wheezing (OR 1.63 (1.16 to 2.31) and asthma (OR 1.34 (1.00 to 1.79)). Gestational hypertension is unlikely to be a risk factor for childhood respiratory disorders; hypertension before pregnancy may be a risk factor for childhood wheezing and asthma, but this finding needs replication. Larger studies are needed to confirm whether preeclampsia is associated with impaired childhood lung function. PMID:26541530

  4. Iodine supplementation in pregnancy and its effects on perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, A; Pokhrel, T; Bastola, S P; Banjara, M R; Joshi, A B

    2011-06-01

    Iodine is an important micronutrient for mental growth and development. Limited information is available on the role of iodine supplementation in pregnancy and its effect on perinatal outcome. We designed intervention study to assess the effect of iodine supplementation during second half pregnancy and its effect on perinatal outcomes (maternal and neonatal health). Among 60 intervened with oral iodine tablet in pregnancy and 60 control pregnant women in Sindhupalchowk District Hospital Chautara, we assessed maternal and neonatal health after the delivery. The significant differences were found among duration of pregnancy, weight of pregnant mother before and after intervention of at least three months duration (56.1 kg vs. 59.6 kg, p < 0.001), weight of neonate (3.3 kg in intervention vs. 3.0 kg in control, p < 0.001), and thyroxin hormone (1.1 ng in intervention vs. 1.2 ng in control, p < 0.001) of women between intervened and control subjects. Therefore, regular supplementation of iodine in oral form for more than three months during pregnancy preferably during early stage will bring significant positive changes in perinatal outcomes. PMID:22364098

  5. Low Gestational Weight Gain in Obese Women and Pregnancy Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Moehlecke, Milene; Costenaro, Fabíola; Reichelt, Angela Aj; Oppermann, Maria Lúcia R; Leitão, Cristiane B

    2016-03-01

    Obesity during pregnancy and excessive weight gain during this period are associated with several maternal-fetal and neonatal complications. Moreover, a significant percentage of women have weight retention in the postpartum period, especially those with excessive weight gain during pregnancy. The recommendations of the 2009 Institute of Medicine were based on observational studies that have consistently shown that women with weight gain within the recommended range had better outcomes during pregnancy. In patients with obesity, however, there is no recommendation for weight gain, according to the class of obesity. This review, therefore, aims to evaluate the evidence on key maternal and fetal complications related to low weight gain during pregnancy in obese and overweight patients. PMID:26929877

  6. Low Gestational Weight Gain in Obese Women and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Moehlecke, Milene; Costenaro, Fabíola; Reichelt, Angela AJ; Oppermann, Maria Lúcia R.; Leitão, Cristiane B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity during pregnancy and excessive weight gain during this period are associated with several maternal–fetal and neonatal complications. Moreover, a significant percentage of women have weight retention in the postpartum period, especially those with excessive weight gain during pregnancy. The recommendations of the 2009 Institute of Medicine were based on observational studies that have consistently shown that women with weight gain within the recommended range had better outcomes during pregnancy. In patients with obesity, however, there is no recommendation for weight gain, according to the class of obesity. This review, therefore, aims to evaluate the evidence on key maternal and fetal complications related to low weight gain during pregnancy in obese and overweight patients. PMID:26929877

  7. Pregnancy After Kidney Transplantation: Outcomes, Tacrolimus Doses, and Trough Levels.

    PubMed

    Aktürk, S; Çelebi, Z K; Erdoğmuş, Ş; Kanmaz, A G; Yüce, T; Şengül, Ş; Keven, K

    2015-06-01

    Although pregnancy after kidney transplantation has been considered as high risk for maternal and fetal complications, it can be successful in properly selected patients. It is well known that pregnancy can induce changes in the plasma concentrations of some drugs; however, there has been very limited information about tacrolimus pharmacokinetics during pregnancy. In this study, we evaluated the tacrolimus doses, blood levels, and the outcomes of pregnancies in kidney allograft recipients. From 2004 to 2014, we found 16 pregnancies in 12 kidney allograft recipients at our center. We reviewed the files and data reports including fetal outcomes, graft function, complications, tacrolimus trough levels, and doses. We analyzed the tacrolimus trough levels and doses before pregnancy, during pregnancy (monthly), and in the postpartum period. Throughout the pregnancy, we aimed to achieve tacrolimus trough levels between 4 and 7 ng/mL. All patients were on triple immunosuppression, including tacrolimus, azathioprine, and prednisolone. In total, 11 of 16 (68.7%) pregnancies were successful, with a mean weight gain of 12.5 ± 1.66 kg. One patient developed gestational diabetes mellitus and 2 had preeclampsia. Although 5 of 11 babies were found to have low birth weight, 4 of these were premature. Two patients lost their grafts, 1 due to acute rejection and the second due to progression of chronic allograft dysfunction. We have shown that tacrolimus doses need to be significantly increased to keep appropriate trough levels during pregnancy (the doses: before, 3.20 ± 0.9 mg/day; first trimester, 5.03 ± 1.5; second trimester, 6.50 ± 1.8; third trimester, 7.30 ± 2.3; post-partum, 3.5 ± 0.9). In conclusion, the dose of tacrolimus needs to be increased to provide safe and stable tacrolimus trough levels during pregnancy. Although pregnancy can be successful in most cases, it should be kept in mind that there is an increased risk of maternal and fetal complications, including

  8. Pregnancy outcomes in Southeast Asian migrant workers at Southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hanprasertpong, T; Hanprasertpong, J

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to determine the pregnancy outcomes and identify predictive factors of adverse outcomes in pregnant migrant workers who delivered at Songklanagarind Hospital from January 2002 to December 2012. Two hundred and forty migrant worker pregnancies were enrolled. Pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, pre-term birth and foetal intrauterine growth restriction found were 15, 7.9, 13.7 and 3.7%, respectively. No stillbirth was found. Apgar score was outcomes. Only pre-term birth was significantly related to overall adverse neonatal outcomes. PMID:25496499

  9. Case series: Pregnancy Outcome in Patients with Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Kusuma; Shreelatha, S.; Vana, Harshini

    2015-01-01

    Fibroids in pregnancy is a commonly encountered clinical entity. Objective of this study was to evaluate the maternal and fetal outcome in women having pregnancy with uterine fibroids. We present the clinical, obstetric data, perinatal outcomes of 15 patients from a prospective study. Fifteen pregnant women with fibroid >3cm were prospectively included in study. Major proportion of patient with fibroids were in younger age group of 25-30 years when compared to older age group of 31-35 years (66% vs 33%). Fibroids were more frequent in multi-gravidae, compared to primigravidae. In almost half of patients, (53.3%) fibroids were diagnosed before pregnancy. Common complications encountered during pregnancy in decreasing order of frequency were pain abdomen (46.6%), followed by threatened preterm labour (26.6%) and anaemia (26.6%). Out of 15, three (20%) women had abortion. In remaining, 11/12 patients attained term pregnancy between 37 to 40 weeks. Two patients required antenatal myomectomy. Caesarean section was done in 75% of women who attained term pregnancy and one patient had technical difficulty during caesarean section. Post partum heamorrhage was seen in 5/15 (33.3%) of patients. Out of 12, five babies were low birth weight. Four babies required NICU admission. There was no perinatal mortality. In our small patient series high incidence of caesarean section rates and increased incidence of threatened preterm labour, anaemia, and postpartum haemorrhage, was observed in pregnant patients with fibroids and hence, the pregnancy with fibroids should be considered as high risk pregnancy. PMID:26557577

  10. Case series: Pregnancy Outcome in Patients with Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Radhika, B H; Naik, Kusuma; Shreelatha, S; Vana, Harshini

    2015-10-01

    Fibroids in pregnancy is a commonly encountered clinical entity. Objective of this study was to evaluate the maternal and fetal outcome in women having pregnancy with uterine fibroids. We present the clinical, obstetric data, perinatal outcomes of 15 patients from a prospective study. Fifteen pregnant women with fibroid >3cm were prospectively included in study. Major proportion of patient with fibroids were in younger age group of 25-30 years when compared to older age group of 31-35 years (66% vs 33%). Fibroids were more frequent in multi-gravidae, compared to primigravidae. In almost half of patients, (53.3%) fibroids were diagnosed before pregnancy. Common complications encountered during pregnancy in decreasing order of frequency were pain abdomen (46.6%), followed by threatened preterm labour (26.6%) and anaemia (26.6%). Out of 15, three (20%) women had abortion. In remaining, 11/12 patients attained term pregnancy between 37 to 40 weeks. Two patients required antenatal myomectomy. Caesarean section was done in 75% of women who attained term pregnancy and one patient had technical difficulty during caesarean section. Post partum heamorrhage was seen in 5/15 (33.3%) of patients. Out of 12, five babies were low birth weight. Four babies required NICU admission. There was no perinatal mortality. In our small patient series high incidence of caesarean section rates and increased incidence of threatened preterm labour, anaemia, and postpartum haemorrhage, was observed in pregnant patients with fibroids and hence, the pregnancy with fibroids should be considered as high risk pregnancy. PMID:26557577

  11. The Impact of Uterine Radiation on Subsequent Fertility and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Wan Tinn; Stern, Catharyn; Chander, Sarat; Hickey, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Future fertility is of paramount importance to younger cancer survivors. Advances in assisted reproductive technology mean that young women treated with radiation involving the uterus may require clinical guidance regarding whether to attempt a pregnancy themselves. We performed a review of the literature regarding radiation involving uterus (total body irradiation (TBI) and pelvic radiation), fertility, and pregnancy outcomes to come up with a recommendation for our patients. Limited evidence suggests lower fecundity and an increased incidence of pregnancy complications after uterine radiation. Higher radiation doses and direct uterine radiation both significantly increase the risk of an adverse pregnancy outcome. Uterine radiation doses of <4 Gy do not appear to impair uterine function. Adult TBI data (usually 12 Gy) suggest pregnancy is possible but with lower fecundity and more complications. Although there is no clear data indicating the dose of radiation to the uterus, above which a pregnancy would not be sustainable, we suggest patients receiving >45 Gy during adulthood and >25 Gy in childhood be counselled to avoid attempting pregnancy. There is preliminary evidence that menopausal hormone therapy and a combination of pentoxifylline and tocopherol may improve uterine function following irradiation. PMID:25165706

  12. Pregnancy Outcomes Based on Pre-Pregnancy Body Mass Index in Japanese Women

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Kimiko; Aoki, Shigeru; Toma, Rie; Fujiwara, Kana; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2016-01-01

    Objective To verify whether body mass index (BMI) classification proposed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) is valid in Japanese women. Method A study was conducted in 97,157 women with singleton pregnancies registered in the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (JSOG) Successive Pregnancy Birth Registry System between January 2013 and December 2013, to examine pregnancy outcomes in four groups stratified by pre-pregnancy BMI category according to the 2009 criteria recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The groups comprised 17,724 underweight women with BMI <18.5, 69,126 normal weight women with BMI 18.5–24.9, 7,502 overweight women with BMI 25–29.9, and 2,805 obese women with BMI ≥30. The pregnancy outcomes were also compared among subgroups stratified by a gestational weight gain below, within, and above the optimal weight gain. Results The higher the pre-pregnancy BMI, the higher the incidences of pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, macrosomia, cesarean delivery, postpartum hemorrhage, and post-term birth, but the lower the incidence of small for gestational age (SGA). In all pre-pregnancy BMI category groups, excess gestational weight gain was associated with a higher frequency of large for gestational age and macrosomia; poor weight gain correlated with a higher frequency of SGA, preterm birth, preterm premature rupture of membranes, and spontaneous preterm birth; and optimal weight gain within the recommended range was associated with a better outcome. Conclusion The BMI classification by the IOM was demonstrated to be valid in Japanese women. PMID:27280958

  13. Missouri's parental consent law and teen pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pierson, V H

    1995-01-01

    The Supreme Court decision of July 1989 upholding state regulation of abortion has led to numerous attempts to impose parental consent and/or parental notification legislation for females under the age of 18 seeking abortions. The effect of such legislation on teen pregnancy outcomes is hotly debated. Missouri vital statistics data from 1980 through 1992 are examined for the effect of such a law on pregnancy resolution choices among teens. The Missouri data suggest that since the enforcement of the parental consent statute in 1985 there has been a decrease in the selection of abortion as a pregnancy outcome, particularly among white teens. In addition there has been an increase in the percent of abortions among teens taking place in other states and an irregular but steady trend toward later abortions. The increasing number of births to unmarried mothers under the age of 18 suggest the need for specific services to help these young mothers cope. PMID:7638977

  14. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes after Abnormal First Trimester Screening for Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Women with abnormal first trimester screening but with a normal karyotype are at risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. A nuchal translucency >3.5mm is associated with an increased risk of subsequent pregnancy loss, fetal infection, fetal heart abnormalities and other structural abnormalities. Abnormal first trimester analytes are also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes but the predictive value is less impressive. As a single marker, PAPP-A <1st%ile has a good predictive value for subsequent fetal growth restriction. Women with PAPP-A<5th%ile should undergo subsequent risk assessment with routine MSAFP screening with the possible addition of uterine artery PI assessment in the midtrimester. PMID:20638576

  15. The Relationship between Prenatal Parental Stress and Pregnancy Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neihardt, Joanne E.

    To explore the relationship between prenatal parental stress and pregnancy outcome, this study investigated the hypothesis that parents of infants with defects would report greater amounts of stress in the year prior to their infant's birth than would parents of normally developing infants. Data on levels of parental stress were obtained from 37…

  16. Pregnancy outcome in immigrant women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dalfrà, Maria Grazia; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Masin, Michela; Bonsembiante, Barbara; Cosma, Chiara; Barison, Antonella; Toniato, Rosanna; Fedele, Domenico; Lapolla, Annunziata

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies show adverse outcomes of pregnancy among immigrant women from countries with high diabetes rates. We compared maternal and fetal outcomes in immigrant and Italian women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) followed up at our center. Maternal characteristics considered were age, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), HbA1c, frequency of insulin treatment, timing and mode of delivery, and hypertensive disorders; and, for fetal outcome, infants large or small for gestational age, and fetal complications. Pre-pregnancy BMI and HbA1c were higher in immigrant GDM women than in Italians, and more of them were on insulin. No differences in maternal outcome emerged between the two groups. More large for gestational age (LGA) babies were born to immigrant women than to Italians, but no other differences emerged. Apart from newborn LGA, maternal and fetal outcomes were comparable in our immigrant and Italian GDM women. Immigrant GDM women have favourable outcomes if given access to health care and language and cultural barriers are removed. PMID:20528567

  17. Periodontal Disease: A Possible Risk-Factor for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Anuj Singh; Katoch, Vartika; Rajguru, Sneha A; Rajpoot, Nami; Singh, Pinojj; Wakhle, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion in subgingival sites especially of gram-negative organisms are initiators for periodontal diseases. The periodontal pathogens with persistent inflammation lead to destruction of periodontium. In recent years, periodontal diseases have been associated with a number of systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular-disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic respiratory diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes including pre-term low-birth weight (PLBW) and pre-eclampsia. The factors like low socio-economic status, mother's age, race, multiple births, tobacco and drug-abuse may be found to increase risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. However, the same are less correlated with PLBW cases. Even the invasion of both aerobic and anerobic may lead to inflammation of gastrointestinal tract and vagina hence contributing to PLBW. The biological mechanism involved between PLBW and Maternal periodontitis is the translocation of chemical mediators of inflammation. Pre-eclampsia is one of the commonest cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity as it is characterized by hypertension and hyperprotenuria. Improving periodontal health before or during pregnancy may prevent or reduce the occurrences of these adverse pregnancy outcomes and, therefore, reduce the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, this article is an attempt to review the relationship between periodontal condition and altered pregnancy outcome. PMID:26229389

  18. Periodontal Disease: A Possible Risk-Factor for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Anuj Singh; Katoch, Vartika; Rajguru, Sneha A; Rajpoot, Nami; Singh, Pinojj; Wakhle, Sonal

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial invasion in subgingival sites especially of gram-negative organisms are initiators for periodontal diseases. The periodontal pathogens with persistent inflammation lead to destruction of periodontium. In recent years, periodontal diseases have been associated with a number of systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular-disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic respiratory diseases and adverse pregnancy outcomes including pre-term low-birth weight (PLBW) and pre-eclampsia. The factors like low socio-economic status, mother's age, race, multiple births, tobacco and drug-abuse may be found to increase risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. However, the same are less correlated with PLBW cases. Even the invasion of both aerobic and anerobic may lead to inflammation of gastrointestinal tract and vagina hence contributing to PLBW. The biological mechanism involved between PLBW and Maternal periodontitis is the translocation of chemical mediators of inflammation. Pre-eclampsia is one of the commonest cause of both maternal and fetal morbidity as it is characterized by hypertension and hyperprotenuria. Improving periodontal health before or during pregnancy may prevent or reduce the occurrences of these adverse pregnancy outcomes and, therefore, reduce the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Hence, this article is an attempt to review the relationship between periodontal condition and altered pregnancy outcome. PMID:26229389

  19. Comparison of normal and abnormal cardiotocography with pregnancy outcomes and early neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Jobaida; Chowdhury, T A; Begum, Kohinoor; Khan, Manir Hossain

    2009-01-01

    Cardiotocography (CTG) is the most commonly used test for antepartum and intrapartum foetal surveillance in the majority hospitals of developed countries. The purpose of this study was to compare the pregnancy outcome and early neonatal outcome among the normal and abnormal CTG groups. In this prospective study, fifty consecutive normal and fifty consecutive abnormal CTG were collected within one hour before delivery from patients who have singleton pregnancy with gestational age >or=32 weeks and having obstetric or medical indication for CTG. In this study, the measure of pregnancy outcomes were mode of delivery, indications of caesarean section, percentage requiring caesarean section for foetal distress, oligohydramnios, meconium stained liquor, small placenta and cord around the neck. Early neonatal outcomes included apgar score, birth weight, admission into neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), duration of stay in NICU and perinatal mortality. There were significant differences between the two groups regarding pregnancy outcomes and early neonatal outcomes. So, CTG is an important test to assess the foetal condition in both antepartum and intrapartum period. The sensitivity of CTG was 87%, specificity was 66%, positive predictive value was 54% and negative predictive value was 92% in the prediction of abnormal outcomes. So, normal CTG is more predictive of normal outcomes than abnormal CTG regarding abnormal outcomes. PMID:19377417

  20. Maternal cerebrovascular accidents in pregnancy: incidence and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jennifer; Murphy, Cliona; Murray, Aoife; O'Laoide, Risteard; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2010-01-01

    Stroke occurring during pregnancy and the postnatal period is a rare but potentially catastrophic event. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and outcomes of pregnancies complicated by maternal stroke in a single centre. This is a prospective study of over 35,000 consecutive pregnancies over a four-year period at the National Maternity Hospital in Dublin from 2004 to 2008; in addition we also retrospectively examined all cases of maternal mortality at our institution over a 50-year period from 1959 to 2009. We prospectively identified eight cases of strokes complicating pregnancy and the postnatal period giving an overall incidence of 22.34 per 100,000 pregnancies or 24.74 per 100,000 deliveries. There were no stroke-related mortalities during that time. Retrospective analysis of maternal mortality revealed 102 maternal deaths over a 50-year period, 19 (18.6%) of which were due to cerebrovascular accidents. In conclusion, strokes complicating pregnancy and the puerperium remain a rare event and though there appears to be evidence that the incidence is increasing, the associated maternal mortality appears to be falling.

  1. Pregnancy outcome after liver transplantation: a single-center experience of 71 pregnancies in 45 recipients.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Vimala; Al-Chalabi, Thawab; Richardson, Paul D; Muiesan, Paolo; Rela, Mohammed; Heaton, Nigel D; O'Grady, John G; Heneghan, Michael A

    2006-07-01

    Infertility is common in women with end-stage liver disease. Successful liver transplant (LT), however, can restore childbearing potential. Controversy exists regarding the most appropriate immunosuppressive regimen and timing of conception following LT. We report the outcomes of a review of all pregnancies occurring following LT at King's College Hospital, London, from 1988 to 2004. Seventy-one pregnancies were recorded in 45 women. Tacrolimus (60%) and cyclosporin A (38%) were the predominant primary immunosuppressive agents used. Median age at conception was 29 years (range, 19-42), with a median time from LT to conception of 40 months (range, 1-111). There were 50 live births, and no maternal or fetal deaths related to pregnancy. There were no graft losses. Median gestation was 37 weeks (range, 24-42) with a median birth weight of 2,690 g (range, 554-4,260). Caesarean section was performed in 40% of pregnancies. Complications included pregnancy-induced hypertension in 20%, preeclampsia in 13%, acute cellular rejection in 17%, and renal impairment in 11%. There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates observed between immunosuppressive groups. Pregnancies occurring within 1-year posttransplant had an increased incidence of prematurity, low birth weight, and acute cellular rejection compared to those occurring later than 1 year. In conclusion, this study confirms that favorable outcomes of pregnancy post-LT can be expected for the majority of patients. However, delaying pregnancy until after 1-year post-LT is advisable, since doing so maybe associated with a lower risk of prematurity. PMID:16799943

  2. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Obesity, Reproduction, and Pregnancy Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stang, Jamie; Huffman, Laurel G

    2016-04-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that all women of reproductive age receive education about maternal and fetal risks associated with prepregnancy obesity, excessive gestational weight gain, and significant postpartum weight retention, including potential benefits of lifestyle changes. Behavioral counseling to improve dietary intake and physical activity should be provided to overweight and obese women, beginning in the preconception period and continuing throughout pregnancy, for at least 12 to 18 months postpartum. Weight loss before pregnancy may improve fertility and reduce the risk of poor maternal-fetal outcomes, such as preterm birth, gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, assisted delivery, and select congenital anomalies. Lifestyle interventions that moderate gestational weight gain may reduce the risk of poor pregnancy outcomes, such as gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, large for gestational age, and macrosomia, as well as lower the risk for significant postpartum retention. Postpartum interventions that promote healthy diet and physical activity behaviors may reduce postpartum weight retention and decrease obesity-related risks in subsequent pregnancies. Analysis of the evidence suggests that there is good evidence to support the role of diet, physical activity, and behavior changes in promoting optimal weight gain during pregnancy; however, there is currently a relative lack of evidence in other areas related to reproductive outcomes. PMID:27017177

  3. Experimental genital mycoplasmosis: time of infection influences pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M B; Steiner, D A

    1996-01-01

    Genital infection of rats with Mycoplasma pulmonis causes adverse pregnancy outcome and can result in in utero spread of infection to the fetus. The current study was designed to determine whether the stage of pregnancy when infection occurs influences pregnancy outcome. Rats were inoculated with 3 X 10(7) CFU of M. pulmonis at 10 days prior to breeding (-10) or at gestational day (gd) 11 or 14 and were necropsied at gd 11, 14, or 18 or within 24 h of parturition (term). Control rats received sterile broth. M. pulmonis was isolated from the placenta, amniotic fluid, or fetal tissues only from rats infected prior to breeding (P < 0.001). All infected rats had significantly more loss of pups than did control rats (P < 0.006), but rats infected prior to breeding or at the beginning of the third trimester (gd 14) were much more likely to have fetal losses. Rats infected in the early second trimester after implantation (gd 11) did not experience severe losses. Litter sizes, total litter weight, and individual pup weight from all infected rats, regardless of gestational stage when infected, were significantly smaller than those of control rats (P < 0.001). On the basis of the results of this study, we conclude that the time of infection plays a major role in determination of pregnancy outcome and spread of infection from the genital tract to the respiratory tract. PMID:8675343

  4. Paternal influences on pregnancy complications and birth outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Cleghorn de Rohrmoser, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of selected characteristics of the paternal work environment and occupational history to the incidence of complications in pregnancy, complications in labor and anomalies in birth outcomes. The literature suggested that male exposure to teratogenic hazards in the form of radiation and chemical compounds, primarily in the form of solvents, has been implicated in reproductive disorders and malformed offspring in animals. Similarly, some recent research suggests that the exposure of male workers to such hazards on their job may have consequences for their spouses and children. Based on these experimental research studies and analyses of persons working in high risk occupations, a broader study of the potential contribution of paternal work environment variables to the success of pregnancy and birth outcomes seemed warranted. Based upon the literature review, a model was proposed for predicting complications in pregnancy, complications in labor and birth outcome (normal birth, low birth weight, congenital malformations and fetal death). From the 1980 National Natality Survey and the 1980 National Fetal Mortality Survey, four sub-samples of married couples, with both husband and wife employed, were selected on the basis of one of the four birth outcomes. The model called for controlling a range of maternal intrinsic and extrinsic health and behavioral variables known to be related to birth outcomes. Multiple logistic regression procedures were used to analyze the effects of father's exposure to radiation and solvents on the job, to complications in pregnancy and labor, and to birth outcome, while controlling for maternal variables. The results indicated that none of the paternal variables were predictors of complications in labor. Further, there was no clear pattern of results, though father's degree of exposure to solvents, and exposures to radiation did reach significance in some analyses.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of human placental function and pregnancy outcome: considerations for causal inference.

    PubMed

    Januar, Vania; Desoye, Gernot; Novakovic, Boris; Cvitic, Silvija; Saffery, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, often defined as regulating gene activity independently of underlying DNA sequence, are crucial for healthy development. The sum total of epigenetic marks within a cell or tissue (the epigenome) is sensitive to environmental influence, and disruption of the epigenome in utero has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Not surprisingly, given its multifaceted functions and important role in regulating pregnancy outcome, the placenta shows unique epigenetic features. Interestingly however, many of these are only otherwise seen in human malignancy (the pseudomalignant placental epigenome). Epigenetic variation in the placenta is now emerging as a candidate mediator of environmental influence on placental functioning and a key regulator of pregnancy outcome. However, replication of findings is generally lacking, most likely due to small sample sizes and a lack of standardization of analytical approaches. Defining DNA methylation "signatures" in the placenta associated with maternal and fetal outcomes offers tremendous potential to improve pregnancy outcomes, but care must be taken in interpretation of findings. Future placental epigenetic research would do well to address the issues present in epigenetic epidemiology more generally, including careful consideration of sample size, potentially confounding factors, issues of tissue heterogeneity, reverse causation, and the role of genetics in modulating epigenetic profile. The importance of animal or in vitro models in establishing a functional role of epigenetic variation identified in human beings, which is key to establishing causation, should not be underestimated. PMID:26428498

  6. Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: A Fresh Look

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Bryan; Hwang, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the Molicutes that associate with genital tract tissues focuses on four species that may be of interest in potential maternal, fetal, and neonatal infection and in contributing to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum have historically been the subject of attention, but Mycoplasma genitalis which causes male urethritis in addition to colonizing the female genital tract and the division of Ureaplasma into two species, urealyticum and parvum, has also added new taxonomic clarity. The role of these genital tract inhabitants in infection during pregnancy and their ability to invade and infect placental and fetal tissue is discussed. In particular, the role of some of these organisms in prematurity may be mechanistically related to their ability to induce inflammatory cytokines, thereby triggering pathways leading to preterm labor. A review of this intensifying exploration of the mycoplasmas in relation to pregnancy yields several questions which will be important to examine in future research. PMID:20706675

  7. Atrazine and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Epidemiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Mandel, Jack S; DeSesso, John M; Scialli, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a commonly used agricultural herbicide that has been the subject of epidemiologic studies assessing its relation to reproductive health problems. This review evaluates both the consistency and the quality of epidemiologic evidence testing the hypothesis that ATR exposure, at usually encountered levels, is a risk factor for birth defects, small for gestational age birth weight, prematurity, miscarriages, and problems of fetal growth and development. We followed the current methodological guidelines for systematic reviews by using two independent researchers to identify, retrieve, and evaluate the relevant epidemiologic literature on the relation of ATR to various adverse outcomes of birth and pregnancy. Each eligible paper was summarized with respect to its methods and results with particular attention to study design and exposure assessment, which have been cited as the main areas of weakness in ATR research. As a quantitative meta-analysis was not feasible, the study results were categorized qualitatively as positive, null, or mixed. The literature on ATR and pregnancy-related health outcomes is growing rapidly, but the quality of the data is poor with most papers using aggregate rather than individual-level information. Without good quality data, the results are difficult to assess; however, it is worth noting that none of the outcome categories demonstrated consistent positive associations across studies. Considering the poor quality of the data and the lack of robust findings across studies, conclusions about a causal link between ATR and adverse pregnancy outcomes are not warranted. PMID:24797711

  8. Bacterial Vaginosis and Pregnancy Outcome in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Afolabi, Bosede B.; Moses, Olusanjo E.; Oduyebo, Oyinlola O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora and a malodorous discharge when symptomatic. In pregnancy, BV has been associated with adverse outcomes such as miscarriage, premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, and low birth weight. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and associations of BV and pregnancy outcomes among pregnant women in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study with high vaginal swabs obtained from consecutive newly registered antenatal women between 14 and 36 weeks gestation. The women were monitored until delivery, and their pregnancy outcome and demographic data were obtained using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results. Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed by Nugent score in 64 of 246 women, giving a prevalence rate of 26%. Bacterial vaginosis was significantly associated with preterm delivery (risk ratio [RR], 2.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44–4.98), low birth weight (RR, 3.20; 95% CI, 1.29–7.94), and premature rupture of membranes (RR, 6.75; 95% CI, 3.11–14.67). The association between BV and miscarriage (<28 weeks gestation) and neonatal admission for various morbidities was not statistically significant. Conclusions. The prevalence rate of BV among pregnant women in LUTH is high and is significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Routine screening and treatment of women preconceptually may enable interventions to prevent these adverse outcomes. PMID:26989754

  9. Snoring during Pregnancy and Delivery Outcomes: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Louise M.; Bullough, Alexandra S.; Owusu, Jocelynn T.; Tremblay, Kimberley A.; Brincat, Cynthia A.; Chames, Mark C.; Kalbfleisch, John D.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: This cohort study examined the impact of maternal snoring on key delivery outcomes such as mode of delivery, infant birth centile, and small-for-gestational age. Design: Cohort study. Setting: A large tertiary medical center. Patients or Participants: Pregnant women in their third trimester were recruited between March 2007 and December 2010. Measurements and Results: Women were screened for habitual snoring, as a known marker for sleep disordered breathing. Outcome data were obtained from medical records following delivery and birth centiles were calculated. Of 1,673 women, a total of 35% reported habitual snoring (26% with pregnancy-onset snoring and 9% with chronic snoring). After adjusting for confounders, chronic snoring was associated with small-forgestational age (OR 1.65, 95%CI 1.02-2.66, P = 0.041) and elective cesarean delivery (OR 2.25, 95%CI 1.22-4.18, P = 0.008). Pregnancy-onset snoring was associated with emergency cesarean delivery (OR 1.68, 95%CI 1.22-2.30, P = 0.001). Conclusion: Maternal snoring during pregnancy is a risk factor for adverse delivery outcomes including cesarean delivery and small-for-gestational age. Screening pregnant women for symptoms of SDB may provide an early opportunity to identify women at risk of poor delivery outcomes. Clinical Trials Registration: Identifier: NCT01030003. Citation: O'Brien LM; Bullough AS; Owusu JT; Tremblay KA; Brincat CA; Chames MC; Kalbfleisch JD; Chervin RD. Snoring during pregnancy and delivery outcomes: a cohort study. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1625-1632. PMID:24179294

  10. Pregnancy outcomes in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome treated with sildenafil monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Pichy Ann; Benedicto, Jubert

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension have not been documented in our local setting. In our institution, access to therapies like nitric oxide, inhaled prostacyclin and iloprost is limited. We describe two such women given sildenafil monotherapy between April and May 2011. Both had an atrial septal defect complicated by Eisenmenger syndrome. Both survived – one after elective Caesarean section for malpresentation (breech) under general anaesthesia, the other after an assisted vaginal delivery. In addition to oral sildenafil, both received oxygen supplementation. To date, there have been three reported cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension in pregnancy treated with sildenafil in combination with another drug. Our two cases demonstrate that treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension using sildenafil as monotherapy may allow stabilization of the maternal condition and improve clinical outcomes for both mother and baby. However, pregnancy is still discouraged in women with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  11. Effects of maternity care coordination on pregnancy outcomes: propensity-weighted analyses.

    PubMed

    Hillemeier, Marianne M; Domino, Marisa E; Wells, Rebecca; Goyal, Ravi K; Kum, Hye-Chung; Cilenti, Dorothy; Timothy Whitmire, J; Basu, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Care coordination services that link pregnant women to health-promoting resources, avoid duplication of effort, and improve communication between families and providers have been endorsed as a strategy for reducing disparities in adverse pregnancy outcomes, however empirical evidence regarding the effects of these services is contradictory and incomplete. This study investigates the effects of maternity care coordination (MCC) on pregnancy outcomes in North Carolina. Birth certificate and Medicaid claims data were analyzed for 7,124 women delivering live infants in North Carolina from October 2008 through September 2010, of whom 2,255 received MCC services. Propensity-weighted analyses were conducted to reduce the influence of selection bias in evaluating program participation. Sensitivity analyses compared these results to conventional ordinary least squares analyses. The unadjusted preterm birth rate was lower among women who received MCC services (7.0 % compared to 8.3 % among controls). Propensity-weighted analyses demonstrated that women receiving services had a 1.8 % point reduction in preterm birth risk; p < 0.05). MCC services were also associated with lower pregnancy weight gain (p = 0.10). No effects of MCC were seen for birthweight. These findings suggest that coordination of care in pregnancy can significantly reduce the risk of preterm delivery among Medicaid-enrolled women. Further research evaluating specific components of care coordination services and their effects on preterm birth risk among racial/ethnic and geographic subgroups of Medicaid enrolled mothers could inform efforts to reduce disparities in pregnancy outcome. PMID:24770956

  12. Maternal Thyroid Hypofunction and Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cleary-Goldman, Jane; Malone, Fergal D.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Sullivan, Lisa; Canick, Jacob; Porter, T. Flint; Luthy, David; Gross, Susan; Bianchi, Diana W.; D’Alton, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate whether maternal thyroid hypofunction is associated with complications. METHODS A total of 10,990 patients had first- and second-trimester serum assayed for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (freeT4), and antithyroglobulin and antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. Thyroid hypofunction was defined as 1) subclinical hypothyroidism: TSH levels above the 97.5th percentile and free T4 between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles or 2) hypothyroxinemia: TSH between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles and free T4 below the 2.5th percentile. Adverse outcomes were evaluated. Patients with thyroid hypofunction were compared with euthyroid patients (TSH and free T4 between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles). Patients with and without antibodies were compared. Multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for confounders was used. RESULTS Subclinical hypothyroidism was documented in 2.2% (240 of 10,990) in the first and 2.2% (243 of 10,990) in the second trimester. Hypothyroxinemia was documented in 2.1% (232 of 10,990) in the first and 2.3% (247 of 10,990) in the second trimester. Subclinical hypothyroidism was not associated with adverse outcomes. In the first trimester, hypothyroxinemia was associated with preterm labor (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–2.62) and macrosomia (aOR 1.97; 95% CI 1.37–2.83). In the second trimester, it was associated with gestational diabetes (aOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.02–2.84). Fifteen percent (1,585 of 10,990) in the first and 14% (1,491 of 10,990) in the second trimester had antithyroid antibodies. When both antibodies were positive in either trimester, there was an increased risk for preterm premature rupture of membranes (P = .002 and P<.001, respectively). CONCLUSION Maternal thyroid hypofunction is not associated with a consistent pattern of adverse outcomes. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II PMID:18591312

  13. Outcome of pregnancies in patients with complex pulmonary atresia.

    PubMed Central

    Neumayer, U.; Somerville, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of pregnancies in patients with complex pulmonary atresia, comparing those with and without previous radical surgical repair. DESIGN: A retrospective study of all pregnancies in women with complex pulmonary atresia registered on the Grown-up Congenital Heart Unit database between 1977 and 1994. SETTING: Referral centre for adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease. PATIENTS: Forty one pregnancies occurred in 15 patients. They were divided into two groups; group I, 26 pregnancies in nine patients before radical repair (cyanotic); group II, 15 pregnancies in seven women after radical surgical repair. RESULTS: In group I there were three terminations, 13 miscarriages, eight healthy children, and two neonatal deaths. Five children were born prematurely and all had low birthweights. In group II there were two miscarriages, 11 normal children, and two children with congenital heart disease. None was premature and all had normal birthweights. There were major complications in both groups: in group I there were two thromboembolic complications and one episode of heart failure; in group II there was one pulmonary embolism and one arrhythmic complication, five pregnancies in three patients were complicated by left ventricular failure that was persistent in one case and progressive in another, leading to death 13 months after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with complex pulmonary atresia, with or without surgical repair, who have no or mild symptoms, can have successful pregnancies. Surgical repair decreases fetal complications significantly. In both groups thrombotic disorders and heart failure must be prevented. Patients with residual systemic-pulmonary collaterals after surgical repair are particularly at risk of left ventricular failure. PMID:9290396

  14. Retinal artery and vein thrombotic occlusion during pregnancy: markers for familial thrombophilia and adverse pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Will S; Glueck, Charles J; Hutchins, Robert K; Sisk, Robert A; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Ocular vascular occlusion (OVO), first diagnosed during or immediately after giving birth, often reflects superposition of the physiologic thrombophilia of pregnancy on previously undiagnosed underlying familial or acquired thrombophilia associated with spontaneous abortion, eclampsia, or maternal thrombosis. Specific aim We describe OVO, first diagnosed during pregnancy or immediately postpartum, in three young females (ages 32, 35, 40) associated with previously undiagnosed familial thrombophilia. Results Branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) occurred at 9 and 13 weeks gestation in two females, aged 32 and 35. Central retinal vein occlusion occurred immediately postpartum in a 40-year-old. One of the two females with BRAO subsequently developed eclampsia, and one had a history of unexplained first trimester spontaneous abortion. All three females were found to have previously unexplained familial thrombophilia. The two females with BRAO had low first trimester free protein S 42 (41%), lower normal limit (50%), and one of these two had high factor VIII (165%, upper normal limit 150%). The woman with central retinal vein occlusion had high factor XI (169%, upper normal limit 150%). Enoxaparin (40–60 mg/day) was started and continued throughout pregnancy in both females with BRAO to prevent maternal–placental thrombosis, and of these two females, one had an uncomplicated pregnancy course and term delivery, and the second was at gestational week 22 without complications at the time of this manuscript. There were no further OVO events in the two females treated with enoxaparin or in the untreated patient with postpartum eclampsia. Conclusion OVO during pregnancy may be a marker for familial or acquired thrombophilia, which confers increased thrombotic risk to the mother and pregnancy, associated with spontaneous abortion or eclampsia. OVO during pregnancy, particularly when coupled with antecedent adverse pregnancy outcomes, should prompt urgent

  15. Acute promyelocytic leukemia during pregnancy: a systematic analysis of outcome.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Giri, Smith; Manandhar, Samyak; Pathak, Ranjan; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-03-01

    The outcomes of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in pregnancy are largely unknown. The MEDLINE database was systematically searched to obtain 43 articles with 71 patients with new-onset APL during pregnancy. Induction therapy included various regimens of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), cytarabine, and anthracycline and resulted in a complete remission rate of 93%. Obstetric and fetal complications included pre-term deliveries (46%), spontaneous/therapeutic abortion/intrauterine death (33.3%) and other neonatal complications (25.9%). Mothers diagnosed in the first trimester were more likely to experience obstetric (p < 0.01) and fetal (p < 0.01) complications. To our knowledge, this is the largest systematic review of APL in pregnancy. The vast majority of APL patients in pregnancy may achieve remission with initial induction therapy. APL or its therapy in pregnancy, however, is associated with a high risk of fetal and obstetrical complications. The results of our study may help in patient counseling and informed decision-making. PMID:26110880

  16. Delivery outcome after the use of meclozine in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Källén, Bengt; Mottet, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    In some countries, including Sweden, no risk is considered to exist with the use of meclozine for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP), but in other countries warnings against use during pregnancy are given. Rat tests indicate a teratogenic risk and published epidemiological studies are of restricted size. Delivery outcome was studied in 16,536 women who reported the use of meclozine in early pregnancy and was compared with all 540,660 women who gave birth. Information on drug usage was obtained prospectively in early pregnancy. Risk factors for using meclozine were young maternal age, to have had a previous child, not to smoke, to have a low body mass index. The use of some other drugs (antihypertensives, thyroxine, anticonvulsants) decreased the use of meclozine. Maternal diagnoses of preeclampsia or diabetes were less frequent when the woman had used meclozine. The twinning rate was increased and the sex distribution of the infants low (female excess). Preterm birth, low birth weight, short body length, and small head circumference occurred at a reduced rate after meclozine use, notably for boys. Also the rate of congenital malformations was reduced. If anything, delivery outcome is better than expected when the mother used meclozine. These beneficial effects are probably secondary to NVP. Meclozine can apparently be used without risk at this condition. PMID:12952140

  17. Pre-conception counselling for key cardiovascular conditions in Africa: optimising pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Liesl; Acquah, Letitia

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) supports pre-conception care (PCC) towards improving health and pregnancy outcomes. PPC entails a continuum of promotive, preventative and curative health and social interventions. PPC identifies current and potential medical problems of women of childbearing age towards strategising optimal pregnancy outcomes, whereas antenatal care constitutes the care provided during pregnancy. Optimised PPC and antenatal care would improve civil society and maternal, child and public health. Multiple factors bar most African women from receiving antenatal care. Additionally, PPC is rarely available as a standard of care in many African settings, despite the high maternal mortality rate throughout Africa. African women and healthcare facilitators must cooperate to strategise cost-effective and cost-efficient PPC. This should streamline their limited resources within their socio-cultural preferences, towards short- and long-term improvement of pregnancy outcomes. This review discusses the relevance of and need for PPC in resource-challenged African settings, and emphasises preventative and curative health interventions for congenital and acquired heart disease. We also consider two additional conditions, HIV/AIDS and hypertension, as these are two of the most important co-morbidities encountered in Africa, with significant burden of disease. Finally we advocate strongly for PPC to be considered as a key intervention for reducing maternal mortality rates on the African continent. PMID:27213854

  18. Toward a bioethical issue: induced multiple pregnancies and neonatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technology has made great progress during the last three decades. After the initial enthusiasm, many ethical, legal and social issues related to the application of these procedures began to evolve. Multifetal pregnancy and fetal reduction, embryo cryopreservation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, risks of birth defects and other adverse outcome associated with assisted reproductive technology are issues that have to be addressed building future collaborative studies and continuing the debate on related ethical issues. PMID:21070661

  19. Toward a bioethical issue: induced multiple pregnancies and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, Antonio A; Alighieri, Giovanni; Catenazzi, Piero; Scorrano, Antonio; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2010-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technology has made great progress during the last three decades. After the initial enthusiasm, many ethical, legal and social issues related to the application of these procedures began to evolve. Multifetal pregnancy and fetal reduction, embryo cryopreservation, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, risks of birth defects and other adverse outcome associated with assisted reproductive technology are issues that have to be addressed building future collaborative studies and continuing the debate on related ethical issues. PMID:21070661

  20. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes in Indigenous Australians with diabetes in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Victor; Davis, Bronwyn; Falhammar, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review of reported neonatal and pregnancy outcomes of Indigenous Australians with diabetes in pregnancy (DIP). METHODS: Electronic searches of PubMed and Web of Science were carried out. Articles were selected if they contained original data on DIP outcomes in Indigenous Australians. There were no specific exclusion criteria. RESULTS: A total of eight articles, predominantly from Queensland and Western Australia were identified once inclusion criteria were applied. Birth data from midwifery registries or paper charts encompassing years 1985-2008 were used. A total of 465591 pregnant women with and without DIP were included in the eight studies, with 1363 being Indigenous women with DIP. Indigenous Australians experienced increased rates of many known adverse outcomes of DIP including: macrosomia, caesarean section, congenital deformities, low birth weight, hypoglycaemia, and neonatal trauma. There were regional differences among Indigenous Australians, particularly regional/remote vs metropolitan populations where the regional/remote data showed worse outcomes. Two of the articles did not note a difference between Aboriginals and Caucasians in the rates of measured adverse outcome. Studies varied significantly in size, measured outcomes, and subsequent analysis. CONCLUSION: The health disparities between Indigenous Australians and non-Indigenous Australians are further evidenced by poorer outcomes in DIP. This has broader implications for Indigenous health in general. PMID:26131329

  1. Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C James

    2013-05-01

    Objective To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

  2. Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes Associated with Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Mai; Kostadinov, Stefan; Gundogan, Fusun; Struminsky, Judith; Pinar, Halit; Sung, C. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine perinatal and pregnancy outcomes of Acinetobacter baumannii infection using clinicopathologic material from pregnant women, neonates, and perinatal postmortem examinations with positive cultures. Study Design This is a retrospective record review with placental and postmortem examination. Results During a 5-year period, 40 positive cultures were found. Three pregnancies with positive cultures close in the peripartum period were all associated with adverse outcomes including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, and one full-term birth with histological chorioamnionitis. Two positive cultures were found in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Two of three cases of perinatal death grew pure cultures from blood and/or fetal tissue with placental or fetal examination demonstrating evidence of infection/inflammation with fetal inflammatory response. Conclusion This is the first case series report of A. baumannii-positive cultures in maternal, fetal, and neonatal specimen, with histopathologic evidence of infection. The results suggest a significant role of A. baumannii infection in adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes. PMID:23943711

  3. Chernobyl fallout and outcome of pregnancy in Finland.

    PubMed Central

    Auvinen, A; Vahteristo, M; Arvela, H; Suomela, M; Rahola, T; Hakama, M; Rytömaa, T

    2001-01-01

    Possible effects of Chernobyl fallout on outcome of pregnancy in Finland were evaluated in a nationwide follow-up study. The outcomes were the rate of live births and stillbirths, pregnancy loss, and induced abortions by municipality. Exposure was assessed based on nationwide surveys of radiation dose rate from the Chernobyl fallout, from both external and internal exposures. Using these measurements, we estimated the monthly dose rate for each of the 455 Finnish municipalities. On average, the dose rate from Chernobyl fallout reached 50 microSv per month in May 1986--a doubling of the natural background radiation. In the most heavily affected area, 4 times the normal background dose rates were recorded. Given the underlying regional differences in live birth, stillbirth, and abortion rates, we used longitudinal analysis comparing changes over time within municipalities. A temporary decline in the live birth rate had already begun before 1986, with no clear relationship to the level of fallout. A statistically significant increase in spontaneous abortions with dose of radiation was observed. No marked changes in induced abortions or stillbirths were observed. The decrease in the live birth rate is probably not a biological effect of radiation, but more likely related to public concerns of the fallout. The effect on spontaneous abortions should be interpreted with caution, because of potential bias or confounding. Further, there is little support in the epidemiologic literature on effects of very low doses of radiation on pregnancy outcome. PMID:11266330

  4. Prospective Study of Pregnancy and Newborn Outcomes in Mothers with West Nile Illness during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pridjian, Gabriella; Sirois, Patricia A.; McRae, Scott; Hinckley, Alison F.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Kissinger, Patricia; Buekens, Pierre; Hayes, Edward B.; O’Leary, Dan; Kuhn, Stephanie; Swan, Kenneth F.; Xiong, Xu; Wesson, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A previous case report of West Nile virus (WNV) illness during pregnancy suggested that WNV could be a cause of congenital defects. We performed a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of pregnant women with WNV illness to increase our knowledge of the effects of WNV illness during pregnancy. Methods Participants were enrolled in 2005 to 2008 from pregnant women with serologically confirmed WNV illness reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Comparison was made to WNV-uninfected women, matched on maternal age and enrollment month. Pregnancy and newborn data were collected; cord blood WNV serology was obtained. Pediatric exams and the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-Third Edition (Bayley-III) were performed. Results Twenty-eight WNV-infected mothers and 25 WNV-uninfected mothers participated. Maternal demographics were similar except for a higher rate of planned pregnancies, education, and household income in the WNV-uninfected mothers. There were no differences in pregnancy and delivery characteristics except that infected mothers had a higher incidence of febrile illnesses and used more medications. Birth weight, length, head circumference, and rate of congenital malformations were similar in babies born to WNV-infected and -uninfected mothers. Follow-up physical exams were generally normal. The Bayley-III assessments, available for 17 children born to mothers with WNV illness, showed performance at or above age level across domains. Conclusion The risk for adverse pregnancy and newborn outcomes in women experiencing WNV illness in pregnancy appears to be low, but future studies with larger numbers are needed to rule out a small risk. PMID:27223334

  5. Early pregnancy B vitamin status, one carbon metabolism, pregnancy outcome and child development.

    PubMed

    Solé-Navais, Pol; Cavallé-Busquets, Pere; Fernandez-Ballart, Joan D; Murphy, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Periconception supplementation with folic acid is recommended until 12 gestational weeks to prevent neural tube defects. Doses of folic acid contained in supplements and timing and length of use during pregnancy vary. The effects of status in periconception and pregnancy folate, cobalamin, betaine and their interactions on one carbon metabolism (1C), as well as the global effect of 1C on foetal growth and pregnancy outcome, are reviewed. Results from prospective studies are reviewed. Cessation of folic acid supplement use after the first trimester is associated with a sharp drop in plasma folate status and enhanced conversion of betaine to dimethylglycine. Dimethylglycine production is also higher in mothers with low folate status than in those with normal-high folate status. The effects of high doses of folic acid on one carbon metabolism in mothers with low early pregnancy cobalamin status and on foetal growth are also reviewed. Several studies report that moderately elevated early pregnancy fasting plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) is inversely associated with birth weight and a predictor of intrauterine growth retardation. There is also evidence for increased risk of preterm birth when maternal folate status is low. PMID:26700149

  6. Pregnancy outcomes following the administration of high doses of dexamethasone in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kayvan Jafari, Sabah; Nezafat Firizi, Maryam; Abbaspour, Ali Reza; Ghafoori Gharib, Fahime; Ghobadi, Yusef; Gholizadeh, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Objective In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of high doses of dexamethasone (DEX) in early pregnancy on pregnancy outcomes. Methods Pregnant BALB/c mice were treated with high-dose DEX in the experimental group or saline in the control group on gestational days (GDs) 0.5 to 4.5. Pregnant mice were sacrificed on GDs 7.5, 13.5, or 18.5 and their peripheral blood, placentas, fetuses, and uterine tissue were collected. Decidual and placenta cell supernatants were examined to evaluate the effect of DEX on the proliferation of mononuclear cells, the quantity of uterine macrophages and uterine natural killer (uNK) cells, and levels of progesterone and 17β-estradiol, as determined by an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. We also were measured fetal and placental growth parameters on GD 18.5. Results We found that high doses of DEX were associated with an increased abortion rate, enhancement of the immunosuppressive effect of the decidua, alterations in placental growth parameters, decreased progesterone and 17β-estradiol levels, and a reduced frequency of macrophages and uNK cells. Conclusion Our data suggest that the high-dose administration of DEX during early pregnancy negatively affected pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27104153

  7. Pregnancy after diabetes obesity surgery (PADOS): Incidence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whyte, M; Pring, C; Cooke, D; Hart, K; McGowan, B M; Subramanian, D; Shawe, J

    2014-07-01

    Half of all bariatric surgical procedures are in women of childbearing age but it remains unclear whether surgery is suitable for women who subsequently conceive: specifically the relative risks and benefits of potential nutrient deficiencies versus weight reduction. We will present data collected from Clinical Practice Research Databases on the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancies complicated either by obesity or previous bariatric surgery (BS). Two groups, matched to obese controls for BMI pre-BS and post-BS (at the time of ante-natal booking) will be compared. In this way, the effect of BS on pregnancy outcomes may be examined, independent of its effect on weight. A sub-group of women with antecedent Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) will allow for investigation of the additional impact and persistence of this co-morbidity. This builds upon pilot data collected from a retrospective cohort of women (18-45years) undergoing laparoscopic roux-en-Y (RYGB) surgery over a 24-month period (n=218). After exclusions and loss to follow up, data from 111 patients were analysed; 81 (73%) had conceived prior to RYGB, 20 (18%) became pregnant post RYGB and a further 22 patients (20%) were trying to conceive at the time of data collection. Three women had T2DM which resolved post BS. A suggestion of greater miscarriage risk prior to surgery in this sub-group will be confirmed as more women are recruited. Pregnancy is a frequent desire/occurrence after BS. This database study will advance understanding of the maternal and fetal outcomes of such pregnancies and inform antenatal care. PMID:26104634

  8. Inter-pregnancy weight change impacts placental weight and is associated with the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in the second pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The inter-pregnancy period is considered a teachable moment when women are receptive to weight- management guidance aimed at optimising pregnancy outcome in subsequent pregnancies. In population based studies inter-pregnancy weight change is associated with several adverse pregnancy outcomes but the impact on placental size is unknown. Methods The association between inter-pregnancy weight change and the primary risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in the second pregnancy was investigated in 12,740 women with first two consecutive deliveries at a single hospital using logistic regression. Results Compared with women who were weight stable, weight loss (>1BMI unit) between pregnancies was associated with an increased risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, low placental weight and small for gestational age (SGA) birth, while weight gain (>3BMI units) increased the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, emergency caesarean section, placental oversize and large for gestational age (LGA) birth at the second pregnancy. The relationship between weight gain and pre-eclampsia risk was evident in women who were overweight at first pregnancy only (BMI ≥25 units), while that between weight loss and preterm delivery was confined to women with a healthy weight at first pregnancy (BMI <25 units). In contrast, the association between weight loss and SGA was independent of first pregnancy BMI. A higher percentage of women who were obese at first pregnancy were likely to experience a large weight gain (P < 0.01) or weight loss (P < 0.001) between consecutive pregnancies compared with the normal BMI reference group. Conclusion Inter-pregnancy weight change in either direction increases the risk of a number of contrasting pregnancy complications, including extremes of placental weight. The placenta may lie on the causal pathway between BMI change and the risk of LGA or SGA birth. PMID:24450357

  9. Indigenous Women of Latin America: Unintended Pregnancy, Unsafe Abortion, and Reproductive Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wurtz, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous women in Latin America have poorer reproductive health outcomes than the general population and face considerable barriers in accessing adequate health services. Indigenous women have high rates of adolescent fertility and unintended pregnancy and may face increased risks for morbidity and mortality related to unsafe abortion. However, research among this population, particularly focusing on social and cultural implications of unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion, is significantly limited. This article reviews the literature on unsafe abortion in Latin America and describes successful interventions to ameliorate reproductive health outcomes within Indigenous communities. It also explores important implications for future research. Shedding light on the circumstances, perspectives, and lived realities of Indigenous women of childbearing age, could encourage further qualitative investigation and mitigate negative outcomes through improved understanding of the topic, targeted culturally appropriate interventions, and recommendations for future policy and programming reformations. PMID:23772229

  10. Heart Valve Prostheses in Pregnancy: Outcomes for Women and Their Infants

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Claire M.; Algert, Charles S.; Ford, Jane B.; Nippita, Tanya A.; Figtree, Gemma A.; Roberts, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Background As the prognosis of women with prosthetic heart valves improves, and increasing number are contemplating and undertaking pregnancy. Accurate knowledge of perinatal outcomes is essential, assisting counseling and guiding care. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes in a contemporary population of women with heart valve prostheses undertaking pregnancy and to compare outcomes for women with mechanical and bioprosthetic prostheses. Methods and Results Longitudinally linked population health data sets containing birth and hospital admissions data were obtained for all women giving birth in New South Wales, Australia, 2000–2011. This included information identifying presence of maternal prosthetic heart valve. Cardiovascular and birth outcomes were evaluated. Among 1 144 156 pregnancies, 136 involved women with a heart valve prosthesis (1 per 10 000). No maternal mortality was seen among these women, although the relative risk for an adverse event was higher than the general population, including severe maternal morbidity (139 versus 14 per 1000 births, rate ratio [RR]=9.96, 95% CI 6.32 to 15.7), major maternal cardiovascular event (44 versus 1 per 1000, RR 34.6, 95% CI 14.6 to 81.6), preterm birth (183 versus 66 per 1000, RR=2.77, 95% CI 1.88 to 4.07), and small‐for‐gestational‐age infants (193 versus 95 per 1000, RR=2.03, 95% CI 1.40 to 2.96). There was a trend toward increased maternal and perinatal morbidity in women with a mechanical valve compared with those with a bioprosthetic valve. Conclusions Pregnancies in women with a prosthetic heart valve demonstrate an increased risk of an adverse outcome, for both mothers and infants, compared with pregnancies in the absence of heart valve prostheses. In this contemporary population, the risk was lower than previously reported. PMID:24970269

  11. Correlation of Thyroid Functions with Severity and Outcome of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kharb, S; Sardana, D; Nanda, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: During normal pregnancy, changes in thyroid function are well documented; however, information regarding thyroid function in preeclampsia is scanty. Aim: The present study was planned to study thyroid hormones in mild and severe preeclamptic women and normotensive women and correlate them with outcome of pregnancy. Subject and Methods: Thyroid hormones were analyzed in mild (n = 50) and severe (n = 50) cases of preeclamptic women and normotensive women (n = 100). Results: Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and TT4 levels were higher in mild preeclampsia as compared with severe preeclampsia (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). TT3 levels were lower in preeclampsia (more so in severe preeclamptics as compared with normotensive pregnant and non-pregnant women). Preeclamptic with raised TSH levels had significantly higher mean arterial blood pressure and low birth weight (BW). A negative correlation was observed between BW and TSH levels (r = 0.296, P < 0.001) and BW and TT4 levels. A positive correlation was observed between BW and TT3 levels. Conclusion: These findings indicate that there is a state of biochemical hypothyroidism that correlates with severity of preeclampsia and influences obstetric outcome in these women. Identification of thyroid hormone in pregnancy might be of help in predicting occurrence of preeclampsia. PMID:23634328

  12. Medication Safety During Pregnancy: Improving Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Susan M; Miller, Richard K; Chambers, Christina; Cooper, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 90% of women in the United States have taken medications during pregnancy. Medication exposures during pregnancy can result in adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes including birth defects, fetal loss, intrauterine growth restriction, prematurity, and longer-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Advising pregnant women about the safety of medication use during pregnancy is complicated by a lack of data necessary to engage the woman in an informed discussion. Routinely, health care providers turn to the package insert, yet this information can be incomplete and can be based entirely on animal studies. Often, adequate safety data are not available. In a busy clinical setting, health care providers need to be able to quickly locate the most up-to-date information in order to counsel pregnant women concerned about medication exposure. Deciding where to locate the best available information is difficult, particularly when the needed information does not exist. Pregnancy registries are initiated to obtain more data about the safety of specific medication exposures during pregnancy; however, these studies are slow to produce meaningful information, and when they do, the information may not be readily available in a published form. Health care providers have valuable data in their everyday practice that can expand the knowledge base about medication safety during pregnancy. This review aims to discuss the limitations of the package insert regarding medication safety during pregnancy, highlight additional resources available to health care providers to inform practice, and communicate the importance of pregnancy registries for expanding knowledge about medication safety during pregnancy. PMID:26771055

  13. Teenage pregnancy: a comparative study of the outcome and complications.

    PubMed

    Thekkekkara, Tina; Veenu, J

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the outcome and complications of pregnancy among teenagers with those above 19 years of age. This retrospective study conducted in a maternity hospital in rural Karnataka, under the guidance of the department of community medicine, St Johns National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore, included 221 women who delivered between February 2003 and April 2003. The data was tabulated in excel spreadsheet and analysed using epi 6 programme. Anaemia among teenage multigravidae was found to be a significant health problem. There were no statistically significant differences between the gestational age at delivery and the mode of delivery in the different age groups. Teenage pregnancy was not found to be associated with an increased risk for antenatal complications or postnatal complications. There was no increased incidence of low birth weight or congenital anomalies among the babies of teenage mothers. Mortality was not found to be increased both among the teenage mothers as well as their babies. PMID:19588686

  14. The Risk Factors and Pregnancy Outcomes of 48 Cases of Heterotopic Pregnancy from a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors that are associated with heterotopic pregnancy (HP) following in vitro fertilization (IVF)-embryo transfer (ET) and to demonstrate the outcomes of HP after the surgical treatment of ectopic pregnancies. Forty-eight patients from a single center, who were diagnosed with HP between 1998 and 2012 were included. All of the patients had received infertility treatments, such as Clomid with timed coitus (n = 1, 2.1%), superovulation with intrauterine insemination (n = 7, 14.6%), fresh non-donor IVF-ET (n = 33, 68.8%), and frozen-thawed cycles (n = 7, 14.6%). Eighty-four additional patients were randomly selected as controls from the IVF registry database. HP was diagnosed at 7.5 ± 1.2 weeks (range 5.4-10.3) gestational age. In six cases (12.5%), the diagnosis was made three weeks after the patients underwent treatment for abortion. There were significant differences in the history of ectopic pregnancy (22.5% vs. 3.6%, P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in either group between the rates of first trimester intrauterine fetal loss (15.0% vs. 13.1%) or live birth (80.0% vs. 84.1%) after the surgical treatment for ectopic pregnancy. The risk factors for HP include a history of ectopic pregnancy (OR 7.191 [1.591-32.513], P = 0.010), abortion (OR 3.948 [1.574-9.902], P = 0.003), and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) (OR 10.773 [2.415-48.060], P = 0.002). In patients undergoing IVF-ET, history of ectopic pregnancy, abortion, and OHSS may be risk factors for HP as compared to the control group of other IVF patients. The surgical treatment of HP does not appear to affect the rates of first trimester fetal loss or live birth. PMID:27366008

  15. The Risk Factors and Pregnancy Outcomes of 48 Cases of Heterotopic Pregnancy from a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Yu Im; Shin, Im Hee; Park, Chan Woo; Yang, Kwang Moon; Kim, Hye Ok

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors that are associated with heterotopic pregnancy (HP) following in vitro fertilization (IVF)-embryo transfer (ET) and to demonstrate the outcomes of HP after the surgical treatment of ectopic pregnancies. Forty-eight patients from a single center, who were diagnosed with HP between 1998 and 2012 were included. All of the patients had received infertility treatments, such as Clomid with timed coitus (n = 1, 2.1%), superovulation with intrauterine insemination (n = 7, 14.6%), fresh non-donor IVF-ET (n = 33, 68.8%), and frozen-thawed cycles (n = 7, 14.6%). Eighty-four additional patients were randomly selected as controls from the IVF registry database. HP was diagnosed at 7.5 ± 1.2 weeks (range 5.4-10.3) gestational age. In six cases (12.5%), the diagnosis was made three weeks after the patients underwent treatment for abortion. There were significant differences in the history of ectopic pregnancy (22.5% vs. 3.6%, P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in either group between the rates of first trimester intrauterine fetal loss (15.0% vs. 13.1%) or live birth (80.0% vs. 84.1%) after the surgical treatment for ectopic pregnancy. The risk factors for HP include a history of ectopic pregnancy (OR 7.191 [1.591-32.513], P = 0.010), abortion (OR 3.948 [1.574-9.902], P = 0.003), and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) (OR 10.773 [2.415-48.060], P = 0.002). In patients undergoing IVF-ET, history of ectopic pregnancy, abortion, and OHSS may be risk factors for HP as compared to the control group of other IVF patients. The surgical treatment of HP does not appear to affect the rates of first trimester fetal loss or live birth. PMID:27366008

  16. The effect of exposure to hypergravity on pregnant rat dams, pregnancy outcome and early neonatal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, B.; Nguon, K.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that hypergravity exposure affects food intake and mass gain during pregnancy. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that changes in maternal body mass in hypergravity-exposed pregnant rat dams affect pregnancy outcome and early offspring development. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the changes observed at 1.5G will be magnified at higher gravity and by exposure during critical developmental periods. To test this hypothesis, we compared maternal body mass gain, food consumption, birth outcome and early offspring development between Sprague Dawley rat dams exposed to graded (1.5 1.75G) chronic hypergravity (HG) or rotation (rotational control, RC) on a 24-ft centrifuge for 22.5 h starting on gestational day (G) 10 with dams housed under identical conditions but not exposed to hypergravity (SC). We also compared maternal body mass, food consumption, birth outcome and early offspring development between rat dams exposed to 1.65G during different stages of pregnancy and nursing. Exposure to hypergravity resulted in transient loss in body mass and prolonged decrease in food consumption in HG dams, but the changes observed at 1.5G were not magnified at 1.65G or 1.75G. On the other hand RC dams gained more mass and consumed more food than SC dams. Exposure to hypergravity also affected pregnancy outcome as evidenced by decreased litter size, lowered neonatal mass at birth, and higher neonatal mortality; pregnancy outcome was not affected in RC dams. Neonatal changes evidenced by impaired righting response observed at 1.5G was magnified at higher gravity and was dependent on the period of hypergravity exposure. On the other hand, righting response was improved in RC neonates. Hypergravity exposure during early postpartum affected the food consumption of nursing mothers and affected early survival of their offspring. The changes observed in dams and neonates appear to be due to hypergravity exposure since animals exposed to the rotation

  17. Excessive weight gain among obese women and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Flick, Amy A; Brookfield, Kathleen F; de la Torre, Lesley; Tudela, Carmen Maria; Duthely, Lunthita; González-Quintero, Víctor Hugo

    2010-04-01

    We evaluated pregnancy outcomes in obese women with excessive weight gain during pregnancy. A retrospective study was performed on all obese women. Outcomes included rates of preeclampsia (PEC), gestational diabetes, cesarean delivery (CD), preterm delivery, low birth weight, very low birth weight, macrosomia, 5-minute Apgar score of <7, and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and were stratified by body mass index (BMI) groups class I (BMI 30 to 35.9 kg/m(2)), class II (36 to 39.9 kg/m(2)), and class III (>or=40 kg/m(2)). Gestational weight change was abstracted from the mother's medical chart and was divided into four categories: weight loss, weight gain of up to 14.9 pounds, weight gain of 15 to 24.9 pounds, and weight gain of more than 25 pounds. A total 20,823 obese women were eligible for the study. Univariate analysis revealed higher rates of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, Cesarean deliveries, preterm deliveries, low birth weight, macrosomia, and NICU admission in class II and class III obese women when compared with class I women. When different patterns of weight gain were used as in the logistic regression model, rates of PEC and CD were increased. Excessive weight gain among obese women is associated with adverse outcomes with a higher risk as BMI increases. PMID:20013581

  18. Oral Health in Women During Preconception and Pregnancy: Implications for Birth Outcomes and Infant Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Burton L.

    2006-01-01

    The mouth is an obvious portal of entry to the body, and oral health reflects and influences general health and well being. Maternal oral health has significant implications for birth outcomes and infant oral health. Maternal periodontal disease, that is, a chronic infection of the gingiva and supporting tooth structures, has been associated with preterm birth, development of preeclampsia, and delivery of a small-for-gestational age infant. Maternal oral flora is transmitted to the newborn infant, and increased cariogenic flora in the mother predisposes the infant to the development of caries. It is intriguing to consider preconception, pregnancy, or intrapartum treatment of oral health conditions as a mechanism to improve women's oral and general health, pregnancy outcomes, and their children's dental health. However, given the relationship between oral health and general health, oral health care should be a goal in its own right for all individuals. Regardless of the potential for improved oral health to improve pregnancy outcomes, public policies that support comprehensive dental services for vulnerable women of childbearing age should be expanded so that their own oral and general health is safeguarded and their children's risk of caries is reduced. Oral health promotion should include education of women and their health care providers ways to prevent oral disease from occurring, and referral for dental services when disease is present. PMID:16816998

  19. Indications for Cardiopulmonary Bypass During Pregnancy and Impact on Fetal Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S-M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiac operations in pregnant patients are a challenge for physicians in multidisciplinary teams due to the complexity of the condition which affects both mother and baby. Management strategies vary on a case-by-case basis. Feto-neonatal and maternal outcomes after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in pregnancy, especially long-term follow-up results, have not been sufficiently described. Methods: This review was based on a complete literature retrieval of articles published between 1991 and April 30, 2013. Results: Indications for CPB during pregnancy were cardiac surgery in 150 (96.8 %) patients, most of which consisted of valve replacements for mitral and/or aortic valve disorders, resuscitation due to amniotic fluid embolism, autotransfusion, and circulatory support during cesarean section to improve patient survival in 5 (3.2 %) patients. During CPB, fetuses showed either a brief heart rate drop with natural recovery after surgery or, in most cases, fetal heart rate remained normal throughout the whole course of CPB. Overall feto-neonatal mortality was 18.6 %. In comparison with pregnant patients whose baby survived, feto-neonatal death occurred after a significantly shorter gestational period at the time of onset of cardiac symptoms, cardiac surgery/resuscitation under CPB in the whole patient setting, or cardiac surgery/resuscitation with CPB prior to delivery. Conclusions: The most common surgical indications for CPB during pregnancy were cardiac surgery, followed by resuscitation for cardiopulmonary collapse. CPB was used most frequently in maternal cardiac surgery/resuscitation in the second trimester. Improved CPB conditions including high flow, high pressure and normothermia or mild hypothermia during pregnancy have benefited maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes. A shorter gestational period and the use of CPB during pregnancy were closely associated with feto-neonatal mortality. It is therefore important to attempt delivery ahead of

  20. Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes Among Primiparae at Very Advanced Maternal Age: At What Price?

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Alon; Glasser, Saralee; Schiff, Eyal; Zahav, Aliza Segev; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat

    2016-04-01

    Objectives In light of the potential physical and emotional costs to both woman and child, this study was conducted to assess pregnancy complications and birth outcomes in primiparae at very advanced maternal age (VAMA, aged ≥45) compared to younger primiparae. Methods Retrospective cohort study comparing 222 VAMA primiparae and a reference group of 222 primiparae aged 30-35, delivering at Sheba Medical Center from 2008 through 2013.Results VAMA primiparae were more likely than younger primiparae to be single, to have chronic health conditions, and higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), gestational-hypertension (GHTN) and preeclampsia-eclampsia. VAMA primiparae conceived mostly by oocyte donation. They were more likely to be hospitalized during pregnancy, to deliver preterm and by cesarean birth. Infants of VAMA primiparae were at greater risk for low birthweight and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admission. There were no differences in outcomes between VAMA primiparae with or without preexisting chronic conditions, or between those aged 45-49 and ≥50. In multivariable analysis VAMA was an independent risk factor for GDM, GHTN and preeclamsia-eclampsia, with adjusted odds ratio of 2.38 (95 % CI 1.32, 4.29), 5.80 (95 % CI 2.66, 12.64) and 2.45 (95 % CI 1.03, 5.85); respectively. The effect of age disappeared in multiple pregnancies. Conclusions Primiparity at VAMA holds a significant risk for adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. The absence of chronic medical conditions or the use of a young oocyte donor does not improve these outcomes. Multiple pregnancies hold additional risk and may diminish the effect of age. Primiparity at an earlier age should be encouraged. PMID:26686195

  1. Poverty during pregnancy: Its effects on child health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles P

    2007-01-01

    It is estimated that nearly 100,000 children are born into poverty each year in Canada. During pregnancy, their mothers are likely to face multiple stressful life events, including lone-mother and teenage pregnancies, unemployment, more crowded or polluted physical environments, and far fewer resources to deal with these exposures. The early child health consequences of poverty and pregnancy are multiple, and often set a newborn child on a life-long course of disparities in health outcomes. Included are greatly increased risks for preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and neonatal or infant death. Poverty has consistently been found to be a powerful determinant of delayed cognitive development and poor school performance. Behaviour problems among young children and adolescents are strongly associated with maternal poverty. Sound evidence in support of policies and programs to reduce these disparities among the poor, including the role of health practitioners, is difficult to find. This is partly because many interventions and programs targeting the poor are not properly evaluated or critically appraised. PMID:19030445

  2. Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and adverse pregnancy outcomes among Chinese women: Results from the C-ABCS.

    PubMed

    Ding, X-X; Xu, S-J; Hao, J-H; Huang, K; Su, P-Y; Tao, F-B

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations between pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and adverse pregnancy outcomes among Chinese pregnant women. A prospective population-based cohort study was performed using data collected as part of the China-Anhui Birth Cohort Study or C-ABCS. A total of 13,121 pregnant women who received the first prenatal visit were enrolled from November 2008 to October 2010. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate associations between pre-pregnancy BMI and pregnancy outcomes. Results indicated that the increased pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes such as hypertensive disorder (adjusted relative risk (ARR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-3.6), gestational diabetes (ARR 3.5, 95% CI 2.3-5.2), caesarean delivery (ARR 2.0, 95% CI 1.6-2.4), and medically indicated preterm delivery (ARR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9). Women with pre-pregnancy BMI above the normal range pose an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26492517

  3. Effects of Emergency Cervical Cerclage on Pregnancy Outcome: A Retrospective Study of 158 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Qiong; Chen, Hui; Chen, Li-Bin; Liu, Ying-Lin; Tan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Yun-Hui; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of emergency cervical cerclage in women with advanced cervical dilatation and bulging of fetal membranes. The study included 158 women who underwent emergency cervical cerclage because of cervix dilatation and protruding membranes in mid-trimester at Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. Pregnancy outcomes and pregnancy outcome related to clinical features were analyzed retrospectively. Analysis revealed that the placement of emergency cerclage led to the delivery of live infants with a success rate of 82.28%. The mean interval between cerclage and delivery was 52.16.±26.62 days, with a mean gestation at delivery of 30.3±4.7 weeks and a mean birth weight of 1934.69±570.37 g. No severe maternal complications such as maternal death, hematosepsis, and hysterorrhexis occurred after the operation. Two women (1.25%) had laceration of the cervix, 1 woman (0.61%) suffered pulmonary edema, and 2 women (1.25%) developed deep vein thrombosis (DVT). There were significant correlations between the pregnancy outcome and risk factors, including any presenting symptoms, cervical dilatation, postoperative white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) value. No significant difference was found in women with good vs. poor outcome in terms of maternal age and obstetric histories. Emergency cervical cerclage is effective in prolonging pregnancy and improving neonatal outcome in women with cervical incompetence. It should be considered a viable option for women with a dilated cervix in mid-trimester. PMID:25975832

  4. Effects of emergency cervical cerclage on pregnancy outcome: a retrospective study of 158 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Qiong; Chen, Hui; Chen, Li-Bin; Liu, Ying-Lin; Tian, Jian-Ping; Wang, Yun-Hui; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of emergency cervical cerclage in women with advanced cervical dilatation and bulging of fetal membranes. The study included 158 women who underwent emergency cervical cerclage because of cervix dilatation and protruding membranes in mid-trimester at Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. Pregnancy outcomes and pregnancy outcome related to clinical features were analyzed retrospectively. Analysis revealed that the placement of emergency cerclage led to the delivery of live infants with a success rate of 82.28%. The mean interval between cerclage and delivery was 52.16.±26.62 days, with a mean gestation at delivery of 30.3±4.7 weeks and a mean birth weight of 1934.69±570.37 g. No severe maternal complications such as maternal death, hematosepsis, and hysterorrhexis occurred after the operation. Two women (1.25%) had laceration of the cervix, 1 woman (0.61%) suffered pulmonary edema, and 2 women (1.25%) developed deep vein thrombosis (DVT). There were significant correlations between the pregnancy outcome and risk factors, including any presenting symptoms, cervical dilatation, postoperative white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) value. No significant difference was found in women with good vs. poor outcome in terms of maternal age and obstetric histories. Emergency cervical cerclage is effective in prolonging pregnancy and improving neonatal outcome in women with cervical incompetence. It should be considered a viable option for women with a dilated cervix in mid-trimester. PMID:25975832

  5. G-CSF Intrauterine for Thin Endometrium, and Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Tehraninejad, Ensieh; Davari Tanha, Fateme; Asadi, Ebrahim; Kamali, Koorosh; Aziminikoo, Elham; Rezayof, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of G-CSF on a cancelled ART cycle due to thin endometrium. Materials and methods: In a nonrandomized clinical trial from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary university based hospitals fifteen patients undergoing embryo transfer and with the history of cycle cancellation due to thin endometrium were studied. Intrauterine infusion of G-CSF was done on the day of oocyte pick-up or 5 days before embryo transfer. The primary outcome to be measured was an endometrium thickened to at least 6 mm and the secondary outcome was clinical pregnancy rate and consequently take-home baby. All previous cycles were considered as control for each patient. Results: The G-CSF was infused at the day of oocyte retrieval or 5 days before embryo transfer. The endometrial thickness reached from 3.593±0.251 mm to 7.120 ± 0.84 mm. The mean age, gravidity, parity, and FSH were 35.13± 9.531 years, 3, 1 and 32.78 ± 31.10 mIU/ml, respectively. The clinical pregnancy rate was 20%, and there was one missed abortion, a mother death at 34 weeks, and a preterm labor at 30 weeks due to PROM. Conclusion: G-CSF may increase endometrial thickness in the small group of patients who had no choice except cycle cancellation or surrogacy. PMID:26622308

  6. Paternal employment in solvent related occupations and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Daniell, W E; Vaughan, T L

    1988-03-01

    Washington State birth certificates were examined for associations between adverse pregnancy outcomes and paternal employment in solvent exposed occupations. Four cohorts defined by live, singleton births to fathers usually employed as auto body shop workers, painters (construction and maintenance), printers, or fibreglass workers were compared retrospectively with both a systematically selected control cohort and a low solvent exposed, occupationally defined control cohort (paternal electricians). The effects of maternal race and medical illness were controlled by sample restriction; maternal age and gravidity by stratified analysis. There was evidence of increased risk of low birth weight for infants born to fathers employed as body shop workers (relative risk = 1.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.1-2.4) or painters (RR = 1.4; CI = 0.9-2.1) when compared with the systematically selected controls but not with the electrician controls. The excess risk appeared stronger when only term infants were analysed suggesting a mechanism of growth retardation rather than prematurity. There was no evidence of increased risk among the other exposed cohorts or for other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Several design features limit the interpretation of the findings and confirmation by other studies is needed. PMID:3348995

  7. Understanding the Association of Biomedical, Psychosocial and Behavioral Risks with Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, Michele; El-Mohandes, Ayman A.E.; Gantz, Marie G.; Chowdhury, Dhuly; Thornberry, Jutta S.; El-Khorazaty, M. Nabil

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the relationship between diabetes, hypertension, preeclampsia, and Body Mass Index (BMI) -- the most common and interrelated medical conditions occurring during pregnancy; sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors; and adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk urban African American women in Washington, DC. Methods Data are from a randomized controlled trial conducted in 6 prenatal clinics. Women in their 1st or 2nd trimester were screened for behavioral risks (smoking, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, depression, and intimate partner violence) and demographic eligibility. 1,044 were eligible, interviewed and followed through their pregnancies. Classification and Regression Trees (CART) methodology was used to: 1) explore the relationship between medical and behavioral risks (reported at enrollment), sociodemographic factors and pregnancy outcomes, 2) identify the relative importance of various predictors of adverse pregnancy outcomes, and 3) characterize women at the highest risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. Results Overall, the strongest predictors of poor outcomes were prepregnancy BMI, preconceptional diabetes, employment status, intimate partner violence, and depression. In CART analysis, preeclampsia was the first splitter for low birthweight; preconceptional diabetes was the first splitter for preterm birth (PTB) and neonatal intensive care admission; BMI was the first splitter for very PTB, large for gestational age, Cesarean section and perinatal death; and employment was the first splitter for miscarriage. Conclusions Preconceptional factors play a very important role in pregnancy outcomes. For many of these women, the risks that they bring into the pregnancy were more likely to impact their pregnancy outcome than events during pregnancy. PMID:21785892

  8. Impact of Psychological Violence on Pregnancy Outcomes in a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Fatemeh; Rezaie Abhari, Farideh; Yazdani Charati, Jamshid; Rouhani, Samad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Violence during pregnancy has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study aimed to explore the link between psychological violence (PSV) and pregnancy outcomes in terms of maternal and birth for the first time in women attending Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MUMS) primary health centers (PHCs) in Iran. Methods: Prospective cohort of 1461 pregnant women exposed and non-exposed to PSV was followed until the pregnancy outcome. Modified Intimate Partner Violence, demographic and pregnancy outcomes questionnaires were administered face-to-face. Logistic regression analysis was down to estimate independent effects of the PSV on pregnancy outcomes. Results: More than half of the women (69.9%) reported PSV during pregnancy. The differences between the two groups in reference with pregnancy complication did not reach statistical significance. Premature rapture of membrane was the only outcome that was independently associated with PSV. Conclusion: PSV in pregnancy was frequent in our study. Although the lack of adverse pregnancy outcome following PSV was observed in this study, intervention is required to prevent the effect of violence on women and child health. PMID:25780371

  9. Glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in patients with diabetes in pregnancy: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Buhary, Badurudeen Mahmood; Almohareb, Ohoud; Aljohani, Naji; Alzahrani, Saad H.; Elkaissi, Samer; Sherbeeni, Suphia; Almaghamsi, Abdulrahman; Almalki, Mussa

    2016-01-01

    Context: Diabetes in pregnancy (DIP) is either pregestational or gestational. Aims: To determine the relationship between glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of DIP patients. Settings and Design: In this 12-month retrospective study, a total of 325 Saudi women with DIP who attended the outpatient clinics at a tertiary center Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were included. Subjects and Methods: The patients were divided into two groups, those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≤6.5% (48 mmol/mol) and those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) above 6.5%. The two groups were compared for differences in maternal and fetal outcomes. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent Student's t-test and analysis of variance were performed for comparison of continuous variables and Chi-square test for frequencies. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Patients with higher HbA1c were older (P = 0.0077), had significantly higher blood pressure, proteinuria (P < 0.0001), and were multiparous (P = 0.0269). They had significantly shorter gestational periods (P = 0.0002), more preterm labor (P < 0.0001), more perineal tears (P = 0.0406), more miscarriages (P < 0.0001), and more operative deliveries (P < 0.0001). Their babies were significantly of greater weight, had more Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admissions, hypoglycemia, and macrosomia. Conclusions: Poor glycemic control during pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes (shortened gestational period, greater risk of miscarriage, increased likelihood of operative delivery, hypoglycemia, macrosomia, and increased NICU admission). Especially at risk are those with preexisting diabetes, who would benefit from earlier diabetes consultation and tighter glycemic control before conception. PMID:27366714

  10. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Procter, Sandra B; Campbell, Christina G

    2014-07-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that women of childbearing age should adopt a lifestyle optimizing health and reducing risk of birth defects, suboptimal fetal development, and chronic health problems in both mother and child. Components leading to a healthy pregnancy outcome include healthy prepregnancy weight, appropriate weight gain and physical activity during pregnancy, consumption of a wide variety of foods, appropriate vitamin and mineral supplementation, avoidance of alcohol and other harmful substances, and safe food handling. Pregnancy is a critical period during which maternal nutrition and lifestyle choices are major influences on mother and child health. Inadequate levels of key nutrients during crucial periods of fetal development may lead to reprogramming within fetal tissues, predisposing the infant to chronic conditions in later life. Improving the well-being of mothers, infants, and children is key to the health of the next generation. This position paper and the accompanying practice paper (www.eatright.org/members/practicepapers) on the same topic provide registered dietitian nutritionists and dietetic technicians, registered; other professional associations; government agencies; industry; and the public with the Academy's stance on factors determined to influence healthy pregnancy, as well as an overview of best practices in nutrition and healthy lifestyles during pregnancy. PMID:24956993

  11. Pregnancy outcome and follow-up cardiac outcome in women with aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Trinder, Johanna; Caputo, Massimo; Curtis, Stephanie L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the maternal, fetal and cardiac outcomes in women who have undergone aortic valve replacement. Method Retrospective observational study of all women with aortic valve replacement, who underwent a pregnancy (1998–2012). Maternal-, fetal- and valve-related cardiac outcomes were assessed. Results Thirty-two pregnancies in 16 women with aortic valve replacement (nine bioprosthetic, six Ross and 17 mechanical) were evaluated. There were no adverse maternal events in the bioprosthetic and Ross groups but three in the mechanical group. Fetal loss rate was highest in the mechanical valve pregnancies (53%). One woman in the bioprosthetic group needed valve re-operation, and one woman in the mechanical valve group died. There was no difference in the change of Vmax over the follow-up between the valves (p = 0.25). Conclusions There was no difference in deterioration between aortic valve replacements during and after pregnancy. The highest risk of maternal and fetal complications occurred in the mechanical valve group.

  12. Waiting time to pregnancy and pregnancy outcome among Danish workers in the textile, clothing, and footwear industries.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, I; Boldsen, J L

    1992-06-01

    The relationship between time from planned to achieved pregnancy and pregnancy outcome has been studied in a group of 18,658 workers in the textile, clothing and footwear industries. Information on pregnancy outcome and delay in conception in the period 1979-84 was collected by self administered questionnaires in 1985. The response rate was 70.3%. During the study period there had been 5,171 live births and 708 spontaneous abortions. Information on delay in conception was collected in broad categories. The data were analysed by means of a newly developed statistical parametric model in order to collect all possible information from the highly grouped data. Median waiting time before a pregnancy which ended in spontaneous abortion was 1.68 times longer than median waiting time before a pregnancy leading to a live birth. There seems to be a correlation between the length of the waiting time and abortion. PMID:1496329

  13. Young Adult Outcomes Associated with Teen Pregnancy Among High-Risk Girls in an RCT of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Leve, Leslie D; Kerr, David C R; Harold, Gordon T

    2013-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is associated with a host of deleterious outcomes for girls such as drug use and poor parenting. Thus, reducing teen pregnancy rates could improve long-term developmental outcomes for girls, improving adjustment during young adulthood. Based on the positive effects of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to group care (GC) in a study of adolescent girls-significantly fewer pregnancies reported in the 2-year follow-up for MTFC girls-the present study followed this sample into young adulthood (approximately 7 years postbaseline) to examine the effects of adolescent pregnancy on young adult substance use and pregnancy-related outcomes. All participants were randomly assigned to MTFC (n = 81) or GC (n = 85) as adolescents as part of two RCTs. Results from logistic regression analyses indicated that becoming pregnant during the 2-year follow-up was significantly related to illicit drug use, miscarriage from a new pregnancy, and child welfare involvement at 7 years postbaseline. In addition, baseline marijuana use predicted marijuana use at 7 years postbaseline. PMID:24453470

  14. Zika Found in 9 U.S. Pregnancies, Outcomes Often Severe: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157505.html Zika Found in 9 U.S. Pregnancies, Outcomes Often Severe: ... among U.S. women who were infected with the Zika virus have resulted in tragic outcomes, federal health ...

  15. Pregnancy losses in cattle: potential for improvement.

    PubMed

    Diskin, M G; Waters, S M; Parr, M H; Kenny, D A

    2015-02-01

    For heifers, beef and moderate-yielding dairy cows, it appears that the fertilisation rate generally lies between 90% and 100%. For high-producing dairy cows, there is a less substantive body of literature, but it would appear that the fertilisation rate is somewhat lower and possibly more variable. In cattle, the major component of embryo loss occurs in the first 16 days following breeding (Day 0), with emerging evidence of greater losses before Day 8 in high-producing dairy cows. In cattle, late embryo mortality causes serious economic losses because it is often recognised too late to rebreed females. Systemic concentrations of progesterone during both the cycle preceding and following insemination affect embryo survival, with evidence of either excessive or insufficient concentrations being negatively associated with survival rate. The application of direct progesterone supplementation or treatments to increase endogenous output of progesterone to increase embryo survival cannot be recommended at this time. Energy balance and dry matter intake during the first 4 weeks after calving are critically important in determining pregnancies per AI when cows are inseminated at 70-100 days after calving. Level of concentrate supplementation of cows at pasture during the breeding period has minimal effects on conception rates, although sudden reductions in dietary intake should be avoided. For all systems of milk production, more balanced breeding strategies with greater emphasis on fertility and feed intake and/or energy must be developed. There is genetic variability within the Holstein breed for fertility traits, which can be exploited. Genomic technology will not only provide scientists with an improved understanding of the underlying biological processes involved in fertilisation and the establishment of pregnancy, but also, in the future, could identify genes responsible for improved embryo survival. Such information could be incorporated into breeding objectives in

  16. The effects of female age on fecundity and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Nugent, D; Balen, A H

    2001-01-01

    In industrialized countries worldwide, women are delaying childbearing for a variety of reasons, including pursuit of career, greater financial independence, improved and more accessible contraception and longer life expectancy. In terms of fertility and maternity, those aged > or = 35 years are considered to be of advanced maternal age and there are usually marked reductions in both the fecundity rate for spontaneous conceptions and the success rates with assisted conception. These decreases are thought to be due mainly to oocyte ageing, and the established success of oocyte donation from younger individuals to older recipients supports this contention. For those who achieve a pregnancy at an advanced maternal age there is a greater likelihood of aneuploidy (assuming conception with the woman's own oocytes), hypertensive and other medical disorders, birth by Caesarean section and maternal mortality. However, most of the complications associated with advanced maternal age are caused by age-related confounding variables, and older premenopausal women in good health should not require special attention. The data on perinatal mortality rates are encouraging and in the absence of congenital abnormalities perinatal mortality is probably not much increased, if at all, in older mothers. Pregnancy is now possible for postmenopausal women with the application of oocyte donation, but these individuals have a significantly higher likelihood of cardiovascular ageing and should be considered at increased risk of vascular complications during pregnancy. PMID:11591256

  17. Neighborhood conditions are associated with maternal health behaviors and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vinikoor-Imler, L C; Messer, L C; Evenson, K R; Laraia, B A

    2011-11-01

    Women residing in neighborhoods of low socioeconomic status are more likely to experience adverse reproductive outcomes; however, few studies explore which specific neighborhood features are associated with poor maternal health behaviors and pregnancy outcomes. Based upon our conceptual model, directly observed street-level data from four North Carolina US counties were used to create five neighborhood indices: physical incivilities (neighborhood degradation), social spaces (public space for socializing), walkability (walkable neighborhoods), borders (property boundaries), and arterial features (traffic safety). Singleton birth records (2001-2005) were obtained from the North Carolina State Center for Vital Statistics and maternal health behavior information (smoking, inadequate or excessive weight gain) and pregnancy outcomes (pregnancy-induced hypertension/pre-eclampsia, low birthweight, preterm birth) were abstracted. Race-stratified random effect models were used to estimate associations between neighborhood indices and women's reproductive behaviors and outcomes. In adjusted models, higher amounts of physical incivilities were positively associated with maternal smoking and inadequate weight gain, while walkability was associated with lower odds of these maternal health behaviors. Social spaces were also associated with inadequate weight gain during pregnancy. Among pregnancy outcomes, high levels of physical incivilities were consistently associated with all adverse pregnancy outcomes, and high levels of walkability were inversely associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension and preterm birth for Non-Hispanic white women only. None of the indices were associated with adverse birth outcomes for Non-Hispanic black women. In conclusion, certain neighborhood conditions were associated with maternal health behaviors and pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21920650

  18. Pregnancy outcomes among Spanish-surname women in California.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R L; Binkin, N J; Clingman, E J

    1986-01-01

    We compared pregnancy outcomes among United States-born and Mexican-born women having Spanish surnames with US-born Whites and Blacks using California's 1981 matched birth-death cohort file. Maternal risk characteristics between US-born Black women and US-born women with Spanish surnames were similar. In contrast, Latino women, regardless of national origin, delivered small proportions of low weight infants as compared to Blacks. Birthweight-specific mortality rates during the fetal and neonatal periods for the offspring of Mexican-born Spanish surname women were generally higher than those for other ethnic groups. Our findings are consistent with the underreporting of postneonatal deaths among Mexican-born Latinos, yet suggest that their relatively low reported infant mortality rates compared to Blacks can be explained by a more favorable birthweight distribution. PMID:3953914

  19. Adverse pregnancy outcome in a petrochemical polluted area in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, M C; Yu, H S; Tsai, S S; Cheng, B H; Hsu, T Y; Wu, T N; Yang, C Y

    2001-08-24

    The petrochemical industry is the main source of industrial air pollution in Taiwan. Reported here are the results from an ongoing study of outdoor air pollution and the health of individuals living in a community in close proximity to petrochemical industrial complexes. The prevalences of term low birth weight (LBW) in the petrochemical municipality and control municipality were 3.22%, and 1.84%, respectively. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, and infant sex), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.767 (1.002-3.116) for term LBW in the petrochemical municipality. Data provide further support for the hypothesis that air pollution can affect the outcome of pregnancy. PMID:11549116

  20. Intimate Partner Violence During Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered “risky,” including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient–provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  1. Intimate partner violence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered "risky," including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient-provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  2. Heterotopic Triplet Pregnancy after In Vitro Fertilization with Favorable Outcome of the Intrauterine Twin Pregnancy Subsequent to Surgical Treatment of the Tubal Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Akrivis, Christodoulos; Tsirkas, Panagiotis; Korkontzelos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Heterotopic triplet pregnancy is an exceptionally rare medical condition. The broad use of assisted reproductive technologies has contributed to the increase of ectopic and subsequently heterotopic pregnancy rate, masking a life-threatening condition for the gravid and the intrauterine pregnancy. We describe a case of a woman with heterotopic triplets at 9+4 gestational week following transfer of three embryos obtained by in vitro fertilization techniques. The ectopic tubal pregnancy was ruptured and salpingectomy was performed by laparotomy. The intrauterine pregnancy progressed to the delivery by cesarean section of two healthy twins at 36+2 gestational age. Heterotopic triplets with tubal ectopic are a special diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the obstetrician. High index of suspicion and timely treatment by laparotomy or laparoscopy can preserve the intrauterine gestation with a successful outcome of the pregnancy. PMID:24527252

  3. Effect of assisted hatching on pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Yang, Da-Lei; An, Jing; Jiao, Jiao; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Wu, Qi-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that assisted hatching (AH) techniques may improve clinical pregnancy rates, particularly in poor prognosis patients; however, there still remains considerable uncertainty. We conducted a meta-analysis to verify the effect of AH on pregnancy outcomes. We searched for related studies published in PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases from start dates to October 10, 2015. Totally, 36 randomized controlled trials with 6459 participants were included. Summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for whether by AH or not were estimated. We found a significant increase in clinical pregnancy (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.00-1.36, I(2) = 48.3%) and multiple pregnancy rates (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.11-2.01, I(2) = 44.0%) with AH when compared to the control. Numerous subgroup analyses stratified by hatching method, conception mode, extent of AH, embryos transfer status, and previous failure history were also carried out. Interestingly, significant results of clinical pregnancy as well as multiple pregnancy rates were observed among women who received intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and who received AH which the zona were completely removed. In summary, this meta-analysis supports that AH was associated with an increased chance of achieving clinical pregnancy and multiple pregnancy. Whether AH significantly changes live birth and miscarriage rates needs further investigations. PMID:27503701

  4. Effect of assisted hatching on pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Yang, Da-Lei; An, Jing; Jiao, Jiao; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Wu, Qi-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that assisted hatching (AH) techniques may improve clinical pregnancy rates, particularly in poor prognosis patients; however, there still remains considerable uncertainty. We conducted a meta-analysis to verify the effect of AH on pregnancy outcomes. We searched for related studies published in PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases from start dates to October 10, 2015. Totally, 36 randomized controlled trials with 6459 participants were included. Summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for whether by AH or not were estimated. We found a significant increase in clinical pregnancy (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.00–1.36, I2 = 48.3%) and multiple pregnancy rates (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.11–2.01, I2 = 44.0%) with AH when compared to the control. Numerous subgroup analyses stratified by hatching method, conception mode, extent of AH, embryos transfer status, and previous failure history were also carried out. Interestingly, significant results of clinical pregnancy as well as multiple pregnancy rates were observed among women who received intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and who received AH which the zona were completely removed. In summary, this meta-analysis supports that AH was associated with an increased chance of achieving clinical pregnancy and multiple pregnancy. Whether AH significantly changes live birth and miscarriage rates needs further investigations. PMID:27503701

  5. Marijuana use and pregnancy: prevalence, associated characteristics, and birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mark, Katrina; Desai, Andrea; Terplan, Mishka

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the prevalence, behaviors, and birth outcomes associated with marijuana use in pregnancy. This was a retrospective cohort from a university-based prenatal care clinic from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. The primary exposure was marijuana use, defined by self-report or urine toxicology. Demographic and outcome data were determined by chart review and analyzed by chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, ANOVA, and logistic regression. Three hundred and ninety-six patients initiated prenatal care during this time frame; 116 (29.3 %) of whom screened positive for marijuana at initial visit. Patients who used marijuana were less likely to have graduated high school (p = 0.016) or be employed (p = 0.015); they were more likely to use tobacco (p < 0.001) or alcohol (p = 0.032) and report a history of abuse (p = 0.010) or depressed mood (p = 0.023). When analyzed via logistic regression, only tobacco use remained associated with marijuana use (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 3.3; 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.9-5.9). Birth outcomes were available for 170 (43.0 %) patients. Only 3 (1.9 %) tested positive for marijuana at the time of delivery. Marijuana use was not related to incidence of low birth weight (13.8 % vs 14.0 %, p = 1.00), preterm delivery (17.7 % vs 12.0 %, p = 0.325), or NICU admissions (25.5 % vs 15.8 %, p = 0.139). Prenatal care utilization was equal between marijuana users and non-users. Although marijuana is common among obstetric patients at prenatal care initiation, most cease use by delivery. Marijuana is strongly correlated with cigarette use. We found no differences in birth outcomes or utilization of prenatal care by marijuana exposure. PMID:25895138

  6. Clinical outcomes after assisted reproductive technology in twin pregnancies: chorionicity-based comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Luming; Zou, Gang; Wei, Xing; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Okun, Nanette; Duan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The chorionicity–based evaluation of the perinatal risk in twin pregnancies after assisted reproductive technology (ART) is lacking. A retrospective review was performed of all twin pregnancies monitored prenatally and delivered at our hospital between 2010 and 2014. Chorionicity was diagnosed by ultrasound examination at first trimester and confirmed by postnatal pathology. Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes were prospectively recorded. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated in a logistic regression model. A total of 1153 twin pregnancies were analyzed. The occurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) was 3 times as frequent in monochorionic diamniotic (MCDA) twin pregnancies after ART as in those spontaneous counterparts (aOR 3.0; 95%CI 1.1–3.2). The prevalence of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancies (ICP) was significantly higher in dichorionic diamniotic (DCDA) twin pregnancies following ART compared to spontaneous DCDA pregnancies (aOR 3.3; 95%CI 1.3–5.6). Perinatal outcomes did not differ between two conception methods, either in MCDA or DCDA twin pregnancies. Based on differentiation of chorionicity, ART is associated with the increased risk of PPROM in MCDA twin pregnancies and with a higher rate of ICP in DCDA twin gestations. ART does not increase adversity of perinatal outcomes in twin pregnancies. PMID:27243373

  7. Clinical outcomes after assisted reproductive technology in twin pregnancies: chorionicity-based comparison.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luming; Zou, Gang; Wei, Xing; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Okun, Nanette; Duan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The chorionicity-based evaluation of the perinatal risk in twin pregnancies after assisted reproductive technology (ART) is lacking. A retrospective review was performed of all twin pregnancies monitored prenatally and delivered at our hospital between 2010 and 2014. Chorionicity was diagnosed by ultrasound examination at first trimester and confirmed by postnatal pathology. Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes were prospectively recorded. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated in a logistic regression model. A total of 1153 twin pregnancies were analyzed. The occurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) was 3 times as frequent in monochorionic diamniotic (MCDA) twin pregnancies after ART as in those spontaneous counterparts (aOR 3.0; 95%CI 1.1-3.2). The prevalence of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancies (ICP) was significantly higher in dichorionic diamniotic (DCDA) twin pregnancies following ART compared to spontaneous DCDA pregnancies (aOR 3.3; 95%CI 1.3-5.6). Perinatal outcomes did not differ between two conception methods, either in MCDA or DCDA twin pregnancies. Based on differentiation of chorionicity, ART is associated with the increased risk of PPROM in MCDA twin pregnancies and with a higher rate of ICP in DCDA twin gestations. ART does not increase adversity of perinatal outcomes in twin pregnancies. PMID:27243373

  8. Recent immigration and adverse pregnancy outcomes in an urban setting in Spain.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Subirats, Irene; Pérez, Glòria; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Salvador, Joaquín; Jané, Mireia

    2011-07-01

    To describe social and economic inequalities in non-fatal pregnancy outcomes (low birth weight, preterm birth and small for gestational age births) in the neighbourhoods of the city of Barcelona (Spain), according to maternal age and maternal country of origin, between 1991 and 2005. A cross-sectional ecological study was carried out using the 38 neighbourhoods of Barcelona as the unit of analysis. The study population comprises the 192,921 live births to resident women aged 12-49 residing from 1991 to 2005. Information was gathered from births registry. Prevalence of low birth-weight, preterm birth and small for gestational age, was calculated for each of the 38 neighbourhoods of mothers' residence, stratifying results by maternal age and country of origin. The indicator of neighbourhood socio-economic level was the unemployment rate. Quartile maps along with Spearman correlation coefficients and linear regression were performed between indicators. The present study reports socio-economic inequalities in pregnancy outcomes among neighbourhoods in Barcelona (Spain): the more disadvantaged neighbourhoods have worse pregnancy outcomes (low birth weight, preterm birth and small for gestational age births) in all women age groups. These inequalities do not exist among immigrant women, and some groups of foreign mothers even have lower rates of low birth weight, preterm birth, and small for gestational age births than autochthonous women. The existing inequalities suggest that policy efforts to reduce these inequalities are not entirely successful and should focus on improving pregnancy and delivery care in less privileged women in a country with universal access to health care. PMID:20440546

  9. Pre-pregnancy Dating Violence and Birth Outcomes among Adolescent Mothers in a National Sample

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong; Harville, Emily W.

    2015-01-01

    adolescent relationships prior to pregnancy may improve Black adolescent mothers’ birth outcomes. Intervening on long-term violence may be particularly important. PMID:24366966

  10. Spousal Military Deployment During Pregnancy and Adverse Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Spieker, Amy; Schiff, Melissa A; Davis, Beth E

    2016-03-01

    Pregnant women with a military-deployed spouse have increased risk of depression and self-reported stress. In nonmilitary populations, depression and stress during pregnancy are associated with adverse birth outcomes. This study assesses the association between a spouse's military deployment and adverse birth outcomes. We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a large military medicine center in the Northwest and evaluated records of singleton deliveries to dependent Army spouses from September 2001 to September 2011. We used logistic regression to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the associations between deployment and low birth weight (<2,500 g), preterm delivery (<37 weeks), small for gestational age (SGA, <10 percentile for gestational age), and cesarean delivery. We identified 10,536 births; 1,364 (12.9%) spouses were deployed at delivery. No associations were observed in the overall population. Among women with two or more children, we observed an 81% increased risk of SGA (95% CI 1.18-2.79). Women 30 to 34 years old had an 82% (95% CI 1.06-3.14) increased risk of low birth weight and an 84% increased risk of SGA (95% CI 1.13-2.98). Deployment's effects vary by maternal age and the number of children in the household. These findings may inform programs and practitioners to best serve women with military-deployed spouses. PMID:26926749

  11. Outcome assessment of pregnancy-related acute kidney injury in Morocco: A national prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kabbali, Nadia; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohammed; Harandou, Mustapha; Tagnaouti, Mounia; Bentata, Yassamine; Laouad, Inass; Ramdani, Benyounes; Bayahia, Rabia; Oualim, Zouhair; Houssaini, Tarik Sqalli

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but life-threatening complication of pregnancy. The aim of this paper is to study the characteristics of acute AKI in pregnancy and to emphasize on its management modalities in Moroccan hospitals. This is a national prospective study performed over six months from July 1 to December 31 2010 on AKI developing in pregnant patients, both preand post-partum period. Patients with pre-existing kidney disease were excluded from the study. Outcome was considered unfavorable when complete recovery of renal function was not achieved and/or maternal death occurred. Forty-four patients were included in this study. They were 29.6 ± 6 years old and mostly illiterate (70.6%). Most AKI occurred in the post-partum period, with 66% of the cases occurring in those who did not receive antenatal care. The main etiologies were pre-eclampsia (28 cases), hemorrhagic shock (six cases) and septic events (five cases). We noted three cases of acute fatty liver, one case of obstructive kidney injury and one case of lupus nephritis. Hemodialysis was necessary in 17 (38.6%) cases. The outcome was favorable in 29 patients. The maternal mortality rate was 11.4%. Two poor prognostic factors were identified: Age over 38 years and sepsis. AKI is a severe complication of pregnancy in developing countries. Its prevention necessitates the improvement of the sanitary infrastructure and the establishment of the obligatory antenatal care. PMID:26022044

  12. The Global Network Maternal Newborn Health Registry: a multi-national, community-based registry of pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research (Global Network) supports and conducts clinical trials in resource-limited countries by pairing foreign and U.S. investigators, with the goal of evaluating low-cost, sustainable interventions to improve the health of women and children. Accurate reporting of births, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, maternal mortality, and measures of obstetric and neonatal care is critical to efforts to discover strategies for improving pregnancy outcomes in resource-limited settings. Because most of the sites in the Global Network have weak registration within their health care systems, the Global Network developed the Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR), a prospective, population-based registry of pregnancies at the Global Network sites to provide precise data on health outcomes and measures of care. Methods Pregnant women are enrolled in the MNHR if they reside in or receive healthcare in designated groups of communities within sites in the Global Network. For each woman, demographic, health characteristics and major outcomes of pregnancy are recorded. Data are recorded at enrollment, the time of delivery and at 42 days postpartum. Results From 2010 through 2013 Global Network sites were located in Argentina, Guatemala, Belgaum and Nagpur, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Zambia. During this period, 283,496 pregnant women were enrolled in the MNHR; this number represented 98.8% of all eligible women. Delivery data were collected for 98.8% of women and 42-day follow-up data for 98.4% of those enrolled. In this supplement, there are a series of manuscripts that use data gathered through the MNHR to report outcomes of these pregnancies. Conclusions Developing public policy and improving public health in countries with poor perinatal outcomes is, in part, dependent upon understanding the outcome of every pregnancy. Because the worst pregnancy outcomes typically occur in countries with limited health registration

  13. Are Women With Uterine Fibroids at Increased Risk for Adverse Pregnancy Outcome?

    PubMed

    Ezzedine, Dima; Norwitz, Errol R

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are common in reproductive age women. Most women with fibroids have uneventful pregnancies. The most common complication is painful degeneration. Are fibroids associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes? If so, can we predict which fibroids are most likely to cause complications? And is there anything that can be done to prevent these complications, such as performing a myomectomy before pregnancy? Here we review the published literature looking at the impact of uterine fibroids on adverse pregnancy events, such as miscarriage, preterm labor, placental abruption, fetal growth restriction, and fetal malpresentation. A series of clinical recommendations for the management of pregnancy in women with uterine fibroids are included. PMID:26670833

  14. Efforts to Improve Perinatal Outcomes for Women Enrolled in Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Daniel-Robinson, Lekisha; Cha, Stephen; Lillie-Blanton, Marsha

    2015-08-01

    Improving women's health and perinatal health outcomes is a high priority for Medicaid, the jointly financed federal-state health coverage program. The authorities provided by the Affordable Care Act give Medicaid new resources and opportunities to improve coverage and perinatal care. Given that the Medicaid program currently covers almost half of all births in the United States, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in partnership with states and other stakeholders, is using new and existing authorities to improve birth outcomes. Quality measurement, quality-improvement projects, and expanded models of care underscore the major quality approach of the center. As an outgrowth of an expert panel that included membership of several state Medicaid medical directors, Medicaid providers, and consumer representatives, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services launched the Maternal and Infant Health Initiative, which aims to increase postpartum visit rates and the use of effective contraception among women covered by Medicaid. This Initiative provides focus on key opportunities and strategies to improve the rate, measurement, timing, and content of postpartum visits. Additionally, a focus on contraception will serve to improve pregnancy planning and spacing and prevent unintended pregnancy. As the Initiative evolves, the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services plans to identify policy, service delivery, and reimbursement policies to advance the Initiative's goals and improve outcomes for women covered by Medicaid. PMID:26241435

  15. Pregnancy rate and outcome in Swedish women with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bryman, Inger; Sylvén, Lisskulla; Berntorp, Kerstin; Innala, Eva; Bergström, Ingrid; Hanson, Charles; Oxholm, Marianne; Landin-Wilhelmsen, Kerstin

    2011-06-30

    Pregnancies occurred in 57 (12%) of 482 Swedish women with Turner syndrome with a liveborn rate of 54% in 124 pregnancies. Spontaneous pregnancies occurred in 40%, mainly in women with 45,X/46,XX mosaicism, and oocyte donation in 53% where miscarriages were less frequent, odds ratio = 0.43 (95% confidence interval 0.17-1.04). PMID:21256486

  16. Prenatal exposure to amphetamines. Risks and adverse outcomes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Plessinger, M A

    1998-03-01

    Based on findings in humans and the confirmation of prenatal exposures in animals, amphetamines and methamphetamines increase the risk of an adverse outcome when abused during pregnancy. Clefting, cardiac anomalies, and fetal growth reduction deficits that have been seen in infants exposed to amphetamines during pregnancy have all been reproduced in animal studies involving prenatal exposures to amphetamines. The differential effects of amphetamines between genetic strains of mice and between species demonstrate that pharmacokinetics and the genetic disposition of the mother and developing embryo can have an enormous influence on enhancing or reducing these potential risks. The effects of prenatal exposure to amphetamines in producing altered behavior in humans appear less compelling when one considers other confounding variables of human environment, genetics, and polydrug abuse. In view of the animal data concerning altered behavior and learning tasks in comparison with learning deficits observed in humans, the influence of the confounding variables in humans may serve to increase the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to prenatal exposure to amphetamines. These factors and others may predispose the developing conceptus to the damaging effects of amphetamines by actually lowering the threshold of susceptibility at the sites where damage occurs. Knowledge of the effects of prenatal exposure of the fetus and the mother to designer amphetamines is lacking. Based on the few studies in which designer drugs have been examined in animal models, more questions are raised than answered. Possible reasons why no malformations or significant fetal effects were found in the study by St. Omer include the genetic strain of rat used, the conservative exposure profile, or the fact that the placenta metabolized MDMA before reaching the embryo. These questions underscore the need for further investigations concerning the prenatal exposure effects of designer compounds and

  17. The effects of subchorionic hematoma on pregnancy outcome in patients with threatened abortion

    PubMed Central

    Şükür, Yavuz Emre; Göç, Göksu; Köse, Osman; Açmaz, Gökhan; Özmen, Batuhan; Atabekoğlu, Cem Somer; Koç, Acar; Söylemez, Feride

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of ultrasonographically detected subchorionic hematomas on pregnancy outcomes in patients with vaginal bleeding within the first half of pregnancy. Material and Methods Patients diagnosed with threatened abortion due to painless vaginal bleeding and who were followed up in an in-patient service during the first vaginal bleeding between January 2009 and December 2010 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of subchorionic hematoma. Miscarriage rates and pregnancy outcomes of ongoing pregnancies were compared between the groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding demographic parameters, including age, parity, previous miscarriage history, and gestational age at first vaginal bleeding. While 13 of 44 pregnancies (29.5%) with subchorionic hematoma resulted in miscarriage, 25 of 198 pregnancies (12.6%) without subchorionic hematoma resulted in miscarriage (p=.010). The gestational age at miscarriage and the duration between first vaginal bleeding and miscarriage were similar between the groups. The outcome measures of ongoing pregnancies, such as gestational week at delivery, birth weight, and delivery route, were also similar between the groups. Conclusion Ultrasonographically detected subchorionic hematoma increases the risk of miscarriage in patients with vaginal bleeding and threatened abortion during the first 20 weeks of gestation. However, it does not affect the pregnancy outcome measures of ongoing pregnancies. PMID:25584033

  18. Tips to Improve AI Pregnancy Rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is aimed at identifying and emphasizing the critical factors that contribute to a successful AI breeding season. Accurate and efficient heat detection is the first step toward achieving AI pregnancies. Electronic estrous detection is not necessary if producers will spend more time observi...

  19. Epidemiologic Tools to Study the Influence of Environmental Factors on Fecundity and Pregnancy-related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Rémy; Ballester, Ferran; Casas, Maribel; Cordier, Sylvaine; Eggesbø, Merete; Iniguez, Carmen; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Philippat, Claire; Rey, Sylvie; Vandentorren, Stéphanie; Vrijheid, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes entail a large health burden for the mother and offspring; a part of it might be avoided by better understanding the role of environmental factors in their etiology. Our aims were to review the assessment tools to characterize fecundity troubles and pregnancy-related outcomes in human populations and their sensitivity to environmental factors. For each outcome, we reviewed the possible study designs, main sources of bias, and their suggested cures. In terms of study design, for most pregnancy outcomes, cohorts with recruitment early during or even before pregnancy allow efficient characterization of pregnancy-related events, time-varying confounders, and in utero exposures that may impact birth outcomes and child health. Studies on congenital anomalies require specific designs, assessment of anomalies in medical pregnancy terminations, and, for congenital anomalies diagnosed postnatally, follow-up during several months after birth. Statistical analyses should take into account environmental exposures during the relevant time windows; survival models are an appropriate approach for fecundity, fetal loss, and gestational duration/preterm delivery. Analysis of gestational duration could distinguish pregnancies according to delivery induction (and possibly pregnancy-related conditions). In conclusion, careful design and analysis are required to better characterize environmental effects on human reproduction. PMID:24363355

  20. Adverse pregnancy outcomes and cardiovascular risk factor management.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja K; Minissian, Margo; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading health threat to American women. In addition to establish risk factors for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) including pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes are now recognized as factors that increase a woman's risk for future CVD. CVD risk factor burden is disproportionately higher in those of low socioeconomic status and in ethnic/racial minority women. Since younger women often use their obstetrician/gynecologist as their primary health provider, this is an opportune time to diagnose and treat CVD risk factors early. Embedding preventive care providers such as nurse practitioners or physician assistants within OB/GYN practices can be considered, with referral to family medicine or internist for ongoing risk assessment and management. The American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) stroke prevention guidelines tailored to women recommend that women with a history of pre-eclampsia can be evaluated for hypertension and other CVD risk factors within 6 months to 1-year post-partum. Given the burden and impact of CVD on women in our society, the entire medical community must work to establish feasible practice and referral patterns for assessment and treatment of CVD risk factors. PMID:26159741

  1. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Puja K.; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading health threat to American women. In addition to established risk factors for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) including pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes are now recognized as factors that increase a woman’s risk for future CVD. CVD risk factor burden is disproportionately higher in those of low socioeconomic status and in ethnic/racial minority women. Since younger women often use their obstetrician/gynecologist as their primary health provider, this is an opportune time to diagnose and treat CVD risk factors early. Embedding preventive care providers such as nurse practitioners or physician assistants within OB/GYN practices can be considered, with referral to family medicine or internist for ongoing risk assessment and management. The American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) stroke prevention guidelines tailored to women recommend that women with a history of pre-eclampsia be evaluated for hypertension and other CVD risk factors within 6 months to 1 year post-partum. Given the burden and impact of CVD on women our society, the entire medical community must work to establish feasible practice and referral patterns for assessment and treatment of CVD risk factors. PMID:26159741

  2. Comorbid depression and anxiety effects on pregnancy and neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Figueiredo, Barbara; Deeds, Osvelia; Ascencio, Angela; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia

    2010-02-01

    The effects of comorbid depression and anxiety were compared to the effects of depression alone and anxiety alone on pregnancy mood states and biochemistry and on neonatal outcomes in a large multi-ethnic sample. At the prenatal period the comorbid and depressed groups had higher scores than the other groups on the depression measure. But, the comorbid group had higher anxiety, anger and daily hassles scores than the other groups, and they had lower dopamine levels. As compared to the non-depressed group, they also reported more sleep disturbances and relationship problems. The comorbid group also experienced a greater incidence of prematurity than the depressed, the high anxiety and the non-depressed groups. Although the comorbid and anxiety groups were lower birthweight than the non-depressed and depressed groups, the comorbid group did not differ from the depressed and anxiety groups on birth length. The neonates of the comorbid and depressed groups had higher cortisol and norepinephrine and lower dopamine and serotonin levels than the neonates of the anxiety and non-depressed groups as well as greater relative right frontal EEG. These data suggest that for some measures comorbidity of depression and anxiety is the worst condition (e.g., incidence of prematurity), while for others, comorbidity is no more impactful than depression alone. PMID:19945170

  3. Contraceptive Use and Pregnancy Outcomes among Opioid Drug-Using Women: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cornford, Charles S.; Close, Helen J.; Bray, Roz; Beere, Deborah; Mason, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The contraceptive needs of illicit opioid users differ from non-drug users but are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to describe contraceptive use and pregnancy outcomes in opioid-using women, and to examine their association with a range of risk factors. Method This retrospective cohort study used UK general practice records, Treatment Outcomes Profile and National Drug Treatment Monitoring System data, and a nested data validation exercise. A cohort of 376 women aged 20–61 years were in active treatment for opioid addiction in October 2010 at two specialised primary care practices in North-East England. Outcomes were age-adjusted prevalence estimates for contraceptive use and pregnancy outcomes in users of illicit opioids. The association between lifestyle-related risk factors and contraception was explored. Results Drug-using women made lower use of planned (non-condom) contraception (24% vs 50%, p<0.001), had more frequent pregnancy terminations (0.46 vs. 0.025, p = 0.004) and higher annual incidence of chlamydia (1.1% vs. 0.33%, p<0.001), when compared with age-matched population data. Specifically, there was low use of oral contraceptives (4% vs. 25%, p<0.001), IUCD (1% vs. 6%, p<0.001), and sterilisation (7% vs. 6%, p = 0.053), but higher rates of injectable contraceptives (6% vs. 3%, p = 0.003). A total of 64% of children aged <16 years born to this group did not live with their mother. No individual risk factor (such as sex-working) significantly explained the lower use or type of non-condom contraception. Conclusions This is the first study to describe planned contraceptive use among drug-users, as well as the association with a range of risk factors and pregnancy outcomes. The low uptake of planned contraception, set against high rates of terminations and sexually transmitted disease demonstrates the urgent clinical need to improve contraceptive services, informed by qualitative work to explore the values and beliefs influencing

  4. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy: Maternal and fetal outcomes and progression of kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Penny; Callaway, Leonie K; Barrett, Helen L; Fagermo, Narelle; Lust, Karin; Shakhovskoy, Rebekah E

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of Australian data regarding renal disease in pregnancy. We undertook a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary institution to examine the impact of renal disease on pregnancy outcomes and the effect of pregnancy on disease progression. Methods A total of 55 pregnancies of patients with renal disease admitted from 2003 to 2010 to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital were analysed. Pre-conception variables, fetal/delivery and maternal outcomes were analysed in this group and in a control group of women with normal kidney function pre-pregnancy. Results Of the 55 pregnancies, 71% experienced pre-term delivery, 38% had intra-uterine growth restriction and 62% required caesarean section. Of all, 60% of neonates required neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and six perinatal deaths occurred. Of all, 67% of women suffered preeclampsia, 47% anaemia and 3 patients required dialysis in pregnancy. Postpartum deterioration of renal function occurred in patients with pre-conception chronic kidney disease stage 3–5. Conclusions Chronic kidney disease of all stages is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. In a tertiary institution however, there is a high rate of successful pregnancy (84%).

  5. Combined Effect of Fetal Sex and Advanced Maternal Age on Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal sex and maternal age are each known to affect outcomes of pregnancies. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of the combination of maternal age and fetal sex on pregnancy outcomes in term and post-term singleton pregnancies. Material/Methods This was a retrospective study on term singleton pregnancies delivered between 2004 and 2008 at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center. Data collected included maternal age, fetal sex, and maternal and neonatal complications. The combined effect of fetal sex and maternal age on complications of pregnancy was assessed by multivariable logistic regression models. Results The study population comprised 37,327 pregnancies. The risk of operative deliveries increased with maternal age ≥40 and in pregnancies with male fetuses. The risk of maternal diabetes and of longer hospitalization increased as maternal age increased, and in women <40 carrying male fetuses. The risk of hypertensive disorders increased in pregnancies with males as maternal age advanced. The risk of shoulder dystocia and neonatal respiratory complications increased in male neonates born to women<40. The risk of neonatal hypoglycemia increased in males for all maternal ages. Conclusions Risk assessment for fetal sex and advanced maternal age were given for different pregnancy complications. Knowledge of fetal sex adds value to the risk assessment of pregnancies as maternal age increases. PMID:25892459

  6. Effects of prenatal multimicronutrient supplementation on pregnancy outcomes: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Prakesh S.; Ohlsson, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Background Reduced intake of micronutrients during pregnancy exposes women to nutritional deficiencies and may affect fetal growth. We conducted a systematic review to examine the efficacy of prenatal supplementation with multimicronutrients on pregnancy outcomes. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library for relevant articles published in English up to December 2008. We also searched the bibliographies of selected articles as well as clinical trial registries. The primary outcome was low birth weight; secondary outcomes were preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age infants, birth weight and gestational age. Results We observed a significant reduction in the risk of low birth weight among infants born to women who received multimicronutrients during pregnancy compared with placebo (relative risk [RR] 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73–0.91) or iron–folic acid supplementation (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.74–0.93). Birth weight was significantly higher among infants whose mothers were in the multimicronutrient group than among those whose mothers received iron–folic acid supplementation (weighted mean difference 54 g, 95% CI 36 g–72 g). There was no significant differences in the risk of preterm birth or small-for-gestational-age infants between the 3 study groups. Interpretation Prenatal multimicronutrient supplementation was associated with a significantly reduced risk of low birth weight and with improved birth weight when compared with iron–folic acid supplementation. There was no significant effect of multimicronutrient supplementation on the risk of preterm birth or small-for-gestational-age infants. PMID:19506270

  7. Maternal Snoring May Predict Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: A Cohort Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xing; Tao, Fangbiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of snoring during pregnancy and its effects on key pregnancy outcomes. Methods Pregnant women were consecutively recruited in their first trimester. Habitual snoring was screened by using a questionnaire in the 1st and 3rd trimester, respectively. According to the time of snoring, participants were divided into pregnancy onset snorers, chronic snorers and non-snorers. Logistic regressions were performed to examine the associations between snoring and pregnancy outcomes. Results Of 3 079 pregnant women, 16.6% were habitual snorers, with 11.7% were pregnancy onset snorers and 4.9% were chronic snorers. After adjusting for potential confounders, chronic snorers were independently associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (RR 1.66, 95%CI 1.09–2.53). Both pregnancy onset and chronic snorers were independently associated with placental adhesion (RR 1.96, 95%CI 1.17–3.27, and RR 2.33, 95%CI 1.22–4.46, respectively). Pregnancy onset snorers were at higher risk of caesarean delivery (RR 1.37, 95%CI 1.09–1.73) and having macrosomia (RR 1.54, 95%CI 1.05–2.27) and large for gestational age (LGA) (RR 1.71, 95%CI 1.31–2.24) infants. In addition, being overweight or obese before pregnancy plays an important role in mediating snoring and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Conclusions Maternal snoring may increase the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, and being overweight or obese before pregnancy with snoring is remarkable for researchers. Further studies are still needed to confirm our results. PMID:26871434

  8. Using Chronic Pain Outcomes Data to Improve Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neel; Inturrisi, Charles E; Horn, Susan D; Witkin, Lisa R

    2016-06-01

    Standardization of care that is derived from analysis of outcomes data can lead to improvements in quality and efficiency of care. The outcomes data should be validated, standardized, and integrated into ongoing patient care with minimal burden on the patient and health care team. This article describes the organization and workflow of a chronic pain clinic registry designed to collect and analyze patient data for quality improvement and dissemination. Future efforts in using mobile technology and integrating patient-reported outcome data in the electronic health records have the potential to offer new and improved models of comprehensive pain management. PMID:27208717

  9. Neighborhood conditions are associated with maternal health behaviors and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vinikoor-Imler, L.C.; Messer, L.C.; Evenson, K.R.; Laraia, B.A.

    2016-01-01

    Women residing in neighborhoods of low socioeconomic status are more likely to experience adverse reproductive outcomes; however, few studies explore which specific neighborhood features are associated with poor maternal health behaviors and pregnancy outcomes. Based upon our conceptual model, directly observed street-level data from four North Carolina US counties were used to create five neighborhood indices: physical incivilities (neighborhood degradation), social spaces (public space for socializing), walkability (walkable neighborhoods), borders (property boundaries), and arterial features (traffic safety). Singleton birth records (2001–2005) were obtained from the North Carolina State Center for Vital Statistics and maternal health behavior information (smoking, inadequate or excessive weight gain) and pregnancy outcomes (pregnancy-induced hypertension/pre-eclampsia, low birthweight, preterm birth) were abstracted. Race-stratified random effect models were used to estimate associations between neighborhood indices and women’s reproductive behaviors and outcomes. In adjusted models, higher amounts of physical incivilities were positively associated with maternal smoking and inadequate weight gain, while walkability was associated with lower odds of these maternal health behaviors. Social spaces were also associated with inadequate weight gain during pregnancy. Among pregnancy outcomes, high levels of physical incivilities were consistently associated with all adverse pregnancy outcomes, and high levels of walkability were inversely associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension and preterm birth for Non-Hispanic white women only. None of the indices were associated with adverse birth outcomes for Non-Hispanic black women. In conclusion, certain neighborhood conditions were associated with maternal health behaviors and pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21920650

  10. Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and Adolescents' Sexual Outcomes: An Experiential Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an experiential approach to teen pregnancy (TP) prevention called "Baby Think It Over," a computerized infant simulator, on adolescents' attitudes and behaviors regarding teen pregnancy and sexuality. Recently, a more realistic model called "Real Care Baby" was developed. The small amount of research on…

  11. Variation in outcomes in trials reporting effects of diet and lifestyle based intervention on pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rogozinska, E; Fen, Y; Molyneaux, E; Khan, K S; Thangaratinam, S

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is a growing threat to women of childbearing age. Increased maternal weight or excessive weight gain in pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Interventions based on diet and physical activity minimise gestational weight gain with varied effect on a number of clinical outcomes. There is no consensus amongst the trialists on the core outcomes that need to be reported to inform the clinical care of pregnant women. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate variation in the type and quality of outcomes reported in systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials on diet and lifestyle interventions on maternal and fetal outcomes. We will assess the correlation between the type of outcome, the quality of the studies and journal impact factor. We searched the major databases from the inception to October 2013 without language restrictions. We used current recommendations for quality of outcome reporting using a 6-point scale. The quality assessment of systematic reviews and RCTs was performed using the AMSTAR and Jadad scoring systems. Additionally we obtained journals' impact factor in the year of publication. We calculated Spearman rank coefficient to assess the correlation between the type of outcome, and study quality. An overview of outcome reporting will show the current attitude of the researchers towards outcomes of importance when conducting trials on diet and lifestyle management in pregnancy. If our abstract is accepted, we will provide the details of the results. PMID:26104628

  12. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: Opportunity for Analysis of Biospecimens and Co-development of Prognostics | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Pregnancy and Perinatology Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to: (i) evaluate data and samples taken from women for potential biomarkers indicative for adverse pregnancy outcomes and (ii) co-develop diagnostic kits useful as predictors of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  13. What is the best treatment of heterotopic cervical pregnancies for a successful pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Won; Park, Han Moie; Lee, Woo Sik

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic pregnancy is rare event and the risk is increased with assisted reproductive technology procedures. Heterotopic cervical pregnancy is even more unusual. We report a rare case of heterotopic cervical pregnancy that was managed successfully. A 36-year-old women who conceived by IVF-ICSI was diagnosed with heterotopic cervical pregnancy. She visited the emergency room with vaginal bleeding at 5 weeks of gestation and underwent careful intracervical gestational sac reduction with forceps under abdominal guidance the next day. The postoperative course was uneventful and with regular check-ups, the intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) progressed unremarkably through 41 weeks with delivery of a healthy newborn. We reviewed a total of 37 cases of heterotopic pregnancy that have been reported in the English language literature. There have been many attempts to eliminate the cervical embryo while preserving the IUP, and complete cervical evacuation is important in order to avoid infection, bleeding, and premature birth. PMID:23346531

  14. Successful pregnancy outcome in a woman with Turner’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, A; O’Connell, I; Naqvi, N

    2014-01-01

    Women with Turner’s syndrome have a high incidence of cardiovascular complications, endocrine and hypertensive disorders. Those with the 45X chromosome complement require oocyte donation and in vitro fertilisation to conceive. Pregnancies in such women are challenging to manage due to the high risk of pregnancy-related hypertensive disorders, impaired glucose tolerance, fetal growth restriction and preterm birth. Women also need to be aware of the significant risk of aortic dilatation, dissection or rupture in pregnancy, which may be fatal. Despite these risks, favourable obstetric outcomes are achievable with careful pre-pregnancy counselling and cardiovascular assessment, intensive multidisciplinary antenatal monitoring and individualised delivery planning. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman with Turner’s syndrome, pre-existing hypertension, insulin-dependent diabetes and primary hypoparathyroidism who had a successful pregnancy with good maternal and fetal outcomes despite the complexity of her medical conditions.

  15. Isolated Single Umbilical Artery in Twin Pregnancies and its Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes - A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Raiz, Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Single umbilical artery is the most common congenital abnormality of the umbilical cord and is seen in 4-11% of twin pregnancies. It is usually associated with intrauterine growth retardation, preterm labour, small-for-dates and other structural anomalies. There is no significant difference in the incidence between monochorionic and dichorionic twins. The left artery is usually absent more commonly than the right. The female co-twin was predominantly more affected than their male counterparts. Single umbilical artery is found twice more common in white women than in Afro-Asians and Americans. The hemodynamic disturbances occur early in the embryonic development, influence greatly in the development of single umbilical artery. Genetic and environmental factors also play a major role in the development of this anomaly. The pregnancies with single umbilical artery were classified as high risk group, because the overall perinatal mortality rate was estimated to be as high as 20%. There is a significant increase in the occurrence of single umbilical artery in pregnancies due to artificial reproductive technologies, as well as in spontaneous miscarriages. Prenatal ultrasonography is the principal diagnostic technique employed to identify single umbilical artery during 3rd trimester of pregnancy. The present case, reports the presence of a single umbilical artery in a monozygotic, monochorionic twin pregnancy, which is acardiac-acephalic fetus, small for dates, female sex, associated with other major structural anomalies, and was still born. Authors analyse its incidence, clinical presentations and pregnancy outcome and also review the pertinent literature. PMID:25737967

  16. Characterization of the Risks of Adverse Outcomes Following Rubella Infection in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Simons, Emily A; Badizadegan, Kamran; Reef, Susan E; Cooper, Louis Z

    2016-07-01

    Although most infections with the rubella virus result in relatively minor sequelae, rubella infection in early pregnancy may lead to severe adverse outcomes for the fetus. First recognized in 1941, congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) can manifest with a diverse range of symptoms, including congenital cataracts, glaucoma, and cardiac defects, as well as hearing and intellectual disability. The gestational age of the fetus at the time of the maternal rubella infection impacts the probability and severity of outcomes, with infection in early pregnancy increasing the risks of spontaneous termination (miscarriage), fetal death (stillbirth), birth defects, and reduced survival for live-born infants. Rubella vaccination continues to change the epidemiology of rubella and CRS globally, but no models currently exist to evaluate the economic benefits of rubella management. This systematic review provides an overall assessment of the weight of the evidence for the outcomes associated with rubella infections in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy. We identified, evaluated, and graded 31 studies (all from developed countries) that reported on the pregnancy outcomes of at least 30 maternal rubella infections. We used the available evidence to estimate the increased risks of spontaneous termination, fetal death, infant death, and CRS as a function of the timing of rubella infection in pregnancy and decisions about induced termination. These data support the characterization of the disability-adjusted life years for outcomes associated with rubella infection in pregnancy. We find significant impacts associated with maternal rubella infections in early pregnancy, which economic analyses will miss if they only focus on live births of CRS cases. Our estimates of fetal loss from increased induced terminations due to maternal rubella infections provide context that may help to explain the relatively low numbers of observed CRS cases per year despite potentially large burdens of disease. Our

  17. Outcome of patients with pregnancy during or after breast cancer: a review of the recent literature

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, J.; Trudeau, M.E.; Chan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of young women are delaying childbearing; hence, more are diagnosed with breast cancer (bca) before having a family. No clear recommendations are currently available for counselling such a population on the safety of carrying a pregnancy during bca or becoming pregnant after treatment for bca. Methods Using a Web-based search of PubMed we reviewed the recent literature about bca and pregnancy. Our objective was to report outcomes for patients diagnosed with bca during pregnancy, comparing them with outcomes for non-pregnant women, and to evaluate prognosis in women diagnosed with and treated for bca who subsequently became pregnant. Results “Pregnancy and bca” should be divided into two entities. Pregnancy-associated bca tends to be more aggressive and advanced in stage at diagnosis than bca in control groups; hence, it has a poorer prognosis. With respect to pregnancy after bca, there is, despite the bias in reported studies and meta-analyses, no clear evidence for a different or worse disease outcome in bca patients who become pregnant after treatment compared with those who do not. Conclusions Pregnancy-associated bca should be treated as aggressively as and according to the standards applicable in nonpregnant women; pregnancy after bca does not jeopardize outcome. The guidelines addressing risks connected to pregnancy and bca lack a high level of evidence for better counselling young women about pregnancy considerations and preventing unnecessary abortions. Ideally, evidence from large prospective randomized trials would set better guidelines, and yet the complexity of such studies limits their feasibility. PMID:25848342

  18. Risk Factors and Birth Outcomes of Anaemia in Early Pregnancy in a Nulliparous Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Masukume, Gwinyai; Khashan, Ali S.; Kenny, Louise C.; Baker, Philip N.; Nelson, Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaemia in pregnancy is a major public health and economic problem worldwide, that contributes to both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Objective The aim of the study was to calculate the prevalence of anaemia in early pregnancy in a cohort of ‘low risk’ women participating in a large international multicentre prospective study (n = 5 609), to identify the modifiable risk factors for anaemia in pregnancy in this cohort, and to compare the birth outcomes between pregnancies with and without anaemia in early gestation. Methods The study is an analysis of data that were collected prospectively during the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints study. Anaemia was defined according to the World Health Organization’s definition of anaemia in pregnancy (haemoglobin < 11g/dL). Binary logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders (country, maternal age, having a marital partner, ethnic origin, years of schooling, and having paid work) was the main method of analysis. Results The hallmark findings were the low prevalence of anaemia (2.2%), that having no marital partner was an independent risk factor for having anaemia (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.01-1.78), and that there was no statistically significant effect of anaemia on adverse pregnancy outcomes (small for gestational age, pre-tem birth, mode of delivery, low birth weight, APGAR score < 7 at one and five minutes). Adverse pregnancy outcomes were however more common in those with anaemia than in those without. Conclusion In this low risk healthy pregnant population we found a low anaemia rate. The absence of a marital partner was a non-modifiable factor, albeit one which may reflect a variety of confounding factors, that should be considered for addition to anaemia’s conceptual framework of determinants. Although not statistically significant, clinically, a trend towards a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes was observed in women that were anaemic in early pregnancy. PMID:25875012

  19. Traffic pollution at the home address and pregnancy outcomes in Stockholm, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, David; Mogren, Ingrid; Eneroth, Kristina; Forsberg, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Background For the past two decades, several studies have reported associations between elevated levels of ambient air pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes, although with varying conclusions. Objectives To examine possible associations between the traffic pollution situation at the home address, for women who did not change address during pregnancy, and three types of pregnancy outcomes: spontaneous preterm delivery, children born small for gestational age (SGA) and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders. Methods We used data for the Greater Stockholm Area from the Swedish Medical Birth Register to construct a cohort based on all pregnancies conceived between July 1997 and March 2006, n=100 190. The pregnancy average nitrogen oxide, NOx, levels and annual mean daily vehicles at the home address were used as exposure variables. Mixed-model logistic regression was performed to assess any associations between exposure and outcome. Results There was an association between elevated traffic pollution exposure during pregnancy and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders. A 10 µg/m3 increase in the pregnancy average NOx level at the home address resulted in an OR of 1.17 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.26). The 2nd to 4th quartiles of NOx were all associated with an increased risk of SGA, but there was no difference in the risk estimate among the higher quartiles. There was a tendency of a higher risk of spontaneous preterm delivery in relation to higher levels of NOx. There was no evidence of an association between vehicle flow, the cruder indicator of traffic pollution, and the studied outcomes in this study. Conclusions In this large cohort, there was a fairly strong association between vehicle exhaust levels at the home address and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders, after adjustment for important risk factors. PMID:26275899

  20. Ondansetron in pregnancy and risk of adverse fetal outcomes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fejzo, Marlena S; MacGibbon, Kimber W; Mullin, Patrick M

    2016-07-01

    This is an analysis of fetal outcome in pregnancies exposed to ondansetron to treat Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG). In this retrospective cohort study, U.S. data on outcome were collected on 1070 pregnancies exposed to ondansetron and compared to outcomes in two control groups: 771 pregnancies in women with a history of HG with no ondansetron exposure and 1555 pregnancies with neither a history of HG nor ondansetron exposure. Ventricular septal defects were reported in 2/952 of infants in the HG/Ondansetron-exposure group and 4/1286 in the No HG/No Ondansetron-exposure group. Cleft palate was reported in 1/952 live births in the HG/Ondansetron and 2/1286 in the No HG/No Ondansetron-exposure groups. Women with a history of HG who took ondansetron reported less miscarriages and terminations, and higher live birth rates. The overall results do not support evidence of teratogenicity of ondansetron. PMID:27151373

  1. Measuring Stress Before and During Pregnancy: A Review of Population-Based Studies of Obstetric Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Whitney; Litzelman, Kristin; Cheng, Erika R; Wakeel, Fathima; Barker, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Mounting evidence from clinic and convenience samples suggests that stress is an important predictor of adverse obstetric outcomes. Using a proposed theoretical framework, this review identified and synthesized the population-based literature on the measurement of stress prior to and during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes. Methods Population-based, peer-reviewed empirical articles that examined stress prior to or during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes were identified in the PubMed and PsycInfo databases. Articles were evaluated to determine the domain(s) of stress (environmental, psychological, and/or biological), period(s) of stress (preconception and/or pregnancy), and strength of the association between stress and obstetric outcomes. Results Thirteen studies were evaluated. The identified studies were all conducted in developed countries. The majority of studies examined stress only during pregnancy (n=10); three examined stress during both the preconception and pregnancy periods (n=3). Most studies examined the environmental domain (e.g., life events) only (n=9), two studies examined the psychological domain only, and two studies examined both. No study incorporated a biological measure of stress. Environmental stressors before and during pregnancy were associated with worse obstetric outcomes, although some conflicting findings exist. Conclusions Few population-based studies have examined stress before or during pregnancy in relation to obstetric outcomes. Although considerable variation exists in the measurement of stress across studies, environmental stress increased the risk for poor obstetric outcomes. Additional work using a lifecourse approach is needed to fill the existing gaps in the literature and to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms by which stress impacts obstetric outcomes. PMID:23447085

  2. Significant roles played by interleukin-10 in outcome of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mobini, Masoud; Mortazavi, Maryam; Nadi, Somayeh; Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Pourtalebi, Somayeh; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced immune responses against fetus alloantigens can lead to abnormality in pregnancy. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays key roles in regulation of immune responses against self and foreign antigens to induce tolerance to these antigens. Therefore, alteration in expression of IL-10 during pregnancy may result in several pathologic conditions such as preterm labor. IL-10 leads to a normal pregnancy via several molecular mechanisms including development of tolerogenic dendritic cells, T regulatory lymphocytes and activation of the JAK1/STAT3 pathway in the target cells. This review has collected recent data regarding the status of IL-10 expression during term and preterm deliveries and also its molecular mechanisms that lead to a normal pregnancy. PMID:27081455

  3. Estimated Pregnancy Rates and Rates of Pregnancy Outcomes for the United States, 1990-2008

    MedlinePlus

    ... of decline slowed in the mid-2000s. The teenage pregnancy rate in 2008 was the lowest reported since ... 1708–12. 2000. 24. Kost K, Henshaw S. U.S. teenage pregnancies, births, and abortions, 2008: National trends by age, ...

  4. An update on diabetic women obstetrical outcomes linked to preconception and pregnancy glycemic profile: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Rossanese, Marta; Noventa, Marco; Berretta, Roberto; Di Gangi, Stefania; Bertin, Martina; Gangemi, Michele; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2013-01-01

    Women with type 2 diabetes were less likely to have diabetes related complications than women with type 1. Women with type 1 diabetes had a high prepregnancy care and showed a worse glycemic control than women with type 2 both in the preconception period and during pregnancy. Obstetrical outcomes showed that preeclampsia and stillbirth rate is almost doubled in type 1 patients while perinatal deaths and SGA importantly increased in type 2 diabetes. In modern obstetrical care it is mandatory to maintain glucose levels as close to normal as possible particularly in diabetic population. HbA1C no higher than 6% before pregnancy and during the first trimester seems to decrease the risk of adverse obstetrical outcomes. Both the preconceptional counseling and glycemic profile optimization represent a fundamental step to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with preexisting diabetes. A systematic approach to family planning and the availability of preconception care for all diabetic women who desire pregnancy could be an essential step for diabetic management program. PMID:24319351

  5. Psychiatric outcome of termination of pregnancy for foetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Iles, S; Gath, D

    1993-05-01

    Termination of pregnancy for foetal abnormality has become frequent with the increasing sophistication of techniques of antenatal diagnosis. The aim of this study was to obtain quantitative and qualitative information about psychiatric morbidity in women after termination of pregnancy for foetal abnormality. Two samples of women were compared. The first consisted of 71 women who had had a termination of pregnancy for foetal abnormality (FA group). The second consisted of 26 women who had experienced so-called missed abortion (MA group). Both groups had lost a pregnancy in the mid-trimester of pregnancy, but the MA group had no element of choice. Standardized psychiatric and social measures were used to assess both groups on three occasions after the termination. In both groups, 4 weeks after the termination psychiatric morbidity was high (four to five times higher than in the general population of women), and social adjustment was impaired. Six months and 12 months after the abortion, levels of psychiatric morbidity were near normal. Semi-structured interviewing was used to obtain information about the experience of grief after mid-trimester termination. For many women, symptoms of grief persisted throughout the year. These symptoms included typical features of grief as well as grief symptoms specific to pregnancy loss. The findings have implications for the counselling of women after termination for foetal abnormality or after missed abortion. PMID:8332657

  6. Pregnancy outcomes in sickle cell disease: a retrospective cohort study from two tertiary centres in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Chase, A R; Sohal, M; Howard, J; Laher, R; McCarthy, A; Layton, D M; Oteng-Ntim, E

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective cohort study from two tertiary centres in the UK was to describe the pregnancy outcomes of women with sickle cell disease (SCD) who booked at these centres between 2004 and 2008, and to compare this with historical data. The study population comprised 122 singleton pregnancies in women with SCD: homozygous sickle cell disease 64, sickle cell haemoglobin C disease 45, sickle b plus thalassaemia 11, sickle cell haemoglobin E disease 1 and sickle cell delta disease 1 from 2004 to 2008 managed in the joint haematology/obstetric antenatal clinics in two tertiary teaching hospitals. The main outcome measures were the frequency of sickle cell crises and obstetric complications. Age and gestation at booking were 18–43 years (mean 29.7) and 9–36 weeks gestation (mean 17.3), respectively. Complications of SCD occurred in 25% of pregnancies. Fifty-four percent of women had induction of labour and 39% were delivered by emergency caesarean section. Thirty-three percent had a postpartum haemorrhage. Nineteen percent of women delivered before 37 completed weeks. Birth weight below 2500 g occurred in 20% of singleton pregnancies. Three neonates developed transient complications related to maternal opiate exposure postnatally. Three intrauterine deaths occurred at 24, 29 and 34 weeks. Two of these had congenital defects, and the other severe intrauterine growth restriction. No maternal deaths occurred. Successful pregnancy outcomes can be achieved in SCD. There has been an improvement in fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality compared with historical data. Pregnancy in women with SCD remains high risk. Early access to antenatal care and to expertise in SCD is essential. A matched control population from the same time period and prospective data collection is needed to address confounders such as ethnicity and deprivation.

  7. ENDOCRINOLOGY IN PREGNANCY: Influence of maternal vitamin D status on obstetric outcomes and the fetal skeleton.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rebecca J; Harvey, Nicholas C; Cooper, Cyrus

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin D status has been increasingly associated with wide-ranging clinical outcomes. There is now a wealth of observational studies reporting on its associations with obstetric complications, including pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes and the mode and timing of delivery. The findings are inconsistent, and currently there is a lack of data from high-quality intervention studies to confirm a causal role for vitamin D in these outcomes. This is similarly true with regards to fetal development, including measures of fetal size and skeletal mineralisation. Overall, there is an indication of possible benefits of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy for offspring birthweight, calcium concentrations and bone mass as well as for reduced maternal pre-eclampsia. However, for none of these outcomes is the current evidence base conclusive, and the available data justify the instatement of high-quality randomised placebo controlled trials in a range of populations and health care settings to establish the potential efficacy and safety of vitamin D supplementation to improve particular outcomes. PMID:25862787

  8. Pregnancy outcomes in women with transposition of the great arteries and arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Daniel; Fernandes, Susan M; Wald, Rachel M; Landzberg, Michael; Salehian, Omid; Siu, Samuel C; Colman, Jack M; Sermer, Matthew; Silversides, Candice K

    2010-08-01

    There is a growing population of young women of child-bearing age with complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA) who have had an arterial switch operation (ASO). Pregnancy imposes a hemodynamic stress on the heart and, therefore, adverse cardiac events can occur during this period; however, pregnancy outcomes in this population have not been well studied. We sought to describe cardiac outcomes during pregnancy in women with TGA who had undergone an ASO in childhood. Women were identified from 2 large tertiary care hospitals. A retrospective chart review was performed to determine the prevalence of adverse maternal cardiac events during pregnancy. Overall, 74 women of child-bearing age were identified, 9 of whom had 17 pregnancies. There were 4 miscarriages. Six women (67%) had clinically important valve (n = 5) and ventricular (n = 1) lesions before the index pregnancy. Two women developed cardiac complications during pregnancy; 1 woman with impaired left ventricular systolic function had nonsustained ventricular tachycardia and 1 woman with a mechanical systemic atrioventricular valve developed postpartum valve thrombosis. There were no maternal deaths. In conclusion, young women with TGA from this early cohort repaired with ASO are reaching child-bearing age. A significant proportion have residua and/or sequelae that can confer risk for adverse cardiac events in pregnancy. Co-ordinated care between a congenital heart disease specialist and a high-risk obstetrician should be implemented. PMID:20643256

  9. Mast Cell-Mediated and Associated Disorders in Pregnancy: A Risky Game with an Uncertain Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Woidacki, Katja; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Siebenhaar, Frank

    2014-01-01

    During pregnancy, the maternal organism is under the influence of tremendous endocrine as well as immunological changes as an adaptation to the implanted and developing fetus. In most cases, the maternal adaptations to pregnancy ensure both, the protection against harmful pathogens and the tolerance toward the growing semi-allogeneic fetus. However, under certain circumstances the unique hormonal milieu during pregnancy is causative of a shift into an unfavorable direction. Of particular importance are cellular disorders previous to pregnancy that involve cell types known for their susceptibility to hormones. One interesting cell type is the mast cell (MC), one of the key figures in allergic disorders. While physiological numbers of MCs were shown to positively influence pregnancy outcome, at least in mouse models, uncontrolled augmentations in quantity, and/or activation can lead to pregnancy complications. Women that have the desire of getting pregnant and been diagnosed with MC mediated disorders such as urticaria and mastocytosis or chronic inflammatory diseases in which MCs are involved, including atopic dermatitis, asthma, or psoriasis, may benefit from specialized medical assistance to ensure a positive pregnancy outcome. In the present review, we address the course of pregnancy in women affected by MC mediated or associated disorders. PMID:24904581

  10. Pregnancy Outcome of Women With Gestational Diabetes in a Tertiary Level Hospital of North India

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pikee; Tyagi, Swati; Prakash, Anupam; Nigam, Aruna; Trivedi, Shubha Sagar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) pose an important public health problem because diabetes not only affects the maternal and fetal outcome, but these women and their fetuses are also at an increased risk of developing diabetes and related complications later in their life. Objectives: The study was conducted to determine the maternal and fetal outcomes of 50 diabetic vs 50 normoglycemic pregnancies. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analytical record-based study conducted in a tertiary level hospital. Detailed information regarding maternal, fetal, and labor outcome parameters was recorded in a prestructured proforma and compared in normoglycemic and diabetic pregnancies. Results: Patients with obesity, history of diabetes in the family, spontaneous abortions, and gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies had a greater incidence of GDM in current pregnancy (P<0.05 for all). Hypertension, polyhydramnios, macrosomia, fetopelvic disproportion, and cesarean sections were more (P<0.001) among diabetic pregnancies. Congenital anomalies, polycythemia, hypocalcemia, and hyperbilirubinemia were also observed to be more (P<0.05) in neonates born to diabetics, suggesting an adverse effect of hyperglycemia in utero. Conclusion: Diabetes during pregnancy is associated with higher maternal and fetal morbidity. Therefore, early screening, detection, close monitoring, and intervention is essential to reduce maternal and fetal short- and long-term adverse effects, especially in high-risk groups. Pregnancy provides an opportunity to the clinician to control the disease process and inculcate healthy lifestyle practices in these patients. PMID:21976796

  11. Aluminium sulphate in water in north Cornwall and outcome of pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Golding, J; Rowland, A; Greenwood, R; Lunt, P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether the excess aluminum sulphate accidentally added to the local water supply in north Cornwall in July 1988 had an adverse effect on the outcome of pregnancies. DESIGN--Outcomes of all singleton pregnancies in the affected area at the time of the incident (n = 92) were compared with those in two control groups: pregnancies in this area completed before the incident (n = 68) and pregnancies in a neighbouring area (n = 193). SUBJECTS--Mothers in the three groups, among whom there were 13 miscarriages, five terminations of pregnancy, and 336 live births. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Fetal and perinatal loss, birth weight, gestation, obstetric complications, neonatal condition, and congenital defects. RESULTS--Among 88 pregnancies in women exposed to excess aluminum sulphate there was no excess of perinatal deaths (n = 0), low birthweight (n = 3), preterm delivery (n = 4), or severe congenital malformations (n = 0). There was, however, an increased rate of talipes in exposed fetuses (four cases, one control; p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS--Because of small numbers it is not possible to say that high doses of aluminum sulphate are safe in pregnancy, but there is no evidence from this study of major problems apparent at birth. PMID:2043811

  12. Abnormal maternal serum alpha fetoprotein and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Zarzour, S J; Gabert, H A; Diket, A L; St Amant, M; Miller, J M

    1998-01-01

    The objective was to assess the occurrence of miscarriages, low birth weight, and karyotype abnormalities found with low and elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) among women who had genetic amniocentesis performed. A retrospective study of 2,159 women who had MSAFP analysis prior to amniocentesis was conducted. Pregnancy outcomes were obtained from record review and physicians follow-up. Limits of MSAFP used in analysis were <0.5 adjusted multiples of the median (MOM) (lower levels) and >2.0 MOM (upper levels). Autosomal trisomy was found in 1.6% with low, 0.9% normal, and 0.6% with elevated MSAFP values. Sex chromosome abnormalities were present only in patients with normal MSAFP, [45X (n = 6), 47XXY (n = 2), 69XXX]. Of five open neural tube defects, four had elevated MSAFP and one had a normal value. Omphalocele was identified in four patients, two with normal and two with elevated MSAFP. Gastroschisis was found in one low and one elevated MSAFP. Amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein (AFAFP) values did not correlate with MSAFP values. Patients with low MSAFP levels had a greater prevalence of abnormal karyotype (19 of 249, prevalence = 0.076) than patients with an elevated MSAFP level (2 or 166, prevalence = 0.012 OR (odds ratio) = 0.20 (P value = 0.024) when unadjusted for maternal age, and OR = 0.09 (P value = 0.001) when adjusted for maternal age. Spontaneous abortion occurred more often in patients with elevated (4 of 166, or 4%) than normal or low (20 of 1948, or 1%) values of MSAFP (odds ratio 4.32, P = 0.020 when adjusted for maternal age). Birth weight below 2,500 g was present less frequently with low or normal MSAFP (136 of 1,760, or 7.7%) than in elevated MSAFP (21 of 144 or 14.6%) (odds ratio 2.04, P = 0.005, unadjusted; and odds ratio = 2.32, P = 0.003, adjusted for maternal age). Female fetuses were present more often with low MSAFP (136 of 249, or 55%) than elevated levels 43% (71 of 164, or 43%; P = 0.024). We conclude that patients

  13. Alanine aminotransferase as a predictor of adverse perinatal outcomes in women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ekiz, Ali; Kaya, Basak; Avci, Muhittin Eftal; Polat, Ibrahim; Dikmen, Selin; Yildirim, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the associations between adverse perinatal outcomes and serum transaminase levels at the time of diagnosis in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized for evaluation of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy from January 2013 to June 2014 in a tertiary center. Seventy-one patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (Group I) or absence of adverse perinatal outcomes (Group II). Results: The mean aminotransferase levels and conjugated bilirubin levels at the time of diagnosis were significantly higher in Group I than in Group II. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the alanine aminotransferase level could predict adverse perinatal outcomes with 76.47% sensitivity and 78.38% specificity, and the cut-off value was 95 IU/L. Among patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, those with adverse perinatal outcomes were significantly older, had an earlier diagnosis, and had higher alanine aminotransferase levels. Using the 95-IU/L cut-off value, patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy had a 3.54-fold increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes. Conclusions: Patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and high alanineaminotransferase levels should be followed up for possible adverse perinatal outcomes.

  14. Adverse Perinatal Outcome in Subsequent Pregnancy after Stillbirth by Placental Vascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monari, Francesca; Pedrielli, Giulia; Vergani, Patrizia; Pozzi, Elisa; Mecacci, Federico; Serena, Caterina; Neri, Isabella; Facchinetti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate outcome in the pregnancy following a stillbirth (SB) by a placental vascular disorders. Study Design A prospective, observational, multicenter study was conducted in woman with a history of stillbirth (> 22 weeks) between 2005 and June 2013, in 3 Italian University Hospitals. Causes of SB were previously identified after extensive investigations. Pregnant women were enrolled within the first trimester. The main outcome was “adverse neonatal outcome”, including perinatal death, fetal growth restriction, early preterm birth <33+6 weeks, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial hemorrhage or respiratory distress. Results Out of 364 index pregnancies, 320 women (87.9%) had a subsequent pregnancy during the study period. Forty-seven had an early pregnancy loss. Out of 273 babies, 67 (24.5%) had an adverse perinatal outcome, including 1 SB and 1 early neonatal death (3.7/1000). Women who had a SB related to placental vascular disorders (39.6%), were at higher risk of an adverse neonatal outcome compared with women whose SB was unexplained or resulted from other causes (Adj. OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.8). Moreover, also obesity independently predicts an adverse perinatal outcome (Adj OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.1–4.3). Conclusion When previous SB is related to placental vascular disorders there is a high risk for adverse neonatal outcomes in the subsequent pregnancy. Maternal obesity is an additional risk factor. PMID:27228078

  15. Maternal employment during pregnancy and birth outcomes: evidence from Danish siblings.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    I use Danish survey and administrative data to examine the impact of maternal employment during pregnancy on birth outcomes. As healthier mothers are more likely to work and health shocks to mothers may impact employment and birth outcomes, I combine two strategies: First, I control extensively for time-varying factors that may correlate with employment and birth outcomes, such as pre-pregnancy family income and maternal occupation, pregnancy-related health shocks, maternal sick listing, and health behaviors (smoking and alcohol consumption). Second, to account for remaining time-invariant heterogeneity between mothers, I compare outcomes of mothers' consecutive children. Mothers who work during the first pregnancy trimester have a lower risk of preterm birth. I find no effect on the probability of having a baby of small size for gestational age. To rule out that health selection of mothers between pregnancies drives the results, I focus on mothers whose change in employment status is likely not to be driven by underlying health (mothers who are students in one of their pregnancies and mothers with closely spaced births). Given generous welfare benefits and strict workplace regulations in Denmark, my findings support a residual explanation, namely, that exclusion from employment may stress mothers in countries with high-female employment rates. PMID:24777685

  16. Mitral valve disease in pregnancy: outcomes and management

    PubMed Central

    Tsiaras, Sarah; Poppas, Athena

    2009-01-01

    Young women may have asymptomatic mitral valve disease which becomes unmasked during the haemodynamic stress of pregnancy. Rheumatic mitral stenosis is the most common cardiac disease found in women during pregnancy. The typical increased volume and heart rate of pregnancy are not well tolerated in patients with more than mild stenosis. Maternal complications of atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure can occur, and are increased in patients with poor functional class and severe pulmonary artery hypertension. Patients can be diagnosed by echocardiography and symptoms treated with beta-1 antagonists and cautious diuresis. Patients with heart failure unresponsive to treatment can undergo percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty. Labour and delivery goals include reducing tachycardia by adequate pain control and minimized volume shifts. Mitral valve regurgitation, even when severe, is usually very well tolerated in pregnancy as the increase in volume is offset by a decrease in vascular resistance. On the other hand, patients with left ventricular dysfunction, moderate pulmonary hypertension or NYHA functional class III-IV are at increased risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. They may need cautious diuresis and limitations on physical activity during pregnancy, as well as invasive haemodynamic monitoring for labour and delivery. Vaginal delivery is preferred and caesarean section reserved for obstetric indications.

  17. The Effect of School-Based Health Clinics on Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Outcomes: An Integrated Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunk, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy outcomes have become an increasing concern in the United States. Education and support of pregnant teens are critical factors that may determine good or poor pregnancy outcomes. Poor outcomes may include low birth weight, developmental delays, and poor academic performance. Although the number of teenagers experiencing pregnancy…

  18. Improving access to emergency contraception under the Scottish Sexual Health Strategy: can rates of unintended pregnancy be reduced?

    PubMed

    McGowan, James G

    2013-09-01

    Unintended pregnancy is a global sexual health problem. Outcomes of unintended pregnancy include unwanted childbirth and abortion, which may be associated with negative physical and psychosocial health implications for women. In Scotland, the Scottish Sexual Health Strategy has the stated goal of improving the sexual health of the people of Scotland. One aim of the Strategy is to reduce rates of unintended pregnancy and one policy designed to achieve this is 'widening access to emergency contraception'. This paper examines the success of this policy with reference to the implicit link it makes between expanding access to emergency contraception and increasing its effective use, aiming thereby to reduce rates of unintended pregnancy. Since there is evidence that previous policies and strategies expanding access to emergency contraception have failed to reduce such rates, alternative approaches to achieve a reduction in unintended pregnancies are discussed. PMID:24007249

  19. Pregnancy outcome in dairy and beef cattle after artificial insemination and treatment with seminal plasma or transforming growth factor beta-1.

    PubMed

    Odhiambo, J F; Poole, D H; Hughes, L; Dejarnette, J M; Inskeep, E K; Dailey, R A

    2009-09-01

    Reduced capability of the uterus to support pregnancy in the absence of its interaction with secretions from male accessory glands has been demonstrated in rodents and to some extent in pigs. However, in cattle, the role of postmating inflammatory response on pregnancy success has not been studied. The current study examined the influence of uterine presensitization with seminal antigens at breeding on pregnancy outcome in cows. Lactating beef (n=1090) and dairy (n=800) cows received 0.5 mL seminal plasma (SP), 40 ng recombinant human transforming growth factor-beta1 (rhTGF-beta1), or 0.5 mL bovine serum albumin (BSA), or were left untreated before or at insemination. Semen was deposited into the anterior cervix using a second insemination gun. Pregnancy was diagnosed at 35 to 40 d postinsemination by transrectal ultrasonography or from records of calves born the subsequent calving season. Pregnancy rates in beef cows did not differ among treatments but differed among trials (69.8%, 52.5% vs. 40.3%; P<0.05). In trials where average pregnancy rates were below 50%, treatments with TGF-beta1 but not SP tended (P<0.07) to increase pregnancy rates in beef cows. In dairy cows, SP and TGF-beta1 improved pregnancy outcome by 10 percentage points, but these increments did not achieve statistical significance. In conclusion, this study did not find any conclusive evidence for the effect of TGF-beta1 or seminal plasma on pregnancy outcome in lactating dairy or beef cows but realized marginal improvements when pregnancy rates were below 50% (compromised fertility). PMID:19501392

  20. [Low Back Pain in Pregnancy: Diagnosis, Treatment Options and Outcomes].

    PubMed

    Mühlemann, Daniel; Mühlemann, Malin B

    2015-05-20

    Low back pain in pregnancy is a common occurrence and is mainly caused by hormonal and biomechanical changes. Patients with pregnancy-induced low back pain (PILBP) frequently complain of moderate to severe and disabling pain often restricting their daily activities. In these cases, a “watch and wait” approach cannot be the best solution. On the basis of anamnesis and examination PILBP can be divided into three subgroups: pregnancy-related low back pain (PLBP), pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and the combination of PLBP and PGP. The three entities ask for different diagnostic workups and therapeutic modalities. There are many possible treatments for PLBP, however, only a few are based on sound evidence. Information and advice, exercise and training programs, acupuncture, stabilizing belts and analgesic medication can have a positive impact on pain and disability. PGP und PLBP respond well to chiropractic interventions. PMID:26098153

  1. Pregnancy Outcomes in Liver and Cardiothoracic Transplant Recipients: A UK National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Ahmed, Olaa; Nelson-Piercy, Cathy; Bramham, Kate; Gao, Haiyan; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J.; Brocklehurst, Peter; Knight, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are an increasing number of reports of pregnancy in transplant recipients but many questions remain regarding the effect of the transplant on pregnancy outcome, the pregnancy on the graft and the medication on the fetus. The majority of studies reporting outcomes in transplant recipients have focused on women with kidney transplants, and have included retrospective, voluntary registries or single centre studies. Methods The UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) was used to prospectively identify all pregnant women with a liver or cardiothoracic transplant in the United Kingdom, between January 2007 and January 2012. Data were collected on demographics, transplant characteristics, immunosuppression regimens, antenatal care, maternal, graft and neonatal outcomes. In an exploratory analysis, we tested for associations between “poor fetal outcome” and medications used before or during pregnancy. Results and conclusions We report 62 pregnancies in 56 liver transplant recipients and 14 pregnancies in 14 cardiothoracic transplant recipients (including 10 heart, three lung and one heart-lung recipient). Liver transplant recipients, in comparison to cardiothoracic, had similar livebirth rates (92% vs. 87%) but better fetal outcomes (median gestational age 38 weeks vs. 35 weeks; median birthweight 2698 g vs. 2365 g), fewer caesarean deliveries (47% vs. 62%), fewer maternal intensive care (ICU) admissions (19% vs. 29%) and fewer neonatal ICU admissions (25% vs. 54%). Nine women (12%) were taking mycophenolate mofetil at conception, which was associated with adverse fetal outcomes. Pregnancy in transplant recipients may have successful outcomes, but complication rates are high, emphasising the role of pre-conception counselling and further research into the long-term effect on maternal and graft survival rates. PMID:24586554

  2. Pregnancy outcome of 149 pregnancies in women with epilepsy: Experience from a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Mustafa Erkan; Kurt, Aslihan; Sakar, Vefa Selimova; Atalay, Cemal Resat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Epilepsy has a prevalence of 1.65% in adults, and every 1 in 200 pregnancies encounters its complications. We aimed to present the existing condition of and our experience with epileptic pregnant women for whom the prepregnancy counseling is inadequate in Turkey. Methods We evaluated 149 epileptic pregnant women between March 2009 and January 2015. Demographic features of the patients, along with type and duration of epileptic seizure, time of diagnosis, date of last seizure prior to pregnancy, number and duration of seizures during pregnancy, type of AEDs, result and week of termination of pregnancy, and birth weight were registered, and also, we evaluated perinatal complications and fetal malformations. Results Mean age of the patients was 27.12 ± 5.4 years, and mean duration from the diagnosis of epilepsy to pregnancy was 9.68 ± 5.91 years. Twenty-seven (18.12%) and 101 (67.78%) patients had polytherapy and monotherapy, respectively. We observed epileptic seizures in 103 (69.12%) patients during pregnancy, and seizures mostly occurred in the first and third trimesters. Forty-one (39.80%) patients had seizures in all three trimesters. Forty-two (28.18%) patients among all patients who had seizures during pregnancy had 5 or more seizures. Major malformations, namely, cleft lip and palate, ventriculoseptal defect, and spina bifida were observed in the patients. Mean birth week was 38.43 ± 1.68 weeks, and mean birth weight was 2965.31 ± 453.94 grams. Twenty-two patients had normal spontaneous vaginal delivery whereas 118 patients had cesarean section. Conclusions Pregnant women with epilepsy have their own risks. These women should be followed by experienced obstetricians and neurologists during their pregnancies. Appropriate management and follow-up lead to good results almost the same as general population. PMID:26527567

  3. Vitamin D inadequacy in pregnancy: biology, outcomes, and interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high prevalence of maternal vitamin D inadequacy during pregnancy and at delivery has been demonstrated in various ethnic populations living at different latitudes. Because placental transfer of 25(OH)D is the major source of vitamin D to the developing human fetus, there is growing concern about ...

  4. Outcomes in Women Receiving Low-Molecular Weight Heparin During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Desancho, Maria T.; Khalid, Sana; Christos, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the rate and type of maternal and infant complications among pregnant women receiving low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). Study Design Retrospective study of pregnant women on LMWH referred to two university hematology clinics from January 2001 to December 2010. We recorded the number of pregnancies, indication, dose and dose adjustments for LMWH, pregnancy outcomes (live births, maternal and infant complications) and side effects of LMWH. Results There were 89 pregnancies in 76 women. The most common indication for LMWH was a history of adverse outcome of pregnancy associated with thrombophilia. LMWH was adjusted in 75% and 45% of pregnancies in women on therapeutic and prophylactic doses, respectively. Live birth rate was 97%. There were 25 maternal and 11 infant complications. Side effects were minimal and included decreased bone mineral density and bleeding. Conclusion LMWH use among pregnant women is associated with successful pregnancy outcomes. While side effects were minimal, maternal and infant complications occurred in 28% and 12% of cases, respectively. PMID:22964770

  5. The 2011 Survey on Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy (HDP) in China: Prevalence, Risk Factors, Complications, Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chun; Ruan, Yan; Zou, Liying; Li, Guanghui; Li, Changdong; Chen, Yi; Jia, Chaoxia; Megson, Ian L.; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are a group of medical complications in pregnancy and also a risk factor for severe pregnancy outcomes, but it lacks a large-scale epidemiological investigation in recent years. This survey represents a multicenter cross-sectional retrospective study to estimate the prevalence and analyze the risk factors for HDP among the pregnant women who had referred for delivery between January 1st 2011 and December 31st 2011 in China Mainland. A total of 112,386 pregnant women were investigated from 38 secondary and tertiary specialized or general hospitals randomly selected across the country, of which 5,869 had HDP, accounting for 5.22% of all pregnancies. There were significant differences in the prevalence of HDP between geographical regions, in which the North China showed the highest (7.44%) and Central China showed the lowest (1.23%). Of six subtypes of HDP, severe preeclampsia accounted for 39.96%, gestational hypertension for 31.40%, mild preeclampsia for 15.13%, chronic hypertension in pregnancy for 6.00%, preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension for 3.68% and eclampsia for 0.89%. A number of risk factors for HDP were identified, including twin pregnancy, age of >35 years, overweight and obesity, primipara, history of hypertension as well as family history of hypertension and diabetes. The prevalence of pre-term birth, placental abruption and postpartum hemorrhage were significantly higher in women with HDP than those without HDP. The possible risk factors confirmed in this study may be useful for the development of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of HDP. PMID:24937406

  6. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  7. The Maternal Microbiome and Pregnancy Outcomes that Impact Infant Health: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mulle, Jennifer G.; Ferranti, Erin P.; Edwards, Sara; Dunn, Alexis B.; Corwin, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The maternal microbiome is recognized as a key determinant of a range of important maternal and child health outcomes, and together with perinatal factors influences the infant microbiome. This manuscript provides a summary review of research investigating: (1) the role of the maternal microbiome in pregnancy outcomes known to adversely influence neonatal and infant health, including preterm birth, cardiometabolic complications of pregnancy such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes, and excessive gestational weight gain; (2) factors with an established link to adverse pregnancy outcomes that are known to influence the composition of the maternal microbiome; and (3) strategies for promoting a healthy maternal microbiome, recognizing that much more research is needed in this area. PMID:26317856

  8. Assessing health and economic outcomes of interventions to reduce pregnancy-related mortality in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Women in Nigeria face some of the highest maternal mortality risks in the world. We explore the benefits and cost-effectiveness of individual and integrated packages of interventions to prevent pregnancy-related deaths. Methods We adapt a previously validated maternal mortality model to Nigeria. Model outcomes included clinical events, population measures, costs, and cost-effectiveness ratios. Separate models were adapted to Southwest and Northeast zones using survey-based data. Strategies consisted of improving coverage of effective interventions, and could include improved logistics. Results Increasing family planning was the most effective individual intervention to reduce pregnancy-related mortality, was cost saving in the Southwest zone and cost-effective elsewhere, and prevented nearly 1 in 5 abortion-related deaths. However, with a singular focus on family planning and safe abortion, mortality reduction would plateau below MDG 5. Strategies that could prevent 4 out of 5 maternal deaths included an integrated and stepwise approach that includes increased skilled deliveries, facility births, access to antenatal/postpartum care, improved recognition of referral need, transport, and availability quality of EmOC in addition to family planning and safe abortion. The economic benefits of these strategies ranged from being cost-saving to having incremental cost-effectiveness ratios less than $500 per YLS, well below Nigeria’s per capita GDP. Conclusions Early intensive efforts to improve family planning and control of fertility choices, accompanied by a stepwise effort to scale-up capacity for integrated maternal health services over several years, will save lives and provide equal or greater value than many public health interventions we consider among the most cost-effective (e.g., childhood immunization). PMID:22978519

  9. Azathioprine during pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus patients is not associated with poor fetal outcome.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez, Antonio; Morales, Sara; Ángeles, Ulises; Jara, Luis Javier

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk of adverse fetal outcome in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) women exposed to azathioprine during pregnancy. We reviewed the medical records of SLE pregnant women followed from January 2005 to April 2013. The patients were evaluated at least once in each trimester and postpartum. Relevant fetal outcomes were extracted, such as rate of liveborns, fetal loss (spontaneous abortion and stillbirth), term delivery, preterm birth, neonatal death, low birth weight, low birth weight at term, and congenital malformations. A detailed history of drug use during pregnancy was obtained. We studied 178 pregnancies (in 172 women), 87 of them were exposed to azathioprine (AZA-group) and the remaining 91 were not exposed (NO AZA-group). Exposure to other drugs was similar in both groups. The rate of live births, spontaneous abortions mean birth weight, weeks of gestation, rate of birth weight <2500 g, and low birth weight at term did not differ between groups. No infant had major congenital abnormalities. Multivariate analysis showed that preeclampsia, premature rupture of membranes (PROM), lupus flare, and anti-DNA positive were associated with an increased risk of poor fetal outcome. Our study suggests that the use of azathioprine is safe and lacks of teratogenity in patients with SLE and pregnancy. Exposure to azathioprine during pregnancy is not associated with poor fetal outcome. PMID:26050103

  10. Myophosphorylase deficiency (McArdle disease) in a patient with normal pregnancy and normal pregnancy outcome

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Warwick; Maher, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    McArdle disease is a rare, mostly autosomal recessive disorder of deficient myophosphorylation of glycogen in skeletal muscles. Recent knowledge regarding this condition means that women of childbearing age with McArdle disease can expect to labour normally without ill effect. We report a case of a 30-year-old woman in her first pregnancy who had an episode of exercise-induced myoglobinuria with a significant rise in serum creatine kinase (CK) levels in early pregnancy who then laboured normally but did require a caesarean section for a malposition of the fetal head.