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Sample records for improved nitrogen difference

  1. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  2. Simulation of the dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in different land uses in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region--based on the improved export coefficient model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Shao, Jing'an; Wang, Dan; Ni, Jiupai; Xie, Deti

    2015-11-01

    much smaller than those of the paddy field. The dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in the woodland and meadow decreased after modification. The dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in the building lot were the lowest but showed an increase with the progression of time. These results demonstrate that the modified export coefficient model significantly improves the accuracy of dissolved pollutant load simulation for different land uses in the TGRR, especially the accuracy of dissolved nitrogen load simulation. PMID:26477516

  3. Foliage nitrogen turnover: differences among nitrogen absorbed at different times by Quercus serrata saplings

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Miki U.; Mizumachi, Eri; Tokuchi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitrogen turnover within plants has been intensively studied to better understand nitrogen use strategies. However, differences among the nitrogen absorbed at different times are not completely understood and the fate of nitrogen absorbed during winter is largely uncharacterized. In the present study, nitrogen absorbed at different times of the year (growing season, winter and previous growing season) was traced, and the within-leaf nitrogen turnover of a temperate deciduous oak Quercus serrata was investigated. Methods The contributions of nitrogen absorbed at the three different times to leaf construction, translocation during the growing season, and the leaf-level resorption efficiency during leaf senescence were compared using 15N. Key Results Winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen significantly contributed to leaf construction, although the contribution was smaller than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen. On the other hand, the leaf-level resorption efficiency of winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen was higher than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen, suggesting that older nitrogen is better retained in leaves than recently absorbed nitrogen. Conclusions The results demonstrate that nitrogen turnover in leaves varies with nitrogen absorption times. These findings are important for understanding plant nitrogen use strategies and nitrogen cycles in forest ecosystems. PMID:21515608

  4. [Nitrogen Fraction Distributions and Impacts on Soil Nitrogen Mineralization in Different Vegetation Restorations of Karst Rocky Desertification].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning; Ma, Zhi-min; Lan, Jia-cheng; Wu, Yu-chun; Chen, Gao-qi; Fu, Wa-li; Wen, Zhi-lin; Wang, Wen-jing

    2015-09-01

    In order to illuminate the impact on soil nitrogen accumulation and supply in karst rocky desertification area, the distribution characteristics of soil nitrogen pool for each class of soil aggregates and the relationship between aggregates nitrogen pool and soil nitrogen mineralization were analyzed in this study. The results showed that the content of total nitrogen, light fraction nitrogen, available nitrogen and mineral nitrogen in soil aggregates had an increasing tendency along with the descending of aggregate-size, and the highest content was occurred in < 0. 25 mm. The content of nitrogen fractions for all aggregate-classes followed in the order of abandoned land < grass land < brush land < brush-arbor land < arbor land in different sample plots. Artificial forest lands had more effects on the improvement of the soil nitrogen than honeysuckle land. In this study it also showed the nitrogen stockpiling quantity of each aggregate-size class was differed in all aggregate-size classes, in which the content of nitrogen fraction in 5-10 mm and 2-5 mm classes of soil aggregate-size were the highest. And it meant that soil nutrient mainly was stored in large size aggregates. Large size aggregates were significant to the storage of soil nutrient. For each class of soil aggregate-size, the contribution of the nitrogen stockpiling quantity of 0. 25-1 mm class to soil net nitrogen mineralization quantity was the biggest, and following >5mm and 2-5 mm classes, and the others were the smallest. With the positive vegetation succession, the weight percentage of > 5 mm aggregate-size classes was improved and the nitrogen storage of macro-aggregates also was increased. Accordingly, the capacity of soil supply mineral nitrogen and storage organic nitrogen were intensified. PMID:26717705

  5. Response of potatoes to nitrogen concentrations differ with nitrogen forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1998-01-01

    Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate plant growth and mineral composition of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) at varied solution concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Each experiment evaluated five nitrogen (N) concentrations of 0.5, 2, 4, 8, and 12 mM, which were maintained with a non-recirculating nutrient film system in controlled environment. Plants were harvested on day 42 with NO3-; and day 35 with NH4+ after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets, and growth measurements were taken as leaf area, tuber number, and dry weights of different parts. With NO3-, plant growth was greatest and similar at 2, 4, and 8 mM of N whereas with NH4+, plant growth was best only at 2 and 4 mM of N. At 12 mM of N, plants exhibited interveinal ammonium toxicity with NH4+ nutrition, but healthy growth appearance with NO3- nutrition. With either N form, total N concentrations in tissues tended to increase with increased N concentrations, and tissue phosphorus (P) concentrations were reduced at 0.5 and 2 mM of N. Tissue concentrations of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S) changed only slightly at particular N concentrations, yet changed substantially with different N forms. The data indicate that the optimal ranges of N concentrations in both solution and tissues are wider and higher with NO3- than with NH4+ nutrition, and thus a careful control of NH4+ concentrations is necessary to minimize possible ammonium toxicity to potato plants.

  6. Response of potatoes to nitrogen concentrations differ with nitrogen forms.

    PubMed

    Cao, W; Tibbitts, T W

    1998-01-01

    Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate plant growth and mineral composition of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) at varied solution concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Each experiment evaluated five nitrogen (N) concentrations of 0.5, 2, 4, 8, and 12 mM, which were maintained with a non-recirculating nutrient film system in controlled environment. Plants were harvested on day 42 with NO3-; and day 35 with NH4+ after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets, and growth measurements were taken as leaf area, tuber number, and dry weights of different parts. With NO3-, plant growth was greatest and similar at 2, 4, and 8 mM of N whereas with NH4+, plant growth was best only at 2 and 4 mM of N. At 12 mM of N, plants exhibited interveinal ammonium toxicity with NH4+ nutrition, but healthy growth appearance with NO3- nutrition. With either N form, total N concentrations in tissues tended to increase with increased N concentrations, and tissue phosphorus (P) concentrations were reduced at 0.5 and 2 mM of N. Tissue concentrations of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S) changed only slightly at particular N concentrations, yet changed substantially with different N forms. The data indicate that the optimal ranges of N concentrations in both solution and tissues are wider and higher with NO3- than with NH4+ nutrition, and thus a careful control of NH4+ concentrations is necessary to minimize possible ammonium toxicity to potato plants. PMID:11541134

  7. Bioretention Design to Improve Nitrogen Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention has been shown to effectively remove a variety of stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate and total nitrogen removal performance is highly variable. The media typically used in bioretention install...

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under different nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaohui; Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Fu, Jianwei; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-14

    In cultures containing multiple sources of nitrogen, Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a sequential use of nitrogen sources through a mechanism known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). To identify proteins differentially expressed due to NCR, proteomic analysis of S. cerevisiae S288C under different nitrogen source conditions was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), revealing 169 candidate protein spots. Among these 169 protein spots, 121 were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins were closely associated with four main biological processes through Gene Ontology (GO) categorical analysis. The identification of the potential proteins and cellular processes related to NCR offer a global overview of changes elicited by different nitrogen sources, providing clues into how yeast adapt to different nutritional conditions. Moreover, by comparing our proteomic data with corresponding mRNA data, proteins regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level could be distinguished. Biological significance In S. cerevisiae, different nitrogen sources provide different growth characteristics and generate different metabolites. The nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) process plays an important role for S. cerevisiae in the ordinal utilization of different nitrogen sources. NCR process can result in significant shift of global metabolic networks. Previous works on NCR primarily focused on transcriptomic level. The results obtained in this study provided a global atlas of the proteome changes triggered by different nitrogen sources and would facilitate the understanding of mechanisms for how yeast could adapt to different nutritional conditions. PMID:24530623

  9. Structural, mechanical and optical properties of nitrogen-implanted titanium at different pulse frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaif, Mohamed; Mohamed, Sodky H.; Abd El-Rahman, Ahmed M.; Kolitsch, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Plasma-immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a potent method to obtain hard and wear-resistant surface on Ti by nitrogen implantation. This presentation is one part of a sequence of experiments to optimize the microstructure and physical properties of TiN through adapting the plasma-processing parameters. In this work, nitrogen ions were implanted into samples of pure Ti at different nitrogen pulse frequency without using any external source of heating. The nitrogen-implanted surfaces were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), optical microscope, nano-indentation technique, ball-on-disk type tribometer, surface profilemeter, Tafel polarization technique for corrosion performance and ellipsometry. The outcomes show that, nitrogen PIII is an effectual method for nitriding titanium and nitrogen pulse frequency affected the microstructure and physical properties of the treated Ti. X-ray diffraction depicted the formation of α-Ti (N) and the cubic TiN after implanting titanium by nitrogen and the thickness of the nitrided layer increased as the nitrogen pulse frequency increased. The wear and corrosion resistance of the nitrogen-implanted titanium are improved and the friction coefficient decreased from nearly 0.8 for the un-implanted titanium to 0.3 for the implanted titanium, this ascribed to the formation of the titanium nitrided phases. Ellipsometric measurements were carried out on the PIII titanium samples at different nitrogen pulse frequency. The ellipsometric measurements show that, the thickness of the nitrided layer and surface roughness increased while the refractive index decreased with increasing nitrogen pulse frequency.

  10. Legumes are different: Leaf nitrogen, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark Andrew; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Sprent, Janet I; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-04-12

    Using robust, pairwise comparisons and a global dataset, we show that nitrogen concentration per unit leaf mass for nitrogen-fixing plants (N2FP; mainly legumes plus some actinorhizal species) in nonagricultural ecosystems is universally greater (43-100%) than that for other plants (OP). This difference is maintained across Koppen climate zones and growth forms and strongest in the wet tropics and within deciduous angiosperms. N2FP mostly show a similar advantage over OP in nitrogen per leaf area (Narea), even in arid climates, despite diazotrophy being sensitive to drought. We also show that, for most N2FP, carbon fixation by photosynthesis (Asat) and stomatal conductance (gs) are not related to Narea-in distinct challenge to current theories that place the leaf nitrogen-Asat relationship at the center of explanations of plant fitness and competitive ability. Among N2FP, only forbs displayed an Narea-gs relationship similar to that for OP, whereas intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi; Asat/gs) was positively related to Narea for woody N2FP. Enhanced foliar nitrogen (relative to OP) contributes strongly to other evolutionarily advantageous attributes of legumes, such as seed nitrogen and herbivore defense. These alternate explanations of clear differences in leaf N between N2FP and OP have significant implications (e.g., for global models of carbon fluxes based on relationships between leaf N and Asat). Combined, greater WUE and leaf nitrogen-in a variety of forms-enhance fitness and survival of genomes of N2FP, particularly in arid and semiarid climates. PMID:27035971

  11. Analysing nitrogen responses of cereals to prioritize routes to the improvement of nitrogen use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sylvester-Bradley, Roger; Kindred, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    The efficient use of fertilizer nitrogen (N) is crucial to sustainable human nutrition. All crops receive significant amounts of additional N in temperate environments, through fixation or fertilizer use. This paper reviews progress towards the efficient use of fertilizer N by winter wheat (Triticum aesitivum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in the UK, acknowledging that on-farm this is governed by economics. Recent multi-site N response experiments on old and modern varieties show that yield improvements since the 1980s have been accompanied by increases in economic optimum N amounts for wheat but not for spring barley. On-farm N use efficiency (NUE) has increased for barley because increased yields with optimum N were associated with compensatory decreases in grain N concentration, whereas on-farm NUE has not increased for wheat because grain N concentration has not changed and improvements in N capture were insufficient to make up for the increased yield. Genetic effects on NUE are shown to differ markedly depending on whether they are determined at a single N rate, as in variety trials, or with optimum N amounts. It is suggested that, in order to elicit faster improvement in NUE on farms, breeding and variety testing should be conducted at some sites with more than one level of applied N, and that grain N%, N harvest index, and perhaps canopy N ratio (kg N ha(-1) green area) should be measured more widely. It is also suggested that, instead of using empirical functions, N responses might be analysed more effectively using functions based on explanations of yield determination for which the parameters have some physiological meaning. PMID:19395389

  12. Integrating soil information into canopy sensor algorithms for improved corn nitrogen rate recommendation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop canopy sensors have proven effective at determining site-specific nitrogen (N) needs, but several Midwest states use different algorithms to predict site-specific N need. The objective of this research was to determine if soil information can be used to improve the Missouri canopy sensor algori...

  13. Physiological limitations and the genetic improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, F.O.; Manian, S. ); Drevon, J.J. )

    1988-01-01

    The rhizobium legume symbiosis continues to be of strategic importance particularly in the context of food production. As the world population grows, it is necessary that new developments take place in crop improvement. The development and application of new technologies in biological sciences over past years has made the entire area of plant-microbial interaction an exciting and challenging research area to be involved in. In view of the importance of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, it is not surprising that it still represents one of the priority areas for commercial development in agricultural biotechnology. Since this symbiosis involves an association between procaryotic and eucaryhotic partners, it requires of necessity a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach. This book focuses on physiological limitations affecting symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the potential for overcoming such limitations by using genetic technologies.

  14. Legumes are different: Leaf nitrogen, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Mark Andrew; Turnbull, Tarryn L.; Sprent, Janet I.; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Using robust, pairwise comparisons and a global dataset, we show that nitrogen concentration per unit leaf mass for nitrogen-fixing plants (N2FP; mainly legumes plus some actinorhizal species) in nonagricultural ecosystems is universally greater (43–100%) than that for other plants (OP). This difference is maintained across Koppen climate zones and growth forms and strongest in the wet tropics and within deciduous angiosperms. N2FP mostly show a similar advantage over OP in nitrogen per leaf area (Narea), even in arid climates, despite diazotrophy being sensitive to drought. We also show that, for most N2FP, carbon fixation by photosynthesis (Asat) and stomatal conductance (gs) are not related to Narea—in distinct challenge to current theories that place the leaf nitrogen–Asat relationship at the center of explanations of plant fitness and competitive ability. Among N2FP, only forbs displayed an Narea–gs relationship similar to that for OP, whereas intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi; Asat/gs) was positively related to Narea for woody N2FP. Enhanced foliar nitrogen (relative to OP) contributes strongly to other evolutionarily advantageous attributes of legumes, such as seed nitrogen and herbivore defense. These alternate explanations of clear differences in leaf N between N2FP and OP have significant implications (e.g., for global models of carbon fluxes based on relationships between leaf N and Asat). Combined, greater WUE and leaf nitrogen—in a variety of forms—enhance fitness and survival of genomes of N2FP, particularly in arid and semiarid climates. PMID:27035971

  15. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  16. Do nitrogen fertilizer rate and application timing make a difference in corn production?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high prices of nitrogen fertilizer have forced corn producers to consider strategies to increase nitrogen use efficiency. Improving nitrogen management in corn could involve the implementation of several management strategies. Side dressing, adjustment of nitrogen levels according to the site’s...

  17. Nitrogen deposition along differently exposed slopes in the Bavarian Alps.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Manfred; Fegg, Wolfgang; Römmelt, Horst; Leuchner, Michael; Ries, Ludwig; Zimmermann, Ralf; Michalke, Bernd; Wallasch, Markus; Maguhn, Jürgen; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Jakobi, Gert

    2014-02-01

    The Alps are affected by high nitrogen deposition, particularly in the fringe of the Northern and Southern Alps. In the framework of a two-year monitoring study performed in 2010 and 2011, we investigated the ammonia and nitrogen dioxide air concentration and ammonium and nitrate deposition at different altitudes between 700 and 1,600 ma.s.l. in the Garmisch-Partenkirchen district in the Upper Bavaria region (Germany). Four-weekly measurements of deposition collected with bulk open field samplers and under-crown were performed in a profile perpendicular to the axis of the Loisach valley; measurements were conducted at eight sites. Whereas open field deposition ranged from 5 to 11 kg ha(-1)a(-1), nitrogen throughfall has reached up to 21 kg ha(-1)a(-1). Data from the valley and the slopes were compared with measurements performed on the platform of the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (Zugspitze) at an altitude of 2,650 ma.s.l. For the rough estimation of the total yearly deposition rate of nitrogen, the canopy uptake model was applied. By regarding nitrogen uptake by the trees, total deposition can exceed the throughfall in all sites by up to 50%. Additionally, we estimated the total deposition from the sum of wet and dry deposition. On the one side, the wet deposition could be extrapolated from the open field deposition. On the other side, we used the inferential method to calculate the dry deposition on the basis of NH3 and NO2 air concentrations and their literature based deposition velocities. Since fixed deposition velocities are inappropriate particularly in complex orography, we tried to find correction factors based upon terrain characteristics and meteorological considerations. Temperature monitoring at the eight sites and wind measurements at two sites provided some evidence for the semi-empirical parameterization. Due to numerous imponderabilities, the results of the two methods were not consistent for all sites. PMID:24211349

  18. [Effects of different fertilizer species on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a reddish paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Zou, Jing-Dong; Xu, Li-Li; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Feng-Ting; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Sun, Xiao-Min

    2014-08-01

    Enhanced fertilization could decrease nitrogen utilization rate and increase carbon and nitrogen leaching, leading to water pollution in agricultural ecosystem. A long-term field experiment had been established on a reddish paddy soil of Qianyanzhou Ecological Experimental Station (114 degrees 53'E, 26 degrees 48'N) in Jiangxi Province in 1998. Soil solution samples were collected by clay tube and vacuum pump. Four fertilizer species treatments were selected: control with no fertilizer (CK), straw return (ST), nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium mineral fertilizers (NPK) and pig manure (OM), aiming to evaluate the effects of different species of fertilizer on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a double rice cropping system. The results showed that: (1) ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) was the major type of N in soil leachate in reddish paddy soil. The application of NPK could significantly increase the ammonium nitrogen concentration (1.2 mg x L(-1) +/- 0.1 mg x L(-1)) compared with the CK, ST and OM treatments, and the application of OM could significantly increase the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (27.3 mg x L(-1) +/- 1.6 mg x L(-1)) in soil leachate. The carbon and nitrogen leaching were more notable in the vegetative growth stage than the reproductive growth stage of rice (P < 0.05); (2) the long-term application of NPK and OM increased the NH4(+) -N, DOC, soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents. The NPK was best beneficial to improve TN contents and OM to improve SOC contents. (3) The DOC contents in soil leachate and SOC in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01), while NH4(+) -N contents in soil leachate and TN contents in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01). PMID:25338383

  19. Nitrogen cycling in different types of sediments from Danish waters

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, T.H.; Henridsen, K.

    1983-05-01

    Variations in sediment N:C ratios were correlated with water depth and season. /sup 14/NH/sub 4//sup +/ was used to measure the rates of NH/sub 4//sup +/ production (d) and incorporation into bacterial cells (i) in sediments from different stations, at different seasons. The validity of the rates d and i was indicated by the predicted correlation of d:i ratios with N:C ratios of the sediment, and the predicted N:C ratio at which net NH/sub 4//sup +/; pore water NH/sub 4//sup +/, flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ from sediment, and flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ into exchangeable pool. The NO/sub 3//sup -/ flux from sediment was correlated with nitrification rate and with season. Benthic infauna increased the flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ from the sediment by 50%. The rates of transfer of nitrogen (NO/sub 3//sup -/, NH/sub 4//sup +/, N/sub 2/) from sediment to water were 44-66% of the net rates of organic nitrogen mineralization (d-i). Flux of NO/sub 3//sup -/ + NH/sub 4//sup +/ from the sediment could supply 30-82% of the nitrogen requirement of the planktonic primary producers.

  20. The role of water nitrogen retention in integrated nutrient management: assessment in a large basin using different modelling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizzetti, Bruna; Passy, Paul; Billen, Gilles; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Garnier, Josette; Lassaletta, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Assessing the removal of nitrogen (temporary and permanent) in large river basins is complex due to the dependency on climate, hydrological and physical characteristics, and ecosystems functioning. Measurements are generally limited in number and do not account for the full integration of all processes contributing to nitrogen retention in the river basin. However, the estimation of nitrogen retention by the ecosystems is crucial to understanding the nitrate water pollution and the N2O emissions to the atmosphere, as well as the lag time between the implementation of agri-environmental measures to reduce nitrogen pollution and the improvement of water quality. Models have often been used to understand the dynamics of the river basin system. The objective of this study was to assess nitrogen retention in a large river basin, the Seine basin (∼65 000 km2, in France), through the application of three models with different levels of complexity developed for different specific purposes: the GREEN, SWAT and RiverStrahler models. The study analyses the different modelling approaches and compares their estimates of water nitrogen retention over an 11-year period. Then reflexions on the role played by nitrogen retention by aquatic ecosystems in integrated nutrient management are presented. The results of this study are relevant for the understanding of nitrogen retention processes at the large river basin scale and for the analysis of mitigation measure scenarios designed to reduce nitrogen impacts on aquatic ecosystems and climate.

  1. Improving dynamic phytoplankton reserve-utilization models with an indirect proxy for internal nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Martino E; Heimann, Kirsten; Connolly, Sean R

    2016-09-01

    Ecologists have often used indirect proxies to represent variables that are difficult or impossible to measure directly. In phytoplankton, the internal concentration of the most limiting nutrient in a cell determines its growth rate. However, directly measuring the concentration of nutrients within cells is inaccurate, expensive, destructive, and time-consuming, substantially impairing our ability to model growth rates in nutrient-limited phytoplankton populations. The red chlorophyll autofluorescence (hereafter "red fluorescence") signal emitted by a cell is highly correlated with nitrogen quota in nitrogen-limited phytoplankton species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of including flow cytometric red fluorescence as a proxy for internal nitrogen status to model phytoplankton growth rates. To this end, we used the classic Quota model and designed three approaches to calibrate its model parameters to data: where empirical observations on cell internal nitrogen quota were used to fit the model ("Nitrogen-Quota approach"), where quota dynamics were inferred only from changes in medium nutrient depletion and population density ("Virtual-Quota approach"), or where red fluorescence emission of a cell was used as an indirect proxy for its internal nitrogen quota ("Fluorescence-Quota approach"). Two separate analyses were carried out. In the first analysis, stochastic model simulations were parameterized from published empirical relationships and used to generate dynamics of phytoplankton communities reared under nitrogen-limited conditions. Quota models were fitted to the dynamics of each simulated species with the three different approaches and the performance of each model was compared. In the second analysis, we fit Quota models to laboratory time-series and we calculate the ability of each calibration approach to describe the observed trajectories of internal nitrogen quota in the culture. Results from both analyses concluded that the

  2. Nitrogen transformations and balance in constructed wetlands for slightly polluted river water treatment using different macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiming; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Rong; Liang, Shuang; Li, Cong; Xie, Huijun

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen removal processing in different constructed wetlands treating different kinds of wastewater often varies, and the contribution to nitrogen removal by various pathways remains unclear. In this study, the seasonal nitrogen removal and transformations as well as nitrogen balance in wetland microcosms treating slightly polluted river water was investigated. The results showed that the average total nitrogen removal rates varied in different seasons. According to the mass balance approach, plant uptake removed 8.4-34.3 % of the total nitrogen input, while sediment storage and N(2)O emission contributed 20.5-34.4 % and 0.6-1.9 % of nitrogen removal, respectively. However, the percentage of other nitrogen loss such as N(2) emission due to nitrification and denitrification was estimated to be 2.0-23.5 %. The results indicated that plant uptake and sediment storage were the key factors limiting nitrogen removal besides microbial processes in surface constructed wetland for treating slightly polluted river water. PMID:22707115

  3. Mapping quantitative trait loci for nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency in rice (Oryza sativa L.) at different nitrogen fertilizer levels.

    PubMed

    Dai, G J; Cheng, S H; Hua, Z T; Zhang, M L; Jiang, H B; Feng, Y; Shen, X H; Su, Y A; He, N; Ma, Z B; Ma, X Q; Hou, S G; Wang, Y R

    2015-01-01

    Genetic improvement is the fundamental basis for improving nitrogen-use efficiency. A better understanding of genetic factors controlling nitrogen uptake and utilization is required for crop genetic improvement. In this study, we identified the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with traits of nitrogen uptake and utilization by using the single-sequence repeat marker method and a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a super hybrid Xieyou9308. All the traits investigated were inherited quantitatively by continuous variation and showed normal distribution in phenotype with transgressive segregation in the RIL population. Most of the traits were significantly correlated with each other except for nitrogen absorption ability (NAA) with nitrogen harvest index (NHI) and NHI with agricultural nitrogen-absorption efficiency (ANAE). At logarithmic odds value of 2.3, total 13 candidate QTLs, including 4 for NAA, 2 for NHI, 2 for physiological nitrogen-use efficiency, 1 for agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency (ANUE), and 4 for ANAE, were detected and mapped on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, and 12. Significant pleiotropic effect or neighboring expression of QTLs was observed among traits. At position 64.8 cM on chromosome 4 near the marker RM5757, there was a QTL cluster of NAA, ANUE, and ANAE, and at chromosome 5 near the marker RM5968, there was a QTL cluster of NAA and ANUE. The QTL clusters might provide partial explanation and genetic mechanism for the observed correlations between nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency traits and might form a basis for future breeding programs. PMID:26400271

  4. Nitrogen balance as a tool to assess nitrogen mineralized from winery wastes under different irrigation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requejo, Maria Isabel; Castellanos, Maria Teresa; Villena, Raquel; Ribas, Francisco; Jesús Cabello, Maria; Arce, Augusto; Cartagena, Maria Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Grape marc is a by-product coming from the winery industry, composed of skins, seeds and stalks generated during the crushing process. In Spain, large quantities of wine are produced every year (3,610,000 tonnes in 2010 (FAO, 2010)) with the consequent waste generation. With an adequate composting treatment, this waste can be applied to soils as a source of nutrients and organic matter. Compost N forms added to soil are mostly organic N forms, so organic N can be mineralized during the crop period and thus be taken up by the plants, immobilised, or leached. Compost N mineralization depends on factors such as compost C/N ratio but also on climate conditions. Estimation of N mineralization is necessary to optimise crop yield and minimize the risk of N losses to the environment, especially in zones vulnerable to nitrate pollution. The aim of this work was to assess mineralized N during the crop season when applying grape marc compost as fertilizer in a melon crop cultivated under different drip irrigation rates. A nitrogen balance in field conditions was carried out with three different doses of compost: 0 (D0), 6.7 (D1), 13.3 (D2) and 20 T/ha (D3); and two irrigation rates (100% ETc and 120% ETc). The field experiment was carried out in Ciudad Real, designated "vulnerable zone" by the "Nitrates Directive" 91/676/CEE. The soil was a shallow sandy-loam (Petrocalcic Palexeralfs), with 0.6 depth and a discontinuous petrocalcic horizon between 0.6 and 0.7 m. Nitrogen plant uptake and nitrate losses were measured weekly; mineral N in soil was determined before compost addition and at the end of the crop cycle. An estimation of soil mineralized N during the crop season using nitrogen balance is presented. Results are compared with data obtained in laboratory conditions. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01.

  5. Improvement of fluorescence intensity of nitrogen vacancy centers in self-formed diamond microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Furuyama, S.; Yaita, J.; Kondo, M.; Tahara, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Shimizu, M.; Kodera, T.; Hatano, M.

    2015-10-19

    We present umbrella-shaped diamond microstructures with metal mirrors at the bottom in order to improve the amount of collected photons from nitrogen vacancy centers. The metal mirrors at the bottom are self-aligned to the umbrella-shaped diamond microstructures which are selectively grown through holes created on a metal mask. By the finite-difference time-domain simulations, we found that the umbrella-shaped microstructures, which have an effect similar to solid immersion lens, could collect photons more efficiently than bulk or pillar-shaped microstructures. Improvement of the fluorescence intensity by factors of from 3 to 5 is shown experimentally.

  6. An Improved Retrieval of Tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide from GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly; Jacob, Daniel J.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Bucsela, Eric; Gleason, James F.; Palmer, Paul I.; Bey, Isabelle; Fiore, Arlene M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a retrieval of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument that improves in several ways over previous retrievals, especially in the accounting of Rayleigh and cloud scattering. Slant columns, which are directly fitted without low-pass filtering or spectral smoothing, are corrected for an artificial offset likely induced by spectral structure on the diffuser plate of the GOME instrument. The stratospheric column is determined from NO2 columns over the remote Pacific Ocean to minimize contamination from tropospheric NO2. The air mass factor (AMF) used to convert slant columns to vertical columns is calculated from the integral of the relative vertical NO2 distribution from a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry driven by assimilated meteorological data (Global Earth Observing System (GEOS)-CHEM), weighted by altitude dependent scattering weights computed with a radiative transfer model (Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer), using local surface albedos determined from GOME observations at NO2 wavelengths. The AMF calculation accounts for cloud scattering using cloud fraction, cloud top pressure, and cloud optical thickness from a cloud retrieval algorithm (GOME Cloud Retrieval Algorithm). Over continental regions with high surface emissions, clouds decrease the AMT by 20- 30% relative to clear sky. GOME is almost twice as sensitive to tropospheric NO2 columns over ocean than over land. Comparison of the retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns for July 1996 with GEOS-CHEM values tests both the retrieval and the nitrogen oxide radical (NOx) emissions inventories used in GEOS-CHEM. Retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns over the United States, where NOx emissions are particularly well known, are within 18% of GEOS-CHEM columns and are strongly spatially correlated (r = 0.78, n = 288, p less than 0.005). Retrieved columns show more NO2 than GEOS-CHEM columns over the Transvaal

  7. Phenotyping two tomato genotypes with different nitrogen use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Maria Rosa; Longo, Caterina; Lupini, Antonio; Miller, Anthony J; Araniti, Fabrizio; Mercati, Francesco; Princi, Maria P; Sunseri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) supply usually limits crop production and optimizing N-use efficiency (NUE) to minimize fertilizer loss is important. NUE is a complex trait that can be dissected into crop N uptake from the soil (NUpE) and N utilization (NUtE). We compared NUE in 14 genotypes of three week old tomatoes grown in sand or hydroponic culture supplied with nitrate (NO3(-)). Culture method influenced measured NUE for some cultivars, but Regina Ostuni (RO) and UC82 were consistently identified as high and low NUE genotypes. To identify why these genotypes had contrasting NUE some traits were compared growing under 0.1 and 5 mM NO3(-) supply. UC82 showed greater root (15)NO3(-) influx at low and high supply, and stronger SlNRT2.1/NAR2.1 transporter expression under low supply when compared with RO. Conversely, RO showed a higher total root length and thickness compared to UC82. Compared with UC82, RO showed higher shoot SlNRT2.3 expression and NO3(-) storage at high supply, but similar NO3(-) reductase activity. After N-starvation, root cell electrical potentials of RO were significantly more negative than UC82, but nitrate elicited similar responses in both root types. Overall for UC82 and RO, NUtE may play a greater role than NUpE for improved NUE. PMID:27235648

  8. [Allelopathy and resources competition of rice under different nitrogen supplies].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jun; Lin, Wenxiong; Zhou, Junjian; Wu, Minhong; Chen, Xiangxu; He, Huaqin; Guo, Yuchun; Liang, Yiyuan

    2005-05-01

    In order to explore the bio-interference of allelopathic rice with barnyardgrass under different nitrogen supplies, a new bioassay method, i.e., allelopathy-competition separation based (ACS) approach was recommended in this study. The results indicated that ACS could be successfully used to distinguish the rice allelopathy from its resources competition in rice-weed co-culture system, and to evaluate its response characteristics under different N supplies. The test rice accession PI312777 had a higher ability in interfering target weed barnyardgrass (BYD), represented by its stable and higher ability in resources competition, as well as its increasing allelopathic potential in suppressing companion weed BYD when the N supply decreased in the co-cultured system. The reverse was true in the case of rice accession Lemont, which had a lower allelopathic potential under all N supply levels, and a lower ability in resources competition under normal or rich N supply. But, Lemont had an obviously increased ability in resources competition under lower N supply, which was considered as the result of econiche competition in rice-weed system. PMID:16110664

  9. Nitrogen metabolism in pepper plants applied with different bioregulators.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J M; Castilla, N; Romero, L

    2000-07-01

    Certain bioregulators were studied in relation to nitrogen metabolism of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Lamuyo). Plants were grown under controlled conditions and submitted to regular fertilization with macro- and micronutrients. Treatments were as follows: nontreated control (T0); fosfonutren [essential amino acids and micronutrients (46.9 mg L(-)(1))] (T1); biozyme [GA(3) (32.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus IAA (32.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus zeatin (83.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus chelated micronutrients] (T2); and GA(3) [16 mg L(-)(1)] (T3). The concentrations of NO(3)(-), organic N, amino acids, and proteins, the activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), and finally the foliar dry weight and yield were analyzed. The results indicated that the application of certain bioregulators, such as fosfonutren (T1), which contain amino acids can cause a negative effect on the efficiency and utilization of NO(3)(-), resulting in a drastic loss in growth and yield, even under the control treatment, in which no bioregulator was applied. On the contrary, the application of certain bioregulators based principally on the combination of different hormones, as in the case of biozyme (T2), increased NO(3)(-) assimilation under our experimental conditions, due possibly to a greater availability of these bioregulators in the leaves and increased NR and NiR activities. This appears to explain why the T2 treatment gave the greatest foliar dry weight and fruit yield per plant in the experiment. PMID:10898646

  10. Nitrogen pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Christian; Laner, David; Fellner, Johann

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills occur primarily via leachate, where they pose a long-term pollution problem in the form of ammonium. In-situ aeration was proposed as a remediation measure to mitigate nitrogenous landfill emissions, turning the anaerobic environment to anoxic and subsequently aerobic. As in-depth studies of the nitrogen cycle during landfill aeration had been largely missing, it was the aim of this work to establish a detailed nitrogen balance for aerobic and anaerobic degradation of landfilled MSW based on lab-scale experiments, and also investigating the effect of different water regimes on nitrogen transformation during aeration. Six landfill simulation reactors were operated in duplicate under different conditions: aerated wet (with water addition and recirculation), aerated dry (without water addition) and anaerobic (wet). The results showed that more than 78 % of the initial total nitrogen (TNinit) remained in the solids in all set ups, with the highest nitrogen losses achieved with water addition during aeration. In this case, gaseous nitrogen losses (as N2 due to denitrification) amounted up to 16.6 % of TNinit and around 4 % of TNinit was discharged via leachate. The aerated dry set-up showed lower denitrification rates (2.6-8.8 % of TNinit was released as N2), but was associated with the highest N2O emissions (3.8-3.9 % of TNinit). For the anaerobic treatment the main pathway of nitrogen discharge was the leachate, where NH4 accounted for around 8 % of TNinit. These findings provide the basis for improved management strategies to enhance nitrogen removal during in-situ aeration of old landfills. PMID:26216372

  11. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7-overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement. PMID:27293103

  12. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7–overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement. PMID:27293103

  13. Spectral measurements at different spatial scales in potato: relating leaf, plant and canopy nitrogen status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongschaap, Raymond E. E.; Booij, Remmie

    2004-09-01

    Chlorophyll contents in vegetation depend on soil nitrogen availability and on crop nitrogen uptake, which are important management factors in arable farming. Crop nitrogen uptake is important, as nitrogen is needed for chlorophyll formation, which is important for photosynthesis, i.e. the conversion of absorbed radiance into plant biomass. The objective of this study was to estimate leaf and canopy nitrogen contents by near and remote sensing observations and to link observations at leaf, plant and canopy level. A theoretical base is presented for scaling-up leaf optical properties to whole plants and crops, by linking different optical recording techniques at leaf, plant and canopy levels through the integration of vertical nitrogen distribution. Field data come from potato experiments in The Netherlands in 1997 and 1998, comprising two potato varieties: Eersteling and Bintje, receiving similar nitrogen treatments (0, 100, 200 and 300 kg N ha -1) in varying application schemes to create differences in canopy nitrogen status during the growing season. Ten standard destructive field samplings were performed to follow leaf area index and crop dry weight evolution. Samples were analysed for inorganic nitrogen and total nitrogen contents. At sampling dates, spectral measurements were taken both at leaf level and at canopy level. At leaf level, an exponential relation between SPAD-502 readings and leaf organic nitrogen contents with a high correlation factor of 0.91 was found. At canopy level, an exponential relation between canopy organic nitrogen contents and red edge position ( λrep, nm) derived from reflectance measurements was found with a good correlation of 0.82. Spectral measurements (SPAD-502) at leaf level of a few square mm were related to canopy reflectance measurements (CropScan™) of approximately 0.44 m 2. Statistical regression techniques were used to optimise theoretical vertical nitrogen profiles that allowed scaling-up leaf chlorophyll measurements

  14. Nitrogen fertilizer improves boron phytoextraction by Brassica juncea grown in contaminated sediments and alleviates plant stress.

    PubMed

    Giansoldati, Virginia; Tassi, Eliana; Morelli, Elisabetta; Gabellieri, Edi; Pedron, Francesca; Barbafieri, Meri

    2012-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of different fertilizer treatments on Brassica plants grown on boron-contaminated sediments. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and on the lysimeter scale. At laboratory scale (microcosm), five different fertilizers were tested for a 35-d period. On the lysimeter scale, nitrogen fertilization was tested at three different doses and plants were allowed to grow until the end of the vegetative phase (70 d). Results showed that nitrogen application had effectively increased plant biomass production, while B uptake was not affected. Total B phytoextracted increased three-fold when the highest nitrogen dose was applied. Phytotoxicity on Brassica was evaluated by biochemical parameters. In plants grown in unfertilized B-contaminated sediments, the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and pyrogallol peroxidase (PPX) increased, whereas catalase (CAT) decreased with respect to control plants. Addition of N progressively mitigated the alteration of enzymatic activity, thus suggesting that N can aid in alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. SOD activity was restored to control levels just at the lowest N treatment, whereas the CAT inhibition was partially restored only at the highest one. N application also lowered the B-induced increase in APX and PPX activities. Increased glutathione reductase activity indicated the need to restore the oxidative balance of glutathione. Data also suggest a role of glutathione and phytochelatins in B defense mechanisms. Results suggest that the nitrogen fertilizer was effective in improving B phytoextraction by increasing Brassica biomass and by alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. PMID:22382070

  15. Improved predictability of fertilizer nitrogen need for corn following alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accounting for alfalfa nitrogen (N) credits to first-year corn reduces fertilizer N costs, over-application of N, and the risk of nitrate loss to ground water. It is equally important, however, to avoid inadequate N supply for corn. We analyzed nearly all previous research on fertilizer N response i...

  16. Root aeration improves growth and nitrogen accumulation in rice seedlings under low nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingwen; Liang, Jing; Xu, Zhihui; Fan, Xiaorong; Zhou, Quansuo; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In wetland soils, changes in oxygen (O2) level in the rhizosphere are believed to influence the behaviour of nutrients and their usage by plants. However, the effect of aeration on nitrogen (N) acquisition under different N supply conditions remains largely unknown. In this study, the rice cultivars Yangdao 6 (YD6, with higher root aerenchyma abundance) and Nongken 57 (NK57, with lower root aerenchyma abundance) were used to evaluate the effects of aeration on rice growth and N accumulation. Our results showed that the number of adventitious roots and the root surface area increased significantly, and ethylene production and aerenchyma formation decreased in both cultivars after external aeration (EA). Five N treatments, including no N (−N), 0.125 mM NH4NO3 (LN), 1.25 mM Ca(NO3)2 (NO3-N), 1.25 mM (NH4)2SO4 (NH4-N) and 1.25 mM NH4NO3 (N/N), were applied to YD6 and NK57 for 2 days under internal aeration or EA conditions. External aeration increased the root biomass in both cultivars and the shoot biomass in NK57 by 18–50 %. The total N concentrations in roots of YD6 grown under −N and LN and of NK57 grown under NO3-N were increased by EA. Expression of OsPAD4, one of four putative genes regulating aerenchyma formation, showed a similar pattern alongside changes in the ethylene level in the EA-treated rice irrespective of the N treatments. Furthermore, expression of the high-affinity nitrate transporter gene OsNRT2.1 was increased by EA under −N, LN and NO3-N conditions. Our data provide evidence of an interaction between O2 and the supply of N in ethylene production, aerenchyma formation and N nutrition through modification of the expression of OsPAD4 and OsNRT2.1. PMID:26578743

  17. Root aeration improves growth and nitrogen accumulation in rice seedlings under low nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingwen; Liang, Jing; Xu, Zhihui; Fan, Xiaorong; Zhou, Quansuo; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In wetland soils, changes in oxygen (O2) level in the rhizosphere are believed to influence the behaviour of nutrients and their usage by plants. However, the effect of aeration on nitrogen (N) acquisition under different N supply conditions remains largely unknown. In this study, the rice cultivars Yangdao 6 (YD6, with higher root aerenchyma abundance) and Nongken 57 (NK57, with lower root aerenchyma abundance) were used to evaluate the effects of aeration on rice growth and N accumulation. Our results showed that the number of adventitious roots and the root surface area increased significantly, and ethylene production and aerenchyma formation decreased in both cultivars after external aeration (EA). Five N treatments, including no N (-N), 0.125 mM NH4NO3 (LN), 1.25 mM Ca(NO3)2 (NO3-N), 1.25 mM (NH4)2SO4 (NH4-N) and 1.25 mM NH4NO3 (N/N), were applied to YD6 and NK57 for 2 days under internal aeration or EA conditions. External aeration increased the root biomass in both cultivars and the shoot biomass in NK57 by 18-50 %. The total N concentrations in roots of YD6 grown under -N and LN and of NK57 grown under NO3-N were increased by EA. Expression of OsPAD4, one of four putative genes regulating aerenchyma formation, showed a similar pattern alongside changes in the ethylene level in the EA-treated rice irrespective of the N treatments. Furthermore, expression of the high-affinity nitrate transporter gene OsNRT2.1 was increased by EA under -N, LN and NO3-N conditions. Our data provide evidence of an interaction between O2 and the supply of N in ethylene production, aerenchyma formation and N nutrition through modification of the expression of OsPAD4 and OsNRT2.1. PMID:26578743

  18. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  19. Validation of nitrogen dioxide measurements from the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reburn, W. J.; Remedios, J. J.; Morris, P. E.; Rodgers, C. D.; Taylor, F. W.; Kerridge, B. J.; Knight, R. J.; Ballard, J.; Kumer, J. B.; Massie, S. T.

    1996-04-01

    Measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are assessed. Channel 5 of the instrument was dedicated to observations of nitrogen dioxide and employed pressure-modulation and wideband radiometry to make measurements at 6.2 μm. This dual technique allows simultaneous determination of nitrogen dioxide mixing ratio and the aerosol extinction coefficient at this wavelength and therefore provides nitrogen dioxide data even in the presence of heavy aerosol loading. Approximately 180 days of data, in the period from September 1991 to July 1992, were obtained with, typically, over 2600 profiles per day for each retrieved species, covering an altitude range of 100-0.01 mbar. In this paper the version 10 data are assessed and a full error analysis is described. Comparisons with the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) on UARS and the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) on Nimbus 7 are also presented. It is concluded that the morphology of the retrieved ISAMS fields is robust and consistent with concurrent as well as previous infrared satellite measurements. Random errors are estimated to be of the order of 10% for nighttime and 15% for daytime NO2 near the maxima of the distributions, and systematic errors are estimated to be of a similar size. However, there remains an unresolved systematic difference of about a factor of 2 between ISAMS and CLAES. Both random and systematic errors are likely to be reduced in future versions of the processing.

  20. Detecting leaf nitrogen content in wheat with canopy hyperspectrum under different soil backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, X.; Ren, H.; Cao, Z.; Tian, Y.; Cao, W.; Zhu, Y.; Cheng, T.

    2014-10-01

    Hyperspectral sensing techniques can be effective for rapid, non-destructive detecting of the nitrogen (N) status in crop plants; however, their accuracy is often affected by the soil background. Under different fractions of soil background, the canopy spectra and leaf nitrogen content (LNC) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were obtained from field experiments with different N rates and planting densities over 3 growing seasons. Five types of vegetation index (VIs: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), ratio vegetation index (RVI), soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), optimize soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI), and perpendicular vegetation index (PVI) were constructed based on three types of spectral information: (1) the original and the first derivative (FD) spectrum, (2) the spectrum adjusted with the vegetation coverage (FVcover), and (3) the pure spectrum extracted by a linear mixed model. Comprehensive relationships of above five types of VI with LNC were quantified for LNC detecting under different soil backgrounds. The results indicated that all five types of VI were significantly affected by the soil background, with R2 values of around 0.55 for LNC detecting, with the OSAVI (R514, R469)L=0.04 producing the best performance of all five indices. However, based on the FVcover, the coverage adjusted spectral index (CASI = NDVI(R513, R481)/(1 + FVcover) produced the higher R2 value of 0.62 and the lower RRMSE of 13%, and was less sensitive to the leaf area index (LAI), leaf dry weight (LDW), FVcover, and leaf nitrogen accumulation (LNA). The results demonstrate that the newly developed CASI could improve the performance of LNC estimation under different soil backgrounds.

  1. Reliable Reference Genes for Normalization of Gene Expression in Cucumber Grown under Different Nitrogen Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Warzybok, Anna; Migocka, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In plants, nitrogen is the most important nutritional factor limiting the yield of cultivated crops. Since nitrogen is essential for synthesis of nucleotides, amino acids and proteins, studies on gene expression in plants cultivated under different nitrogen availability require particularly careful selection of suitable reference genes which are not affected by nitrogen limitation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to select the most reliable reference genes for qPCR analysis of target cucumber genes under varying nitrogen source and availability. Among twelve candidate cucumber genes used in this study, five are highly homologous to the commonly used internal controls, whereas seven novel candidates were previously identified through the query of the cucumber genome. The expression of putative reference genes and the target CsNRT1.1 gene was analyzed in roots, stems and leaves of cucumbers grown under nitrogen deprivation, varying nitrate availability or different sources of nitrogen (glutamate, glutamine or NH3). The stability of candidate genes expression significantly varied depending on the tissue type and nitrogen supply. However, in most of the outputs genes encoding CACS, TIP41, F-box protein and EFα proved to be the most suitable for normalization of CsNRT1.1 expression. In addition, our results suggest the inclusion of 3 or 4 references to obtain highly reliable results of target genes expression in all cucumber organs under nitrogen-related stress. PMID:24058446

  2. Global scale analysis and evaluation of an improved mechanistic representation of plant nitrogen and carbon dynamics in the Community Land Model (CLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, B.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C. D.; Randerson, J. T.; Mu, M.; Kattge, J.; Rogers, A.; Reich, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    In many ecosystems, nitrogen is the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and productivity. However mechanistic representation of nitrogen uptake linked to root traits, and functional nitrogen allocation among different leaf enzymes involved in respiration and photosynthesis is currently lacking in Earth System models. The linkage between nitrogen availability and plant productivity is simplistically represented by potential photosynthesis rates, and is subsequently downregulated depending on nitrogen supply and other nitrogen consumers in the model (e.g., nitrification). This type of potential photosynthesis rate calculation is problematic for several reasons. Firstly, plants do not photosynthesize at potential rates and then downregulate. Secondly, there is considerable subjectivity on the meaning of potential photosynthesis rates. Thirdly, there exists lack of understanding on modeling these potential photosynthesis rates in a changing climate. In addition to model structural issues in representing photosynthesis rates, the role of plant roots in nutrient acquisition have been largely ignored in Earth System models. For example, in CLM4.5, nitrogen uptake is linked to leaf level processes (e.g., primarily productivity) rather than root scale process involved in nitrogen uptake. We present a new plant model for CLM with an improved mechanistic presentation of plant nitrogen uptake based on root scale Michaelis Menten kinetics, and stronger linkages between leaf nitrogen and plant productivity by inferring relationships observed in global databases of plant traits (including the TRY database and several individual studies). We also incorporate improved representation of plant nitrogen leaf allocation, especially in tropical regions where significant over-prediction of plant growth and productivity in CLM4.5 simulations exist. We evaluate our improved global model simulations using the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) framework. We conclude that

  3. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  4. Increasing in-stream nitrogen concentrations under different bioenergy crop management practices in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Thraen, Daniela; Rode, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how nitrogen fluxes respond to changes in land use and agriculture practices is crucial for improving instream water quality prediction. In central Germany, expansion of bioenergy crops such as maize and rape for ethanol production during the last decade led to increasing of fertilizer application rates. To examine the effect of these changes, surface water quality of a drinking water reservoir catchment was investigated for more than 30 years. The Weida catchment (99.5 km2) is part of the Elbe river basin and has a share of 67% agricultural land use with significant changes in agricultural practices within the investigation period. For the period 2004-2012, the share of maize and rape has been increased by 52% and 20%, respectively, for enhancing bioenergy production. To achieve our gaols, the semi-distributed hydrological water quality HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) model was calibrated for discharge and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (IN) during the period 1997-2000.The model was validated successfully (with lowest performance of NSE = 0.78 and PBIAS = 3.74% for discharge) for three different periods 1983-1987, 1989-1996 and 2000-2003, which are charaterized by different fertilizer application rates. Results showed that the HYPE model reproduced reasonably well discharge and IN daily loads (with lowest NSE = 0.64 for IN-load). In addition, the HYPE model was evaluated successfully to predict the discharge and IN concentrations for the period 2004-2012, where detailed input data in terms of crops management (field-specific survey) have been considered. Land use and crop rotations scenarios, with high hypothetical percentage of acceptance by the farmers, revealed that continuous conversion of agricultural land into bioenergy crops, will most likely, lead to an enrichment of in-stream nitrogen, especially after spring storms.

  5. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  6. [Effects of different fertilization modes on vegetable growth, fertilizer nitrogen utilization, and nitrogen loss from vegetable field].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-feng; Wang, Guo; Li, Wei-hua; Qiu, Xiao-xuan

    2009-03-01

    A field experiment with Chinese cabbage, water spinach, and three-colored amaranth cropped three times in one year was conducted to study the effects of seven fertilization modes, i.e., none fertilization, basal application of chemical fertilizers, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers, basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure, and basal application of organic manure, on the plant height, yield, nitrogen accumulation, and fertilizer nitrogen utilization of the vegetables, and the loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N from vegetable field under natural rainfall condition. The results showed that comparing with none fertilization, the fertilization modes '1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure' and 'basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide' improved the agronomic properties of test vegetables, increased their yields by 103%-219% and 93%-226%, and nitrogen accumulation by 153% -216% and 231%-320%, respectively, and enhanced fertilizer nitrogen utilization rate. They also decreased the surface runoff loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N by 48.1% and 46.5%, respectively, compared with the mode 'basal application of chemical fertilizers', and hence, reduced the risk of agricultural non-point pollution. Therefore, these two fertilization modes could be popularized in vegetable production. PMID:19637603

  7. Improved Productivity of Neutral Lipids in Chlorella sp. A2 by Minimal Nitrogen Supply

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junying; Chen, Weixian; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Xin; He, Chenliu; Rong, Junfeng; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen starvation is an efficient environmental pressure for increasing lipid accumulation in microalgae, but it could also significantly lower the biomass productivity, resulting in lower lipid productivity. In this study, green alga Chlorella sp. A2 was cultivated by using a minimal nitrogen supply strategy under both laboratory and outdoor cultivation conditions to evaluate biomass accumulation and lipid production. Results showed that minimal nitrogen supply could promote neutral lipid accumulation of Chlorella sp. A2 without a significant negative effect on cell growth. In laboratory cultivation mode, alga cells cultured with 18 mg L−1 d−1 urea addition could generate 74 and 416% (w/w) more neutral lipid productivity than cells cultured with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. In outdoor cultivation mode, lipid productivity of cells cultured with 18 mg L−1 d−1 urea addition is approximately 10 and 88% higher than the one with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. Notably, the results of photosynthetic analysis clarified that minimal nitrogen supply reduced the loss of photosynthetic capacity to keep CO2 fixation during photosynthesis for biomass production. The minimal nitrogen supply strategy for microalgae cultivation could promote neutral lipid accumulation without a significant negative effect on cell growth, resulting in a significant improvement in the lipid productivity. PMID:27148237

  8. [Effect of different nitrogen forms and ratio on growth and active ingredient content of Platycodon grandiflorum].

    PubMed

    Duan, Yun-jing; Wang, Kang-cai; Niu, Ling-hui; Li, Ke; Su, Yun-yun

    2015-10-01

    To providing evidence about nitrogen adequate application of Platycodon grandiflorum, the pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of nitrogen on the growth, physiological metabolism and the quality of P. grandiflorum. The activity of NR, GS and SOD, POD and CAT were determined. And the nitrate and ammonium nitrogen content, photosynthetic characteristics, active components of P. grandiflorum were determined. The results showed that the nitrate nitrogen content and P. biomass reached its maximum value, when NH4(+)-N/NO3(-) -N was 0: 100, the activity of NR. The activity of GS was the highest at the NH4(+) -N/NO3(-) -N ratio of 25:75 and ammonium nitrogen content was the highest at 75:25. The activity of SOD decreased and then increased with the increasing of NO3(-) -N. At the NH4(+) -N/NO3(-) -N ratio of 25: 75, the activity of CAT had its maximum value and the content of MDA had the minimum value. At the same time, the content of platycodon D was the highest at this treatment. The studies had shown that different nitrogen forms and ratio had a significant effect on the characteristics of photosynthetic physiology, nitrogen metabolism and resistance adjustment, growth and the quality of P. grandiflorum. The NH4(+) -N/NO3(-) -N ratio of 25: 75 was a suitable ratio of nitrogen forms for the growth of P. Grandiflorum and accumulating the content of platycodon D. PMID:26975097

  9. Improvement of wine terroir management according to biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najat, Nassr; Aude, Langenfeld; Mohammed, Benbrahim; Lionel, Ley; Laurent, Deliere; Jean-Pascal, Goutouly; David, Lafond; Marie, Thiollet-Scholtus

    2015-04-01

    Good wine terroir production implies a well-balanced Biogeochemical Cycle of Nitrogen (BCN) at field level i.e. in soil and in plant. Nitrogen is very important for grape quality and soil sustainability. The mineralization of organic nitrogen is the main source of mineral nitrogen for the vine. This mineralization depends mainly on the soil microbial activity. This study is focused on the functional microbial populations implicated in the BCN, in particular nitrifying bacteria. An experimental network with 6 vine sites located in Atlantic coast (Loire valley and Bordeaux) and in North-East (Alsace) of France has been set up since 2012. These vine sites represent a diversity of environmental factors (i.e. soil and climate). The adopted approach is based on the measure of several indicators to assess nitrogen dynamic in soil, i.e. nitrogen mineralization, regarding microbial biomass and activity. Statistical analyses are performed to determine the relationship between biological indicator and nitrogen mineralisation regarding farmer's practices. The variability of the BCN indicators seems to be correlated to the physical and chemical parameters in the soil of the field. For all the sites, the bacterial biomass is correlated to the rate and kinetic of nitrogen in soil, however this bioindicator depend also on others parameters. Moreover, the functional bacterial diversity depends on the soil organic matter content. Differences in the bacterial biomass and kinetic of nitrogen mineralization are observed between the sites with clayey (Loire valley site) and sandy soils (Bordeaux site). In some tested vine systems, effects on bacterial activity and nitrogen dynamic are also observed depending on the farmer's practices: soil tillage, reduction of inputs, i.e. pesticides and fertilizers, and soil cover management between rows. The BCN indicators seem to be strong to assess the dynamics of the nitrogen in various sites underline the functional diversity of the soils. These

  10. A Novel Remote Sensing Approach for Prediction of Maize Yield Under Different Conditions of Nitrogen Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Díaz, Omar; Zaman-Allah, Mainassara A; Masuka, Benhildah; Hornero, Alberto; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Cairns, Jill E; Araus, José L

    2016-01-01

    Maize crop production is constrained worldwide by nitrogen (N) availability and particularly in poor tropical and subtropical soils. The development of affordable high-throughput crop monitoring and phenotyping techniques is key to improving maize cultivation under low-N fertilization. In this study several vegetation indices (VIs) derived from Red-Green-Blue (RGB) digital images at the leaf and canopy levels are proposed as low-cost tools for plant breeding and fertilization management. They were compared with the performance of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) measured at ground level and from an aerial platform, as well as with leaf chlorophyll content (LCC) and other leaf composition and structural parameters at flowering stage. A set of 10 hybrids grown under five different nitrogen regimes and adequate water conditions were tested at the CIMMYT station of Harare (Zimbabwe). Grain yield and leaf N concentration across N fertilization levels were strongly predicted by most of these RGB indices (with R (2)~ 0.7), outperforming the prediction power of the NDVI and LCC. RGB indices also outperformed the NDVI when assessing genotypic differences in grain yield and leaf N concentration within a given level of N fertilization. The best predictor of leaf N concentration across the five N regimes was LCC but its performance within N treatments was inefficient. The leaf traits evaluated also seemed inefficient as phenotyping parameters. It is concluded that the adoption of RGB-based phenotyping techniques may significantly contribute to the progress of plant breeding and the appropriate management of fertilization. PMID:27242867

  11. A Novel Remote Sensing Approach for Prediction of Maize Yield Under Different Conditions of Nitrogen Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Vergara-Díaz, Omar; Zaman-Allah, Mainassara A.; Masuka, Benhildah; Hornero, Alberto; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Cairns, Jill E.; Araus, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Maize crop production is constrained worldwide by nitrogen (N) availability and particularly in poor tropical and subtropical soils. The development of affordable high-throughput crop monitoring and phenotyping techniques is key to improving maize cultivation under low-N fertilization. In this study several vegetation indices (VIs) derived from Red-Green-Blue (RGB) digital images at the leaf and canopy levels are proposed as low-cost tools for plant breeding and fertilization management. They were compared with the performance of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) measured at ground level and from an aerial platform, as well as with leaf chlorophyll content (LCC) and other leaf composition and structural parameters at flowering stage. A set of 10 hybrids grown under five different nitrogen regimes and adequate water conditions were tested at the CIMMYT station of Harare (Zimbabwe). Grain yield and leaf N concentration across N fertilization levels were strongly predicted by most of these RGB indices (with R2~ 0.7), outperforming the prediction power of the NDVI and LCC. RGB indices also outperformed the NDVI when assessing genotypic differences in grain yield and leaf N concentration within a given level of N fertilization. The best predictor of leaf N concentration across the five N regimes was LCC but its performance within N treatments was inefficient. The leaf traits evaluated also seemed inefficient as phenotyping parameters. It is concluded that the adoption of RGB-based phenotyping techniques may significantly contribute to the progress of plant breeding and the appropriate management of fertilization. PMID:27242867

  12. The nitrogen budget for different forest types in the central Congo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauters, Marijn; Verbeeck, Hans; Cizungu, Landry; Boeckx, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of fundamental processes in different forest types is vital to understand the interaction of forests with their changing environment. Recent data analyses, as well as modeling activities have shown that the CO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems strongly depends on site fertility, i.e. nutrient availability. Accurate projections of future net forest growth and terrestrial CO2 uptake thus necessitate an improved understanding on nutrient cycles and how these are coupled to the carbon (C) cycle in forests. This holds especially for tropical forests, since they represent about 40-50% of the total carbon that is stored in terrestrial vegetation, with the Amazon basin and the Congo basin being the largest two contiguous blocks. However, due to political instability and reduced accessibility in the central Africa region, there is a strong bias in scientific research towards the Amazon basin. Consequently, central African forests are poorly characterized and their role in global change interactions shows distinct knowledge gaps, which is important bottleneck for all efforts to further optimize Earth system models explicitly including this region. Research in the Congo Basin region should combine assessments of both carbon stocks and the underlying nutrient cycles which directly impact the forest productivity. We set up a monitoring network for carbon stocks and nitrogen fluxes in four different forest types in the Congo Basin, which is now operative. With the preliminary data, we can get a glimpse of the differences in nitrogen budget and biogeochemistry of African mixed lowland rainforest, monodominant lowland forest, mixed montane forest and eucalypt plantations.

  13. Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr., C.T.

    2004-02-09

    Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

  14. Improvement of crop yield in dry environments: benchmarks, levels of organisation and the role of nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Sadras, V O; Richards, R A

    2014-05-01

    Crop yield in dry environments can be improved with complementary approaches including selecting for yield in the target environments, selecting for yield potential, and using indirect, trait- or genomic-based methods. This paper (i) outlines the achievements of direct selection for yield in improving drought adaptation, (ii) discusses the limitations of indirect approaches in the context of levels of organization, and (iii) emphasizes trade-offs and synergies between nitrogen nutrition and drought adaptation. Selection for yield in the water- and nitrogen-scarce environments of Australia improved wheat yield per unit transpiration at a rate of 0.12kg ha(-1) mm(-1) yr(-1); for indirect methods to be justified, they must return superior rates of improvement, achieve the same rate at lower cost or provide other cost-effective benefits, such as expanding the genetic basis for selection. Slow improvement of crop adaptation to water stress using indirect methods is partially related to issues of scale. Traits are thus classified into three broad groups: those that generally scale up from low levels of organization to the crop level (e.g. herbicide resistance), those that do not (e.g. grain yield), and traits that might scale up provided they are considered in a integrated manner with scientifically sound scaling assumptions, appropriate growing conditions, and screening techniques (e.g. stay green). Predicting the scalability of traits may help to set priorities in the investment of research efforts. Primary productivity in arid and semi-arid environments is simultaneously limited by water and nitrogen, but few attempts are made to target adaptation to water and nitrogen stress simultaneously. Case studies in wheat and soybean highlight biological links between improved nitrogen nutrition and drought adaptation. PMID:24638898

  15. Nitrogen Management for Irrigated Potato Production under Different Tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four years of potato (Solanum tuberosum) field study was conducted under center pivot irrigation using large size plots and standard industry cultural practices to evaluate the affects of reduced or conventional tillage and different N management practices; i.e. pre-plant N rates of either 56, 112, ...

  16. Use of GIS-based site-specific nitrogen management for improving energy efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) is a significant energy component of in support of crop production but it can be highly variable within fields. To our knowledge, no efforts have been made to employ GIS-based site-specific N management (SSNM) to assess and improve energy costs and efficiency. We examine recent SSNM ca...

  17. Improved Exciton Dissociation at Semiconducting Polymer:ZnO Donor:Acceptor Interfaces via Nitrogen Doping of ZnO

    PubMed Central

    Musselman, Kevin P; Albert-Seifried, Sebastian; Hoye, Robert L Z; Sadhanala, Aditya; Muñoz-Rojas, David; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Friend, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Exciton dissociation at the zinc oxide/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (ZnO/P3HT) interface as a function of nitrogen doping of the zinc oxide, which decreases the electron concentration from approximately 1019 cm−3 to 1017 cm−3, is reported. Exciton dissociation and device photocurrent are strongly improved with nitrogen doping. This improved dissociation of excitons in the conjugated polymer is found to result from enhanced light-induced de-trapping of electrons from the surface of the nitrogen-doped ZnO. The ability to improve the surface properties of ZnO by introducing a simple nitrogen dopant has general applicability. PMID:25520604

  18. Performance and recent improvement in microbial fuel cells for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal: A review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haishu; Xu, Shengjun; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhuang, Xuliang

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have become a promising technology for wastewater treatment accompanying electricity generation. Carbon and nitrogen removal can be achieved by utilizing the electron transfer between the anode and cathode in an MFC. However, large-scale power production and high removal efficiency must be achieved at a low cost to make MFCs practical and economically competitive in the future. This article reviews the principles, feasibility and bottlenecks of MFCs for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal, the recent advances and prospective strategies for performance improvement, as well as the involved microbes and electron transfer mechanisms. PMID:26899662

  19. Farm nitrogen balances in six European landscapes as an indicator for nitrogen losses and basis for improved management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgaard, T.; Bienkowski, J. F.; Bleeker, A.; Dragosits, U.; Drouet, J. L.; Durand, P.; Frumau, A.; Hutchings, N. J.; Kedziora, A.; Magliulo, V.; Olesen, J. E.; Theobald, M. R.; Maury, O.; Akkal, N.; Cellier, P.

    2012-12-01

    Improved management of nitrogen (N) in agriculture is necessary to achieve a sustainable balance between the production of food and other biomass, and the unwanted effects of N on water pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity deterioration and human health. To analyse farm N-losses and the complex interactions within farming systems, efficient methods for identifying emissions hotspots and evaluating mitigation measures are therefore needed. The present paper aims to fill this gap at the farm and landscape scales. Six agricultural landscapes in Poland (PL), the Netherlands (NL), France (FR), Italy (IT), Scotland (UK) and Denmark (DK) were studied, and a common method was developed for undertaking farm inventories and the derivation of farm N balances, N surpluses and for evaluating uncertainty for the 222 farms and 11 440 ha of farmland included in the study. In all landscapes, a large variation in the farm N surplus was found, and thereby a large potential for reductions. The highest average N surpluses were found in the most livestock-intensive landscapes of IT, FR, and NL; on average 202 ± 28, 179 ± 63 and 178 ± 20 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. All landscapes showed hotspots, especially from livestock farms, including a special UK case with large-scale landless poultry farming. Overall, the average N surplus from the land-based UK farms dominated by extensive sheep and cattle grazing was only 31 ± 10 kg N ha-1 yr-1, but was similar to the N surplus of PL and DK (122 ± 20 and 146 ± 55 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively) when landless poultry farming was included. We found farm N balances to be a useful indicator for N losses and the potential for improving N management. Significant correlations to N surplus were found, both with ammonia air concentrations and nitrate concentrations in soils and groundwater, measured during the period of N management data collection in the landscapes from 2007-2009. This indicates that farm N surpluses may be used as an

  20. Improved spectral fitting of nitrogen dioxide from OMI in the 405-465 nm window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geffen, J. H. G. M.; Boersma, K. F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; De Smedt, I.; Sneep, M.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2014-10-01

    An improved nitrogen dioxide (NO2) slant column density retrieval for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in the 405-465 nm spectral region is presented. Since the launch of OMI on board NASA's EOS-Aura satellite in 2004, DOAS retrievals of NO2 slant column densities have been the starting point for the KNMI DOMINO (v2.0) and NASA SP (v2.1) retrievals. However, recent intercomparisons between NO2 retrievals from OMI and other UV/Vis and limb spectrometers, as well as ground-based measurements, clearly suggested that OMI stratospheric NO2 is biased high. This study revises the OMI NO2 retrieval in detail. The representation of the OMI slit function to convolve high-resolution reference spectra onto the relevant spectral grid is improved. The window used for the wavelength calibration is optimised, leading to much-reduced fitting errors. Ozone and water vapour spectra used in the fit are updated, reflecting the recently improved knowledge on their absorption cross section as documented in the literature. The improved spectral fit also accounts for absorption by the O2-O2 collision complex and by liquid water over clear-water areas. The main changes in the improved spectral fitting result from the updates related to the wavelength calibration: the RMS error of the fit is reduced by 23% and the NO2 slant column by 0.85 × 1015 molec cm-2, independent of latitude, solar zenith angle and NO2 value. Including O2-O2 and liquid water absorption and updating the O3 and water vapour cross-section spectra further reduces NO2 slant columns on average by 0.35 × 1015 molec cm-2, accompanied with a further 9% reduction in the RMS error of the fit. The improved OMI NO2 slant columns are consistent with independent NO2 retrievals to within a range that can be explained by photo-chemically driven diurnal increases in stratospheric NO2 and by small differences in fitting window and fitting approach. The revisions indicate that current OMI NO2 slant columns suffered mostly from an

  1. Improved spectral fitting of nitrogen dioxide from OMI in the 405-465 nm window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geffen, J. H. G. M.; Boersma, K. F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; De Smedt, I.; Sneep, M.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2015-04-01

    An improved nitrogen dioxide (NO2) slant column density retrieval for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in the 405-465 nm spectral region is presented. Since the launch of OMI on board NASA's EOS-Aura satellite in 2004, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) retrievals of NO2 slant column densities have been the starting point for the KNMI DOMINO and NASA SP NO2 vertical column data as well as the OMI NO2 data of some other institutes. However, recent intercomparisons between NO2 retrievals from OMI and other UV/Vis and limb spectrometers, as well as ground-based measurements, suggest that OMI stratospheric NO2 is biased high. This study revises and, for the first time, fully documents the OMI NO2 retrieval in detail. The representation of the OMI slit function to convolve high-resolution reference spectra onto the relevant spectral grid is improved. The window used for the wavelength calibration is optimised, leading to much-reduced fitting errors. Ozone and water vapour spectra used in the fit are updated, reflecting the recently improved knowledge of their absorption cross section in the literature. The improved spectral fit also accounts for absorption by the O2-O2 collision complex and by liquid water over clear-water areas. The main changes in the improved spectral fitting result from the updates related to the wavelength calibration: the RMS error of the fit is reduced by 23% and the NO2 slant column by 0.85 × 1015 molec cm-2, independent of latitude, solar zenith angle and NO2 value. Including O2-O2 and liquid water absorption and updating the O3 and water vapour cross-section spectra further reduces NO2 slant columns on average by 0.35 × 1015 molec cm-2, accompanied by a further 9% reduction in the RMS error of the fit. The improved OMI NO2 slant columns are consistent with independent NO2 retrievals from other instruments to within a range that can be explained by photochemically driven diurnal increases in stratospheric NO2 and by

  2. Microbial Nitrogen-Cycle Gene Abundance in Soil of Cropland Abandoned for Different Periods

    PubMed Central

    Huhe; Borjigin, Shinchilelt; Buhebaoyin; Wu, Yanpei; Li, Minquan; Cheng, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    In Inner Mongolia, steppe grasslands face desertification or degradation because of human overuse and abandonment after inappropriate agricultural management. The soils in these abandoned croplands exist in heterogeneous environments characterized by widely fluctuating microbial growth. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of microbial genes encoding proteins involved in the nitrogen cycle was used to study Azotobacter species, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the soils from steppe grasslands and croplands abandoned for 2, 6, and 26 years. Except for nitrifying archaea and nitrous oxide-reducing bacteria, the relative genotypic abundance of microbial communities involved in nitrogen metabolism differed by approximately 2- to 10-fold between abandoned cropland and steppe grassland soils. Although nitrogen-cycle gene abundances varied with abandonment time, the abundance patterns of nitrogen-cycle genes separated distinctly into abandoned cropland versus light-grazing steppe grassland, despite the lack of any cultivation for over a quarter-century. Plant biomass and plant diversity exerted a significant effect on the abundance of microbial communities that mediate the nitrogen cycle (P < 0.002 and P < 0.03, respectively). The present study elucidates the ecology of bacteria that mediate the nitrogen cycle in recently abandoned croplands. PMID:27140199

  3. Nitrogen Metabolism in Lactating Goats Fed with Diets Containing Different Protein Sources

    PubMed Central

    Santos, A. B.; Pereira, M. L. A.; Silva, H. G. O.; Pedreira, M. S.; Carvalho, G. G. P.; Ribeiro, L. S. O.; Almeida, P. J. P.; Pereira, T. C. J.; Moreira, J. V.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate urea excretion, nitrogen balance and microbial protein synthesis in lactating goats fed with diets containing different protein sources in the concentrate (soybean meal, cottonseed meal, aerial part of cassava hay and leucaena hay). Four Alpine goats whose mean body weight was 42.6±6.1 kg at the beginning of the experiment, a mean lactation period of 94.0±9.0 days and a production of 1.7±0.4 kg of milk were distributed in a 4×4 Latin square with four periods of 15 days. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous, containing 103.0 g/kg of CP, 400 g/kg of Tifton 85 hay and 600 g/kg of concentrate. Diet containing cottonseed meal provided (p<0.05) increased excretion of urea and urea nitrogen in the urine (g/d and mg/kg of BW) when compared with leucaena hay. The diets affected the concentrations of urea nitrogen in plasma (p<0.05) and excretion of urea nitrogen in milk, being that soybean meal and cottonseed meal showed (p<0.05) higher than the average aerial part of the cassava hay. The use of diets with cottonseed meal as protein source in the concentrate in feeding of lactating goats provides greater nitrogen excretion in urine and negative nitrogen balance, while the concentrate with leucaena hay as a source of protein, provides greater ruminal microbial protein synthesis. PMID:25050000

  4. Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 1: Laboratory measurements at different conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, K.; Vakkilainen, E. ); Hupa, M. . Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-05-01

    Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis is high. There is only minor release during the drying stage. Ammonia is the main fixed nitrogen species formed. The rate of fixed nitrogen release increases with increasing temperature. The level of fixed nitrogen released by birch liquor is almost twice the level for pine liquor. Assuming complete conversion to NO, fixed nitrogen yields gave NO concentrations near typically measured values for flue gases in full scale recovery boilers. The purpose of this work was to gain more detailed information about the behavior of the fuel nitrogen in black liquor combustion. The work focused on the pyrolysis or devolatilization of the combustion process. Devolatilization is the stage at which the majority (typically 50--80%) of the liquor organics release from a fuel particle or droplet as gaseous species due to the rapid destruction of the organic macromolecules in the liquor. In this paper, the authors use the terms devolatilization and pyrolysis interchangeably with no difference in their meaning.

  5. Herbivore trampling as an alternative pathway for explaining differences in nitrogen mineralization in moist grasslands.

    PubMed

    Schrama, Maarten; Heijning, Pieter; Bakker, Jan P; van Wijnen, Harm J; Berg, Matty P; Olff, Han

    2013-05-01

    Studies addressing the role of large herbivores on nitrogen cycling in grasslands have suggested that the direction of effects depends on soil fertility. Via selection for high quality plant species and input of dung and urine, large herbivores have been shown to speed up nitrogen cycling in fertile grassland soils while slowing down nitrogen cycling in unfertile soils. However, recent studies show that large herbivores can reduce nitrogen mineralization in some temperate fertile soils, but not in others. To explain this, we hypothesize that large herbivores can reduce nitrogen mineralization in loamy or clay soils through soil compaction, but not in sandy soils. Especially under wet conditions, strong compaction in clay soils can lead to periods of soil anoxia, which reduces decomposition of soil organic matter and, hence, N mineralization. In this study, we use a long-term (37-year) field experiment on a salt marsh to investigate the hypothesis that the effect of large herbivores on nitrogen mineralization depends on soil texture. Our results confirm that the presence of large herbivores decreased nitrogen mineralization rate in a clay soil, but not in a sandy soil. By comparing a hand-mown treatment with a herbivore-grazed treatment, we show that these differences can be attributed to herbivore-induced changes in soil physical properties rather than to above-ground biomass removal. On clay soil, we find that large herbivores increase the soil water-filled porosity, induce more negative soil redox potentials, reduce soil macrofauna abundance, and reduce decomposition activity. On sandy soil, we observe no changes in these variables in response to grazing. We conclude that effects of large herbivores on nitrogen mineralization cannot be understood without taking soil texture, soil moisture, and feedbacks through soil macrofauna into account. PMID:23271034

  6. Microcystin-tolerant Rhizobium protects plants and improves nitrogen assimilation in Vicia faba irrigated with microcystin-containing waters.

    PubMed

    Lahrouni, Majida; Oufdou, Khalid; El Khalloufi, Fatima; Benidire, Loubna; Albert, Susann; Göttfert, Michael; Caviedes, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Llorente, Ignacio D; Oudra, Brahim; Pajuelo, Eloísa

    2016-05-01

    Irrigation of crops with microcystins (MCs)-containing waters-due to cyanobacterial blooms-affects plant productivity and could be a way for these potent toxins entering the food chain. This study was performed to establish whether MC-tolerant rhizobia could benefit growth, nodulation, and nitrogen metabolism of faba bean plants irrigated with MC-containing waters. For that, three different rhizobial strains-with different sensitivity toward MCs-were used: RhOF96 (most MC-sensitive strain), RhOF125 (most MC-tolerant strain), or Vicz1.1 (reference strain). As a control, plants grown without rhizobia and fertilized by NH4NO3 were included in the study. MC exposure decreased roots (30-37 %) and shoots (up to 15 %) dry weights in un-inoculated plants, whereas inoculation with rhizobia protects plants toward the toxic effects of MCs. Nodulation and nitrogen content were significantly impaired by MCs, with the exception of plants inoculated with the most tolerant strain RhOF125. In order to deep into the effect of inoculation on nitrogen metabolism, the nitrogen assimilatory enzymes (glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT)) were investigated: Fertilized plants showed decreased levels (15-30 %) of these enzymes, both in shoots and roots. By contrast, inoculated plants retained the levels of these enzymes in shoots and roots, as well as the levels of NADH-GOGAT activity in nodules. We conclude that the microcystin-tolerant Rhizobium protects faba bean plants and improves nitrogen assimilation when grown in the presence of MCs. PMID:26865488

  7. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  8. Mapping genetic variants underlying differences in the central nitrogen metabolism in fermenter yeasts.

    PubMed

    Jara, Matías; Cubillos, Francisco A; García, Verónica; Salinas, Francisco; Aguilera, Omayra; Liti, Gianni; Martínez, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Different populations within a species represent a rich reservoir of allelic variants, corresponding to an evolutionary signature of withstood environmental constraints. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are widely utilised in the fermentation of different kinds of alcoholic beverages, such as, wine and sake, each of them derived from must with distinct nutrient composition. Importantly, adequate nitrogen levels in the medium are essential for the fermentation process, however, a comprehensive understanding of the genetic variants determining variation in nitrogen consumption is lacking. Here, we assessed the genetic factors underlying variation in nitrogen consumption in a segregating population derived from a cross between two main fermenter yeasts, a Wine/European and a Sake isolate. By linkage analysis we identified 18 main effect QTLs for ammonium and amino acids sources. Interestingly, majority of QTLs were involved in more than a single trait, grouped based on amino acid structure and indicating high levels of pleiotropy across nitrogen sources, in agreement with the observed patterns of phenotypic co-variation. Accordingly, we performed reciprocal hemizygosity analysis validating an effect for three genes, GLT1, ASI1 and AGP1. Furthermore, we detected a widespread pleiotropic effect on these genes, with AGP1 affecting seven amino acids and nine in the case of GLT1 and ASI1. Based on sequence and comparative analysis, candidate causative mutations within these genes were also predicted. Altogether, the identification of these variants demonstrate how Sake and Wine/European genetic backgrounds differentially consume nitrogen sources, in part explaining independently evolved preferences for nitrogen assimilation and representing a niche of genetic diversity for the implementation of practical approaches towards more efficient strains for nitrogen metabolism. PMID:24466135

  9. Improving Model Representation of Reduced Nitrogen in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Human activity, including fossil fuel combustion and agriculture has greatly increased the amount of reactive nitrogen (RN) in the atmosphere and its subsequent deposition to land. Increases in deposition of RN compounds can adversely affect sensitive ecosystems and is a growing problem in many natural areas. The National Park Service in conjunction with Colorado State University researchers and assistance from the Forest Service conducted the Grand Teton Reactive Nitrogen Deposition Study (GrandTReNDS) involving spatially and temporally detailed measurements of RN during spring/summer 2011. In this work it was found that during summer months at the high elevation site Grand Targhee, 62% of the nitrogen deposition was due to reduced nitrogen, about equally split between dry and wet deposition, oxidized nitrogen accounted for 27% of the total, and the remaining was wet deposited organic nitrogen. An important next step to GrandTReNDS is the use of chemical transport models (CTMs) to estimate source contributions to RN in the park. Given the large contribution of reduced nitrogen species to total nitrogen deposition in the park, understanding and properly characterizing ammonia in CTMs is critical to estimating the total nitrogen deposition. A model performance evaluation of the CAMx uni-directional model and CMAQ bi-direction and uni-directional 2011 model simulations versus GrandTReNDS and other datasets was conducted. Preliminary results suggest that, in some areas, model performance of ambient ammonia concentration is more sensitive to the spatial resolution of the model and the accuracy of the spatial representation of emissions than to the incorporation of bi-directional flux. Additional model sensitivity runs, including sensitivity to resolution (with and without bi-directional flux capabilities), changes to model estimated ammonia dry deposition velocities, and improved representation of the spatial distribution of ammonia emissions, are used to identify the

  10. [XPS and Raman spectral analysis of nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films with different nitrogen content].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang-Shou; Zhu, Jia-Qi; Han, Jie-Cai; Tian, Gui; Tan, Man-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films were prepared on the polished C--Si substrates by introducing highly pure nitrogen gas into the cathode region and the depositing chamber synchronously using filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology. The nitrogen content in the films was controlled by changing the flow rate of nitrogen gas. The configuration of ta-C : N films was investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and visible Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the nitrogen content in the films increased from 0.84 at% to 5.37 at% monotonously when the nitrogen flow rate was varied from 2 seem to 20 sccm. The peak position of C (1s) core level moved towards higher binding energy with the increase in nitrogen content. The shift of C (1s) peak position could be ascribed to the chemical bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms even though more three-fold coordinated sp2 configuration as in graphite was formed when the films were doped with more nitrogen atoms. Additionally, the half width of C(1s) peak gradually was also broadened with increasing nitrogen content. In order to discover clearly the changing regularities of the microstructure of the films, the XPS C(1s) spectra and Raman spectra were deconvoluted using a Gaussian-Lorentzian mixed lineshape. It was shown that the tetrahedral hybridization component was still dominant even though the ratio of sp2/sp3 obtained from C(1s) spectra rose with the increase in nitrogen content. The Raman measurements demonstrated that the G peak position shifted towards higher frequency from 1,561 to 1,578 cm(-1) and the ratio of ID/IG also rose with the increase in nitrogen content. Both results indicated that the graphitizing tendency could occur with the increase in nitrogen content in the films. PMID:19385255

  11. Field observations of soil water content and nitrogen distribution on two hillslopes of different shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Huang, Manli; Hua, Jianlan; Zhang, Zhentin; Ni, Lixiao; Li, Ping; Chen, Yong; Zhu, Liang

    2015-06-01

    nitrogen concentrations compared to its mid and lower positions. Nitrogen storage in the low segment soil profile of the CCS was higher than its up segment, but they were similar on the CVS. The nitrogen redistributions on the hillslopes were dominantly from water regimes, in particular, from the lateral subsurface flow. Due to the diversity of water regimes in different shaped hillslopes, the interception of lateral subsurface flow and its nitrogen pollution should receive more attention in a humid region.

  12. Combined Spectral Index to Improve Ground-Based Estimates of Nitrogen Status in Dryland Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of the single ratio Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and ground-based remote sensing for estimating crop yield potential and basing in-season nitrogen (N) fertilizer application. The NDVI is positively related to crop N status and leaf ar...

  13. Assessing the Mechanisms Responsible for Differences between Nitrogen Requirements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeasts in Alcoholic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Brice, Claire; Sanchez, Isabelle; Tesnière, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation, and its abundance determines the fermentation rate and duration. The capacity to ferment under conditions of nitrogen deficiency differs between yeasts. A characterization of the nitrogen requirements of a set of 23 strains revealed large differences in their fermentative performances under nitrogen deficiency, and these differences reflect the nitrogen requirements of the strains. We selected and compared two groups of strains, one with low nitrogen requirements (LNRs) and the other with high nitrogen requirements (HNRs). A comparison of various physiological traits indicated that the differences are not related to the ability to store nitrogen or the protein content. No differences in protein synthesis activity were detected between strains with different nitrogen requirements. Transcriptomic analysis revealed expression patterns specific to each of the two groups of strains, with an overexpression of stress genes in HNR strains and a stronger expression of biosynthetic genes in LNR strains. Our data suggest that differences in glycolytic flux may originate from variations in nitrogen sensing and signaling under conditions of starvation. PMID:24334661

  14. Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: implications for soil carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Ashwood, Tom L

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate ({ge}53 {micro}m) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 {micro}m). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

  15. Tuning the work function of graphene by nitrogen plasma treatment with different radio-frequency powers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jian-Jhou; Lin, Yow-Jon

    2014-06-09

    Graphene prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method was treated with nitrogen plasma under different radio-frequency (rf) power conditions in order to experimentally study the change in the work function. Control of the rf power could change the work function of graphene from 4.91 eV to 4.37 eV. It is shown that the increased rf power may lead to the increased number of graphitic nitrogen, increasing the electron concentration, and shifting the Fermi level to higher energy. The ability to controllably tune the work function of graphene is essential for optimizing the efficiency of optoelectronic and electronic devices.

  16. Nitrogen nutrient status induces sexual differences in responses to cadmium in Populus yunnanensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lianghua; Han, Ying; Jiang, Hao; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2011-01-01

    Populus yunnanensis was employed as a model species to detect sexual differences in growth, physiological, biochemical, and ultrastructural responses to cadmium (Cd) stress, nitrogen (N) deposition, and their combination. Compared with the control conditions, Cd decreased plant biomass, damaged the photosynthetic apparatus, visible as a decreased maximum efficiency of photosystem II (PSII; Fv/Fm) and effective quantum yield of PSII (Yield), depressed gas exchange capacity, and induced oxidative stress, visible as the disruption of antioxidative enzymes and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in both sexes. On the other hand, Cd toxicity was mitigated by the recovery of gas exchange capacity, a decrease in ROS, and improvement of the redox imbalance in both sexes when N deposition was applied. However, males showed a higher gas exchange capacity, lower enzyme inhibition and ROS accumulation, stronger abilities to maintain cellular redox homeostasis, and a better maintenance of chloroplast ultrastructure than did females when exposed to Cd stress alone. Although males exhibited a higher Cd content in leaves than did females, males also accumulated higher levels of non-protein thiols (NP-SHs) and free amino acids (FAAs) for detoxification than did females. Sexual differences induced by Cd, visible, for example, in Fv/Fm, Yield, net photosynthesis rate (A), and stomatal conductance (gs), decreased under N deposition, as no significant differences between the sexes existed in these parameters under the combined treatment. The results indicated that females are more sensitive to Cd stress and suffer more injuries than do males. Moreover, N deposition can mitigate Cd toxicity and decrease sexual differences in Cd sensitivity. PMID:21778178

  17. Total lipid production of the green alga Nannochloropsis sp. QII under different nitrogen regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, Yu.; Hubbard, J.S.; Holzer, G.; Tornabene, T.G.

    1987-06-01

    The green alga Nannochloropsis sp. QII was cultivated in media with sufficient and growth-limiting levels of nitrogen (nitrate). Nitrogen deficiency promoted lipid synthesis yielding cells with lipids comprising 55% of the biomass. The major lipids were triacylglycerols (79%), polar lipids (9%) and hydrocarbons (2.5%). The polar lipids consisted of a broad range of phospholipids, glycolipids and sulfolipids. Other lipids identified were pigments, free fatty acids, saponifiable and unsaponifiable sterol derivatives, various glycerides, a family of alkyl-1, 4-dioxane derivatives and a series of alkyl- and hydroxy-alkyl-dimethyl-acetals. Experiments in which /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was provided at different times in the growth cycle demonstrated that enhanced lipid biosynthesis at low nitrogen levels resulted principally from de novo CO/sub 2/ fixation.

  18. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for Nitrogen Fixation and its Application to Improve Plant Growth under Nitrogen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Setten, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Fox, Ana Romina; Lisi, Christian; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Pagano, Elba; Díaz-Paleo, Antonio; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops. PMID:23675499

  19. Persistence of biological nitrogen fixation in high latitude grass-clover grasslands under different management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakakis, Vasileios; Sturite, Ievina; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) can substantially contribute to N supply in permanent grasslands, improving N yield and forage quality, while reducing inorganic N inputs. Among the factors critical to the performance of BNF in grass-legume mixtures are selected grass and legume species, proportion of legumes, the soil-climatic conditions, in particular winter conditions, and management practices (e.g. fertilization and compaction). In high latitude grasslands, low temperatures can reduce the performance of BNF by hampering the legumés growth and by suppressing N2 fixation. Estimation of BNF in field experiments is not straightforward. Different methods have been developed providing different results. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of BNF, in a newly established field experiment in North Norway over four years. The grassland consisted of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) sawn in three proportions (0, 15 and 30% in total) together with timothy (Pheum pretense L.) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis L.). Three levels of compaction were applied each year (no tractor, light tractor, heavy tractor) together with two different N rates (110 kg N/ha as cattle slurry or 170 kg N/ha as cattle slurry and inorganic N fertilizer). We applied two different methods, the 15N natural abundance and the difference method, to estimate BNF in the first harvest of each year. Overall, the difference method overestimated BNF relative to the 15N natural abundance method. BNF in the first harvest was compared to winter survival of red and white clover plants, which decreased with increasing age of the grassland. However, winter conditions did not seem to affect the grassland's ability to fix N in spring. The fraction of N derived from the atmosphere (NdfA) in white and red clover was close to 100% in each spring, indicating no suppression of BNF. BNF increased the total N yield of the grasslands by up to 75%, mainly due to high

  20. Increased Needle Nitrogen Contents Did Not Improve Shoot Photosynthetic Performance of Mature Nitrogen-Poor Scots Pine Trees

    PubMed Central

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Lutz, Martina; Räntfors, Mats; Näsholm, Torgny; Wallin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that temperate and boreal forests are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. However, few studies have provided a detailed account of how carbon (C) acquisition of such forests reacts to increasing N supply. We combined measurements of needle-scale biochemical photosynthetic capacities and continuous observations of shoot-scale photosynthetic performance from several canopy positions with simple mechanistic modeling to evaluate the photosynthetic responses of mature N-poor boreal Pinus sylvestris to N fertilization. The measurements were carried out in August 2013 on 90-year-old pine trees growing at Rosinedalsheden research site in northern Sweden. In spite of a nearly doubling of needle N content in response to the fertilization, no effect on the long-term shoot-scale C uptake was recorded. This lack of N-effect was due to strong light limitation of photosynthesis in all investigated canopy positions. The effect of greater N availability on needle photosynthetic capacities was also constrained by development of foliar phosphorus (P) deficiency following N addition. Thus, P deficiency and accumulation of N in arginine appeared to contribute toward lower shoot-scale nitrogen-use efficiency in the fertilized trees, thereby additionally constraining tree-scale responses to increasing N availability. On the whole our study suggests that the C uptake response of the studied N-poor boreal P. sylvestris stand to enhanced N availability is constrained by the efficiency with which the additional N is utilized. This efficiency, in turn, depends on the ability of the trees to use the greater N availability for additional light capture. For stands that have not reached canopy closure, increase in leaf area following N fertilization would be the most effective way for improving light capture and C uptake while for mature stands an increased leaf area may have a rather limited effect on light capture owing to increased self-shading. This raises the

  1. Increased Needle Nitrogen Contents Did Not Improve Shoot Photosynthetic Performance of Mature Nitrogen-Poor Scots Pine Trees.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Lutz, Martina; Räntfors, Mats; Näsholm, Torgny; Wallin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that temperate and boreal forests are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. However, few studies have provided a detailed account of how carbon (C) acquisition of such forests reacts to increasing N supply. We combined measurements of needle-scale biochemical photosynthetic capacities and continuous observations of shoot-scale photosynthetic performance from several canopy positions with simple mechanistic modeling to evaluate the photosynthetic responses of mature N-poor boreal Pinus sylvestris to N fertilization. The measurements were carried out in August 2013 on 90-year-old pine trees growing at Rosinedalsheden research site in northern Sweden. In spite of a nearly doubling of needle N content in response to the fertilization, no effect on the long-term shoot-scale C uptake was recorded. This lack of N-effect was due to strong light limitation of photosynthesis in all investigated canopy positions. The effect of greater N availability on needle photosynthetic capacities was also constrained by development of foliar phosphorus (P) deficiency following N addition. Thus, P deficiency and accumulation of N in arginine appeared to contribute toward lower shoot-scale nitrogen-use efficiency in the fertilized trees, thereby additionally constraining tree-scale responses to increasing N availability. On the whole our study suggests that the C uptake response of the studied N-poor boreal P. sylvestris stand to enhanced N availability is constrained by the efficiency with which the additional N is utilized. This efficiency, in turn, depends on the ability of the trees to use the greater N availability for additional light capture. For stands that have not reached canopy closure, increase in leaf area following N fertilization would be the most effective way for improving light capture and C uptake while for mature stands an increased leaf area may have a rather limited effect on light capture owing to increased self-shading. This raises the

  2. PCS Nitrogen: Combustion Fan System Optimization Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Chemical Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-01-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program case study describes how, in 2003, PCS Nitrogen, Inc., improved the efficiency of the combustion fan on a boiler at the company's chemical fertilizer plant in Augusta, Georgia. The project saved $420,000 and 76,400 million British thermal units (MBtu) per year. In addition, maintenance needs declined, because there is now less stress on the fan motor and bearings and less boiler feed water usage. This project was so successful that the company has implemented more efficiency improvements that should result in energy cost savings of nearly $1 million per year.

  3. Environmental analysis of sunflower production with different forms of mineral nitrogen fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, D; Bardi, L; Fierro, A; Jez, S; Basosi, R

    2013-11-15

    Environmental profiles of mineral nitrogen fertilizers were used to evaluate the environmental disturbances related to their use in cultivation systems in Europe. Since the production of mineral fertilizers requires a large amount of energy, the present study of bioenergy systems is relevant in order to achieve crop yields less dependent on fossil fuels and to reduce the environmental impact due to fertilization. In this study, the suitability of the LCA methodology to analyze the environmental impact of sunflower cultivation systems with different forms of mineral nitrogen fertilizers urea and ammonium nitrate was investigated. Effects on climate change were estimated by the use of Ecoinvent 2.2 database default value for soil N2O emission factor (1%) and local emission data (0.8%) of mineral nitrogen applied to soils. LCA analysis showed a higher impact on environmental categories (human health and ecosystem quality) for the system in which urea was used as a nitrogen source. Use of urea fertilizer showed a higher impact on resource consumption due to fossil fuel consumption. Use of mineral nitrogen fertilizers showed a higher environmental burden than other inputs required for sunflower cultivation systems under study. Urea and ammonium nitrate showed, respectively, a 7.8% and 4.9% reduced impact of N2O as greenhouse gas by using direct field data of soil N2O emission factor compared to the default soil emission factor of 2006 IPCC Guidelines. Use of ammonium nitrate as mineral nitrogen fertilizer in sunflower cultivation would have a lower impact on environmental categories considered. Further environmental analysis of available technologies for fertilizer production might be also evaluated in order to reduce the environmental impacts of each fertilizer. PMID:23974447

  4. [Effects of poplar-amaranth intercropping system on the soil nitrogen loss under different nitrogen applying levels].

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun; Xue, Jian-Hui; Wu, Dian-Ming; Jin, Mei-Juan; Wu, Yong-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Characteristics of soil nitrogen loss were investigated based on field experiments in two types of poplar-amaranth intercropping systems (spacing: L1 2 m x 5 m, L2 2 m x 15 m) with four N application rates, i. e., 0 (N1), 91 (N2), 137 (N3) and 183 (N4) kg · hm(-2). The regulation effects on the soil surface runoff, leaching loss and soil erosion were different among the different types of intercropping systems: L1 > L2 > L3 (amaranth monocropping). Compared with the amaranth monocropping, the soil surface runoff rates of L1 and L2 decreased by 65.1% and 55.9%, the soil leaching rates of L1 and L2 with a distance of 0.5 m from the poplar tree row de- creased by 30.0% and 28.9%, the rates with a distance of 1. 5 m decreased by 25. 6% and 21.9%, and the soil erosion rates decreased by 65.0% and 55.1%, respectively. The control effects of two intercropping systems on TN, NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N in soil runoff and leaching loss were in the order of L1 > L2 > L3. Compared with the amaranth monocropping, TN, NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N loss rates in soil runoff of L1 decreased by 62.9%, 45.1% and 69.2%, while the loss rates of L2 decreased by 23.4%, 6.9% and 46.2% under N1 (91 kg · hm(-2)), respectively. High- er tree-planting density and closer positions to the polar tree row were more effective on controlling the loss rates of NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N caused by soil leaching. The loss proportion of NO(3-)-N in soil runoff decreased with the increasing nitrogen rate under the same tree-planting density, while that of NH(4+)-N increased. Leaching loss of NO(3-)-N had a similar trend with that of NH(4+)-N, i. e. , N3 > N2 > N1 > N0. PMID:25757310

  5. Genetic engineering of improved nitrogen use efficiency in rice by the tissue-specific expression of alanine aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Shrawat, Ashok K; Carroll, Rebecka T; DePauw, Mary; Taylor, Gregory J; Good, Allen G

    2008-09-01

    Summary Nitrogen is quantitatively the most essential nutrient for plants and a major factor limiting crop productivity. One of the critical steps limiting the efficient use of nitrogen is the ability of plants to acquire it from applied fertilizer. Therefore, the development of crop plants that absorb and use nitrogen more efficiently has been a long-term goal of agricultural research. In an attempt to develop nitrogen-efficient plants, rice (Oryza sativa L.) was genetically engineered by introducing a barley AlaAT (alanine aminotransferase) cDNA driven by a rice tissue-specific promoter (OsAnt1). This modification increased the biomass and grain yield significantly in comparison with control plants when plants were well supplied with nitrogen. Compared with controls, transgenic rice plants also demonstrated significant changes in key metabolites and total nitrogen content, indicating increased nitrogen uptake efficiency. The development of crop plants that take up and assimilate nitrogen more efficiently would not only improve the use of nitrogen fertilizers, resulting in lower production costs, but would also have significant environmental benefits. These results are discussed in terms of their relevance to the development of strategies to engineer enhanced nitrogen use efficiency in crop plants. PMID:18510577

  6. Altering blood flow does not reveal differences between nitrogen and helium kinetics in brain or in skeletal miracle in sheep.

    PubMed

    Doolette, David J; Upton, Richard N; Grant, Cliff

    2015-03-01

    In underwater diving, decompression schedules are based on compartmental models of nitrogen and helium tissue kinetics. However, these models are not based on direct measurements of nitrogen and helium kinetics. In isoflurane-anesthetized sheep, nitrogen and helium kinetics in the hind limb (n = 5) and brain (n = 5) were determined during helium-oxygen breathing and after return to nitrogen-oxygen breathing. Nitrogen and helium concentrations in arterial, femoral vein, and sagittal sinus blood samples were determined using headspace gas chromatography, and venous blood flows were monitored continuously using ultrasonic Doppler. The experiment was repeated at different states of hind limb blood flow and cerebral blood flow. Using arterial blood gas concentrations and blood flows as input, parameters and model selection criteria of various compartmental models of hind limb and brain were estimated by fitting to the observed venous gas concentrations. In both the hind limb and brain, nitrogen and helium kinetics were best fit by models with multiexponential kinetics. In the brain, there were no differences in nitrogen and helium kinetics. Hind limb models fit separately to the two gases indicated that nitrogen kinetics were slightly faster than helium, but models with the same kinetics for both gases fit the data well. In the hind limb and brain, the blood:tissue exchange of nitrogen is similar to that of helium. On the basis of these results, it is inappropriate to assign substantially different time constants for nitrogen and helium in all compartments in decompression algorithms. PMID:25525213

  7. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cendrero-Mateo, M. Pilar; Moran, M. Susan; Papuga, Shirley A.; Thorp, K.R.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Rascher, U.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  8. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Cendrero-Mateo, M Pilar; Moran, M Susan; Papuga, Shirley A; Thorp, K R; Alonso, L; Moreno, J; Ponce-Campos, G; Rascher, U; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  9. Synthesis of nitrogen-doping carbon dots with different photoluminescence properties by controlling the surface states.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yun Huan; Liu, Ze Xi; Li, Rong Sheng; Zou, Hong Yan; Lin, Min; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-03-28

    Surface states of carbon dots (CDs) are critical to the photoemission properties of CDs. By carefully adjusting the reaction conditions in a hydrothermal synthesis route, we have prepared a series of CDs with excitation-dependent emission (EDE) and excitation-independent emission (EIE) properties by controlling the content of nitrogen elements, confirming that the characteristic optical properties of CDs originate from their energy levels. It has been found that surface-passivation of the as-prepared CDs by nitrogen doping can improve the emission efficiency and be beneficial to EIE features due to the single electron transition resulting from the single functional groups. And the as-prepared CDs can specifically bind with Hg(2+) with the emission quenched because of the electron transfer from the LUMO levels of CDs to Hg(2+). PMID:26955862

  10. Synthesis of nitrogen-doping carbon dots with different photoluminescence properties by controlling the surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yun Huan; Liu, Ze Xi; Li, Rong Sheng; Zou, Hong Yan; Lin, Min; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Surface states of carbon dots (CDs) are critical to the photoemission properties of CDs. By carefully adjusting the reaction conditions in a hydrothermal synthesis route, we have prepared a series of CDs with excitation-dependent emission (EDE) and excitation-independent emission (EIE) properties by controlling the content of nitrogen elements, confirming that the characteristic optical properties of CDs originate from their energy levels. It has been found that surface-passivation of the as-prepared CDs by nitrogen doping can improve the emission efficiency and be beneficial to EIE features due to the single electron transition resulting from the single functional groups. And the as-prepared CDs can specifically bind with Hg2+ with the emission quenched because of the electron transfer from the LUMO levels of CDs to Hg2+.Surface states of carbon dots (CDs) are critical to the photoemission properties of CDs. By carefully adjusting the reaction conditions in a hydrothermal synthesis route, we have prepared a series of CDs with excitation-dependent emission (EDE) and excitation-independent emission (EIE) properties by controlling the content of nitrogen elements, confirming that the characteristic optical properties of CDs originate from their energy levels. It has been found that surface-passivation of the as-prepared CDs by nitrogen doping can improve the emission efficiency and be beneficial to EIE features due to the single electron transition resulting from the single functional groups. And the as-prepared CDs can specifically bind with Hg2+ with the emission quenched because of the electron transfer from the LUMO levels of CDs to Hg2+. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00402d

  11. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  12. Improvements to the treatment of organic nitrogen chemistry & deposition in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  13. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ (CMAS Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  14. Improving nitrogen management via a regional management plan for Chinese rice production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang; Chen, Xinping; Cui, Zhenling; Wang, Guiliang; Zhang, Weifeng

    2015-09-01

    A lack of basic information on optimal nitrogen (N) management often results in over- or under-application of N fertilizer in small-scale intensive rice farming. Here, we present a new database of N input from a survey of 6611 small-scale rice farmers and rice yield in response to added N in 1177 experimental on-farm tests across eight agroecological subregions of China. This database enables us to evaluate N management by farmers and develop an optimal approach to regional N management. We also investigated grain yield, N application rate, and estimated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in comparison to N application and farming practices. Across all farmers, the average N application rate, weighted by the area of rice production in each subregion, was 210 kg ha-1 and ranged from 30 to 744 kg ha-1 across fields and from 131 to 316 kg ha-1 across regions. The regionally optimal N rate (RONR) determined from the experiments averaged 167 kg ha-1 and varied from 114 to 224 kg N ha-1 for the different regions. If these RONR were widely adopted in China, approximately 56% of farms would reduce their use of N fertilizer, and approximately 33% would increase their use of N fertilizer. As a result, grain yield would increase by 7.4% from 7.14 to 7.67 Mg ha-1, and the estimated GHG emissions would be reduced by 11.1% from 1390 to 1236 kg carbon dioxide (CO2) eq Mg-1 grain. These results suggest that to achieve the goals of improvement in regional yield and sustainable environmental development, regional N use should be optimized among N-poor and N-rich farms and regions in China.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-01-28

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, it was planned to investigate the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and to obtain data on the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane. The investigation of the reaction mechanism will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations. The last component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium. In the current reporting period, the screening of the promoted catalysts were completed, sufficient amount of the selected catalysts were prepared and delivered to TDA for long term deactivation testing.

  16. Effect of cooling rate on the survival of cryopreserved rooster sperm: Comparison of different distances in the vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, M; Mosca, F; Abdel Sayed, A; Zaniboni, L; Mangiagalli, M G; Colombo, E; Cerolini, S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present trial was to study the effect of different freezing rates on the survival of cryopreserved rooster semen packaged in straws. Slow and fast freezing rates were obtained keeping straws at different distances in the vapor above the surface of the nitrogen during freezing. Adult Lohmann roosters (n=27) were used. Two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, semen was packaged in straws and frozen comparing the distances of 1, 3 and 5cm in nitrogen vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen. In Experiment 2, the distances of 3, 7 and 10cm above the surfaces of the liquid nitrogen were compared. Sperm viability, motility and progressive motility and the kinetic variables were assessed in fresh and cryopreserved semen samples. The recovery rates after freezing/thawing were also calculated. In Experiment 1, there were no significant differences among treatments for all semen quality variables. In Experiment 2, the percentage of viable (46%) and motile (22%) sperm in cryopreserved semen was greater when semen was placed 3cm compared with 7 and 10cm in the vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen. The recovery rate of progressive motile sperm after thawing was also greater when semen was stored 3cm in the vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen. More rapid freezing rates are required to improve the survival of rooster sperm after cryopreservation and a range of distances from 1 to 5cm in nitrogen vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen is recommended for optimal sperm viability. PMID:27349144

  17. Improving Student Writing Through Different Writing Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Sean; Haley, Jennifer

    This report describes a program for improving writing skills through choices of structured and unstructured writing process. The purpose of this program is to increase their ability to produce quality writing as measured by the district's fourth grade writing rubric. The targeted population consisted of an average fourth grade class, located in a…

  18. Improvement of tribological behavior of a Ti Al Zr alloy by nitrogen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Z.; Zu, X. T.; He, X.; Qiu, S. Y.; Cao, J.; Huang, X. Q.

    2006-07-01

    Surface modification of a Ti-Al-Zr alloy with nitrogen implantation is considered as a method to improve its tribological properties especially wear and hardness. The implantation was carried out at fluences range from 1 × 10 16 to 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 and energy 65 keV. The tribological tests for the friction coefficients and wear were made on a pin-on-disk tribotester with the load 60 mN. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed to obtain surface characterization of the implanted sample. The unimplanted and implanted samples were also annealed at 500 °C in order to understand the influence of annealing on the tribological properties of Ti-Al-Zr. The hardness showed significant improvement at the higher fluence. After annealing at 500 °C, the friction coefficient exhibited a relative decrease for the nitrogen-implanted samples. In addition, the wear rates of the implanted samples exhibited a great decrease after annealing at 500 °C. Nature of the surface and reason for the variation and improvement in wear resistance were discussed in detail.

  19. Corrosion behaviors of Mo coating on stainless steel 316 substrates implanted by different nitrogen ion fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Madjid; Bafandeh, Nastaran

    2014-03-01

    The molybdenum nitride coating was produced by nitrogen ion implantation of the molybdenum layer deposited on the stainless steel 316 (SS) substrates. At first, molybdenum layers were deposited on the substrates by ion beam sputtering method, then nitrogen ions with an energy of 30 keV and a fluence between 1×1017 and 12×1017 N+ cm-2 were implanted in Mo/SS system. Crystal structure and topography of the surface are investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) image respectively. XRD patterns showed the formation of molybdenum nitride phases in all implanted samples. Corrosion tests showed that the corrosion resistance of the samples strongly depends on the nitrogen applied fluences. A considerable improvement of corrosion performance by increasing ions fluences was observed. The lowest corrosion current density with amount of 0.1 μA/cm2 was obtained at 12×1017 ions/cm2 fluence in our case.

  20. Generation and reduction of nitrogen oxides in firing different kinds of fuel in a circulating fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munts, V. A.; Munts, Yu. G.; Baskakov, A. P.; Proshin, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    The processes through which nitrogen oxides are generated and reduced in the course of firing different kinds of fuel in a circulating fluidized bed are addressed. All experimental studies were carried by the authors on their own laboratory installations. To construct a model simulating the generation of nitrogen oxides, the fuel combustion process in a fluidized bed was subdivided into two stages: combustion of volatiles and combustion of coke residue. The processes through which nitrogen oxides are generated and reduced under the conditions of firing fuel with shortage of oxygen (which is one of efficient methods for reducing nitrogen oxide emissions in firing fuel in a fluidized bed) are considered.

  1. Improving the accuracy of central difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli

    1988-01-01

    General difference approximations to the fluid dynamic equations require an artificial viscosity in order to converge to a steady state. This artificial viscosity serves two purposes. One is to suppress high frequency noise which is not damped by the central differences. The second purpose is to introduce an entropy-like condition so that shocks can be captured. These viscosities need a coefficient to measure the amount of viscosity to be added. In the standard scheme, a scalar coefficient is used based on the spectral radius of the Jacobian of the convective flux. However, this can add too much viscosity to the slower waves. Hence, it is suggested that a matrix viscosity be used. This gives an appropriate viscosity for each wave component. With this matrix valued coefficient, the central difference scheme becomes closer to upwind biased methods.

  2. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering. PMID:25971893

  3. Improved analysis of dissolved organic nitrogen in water via electrodialysis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Anbang; Chen, Baiyang; Zhang, Liang; Westerhoff, Paul

    2015-02-17

    This study evaluated electrodialysis (ED) for direct, accurate, and precise dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) analysis in water. Unlike conventional methods that calculate DON as the difference between total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), we designed a compact ED reactor as a pretreatment tool that completely separates DIN from DON in water and then measures DON by equating DON to TDN. The experiments confirmed that the ED pretreatment process can achieve 99% removal of all three major DIN species (i.e., ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate) and an average recovery rate of 88% for an array of model DON compounds of varying characteristics (e.g., urea, amino acids, tripeptide, protein, and humic substances). Variations in nitrogen removal and recovery might be explained by a combined effect of molecular weight, acid dissociation ability (pK(a)), aromaticity, and ED reactor configurations. For model solutions with DIN/DON ratios varying from 1 to 10 mg-N/mg-N, the relative standard deviations in DON concentrations were considerably lower with ED pretreatment (<10%) than without pretreatment (47%). A survey of seven field samples, including lake water, tap water, and treated wastewater, also demonstrated the benefits of using ED pretreatment as compared with a conventional DON analysis method. Overall, this study provides evidence and mechanistic insight for a new DON detection method that uses ED pretreatment. The ED unit is robust for separating DIN and DON, and thus it may facilitate more frequent detection of DON and ultimately enhances understanding of DON issues in the environmental studies. PMID:25621718

  4. Improved retrieval of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column densities by means of MKIV Brewer spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diémoz, H.; Siani, A. M.; Redondas, A.; Savastiouk, V.; McElroy, C. T.; Navarro-Comas, M.; Hase, F.

    2014-11-01

    A new algorithm to retrieve nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column densities using MKIV ("Mark IV") Brewer spectrophotometers is described. The method includes several improvements, such as a more recent spectroscopic data set, the reduction of measurement noise, interference by other atmospheric species and instrumental settings, and a better determination of the zenith sky air mass factor. The technique was tested during an ad hoc calibration campaign at the high-altitude site of Izaña (Tenerife, Spain) and the results of the direct sun and zenith sky geometries were compared to those obtained by two reference instruments from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC): a Fourier Transform Infrared Radiometer (FTIR) and an advanced visible spectrograph (RASAS-II) based on the differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) technique. To determine the extraterrestrial constant, an easily implementable extension of the standard Langley technique for very clean sites without tropospheric NO2 was developed which takes into account the daytime linear drift of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide due to photochemistry. The measurement uncertainty was thoroughly determined by using a Monte Carlo technique. Poisson noise and wavelength misalignments were found to be the most influential contributors to the overall uncertainty, and possible solutions are proposed for future improvements. The new algorithm is backward-compatible, thus allowing for the reprocessing of historical data sets.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-11-30

    temperature programmed desorption studies a strong interaction between manganese and cerium. Presence of manganese not only enhanced the reduction rate of NO by methane, but also significantly improved the N{sub 2} selectivity. To increase the activity of the Mn-promoted catalyst, the manganese content of the catalyst need to be optimized and different methods of catalyst preparation and different reactor types need to be investigated to lower the transport limitations in the reactor.

  6. Nitrogen and phosphorus in runoff from cattle manure compost windrows of different maturities.

    PubMed

    Larney, Francis J; Olson, Andrew F; Miller, Jim J; Tovell, Bonnie C

    2014-03-01

    Manure composting has become commonplace in the beef cattle ( L.) feedlot industry in Alberta. However, the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) characteristics of runoff from windrows subjected to heavy rainfall at different compost maturities are unknown. On Days 18, 26, 40, 54, 81, 109, and 224 of composting, a rainfall simulator generated runoff, which was collected in timed 5-L increments, creating the variable "time during runoff event" (TDRE). The volumetric runoff coefficient of windrows increased from 24% of incident rainfall on Day 0 to 69% by Day 90. Ammonium-nitrogen showed a significant maturity × TDRE interaction on Day 18, increasing from 46 mg L for the 0- to 5-L increment to 172 mg L for the 25- to 30-L increment, as did total dissolved phosphorus (TDP), increasing from 36 to 61 mg L. Nitrate-nitrogen had a runoff export coefficient of 19.5 mg m min on Day 224, which was significantly higher than 1.8 to 6.3 mg m min on Days 18 to 54. Across the 224-d composting period, compost NO-N concentration explained 87% of runoff NO-N, whereas compost water-soluble P explained 68% of runoff TDP. The occurrence and duration of rainfall events relative to the compost maturity spectrum has implications for the magnitude of N and P mobility and overall nutrient losses. PMID:25602668

  7. [Evaluation of nitrogen loss way in summer maize system under different fertilizer N managements].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Hu, Ke-Lin; Li, Guang-De; Wang, Huan-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate nitrogen (N) loss from soil-crop systems under different fertilizer N managements, and to provide some suggestions on optimizing fertilizer management practices. The experiment was carried in high yield production area of Huantai county in Shandong province in 2009. Four kinds of fertilizer N application practices were designed, including CK, farmer practice (FP), optimizing fertilizer application (OPT) and controlled release fertilizer (CRT) for studying the fate of N during the maize growth season in 2009. The water and nitrogen management model (WNMM) was used to simulate the dynamics of soil water and N fate. The results indicated that the ratio of nitrate leaching and NH3 volatilization accounting of fertilizer N ranged from 6% to 18% and 5% to 34%, and their means were 12.7% and 20.7%, respectively. The amount of N leaching under OPT was 14.5 kg x hm(-2), was the lowest in all treatments. The amount of NH3 volatilization under CRT was 7.6 kg x hm(-2), respectively, was the lowest in all treatments. The order of total N loss under four treatments followed as: FP > OPT > CRF approximately CK. Both OPT and CRT treatments are the best management practices considering their high grain yield, water and nitrogen use efficiencies, and environmental protection. PMID:22165230

  8. Experimental analysis of a nitrogen removal process simulation of wastewater land treatment under three different wheat planting densities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Qi; Chen, Jia-Jun; Tian, Kai-Ming; Lu, Yan

    2002-07-01

    Nitrogen contaminant transport, transformation and uptake simulation experiments were conducted in green house under three different planting density of winter wheat. They were Group A, planting density of 0.0208 plants/cm2, Group B, 0.1042 plants/cm2, and Group C, 0.1415 plants/cm2. The capacity and ratio of nitrogen removal were different on three kinds of conditions of wastewater land treatment. From analysis of wastewater treatment capacity, wastewater concentration and irrigation intensity for Group C were suitable and nitrogen quantity added was 2 times of that for Group B, 2.6 times for Group A while nitrogen residue was only 7.06%. Hence, wastewater irrigation and treatment design with purpose of waste water treatment should select the design with maximum capacity, optimal removal ratio and least residue in soil, which was closely related to crop planting density, crop growth status and also background nitrogen quantity in soil. PMID:12211980

  9. Nitrogen transformations under different conditions in open ponds by means of microalgae-bacteria consortium treating pig slurry.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Cristina; Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; García-González, Maria Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Four open ponds inoculated with microalgae-bacteria consortium treating different swine slurries (fresh and anaerobically digested) were evaluated in terms of nitrogen transformation under optimal and real conditions of temperature and illumination. Ammonium complete depletion was not achieved. Ponds operated under real conditions presented lower ammonium removal. Elimination capacities were around 26 mg N/Ld and were subsequently increased with increasing inlet ammonium loading rate. Different nitrogen transformation was observed depending on substrate source. When anaerobically digested slurry was fed to the ponds, nitrification followed by biomass uptake and denitrification were the main nitrogen transformation taking place depending on inlet ammonium loading rate and operational conditions. Ponds fed with fresh slurry exhibited denitrification as the main nitrogen removal mechanism for the pond operated under real conditions while under optimal conditions stripping, denitrification and biomass uptake contributed similarly. Therefore, this study confirmed that the so-claimed nitrogen recovery by microalgae biomass is frequently overestimated. PMID:20943377

  10. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Two Bornean Nepenthes Species with Differences in Nitrogen Acquisition Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sickel, Wiebke; Grafe, T Ulmar; Meuche, Ivonne; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Keller, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes have been studied for over a century, but surprisingly little is known about associations with microorganisms. The two species Nepenthes rafflesiana and Nepenthes hemsleyana differ in their pitcher-mediated nutrient sources, sequestering nitrogen from arthropod prey and arthropods as well as bat faeces, respectively. We expected bacterial communities living in the pitchers to resemble this diet difference. Samples were taken from different parts of the pitchers (leaf, peristome, inside, outside, digestive fluid) of both species. Bacterial communities were determined using culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Bacterial richness and community structure were similar in leaves, peristomes, inside and outside walls of both plant species. Regarding digestive fluids, bacterial richness was higher in N. hemsleyana than in N. rafflesiana. Additionally, digestive fluid communities were highly variable in structure, with strain-specific differences in community composition between replicates. Acidophilic taxa were mostly of low abundance, except the genus Acidocella, which strikingly reached extremely high levels in two N. rafflesiana fluids. In N. hemsleyana fluid, some taxa classified as vertebrate gut symbionts as well as saprophytes were enriched compared to N. rafflesiana, with saprophytes constituting potential competitors for nutrients. The high variation in community structure might be caused by a number of biotic and abiotic factors. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were present in both study species, which might provide essential nutrients to the plant at times of low prey capture and/or rare encounters with bats. PMID:26790863

  11. Sexually different physiological responses of Populus cathayana to nitrogen and phosphorus deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Hongxia; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that there are significant sexual differences in the morphological and physiological responses of Populus cathayana Rehder under stressful conditions. However, little is known about sex-specific differences in responses to nutrient deficiencies. In this study, the effects of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deficiencies on the morphological, physiological and chloroplast ultrastructural traits of P. cathayana males and females were investigated. The results showed that N and P deficiencies significantly decreased plant growth, foliar N and P contents, chlorophyll content, photosynthesis, and instantaneous photosynthetic N- and P-use efficiencies (PNUE and PPUE) in both sexes. Males had higher photosynthesis, higher PNUE and PPUE rates, and a lower accumulation of plastoglobules in chloroplasts than did females when exposed to N- and P-deficiency conditions. Nitrogen-deficient males had higher glutamate dehydrogenase and peroxidase activities, and a more intact chloroplast ultrastructure, but less starch accumulation than did N-deficient females. Phosphorus-deficient males had higher nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase and acid phosphatase activities, but a lower foliar N : P ratio and less PSII damage than did P-deficient females. These results suggest that N and P deficiencies cause greater negative effects on females than on males, and that the different sexes of P. cathayana may employ different strategies to cope with N and P deficiencies. PMID:24739232

  12. Determination of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass of southern-Taiga soils by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. I.; Malysheva, T. I.; Maslov, M. N.; Kuznetsova, E. Yu.; Menyailo, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    The results of methods for determining microbial biomass carbon vary in reproducibility among soils. The fumigation-extraction and substrate-induced respiration methods give similar results for Albic Luvisol and Gleyic Fluvisol, while the results of the rehydration method are reliably higher. In Histic Fluvisol, relatively similar results are obtained using the fumigation-extraction and rehydration methods, and the substrate-induced respiration method gives almost halved results. The seasonal dynamics of microbial biomass carbon also varies depending on the method used. The highest difference is typical for the warm period, when the concentrations found by the extraction and substrate-induced methods poorly agree between two out of three soils studied. The concentration of microbial biomass nitrogen is less sensitive to the analytical method: the differences between the results of the fumigation-extraction and rehydration methods are statistically insignificant in the all soils. To reveal stable relationships between the results of determining microbial carbon and the soil properties and analytical method, a large diversity of soils should be studied. This will allow for proposing of conversion factors for the recalculation of the obtained values to the concentrations of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass for different soils (or soil groups) and, hence, the more correct comparison of the results obtained by different methods.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2001-09-01

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments

  14. Effects of cryptogamic covers on the global carbon and nitrogen balance as investigated by different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Bettina; Porada, Philipp; Elbert, Wolfgang; Burrows, Susannah; Caesar, Jennifer; Steinkamp, Jörg; Tamm, Alexandra; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Büdel, Burkhard; Kleidon, Axel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    needed by the organisms to build up biomass. The predicted requirement for nitrogen ranges from 3.5 to 34 Tg a-1, again being in a reasonable range compared to the data analysis approach. In experimental field studies (3rd approach), we analyzed the net primary production of biological soil crusts, i.e. one major group of cryptogamic covers. The microclimatic conditions (water status, temperature, light intensity) of different types of biological soil crusts were monitored at 5-minute intervals over a whole year. Conducting a factorial analysis of CO2 gas exchange of the crusts in the lab, we obtained the net photosynthesis or respiration rate for all microclimatic conditions encountered in the field. The latter results were combined with the microclimate data, assigning CO2 gas exchange values to each microclimate measurement tuple. Integration over the year resulted in an annual carbon fixation of ~5 g m-2 a-1, being nearly identical to the numbers obtained during the data analysis approach. In summary, our three different approaches clearly revealed that cryptogamic covers have a considerable effect on the global terrestrial C and N cycle, which must not be neglected in global carbon and nitrogen balances.

  15. Differences in phosphorus and nitrogen delivery to the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.; Boyer, E.W.; Nolan, J.V.; Brakebill, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Seasonal hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico has been linked to increased nitrogen fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Basins, though recent evidence shows that phosphorus also influences productivity in the Gulf. We developed a spatially explicit and structurally detailed SPARROW water-quality model that reveals important differences in the sources and transport processes that control nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) delivery to the Gulf. Our model simulations indicate that agricultural sources in the watersheds contribute more than 70% of the delivered N and P. However, corn and soybean cultivation is the largest contributor of N (52%), followed by atmospheric deposition sources (16%); whereas P originates primarily from animal manure on pasture and rangelands (37%), followed by corn and soybeans (25%), other crops (18%), and urban sources (12%). The fraction of in-stream P and N load delivered to the Gulf increases with stream size, but reservoir trapping of P causes large local- and regional-scale differences in delivery. Our results indicate the diversity of management approaches required to achieve efficient control of nutrient loads to the Gulf. These include recognition of important differences in the agricultural sources of N and P, the role of atmospheric N, attention to P sources downstream from reservoirs, and better control of both N and P in close proximity to large rivers. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  16. Nitrogen mineralization and nitrate leaching of a sandy soil amended with different organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Pilar; Madejón, Engracia; Cabrera, Francisco

    2006-04-01

    Organic wastes can be recycled as a source of plant nutrients, enhancing crop production by improving soil quality. However, the study of the dynamic of soil nutrient, especially the N dynamic, after soil application of any organic material is vital for assessing a correct and effective use of the material, minimizing the losses of nitrate in leachates and avoiding the negative environmental effects that it may cause in groundwater. To estimate the effect of three organic materials, a municipal solid waste compost (MWC), a non-composted paper mill sludge (PS), and an agroforest compost (AC) on the N dynamic of a sandy soil two experiments were carried out: an incubation experiment and a column experiment. The incubation experiment was conducted to estimate the N mineralization rate of the different soil-amendment mixtures. The soil was mixed with the organic amendments at a rate equivalent to 50,000 kg ha(-1) and incubated during 40 weeks at constant moisture content (70% of its water-holding capacity) and temperature (28 degrees C) under aerobic conditions. Organic amendment-soil samples showed an immobilization of N during the first weeks, which was more noticeable and longer in the case of PS-treated soil compared to the other two amendments due to its high C/N ratio. After this immobilization stage, a positive mineralization was observed for all treatment, especially in MWC treated soil. Contemporaneously a 1-year column (19 cm diameter and 60 cm height) experiment was carried out to estimate the nitrate losses from the soil amended with the same organic materials. Amendments were mixed with the top soil (0-15 cm) at a rate equivalent to 50,000 kg ha(-1). The columns were periodically irrigated simulating rainfall in the area of study, receiving in total 415 mm of water, and the water draining was collected during the experimental period and analysed for NO3-N. At the end of the experimental period NO3-N content in soil columns at three depths (0-20, 20-35 and

  17. Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 2: Comparisons between different liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, K.; Nikkanen, S. ); Hupa, M. . Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    This continuation of earlier work reports fuel nitrogen release for black liquors at two temperatures during pyrolysis of single droplets in an oxygen-free environment. Approximately half of the 20--60% fuel nitrogen released was ammonia and half was molecular nitrogen. The total amount of fixed nitrogen released during pyrolysis was almost linearly proportional to the liquor nitrogen content. The yield of fixed nitrogen for birch liquors was significantly higher than for pine liquors, and the yield for bagasse liquor was extremely high.

  18. Split Nitrogen Application Improves Wheat Baking Quality by Influencing Protein Composition Rather Than Concentration.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cheng; Auf'm Erley, Gunda Schulte; Rossmann, Anne; Schuster, Ramona; Koehler, Peter; Mühling, Karl-Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The use of late nitrogen (N) fertilization (N application at late growth stages of wheat, e.g., booting, heading or anthesis) to improve baking quality of wheat has been questioned. Although it increases protein concentration, the beneficial effect on baking quality (bread loaf volume) needs to be clearly understood. Two pot experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate whether late N is effective under controlled conditions and if these effects result from increased N rate or N splitting. Late N fertilizers were applied either as additional N or split from the basal N at late boot stage or heading in the form of nitrate-N or urea. Results showed that late N fertilization improved loaf volume of wheat flour by increasing grain protein concentration and altering its composition. Increasing N rate mainly enhanced grain protein quantitatively. However, N splitting changed grain protein composition by enhancing the percentages of gliadins and glutenins as well as certain high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), which led to an improved baking quality of wheat flour. The late N effects were greater when applied as nitrate-N than urea. The proportions of glutenin and x-type HMW-GS were more important than the overall protein concentration in determining baking quality. N splitting is more effective in improving wheat quality than the increase in the N rate by late N, which offers the potential to cut down N fertilization rates in wheat production systems. PMID:27313585

  19. Split Nitrogen Application Improves Wheat Baking Quality by Influencing Protein Composition Rather Than Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Cheng; auf’m Erley, Gunda Schulte; Rossmann, Anne; Schuster, Ramona; Koehler, Peter; Mühling, Karl-Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The use of late nitrogen (N) fertilization (N application at late growth stages of wheat, e.g., booting, heading or anthesis) to improve baking quality of wheat has been questioned. Although it increases protein concentration, the beneficial effect on baking quality (bread loaf volume) needs to be clearly understood. Two pot experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate whether late N is effective under controlled conditions and if these effects result from increased N rate or N splitting. Late N fertilizers were applied either as additional N or split from the basal N at late boot stage or heading in the form of nitrate-N or urea. Results showed that late N fertilization improved loaf volume of wheat flour by increasing grain protein concentration and altering its composition. Increasing N rate mainly enhanced grain protein quantitatively. However, N splitting changed grain protein composition by enhancing the percentages of gliadins and glutenins as well as certain high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), which led to an improved baking quality of wheat flour. The late N effects were greater when applied as nitrate-N than urea. The proportions of glutenin and x-type HMW-GS were more important than the overall protein concentration in determining baking quality. N splitting is more effective in improving wheat quality than the increase in the N rate by late N, which offers the potential to cut down N fertilization rates in wheat production systems. PMID:27313585

  20. Improved nitrogen management utilizing ground-penetrating-radar: A nine-year investigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water availability and efficient use of nitrogen are critical components of a sustainable and profitable agricultural system. Since nitrogen is typically excessively applied, considerable nitrogen may leach to and move through the subsurface. Our hypothesis is that knowledge of the subsurface hydr...

  1. IR spectroscopy of ethanol in nitrogen cryomatrices with different concentration ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiyarov, A.; Aryutkina, M.; Drobyshev, A.; Kurnosov, V.

    2011-06-01

    Thin films of cryovacuum condensates of ethanol-nitrogen mixtures formed by co-condensation of gas mixtures with different concentrations on a cooled metal substrate are studied by IR spectrometry. The condensation temperature was Tc = 16 K and the pressure of the gaseous phase during cryodeposition was P = 10-5 Torr. The ethanol concentration in nitrogen was varied from 0.5 to 10% and the film thickness, from 1 to 30 μm. Measurements were made in the range from 400 to 4200 cm-1. An analysis of the IR spectra and a comparison with published data shows that ethanol monomers and dimers are present in the nitrogen matrix. This is indicated by an absorption band at a frequency of 3658 cm-1 owing to vibrations of O-H bonds of ethanol monomers and dimers. The local minima of this band at 3645 and 3658 cm-1 are related to the existence of two conformational states of the ethanol molecule: anti (3658 cm-1) and gauche (3645 cm-1). In addition, the presence of ethanol dimers and monomers in the matrix leads to the appearance of absorption bands at 1259 and 1276 cm-1 attributable to deformation vibrations δ(COH) of the anti- and gauche-isomers, respectively, as well as bands corresponding to a combination of ν(CCO) valence vibrations and rotational oscillations of the methyl group r(CH3) attributable to anti-dimers (ν = 1090 cm-1) and anti-monomers (ν = 1095 cm-1). Local minima within 3000-3600 cm-1 also indicate the presence of cyclical dimers, trimers, and tetramers, as well as hexamers in the matrix. A broad band over 3250-3330 cm-1 indicates that large polyaggregates, with ethanol molecules in a hydrogen-bond state (multimer), exist in the matrix.

  2. Rapidly growing tropical trees mobilize remarkable amounts of nitrogen, in ways that differ surprisingly among species

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Ann E.; Raich, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Fast-growing forests such as tropical secondary forests can accumulate large amounts of carbon (C), and thereby play an important role in the atmospheric CO2 balance. Because nitrogen (N) cycling is inextricably linked with C cycling, the question becomes: Where does the N come from to match high rates of C accumulation? In unique experimental 16-y-old plantations established in abandoned pasture in lowland Costa Rica, we used a mass-balance approach to quantify N accumulation in vegetation, identify sources of N, and evaluate differences among tree species in N cycling. The replicated design contained four broad-leaved evergreen tree species growing under similar environmental conditions. Nitrogen uptake was rapid, reaching 409 (±30) kg⋅ha−1⋅y−1, double the rate reported from a Puerto Rican forest and greater than four times that observed at Hubbard Brook Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Nitrogen amassed in vegetation was 874 (±176) kg⋅ha−1, whereas net losses of soil N (0–100 cm) varied from 217 (±146) to 3,354 (±915) kg⋅ha−1 (P = 0.018) over 16 y. Soil C:N, δ13C values, and N budgets indicated that soil was the main source of biomass N. In Vochysia guatemalensis, however, N fixation contributed >60 kg⋅ha−1⋅y−1. All species apparently promoted soil N turnover, such that the soil N mean residence time was 32–54 y, an order of magnitude lower than the global mean. High rates of N uptake were associated with substantial N losses in three of the species, in which an average of 1.6 g N was lost for every gram of N accumulated in biomass. PMID:22689942

  3. RNA-SEQ Reveals Transcriptional Level Changes of Poplar Roots in Different Forms of Nitrogen Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chun-Pu; Xu, Zhi-Ru; Hu, Yan-Bo; Lu, Yao; Yang, Cheng-Jun; Sun, Guang-Yu; Liu, Guan-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Poplar has emerged as a model plant for better understanding cellular and molecular changes accompanying tree growth, development, and response to environment. Long-term application of different forms of nitrogen (such as NO3--N and NH4+-N) may cause morphological changes of poplar roots; however, the molecular level changes are still not well-known. In this study, we analyzed the expression profiling of poplar roots treated by three forms of nitrogen: S1 (NH4+), S2 (NH4NO3), and S3 (NO3-) by using RNA-SEQ technique. We found 463 genes significantly differentially expressed in roots by different N treatments, of which a total of 112 genes were found to differentially express between S1 and S2, 171 genes between S2 and S3, and 319 genes between S1 and S3. A cluster analysis shows significant difference in many transcription factor families and functional genes family under different N forms. Through an analysis of Mapman metabolic pathway, we found that the significantly differentially expressed genes are associated with fermentation, glycolysis, and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA), secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism, and transport processing. Interestingly, we did not find significantly differentially expressed genes in N metabolism pathway, mitochondrial electron transport/ATP synthesis and mineral nutrition. We also found abundant candidate genes (20 transcription factors and 30 functional genes) regulating morphology changes of poplar roots under the three N forms. The results obtained are beneficial to a better understanding of the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating root morphology changes under different N treatments. PMID:26870068

  4. Using multi-model averaging to improve the reliability of catchment scale nitrogen predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exbrayat, J.-F.; Viney, N. R.; Frede, H.-G.; Breuer, L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydro-biogeochemical models are used to foresee the impact of mitigation measures on water quality. Usually, scenario-based studies rely on single model applications. This is done in spite of the widely acknowledged advantage of ensemble approaches to cope with structural model uncertainty issues. As an attempt to demonstrate the reliability of such multi-model efforts in the hydro-biogeochemical context, this methodological contribution proposes an adaptation of the reliability ensemble averaging (REA) philosophy to nitrogen losses predictions. A total of 4 models are used to predict the total nitrogen (TN) losses from the well-monitored Ellen Brook catchment in Western Australia. Simulations include re-predictions of current conditions and a set of straightforward management changes targeting fertilisation scenarios. Results show that, in spite of good calibration metrics, one of the models provides a very different response to management changes. This behaviour leads the simple average of the ensemble members to also predict reductions in TN export that are not in agreement with the other models. However, considering the convergence of model predictions in the more sophisticated REA approach assigns more weight to previously less well-calibrated models that are more in agreement with each other. This method also avoids having to disqualify any of the ensemble members.

  5. Studies on the storage life of irradiated potatoes of different maturities as influenced by different levels of nitrogen during growth and different harvest dates

    SciTech Connect

    Badshah, N.L.

    1989-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of irradiation levels on potato tubers of different maturities grown with 0.0, 182 and 364 kg/ha nitrogen in 16-16-16 NPK fertilizer, harvested on different dates and stored at 10 and 15.5{degree}C. Tubers from the 1986 crop were harvested on September 15, 1986. Tubers from the 1987 crop were harvested when 0-5%, 50%, and 100% of the vines had died. Gamma irradiation was applied to the tubers of the 1986 crop at dosage 0, 5, 10 and 20 krad; and 0 and 7.5 krad for the tubers of 1987 crop. The 1986 study indicated that increasing fertilizer and irradiation levels significantly decreased sprouting, percent weight loss and specific gravity of tubers. The loss of ascorbic acid, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, and the amount of reducing, and non-reducing sugars were significantly decreased by increasing nitrogen levels. The content of leucine, reducing sugars and ascorbic acid levels were decreased by irradiation. Higher storage temperatures caused greater loss of arginine, isoleucine, valine and ascorbic acid. No significant changes were found in protein, lysine and aromatic amino acids. Tubers stored at 15.5{degree}C showed greater metabolic changes as indicated by sprouting, weight loss; changes in permeability, protein, amino acids, sugars and ascorbic acid contents. The 5 krad irradiation treatment resulted in complete sprout inhibition of tubers from 364 kg/ha nitrogen levels at 10{degree}C storage. Twenty krad dosage while inhibiting sprouting at 15.5{degree}C, caused greater loss of ascorbic acid. The results of 1987 studies showed that tubers from higher nitrogen levels irradiated with 7.5 krad significantly decreased weight loss.

  6. Variations in dissolved organic nitrogen concentration in biofilters with different media during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huining; Zhang, Kefeng; Jin, Huixia; Gu, Li; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is potential precursor of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), especially nitrogenous DBPs. In this study, we investigated the impact of biofilters on DON concentration changes in a drinking water plant. A small pilot plant was constructed next to a sedimentation tank in a drinking water plant and included activated carbon, quartz sand, anthracite, and ceramsite biofilters. As the biofilter layer depth increased, the DON concentration first decreased and then increased, and the variation in DON concentration differed among the biofilters. In the activated carbon biofilter, the DON concentration was reduced by the largest amount in the first part of the column and increased by the largest amount in the second part of the column. The biomass in the activated carbon filter was less than that in the quartz sand filter in the upper column. The heterotrophic bacterial proportion among bacterial flora in the activated carbon biofilter was the largest, which might be due to the significant reduction in DON in the first part of the column. Overall, the results indicate that the DON concentration in biofiltered water can be controlled via the selection of appropriate biofilter media. We propose that a two-layer biofilter with activated carbon in the upper layer and another media type in the lower layer could best reduce the DON concentration. PMID:25576130

  7. Oxidative stress response and nitrogen utilization are strongly variable in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains with different fermentation performances.

    PubMed

    Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Nadai, Chiara; Toniolo, Chiara; Nardi, Tiziana; Giacomini, Alessio; Valle, Giorgio; Blondin, Bruno; Corich, Viviana

    2014-05-01

    We used RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze the expression profile of four vineyard strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae having different fermentation performances. The expression profiles obtained in two steps of the fermentation process were compared with those obtained for the industrial wine strain EC1118 and for the laboratory strain S288c. The two strains with low fermentation efficiency, namely, S288c and the vineyard strain R103, exhibited markedly different expression profiles when compared to the other four strains. We also found that the vineyard strains P283 and P301 are characterized by a high expression of the transcription factor Met32p in the first step of the fermentation. Met32p, in coordination with the Hap4p transcription factor, determined the over-expression of the genes involved in the respiration processes, in the response to oxidative stress and in the sulfur amino acids biosynthesis. These combined actions are likely to increase the level of antioxidants whose protective effect could contribute to improve the fermentation process. Gene expression and phenotypic data revealed that the vineyard strain P301 has low nitrogen utilization in comparison to the other wine strains, combined with high fermentation efficiency. Analysis of the genes involved in fermentation stress response revealed a lower expression in strains characterized by low fermentation efficiency, particularly in the first fermentation phase. These findings evidenced the high variability of transcriptional profiles among different wine yeast strains and clarify their connection with complex phenotypic traits, such as the fermentation efficiency and the nitrogen sources utilization. PMID:24695828

  8. Flux measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds using a chemiluminescence analyser with different converter types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Wolff, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    The availability of reactive nitrogen (Nr) is a key limiting factors for the productivity and the competition success of individual species. On the other hand, certain nitrogenous compounds can also be emitted from natural or managed ecosystems. Thus the quantification of the Nr exchange can be essential for the interpretation of ecosystem behavior. For the observation of Nr dry deposition and emission the eddy covariance (EC) method is preferable since it does not modify the environmental conditions of the ecosystem, is less prone to wall effects than chamber methods, and is less affected by gas phase chemical reactions than gradient methods. Since the various Nr compounds can undergo fast chemical reactions and have differing chemical and physical characteristics, a variety of detection techniques is usually necessary that often cannot meet the fast response requirements of the EC technique. Here we show applications of a fast response 2-channel NO analyzer suitable for EC measurements. In combination with different inlet converters (photolytic converter, gold catalyst converter, and high-temperature steel converter), the system could alternatively be used for flux measurements of NO2, NOy, and total Nr. The quantification of By combining the 2-channel analyzer with the NOy and total Nr converter simultaneously, the NH3 flux could be determined from the difference between the two channels. Concentration and flux measurements of the system were verified by inter-comparison with other methods. Potential problems include the damping of high-frequency fluctuations in the inlet system. It is therefore important to place the converter close to the sampling inlet and to quantify and correct the damping effects. Moreover, like most other flux measurement techniques, the system is susceptible to non-stationary trace gas concentrations that often occur near pollution sources.

  9. Crystallinity-dependent substitutional nitrogen doping in ZnO and its improved visible light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zongbao; Yin, Li-Chang; Xie, Yingpeng; Liu, Gang; Ma, Xiuliang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-06-15

    Increasing visible light absorption of wide-bandgap photocatalysts (for example, ZnO and TiO2) plays a pivotal role in improving their photocatalytic activity. In this work, we show that substitutional nitrogen doping can be realized in semi-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles but fails for highly crystalline ZnO by heating the ZnO at a temperature of 400°C in gaseous ammonia atmosphere. The results suggest that substitutional nitrogen for lattice oxygen is strongly dependent on the crystallinity of ZnO. The nitrogen doped ZnO obtained shows an improved visible light photocatalytic activity in the degradation of organic dyes due to its increased visible light absorption. The origin of the increased visible light absorption is theoretically attributed to the formed N 2p localized states in the bandgap. PMID:23561822

  10. Attempts to improve nitrogen utilization efficiency of aquaponics through nitrifies addition and filler gradation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yina; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Huijun; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Jinhe; Yan, Runxin

    2016-04-01

    Aquaponics has attracted worldwide attention in recent years and is considered as an alternative technology for conventional aquaculture. In this study, common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and pakchoi (Brassica chinensis) were cultured in lab-scale aquaponics, and attempts were conducted to enhance its nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) through two optimization methods, i.e., nitrifies addition (NA) and filler gradation (FG). Results showed that NA and FG could improve the NUE of aquaponics by 8.8 and 16.0%, respectively, compared with control. The total ammonia (TAN) and nitrite (NO2(-)) concentrations in NA and FG systems were maintained at relatively low level (TAN < 0.5 mg/L, NO2(-) < 0.1 mg/L), which demonstrated that both the NA and FG could provide non-toxic water environment for fish culture. Nitrous oxide conversion ratio of the control, NA, and FG were 0.8, 1.2, and 1.7%, respectively, indicating that media-based aquaponics also contributed to global warming. Although the two proposed attempts in this study caused more N2O emission, they made new breakthrough in improving the NUE of aquaponics. PMID:26645232

  11. Improved RDX detoxification with starch addition using a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium from soil contaminated with explosives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yang, Jihoon; Yoo, Byungun; Park, Joonhong

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we developed and characterized a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium for the complete detoxification of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Aerobic RDX biodegradation coupled with microbial growth and nitrogen fixation activity were effectively stimulated by the co-addition of starch and RDX under nitrogen limiting conditions. In the starch-stimulated nitrogen-fixing RDX degradative consortium, the RDX degradation activity was correlated with the xplA and nifH gene copy numbers, suggesting the involvement of nitrogen fixing populations in RDX biodegradation. Formate, nitrite, nitrate, and ammonia were detected as aerobic RDX degradation intermediates without the accumulation of any nitroso-derivatives or NDAB (4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal), indicating nearly complete mineralization. Pyrosequencing targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the Rhizobium, Rhizobacter and Terrimonas population increased as the RDX degradation activity increased, suggesting their involvement in the degradation process. These findings imply that the nitrogen-fixing aerobic RDX degrading consortium is a valuable microbial resource for improving the detoxification of RDX-contaminated soil or groundwater, especially when combined with rhizoremediation. PMID:25661171

  12. Effects of Nitrogen and Shading on Root Morphologies, Nutrient Accumulation, and Photosynthetic Parameters in Different Rice Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shenggang; Liu, Haidong; Mo, Zhaowen; Patterson, Bob; Duan, Meiyang; Tian, Hua; Hu, Shuijing; Tang, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and illumination intensity are two key factors which affect rice growth. However, their influences on total nitrogen accumulation, photosynthetic rate, root morphologies, and yields are not fully understood. We conducted two field experiments to (1) evaluate the effects of shading under different N treatments on photosynthetic parameters, root morphologies, total nutrient accumulation, and grain yields of rice; and (2) elucidate the relationship between total nutrient accumulation and root morphologies under different shading conditions and nitrogen treatments. Three nitrogen rates, three shading treatments, and three different rice cultivars were used in two field experiments. Double shading during the grain-filling stage decreased total nutrient accumulation, altered root morphological characteristics, and decreased yields in rice. There were also significant interaction effects between nitrogen and shading on photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and total root length, root superficial area, and root volume. Significant interactions were found among cultivars and shading for photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate. Correlation analysis revealed that total nitrogen accumulation (TNA) and potassium accumulation (TKA) were significantly positively correlated with total root length, root superficial area, and root volume. N application could alleviate the detrimental effects of shading on total nutrient accumulation and grain yield in rice. PMID:27557779

  13. Effects of Nitrogen and Shading on Root Morphologies, Nutrient Accumulation, and Photosynthetic Parameters in Different Rice Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shenggang; Liu, Haidong; Mo, Zhaowen; Patterson, Bob; Duan, Meiyang; Tian, Hua; Hu, Shuijing; Tang, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and illumination intensity are two key factors which affect rice growth. However, their influences on total nitrogen accumulation, photosynthetic rate, root morphologies, and yields are not fully understood. We conducted two field experiments to (1) evaluate the effects of shading under different N treatments on photosynthetic parameters, root morphologies, total nutrient accumulation, and grain yields of rice; and (2) elucidate the relationship between total nutrient accumulation and root morphologies under different shading conditions and nitrogen treatments. Three nitrogen rates, three shading treatments, and three different rice cultivars were used in two field experiments. Double shading during the grain-filling stage decreased total nutrient accumulation, altered root morphological characteristics, and decreased yields in rice. There were also significant interaction effects between nitrogen and shading on photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and total root length, root superficial area, and root volume. Significant interactions were found among cultivars and shading for photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate. Correlation analysis revealed that total nitrogen accumulation (TNA) and potassium accumulation (TKA) were significantly positively correlated with total root length, root superficial area, and root volume. N application could alleviate the detrimental effects of shading on total nutrient accumulation and grain yield in rice. PMID:27557779

  14. Use of quaternary ammonium salts of nitrogen containing polymers for improved carburetor detergency

    SciTech Connect

    Biasotti, J.B.; Vartanian, P.F.

    1980-01-15

    A quaternary ammonium salt is described of a copolymer, said copolymer being the olefin polymerization product of: (A) a nitrogen amine free ester of a C/sub 1/-C/sub 6/ olefinically unsaturated aliphatic mono-, di-, or polycarboxylic acid having a tertiary nitrogen atom; and (B) an olefinically unsaturated co-monomer containing a basic nitrogen atom in a side chain; a fuel component, especially gasoline, containing such quaternary ammonium salt of such copolymer as a detergent.

  15. [Physiological Effect of Vallisneria natans Under Different Concentrations of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Chloramphenicol].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen-zhen; Cui, Yi-bin; Li, Mei; Yu, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The effects of peroxidase(POD), superoxide dismutase(SOD) activities and malondialdehyde(MDA), soluble proteins and chlorophyll in the leaves of Vallisneria natans exposed to different concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus in the eutrophication water body and chloramphenicol after 7 days were investigated in the study. The soluble protein content increased significantly in group eutrophic water and 0.2 µg.L-1 chloramphenicol, and the concentration of protein was 2.38 times of that in group 0 µg.L-1 chloramphenicol. In group of eutrophic water and 0. 2 µg.L-1 chloramphenicol, POD activities decreased significantly to 33. 84% of that in group 0 µg.L-1 chloramphenicol. With the increasing of the joint concentration, SOD activities decreased. SOD activities in group of mesotrophic and 0. 2 µg.L-1 chloramphenicol was 28. 59% of that in group of 0 µg.L-1 chloramphenicol. PMID:26717684

  16. Phytoplankton of the Swan-Canning Estuary: a comparison of nitrogen uptake by different bloom assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner Rosser, S. M. J.; Thompson, Peter A.

    2001-09-01

    Spring chlorophyte-, summer dinophyte- and autumn cryptophyte-dominated phytoplankton blooms occurring in the upper reaches of the Swan-Canning Estuary have been studied to compare species composition and diurnal distribution and to determine preferential uptake rates for different nitrogen sources. Species distribution patterns over diurnal cycles showed dinophyte and cryptophyte species exhibiting diurnal vertical migration patterns which changed over a three-week bloom period. The dinophyte and cryptophyte behaviour appeared to be related to measured changes in ambient nitrogen profiles over the course of the bloom. Chlorophyte species were not shown to be strongly migratory over diurnal periods. Absolute uptake rates (, approximating Pmax) for nitrogen, in the form of 15NO3-, 15NH4+ or 15N-urea, were compared between seasonal bloom assemblages and ranged between 0·02 and 12 µg N l-1 h-1 (NO3 0·02-7; NH4 0·4-9; urea 0·1-12 µg N l-1nitrogen sources were implicated in supporting these blooms. Results indicated no physiological preference at any depth for NOnitrogen dynamics supporting phytoplankton growth.

  17. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments. PMID:25604564

  18. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, J G; Beinart, R A; Stewart, F J; Delong, E F; Girguis, P R

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking physiological poise to environmental conditions, but recovering samples from the deep sea is challenging, as the long recovery times can change expression profiles before preservation. Here, we present a novel, in situ RNA sampling and preservation device, which we used to compare the symbiont metatranscriptomes associated with Alviniconcha, a genus of vent snail, in which specific host–symbiont combinations are predictably distributed across a regional geochemical gradient. Metatranscriptomes of these symbionts reveal key differences in energy and nitrogen metabolism relating to both environmental chemistry (that is, the relative expression of genes) and symbiont phylogeny (that is, the specific pathways employed). Unexpectedly, dramatic differences in expression of transposases and flagellar genes suggest that different symbiont types may also have distinct life histories. These data further our understanding of these symbionts' metabolic capabilities and their expression in situ, and suggest an important role for symbionts in mediating their hosts' interaction with regional-scale differences in geochemistry. PMID:23619306

  19. Nitrogen fixation in different biogeochemical niches along a 120 000-year chronosequence in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Menge, Duncan N L; Hedin, Lars O

    2009-08-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the major nitrogen (N) input in many terrestrial ecosystems, yet we know little about the mechanisms and feedbacks that control this process in natural ecosystems. We here examine BNF in four taxonomically and ecologically different groups over the course of forest ecosystem development. At nine sites along the Franz Josef soil chronosequence (South Westland, New Zealand) that range in age from 7 to 120000 yr old, we quantified BNF from the symbiotic plant Coriaria arborea, cyanolichens (primarily Pseudocyphellaria spp.), bryophytes (many species), and heterotrophic bacteria in leaf litter. We specifically examined whether these groups could act as "nitrostats" at the ecosystem level, turning BNF on when N is scarce (early in primary succession) and off when N is plentiful (later in succession and retrogression). Coriaria was abundant and actively fixing (approximately 11 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) in the youngest and most N-poor site (7 yr old), consistent with nitrostat dynamics. Coriaria maintained high BNF rates independent of soil N availability, however, until it was excluded from the community after a single generation. We infer that Coriaria is an obligate N fixer and that the nitrostat feedback is mechanistically governed by species replacement at the community level, rather than down-regulation of BNF at the physiological scale. Biological nitrogen fixation inputs from lichens (means of 0-2 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)), bryophytes (0.7-10 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)), and litter (1-2 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) were driven primarily by changes in density, which peaked at intermediate-aged sites (and increased with soil N availability) for both lichens and bryophytes, and grew monotonically with soil age (but did not change with soil N) for litter. This non-nitrostatic link between soil N availability and lichen/bryophyte BNF likely stems from increased tree biomass in more fertile sites, which increases epiphytic moisture conditions

  20. Improving nitrogen management for corn in southern Idaho and southwest Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Funding is being sought from multiple sources to update nitrogen fertilizer recommendations for irrigated corn in southern Idaho and southwest Oregon. This paper summarizes the justifications and main objectives of this proposed research. Nitrogen needs to be correctly managed in corn production sys...

  1. EVALUATION OF TWO APPROACHES FOR IMPROVED NITROGEN OXIDES MONITORING IN URBAN ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, instrumentation used to monitor nitrogen oxides in urban monitoring networks measure NO and "NOx", where NOx includes NO and NO2. hese NO2 measurements are subject to a positive bias from other oxidized nitrogen species (NOy) and it is believed that NOy measurements ar...

  2. Biogas production from water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nitrogen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Jayaweera, Mahesh W; Dilhani, Jayakodi A T; Kularatne, Ranil K A; Wijeyekoon, Suren L J

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports the biogas production from water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nitrogen concentrations of 1-fold [28 mg/L of total nitrogen (TN)], 2-fold, 1/2-fold, 1/4-fold and 1/8-fold and plants harvested from a polluted water body. This study was carried out for a period of 4 months at ambient mesophilic temperatures of 30.3-31.3 degrees C using six 3-barreled batch-fed reactors with the innermost barrel (45 L) being used as the digester. There was no marked variation in the C/N ratios of the plants cultured under different nitrogen concentrations. The addition of fresh cow dung having a low C/N of 8 resulted in a significant reduction in the C/N ratios of the water hyacinth substrates. However, gas production commenced 3 days after charging the reactors and gas production rates peaked in 4-7 days. The volatile solids (VS) degradation and gas production patterns manifested that in conventional single-stage batch digesters acidogenesis and methanogenesis of water hyacinth requires a retention time of around 27-30 days and 27-51 days, respectively. Substrates in the f-1 digester (i.e., the digester containing plants grown under 28 TN mg/L) having the lowest VS content of 45.3 g/L with a highest C/N ratio of 16 showed fairly higher gas production rates consistently (10-27 days) with higher gas yields containing around 50-65% of CH4 (27-51 days). Moreover the highest overall VS (81.7%) removal efficiencies were reported from the f-1 digester. Fairly higher gas production rates and gas yields with fairly higher CH4 contents were also noticed from the f-2 digester containing substrates having a C/N of 14 and f-out digester (containing the plants harvested from the polluted water body) having the lowest C/N ratio of 9.7 with a fairly high VS content of 56 g/L. CH4 production was comparatively low in the f-1/8, f-1/4 and f-1/2 digesters having VS rich substrates with varying C/N ratios. We conclude that water hyacinth could be

  3. Diversity pattern of nitrogen fixing microbes in nodules of Trifolium arvense (L.) at different initial stages of ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Engel, M.; Fischer, D.; Buegger, F.; Elmer, M.; Welzl, G.; Schloter, M.

    2013-02-01

    Legumes can be considered as pioneer plants during ecosystem development, as they form a symbiosis with different nitrogen fixing rhizobia species, which enable the plants to grow on soils with low available nitrogen content. In this study we compared the abundance and diversity of nitrogen fixing microbes based on the functional marker gene nifH, which codes for a subunit of the Fe-protein of the dinitrogenase reductase, in nodules of different size classes of Trifolium arvense (L.). Additionally, carbon and nitrogen contents of the bulk soil and plant material were measured. Plants were harvested from different sites, reflecting 2 (2a) and 5 (5a) yr of ecosystem development, of an opencast lignite mining area in the south of Cottbus, Lower Lusatia (Germany) where the artificial catchment "Chicken Creek" was constructed to study the development of terrestrial ecosystems. Plants from the 5a site revealed higher amounts of carbon and nitrogen, although nifH gene abundances in the nodules and carbon and nitrogen contents between the two soils did not differ significantly. Analysis of the nifH clone libraries showed a significant effect of the nodule size on the community composition of nitrogen fixing microbes. Medium sized nodules (2-5 mm) contained a uniform community composed of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, whereas the small nodules (<2 mm) consisted of a diverse community including clones with non-Rhizobium nifH gene sequences. Regarding the impact of the soil age on the community composition a clear distinction between the small and the medium nodules can be made. While clone libraries from the medium nodules were pretty similar at both soil ages, soil age had a significant effect on the community compositions of the small nodules, where the proportion of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii increased with soil age.

  4. Diversity pattern of nitrogen fixing microbes in nodules of Trifolium arvense (L.) at different initial stages of ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Engel, M.; Fischer, D.; Buegger, F.; Elmer, M.; Welzl, G.; Schloter, M.

    2012-09-01

    Legumes can be considered as pioneer plants during ecosystem development, as they form a symbiosis with different nitrogen fixing rhizobia species, which enable the plants to grow on soils with low available nitrogen content. In this study we compared the abundance and diversity of nitrogen fixing microbes based on the functional marker gene nifH, which codes for a subunit of the Fe-protein of the dinitrogenase reductase, in nodules of different size classes of Trifolium arvense (L.). Additionally, carbon and nitrogen contents of the bulk soil and plant material were measured. Plants were harvested from different sites, reflecting 2 (2a) and 5 (5a) yr of ecosystem development, of an opencast lignite mining area in the south of Cottbus, Lower Lusatia (Germany) where the artificial catchment "Chicken Creek" was constructed to study the development of terrestrial ecosystems. Plants from the 5a site revealed higher amounts of carbon and nitrogen, although nifH gene abundances in the nodules and carbon and nitrogen contents between the two soils did not differ significantly. Analysis of the nifH clone libraries showed a significant effect of the nodule size on the community composition of nitrogen fixing microbes. Medium sized nodules (2-5 mm) contained a uniform community composed of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, whereas the small nodules (< 2 mm) consisted of a diverse community including clones with non-Rhizobium nifH gene sequences. Regarding the impact of the soil age on the community composition a clear distinction between the small and the medium nodules can be made. While clone libraries from the medium nodules were pretty similar at both soil ages, soil age had a significant effect on the community compositions of the small nodules, where the proportion of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii increased with soil age.

  5. Combined use of nitrogen and coatings to improve the quality of mechanically harvested Manzanilla olives.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Eva; Sánchez, Antonio H; Romero, Concepción; Brenes, Manuel

    2015-03-15

    The combined effect of an edible coating and a nitrogen atmosphere on the quality of Manzanilla olives mechanically harvested and processed as Spanish-style green olives was assessed. The percentage of olives free of any brown spots ranged between 35-50%, 10-25% and 50-65% for fruit directly processed, storage under nitrogen and coated and storage under nitrogen respectively. Moreover, olives stored in the open air developed brown spots due to the oxidation of oleuropein. By contrast, the anoxic conditions prevented oleuropein from undergoing enzymatic oxidation but not from its enzymatic hydrolysis. Hence, the phenolic derivative HyEDA was formed in olives stored under nitrogen, and this substance was rapidly oxidized in the open air to give rise to brown spots although to a lesser extent in the coated fruit. Therefore, the postharvest storage of coated olives under nitrogen can be a good method to prevent bruise damage in mechanically harvested fruit. PMID:25308641

  6. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Saima; Huma, Nuzhat; Pasha, Imran; Sameen, Aysha; Mukhtar, Omer; Khan, Muhammad Issa

    2016-07-01

    Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%), solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%), total solids (18.05%±0.05%), protein (5.15%±0.06%) and casein (3.87%±0.04%) contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%), buffalo (0.68%±0.02%) and sheep (0.66%±0.02%) milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82), cow (r = 0.88), sheep (r = 0.86) and goat milk (r = 0.98). The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g), camel (96±2.2 mg/g) and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g) milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products. PMID:26954163

  7. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Saima; Huma, Nuzhat; Pasha, Imran; Sameen, Aysha; Mukhtar, Omer; Khan, Muhammad Issa

    2016-01-01

    Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%), solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%), total solids (18.05%±0.05%), protein (5.15%±0.06%) and casein (3.87%±0.04%) contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%), buffalo (0.68%±0.02%) and sheep (0.66%±0.02%) milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82), cow (r = 0.88), sheep (r = 0.86) and goat milk (r = 0.98). The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g), camel (96±2.2 mg/g) and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g) milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products. PMID:26954163

  8. Improvement of the soil nitrogen content and maize growth by earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in soils polluted by oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jia; Wang, Chong; Ji, Dingge

    2016-11-15

    Interactions between earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus intraradices, AM fungi) have been suggested to improve the maize nitrogen (N) content and biomass and were studied in soils polluted by oxytetracycline (OTC). Maize was planted and amended with AMF and/or earthworms (E) in the soil with low (1mgkg(-1) soil DM) or high (100mgkg(-1) soil DM) amounts of OTC pollution in comparison to soil without OTC. The root colonization, shoot and root biomass, shoot and root N contents, soil nitrogen forms, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) were measured at harvest. The results indicated that OTC decreased maize shoot and root biomass (p<0.05) by mediating the soil urease activity and AOB and AOA abundance, which resulted in a lower N availability for maize roots and shoots. There was a significant interaction between earthworms and AM fungi on the urease activity in soil polluted by OTC (p<0.05). Adding earthworms or AM fungi could increase the maize biomass and N content (p<0.05) in OTC polluted soil by increasing the urease activity and relieving the stress from OTC on the soil N cycle. AM fungi and earthworms interactively increased maize shoot and root biomass (p<0.05) in the OTC polluted soils through their regulation of the urease activity and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers, resulting in different soil NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N contents, which may contribute to the N content of maize shoots and roots. Earthworms and AM fungi could be used as an efficient method to relieve the OTC stress in agro-ecosystems. PMID:27496075

  9. Multifunctional Low-Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of using Helmholtz resonator cavities embedded in low-pressure-turbine (LPT) airfoils to (1) reduce core noise by damping acoustic modes; (2) use the synthetic jets produced by the liner hole acoustic oscillations to improve engine efficiency by maintaining turbulent attached flow in the LPT at low-Reynolds-number cruise conditions; and (3) reduce engine nitrogen oxide emissions by lining the internal cavities with materials capable of catalytic conversion. Flat plates with embedded Helmholtz resonators, designed to resonate at either 3000 or at 400 Hz, were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. The simulations were conducted for two inlet Mach numbers, 0.25 and 0.5, corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 90 000 and 164 000 based on the effective chordwise distance to the resonator orifice. The results of this study are (1) the region of acoustic treatment may be large enough to have a benefit; (2) the jets may not possess sufficient strength to reduce flow separation (based on prior work by researchers in the flow control area); and (3) the additional catalytic surface area is not exposed to a high velocity, so it probably does not have any benefit.

  10. Nitrogen Utilization and Environmental Losses from Organic Farming and Biochar's Potential to Improve N Efficiency.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, E. I.; SIX, J. W. U. A.

    2014-12-01

    The response of plant performance and nitrogen (N) dynamics to biochar amendments were studied across various levels of N input for two growing seasons in mesocosms representing an organic lettuce production systems. A silt loam soil was amended with pine chip (PC) and walnut shell (WS) biochar (10 t ha-1) in combination with five organic N fertilization rates 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of 225 kg N ha-1. N output through harvest, leachate, and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were determined to assess N utilization and environmental losses of biochar-amended soils. Analysis of plant performance indicate that PC and WS biochar did not provide any increases in plant biomass in soils that received less than business-as-usual fertilization rates. At 100% N fertilization rate, biochar amendments (both PC and WS) improved lettuce biomass production, which resulted in significant increases in NUE with no effects on N2O emissions. Furthermore, N losses via leaching were decreased by PC biochar at 100% N fertilization rates. Thus, due to increases in plant biomass and decreases in N losses via leachate, PC biochar significantly decreased the ratio of N lost over N exported in biomass. Findings from this study suggest that biochar can provide some beneficial effects to organic farming systems, however, not in all circumstances, given the effects seem to vary with biochar type and fertilization level.

  11. Improving spatial nitrogen dioxide prediction using diffusion tubes: A case study in West Central Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannullo, Francesca; Lee, Duncan; Waclawski, Eugene; Leyland, Alastair H.

    2015-10-01

    It has been well documented that air pollution adversely affects health, and epidemiological pollution-health studies utilise pollution data from automatic monitors. However, these automatic monitors are small in number and hence spatially sparse, which does not allow an accurate representation of the spatial variation in pollution concentrations required for these epidemiological health studies. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) diffusion tubes are also used to measure concentrations, and due to their lower cost compared to automatic monitors are much more prevalent. However, even combining both data sets still does not provide sufficient spatial coverage of NO2 for epidemiological studies, and modelled concentrations on a regular grid from atmospheric dispersion models are also available. This paper proposes the first modelling approach to using all three sources of NO2 data to make fine scale spatial predictions for use in epidemiological health studies. We propose a geostatistical fusion model that regresses combined NO2 concentrations from both automatic monitors and diffusion tubes against modelled NO2 concentrations from an atmospheric dispersion model in order to predict fine scale NO2 concentrations across our West Central Scotland study region. Our model exhibits a 47% improvement in fine scale spatial prediction of NO2 compared to using the automatic monitors alone, and we use it to predict NO2 concentrations across West Central Scotland in 2006.

  12. The response of mesophyll conductance to nitrogen and water availability differs between wheat genotypes.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Margaret M; Kaiser, Brent N

    2016-10-01

    Increased mesophyll conductance (gm) has been suggested as a target for selection for high productivity and high water-use efficiency in crop plants, and genotypic variability in gm has been reported in several important crop species. However, effective selection requires an understanding of how gm varies with growth conditions, to ensure that the ranking of genotypes is consistent across environments. We assessed the genotypic variability in gm and other leaf gas exchange traits, as well as growth and biomass allocation for six wheat genotypes under different water and nitrogen availabilities. The wheat genotypes differed in their response of gm to growth conditions, resulting in genotypic differences in the mesophyll limitation to photosynthesis and a significant increase in the mesophyll limitation to photosynthesis under drought. In this experiment, leaf intrinsic water-use efficiency was more closely related to stomatal conductance than to mesophyll conductance, and stomatal limitation to photosynthesis increased more in some genotypes than in others in response to drought. Screening for gm should be carried out under a range of growth conditions. PMID:27593470

  13. Cellular responses and biodegradation of amoxicillin in Microcystis aeruginosa at different nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Feng; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nitrogen on the interactions between amoxicillin and Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated using a 7-day exposure test. Growth of M. aeruginosa was not significantly (p>0.05) affected by amoxicillin at the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), stimulated by 500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at a moderate nitrogen level of 0.5 mg L(-1) and enhanced by 200-500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at the highest nitrogen level of 5 mg L(-1). The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the synthesis of glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione (GSH) were more sensitive to amoxicillin and were stimulated at all nitrogen levels. At the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were not effective at eliminating amoxicillin-induced ROS, resulting in the highest malondialdehyde content in M. aeruginosa. The biodegradation of 18.5-30.5% of amoxicillin by M. aeruginosa was coupled to increasing GST activity and GSH content. Elevated nitrogen concentrations significantly enhanced (p<0.05) the stimulation effect of amoxicillin on the growth of M. aeruginosa, the antioxidant responses to amoxicillin and the biodegradation of amoxicillin in M. aeruginosa. The nitrogen-dependent hormesis effect of the coexisting amoxicillin contaminant on the M. aeruginosa bloom should be fully considered during the control of M. aeruginosa bloom. PMID:25450926

  14. Irrigation frequency alters nutrient uptake in container-grown Rhododendron plants grown with different rates of nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of irrigation frequency (same amount of water per day given at different times) on nutrient uptake of container-grown evergreen Rhododendron ‘P.J.M. Compact’ (PJM) and ‘English Roseum’ (ER) and deciduous Rhododendron ‘Gibraltar’ (AZ) grown with different rates of nitrogen (N) fertilize...

  15. Product selectivity of visible-light photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide using titanium dioxide doped by different nitrogen-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoguo; Huang, Zhengfeng; Cheng, Xudong; Wang, Qingli; Chen, Yi; Dong, Peimei; Zhang, Xiwen

    2015-11-01

    The influence of nitrogen-source on the photocatalytic properties of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide is herein first investigated from the perspective of the chemical bond form of the nitrogen element in the nitrogen-source. The definitive role of groups such as Nsbnd N from the nitrogen-source on the surface of as-prepared samples in the selectivity of the dominant product of photocatalytic reduction is demonstrated. Well-crystallized one-dimensional Nsbnd TiO2 nanorod arrays with a preferred orientation of the rutile (3 1 0) facet are manufactured via a hydrothermal treatment using hydrazine and ammonia variously as the source of nitrogen. Significant selectivity of the dominant reduced products has been exhibited for Nsbnd TiO2 prepared from different nitrogen-sources in carbon dioxide photocatalytic reduction under visible light illumination. CH4 is the main product with N2H4-doped Nsbnd TiO2, while CO is the main product with NH3-doped Nsbnd TiO2, which can be attributed to the existence of the reducing Nsbnd N groups in the N2H4-doped Nsbnd TiO2 surfaces after the hydrothermal treatment. Compared with the approaches previously reported, the facile one-step route utilized here accomplishes the fabrication of Nsbnd TiO2 possessing visible-light activity and attainment of selectivity of dominant photocatalytic reduction product simultaneously by choosing a nitrogen-source with appropriate chemical bond form, which provides a completely new approach to understanding the effects of doping treatment on photocatalytic properties.

  16. Carbon and nitrogen balance of leaf-eating sesarmid crabs ( Neoepisesarma versicolor) offered different food sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongtham, Nalinee; Kristensen, Erik

    2005-10-01

    Carbon and nitrogen budgets for the leaf-eating crab, Neoepisesarma versicolor, were established for individuals living on pure leaf diets. Crabs were fed fresh (green), senescent (yellow) and partly degraded (brown) leaves of the mangrove tree Rhizophora apiculata. Ingestion, egestion and metabolic loss of carbon and nitrogen were determined from laboratory experiments. In addition, bacterial abundance in various compartments of the crabs' digestive tract was enumerated after dissection of live individuals. Ingestion and egestion rates (in terms of dry weight) were highest, while the assimilation efficiency was poorest for crabs fed on brown leaves. The low assimilation efficiency was more than counteracted by the high ingestion rate providing more carbon for growth than for crabs fed green and yellow leaves. In any case, the results show that all types of leaves can provide adequate carbon while nitrogen was insufficient to support both maintenance (yellow leaves) and growth (green, yellow and brown leaves). Leaf-eating crabs must therefore obtain supplementary nitrogen by other means in order to meet their nitrogen requirement. Three hypotheses were evaluated: (1) crabs supplement their diet with bacteria and benthic microalgae by ingesting own faeces and/or selective grazing at the sediment surface; (2) assimilation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the crabs' own intestinal system; and (3) nitrogen storage following occasional feeding on animal tissues (e.g. meiofauna and carcasses). It appears that hypothesis 1 is of limited importance for N. versicolor since faeces and sediment can only supply a minor fraction of the missing nitrogen due to physical constraints on the amount of material the crabs can consume. Hypothesis 2 can be ruled out because tests showed no nitrogen fixation activity in the intestinal system of N. versicolor. It is therefore likely that leaf-eating crabs provide most of their nitrogen requirement from intracellular deposits

  17. Effects of nitrogen composition on fermentation performance of brewer's yeast and the absorption of peptides with different molecular weights.

    PubMed

    Mo, Fen; Zhao, Haifeng; Lei, Hongjie; Zhao, Mouming

    2013-11-01

    Four kinds of worts with different nitrogen compositions were used to examine their effects on fermentation performance of brewer's yeast. The absorption pattern of peptides with different molecular weights (Mw) in yeast cells during wort fermentation was also investigated. Results showed that both the nitrogen composition and level had significant impacts on the yeast biomass accumulation, ethanol production, and free amino nitrogen and sugars consumption rates. Worts supplemented with wheat gluten hydrolysates increased 11.5% of the biomass, 5.9% of fermentability, and 0.6% of ethanol content and decreased 25.6% of residual sugar content during wort fermentation. Moreover, yeast cells assimilated peptides with various Mw differently during fermentation. Peptides with Mw below 1 kDa decreased quickly, and the rate of assimilation was more than 50% at the end of fermentation, while those with Mw above 10 kDa almost could not be assimilated by yeast. All these results further indicated that the level and composition of wort nitrogen had significant impacts on the growth and fermentation performances of brewer's yeast, and peptides with Mw below 1 kDa were one of preferred nitrogen sources for brewer's yeast. PMID:23955296

  18. The Fluorescent Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter and Assessment of Total Nitrogen in Overlying Water with Different Dissolved Oxygen Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang Hua; Kuan, Wang; Song, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Ming; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Shan; Wang, Meng

    2016-03-01

    This paper used excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) to probe the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the overlying water with different dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions, investigating the relationship between protein-like fluorescence intensity and total nitrogen concentration. The resulting fluorescence spectra revealed three protein-like components (high-excitation wavelength tyrosine, low-excitation wavelength tyrosine, low-excitation wavelength tryptophan) and two fulvic-like components (ultraviolet fulvic-like components, visible fulvic-like components) in the overlying water. Moreover, the protein-like components were dominant in the overlying water's DOM. The fluorescence intensity of the protein-like components decreased significantly after aeration. Two of the protein-like components--the low-excitation wavelength tyrosine and the low-excitation wavelength tryptophan--were more susceptible to degradation by microorganisms within the degradable organic matter with respect to the high-excitation wavelength tyrosine. In contrast, the ultraviolet and visible fulvic-like fluorescence intensity increased along with increasing DO concentration, indicating that the fulvic-like components were part of the refractory organics. The fluorescence indices of the DOM in the overlying water were between 1.65-1.80, suggesting that the sources of the DOM were related to terrigenous sediments and microbial metabolic processes, with the primary source being the contribution from microbial metabolism. The fluorescence indices increased along with DO growth, which showed that microbial biomass and microbial activity gradually increased with increasing DO while microbial metabolism also improved, which also increased the biogenic components in the overlying water. The fluorescence intensity of the high-excitation wavelength tyrosine peak A showed a good linear relationship with the total nitrogen concentration at higher DO concentrations of 2

  19. Improved finite-difference vibration analysis of pretwisted, tapered beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure based upon second order central differences is developed. Several difficulties encountered in earlier works with fictitious stations that arise in using second order central differences, are eliminated by developing certain recursive relations. The need for forward or backward differences at the beam boundaries or other similar procedures is eliminated in the present theory. By using this improved theory, the vibration characteristics of pretwisted and tapered blades are calculated. Results of the second order theory are compared with published theoretical and experimental results and are found to be in good agreement. The present method generally produces close lower bound solutions and shows fast convergence. Thus, extrapolation procedures that are customary with first order finite-difference methods are unnecessary. Furthermore, the computational time and effort needed for this improved method are almost the same as required for the conventional first order finite-difference approach.

  20. Preference for different inorganic nitrogen forms among plant functional types and species of the Patagonian steppe.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E; Yahdjian, Laura

    2013-11-01

    We have explored species-specific preferences for nitrate (NO3(-)) and ammonium (NH4(+)) as an alternative niche separation in ecosystems where nitrogen (N) is present mostly in inorganic forms. The Patagonian steppe is dominated by shrubs and grasses. Shrubs absorb water and nutrients from deep soil layers, which are poor in N, while grasses have the opposite pattern, absorbing most of their water and nutrients from the upper layers of the soil. We hypothesized that the preferences of shrub and grass for inorganic N forms are different and that the rate of potential N uptake is greater in shrubs than in grasses. To test this hypothesis, we grew individuals of six dominant species in solutions of different NH4(+):NO3(-) concentration ratios. Nitrate uptake was found to be higher in shrubs, while ammonium uptake was similar between plant functional types. The NH4(+):NO3(-) uptake ratio was significantly lower for shrubs than grasses. Shrubs, which under field conditions have deeper rooting systems than grasses, showed a higher N absorption capacity than grasses and a preference for the more mobile N form, nitrate. Grasses, which had lower N uptake rates than shrubs, preferred ammonium over nitrate. These complementary patterns between grasses and shrubs suggest a more thorough exploitation of resources by diverse ecosystems than those dominated by just one functional type. The loss of one plant functional group or a significant change in its abundance would therefore represent a reduction in resource use efficiency and ecosystem functioning. PMID:23812108

  1. Developmental changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism affect tea quality in different leaf position.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Xin; Yang, Wei-Jun; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Shen, Chen; Yan, Peng; Li, Xin; Han, Wen-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Leaf position represents a specific developmental stage that influences both photosynthesis and respiration. However, the precise relationships between photosynthesis and respiration in different leaf position that affect tea quality are largely unknown. Here, we show that the effective quantum yield of photosystem II [ΦPSⅡ] as well as total chlorophyll concentration (TChl) of tea leaves increased gradually with leaf maturity. Moreover, respiration rate (RR) together with total nitrogen concentration (TN) decreased persistently, but total carbon remained unchanged during leaf maturation. Analyses of major N-based organic compounds revealed that decrease in TN was attributed to a significant decrease in the concentration of caffeine and amino acids (AA) in mature leaves. Furthermore, soluble sugar (SS) decreased, but starch concentration increased with leaf maturity, indicating that source-sink relationship was altered during tea leaf development. Detailed correlation analysis showed that ΦPSⅡ was negatively correlated with RR, SS, starch, tea polyphenol (TP), total catechins and TN, but positively correlated with TChl; while RR was positively correlated with TN, SS, TP and caffeine, but negatively correlated with TChl and starch concentrations. Our results suggest that biosynthesis of chlorophyll, catechins and polyphenols is closely associated with photosynthesis and respiration in different leaf position that greatly influences the relationship between primary and secondary metabolism in tea plants. PMID:27380366

  2. Thrust Performance Improvement for a Water/Liquid Nitrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Rikio; Mikami, Ryo

    We propose a water/liquid nitrogen rocket engine as a new non-combustion type rocket engine. Liquid nitrogen is mixed with heated water and specific volume of nitrogen is increased by evaporation. Thrust force is obtained by exhaust of nitrogen gas through a nozzle with water particles. Results of previous experiments indicated a specific impulse is 60 % of the theoretically estimated value. By evaluating the characteristic exhaust velocity and other thrust characteristics, we found that the lower-than-expected specific impulse is due to insufficient propellant mixing and heat transfer between heated water and liquid nitrogen in the mixing chamber. We also performed high-speed imaging experiments to visualize impinging and mixing of propellants. Results indicate that in the original injection setup, heat conveyed by heated water is not adequately transferred to the liquid nitrogen. An alternative injection pattern was tested, which resulted in a 10% increase in the characteristic exhaust velocity. In addition, we tested a new type of injector designed for more efficient mixing and heat transfer that exhibited 30 % increase in characteristic exhaust velocity. Furthermore, we modified the theoretical expression for the characteristic exhaust velocity based on multi-phased flow theory so that it agrees well with the experimental results.

  3. Policies for agricultural nitrogen management—trends, challenges and prospects for improved efficiency in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgaard, Tommy; Hansen, Birgitte; Hasler, Berit; Hertel, Ole; Hutchings, Nicholas J.; Jacobsen, Brian H.; Stoumann Jensen, Lars; Kronvang, Brian; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Schjørring, Jan K.; Sillebak Kristensen, Ib; Graversgaard, Morten; Termansen, Mette; Vejre, Henrik

    2014-11-01

    With more than 60% of the land farmed, with vulnerable freshwater and marine environments, and with one of the most intensive, export-oriented livestock sectors in the world, the nitrogen (N) pollution pressure from Danish agriculture is severe. Consequently, a series of policy action plans have been implemented since the mid 1980s with significant effects on the surplus, efficiency and environmental loadings of N. This paper reviews the policies and actions taken and their ability to mitigate effects of reactive N (Nr) while maintaining agricultural production. In summary, the average N-surplus has been reduced from approximately 170 kg N ha-1 yr-1 to below 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1 during the past 30 yrs, while the overall N-efficiency for the agricultural sector (crop + livestock farming) has increased from around 20-30% to 40-45%, the N-leaching from the field root zone has been halved, and N losses to the aquatic and atmospheric environment have been significantly reduced. This has been achieved through a combination of approaches and measures (ranging from command and control legislation, over market-based regulation and governmental expenditure to information and voluntary action), with specific measures addressing the whole N cascade, in order to improve the quality of ground- and surface waters, and to reduce the deposition to terrestrial natural ecosystems. However, there is still a major challenge in complying with the EU Water Framework and Habitats Directives, calling for new approaches, measures and technologies to mitigate agricultural N losses and control N flows.

  4. Stoichiometric Characteristics of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus in Leaves of Differently Aged Lucerne (Medicago sativa) Stands

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhennan; Lu, Jiaoyun; Yang, Mei; Yang, Huimin; Zhang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Element concentration within a plant which is vital to function maintenance and adaptation to environment, may change with plant growth. However, how carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) vary stoichiometrically with stand growth, i.e., ages or cuts, was still untouched in perennial species. This study tested the hypothesis that lucerne (Medicago sativa) C:N, C:P, and N:P should change with stand age and cut. Leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P changed with stand age, showing various trends in different cuts of lucerne. Generally the greatest stoichiometric ratios were measured in 8 year stand and in the second cut. They were affected significantly and negatively by total N and P concentrations of leaf, but not by organic C concentration. There were significantly positive correlations among leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P. However, leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P were hardly affected by soil features. Conclusively, lucerne C, N, and P stoichiometry are age- and cut-specific, and regulated mainly by leaf N, P concentrations and stoichiometry. There are few correlations with soil fertility. To our knowledge, it is the first try to elucidate the stoichiometry in the viewpoint of age and cut with a perennial herbaceous legume. PMID:26697029

  5. [Application of Hyperspectral Imaging for Visualization of Nitrogen Content in Pepper Leaf with Different Positions].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke-qiang; Zhao, Yan-ru; Li, Xiao-li; Ding, Xi-bin; Zhuang, Zai-chun; He, Yong

    2015-03-01

    In order to estimate pepper plant growth rapidly and accurately, hyperspectral imaging technology combined with chemometrics methods were employed to realize visualization of nitrogen content (NC) distribution. First, pepper leaves were picked up with the leaf number based on different leaf positions, and hyperspectral data of these leaves were acquired. Then, SPAD and NC value of leaves were measured, respectively. After acquirement of pepper leaves' spectral information, random-frog (RF) algorithm was chosen to extract characteristic wavelengths. Finally, five characteristic wavelengths were selected respectively, and then those characteristic wavelengths and full spectra were used to establish partial least squares regression (PLSR) models, respectively. As a result, SPAD predicted model had an excellent performance of R(C) = 0.970, R(CV) = 0.965, R(P) = 0.934, meanwhile evaluation parameters of NC predicted model were R(C) = 0.857, R(CV) = 0.806, R(P) = 0.839. Lastly, according to the optimal models, SPAD and NC of each pixel in hyperspectral images of pepper leaves were calculated and their distribution was mapped. In fact, SPAD in plant can reflect the NC. In this research, the change trend of both was similar, so the conclusions of this research were proved to be corrected. The results revealed that it was feasible to apply hyperspectral imaging technology for mapping SPAD and NC in pepper leaf, which provided a theoretical foundation for monitoring plant growth and distribution of nutrients. PMID:26117891

  6. Modelling of in-stream nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations using different sampling strategies for calibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Jiang, Sanyuan; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Rode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    It is known that a good evaluation and prediction of surface water pollution is mainly limited by the monitoring strategy and the capability of the hydrological water quality model to reproduce the internal processes. To this end, a compromise sampling frequency, which can reflect the dynamical behaviour of leached nutrient fluxes responding to changes in land use, agriculture practices and point sources, and appropriate process-based water quality model are required. The objective of this study was to test the identification of hydrological water quality model parameters (nitrogen and phosphorus) under two different monitoring strategies: (1) regular grab-sampling approach and (2) regular grab-sampling with additional monitoring during the hydrological events using automatic samplers. First, the semi-distributed hydrological water quality HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) model was successfully calibrated (1994-1998) for discharge (NSE = 0.86), nitrate-N (lowest NSE for nitrate-N load = 0.69), particulate phosphorus and soluble phosphorus in the Selke catchment (463 km2, central Germany) for the period 1994-1998 using regular grab-sampling approach (biweekly to monthly for nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations). Second, the model was successfully validated during the period 1999-2010 for discharge, nitrate-N, particulate-phosphorus and soluble-phosphorus (lowest NSE for soluble phosphorus load = 0.54). Results, showed that when additional sampling during the events with random grab-sampling approach was used (period 2011-2013), the hydrological model could reproduce only the nitrate-N and soluble phosphorus concentrations reasonably well. However, when additional sampling during the hydrological events was considered, the HYPE model could not represent the measured particulate phosphorus. This reflects the importance of suspended sediment during the hydrological events increasing the concentrations of particulate phosphorus. The HYPE model could

  7. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in mesocosms of five different European peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodau, Christian; Zajac, Katarzyna

    2015-04-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition, a key growth limiting nutrient in ombrotrophic peatlands, can cause various shifts in peatland N cycling. Quantification of N transformation rates and fluxes within peatlands that are induced by long-term N deposition is crucial for understanding the mechanisms and robustness of N retention. Using a 15N labeled tracer under steady state conditions at two water table levels, we investigated the fate of N in mesocosms from five European peatlands, which have a history of differing long-term N load. Peat contained the largest N pool, followed by Sphagnum (0 - 5 cm), shrubs, graminoids and the dissolved pool. We found a decline of N recovery from the peat and an increase of N recovery from shrubs and the dissolved pool across the N deposition gradient. Sphagnum mosses not only intercepted large amounts of 15N in the mesocosms (0.2 - 0.35 mg g-1) but they also retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Polluted sites (Lille Vildmose, Frölichshaier Sattelmoor) contained the largest dissolved nitrogen pools and the highest nitrate concentrations. At the same time the recoveries of their Sphagnum pools were in the range of the recovery recorded for the Sphagnum layer from the 'clean' site (Degerö Stormyr). Our experiment shows that a decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, might not be an evidence for Sphagnum saturation. As long as N is required for the synthesis of biomass Sphagnum species can thrive even at strongly elevated long-term N loads. A change in WT position from -28 to -8 cm influenced CO2 fluxes from mesocosms only to a small degree, which implies that small changes in water table position may be less important in controlling CO2 exchange with the atmosphere than often assumed. Although water table rise was a main driver for increase of methane emissions in all cores, short time lags (3

  8. Growth and nutrient removal properties of the diatoms, Chaetoceros curvisetus and C. simplex under different nitrogen sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, Panneerselvam; Manimaran, Kuppusamy; Sampathkumar, Pitchai; Rameshkumar, Lakshmanan

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the suitability of the marine diatoms, Chaetoceros curvisetus and C. simplex for the removal of macronutrients from different wastewater, the growth and nitrate-phosphate removal properties were studied with nitrate, ammonium and urea nitrogen sources. Three separate experiments were conducted using modified F/2 medium with 12.35 mg L-1 total nitrogen and 1.12 mg L-1 total phosphorous (simulating the typical concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in secondary effluent) as growth medium. The maximum cell densities of C. curvisetus and C. simplex were 7.16 ± 0.34 × 104 cells mL-1 in {{NO}}3^{ - } and 3.88 ± 0.32 × 105 cells mL-1 in urea, respectively. The maximum chlorophyll a per cell was 1.7 and 4.7 pg for C. simplex and C. curvisetus, cultured with urea and nitrate, respectively. The high protein contents of 4.7 pg cell-1 in C. simplex with urea and 19.7 pg cell-1 in C. curvisetus nitrate nitrogen sources were found. The higher cell density and protein content of both species from urea and nitrate nitrogen sources ( p < 0.05) have shown that these were utilized by microalgae and were converted to protein. The C. simplex and C. curvisetus showed maximum removal efficiencies of nitrate by 97.86 and 91.62 % and phosphate by 98.5 and 100 %, respectively when urea used as nitrogen source than ammonia. The results indicated the C. simplex was more efficient than C. curvisetus and suitable for the removal of macronutrients when cultured with urea and nitrate nitrogen sources.

  9. Physiological Effects of GLT1 Modulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Growing on Different Nitrogen Sources.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Adamo, Giusy Manuela; Frascotti, Gianni; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-02-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most employed cell factories for the production of bioproducts. Although monomeric hexose sugars constitute the preferential carbon source, this yeast can grow on a wide variety of nitrogen sources that are catabolized through central nitrogen metabolism (CNM). To evaluate the effects of internal perturbations on nitrogen utilization, we characterized strains deleted or overexpressed in GLT1, encoding for one of the key enzymes of the CNM node, the glutamate synthase. These strains, together with the parental strain as control, have been cultivated in minimal medium formulated with ammonium sulfate, glutamate, or glutamine as nitrogen source. Growth kinetics, together with the determination of protein content, viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation at the single cell level, revealed that GLT1 modulations do not significantly influence the cellular physiology, whereas the nitrogen source does. As important exceptions, GLT1 deletion negatively affected the scavenging activity of glutamate against ROS accumulation, when cells were treated with H2O2, whereas Glt1p overproduction led to lower viability in glutamine medium. Overall, this confirms the robustness of the CNM node against internal perturbations, but, at the same time, highlights its plasticity in respect to the environment. Considering that side-stream protein-rich waste materials are emerging as substrates to be used in an integrated biorefinery, these results underline the importance of preliminarily evaluating the best nitrogen source not only for media formulation, but also for the overall economics of the process. PMID:26528537

  10. Use of a nitrogen-argon plasma to improve adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440-C steel surfaces that had been RF-sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that a small partial pressure of nitrogen (about 0.5%) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied on sputter-etched oxidized surfaces or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  11. Removal of oxygen demand and nitrogen using different particle-sizes of anthracite coated with nine kinds of LDHs for wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangling; Guo, Lu; Wang, Yafen; Ruan, Congying

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the application of anthracite particles of different sizes and coated with nine kinds of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) varying in MII-MIII cations, as alternative substrates in the simulated vertical-flow constructed wetland columns. Effects of LDHs-coating and particle size of modified anthracites were examined to evaluate their abilities in removing oxygen demand and nitrogen from sewage wastewater. Results showed that LDHs modification effectively enhanced the removal of nitrogen and organics. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) , ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were best improved by 28.5%, 11.9% and 4.1% for the medium particle size (1-3 mm), followed by 9.2%, 5.5% and 13.6% for the large size (3-5 mm), respectively. Only TN removal was improved up to 16.6% for the small particle size (0.5-1 mm). Nitrate tended to accumulate and fluctuate greatly across all the treatments, probably due to the dominancy of aerobic condition in the vertical-flow columns. Overall, MgFe-LDHs was selected as the best-modified coating for anthracite. The results suggested LDHs modification would be one of the promising strategies to provide new-types of highly efficient and lasting wetland substrates.

  12. Removal of oxygen demand and nitrogen using different particle-sizes of anthracite coated with nine kinds of LDHs for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangling; Guo, Lu; Wang, Yafen; Ruan, Congying

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the application of anthracite particles of different sizes and coated with nine kinds of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) varying in M(II)-M(III) cations, as alternative substrates in the simulated vertical-flow constructed wetland columns. Effects of LDHs-coating and particle size of modified anthracites were examined to evaluate their abilities in removing oxygen demand and nitrogen from sewage wastewater. Results showed that LDHs modification effectively enhanced the removal of nitrogen and organics. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) , ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were best improved by 28.5%, 11.9% and 4.1% for the medium particle size (1-3 mm), followed by 9.2%, 5.5% and 13.6% for the large size (3-5 mm), respectively. Only TN removal was improved up to 16.6% for the small particle size (0.5-1 mm). Nitrate tended to accumulate and fluctuate greatly across all the treatments, probably due to the dominancy of aerobic condition in the vertical-flow columns. Overall, MgFe-LDHs was selected as the best-modified coating for anthracite. The results suggested LDHs modification would be one of the promising strategies to provide new-types of highly efficient and lasting wetland substrates. PMID:26456850

  13. Short-Term Nitrogen Transformations Associated with Soil Aggregates and Microbial Community Composition in Three Different Tillage Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying soil nitrogen transformation processes associated with soil aggregates is noteworthy as microbial communities central to N cycle reside in the soil aggregates of different sizes. The objective of this investigation was to determine both the rates of ammonium production and consumption pr...

  14. The Impacts of Different Meteorology Data Sets on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the SWAT Watershed Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated how different meteorology data sets impacts nitrogen fate and transport responses in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We used two meteorology data sets: National Climatic Data Center (observed) and Mesoscale Model 5/Weather Research ...

  15. Tomato response to legume cover crop and nitrogen: differing enhancement patterns of fruit yield, photosynthesis and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomatoes responded to soil and residue from a hairy vetch cover crop differently on many levels than tomato response to inorganic nitrogen. Tomato fruit production, plant biomass parameters, and photosynthesis were higher in plants grown in vetch than bare soil. Tomato growth and photosynthesis metr...

  16. OPPORTUNITIES IN NITROGEN MANAGEMENT RESEARCH; IMPROVING APPLICATIONS FOR PROVEN TECHNOLOGIES AND IDENTIFYING NEW TOOLS FOR MANAGING NITROGEN FLUX AND INPUT IN ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence and distribution of undesirable quantities of bioavailable nitrogenous compounds in the environment are issues of long-standing concern. Importantly for us today, deleterious effects associated with high levels of nitrogen in the ecosystem are becoming everyday news...

  17. Biological nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal from municipal wastewater using different variations of the activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    Munirathinam, K.

    1986-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to obtain operation and design information necessary for the successful functioning of municipal wastewater treatment plants to accomplish carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal. Investigations were carried out on continuous flow bench-scale pilot systems using municipal wastewater. The continuous flow studies involved a one-stage nitrifying system, a three-stage nitrifying-denitrifying system, and a combined biological nitrogen-phosphorus removal system. The first two systems were operated simultaneously. These systems were operated under different sludge retention times and food-to-microorganism ratios. The hydraulic flow rates were carefully controlled throughout all experiments. These data were then used to evaluate the systems for organics, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal.

  18. Suitable strategy to improve nitrogen utilization and reduce the environmental impact of Nellore bulls supplemented on tropical pasture.

    PubMed

    Jose Neto, A; Zervoudakis, J T; da Silva-Marques, R P; Silva, L C R P; Hatamoto-Zervoudakis, L K; Klopfenstein, T J

    2016-03-01

    Expansion of the biodiesel industry has increased the crude glycerin (CG) supply. Crude glycerin has the potential of replacing corn in ruminant diets because the glycerol can be converted to glucose in the liver of ruminants, providing energy for cellular metabolism. The objective was to evaluate the effects of CG with urea, soybean meal, cottonseed meal, and corn gluten feed, respectively, on intake, digestibility, microbial protein yield, and efficiency of N utilization. Five Nellore bulls (initial BW of 448 kg [SD 14]) grazing tropical pasture were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square design. The supplements were control (no supplementation; only free-choice mineral mixture ad libitum), CG with urea (CG-Urea), CG with soybean meal, CG with cottonseed meal, and CG with corn gluten. Crude glycerin was used in all supplements to replace corn (15% of DM supplement). There were differences between CG-Urea and other supplements with regard to intake of DM (% of BW and total; < 0.01), OM ( < 0.01), CP ( < 0.01), and TDN ( < 0.01). The digestibility of CP was greater ( = 0.04) for animals supplemented with CG-Urea than for those fed other supplements. Animals supplemented with CG-Urea showed greater N intake ( < 0.01) and N ammonia ( = 0.04) than those supplemented with other treatments. Nitrogen retained (g/d) was not affected by protein source but was greater for cattle fed a protein supplement compared with cattle fed the control supplement ( < 0.01). Supplementing the animals with protein sources increased ( = 0.02) the daily production of rumen microbial nitrogen (g/d) compared with the control group. Microbial protein (g/d) was lesser for the control than for protein sources ( = 0.02). However, when expressed relative to TDN ( = 0.35) and CP ( = 0.82), there were no differences across treatments. Crude protein intake per digestible OM intake (g CP/kg digestible OM intake) was greater for animals fed protein sources compared with animals fed control supplements ( < 0

  19. Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  20. Improvement in nitrogen fixation capacity could be part of the domestication process in soybean.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, N; Qi, X; Li, M-W; Xie, M; Gao, Y; Cheung, M-Y; Wong, F-L; Lam, H-M

    2016-08-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in soybeans is a complex process involving the interplay between the plant host and the symbiotic rhizobia. As nitrogen supply has a crucial role in growth and development, higher nitrogen fixation capacity would be important to achieve bigger plants and larger seeds, which were important selection criteria during plant domestication by humans. To test this hypothesis, we monitored the nitrogen fixation-related performance in 31 cultivated and 17 wild soybeans after inoculation with the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens sp. nov. USDA110 and the fast-growing Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii CCBAU45436. Our results showed that, in general, cultivated soybeans gave better performance in BNF. Electron microscopic studies indicated that there was an exceptionally high accumulation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate bodies in bacteroids in the nodules of all wild soybeans tested, suggesting that the C/N balance in wild soybeans may not be optimized for nitrogen fixation. Furthermore, we identified new quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for total ureides and total nodule fresh weight by employing a recombinant inbred population composed of descendants from a cross between a cultivated and a wild parent. Using nucleotide diversity (θπ), divergence index (Fst) and distribution of fixed single-nucleotide polymorphisms as parameters, we found that some regions in the total ureides QTL on chromosome 17 and the total nodule fresh weight QTL on chromosome 12 exhibited very low diversity among cultivated soybeans, suggesting that these were traits specially selected during the domestication and breeding process. PMID:27118154

  1. Carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: global carbon cycle impact from an improved plant nitrogen cycle in the Community Land Model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingjie; Fisher, Joshua B; Brzostek, Edward R; Phillips, Richard P

    2016-03-01

    Plants typically expend a significant portion of their available carbon (C) on nutrient acquisition - C that could otherwise support growth. However, given that most global terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) do not include the C cost of nutrient acquisition, these models fail to represent current and future constraints to the land C sink. Here, we integrated a plant productivity-optimized nutrient acquisition model - the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen Model - into one of the most widely used TBMs, the Community Land Model. Global plant nitrogen (N) uptake is dynamically simulated in the coupled model based on the C costs of N acquisition from mycorrhizal roots, nonmycorrhizal roots, N-fixing microbes, and retranslocation (from senescing leaves). We find that at the global scale, plants spend 2.4 Pg C yr(-1) to acquire 1.0 Pg N yr(-1) , and that the C cost of N acquisition leads to a downregulation of global net primary production (NPP) by 13%. Mycorrhizal uptake represented the dominant pathway by which N is acquired, accounting for ~66% of the N uptake by plants. Notably, roots associating with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi - generally considered for their role in phosphorus (P) acquisition - are estimated to be the primary source of global plant N uptake owing to the dominance of AM-associated plants in mid- and low-latitude biomes. Overall, our coupled model improves the representations of NPP downregulation globally and generates spatially explicit patterns of belowground C allocation, soil N uptake, and N retranslocation at the global scale. Such model improvements are critical for predicting how plant responses to altered N availability (owing to N deposition, rising atmospheric CO2 , and warming temperatures) may impact the land C sink. PMID:26473512

  2. Removal of nitrogen in different wetland filter materials: use of stable nitrogen isotopes to determine factors controlling denitrification and DNRA.

    PubMed

    Mørkved, P T; Søvik, A K; Kløve, B; Bakken, L R

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory incubations with varying O2 and NO3 concentrations were performed with a range of filter materials used in constructed wetlands (CWs). The study included material sampled from functioning CWs as well as raw materials subjected to laboratory pre-incubation. 15N-tracer techniques were used to assess the rates of denitrification versus dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), and the relative role of nitrification versus denitrification in producing N2O. The N2O/(N2 + N2O) product ratio was assessed for the different materials. Sand, shell sand, and peat sustained high rates of denitrification. Raw light-weight aggregates (LWA) had a very low rate, while in LWA sampled from a functioning CW, the rate was similar to the one found in the other materials. The N2O/(N2 + N2O) ratio was very low for sand, shell sand and LWA from functioning CWs, but very high for raw LWA. The ratio was intermediate but variable for peat. The N2O produced by nitrification accounted for a significant percentage of the N2O accumulated during the incubation, but was dependent on the initial oxygen concentration. DNRA was significant only for shell sand taken from a functioning CW, suggesting that the establishment of active DNRA is a slower process than the establishment of a denitrifying flora. PMID:16042244

  3. VARYING STABLE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIOS OF DIFFERENT COASTAL MARSH PLANTS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH WASTEWATER NITROGEN AND LAND USE IN NEW ENGLAND, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of coastal biota have been used as indicators of sources of anthropogenic nitrogen. In this study the relationships of the stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of salt marsh plants, Iva frutescens (L.), Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex Steud, Spar...

  4. Can Crops with Greater Rooting Systems Improve Nitrogen Retention and Mitigate Emissions of Nitrous Oxide?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decock, Charlotte; Lee, Juhwan; Barthel, Matti; Mikita, Chris; Wilde, Benjamin; Verhoeven, Elizabeth; Hund, Andreas; Abiven, Samuel; Friedli, Cordula; Conen, Franz; Mohn, Joachim; Wolf, Benjamin; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that crops with deeper root systems could improve agricultural sustainability, because scavenging of nitrogen (N) in the subsoil would increase overall N retention and use efficiency in the system. However, the effect of plant root depth and root architecture on N-leaching and emissions of the potent greenhouse N2O remains largely unknown. We aimed to assess the effect of plant rooting depth on N-cycling and N2O production and reduction within the plant-soil system and throughout the soil profile. We hypothesized that greater root depth and root biomass will (1) increase N use efficiency and decrease N losses in the form of N leaching and N2O emissions; (2) increase N retention by shifting the fate of NH4+ from more nitrification toward more plant uptake and microbial immobilization; and (3) increase the depth of maximum N2O production and decrease the ratio of N2O:(N2O+N2) in denitrification end-products. To test these hypotheses, 4 winter wheat cultivars were grown in lysimeters (1.5 m tall, 0.5 m diameter, 3 replications per cultivar) under greenhouse conditions. Each lysimeter was equipped with an automated flux chamber for the determination of N2O surface fluxes. At 7.5, 30, 60, 90 and 120 cm depth, sampling ports were installed for the determination of soil moisture contents, as well as the collection of soil pore air and soil pore water samples. We selected two older and two newer varieties from the Swiss winter wheat breeding program, spanning a 100-year breeding history. The selection was based on previous experiments indicating that the older varieties have deeper rooting systems than the newer varieties under well watered conditions. N2O fluxes were determined twice per day on a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer interfaced with the automated flux chambers. Once per week, we determined concentrations of mineral N in pore water and of CO2 and N2O in the pore air. For mineral N and N2O, also natural abundance isotope deltas

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2001-05-31

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures

  6. Changes in soil nitrogen and phosphorus under different broiler production systems.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Sylvia; Rogasik, Jutta; Schnug, Ewald

    2004-01-01

    In a field study, soils of four conventional free-range and organic broiler runs were analyzed for N and P concentrations in the years 2000 and 2001. Zones of different use intensity by broilers were identified on the free runs and mean zonal nutrient contents were compared with each other. Intensity of use by birds and spatial distribution of soil nutrient concentrations were found to be related to each other. Fecal N input by broilers resulted in accumulation of soil mineral nitrogen (N(min)) contents down to a 90-cm sampling depth. In highly frequented "hot spots," plant requirement as defined by the German "N-Basis-Sollwert" (110 kg/ha N(min)) for grassland was exceeded in all four cases. This implies an increased environmental risk of ammonia volatilization and nitrate leaching. Fecal P input by broilers resulted in accumulation of plant-available and thus mobile soil P (phosphorus extracted with calcium-acetate-lactate [P(CAL)] and phosphorus extracted with water [P(w)]) in the most intensely used zones. In these areas, soil P contents exceeded 90 mg/kg P(CAL) (upper limit of soil test P defined in Germany for optimum plant yield) by as much as 217 mg/kg, which indicates an enhanced risk of P loss from the soil via runoff or leaching. The conclusion might be drawn that, with regard to nutrient loss from free-run soils, intensive indoor production in a closed system may be more environmentally neutral than conventional free-range or organic production. However, to put this into perspective, the scope of the environmental risk connected with spatially limited point accumulation of nutrients should be considered. Furthermore, an environmental evaluation must also account for the fate and environmental effects of the broiler litter produced inside the broiler house. PMID:15356226

  7. Improved Canopy Sensor-based Corn Nitrogen Recommendations Using Auxiliary Information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nitrogen (N) supplying capacity of the soil available to support corn (Zea mays L.) production can be highly variable both among and within fields. Thus, the amount of N fertilizer applied should be site-specific and also climate-sensitive. In recent years, canopy reflectance sensing has been in...

  8. Improving Yield and Nutrient Uptake Potentials of japonica and indica Rice Varieties with Nitrogen Fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most important problem in achieving high yields in rice is how to increase the nitrogen (N) absorption at each growth stage without reducing the percentage of ripened grains. Proper amount and timing of application could reduce N losses and increase fertilizer use efficiency while cost of produc...

  9. Integrating soil and weather information into canopy sensor algorithms for improved corn nitrogen rate recommendation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn production can be often limited by the loss of nitrogen (N) due to leaching, volatilization and denitrification. The use of canopy sensors for making in-season N fertilizer applications has been proven effective in matching plant N requirements with periods of rapid N uptake (V7-V11), reducing ...

  10. Multiple leaf measurements improve effectiveness of the cholorophyll meter in drum wheat nitrogen management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple and rapid methods are needed to measure durum wheat (Triticum durum L.) nitrogen (N) status and make on-site N application decisions for increased crop yield and grain quality. Although chlorophyll meters (SPAD meters) have been widely tested for cereal crop N management, significant variatio...

  11. Public-private partnering for improving performance of corn nitrogen fertilization tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilization for corn production is complicated by soil and weather variability, yet such has far-reaching economic and environmental implications. To address this challenge, alternative N management strategies have been explored extensively in recent years for determining the most consist...

  12. Future riverine nitrogen export to US coastal regions: Prospects for improving water quality considering population growth

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess nitrogen (N) in the environment degrades ecosystems and adversely affects human health. Here we examine predictions of contemporary (2000) and future (2030) coastal N loading in the continental US by the Nutrient Export from WaterSheds (NEWS) model. Future output is from s...

  13. Future riverine nitrogen export to US coastal regions: Prospects for improving water quality amid population growth.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess nitrogen (N) in the environment degrades ecosystems and adversely affects human health. Here we examine predictions of contemporary (2000) and future (2030) coastal N loading in the continental US by the Nutrient Export from WaterSheds (NEWS) model. Future scenarios were b...

  14. Application of plant genomics for improved symbiotic nitrogen fixation in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because genome sequencing, transcript profiling, proteome analysis, metabolite profiling, mutant analysis, and comparative genomics have progressed at a logarithmic pace, we know more about the plant genes involved in symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) than could have been imagined a decade ago. Howe...

  15. Use of GIS-based Site-specific Nitrogen Management for Improving Energy Efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To our knowledge, geographical information system (GIS)-based site-specific nitrogen management (SSNM) techniques have not been used to assess agricultural energy costs and efficiency. This chapter uses SSNM case studies for corn (Zea mays L.) grown in Missouri and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) gro...

  16. Different Land Use Intensities in Grassland Ecosystems Drive Ecology of Microbial Communities Involved in Nitrogen Turnover in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Annabel; Focks, Andreas; Radl, Viviane; Keil, Daniel; Welzl, Gerhard; Schöning, Ingo; Boch, Steffen; Marhan, Sven; Kandeler, Ellen; Schloter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Understanding factors driving the ecology of N cycling microbial communities is of central importance for sustainable land use. In this study we report changes of abundance of denitrifiers, nitrifiers and nitrogen-fixing microorganisms (based on qPCR data for selected functional genes) in response to different land use intensity levels and the consequences for potential turnover rates. We investigated selected grassland sites being comparable with respect to soil type and climatic conditions, which have been continuously treated for many years as intensely used meadows (IM), intensely used mown pastures (IP) and extensively used pastures (EP), respectively. The obtained data were linked to above ground biodiversity pattern as well as water extractable fractions of nitrogen and carbon in soil. Shifts in land use intensity changed plant community composition from systems dominated by s-strategists in extensive managed grasslands to c-strategist dominated communities in intensive managed grasslands. Along the different types of land use intensity, the availability of inorganic nitrogen regulated the abundance of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers. In contrast, the amount of dissolved organic nitrogen determined the abundance of denitrifiers (nirS and nirK). The high abundance of nifH carrying bacteria at intensive managed sites gave evidence that the amounts of substrates as energy source outcompete the high availability of inorganic nitrogen in these sites. Overall, we revealed that abundance and function of microorganisms involved in key processes of inorganic N cycling (nitrification, denitrification and N fixation) might be independently regulated by different abiotic and biotic factors in response to land use intensity. PMID:24039974

  17. School Improvement in Practice: Schools Make a Difference Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Kate, Ed.

    When the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) was disbanded in 1990, 13 separate education authorities were created in its place. Two years after its creation, in partnership with all of its secondary schools, one of the new LEAs initiated a school-improvement project to raise standards called Schools Make A Difference (SMAD). This book…

  18. Improving high temperature creep resistance of reduced activation steels by addition of nitrogen and intermediate heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. B.; Zhang, C.; Xia, Z. X.; Yang, Z. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we report an enhanced high-temperature creep resistance in reduced activation ferrite/martensite (RAFM) steels, by introducing nitrogen (0.035 wt%, M3 steel) and employing a novel intermediate heat treatment I-Q-T (intermediate treatment, quenching and tempering). In comparison with all the control groups, the uniaxial tests of the I-Q-T treated M3 steel showed significant increase in rupture time and decrease in elongation. The microstructures of the samples were further characterized to elucidate the origin of the enhanced creep resistance. It is found that, by introducing nitrogen, the primary TaC particles were refined; by employing the I-Q-T heat treatment, the dispersed fine secondary MX precipitates, as well as the lath subgrains containing high-density dislocations, were increased: all are responsible for the improved creep resistance.

  19. Response of 'Ranger Russet' Potato Cultivar to Different Soil Water Regimes and Nitrogen Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate availability of water and nitrogen (N) is important for production of high potato yields of high processing quality tubers. In this study, “Ranger Russet” potato cultivar was grown in a Quincy fine sand (mixed, mesic, Xeric Torripsamments) with Center Pivot irrigation in Columbia Basin pro...

  20. Response of two wheat cultivars to supplemental nitrogen under different salinity stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of supplemental nitrogen (N), as either farmyard manure (FYM) or urea, on response of two wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars (a salt sensitive ‘Sakha 69’ and a salt tolerant ‘Sakha 93’) were investigated in a green house experiment under various salinity levels (control, 6, 9, or 12 dS m-1)...

  1. Differences in Growth, and Nitrogen Uptake and Storage between Two Container-Grown Cultivars of Rhododendron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One year-old liners of rhododendron (Rhododendron ‘H-1 P.J.M’) and azalea (Rhododendron ‘Cannon’s Double’) were used to determine nitrogen (N) uptake, remobilization, and storage in relation to plant growth from May to September. Plants were grown with liquid fertilizer with or without N in a substr...

  2. Nitrogen Release in Different Soils Amended with Controlled-Release Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) release from two controlled-release N fertilizers (CRNFs) (Arborite® and ESN®) and two traditional N fertilizers (urea [(NH2)2CO)] and ammonium urea nitrate (UAN) [(NH2)2CO, NH4NO3]) in three soil types of North Carolina was measured throughout a 12 week laboratory incubation. Treatment...

  3. Nitrous oxide emissions from a golf course fairway and rough following application of different nitrogen fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that destroys stratospheric ozone. There is limited research of golf course N2O emission and the effects of frequent fertilization and irrigation. Three enhanced efficiency nitrogen fertilizers (EENFs) were applied to a Colorado golf course fairway and ...

  4. Application of microbial inoculants as tools for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from different nitrogen fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) are increasing due to several factors, including increased use of nitrogen fertilizers. New management tools are needed to reduce N2O emissions from production agriculture. One potential such tool is the use of microbial inoculants, which are increasingly being used ...

  5. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance of different wine yeast species during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Viana, Tiago; Ardö, Ylva; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the influence of twenty different single (i.e. 19 amino acids and ammonium sulphate) and two multiple nitrogen sources (N-sources) on growth and fermentation (i.e. glucose consumption and ethanol production) performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of four wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeast species (Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Torulaspora delbrueckii) was investigated during alcoholic fermentation. Briefly, the N-sources with beneficial effects on all performance parameters (or for the majority of them) for each yeast species were alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, isoleucine, ammonium sulphate, serine, valine and mixtures of 19 amino acids and of 19 amino acids plus ammonium sulphate (for S. cerevisiae), serine (for L. thermotolerans), alanine (for H. uvarum), alanine and asparagine (for M. pulcherrima), arginine, asparagine, glutamine, isoleucine and mixture of 19 amino acids (for T. delbrueckii). Furthermore, our results showed a clear positive effect of complex mixtures of N-sources on S. cerevisiae and on T. delbrueckii (although to a lesser extent) as to all performance parameters studied, whereas for L. thermotolerans, H. uvarum and M. pulcherrima, single amino acids affected growth and fermentation performance to the same extent as the mixtures. Moreover, we found groups of N-sources with similar effects on the growth and/or fermentation performance of two or more yeast species. Finally, the influences of N-sources observed for T. delbrueckii and H. uvarum resembled those of S. cerevisiae the most and the least, respectively. Overall, this work contributes to an improved understanding of how different N-sources affect growth, glucose consumption and ethanol production of wine-related yeast species under oxygen-limited conditions, which, in turn, may be used to, e.g. optimize growth and fermentation performance of the given yeast upon N-source supplementation during

  6. Simulation studies of the separation of Kr-85 radionuclide gas from nitrogen and oxygen across nanoporous graphene membranes in different pore configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, S. Mahmood; Sepehrian, Hamid; Arabieh, Masoud

    2016-05-01

    Separating molecular species is an important precursor for various applications. In this work, we have utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine how pore radius and structure affect the separation process. We show from MD simulations that 2-D graphene sheets with designed sub-nanometer pores can efficiently separate the Kr-85 radionuclide gas from an N2/O2 mixture. Three species of gases (Kr-85, N2 and O2 were considered in the simulation box in which different sizes and geometries of pores were modeled on the graphene sheet. The ( 30× 30× 80 Å^3 simulation box contains a nanoporous graphene membrane in the middle of the box and two fixed walls with equal distances on both sides of the nanoporous graphene. The results revealed that Kr-85 separation was improved by using an optimized pore structure. It was also found that the Kr-85 gas radionuclides could be completely separated from nitrogen and oxygen molecules in the pore-7 configuration. Restriction of the molecular orientation largely prohibited the permeation of nitrogen molecules. It was also found that nitrogen was more strongly adsorbed onto the membrane than oxygen, while krypton was not adsorbed.

  7. Evaluation of toxic effects of aeration and trichloroethylene oxidation on methanotrophic bacteria grown with different nitrogen sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, K.H.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    1999-02-01

    In this study the authors evaluated specific and nonspecific toxic effects of aeration and trichloroethylene (TCE) oxidation on methanotrophic bacteria grown with different nitrogen sources (nitrate, ammonia, and molecular nitrogen). The specific toxic effects, exerted directly on soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), were evaluated by comparing changes in methane uptake rates and naphthalene oxidation rates following aeration and/or TCE oxidation. Nonspecific toxic effects, defined as general cellular damage, were examined by using a combination of epifluorescent cellular stains to measure viable cell numbers based on respiratory activity and measuring formate oxidation activities following aeration and TCE transformation. Their results suggest that aeration damages predominantly sMMO rather than other general cellular components, whereas TCE oxidation exerts a broad range of toxic effects that damage both specific and nonspecific cellular functions. TCE oxidation caused sMMO-catalyzed activity and respiratory activity to decrease linearly with the amount of substrate degraded. Severe TCE oxidation toxicity resulted in total cessation of the methane, naphthalene, and formate oxidation activities and a 95% decrease in the respiratory activity of methanotrophs. The failure of cells to recover even after 7 days of incubation with methane suggests that generation of greater amounts of sMMO per cell due to nitrogen fixation may be responsible for enhanced TCE oxidation activities of nitrogen-fixing methanotrophs rather than enzymatic protection mechanisms associated with the nitrogenase enzymes.

  8. Controls on Nitrogen Fluxes from Agricultural Fields: Differing Conclusions Based on Choice of Sensitivity Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, T.; Matson, P.; Lobell, D.

    2006-12-01

    Sensitivity analyses (SA) of biogeochemical and agricultural models are often used to identify the importance of input variables for variance in model outputs, such as crop yield or nitrate leaching. Identification of these factors can aid in prioritizing efforts in research or decision support. Many types of sensitivity analyses are available, ranging from simple One-At-A-Time (OAT) screening exercises to more complex local and global variance-based methods (see Saltelli et al 2004). The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the type of SA on factor prioritization in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico using the Water and Nitrogen Management Model (WNMM; Chen et al 2005). WNMM, a coupled plant-growth - biogeochemistry simulation model, was calibrated to reproduce crop growth, soil moisture, and gaseous N emission dynamics in experimental plots of irrigated wheat in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico from 1994-1997. Three types of SA were carried out using 16 input variables, including parameters related to weather, soil properties and crop management. Methods used for SA were local OAT, Monte Carlo (MC), and a global variance-based method (orthogonal input; OI). Results of the SA were based on typical interpretations used for each test: maximum absolute ratio of variation (MAROV) for OAT analyses; first- and second-order regressions for MC analyses; and a total effects index for OI. The three most important factors identified by MC and OI methods were generally in agreement, although the order of importance was not always consistent and there was little agreement for variables of less importance. OAT over-estimated the importance of two factors (planting date and pH) for many outputs. The biggest differences between the OAT results and those from MC and OI were likely due to the inability of OAT methods to account for non-linearity (eg. pH and ammonia volatilization), interactions among variables (eg. pH and timing of fertilization) and an over-reliance on baseline

  9. A novel genetic map of wheat: utility for mapping QTL for yield under different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important food crops worldwide. Wheat varieties that maintain yield (YD) under moderate or even intense nitrogen (N) deficiency can adapt to low input management systems. A detailed genetic map is necessary for both wheat molecular breeding and genomics research. In this study, an F6:7 recombinant inbred line population comprising 188 lines was used to construct a novel genetic map and subsequently to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for YD and response to N stress. Results A genetic map consisting of 591 loci distributed across 21 wheat chromosomes was constructed. The map spanned 3930.7 cM, with one marker per 6.7 cM on average. Genomic simple sequence repeat (g-SSR), expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellite (e-SSR), diversity arrays technology (DArT), sequence-tagged sites (STS), sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers were included in the map. The linear relationships between loci found in the present map and in previously compiled physical maps were presented, which were generally in accordance. Information on the genetic and physical positions and allele sizes (when possible) of 17 DArT, 50 e-SSR, 44 SRAP, five ISSR, and two morphological markers is reported here for the first time. Seven segregation distortion regions (SDR) were identified on chromosomes 1B, 3BL, 4AL, 6AS, 6AL, 6BL, and 7B. A total of 22 and 12 QTLs for YD and yield difference between the value (YDDV) under HN and the value under LN were identified, respectively. Of these, QYd-4B-2 and QYddv-4B, two major stable QTL, shared support interval with alleles from KN9204 increasing YD in LN and decreasing YDDV. We probe into the use of these QTLs in wheat breeding programs. Moreover, factors affecting the SDR and total map length are discussed in depth. Conclusions This novel map may facilitate the use of novel markers in wheat molecular breeding programs

  10. Changes in dissolved organic carbon and total dissolved nitrogen fluxes across subtropical forest ecosystems at different successional stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Junhua; Li, Kun; Wang, Wantong; Zhang, Deqiang; Zhou, Guoyi

    2015-05-01

    Lateral transports of carbon and nitrogen are important processes linking terrestrial ecosystems and aquatic systems. Most previous studies made in temperate forests found that fluxes of carbon and nitrogen by runoff water varied in different forests, but few studies have been made in subtropical forests. This study was to investigate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) fluxes at the catchment scale along a subtropical forest succession gradient from pine forest (pioneer) to coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest (transitional) to broadleaved forest (mature). Our results showed that DOC concentration significantly decreased (p<0.001) while TDN concentration significantly increased (p<0.001) in runoff water from pioneer to mature forests, which in turn resulted in a decrease in DOC flux and an increase in TDN flux, as mean annual runoff did not vary significantly among three succession forest catchments. The mean (±standard deviation) annual DOC flux was 118.1±43.6, 88.3±16.7 and 77.2±11.7 kg ha-1 yr-1for pioneer, transitional and mature forest catchments, respectively; and the mean annual TDN flux was 9.9 ±2.7, 18.2±3.0 and 21.2 ±4.5 kg ha-1 yr-1for pioneer, transitional and mature forest catchments, respectively. The mature forest reduced DOC flux by increased soil chemical adsorption and physical protection. An increase in TDN flux from pioneer to mature forests was consistent with the previous finding that mature forest was nitrogen saturated while pioneer forest was nitrogen limited. Therefore large-scale conversion of pioneer forests to transitional or mature forests in subtropical China will reduce DOC concentration and increase TDN concentration in the down-stream water, which may have significant impact on its water quality and aquatic biological activities.

  11. Improved Flaw Detection and Characterization with Difference Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites is often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, variations in fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These variations result in a noise floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. The paper investigates comparing thermographic responses taken before and after a change in state in a composite to improve the detection of subsurface flaws. A method is presented for registration of the responses before finding the difference. A significant improvement in the detectability is achieved by comparing the differences in response. Examples of changes in state due to application of a load and impact are presented.

  12. Improved TNT detoxification by starch addition in a nitrogen-fixing Methylophilus-dominant aerobic microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Jaejin; Yoo, Keunje; Kim, Seonghoon; Park, Joonhong

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a novel aerobic microbial consortium for the complete detoxification of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was developed using starch as a slow-releasing carbon source under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Aerobic TNT biodegradation coupled with microbial growth was effectively stimulated by the co-addition of starch and TNT under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The addition of starch with TNT led to TNT mineralization via ring cleavage without accumulation of any toxic by-products, indicating improved TNT detoxification by the co-addition of starch and TNT. Pyrosequencing targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene suggested that Methylophilus and Pseudoxanthomonas population were significantly stimulated by the co-addition of starch and TNT and that the Methylophilus population became predominant in the consortium. Together with our previous study regarding starch-stimulated RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) degradation (Khan et al., J. Hazard. Mater. 287 (2015) 243-251), this work suggests that the co-addition of starch with a target explosive is an effective way to stimulate aerobic explosive degradation under nitrogen-fixing conditions for enhancing explosive detoxification. PMID:26342802

  13. Nitrogen removal performance in planted and unplanted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands treating different influent COD/N ratios.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Ullman, Jeffrey L; Ambrose, Richard F; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Zhao, Zhimiao

    2016-05-01

    Microcosm horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCWs) were used to examine the impacts of vegetation on nitrogen dynamics treating different influent COD/N ratios (1:1, 4:1, and 8:1). An increase in the COD/N ratio led to increased reductions in NO3 and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) in planted and unplanted wetlands, but diminished removal of NH4. The HSSFCW planted with Canna indica L. exhibited a significant reduction in NH4 compared to the unplanted system, particularly in the active root zone where NH4 removal performance increased by up to 26 % at the COD/N ratio of 8:1. There was no significant difference in NO3 removal between the planted and unplanted wetlands. TIN removal efficiency in the planted wetland increased with COD/N ratios, which was likely influenced by plant uptake. NH4 reductions were greater in planted wetland at the 20- and 40-cm depths while NO3 reductions were uniformly greater with depth in all cases, but no statistical difference was impacted by depth on TIN removal. These findings show that planting a HSSFCW can provide some benefit in reducing nitrogen loads in effluents, but only when a sufficient carbon source is present. PMID:26822218

  14. [Effects of water levels and the additions of different nitrogen forms on soil net nitrogen transformation rate and N2O emission in subtropical forest soils].

    PubMed

    Ma, Fen; Ma, Hong-liang; Qiu, Hong; Yang, Hong-yu

    2015-02-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of the additions of different nitrogen forms on nitrogen transformation in red soils of subtropical forest under soil moisture conditions with 40%, 70% and 110% of water holding capacity (WHC). The results showed that soil net mineralization and ammonification rates were maximum at 70% WHC and minimum at 40% WHC. Compared with the control, the addition of NO(3-)-N decreased the soil net mineralization and ammonification rates by 56.1% and 43.0% under 70% WHC condition, and decreased by 68.2% and 19.0% under 110% WHC, respectively. However, the proportion of ammonification to mineralization increased at 70% and 110% WHC, which suggested that nitrate addition inhibited the nitrification. With addition of NO(3-)-N at 110% WHC, the net nitrification rate was lowest while N20 emission was highest with the concomitant decrease of nitrate content, indicating that N2O emission was largely derived from denitrification. However, at 40% WHC and 70% WHC, the maximum N20 flux was found at the early stage of incubation. Even with addition of NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N, N2O flux did not change much at the latter stage of incubation, indicating that autotrophic nitrification was dominant for N20 production at the early stage of incubation. Under 40% WHC condition, soluble organic carbon increased more and it increased largely with NH(4+)-N addition, which meant NH(4+)-N addition could enhance the mineralization of soil organic matter. Under 40% and 110% WHC conditions, the addition of NH(4+)-N increased significantly the soil soluble organic nitrogen (SON) by 73.6% and 176.6% compared with the control, respectively. A significant increase of 78.7% for SON was only found at 40% WHC under addition of NO(3-)-N compared with the control. These results showed that high soil moisture condition and addition of NH(4+)-N were of benefit to SON formation. PMID:26094450

  15. Time-temperature-sensitization diagrams and critical cooling rates of different nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvathavarthini, N.; Dayal, R. K.

    2010-04-01

    Nitrogen-alloyed 316L stainless steel is being used as structural material for high temperature fast breeder reactor components with a design life of 40 years. With a view to increase the design life to 60 years and beyond, high nitrogen stainless steels are being considered for certain critical components which may be used at high temperatures. Since carbon and nitrogen have major influence on the sensitization kinetics, investigations were carried out to establish the sensitization behaviour of four heats of 316L SS containing (i) 0.07%N and 0.035%C, (ii) 0.120%N and 0.030%C, (iii) 0.150%N and 0.025%C and (iv) 0.22%N and 0.035%C. These stainless steels were subjected to heat treatments in the temperature range of 823-1023 K for various durations ranging from 1 h to 500 h. Using ASTM standard A262 Practice A and E tests, time-temperature-sensitization diagrams were constructed and from these diagrams, critical cooling rate above which there is no risk of sensitization was calculated. The data established in this work can be used to select optimum heat treatment parameters during heat treatments of fabricated components for fast reactors.

  16. OPPORTUNITIES IN NITROGEN MANAGEMENT RESEARCH: IMPROVING APPLICATIONS FOR PROVEN TECHNOLOGIES AND IDENTIFYING NEW TOOLS FOR MANAGING NITROGEN FLUX AND INPUT IN ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence and distribution of undesirable quantities of bioavailable nitrogenous compounds in the
    environment are issues of long-standing concern. Importantly for us today, deleterious effects
    associated with high levels of nitrogen in the ecosystem are becoming everyday...

  17. Exogenous sodium sulfide improves morphological and physiological responses of a hybrid Populus species to nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanbo; Bellaloui, Nacer; Sun, Guangyu; Tigabu, Mulualem; Wang, Jinghong

    2014-06-15

    Gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2) can disturb normal plant growth and trigger complex physiological responses. NO2-induced responses are influenced by biotic or abiotic factors. In this study, we investigated the effects of exogenous sodium sulfide (Na2S, 5mmolL(-1)) on epidermis and stomata related physico-chemical responses of hybrid poplar cuttings (Pouplus alba×P. berolinensis) to gaseous NO2 (4μl1(-1)) for three time periods (0, 14 and 48h). We also investigated hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitrate-nitrogen and nitrate reductase activity (NR) in control and Na2S treated plants. Our results showed that NO2 exposure for 48h led to the decline of NR, maximal PSII quantum yield (Fv/Fm), net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and dark respiration rate (Rd). The maximum rate for the post-illumination carbon dioxide burst (PIB) occurred in 48-h exposed leaves 13-15s after darkening. Moreover, NO2 exposure resulted in a significant increase in nitrogen percentage (from 0 to 33%) and a decrease in the macro and micro-elements of leaf surface. Spraying Na2S aqueous solution on the leaf surfaces significantly increased the thicknesses of palisade/spongy tissue and H2S content. Na2S pretreatment alleviated NO2-caused toxic effects as indicated by increased NR and higher values of Pn, Fv/Fm, and actual photochemical efficiency in light (ФPSII) compared with the control. Na2S pretreatment had no significant impacts on PIB-based photorespiration or elements composition of a leaf surface. PMID:24635903

  18. Using C₆₀⁺ Sputtering to Improve Detection Limit of Nitrogen in Zinc Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zihua; Shutthanandan, V.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2010-05-11

    C₆₀⁺ sputtering was firstly used to determine depth profile of nitrogen in zinc oxide materials by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Compared to traditional Cs+ sputtering depth profiling, the C₆₀⁺ sputtering provides over 200 times of effective signal intensity and the detection limit is about 10 times better. In addition, our X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that sputtering zinc oxide materials by 10 keV C₆₀⁺ leads to very weak carbon deposition at bottom of the sputter crater.

  19. Phosphorus applications improved the soil microbial responses under nitrogen additions in Chinese fir plantations of subtropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Dandan; Yang, Yang; Tang, Yuqian; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Fusheng; Sun, Xiaomin

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition and low soil phosphorus (P) content aggravate the P limitation in subtropical forest soils. However, the responses of soil microbial communities, enzyme kinetics, and N cycling genes to P additions in subtropical plantations are still not clear. The hypothesis that P application can alleviate the limitation and improve the soil microbial properties was tested by long term field experiment in the Chinese fir plantations in subtropical China. Thirty 20m×20m plots were established in November 2011 and six different treatments were randomly distributed with five replicates. The treatments are control (CK, no N and P application), low N addition (N1: 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1), high N addition (N2: 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1), P addition (P: 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1), low N and P addition (N1P: 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1) and high N and P addition (N2P: 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1). A suite of responses of soil microorganism across four years (2012-2015) during three seasons (spring, summer and autumn) were measured. Following 4 years of N amendments, fertilized soils were more acidic and had lower soil microbial biomass carbon contents than CK. However, P alleviated the soil acidification and increased the soil microbial biomass carbon contents. Increases in microbial PLFA biomarkers and exoenzyme kinetics in N fertilized plots were observed in the initial year (2013) but reduced since then (2014 and 2015). Whereas P amendments increased the soil PLFA biomarkers and exoenzyme kinetics through the four years except that the acid phosphatase activities declined after 3 years applications. P applications enhanced the soil N cycling by increases the abundances of nitrifiers (ammonia-oxidizing archea) and denitrifiers (nos Z, norG, and nirK). The bacterial and fungal residue carbons (calculated by amino sugar indicators) were higher under NP fertilizations than the other treatments. Our results suggest that P application could improve the soil

  20. Nitrogen and phosphorus additions alter nutrient dynamics but not resorption efficiencies of Chinese fir leaves and twigs differing in age.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Sheng; Niklas, Karl Joseph; Liu, Yu; Fang, Xiang-Min; Wan, Song-Ze; Wang, Huimin

    2015-10-01

    It is unclear how or even if phosphorus (P) input alters the influence of nitrogen (N) deposition in a forest. In theory, nutrients in leaves and twigs differing in age may show different responses to elevated nutrient input. To test this possibility, we selected Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) for a series of N and P addition experiments using treatments of +N1 - P (50 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)), +N2 - P (100 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)), -N + P (50 kg P ha(-1) year(-1)), +N1 + P, +N2 + P and -N - P (without N and P addition). Soil samples were analyzed for mineral N and available P concentrations. Leaves and twigs in summer and their litters in winter were classified as and sorted into young and old components to measure N and P concentrations. Soil mineral N and available P increased with N and P additions, respectively. Nitrogen addition increased leaf and twig N concentrations in the second year, but not in the first year; P addition increased leaf and twig P concentrations in both years and enhanced young but not old leaf and twig N accumulations. Nitrogen and P resorption proficiencies in litters increased in response to N and P additions, but N and P resorption efficiencies were not significantly altered. Nitrogen resorption efficiency was generally higher in leaves than in twigs and in young vs old leaves and twigs. Phosphorus resorption efficiency showed a minimal variation from 26.6 to 47.0%. Therefore, P input intensified leaf and twig N enrichment with N addition, leaf and twig nutrients were both gradually resorbed with aging, and organ and age effects depended on the extent of nutrient limitation. PMID:26358049

  1. Influence of Residue and Nitrogen Fertilizer Additions on Carbon Mineralization in Soils with Different Texture and Cropping Histories

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianni; Wang, Xudong; Liebman, Matt; Cavigelli, Michel; Wander, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using samples from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ultisols in Maryland [MDsoil]) comparing conventional grain systems (Conv) amended with inorganic fertilizers with 3 yr (Med) and longer (Long), more diverse cropping systems amended with manure. A double exponential model was used to estimate the size (Ca, Cs) and decay rates (ka, ks) of active and slow C pools which we compared with total particulate organic matter (POM) and occluded-POM (OPOM). The high-SOC IAsoil containing highly active smectite clays maintained smaller labile pools and higher decay rates than the low-SOC MDsoil containing semi-active kaolinitic clays. Net SOC loss was greater (2.6 g kg−1; 8.6%) from the IAsoil than the MDsoil (0.9 g kg−1, 6.3%); fractions and coefficients suggest losses were principally from IAsoil’s resistant pool. Cropping history did not alter SOC pool size or decay rates in IAsoil where rotation-based differences in OPOM-C were small. In MDsoil, use of diversified rotations and manure increased ka by 32% and ks by 46% compared to Conv; differences mirrored in POM- and OPOM-C contents. Residue addition prompted greater increases in Ca (340% vs 230%) and Cs (38% vs 21%) and decreases in ka (58% vs 9%) in IAsoil than MDsoil. Reduced losses of SOC from residue-amended MDsoil were associated with increased OPOM-C. Nitrogen addition dampened CO2-C release. Clay type and C saturation dominated the IAsoil’s response to external inputs and made labile and stable fractions more vulnerable to decay. Trends in OPOM suggest aggregate protection influences C turnover in the low active MDsoil. Clay charge and OPOM-C contents were better predictors of soil C dynamics than clay or POM-C contents. PMID:25078458

  2. Influence of residue and nitrogen fertilizer additions on carbon mineralization in soils with different texture and cropping histories.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianni; Wang, Xudong; Liebman, Matt; Cavigelli, Michel; Wander, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using samples from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ultisols in Maryland [MDsoil]) comparing conventional grain systems (Conv) amended with inorganic fertilizers with 3 yr (Med) and longer (Long), more diverse cropping systems amended with manure. A double exponential model was used to estimate the size (Ca, Cs) and decay rates (ka, ks) of active and slow C pools which we compared with total particulate organic matter (POM) and occluded-POM (OPOM). The high-SOC IAsoil containing highly active smectite clays maintained smaller labile pools and higher decay rates than the low-SOC MDsoil containing semi-active kaolinitic clays. Net SOC loss was greater (2.6 g kg(-1); 8.6%) from the IAsoil than the MDsoil (0.9 g kg(-1), 6.3%); fractions and coefficients suggest losses were principally from IAsoil's resistant pool. Cropping history did not alter SOC pool size or decay rates in IAsoil where rotation-based differences in OPOM-C were small. In MDsoil, use of diversified rotations and manure increased ka by 32% and ks by 46% compared to Conv; differences mirrored in POM- and OPOM-C contents. Residue addition prompted greater increases in Ca (340% vs 230%) and Cs (38% vs 21%) and decreases in ka (58% vs 9%) in IAsoil than MDsoil. Reduced losses of SOC from residue-amended MDsoil were associated with increased OPOM-C. Nitrogen addition dampened CO2-C release. Clay type and C saturation dominated the IAsoil's response to external inputs and made labile and stable fractions more vulnerable to decay. Trends in OPOM suggest aggregate protection influences C turnover in the low active MDsoil. Clay charge and OPOM-C contents were better predictors of soil C dynamics than clay or POM-C contents. PMID:25078458

  3. Improved intrinsic resolution: does it make a difference. concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.B.; Neumann, R.; Quartararo, L.; Lange, R.; Hernandez, T.

    1984-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what effect further improvement in an Anger camera's intrinsic resolution has on lesion detection. We studied 52 patients undergoing bone imaging and 58 undergoing liver imaging. All patients had images performed in rapid sequence on ZLC-75 and ZLC-37 Anger cameras, both by Siemens. The two imaging systems are virtually identical except for the number of photomultiplier tubes and crystal thickness; these resulted in differences in intrinsic resolution and sensitivity. Observer performance, measured by ROC curves, for detection of abnormalities was virtually identical with the two instruments. Subjectively, there was a trend toward preference of the ZLC-75 images, but this was not associated with any significant improvement in lesion detectability even in the subgroup in which a preference for one or the other instrument was noted.

  4. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on carbon-nitrogen content and nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover in a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Tahir, M. M.; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2014-10-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, soil properties improvement and plant growth promotion. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water filled pore space (WFPS)) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues i.e. the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Poplus euramericana, Rubinia pseudoacacia and Elagnus umbellate incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed wide variation in total N, carbon, lignin, polyphenols and C/N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of G. max and the shoot and root of T. repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% of added N being released from these resources. The roots of G. max and Z. mays and the shoot of Z. mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation showing net immobilization. After an initial immobilization, leaves of P. euramericana, R. pseudoacacia and E. umbellate exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively and representing a 16, 32 and 33% of added N being released. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01), and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C/N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin/N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and ligin + polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating

  5. Food contact surfaces coated with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide: effect on Listeria monocytogenes survival under different light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Teixeira, P.; Tavares, C. J.; Azeredo, J.

    2013-04-01

    Improvement of food safety is a very important issue, and is on the basis of production and application of new/modified food contact surfaces. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and, more recently, nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO2) coatings are among the possible forms to enhance food contact surfaces performance in terms of higher hygiene and easier sanitation. In this context, the present work aimed at evaluating the bactericidal activity of an N-TiO2 coating on glass and stainless steel under two different sources of visible light - fluorescent and incandescent - and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Listeria monocytogenes was chosen as representative of major foodborne pathogens and its survival was tested on N-TiO2 coated coupons. In terms of survival percentage, good results were obtained after exposure of coated surfaces to all light types since, apart from the value obtained after exposing glass to fluorescent light (56.3%), survival rates were always below 50%. However, no effective disinfection was obtained, given that for a disinfectant or sanitizing agent to be claimed as effective it needs to be able to promote at least a 3-log reduction of the microbial load, which was not observed for any of the experimental conditions assessed. Even so, UV irradiation was the most successful on eliminating cells on coated surfaces, since the amount of bacteria was reduced to 1.49 × 106 CFU/ml on glass and 2.37 × 107 on stainless steel. In contrast, both visible light sources had only slightly decreased the amount of viable cells, which remained in the range of 8 log CFU/ml. Hence, although some bactericidal effect was accomplished under visible light, UV was the most effective light source on promoting photocatalytic reactions on N-TiO2 coated coupons and none of the experimental conditions have reached a satisfactory disinfection level. Thus, this surface coating needs further research and improvement in order to become truly effective against foodborne pathogens and

  6. Improved online δ18O measurements of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing organic materials and a proposed analytical protocol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.; Coplen, T.B.; Wassenaar, L.I.

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that N2 in the ion source of a mass spectrometer interferes with the CO background during the δ18O measurement of carbon monoxide. A similar problem arises with the high-temperature conversion (HTC) analysis of nitrogenous O-bearing samples (e.g. nitrates and keratins) to CO for δ18O measurement, where the sample introduces a significant N2 peak before the CO peak, making determination of accurate oxygen isotope ratios difficult. Although using a gas chromatography (GC) column longer than that commonly provided by manufacturers (0.6 m) can improve the efficiency of separation of CO and N2 and using a valve to divert nitrogen and prevent it from entering the ion source of a mass spectrometer improved measurement results, biased δ18O values could still be obtained. A careful evaluation of the performance of the GC separation column was carried out. With optimal GC columns, the δ18O reproducibility of human hair keratins and other keratin materials was better than ±0.15 ‰ (n = 5; for the internal analytical reproducibility), and better than ±0.10 ‰ (n = 4; for the external analytical reproducibility).

  7. Improved online δ18O measurements of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing organic materials and a proposed analytical protocol.

    PubMed

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2011-07-30

    It is well known that N(2) in the ion source of a mass spectrometer interferes with the CO background during the δ(18)O measurement of carbon monoxide. A similar problem arises with the high-temperature conversion (HTC) analysis of nitrogenous O-bearing samples (e.g. nitrates and keratins) to CO for δ(18)O measurement, where the sample introduces a significant N(2) peak before the CO peak, making determination of accurate oxygen isotope ratios difficult. Although using a gas chromatography (GC) column longer than that commonly provided by manufacturers (0.6 m) can improve the efficiency of separation of CO and N(2) and using a valve to divert nitrogen and prevent it from entering the ion source of a mass spectrometer improved measurement results, biased δ(18)O values could still be obtained. A careful evaluation of the performance of the GC separation column was carried out. With optimal GC columns, the δ(18)O reproducibility of human hair keratins and other keratin materials was better than ± 0.15 ‰ (n=5; for the internal analytical reproducibility), and better than ± 0.10 ‰ (n=4; for the external analytical reproducibility). PMID:21698688

  8. Studies on nitrogen modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst prepared in different conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bubacz, K.; Choina, J.; Dolat, D.; Borowiak-Palen, E.; Moszynski, D.; Morawski, A.W.

    2010-09-15

    Nitrogen modified titania photocatalysts (TiO{sub 2}/N) were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Raman spectroscopy and BET surface area method. The presence of nitrogen in modified photocatalysts has been studied using FT-IR and XPS analyses. The influence of the calcination temperature in the range of 100-350 {sup o}C on nanocrystallite as well as particle size of the samples and their photocatalytic activity was investigated. The calcination of TiO{sub 2}/N samples caused a growth of the particle size and an increase of their crystallinity. TEM studies present changes of the diameter and shape of TiO{sub 2} particles and nanocrystallites. The XRD and the Raman response of the samples confirmed an increase of the crystallinity of the samples when annealed at higher temperatures. The photocatalytic activity of the modified photocatalysts was determined using the reaction of phenol decomposition. It was shown that phenol decomposition rate was greatly influenced by pH of the solution. The highest phenol degradation using all the modified samples was observed for pH 7.1 which is close to the PZC point established for pristine TiO{sub 2} at pH 6.8.

  9. Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Accumulation and Partitioning, and C:N:P Stoichiometry in Late-Season Rice under Different Water and Nitrogen Managements

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yushi; Liang, Xinqiang; Chen, Yingxu; Li, Liang; Ji, Yuanjing; Zhu, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Water and nitrogen availability plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of essential elements, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), in agricultural ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal changes of C, N and P concentrations, accumulation, partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometric ratios in different plant tissues (root, stem-leaf, and panicle) of late-season rice under two irrigation regimes (continuous flooding, CF; alternate wetting and drying, AWD) and four N managements (control, N0; conventional urea at 240 kg N ha−1, UREA; controlled-release bulk blending fertilizer at 240 kg N ha−1, BBF; polymer-coated urea at 240 kg N ha−1, PCU). We found that water and N treatments had remarkable effects on the measured parameters in different plant tissues after transplanting, but the water and N interactions had insignificant effects. Tissue C:N, N:P and C:P ratios ranged from 14.6 to 52.1, 3.1 to 7.8, and 76.9 to 254.3 over the rice growing seasons, respectively. The root and stem-leaf C:N:P and panicle C:N ratios showed overall uptrends with a peak at harvest whereas the panicle N:P and C:P ratios decreased from filling to harvest. The AWD treatment did not affect the concentrations and accumulation of tissue C and N, but greatly decreased those of P, resulting in enhanced N:P and C:P ratios. N fertilization significantly increased tissue N concentration, slightly enhanced tissue P concentration, but did not affect tissue C concentration, leading to a significant increase in tissue N:P ratio but a decrease in C:N and C:P ratios. Our results suggested that the growth of rice in the Taihu Lake region was co-limited by N and P. These findings broadened our understanding of the responses of plant C:N:P stoichiometry to simultaneous water and N managements in subtropical high-yielding rice systems. PMID:24992006

  10. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation and partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometry in late-season rice under different water and nitrogen managements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yushi; Liang, Xinqiang; Chen, Yingxu; Li, Liang; Ji, Yuanjing; Zhu, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Water and nitrogen availability plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of essential elements, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), in agricultural ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal changes of C, N and P concentrations, accumulation, partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometric ratios in different plant tissues (root, stem-leaf, and panicle) of late-season rice under two irrigation regimes (continuous flooding, CF; alternate wetting and drying, AWD) and four N managements (control, N0; conventional urea at 240 kg N ha(-1), UREA; controlled-release bulk blending fertilizer at 240 kg N ha(-1), BBF; polymer-coated urea at 240 kg N ha(-1), PCU). We found that water and N treatments had remarkable effects on the measured parameters in different plant tissues after transplanting, but the water and N interactions had insignificant effects. Tissue C:N, N:P and C:P ratios ranged from 14.6 to 52.1, 3.1 to 7.8, and 76.9 to 254.3 over the rice growing seasons, respectively. The root and stem-leaf C:N:P and panicle C:N ratios showed overall uptrends with a peak at harvest whereas the panicle N:P and C:P ratios decreased from filling to harvest. The AWD treatment did not affect the concentrations and accumulation of tissue C and N, but greatly decreased those of P, resulting in enhanced N:P and C:P ratios. N fertilization significantly increased tissue N concentration, slightly enhanced tissue P concentration, but did not affect tissue C concentration, leading to a significant increase in tissue N:P ratio but a decrease in C:N and C:P ratios. Our results suggested that the growth of rice in the Taihu Lake region was co-limited by N and P. These findings broadened our understanding of the responses of plant C:N:P stoichiometry to simultaneous water and N managements in subtropical high-yielding rice systems. PMID:24992006

  11. Catalytic two-stage coal liquefaction process having improved nitrogen removal

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1991-01-01

    A process for catalytic multi-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquids containing low concentrations of nitogen compounds. First stage catalytic reaction conditions are 700.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1500-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure, with the space velocity maintained in a critical range of 10-40 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 catalyst settled volume. The first stage catalyst has 0.3-1.2 cc/gm total pore volume with at least 25% of the pore volume in pores having diameters of 200-2000 Angstroms. Second stage reaction conditions are 760.degree.-870.degree. F. temperature with space velocity exceeding that in the first stage reactor, so as to achieve increased hydrogenation yield of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products having at least 75% removal of nitrogen compounds from the coal-derived liquid products.

  12. Highs and lows: The effect of differently sized freshwater inflows on estuarine carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, bacteria and chlorophyll a dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, James N.; Mitrovic, Simon M.

    2015-04-01

    Freshwater inflows play a key role in the delivery of organic carbon to estuaries. However, our understanding of the dynamics between discharge and carbon globally is limited. In this study we performed a 30-month monitoring study on the Bega and Clyde River estuaries, Australia, to understand the influence that discharge had on carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, bacteria and chlorophyll a dynamics. We hypothesised that 1) discharge would be the most important factor influencing carbon and nutrient concentrations, though during low flows chlorophyll a would also be positively related to carbon, 2) bacteria would be related to dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and chlorophyll a to temperature, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 3) that concentrations of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, bacterial biomass and chlorophyll a would be significantly different between large 'flood flows', smaller 'fresh flows' and base flow conditions. We found that discharge was always the most important factor influencing carbon and nutrient concentrations, and that primary production appeared to have little influence on the variation in DOC concentration even during base flow conditions. We suggest this relationship is likely due to highly episodic discharge that occurred during the study period. Bacteria were related to DOC in the lower estuary sites, but phosphorus in the upper estuary. We suggest this is likely due to the input of bioavailable carbon in the upper estuary leading bacteria to be P limited, which changes downstream to carbon limitation as DOC becomes more refractory. Chlorophyll a was positively related to temperature but not nutrients, which we suggest may be due to competition with bacteria for phosphorus in the upper estuary. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were different under flood, fresh and base flow conditions, though these differences sometimes varied between estuary locations for different resources. Overall, the results demonstrate that discharge plays an

  13. Effect of different nitrogenous nutrients on the cadmium hyperaccumulation efficiency of Rorippa globosa (Turcz.) Thell.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Ji, Dandan; Twardowska, Irena; Li, Yunmeng; Zhu, Jiangong

    2015-02-01

    This experiment was used to explore whether the 11 nitrogenous nutrients affect the hyperaccumulation of Rorippa globosa (Turcz.) Thell. to Cd. Pot culture experiments using soil spiked with Cd as CdCl2·2.5H2O and 11 nitrogen-containing chemicals were conducted to determine the efficiency of the accumulation of Cd by R. globosa. Application of all 11 nitrogenous nutrients significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced Cd accumulation by R. globosa (Turcz.) Thell. Two major modes of Cd accumulation were observed: (i) through increase of biomass yield without reduction of Cd uptake and (ii) through increase of Cd uptake efficiency in parallel with increase of biomass yield. Bicarbonate > phosphate > chloride compounds of NH4 enhanced the biomass yield to the greatest extent, while oxalate > nitrate > chloride > and bicarbonate caused a significant increase of Cd uptake by R. globosa. Competition between N and Cd translocation caused either significant reduction of Cd translocation factor or decrease of biomass yield. Of studied nutrients, ammonium bicarbonate NH4HCO3 and ammonium chloride NH4Cl exerted the best joint effect of these two processes on the efficiency of R. globosa as a Cd hyperaccumulator. Application of these chemicals caused increase of Cd concentrations in roots of R. globosa by 35.1 and 41.1 %, and in shoots by 13.9 and 56.4 %, while biomasses of roots increased by 5.8- and 3.8-fold and in shoots by 7.4-fold, and 6.4-fold, respectively, compared to the control. As a result, accumulated load (μg pot(-1)) of Cd in roots increased by 8.2- and 5.8-fold and in shoots by 8.6- and 10.6-fold in both pots. Consequently, chemicals (NH4HCO3 and NH4Cl) that enhanced both Cd enrichment and biomass yield had the greatest effect on the bioaccumulation capacity of R. globosa. PMID:25167813

  14. Nitrogen isotope variations in camphor (Cinnamomum Camphora) leaves of different ages in upper and lower canopies as an indicator of atmospheric nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua-Yun; Wu, Liang-Hong; Zhu, Ren-Guo; Wang, Yan-Li; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2011-02-01

    Nitrogen isotopic composition of new, middle-aged and old camphor leaves in upper and lower canopies has been determined in a living area, near a motorway and near an industrial area (Jiangan Chemical Fertilizer Plant). We found that at sites near roads, more positive δ(15)N values were observed in the camphor leaves, especially in old leaves of upper canopies, and ∆δ(15)N=δ(15)N(upper)-δ(15)N(lower)>0, while those near the industrial area had more negative δ(15)N values and ∆δ(15)N<0. These could be explained by two isotopically different atmospheric N sources: greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of atmospheric NO(x) by old leaves in upper canopies at sites adjacent to roads, and greater uptake of (15)N-depleted NH(y) in atmospheric deposition by leaves at sites near the industrial area. This study presents novel evidence that (15)N natural abundance of camphor leaves can be used as a robust indicator of atmospheric N sources. PMID:21130551

  15. Changes of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium content during storage of vermicomposts prepared from different substrates.

    PubMed

    Das, D; Powell, Michael; Bhattacharyya, P; Banik, P

    2014-12-01

    The study was conducted to determine the optimum storage time for vermicompost without significant loss of nutrients; nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K). Cattle manure, paddy straw, municipal solid wastes, and fly ash were used for vermicompost preparations. The dynamics of N, P, and K in the vermicomposts were studied during 180 days of incubation at 28-32 °C. In general, N concentration increased in the first 90-105 days of incubation and then gradually decreased until the 180th day while P and K concentrations steadily decreased over the length of the study, with the rate of loss leveling off after 150 days. The rate of nutrient loss was directly related to the initial level, decreasing the fastest for the nutrients with the highest initial concentrations. Optimum storage times were substrate and N dependent. PMID:25208521

  16. Comparison of improved operating parameters of five different wavelength LEDs for significantly brighter illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Eduard K.; Lee, Susanne M.; Van de Workeen, Brian C.; Mueller, Otward M.

    2001-05-01

    Although light-emitting diodes exhibit much higher efficiencies and greatly reduced power consumption compared to incandescent light sources, the use of LEDs in lighting applications is limited by their smaller size and subsequently lower light output. However, it has been found that these parameters can be increased significantly by cooling the diodes to cryogenic temperatures. This may make their use feasible for several applications requiring more efficient and brighter illumination for much less cost. In this paper, we compare the temperature-dependent behavior of five commercially available LEDs of different wavelengths down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. It was found that three AlInGaP diodes (red, yellow, and green) demonstrated significant operating improvements. The performance of InGaN-based blue LEDs declined at low temperatures, and because most white LEDs are simply blue LEDs coated with YAG, these exhibited similar behavior. However, the three AlInGaP LEDs demonstrated at least an order of magnitude improvement in illuminance, absolute intensity, and maximum operating current. The green LEDs showed the largest improvement factors, while the yellow LEDs produced the brightest illumination at low temperatures. The emissions of all five LEDs shifted to shorter wavelengths at low temperatures. This is significant in terms of lighting applications since the low-temperature AlInGaP diodes emitted more visible spectra.

  17. Modeling the carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: Mycorrhizal trade-offs and multipath resistance uptake improve predictions of retranslocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Phillips, Richard P.

    2014-08-01

    Accurate projections of the future land carbon (C) sink by terrestrial biosphere models depend on how nutrient constraints on net primary production are represented. While nutrient limitation is nearly universal, current models do not have a C cost for plant nutrient acquisition. Also missing are symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi, which can consume up to 20% of net primary production and supply up to 50% of a plant's nitrogen (N) uptake. Here we integrate simultaneous uptake and mycorrhizae into a cutting-edge plant N model—Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN)—that can be coupled into terrestrial biosphere models. The C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type, with plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae benefiting when N is relatively abundant and plants that support ectomycorrhizae benefiting when N is strongly limiting. Across six temperate forested sites (representing arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated stands and 176 site years), including multipath resistance improved the partitioning of N uptake between aboveground and belowground sources. Integrating mycorrhizae led to further improvements in predictions of N uptake from soil (R2 = 0.69 increased to R2 = 0.96) and from senescing leaves (R2 = 0.29 increased to R2 = 0.73) relative to the original model. On average, 5% and 9% of net primary production in arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated forests, respectively, was needed to support mycorrhizal-mediated acquisition of N. To the extent that resource constraints to net primary production are governed by similar trade-offs across all terrestrial ecosystems, integrating these improvements to FUN into terrestrial biosphere models should enhance predictions of the future land C sink.

  18. Changes of Nitrogen Transformation Rates and Related Functional Genes Abundance under Different Dissolved Oxygen Levels in sediments form an Urban River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In the nitrogen rich urban river sediments, we investigated the nitrogen transformation rates and nitrogen-cycling genes in response to different dissolved oxygen (DO) supply levels (saturation, DO > 8.00 mg L-1; aerobic, 2.50 mg L-1 nitrogen transformation rates (ammonium release, ammonia oxidation, nitrite oxidation, denitrification, and anammox) and their corresponding integrated amounts were solved by the least square analysis. Results showed that the total amount of ammonium oxidation, nitrite oxidation, denitrification, and anammox increased with the elevated dissolved oxygen levels, but the amount of ammonium release decreased inversely. The increasing DO level also raised the total amount of nitrogen loss (from 6.12 mg N to 35.44 mg N) and its proportion to ammonium liberated (from 12.96% to 99.84%), but the contributions of anammox to nitrogen loss in each incubation showed no significant difference (83.36% to 89.19%). The dissolved oxygen facilitated an exponential increasing of the anammox oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB), and raised the denitrifiers (nirK and nirS gene) abundance by an order, but its influence on anammox (hzsB) was insignificant. Four quantitative response relationships between nitrogen transformation rates, nitrogen functional genes abundances, and nitrogen concentrations were established by stepwise linear regression analysis. These relationships confirmed that different nitrogen transformation processes were coupled at the molecular level (functional genes), especially for the coupling of ammonium oxidation and anammox.

  19. Acclimation of the Global Transcriptome of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 to Nutrient Limitations and Different Nitrogen Sources

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    The unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a model organism for laboratory-based studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and is a potential platform for biotechnological applications. Two of its most notable properties are its exceptional tolerance of high-light intensity and very rapid growth under optimal conditions. In this study, transcription profiling by RNAseq has been used to perform an integrated study of global changes in transcript levels in cells subjected to limitation for the major nutrients CO2, nitrogen, sulfate, phosphate, and iron. Transcriptional patterns for cells grown on nitrate, ammonia, and urea were also studied. Nutrient limitation caused strong decreases of transcript levels of the genes encoding major metabolic pathways, especially for components of the photosynthetic apparatus, CO2 fixation, and protein biosynthesis. Uptake mechanisms for the respective nutrients were strongly up-regulated. The transcription data further suggest that major changes in the composition of the NADH dehydrogenase complex occur upon nutrient limitation. Transcripts for flavoproteins increased strongly when CO2 was limiting. Genes involved in protection from oxidative stress generally showed high, constitutive transcript levels, which possibly explains the high-light tolerance of this organism. The transcriptomes of cells grown with ammonia or urea as nitrogen source showed increased transcript levels for components of the CO2 fixation machinery compared to cells grown with nitrate, but in general transcription differences in cells grown on different N-sources exhibited surprisingly minor differences. PMID:22514553

  20. Feed ingredients differing in fermentable fibre and indigestible protein content affect fermentation metabolites and faecal nitrogen excretion in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Jha, R; Leterme, P

    2012-04-01

    To study the fermentation characteristics of different non-conventional dietary fibre (DF) sources with varying levels of indigestible CP content and their effects on the production of fermentation metabolites and on faecal nitrogen (N) excretion, an experiment was conducted with 40 growing pigs (initial BW 23 kg) using wheat bran (WB), pea hulls (PH), pea inner fibres (PIF), sugar beet pulp (SBP) or corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS). The diets also contained soya protein isolate, pea starch and sucrose, and were supplemented with vitamin-mineral premix. Faecal samples were collected for 3 consecutive days from day 10, fed with added indigestible marker (chromic oxide) for 3 days from day 13 and pigs were slaughtered on day 16 from the beginning of the experiment. Digesta from the ileum and colon were collected and analysed for short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia (NH3) content. The apparent total tract N digestibility was the lowest (P < 0.001) in diets based on DDGS (74%), medium in diets with WB and SBP (76% each) and highest in those with PIF and PH (79% and 81%, respectively). Expressed per kg fermented non-starch polysaccharides (NSP), faecal N excretion was higher with DDGS and WB diets (130 and 113 g/kg NSP fermented, respectively) and lower with PIF, PH and SBP diets (42, 52 and 55 g/kg NSP fermented, respectively). The PH-based diets had the highest (P < 0.05) SCFA concentrations, both in the ileum and the colon (27 and 122 mMol/kg digesta, respectively). The highest NH3 concentration was also found in the colon of pigs fed with PH (132 mMol/kg digesta). Loading plot of principle component analysis revealed that the CP : NSP ratio was positively related with faecal N excretion and NH3 concentration in colon contents, whereas negatively related with SCFA concentration in colon contents. In conclusion, pea fibres and SBP increased SCFA and reduced NH3 concentration in the pig's intestine and reduced faecal N excretion, which makes pea

  1. Elevated temperature differently affects foliar nitrogen partitioning in seedlings of diverse Douglas fir provenances.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoguo; Jansen, Kirstin; Junker, Laura Verena; Eiblmeier, Monika; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur; Ensminger, Ingo; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-10-01

    Global climate change causes an increase in ambient air temperature, a major environmental factor influencing plant physiology and growth that already has been perceived at the regional scale and is expected to become even more severe in the future. In the present study, we investigated the effect of elevated ambient air temperature on the nitrogen metabolism of two interior provenances of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) originating from contrasting habitats, namely the provenances Monte Creek (MC) from a drier environment and Pend Oreille (PO) from a more humid environment. Three- to four-year-old seedlings of the two provenances were grown for 3 months in controlled environments under either control temperature (day 20 °C, night 15 °C) or high temperature (HT, 30/25 °C) conditions. Total nitrogen (N), soluble protein, chlorophyll and total amino acid (TAA) contents as well as individual amino acid concentrations were determined in both current-year and previous-year needles. Our results show that the foliar total N contents of the two provenances were unaffected by HT. Arginine, lysine, proline, glutamate and glutamine were the most abundant amino acids, which together contributed ∼88% to the TAA pool of current- and previous-year needles. High temperature decreased the contents of most amino acids of the glutamate family (i.e., arginine, proline, ornithine and glutamine) in current-year needles. However, HT did not affect the concentrations of metabolites related to the photorespiratory pathway, such as [Formula: see text], glycine and serine. In general, current-year needles were considerably more sensitive to HT than previous-year needles. Moreover, provenance PO originating from a mesic environment showed stronger responses to HT than provenance MC. Our results indicate provenance-specific plasticity in the response of Douglas fir to growth temperature. Provenance-specific effects of elevated temperature on N-use efficiency suggest

  2. Propionate supplementation improves nitrogen use by reducing urea flux in sheep.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, U; Hu, Q; Bequette, B J

    2015-10-01

    experiments. In Exp. 1, glucose entry and gluconeogenesis were greater ( < 0.05) and plasma glucose tended ( < 0.1) to be greater with sodium propionate infusion than with sodium acetate infusion, but there was no difference in Cori cycling. In Exp. 2, glucose entry, gluconeogenesis, Cori cycling, and plasma glucose increased ( < 0.05) with dietary propionate. Our studies indicate that propionate inclusion in feed, but not continuous infusion in to the rumen, improves N utilization in growing sheep. The propionate effect is likely mediated by providing additional precursors for gluconeogenesis. PMID:26523581

  3. Sewage treatment by an UAFB-EGSB biosystem with energy recovery and autotrophic nitrogen removal under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Wen; Huang, Xiao-Li; Tao, Yu; Cong, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Long

    2015-04-01

    A system combined an upflow anaerobic fixed bed (UAFB) and an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) was designed and verified as a success for treating real sewage with simultaneous energy recovery and autotrophic nitrogen removal. The impact of temperature (stepwise decreased from 30 °C to 20 °C and 10 °C) was a primary focus, aiming to reveal the response of the anaerobic digestion (AD) and anammox efficiency to the temperature variation. As the temperature decreases, the soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) removal rate was 90.6%, 90.0% and 84.7%, respectively; total nitrogen (TN) removal was 69.4%, 48.8%, 38.4%, respectively; NH4(+)-N removal was 91.3%, 74.9%, 65.1%, respectively. Methanogenic activity of UAFB was significantly influenced by low temperatures, while the unavoidable growth of heterotrophic organisms in EGSB also contributed to the sCOD removal, even at 10 °C. Lower working temperature (10/20 °C) limited the growth and activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonia oxidation bacteria (AnAOB), but improved the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) activity. PMID:25625463

  4. Deposition of ammonium and nitrate in the roots of maize seedlings supplied with different nitrogen salts

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Arnold J.; Randall, Lesley; Taylor, Alison R.; Silk, Wendy K.

    2012-01-01

    This study measured total osmolarity and concentrations of NH4+, NO3–, K+, soluble carbohydrates, and organic acids in maize seminal roots as a function of distance from the apex, and NH4+ and NO3– in xylem sap for plants receiving NH4+ or NO3– as a sole N-source, NH4+ plus NO3–, or no nitrogen at all. The disparity between net deposition rates and net exogenous influx of NH4+ indicated that growing cells imported NH4+ from more mature tissue, whereas more mature root tissues assimilated or translocated a portion of the NH4+ absorbed. Net root NO3– influx under Ca(NO3)2 nutrition was adequate to account for pools found in the growth zone and provided twice as much as was deposited locally throughout the non-growing tissue. In contrast, net root NO3– influx under NH4NO3 was less than the local deposition rate in the growth zone, indicating that additional NO3– was imported or metabolically produced. The profile of NO3– deposition rate in the growth zone, however, was similar for the plants receiving Ca(NO3)2 or NH4NO3. These results suggest that NO3– may serve a major role as an osmoticant for supporting root elongation in the basal part of the growth zone and maintaining root function in the young mature tissues. PMID:22213811

  5. [Releases of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from sewage sludge at different microwave energy inputs].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Cheng, Zhen-min; Wang, Ya-wei; Xiao, Ben-yi; Wei, Yuan-song; Liu, Jun-xin

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the releases of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from sludge treated by microwave irradiation were investigated by batch experiments at two microwave energy inputs (MEIs), 54 kJ and 108 kJ. The final temperatures of the treated samples at these two MEIs were about 56 degrees C and 90 degrees C, respectively. Results showed that the higher MEI was more helpful to release TC, TOC, TN and TP from sludge treated by microwave. The release rates of TC, TN and TP were doubled at the MEI of 108 kJ than that of 54 kJ, and their highest rates were 5.26%, 22.06% and 33.15%, respectively. The MLSS significantly affected releases of TOC, TC, TN, NH4+ -N, TP and ortho-PO4(3-). However, the microwave power (MWP) had no significant effect on these releases except IC. The normalization of these parameters, representing the energy efficiencies of treating sludge, clearly showed that the P (TP) was the highest and the P(IC) was the lowest. However, the average values of P(IC), P(NH4+ -N) and P(ortho-PO4(3-)) decreased at the same MISS concentration, respectively, about 67%, 73% and 56% when the MEI doubled from 54 kJ to 108 kJ. PMID:20187400

  6. Reducing nitrogen runoff from paddy fields with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi under different fertilizer regimes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Xue; Fu, Dafang

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) runoff from paddy fields serves as one of the main sources of water pollution. Our aim was to reduce N runoff from paddy fields by fertilizer management and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). In northeast China, Shuangcheng city in Heilongjiang province, a field experiment was conducted, using rice provided with 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% of the local norm of fertilization (including N, phosphorus and potassium), with or without inoculation with Glomus mosseae. The volume, concentrations of total N (TN), dissolved N (DN) and particulate N (PN) of runoff water were measured. We found that the local norm of fertilization led to 18.9kg/ha of N runoff during rice growing season, with DN accounting for 60%-70%. We also found that reduction in fertilization by 20% cut down TN runoff by 8.2% while AMF inoculation decreased N runoff at each fertilizer level and this effect was inhibited by high fertilization. The combination of inoculation with AMF and 80% of the local norm of fertilization was observed to reduce N runoff by 27.2%. Conclusively, we suggested that the contribution of AMF inoculation combined with decreasing fertilization should get more attention to slow down water eutrophication by reducing N runoff from paddy fields. PMID:27521940

  7. Metformin Improves Diabetic Bone Health by Re-Balancing Catabolism and Nitrogen Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiyan; Guo, Yuqi; Yan, Wenbo; Snyder, Michael P.; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metformin, a leading drug used to treat diabetic patients, is reported to benefit bone homeostasis under hyperglycemia in animal models. However, both the molecular targets and the biological pathways affected by metformin in bone are not well identified or characterized. The objective of this study is to investigate the bioengergeric pathways affected by metformin in bone marrow cells of mice. Materials and Methods Metabolite levels were examined in bone marrow samples extracted from metformin or PBS -treated healthy (Wild type) and hyperglycemic (diabetic) mice using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based metabolomics. We applied an untargeted high performance LC-MS approach which combined multimode chromatography (ion exchange, reversed phase and hydrophilic interaction (HILIC)) and Orbitrap-based ultra-high accuracy mass spectrometry to achieve a wide coverage. A multivariate clustering was applied to reveal the global trends and major metabolite players. Results A total of 346 unique metabolites were identified, and they are grouped into distinctive clusters that reflected general and diabetes-specific responses to metformin. As evidenced by changes in the TCA and urea cycles, increased catabolism and nitrogen waste that are commonly associated with diabetes were rebalanced upon treatment with metformin. In particular, we found glutamate and succinate whose levels were drastically elevated in diabetic animals were brought back to normal levels by metformin. These two metabolites were further validated as the major targets of metformin in bone marrow stromal cells. Conclusion Overall using limited sample size, our study revealed the metabolic pathways modulated by metformin in bones which have broad implication in our understanding of bone remodeling under hyperglycemia and in finding therapeutic interventions in mammals. PMID:26716870

  8. Researching ways to improve nitrogen-use efficiency on dairies through the use of condensed tannin-containing forages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high proportion of protein in forages can be lost at two major points in the dairy farming nitrogen cycle: during the ensiling process and during rumen digestion. The formation of non-protein nitrogen (NPN) during these processes contributes to a reduction in nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), resulti...

  9. [Effects of different vegetation restoration patterns on the diversity of soil nitrogen-fixing microbes in Hulunbeier sandy land, Inner Mongolia of North China].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li-Juan; Li, Yu-Jie; Qiao, Jiang; Zhang, Hai-Fang; Song, Xiao-Long; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-06-01

    By using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and sequence analysis, this paper studied the nifH gene diversity and community structure of soil nitrogen-fixing microbes in Hulunbeier sandy land of Inner Mongolia under four years management of five vegetation restoration modes, i. e., mixed-planting of Agropyron cristatum, Hedysarum fruticosum, Caragana korshinskii, and Elymus nutans (ACHE) and of Agropyron cristatum and Hedysarum fruticosum (AC), and mono-planting of Caragana korshinskii (UC), Agropyron cristatum (UA), and Hedysarum fruticosum (UH), taking the bare land as the control (CK). There existed significant differences in the community composition of nitrogen-fixing microbes among the five vegetation restoration patterns. The Shannon index of the nifH gene was the highest under ACHE, followed by under AC, UC, UA, and UH, and the lowest in CK. Except that UH and CK had less difference in the Shannon index, the other four vegetation restoration modes had a significantly higher Shannon index than CK (P < 0.05). The phylogenetic analysis showed that the soil nitrogen-fixing microbes under UA, UH, and UC were mainly of cyanobacteria, but the soil nitrogen-fixing microbes under AC and ACHE changed obviously, mainly of proteobacteria, and also of cyanobacteria. The canonical correlation analysis showed that the soil total phosphorus, available phosphorus, total nitrogen, and nitrate nitrogen contents under the five vegetation restoration modes had significant effects on the nitrogen-fixing microbial communities, and there existed significant correlations among the soil total phosphorus, available phosphorus, total nitrogen, and nitrate nitrogen. It was suggested that the variations of the community composition of soil nitrogen-fixing microbes under the five vegetation restoration modes were resulted from the interactive and combined effects of the soil physical and chemical factors. PMID:24066552

  10. Wear and corrosion performance of two different tempers (T6 and T73) of AA7075 aluminium alloy after nitrogen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, C. M.; Cristóbal, M. J.; Figueroa, R.; Pena, G.

    2015-02-01

    The present work reports the improvements in corrosion resistance and tribological properties achieved after Nitrogen ion implantation into aluminium alloy AA7075 subjected to two different tempers, T6 and T73. Nitrogen implantation at a nominal dose of 2 × 1017 ions/cm2 and at an accelerating voltage of 50 keV produced an increase of the surface hardness of the alloys up to a 130% in T6 samples and to 190% in T73 samples. The increase in hardness has a very positive effect on wear resistance as indicate the significant reduction of specific wear rate on both tempers (about -75% for T6 and -90% for T73 samples). Similarly, an improvement in corrosion properties of both tempers is confirmed by DC techniques, showing a decrease of the registered current density on potentiodynamic curves, and by the increase of impedance shown by AC techniques. This overall improvement in the alloy performance has been mainly attributed to the formation of a stoichiometric aluminium nitride layer (AlN), identified by XPS and GIXRD. The combination of EXCO immersion tests and electrochemical measurements allowed explaining the effect of AlN layer, which behave as a barrier delaying the onset of corrosion and slowing its progress. However, the implantation do not modified the corrosion morphology which seems to be determined mainly by the heat treating conditions. Thereby, in both tempers the localized attack starts at the intermetallic/matrix interface, but in T6 type specimens the progress of corrosion is clearly intergranular, while T73 specimens show the formation of clusters of small geometrical pits, probably related to the biggest MgZn2 strengthening precipitates.

  11. Improvements in the profiles and distributions of nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide with the LIMS version 6 dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, E.; Natarajan, M.; Marshall, T.; Gordley, L. L.; Thompson, R. E.; Lingenfelser, G.

    2010-02-01

    The quality of the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) nitric acid (HNO3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) profiles and distributions of 1978/1979 is described after their processing with an updated, Version 6 (V6) algorithm and subsequent archival in 2002. Estimates of the precision and accuracy of both of those species are developed and provided herein. The character of the V6 HNO3 profiles is relatively unchanged from that of the earlier LIMS Version 5 (V5) profiles, except in the upper stratosphere where the interfering effects of CO2 are accounted for better with V6. The accuracy of the retrieved V6 NO2 is also significantly better in the middle and upper stratosphere, due to improvements in its spectral line parameters and in the reduced biases for the accompanying V6 temperature and water vapor profiles. As a result of these important updates, there is better agreement with theoretical calculations for profiles of the HNO3/NO2 ratio, day-to-night NO2 ratio, and with estimates of the production of NO2 in the mesosphere and its descent to the upper stratosphere during polar night. The improved precisions and more frequent retrievals of the profiles along the LIMS orbit tracks provide for better continuity and detail in map analyses of these two species on pressure surfaces. It is judged that the chemical effects of the oxides of nitrogen on ozone can be examined quantitatively throughout the stratosphere with the LIMS V6 data, and that the findings will be more compatible with those obtained from measurements of the same species from subsequent satellite sensors.

  12. Improvements in the profiles and distributions of nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide with the LIMS version 6 dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, E.; Natarajan, M.; Marshall, B. T.; Gordley, L. L.; Thompson, R. E.; Lingenfelser, G.

    2010-05-01

    The quality of the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) nitric acid (HNO3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) profiles and distributions of 1978/1979 are described after their processing with an updated, Version 6 (V6) algorithm and subsequent archival in 2002. Estimates of the precision and accuracy of both of those species are developed and provided herein. The character of the V6 HNO3 profiles is relatively unchanged from that of the earlier LIMS Version 5 (V5) profiles, except in the upper stratosphere where the interfering effects of CO2 are accounted for better with V6. The accuracy of the retrieved V6 NO2 is also significantly better in the middle and upper stratosphere, due to improvements in its spectral line parameters and in the reduced biases for the accompanying V6 temperature and water vapor profiles. As a result of these important updates, there is better agreement with theoretical calculations for profiles of the HNO3/NO2 ratio, day-to-night NO2 ratio, and with estimates of the production of NO2 in the mesosphere and its descent to the upper stratosphere during polar night. In particular, the findings for middle and upper stratospheric NO2 should also be more compatible with those obtained from more recent satellite sensors because the effects of the spin-splitting of the NO2 lines are accounted for now with the LIMS V6 algorithm. The improved precisions and more frequent retrievals of the LIMS profiles along their orbit tracks provide for better continuity and detail in map analyses of these two species on pressure surfaces. It is judged that the chemical effects of the oxides of nitrogen on ozone can be studied quantitatively throughout the stratosphere with the LIMS V6 data.

  13. Together but different: co-occurring dune plant species differ in their water- and nitrogen-use strategies.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Raimundo; Retuerto, Rubén

    2014-03-01

    Stress factors may severely constrain the range of plant physiological responses in harsh environments. Convergence of traits is expected in coastal dunes because of environmental filtering imposed by severe abiotic factors. However, the wide range of morphological and phenological traits exhibited by coexisting dune species suggests considerable variation in functional traits. We hypothesized that the constraints imposed by structural traits ought to translate into physiological differences. Five dominant species with different morphological traits, but coexisting in a homogeneous dune area in Northwest Spain, were selected for study. Soil characteristics and leaf functional traits were measured in April, June and November 2008. Integrated water-use efficiency (assessed by C isotope discrimination) and N acquisition and use strategies (estimated by N isotope composition) varied significantly among species and the differences changed over time. Species differences in specific leaf area, relative water content, leaf N and C:N ratio, also varied over time. The species differed in stomatal density but not in soil characteristics, with the exception of pH. Species differences in functional traits related to the use of resources suggest species niche segregation. Species-specific temporal effects on the use of these resources support temporal niche differentiation. Somewhat in contrast to the findings of previous studies on harsh environments, this study revealed a considerable level of functional diversity and complexity, suggesting that dune plant species have evolved species-specific strategies to survive by partitioning growth-limiting resources. PMID:24213627

  14. Responses of nitrogen metabolism and seed nutrition to drought stress in soybean genotypes differing in slow-wilting phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Gillen, Anne M.; Mengistu, Alemu; Kebede, Hirut; Fisher, Daniel K.; Smith, James R.; Reddy, Krishna N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in soybean breeding have resulted in genotypes that express the slow-wilting phenotype (trait) under drought stress conditions. The physiological mechanisms of this trait remain unknown due to the complexity of trait × environment interactions. The objective of this research was to investigate nitrogen metabolism and leaf and seed nutrients composition of the slow-wilting soybean genotypes under drought stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using check genotypes: NC-Roy (fast wilting), Boggs (intermediate in wilting); and NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 (slow-wilting, SLW) genotypes. Plants were either well-watered or drought stressed. Results showed that under well-watered conditions, nitrogen fixation (NF), nitrogen assimilation (NA), and leaf and seed composition differed between genotypes. Under drought stress, NF and NA were higher in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 than in NC-Roy and Boggs. Under severe water stress, however, NA was low in all genotypes. Leaf water potential was significantly lower in checks (−2.00 MPa) than in the SLW genotypes (−1.68 MPa). Leaf and seed concentrations of K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, B were higher in SLW genotypes than in the checks under drought stress conditions. Seed protein, oleic acid, and sugars were higher in SLW genotypes, and oil, linoleic and linolenic acids were lower in SLW genotypes. This research demonstrated that K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, and B may be involved in SLW trait by maintaining homeostasis and osmotic regulation. Maintaining higher leaf water potential in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 under drought stress could be a possible water conservation mechanism to maintain leaf turgor pressure. The increase in osmoregulators such as minerals, raffinose, and stachyose, and oleic acid could be beneficial for soybean breeders in selecting for drought stress tolerance. PMID:24339829

  15. Different Growth Responses of an Invasive Weed and a Native Crop to Nitrogen Pulse and Competition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Li, Jingxin; Jin, Chenggong; Jiang, Baiwen; Bai, Yamei

    2016-01-01

    Resource pulses are a common event in agro-ecosystems. A pot experiment was conducted to assess the effects of nitrogen (N) pulses and competition on the growth of an invasive weed, Amaranthus retroflexus, and a native crop, Glycine max. A. retroflexus and G. max were planted in pure culture with two individuals of one species in each pot and in mixed culture with one A. retroflexus and one G. max individual and subjected to three N pulse treatments. The N treatments included a no-peak treatment (NP) with N applied stably across the growing period, a single-peak treatment (SP) with only one N addition on the planting date, and a double-peak treatment (DP) with two N additions, one on the planting date and the other on the flowering date. N pulse significantly impacted biomass and height of the two species across the whole growing season. However, only the relative growth rate (RGR) of A. retroflexus was significantly affected by N pulse. A. retroflexus had the greatest biomass and height in the SP treatment at the first harvest, and in the DP treatment at the last three harvests. Pure culture G. max produced the greatest biomass in the DP treatment. In mixed culture, G. max produced the greatest biomass in the NP treatment. Biomass production of both species was significantly influenced by species combination, with higher biomass in mixed culture than in pure culture at most growth stages. Relative yield total (RYT) values were all greater than 1.0 at the last three harvests across the three N treatments, suggesting partial resource complementarity occurred when A. retroflexus is grown with G. max. These results indicate that A. retroflexus has a strong adaptive capacity to reduce interspecific competition, likely leading to its invasion of G. max cropland in China. PMID:27280410

  16. Different Growth Responses of an Invasive Weed and a Native Crop to Nitrogen Pulse and Competition

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ping; Li, Jingxin; Jin, Chenggong; Jiang, Baiwen; Bai, Yamei

    2016-01-01

    Resource pulses are a common event in agro-ecosystems. A pot experiment was conducted to assess the effects of nitrogen (N) pulses and competition on the growth of an invasive weed, Amaranthus retroflexus, and a native crop, Glycine max. A. retroflexus and G. max were planted in pure culture with two individuals of one species in each pot and in mixed culture with one A. retroflexus and one G. max individual and subjected to three N pulse treatments. The N treatments included a no-peak treatment (NP) with N applied stably across the growing period, a single-peak treatment (SP) with only one N addition on the planting date, and a double-peak treatment (DP) with two N additions, one on the planting date and the other on the flowering date. N pulse significantly impacted biomass and height of the two species across the whole growing season. However, only the relative growth rate (RGR) of A. retroflexus was significantly affected by N pulse. A. retroflexus had the greatest biomass and height in the SP treatment at the first harvest, and in the DP treatment at the last three harvests. Pure culture G. max produced the greatest biomass in the DP treatment. In mixed culture, G. max produced the greatest biomass in the NP treatment. Biomass production of both species was significantly influenced by species combination, with higher biomass in mixed culture than in pure culture at most growth stages. Relative yield total (RYT) values were all greater than 1.0 at the last three harvests across the three N treatments, suggesting partial resource complementarity occurred when A. retroflexus is grown with G. max. These results indicate that A. retroflexus has a strong adaptive capacity to reduce interspecific competition, likely leading to its invasion of G. max cropland in China. PMID:27280410

  17. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

    2011-08-26

    Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

  18. Identification and characterization of improved nitrogen efficiency in interspecific hybridized new-type Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gaili; Ding, Guangda; Li, Ling; Cai, Hongmei; Ye, Xiangsheng; Zou, Jun; Xu, Fangsen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) is an important oil crop worldwide. The aim of this study was to identify the variation in nitrogen (N) efficiency of new-type B. napus (genome ArArCcCc) genotypes, and to characterize some critical physiological and molecular mechanisms in response to N limitation. Methods Two genotypes with contrasting N efficiency (D4-15 and D1-1) were identified from 150 new-type B. napus lines, and hydroponic and pot experiments were conducted. Root morphology, plant biomass, N uptake parameters and seed yield of D4-15 and D1-1 were investigated. Two traditional B. napus (genome AnAnCnCn) genotypes, QY10 and NY7, were also cultivated. Introgression of exotic genomic components in D4-15 and D1-1 was evaluated with molecular markers. Key Results Large genetic variation existed among traits contributing to the N efficiency of new-type B. napus. Under low N levels at the seedling stage, the N-efficient new-type D4-15 showed higher values than the N-inefficient D1-1 line and the traditional B. napus QY10 and NY7 genotypes with respect to several traits, including root and shoot biomass, root morphology, N accumulation, N utilization efficiency (NutE), N uptake efficiency (NupE), activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS), and expression levels of N transporter genes and genes that are involved in N assimilation. Higher yield was produced by the N-efficient D4-15 line compared with the N-inefficient D1-1 at maturity. More exotic genome components were introgressed into the genome of D4-15 (64·97 %) compared with D1-1 (32·23 %). Conclusions The N-efficient new-type B. napus identified in this research had higher N efficiency (and tolerance to low-N stress) than traditional B. napus cultivars, and thus could have important potential for use in breeding N-efficient B. napus cultivars in the field. PMID:24989788

  19. Surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) through oxygen and nitrogen plasma treatment to improve its characteristics towards biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomathi, N.; Mishra, I.; Varma, S.; Neogi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Polymeric materials successfully applied in biomedical applications have an issue of poor surface properties which may restrict their applications as biomaterials. The present paper aims to study the effect of oxygen and nitrogen plasma treatment on physico-chemical properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and enhancement in its biocompatibility. Various characterization techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy were used to evaluate the changes in surface chemistry and morphology of plasma treated PDMS. Changes in the wettability after plasma treatments and the effects of ageing on wettability were studied by contact angle measurement. Ageing studies showed that the contact angle was stable after two hours. The effect of plasma treatment on biocompatibility was studied through cell adhesion and MTT using 3T3 fibroblast cells. Morphology of cells obtained through SEM was analyzed using ImageJ software. Among the different treated and untreated samples, substantial enhancement in biocompatibility was observed for nitrogen plasma treated PDMS for 5 min in terms of highest cell area observed from cell adhesion test and highest cell viability observed from MTT test. This may be probably due to its highest polarity (0.4) and surface energy (33.3 N mm-2) with a moderate surface roughness (Rrms = 100.24 nm) among the other treated and untreated samples.

  20. Improving low-energy boron/nitrogen ion implantation in graphene by ion bombardment at oblique angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhitong; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Ion implantation is a widely adopted approach to structurally modify graphene and tune its electrical properties for a variety of applications. Further development of the approach requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the ion bombardment process as well as establishment of key relationships between the controlling parameters and the dominant physics. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations with adaptive bond order calculations, we demonstrate that boron and nitrogen ion bombardment at oblique angles (particularly at 70°) can improve both the productivity and quality of perfect substitution by over 25%. We accomplished this by systematically analyzing the effects of the incident angle and ion energy in determining the probabilities of six distinct types of physics that may occur in an ion bombardment event, including reflection, absorption, substitution, single vacancy, double vacancy, and transmission. By analyzing the atomic trajectories from 576 000 simulations, we identified three single vacancy creation mechanisms and four double vacancy creation mechanisms, and quantified their probability distributions in the angle-energy space. These findings further open the door for improved control of ion implantation towards a wide range of applications of graphene.Ion implantation is a widely adopted approach to structurally modify graphene and tune its electrical properties for a variety of applications. Further development of the approach requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the ion bombardment process as well as establishment of key relationships between the controlling parameters and the dominant physics. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations with adaptive bond order calculations, we demonstrate that boron and nitrogen ion bombardment at oblique angles (particularly at 70°) can improve both the productivity and quality of perfect substitution by over 25%. We accomplished this by systematically

  1. Concurrent improvement in biocompatibility and bioinertness of diamond-like carbon films with nitrogen doping.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Hsiang; Lin, Chii-Ruey; Wei, Da-Hua; Shen, You-Ruey; Li, Yi-Chieh; Lee, Jen-Ai; Liang, Chia-Yao

    2012-11-01

    The surfaces of implantable biomaterials improving biocompatibility and bioinertness are critical for new application of bioimplantable devices. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film is a promising biomaterial with use for coating bioimplantable devices because of its good biocompatibility, bioinertness, and mechanical properties. In this study, concurrent improvement in biocompatibility and bioinertness of DLC films has been achieved using N-incorporation technique. The N doping degree was found to play an important role in affecting the biocompatibility and bioinertness of N-doped DLC films. The results indicated that the N-doped DLC films deposited at N(2) concentration of 5% could help to create suitable condition of surface/structure/adhesion combination of DLC films in the both affinity of the L929 mouse fibroblasts and electrochemical inertness in the Hank's balanced salt solutions (simulating human body fluids). N doping supports the attachment and proliferation of cells and prevents the permeation of electrolyte solutions, thereby simultaneity improved the biocompatibility and bioinertness of DLC films. This finding is useful for the fabrication and encapsulation of in vivo devices without induced immune response in the human body. PMID:22829476

  2. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective. PMID:25676153

  3. Comparative analysis of corrosion cracking of austenitic steels with different contents of nitrogen in chloride- and hydrogen-containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushnikova, S. Yu.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Filippov, Yu. I.; Kataeva, N. V.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Malyshevskii, V. A.; Kalinin, G. Yu.; Kostin, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    The structural state and the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) at constant loads have been studied using samples with a grown crack by the method of the cantilever bending on quenched austenitic stainless steels of the 20Cr-6Ni-11Mn-2Mo-N-V-Nb (Kh20N6G11M2AFB) type, with different contents of nitrogen (0.17, 0.34, 0.43, and 0.50 wt % N). The tests were conducted in a 3.5% aqueous solution of NaCl (without providing polarization) and in a similar solution under cathodic polarization, which causes the formation of hydrogen. It has been shown that, in a chloride solution without polarization, the steels do not undergo SCC for 2000 h. In the case of significant cathodic polarization via employment of a magnesium protector, there was revealed a brittle character of fracture upon SCC in all steels. It has been shown that steel with a nitrogen content of 0.43 wt % possesses the maximum absolute values of rupture stresses under the conditions of cathodic polarization.

  4. Combining pH and electrical conductivity measurements to improve titrimetric methods to determine ammonia nitrogen, volatile fatty acids and inorganic carbon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Charnier, C; Latrille, E; Lardon, L; Miroux, J; Steyer, J P

    2016-05-15

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA), inorganic carbon (IC) and total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) are key variables in the current context of anaerobic digestion (AD). Accurate measurements like gas chromatography and infrared spectrometry have been developed to follow the concentration of these compounds but none of these methods are affordable for small AD units. Only titration methods answer the need for small plant monitoring. The existing methods accuracy was assessed in this study and reveals a lack of accuracy and robustness to control AD plants. To solve these issues, a new titrimetric device to estimate the VFA, IC and TAN concentrations with an improved accuracy was developed. This device named SNAC (System of titration for total ammonia Nitrogen, volatile fatty Acids and inorganic Carbon) has been developed combining the measurement of electrical conductivity and pH. SNAC were tested on 24 different plant samples in a range of 0-0.16 mol.L(-1) TAN, 0.01-0.21 mol.L(-1) IC and 0-0.04 mol.L(-1) VFA. The standard error was about 0.012 mol.L(-1) TAN, 0.015 mol.L(-1) IC and 0.003 mol.L(-1) VFA. The coefficient of determination R(2) between the estimated and reference data was 0.95, 0.94 and 0.95 for TAN, IC and VFA respectively. Using the same data, current methods based on key pH points lead to standard error more than 14.5 times higher on VFA and more than 1.2 times higher on IC. These results show that SNAC is an accurate tool to improve the management of AD plant. PMID:27010787

  5. [Nitrogen and phosphorus loss in different land use types and its response to environmental factors in the Three Gorges Reservoir area].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li-Xiong; Huang, Zhi-Lin; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Tian, Yao-Wu

    2012-10-01

    The control of agricultural non-point source pollution (AGNPS) is an urgent problem to be solved for the ecological environment construction in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. We analyzed the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loss and its response to environmental factors through monitoring the nutrient loss in different land use types after returning farmland to forest. The results showed that: 1) The variability of nutrient concentration loss was strong in different land use types under different rainfall conditions, and the variability in the concentration of available nutrient was much higher than that of total nutrient; 2) Compared to farmland, the annual phosphorus loss of different land use types was reduced by 84.53% - 91.61% after returning farmland to forest; the reduction of annual nitrogen loss was not significant except Chinese chestnut forest (Castanea mollissima) and arbor forest, and the nitrogen loss was much higher than the phosphorus loss in all land use types; 3) The particle phosphorus and nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) were the main forms of the phosphorus and nitrogen loss, respectively; 4) The nutrient loss of tea garden (Camellia sinensis) and bamboo forest (Phyllostachys pubescens) showed a good correlation with precipitation, and the correlation of phosphorus was better than that of nitrogen, but there was no significant relation with the rainfall intensity; 5) The coverage of vegetation, tree layer and litter had a great influence on the loss of total nitrogen (TN). NO3(-)-N loss was highly influenced by the ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) content in the surface soil, and P loss mainly by the total phosphorus (TP) and sand content in the soil. PMID:23233964

  6. Improvement of plant growth and seed yield in Jatropha curcas by a novel nitrogen-fixing root associated Enterobacter species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Jatropha curcas L. is an oil seed producing non-leguminous tropical shrub that has good potential to be a fuel plant that can be cultivated on marginal land. Due to the low nutrient content of the targeted plantation area, the requirement for fertilizer is expected to be higher than other plants. This factor severely affects the commercial viability of J. curcas. Results We explored the feasibility to use endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacteria that are native to J. curcas to improve plant growth, biomass and seed productivity. We demonstrated that a novel N-fixing endophyte, Enterobacter sp. R4-368, was able to colonize in root and stem tissues and significantly promoted early plant growth and seed productivity of J. curcas in sterilized and non-sterilized soil. Inoculation of young seedling led to an approximately 57.2% increase in seedling vigour over a six week period. At 90 days after planting, inoculated plants showed an average increase of 25.3%, 77.7%, 27.5%, 45.8% in plant height, leaf number, chlorophyll content and stem volume, respectively. Notably, inoculation of the strain led to a 49.0% increase in the average seed number per plant and 20% increase in the average single seed weight when plants were maintained for 1.5 years in non-sterilized soil in pots in the open air. Enterobacter sp. R4-368 cells were able to colonize root tissues and moved systemically to stem tissues. However, no bacteria were found in leaves. Promotion of plant growth and leaf nitrogen content by the strain was partially lost in nifH, nifD, nifK knockout mutants, suggesting the presence of other growth promoting factors that are associated with this bacterium strain. Conclusion Our results showed that Enterobacter sp. R4-368 significantly promoted growth and seed yield of J. curcas. The application of the strains is likely to significantly improve the commercial viability of J. curcas due to the reduced fertilizer cost and improved oil yield. PMID:24083555

  7. Effects of Different Application Methods of Methane Fermentation Digested Liquid into the Paddy Plot on Soil Nitrogen Behavior and Rice Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoko; Nakamura, Kimihito; Seok Ryu, Chan; Iida, Michihisa; Kawashima, Shigeto

    Methane fermentation technique with the treatment of animal waste and food waste is drawing public attention as a good option for the utilization of biomass resources and it is investigated how to apply the by-product of fermentation (methane fermentation digested liquid) to agricultural fields as a fertilizer. It is important to determine an adequate method of applying digested liquid to a paddy plot as fertilizer taking into account the concentrations of soil nitrogen components and rice yield. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of three methods of applying digested liquid to paddy plots in terms of the nitrogen transformation in soil, rice yield, and nitrogen load in effluent. The three methods were pouring (with irrigation water), spreading onto the surface of a plot, and injection into paddy soil. It was found that the ammonium nitrogen concentration and the dissolved organic nitrogen concentration in soil of the spreading plot were higher than that for the pouring plot and that for the injecting plot. The rice yield was higher in the spreading plot than in the injecting and pouring plots. And, there was a significant correlation between the rice yield and the dissolved organic nitrogen just before and after the panicle initiation stage. There were no differences in the nitrogen effluent loads with surface drainage.

  8. Improving Growth and Productivity of Oleiferous Brassicas under Changing Environment: Significance of Nitrogen and Sulphur Nutrition, and Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naser A.; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Umar, Shahid; Ahmad, Iqbal; Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mineral nutrients are the integral part of the agricultural systems. Among important plant nutrients, nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S) are known essential elements for growth, development, and various physiological functions in plants. Oleiferous brassicas (rapeseed and mustard) require higher amounts of S in addition to N for optimum growth and yield. Therefore, balancing S-N fertilization, optimization of nutrient replenishment, minimization of nutrient losses to the environment, and the concept of coordination in action between S and N could be a significant strategy for improvement of growth and productivity of oleiferous brassicas. Additionally, positive interaction between S and N has been reported to be beneficial for various aspects of oilseed brassicas. The current paper updates readers on the significance of N and S for the improvement of plant growth, development, and productivity in detail. In addition, S-N nutrition-mediated control of major plant antioxidant defense system components involved in the removal and/or metabolism of stress-induced/generated reactive oxygen species in plants (hence, the control of plant growth, development, and productivity) has been overviewed. PMID:22629181

  9. Physiological and biochemical responses of the forage legume Trifolium alexandrinum to different saline conditions and nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Zouhaier, Barhoumi; Mariem, Maatallah; Mokded, Rabhi; Rouached, Aida; Alsane, Khaldoun; Chedly, Abdelly; Abderrazek, Smaoui; Abdallah, Atia

    2016-05-01

    Salinity stress reduces plant productivity, but low levels of salinity often increase plant growth rates in some species. We herein describe the effects of salinity on plant growth while focusing on nitrogen use. We treated Trifolium alexandrinum with two nitrogen concentrations and salinity levels and determined growth rates, mineral concentrations, nitrogen use efficiency, photosynthesis rates, and nitrate reductase (NR, E.C. 1.6.6.1) and glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) activities. The T. alexandrinum growth rate increased following treatment with 100 mM NaCl in low nitrogen (LN) and high nitrogen (HN) conditions. Salt treatment also increased root volume, intrinsic water use efficiency, and nitrogen use efficiency in LN and HN conditions. These changes likely contributed to higher biomass production. Salinity also increased accumulations of sodium, chloride, and phosphate, but decreased potassium and calcium levels and total nitrogen concentrations in all plant organs independently of the available nitrogen level. However, the effect of salt treatment on magnesium and nitrate concentrations in photosynthetic organs depended on nitrogen levels. Salt treatment reduced photosynthesis rates in LN and HN conditions because of inhibited stomatal conductance. The effects of salinity on leaf NR and GS activities depended on nitrogen levels, with activities increasing in LN conditions. In saline conditions, LN availability resulted in optimal growth because of low chloride accumulation and increases in total nitrogen concentrations, nitrogen use efficiency, and NR and GS activities in photosynthetic organs. Therefore, T. alexandrinum is a legume forage crop that can be cultivated in low-saline soils where nitrogen availability is limited. PMID:26818949

  10. Change in Uptake, Transport and Accumulation of Ions in Nerium oleander (Rosebay) as Affected by Different Nitrogen Sources and Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Abdolzadeh, Ahmad; Shima, Kazuto; Lambers, Hans; Chiba, Kyozo

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The source of nitrogen plays an important role in salt tolerance of plants. In this study, the effects of NaCl on net uptake, accumulation and transport of ions were investigated in Nerium oleander with ammonium or nitrate as the nitrogen source in order to analyse differences in uptake and cycling of ions within plants. Methods Plants were grown in a greenhouse in hydroponics under different salt treatments (control vs. 100 mm NaCl) with ammonium or nitrate as the nitrogen source, and changes in ion concentration in plants, xylem sap exuded from roots and stems, and phloem sap were determined. Key Results Plant weight, leaf area and photosynthetic rate showed a higher salt tolerance of nitrate-fed plants compared with that of ammonium-fed plants. The total amount of Na+ transported in the xylem in roots, accumulated in the shoot and retranslocated in the phloem of ammonium-fed plants under salt treatment was 1·8, 1·9 and 2·7 times more, respectively, than that of nitrate-treated plants. However, the amount of Na+ accumulated in roots in nitrate-fed plants was about 1·5 times higher than that in ammonium-fed plants. Similarly, Cl− transport via the xylem to the shoot and its retranslocation via the phloem (Cl− cycling) were far greater with ammonium treatment than with nitrate treatment under conditions of salinity. The uptake and accumulation of K+ in shoots decreased more due to salinity in ammonium-fed plants compared with nitrate-fed plants. In contrast, K+ cycling in shoots increased due to salinity, with higher rates in the ammonium-treated plants. Conclusions The faster growth of nitrate-fed plants under conditions of salinity was associated with a lower transport and accumulation of Na+ and Cl− in the shoot, whereas in ammonium-fed plants accumulation and cycling of Na+ and Cl− in shoots probably caused harmful effects and reduced growth of plants. PMID:18772147

  11. Laser induced nitrogen enhanced titanium surfaces for improved osseo-integration.

    PubMed

    Dahotre, Sanket N; Vora, Hitesh D; Rajamure, Ravi Shanker; Huang, Lu; Banerjee, Rajarshi; He, Wei; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2014-01-01

    The osseo-integration, corrosion resistance, and tribological properties of the commonly used bioimplant alloy Ti-6Al-4V were enhanced using a laser-based surface nitridation process. The biomedical properties of the laser nitrided Ti-6Al-4V were investigated using experimental and computational methodologies. Electrochemical analysis of laser nitrided titanium in simulated body fluid (SBF) was performed to assess the biomedical characteristics in near-human body conditions. Additionally, the corrosive wear performance of these laser nitrided samples was evaluated using pin-on-disk geometry with a zirconia pin counter surface in SBF to mimic the biological scenario. Osteoblast studies were conducted to evaluate cell affinity towards titanium nitrided bioimplant material. Cells adhered to all substrates, with high viability. Initial cell adhesion was revealed by focal adhesion formation on all substrates. Cells can proliferate on samples treated with 1.89 and 2.12 × 10(6) J/m(2) laser conditions, while those treated with 1.70 × 10(6) J/m(2) inhibited proliferation. Thus, microstructural and phase observations, electrochemical analyses, corrosive wear evaluation, and cell behavior analysis of laser nitrided surface of bioimplant material (Ti-6Al-4V) indicated that laser nitriding greatly improves the performance of bioimplant material. PMID:23963886

  12. Improvement of Vitamin K2 Production by Escherichia sp. with Nitrogen Ion Beam Implantation Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Li; Zheng, Zhiming; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Genhai; Liu, Hui; Gong, Guohong; Wu, Hefang; Liu, Hongxia; Tan, Mu; Li, Zhemin

    2015-02-01

    Low-energy ion implantation as a novel mutagen has been increasingly applied in the microbial mutagenesis for its higher mutation frequency and wider mutation spectra. In this work, N+ ion beam implantation was used to enhance Escherichia sp. in vitamin K2 yield. Optimization of process parameters under submerged fermentation was carried out to improve the vitamin K2 yield of mutant FM5-632. The results indicate that an excellent mutant FM5-632 with a yield of 123.2±1.6 μg/L, that is four times that of the original strain, was achieved by eight successive implantations under the conditions of 15 keV and 60×2.6×1013 ions/cm2. A further optimization increased the yield of the mutant by 39.7%, i.e. 172.1±1.2 μg/L which occurred in the mutant cultivated in the optimal fermentation culture medium composed of (per liter): 15.31 g glycerol, 10 g peptone, 2.89 g yeast extract, 5 g K2HPO4, 1 g NaCl, 0.5 g MgSO4·7H2O and 0.04 g cedar wood oil, incubated at 33 °C, pH 7.0 and 180 rpm for 120 h.

  13. Leaching behavior of nitrogen in a long-term experiment on rice under different N management systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liang-Guo; Itoh, Sumio; Zhang, Qing-Wen; Yang, Shi-Qi; Zhang, Qing-Zhong; Yang, Zheng-Li

    2011-06-01

    The leaching behavior of nitrogen was studied in single rice paddy production ecosystems in Tsukuba, Japan after 75 years of consistent fertilization regimes (no fertilizer, ammonium sulfate, a combination of composted rice straw with soybean cake, and fresh clover). During the 75-year period, management was unchanged with respect to rice planting density, irrigation, and net N fertilization for each field to which an N-source was added. Percolation water was collected, from May 2001 to April 2002, using porous suction cups installed in the fields at depths of 15, 40, and 60 cm. All water samples were taken to the laboratory for the measurement of both NH(4) ( + )-N and NO(3) ( - )-N concentrations using a continuous-flow nitrogen analyzer. The result indicated that there were significant differences in N leaching losses between treatments during the rice growing season. Total N leaching was significantly lower with the application of composted rice straw plus soybean cake (0.58 kg N ha( - 1)) than with ammonium sulfate (2.41 kg N ha( - 1)), which resulted in N leaching at a similar level to that with the fresh clover treatment (no significant difference). The majority of this N leaching was not due to NO(3) ( - )-N loss, but to that of NH(4) ( + )-N. The mean N leaching for all fertilizer treatments during the entire rice growing season was 1.58 kg N ha( - 1). Composted rice straw plus soybean cake produced leaching losses which were 65-75% lower than those with the application of fresh clover and ammonium sulfate. N accumulation resulting from nitrification in the fallow season could be a key source of nitrate-N leaching when fields become re-flooded before rice transplanting in the following year; particular attention should be paid to this phenomenon. PMID:20676930

  14. Evaluating the uncertainties of thermal catalytic conversion in measuring atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at four differently polluted sites in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Wang, Tao; Xue, L. K.; Louie, Peter K. K.; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Gao, J.; Wang, S. L.; Chai, F. H.; Wang, W. X.

    2013-09-01

    A widely used method for measuring nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the atmosphere is the conversion of NO2 to nitric oxide (NO) on the hot surface of a molybdenum oxide (MoO) catalyst followed by the chemiluminescence detection of NO. Although it has long been recognized that this type of conversion may suffer from the positive interference of other oxidized nitrogen compounds, evaluations of such interference in the atmosphere are scarce, thus rendering it difficult to make use of a large portion of the NO2 or NOx data obtained via this method (often denoted as NO2* or NOx*). In the present study, we compared the MoO converter with a selective, more accurate photolytic approach at four differently polluted sites in China. The converter worked well at the urban site, which was greatly affected by fresh emissions, but, on average, overestimated NO2 by 30%-50% at the two suburban sites and by more than 130% at the mountain-top site during afternoon hours, with a much larger positive bias seen during the top 10% of ozone events. The degree of overestimation depended on both air-parcel age and the composition of the oxidation products/intermediates of NOx (NOz). We attempted to derive an empirical formula to correct for this overestimation using concurrently measured O3, NO, and NO2* at the two suburban sites. Although the formula worked well at each individual site, the different NOz partitions at the sites made it difficult to obtain a universal formula. In view of the difficulty of assessing the uncertainties of the conventional conversion method, thus limiting the usability of data obtained via this method in atmospheric research, we suggest that, in areas away from fresh NOx emission sources, either a more selective NO2 measurement method or a NOy (NOx and its reaction products and intermediates) instrument should be adopted.

  15. Reflectance spectroscopy detects management and landscape differences in soil carbon and nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many studies document the successful calibration of visible and near infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) to various soil properties. However, few studies have reported on the use of VNIR DRS to detect treatment differences in controlled experiments. Therefore, our objective in thi...

  16. Variations in Protein Concentration and Nitrogen Sources in Different Positions of Grain in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangnan; Zhou, Longjing; Liu, Fulai; Zhou, Qin; Cai, Jian; Wang, Xiao; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The distribution patterns of total protein and protein components in different layers of wheat grain were investigated using the pearling technique, and the sources of different protein components and pearling fractions were identified using 15N isotope tracing methods. It was found that N absorbed from jointing to anthesis (JA) and remobilized to the grain after anthesis was the principal source of grain N, especially in the outer layer. For albumin and globulin, the amount of N absorbed during different stages all showed a decreasing trend from the surface layer to the center part. Whereas, for globulin and glutenin, the N absorbed after anthesis accounted for the main part indicating that for storage protein, the utilization of N assimilated after anthesis is greater than that of the stored N assimilated before anthesis. It is concluded that manipulation of the N application rate during different growth stages could be an effective approach to modulate the distribution of protein fractions in pearled grains for specific end-uses. PMID:27446169

  17. [Nitrogen Losses Under the Action of Different Land Use Types of Small Catchment in Three Gorges Region].

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-long; Gao, Ming; Ni, Jiu-pai; Xie, De-ti; Deng, Hua

    2016-05-15

    As an independent water-collecting area, small catchment is the source of non-point source pollution in Three Gorges Region. Choosing 3 kinds of the most representative land-use types and using them to lay monitoring points of overland runoff within the small catchment of Wangjiagou in Fuling of Three Gorges Region, the author used the samples of surface runoff collected through the twelve natural rainfalls from May to December to analyze the feature of spatial-temporal change of Nitrogen's losses concentrations under the influence of different land use types and the hillslopes and small catchments composed by those land use types, revealing the relation between different land-use types and Nitrogen's losses of small catchments in Three Gorges Region. The result showed: the average losses concentration of TN showed the biggest difference for different land use types during the period of spring crops, and the average value of dry land was 1. 61 times and 6.73 times of the values of interplanting field of mulberry and paddy field, respectively; the change of the losses concentration of TN was most conspicuous in the 3 periods of paddy field. The main element was NO₃⁻-N, and the relation between TN and NO₃⁻-N showed a significant linear correlation. TN's and NO₃⁻-N's losses concentrations were significantly and positively correlated with the area ratio of corn and mustard, but got a significant negative correlation with the area ratio of paddy and mulberry; NH₄⁺-N's losses concentrations got a significant positive correlation with the area ratio of mustard. Among all the hillslopes composed by different land use types, TN's average losses concentration of surface runoff of the hillslope composed by interplantating field of mulberry and paddy land during the three periods was the lowest, and the values were 2.55, 11.52, 8.58 mg · L⁻¹, respectively; the hillslope of rotation plough land of corn and mustard had the maximum value, and the values were

  18. Influence of Bacillus subtilis on the physiological state of wheat and the microbial community of the soil under different rates of nitrogen fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchik, V. N.; Vorobyev, N. I.; Moiseev, K. G.; Sviridova, O. V.; Surin, V. G.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of inoculation with bacteria Bacillus subtilis strain No. 2 (hereinafter, B. subtilis 2) and of the physical properties of the soil on the physiological state of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) plants and the soil microbial community under different rates of nitrogen fertilizers are studied. In the field, the physiological state of wheat was evaluated using the optical vegetation index. It was found that (1) the impact of B. subtilis 2 on plants decreases with an increase in the rate of fertilizers and soil bulk density, (2) the inoculation of wheat with bacteria enhances the resistance of the plant-microbial system to the adverse impact of high rates of nitrogen fertilizers due to the rearrangement of bacteria in rhizosphere ecological niches, and (3) the highest agronomic efficiency of nitrogen fertilizers is observed in wheat inoculation with B. subtilis 2 at the rate of nitrogen fertilization of 120 kg/ha.

  19. Atmospheric emissions of nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide from different nitrogen fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Sistani, K R; Jn-Baptiste, M; Lovanh, N; Cook, K L

    2011-01-01

    Alternative N fertilizers that produce low greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soil are needed to reduce the impacts of agricultural practices on global warming potential (GWP). We quantified and compared growing season fluxes of NO, CH, and CO resulting from applications of different N fertilizer sources, urea (U), urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN), ammonium nitrate (NHNO), poultry litter, and commercially available, enhanced-efficiency N fertilizers as follows: polymer-coated urea (ESN), SuperU, UAN + AgrotainPlus, and poultry litter + AgrotainPlus in a no-till corn ( L.) production system. Greenhouse gas fluxes were measured during two growing seasons using static, vented chambers. The ESN delayed the NO flux peak by 3 to 4 wk compared with other N sources. No significant differences were observed in NO emissions among the enhanced-efficiency and traditional inorganic N sources, except for ESN in 2009. Cumulative growing season NO emission from poultry litter was significantly greater than from inorganic N sources. The NO loss (2-yr average) as a percentage of N applied ranged from 0.69% for SuperU to 4.5% for poultry litter. The CH-C and CO-C emissions were impacted by environmental factors, such as temperature and moisture, more than the N source. There was no significant difference in corn yield among all N sources in both years. Site specifics and climate conditions may be responsible for the differences among the results of this study and some of the previously published studies. Our results demonstrate that N fertilizer source and climate conditions need consideration when selecting N sources to reduce GHG emissions. PMID:22031562

  20. Ionic composition and nitrate in drainage water from fields fertilized with different nitrogen sources, middle swamp watershed, North Carolina, August 2000-August 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Stephen L.; Spruill, Timothy B.

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted from August 2000 to August 2001 to characterize the influence of fertilizer use from different nitrogen sources on the quality of drainage water from 11 subsurface tile drains and 7 surface field ditches in a North Carolina Coastal Plain watershed. Agricultural fields receiving commercial fertilizer (conventional sites), swine lagoon effluent (spray sites), and wastewater-treatment plant sludge (sludge site) in the Middle Swamp watershed were investigated. The ionic composition of drainage water in tile drains and ditches varied depending on fertilizer source type. The dominant ions identified in water samples from tile drains and ditches include calcium, magnesium, sodium, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate, with tile drains generally having lower pH, low or no bicarbonates, and higher nitrate and chloride concentrations. Based on fertilizer source type, median nitrate-nitrogen concentrations were significantly higher at spray sites (32.0 milligrams per liter for tiles and 8.2 milligrams per liter for ditches) relative to conventional sites (6.8 milligrams per liter for tiles and 2.7 milligrams per liter for ditches). The median instantaneous nitrate-nitrogen yields also were significantly higher at spray sites (420 grams of nitrogen per hectare per day for tile drains and 15.6 grams of nitrogen per hectare per day for ditches) relative to conventional sites (25 grams of nitrogen per hectare per day for tile drains and 8.1 grams of nitrogen per hectare per day for ditches). The tile drain site where sludge is applied had a median nitrate-nitrogen concentration of 10.5 milligrams per liter and a median instantaneous nitrate-nitrogen yield of 93 grams of nitrogen per hectare per day, which were intermediate to those of the conventional and spray tile drain sites. Results from this study indicate that nitrogen loadings and subsequent edge-of-field nitrate-nitrogen yields through tile drains and ditches were significantly higher at sites receiving

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions from a wheat-maize double cropping system with different nitrogen fertilization regimes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Kang; Su, Fang; Ju, Xiao-Tang; Gao, Bing; Oenema, Oene; Christie, Peter; Huang, Bin-Xiang; Jiang, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2013-05-01

    Here, we report on a two-years field experiment aimed at the quantification of the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) from the dominant wheat-maize double cropping system in North China Plain. The experiment had 6 different fertilization strategies, including a control treatment, recommended fertilization, with and without straw and manure applications, and nitrification inhibitor and slow release urea. Application of N fertilizer slightly decreased CH4 uptake by soil. Direct N2O emissions derived from recommended urea application was 0.39% of the annual urea-N input. Both straw and manure had relatively low N2O emissions factors. Slow release urea had a relatively high emission factor. Addition of nitrification inhibitor reduced N2O emission by 55%. We conclude that use of nitrification inhibitors is a promising strategy for N2O mitigation for the intensive wheat-maize double cropping systems. PMID:23434574

  2. Nitrogen can improve the rapid response of photosynthesis to changing irradiance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiali; Ye, Miao; Peng, Shaobing; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    To identify the effect of nitrogen (N) nutrition on the dynamic photosynthesis of rice plants, a pot experiment was conducted under two N conditions. The leaf N and chlorophyll levels, as well as steady–state photosynthesis, were significantly increased under high N. After the transition from saturating to low light levels, decreases in the induction state (IS%) of leaf photosynthesis (A) and stomatal conductance (gs) were more severe under low than under high N supply. After the transition from low to flecked irradiance, the times to 90% of maximum A (T90%A) were significantly longer under low than under high N supply. Under flecked irradiance, the maximum A under saturating light (Amax–fleck) and the steady–state A under low light (Amin–fleck) were both lower than those under uniform irradiance (Asat and Ainitial). Under high N supply, Amax–fleck was 14.12% lower than Asat, while it was 22.80% lower under low N supply. The higher IS%, shorter T90%A, and the lower depression of Amax–fleck from Asat under high N supply led to a less carbon loss compared with under a low N supply. Therefore, we concluded that N can improve the rapid response of photosynthesis to changing irradiance. PMID:27506927

  3. Nitrogen can improve the rapid response of photosynthesis to changing irradiance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiali; Ye, Miao; Peng, Shaobing; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    To identify the effect of nitrogen (N) nutrition on the dynamic photosynthesis of rice plants, a pot experiment was conducted under two N conditions. The leaf N and chlorophyll levels, as well as steady-state photosynthesis, were significantly increased under high N. After the transition from saturating to low light levels, decreases in the induction state (IS%) of leaf photosynthesis (A) and stomatal conductance (gs) were more severe under low than under high N supply. After the transition from low to flecked irradiance, the times to 90% of maximum A (T90%A) were significantly longer under low than under high N supply. Under flecked irradiance, the maximum A under saturating light (Amax-fleck) and the steady-state A under low light (Amin-fleck) were both lower than those under uniform irradiance (Asat and Ainitial). Under high N supply, Amax-fleck was 14.12% lower than Asat, while it was 22.80% lower under low N supply. The higher IS%, shorter T90%A, and the lower depression of Amax-fleck from Asat under high N supply led to a less carbon loss compared with under a low N supply. Therefore, we concluded that N can improve the rapid response of photosynthesis to changing irradiance. PMID:27506927

  4. Core/shell-structured nickel/nitrogen-doped onion-like carbon nanocapsules with improved electromagnetic wave absorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Niandu; Liu, Xianguo; Or, Siu Wing

    2016-05-01

    Core/shell-structured nickel/nitrogen-doped onion-like carbon (Ni/(C, N)) nanocapsules are synthesized by a modified arc-discharge method using N2 gas as the source of N atoms. Core/shell-structured Ni/C nanocapsules are also prepared for comparison. The Ni/(C, N) nanocapsules with diameters of 10-80 nm exhibit a clear core/shell structure. The doping of N atoms introduces more lattice defects into the (C, N) shells and creates more disorderly C in the (C, N) shells. This leads to a slight shift in the dielectric resonance peak to the lower frequency side and an increase in the dielectric loss tangent for the Ni/(C, N) nanocapsules in comparison with the Ni/C nanocapsules. The magnetic permeability of both types of nanocapsules remains almost unaltered since the N atoms exist only in the (C, N) shells. The reflection loss (RL) of the Ni/(C, N) nanocapsules not only reaches a high value of -35 dB at 13.6 GHz, but also is generally improved in the low-frequency S and C microwave bands covering 2-8 GHz as a result of the N-doping-induced additional dipolar polarization and dielectric loss from the (C, N) shells.

  5. [Changes of algal communities in water body with different proportions of nitrogen and phosphorus].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling; Jin, Xiangcan; Zhong, Yuan; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhu, Lin; Dai, Shugui; Zhuang, Yuanyi

    2006-07-01

    A simulation test was conducted in aquaria to study the responses of algal communities to different N/P ratios in urban water body. The water sample was taken from a small artificial lake in Tianjin, and its initial N/P ratio was adjusted to 0. 5:1,7.2:1, 25:1 and 50:1, respectively. The results showed that in high N/P ratio groups, the numbers of Chlorophyta species decreased, while those of Cyanophyta species didn' t change very much. The numbers of these two species were both decreased in low N/P ratio group. Algal biomass, cell density and chlorophyll a content in medium and high N groups were higher than those in control and high P groups. The mean value of chlorophyll a reached the highest (69.7 microg x L(-1)) in high N group, and was 54.3, 30.3 and 29.7 microg x L(-1) in medium N, control, and high P groups, respectively. At the mid-late stages of culture, green algae Dictyosphaerium pulchellum was dominant in high P group, while blue algae Phormidium tenue, P. corium, Lyngbya limnetica and Microcystis aeruginosa were dominated in high N/P ratio groups. Control group had the highest species richness, while medium and high N groups had the highest and lowest ecological species dominance, respectively. PMID:17044495

  6. Improved Miscible Nitrogen Flood Performance Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Laterals in a Class I Reservoir - East Binger (Marchand) Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Sinner

    2006-06-30

    The reservoir characterization and investigation of the benefits of horizontal wells in the East Binger Unit miscible nitrogen flood as been completed. A significant work program was implemented from 2002 to 2005 in an effort to reduce gas cycling and economically increase ultimate oil recovery. Horizontal and vertical infill wells were drilled and existing producers were converted to injection. Due to successful infill drilling based on the improved flow characterization, more drilling was done than originally planned, and further drilling will occur after the project is completed. Through the drilling of wells and reservoir characterization work, it was determined that poor areal sweep efficiency is the primary factor causing nitrogen cycling and limiting oil recovery. This is in contrast to the perception prior to the initiation of development, which was that gravity segregation was causing poor vertical sweep efficiency. Although not true of all infill wells, most were drilled in areas with little sweep and came online producing gas with much lower nitrogen contents than previously drilled wells in the field and in the pilot area. Seven vertical and three horizontal wells were drilled in the pilot area throughout the project. As previously reported, the benefits of horizontal drilling were found to be insufficient to justify their increased cost. Nitrogen recycle, defined as nitrogen production as a percentage of injection, decreased from 72% prior to initiation of the project to about 25% before rising back to a current rate of 40%. Injection into the pilot area, despite being limited at times by problems in the Air Separation Unit of the Nitrogen Management Facility, increased 60% over levels prior to the project. Meanwhile, gas production and nitrogen content of produced gas both decreased.

  7. Regulation of genes involved in nitrogen utilization on different C/N ratios and nitrogen sources in the model ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Meghan; Müller, Tobias; Mpangara, Anja; Fitz, Michael; Becker, Ben; Pauck, Alexander; Kirsch, Anja; Wipf, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) utilization by ectomycorrhizal fungi is an essential aspect of their ecosystem function. N deposition changes both the N pools and the carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio of the substrates where ectomycorrhizal fungi are found, and it is important to understand how these changes affect the N forms used by ectomycorrhizal fungi. To overcome the difficulties of studying ectomycorrhizal fungi in situ, we investigated all known N genes in the model fungus, Hebeloma cylindrosporum in a culture study. In addition to studying the regulation of all known N utilization genes, we aimed to understand whether there are gene clusters that undergo similar regulation. Lastly we studied how C/N ratio, N transporter type, and N source affected relative gene expression levels. We grew the D2 strain of H. cylindrosporum on a range of inorganic and organic N sources under low, medium, and high C/N ratios. We found three gene clusters that were regulated in a similar pattern. Lastly, we found C/N ratio, N source and N transporter type all affected gene expression levels. Relative expression levels were highest on the high C/N ratio, BSA and diLeucine N sources, and inorganic N transporters were always expressed at higher levels than organic N transporters. These results suggest that inorganic N sources may always the default preference for H. cylindrosporum, regardless of both the N sources and the C/N ratio of the substrate. PMID:22302131

  8. Comparative phenomics and targeted use of genomics reveals variation in carbon and nitrogen assimilation among different Brettanomyces bruxellensis strains.

    PubMed

    Crauwels, S; Van Assche, A; de Jonge, R; Borneman, A R; Verreth, C; Troels, P; De Samblanx, G; Marchal, K; Van de Peer, Y; Willems, K A; Verstrepen, K J; Curtin, C D; Lievens, B

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested a correlation between genotype groups of Brettanomyces bruxellensis and their source of isolation. To further explore this relationship, the objective of this study was to assess metabolic differences in carbon and nitrogen assimilation between different B. bruxellensis strains from three beverages, including beer, wine, and soft drink, using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays. While some similarities of physiology were noted, many traits were variable among strains. Interestingly, some phenotypes were found that could be linked to strain origin, especially for the assimilation of particular α- and β-glycosides as well as α- and β-substituted monosaccharides. Based upon gene presence or absence, an α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase were found explaining the observed phenotypes. Further, using a PCR screen on a large number of isolates, we have been able to specifically link a genomic deletion to the beer strains, suggesting that this region may have a fitness cost for B. bruxellensis in certain fermentation systems such as brewing. More specifically, none of the beer strains were found to contain a β-glucosidase, which may have direct impacts on the ability for these strains to compete with other microbes or on flavor production. PMID:26135985

  9. Dynamics of nitrogen transformation depending on different operational strategies in laboratory-scale tidal flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yongjiang; Wu, Shubiao; Zhang, Tao; Mazur, Robert; Pang, Changle; Dong, Renjie

    2014-07-15

    The influence of different flooded/drained (F/D) time ratios and different effluent flow rates on the dynamics of nitrogen transformations in three laboratory-scale tidal flow constructed wetland systems (TFCWs-A, B, and C) under varying NH4(+)-N and COD influent loadings was investigated in this study. Good organic matter removal performance up to 90% was achieved for all experimental TFCWs under inflow concentrations of 300 and 150 mg/L regardless of F/D and effluent flow rate. The ammonium removal efficiency of wetland with F/D=3h:3h (55%) was higher than that of the wetland with F/D=5h:1h (47%) under an ammonium inflow concentration of 60 mg/L, indicating the positive effect of longer drained and shorter flooded time on tidal-operated wetlands under nitrification. In addition, more uniform oxygen distribution and better nitrification capacity within the wetland might be achieved with a relatively slow effluent flow rate of 0.025 L/s. TFCWs were shown to be a robust and reliable option to achieve high TN removal of 70% due to its repeated cycle of "wet" and "dry" periods, particularly for the treatment of wastewater with high organic content. Moreover, F/D and effluent flow rates of tidal flow constructed wetlands exhibited no significant effect on phosphorus removal in this study. Other techniques, such as pretreatment or post treatment, require further investigation. PMID:24768911

  10. Nitrogen and phosphorus associating with different size suspended solids in roof and road runoff in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junliang; Ren, Yufen; Wang, Xuemei; Wang, Xiaoke; Chen, Liding; Liu, Gangcai

    2015-10-01

    Roofs and roads, accounting for a large portion of the urban impervious land surface, have contributed significantly to urban nonpoint pollution. In this study, in Beijing, China, roof and road runoff are sampled to measure the suspended solids (SS), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contained in particles with different sizes. The SS content in the road runoff (151.59 mg/L) was sevenfold that in the roof runoff (21.13 mg/L, p < 0.05). The SS contained more coarse particulates in the roof runoff than in road runoff. The small particulates in the range of 0.45-50 μm consisted of 59 % SS in the roof runoff and 94 % SS in the road runoff. P was mainly attached to particle sizes of 10-50 μm in the roof (73 %) and road (48 %) runoffs, while N was mainly in a dissolved phase state in both runoffs. So, the different associations of N and P raise a challenge in preventing stormwater pollution in urban environments. PMID:26036583

  11. Potential nitrogen fixation activity of different aged biological soil crusts from rehabilitated grasslands of the hilly Loess Plateau, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, M.; Belnap, J.

    2010-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) cover up to 60–70% of the soil surface in grasslands rehabilitated during the "Grain for Green" project implemented in the hilly Loess Plateau region in 1999. As biocrusts fix nitrogen (N), they are an important part of restoring soil fertility. We measured nitrogenase activity (NA) in biocrusts from sites rehabilitated at six different time periods to estimate 1) the effects of moisture content and temperature on NA in biocrusts of different ages and 2) the potential N contribution from biocrusts to soils and plants in this region. Results show that NA in the biocrusts was mostly controlled by the species composition, as the activity of biocrusts dominated by free-living soil cyanobacteria was significantly higher than that of moss-dominated biocrusts. Nitrogenase activity was also influenced by soil moisture content and ambient temperature, with a significant decline in activity when moisture levels were decreased to 20% field water-holding capacity. The optimal temperature for NA was 35–40 °C and 30–40 °C for cyanobacteria- and moss-dominated biocrusts, respectively. Biocrust fixed N is likely an important source of N in this ecosystem, as we estimated annual potential N inputs per hectare in these grasslands to be up to 13 kg N ha-1 and 4 kg N ha-1 for cyanobacteria- and moss-dominated biocrusts, respectively.

  12. Improved Boundary Conditions for Cell-centered Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Klopfer, Goetz H.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Cell-centered finite-volume (CCFV) schemes have certain attractive properties for the solution of the equations governing compressible fluid flow. Among others, they provide a natural vehicle for specifying flux conditions at the boundaries of the physical domain. Unfortunately, they lead to slow convergence for numerical programs utilizing them. In this report a method for investigating and improving the convergence of CCFV schemes is presented, which focuses on the effect of the numerical boundary conditions. The key to the method is the computation of the spectral radius of the iteration matrix of the entire demoralized system of equations, not just of the interior point scheme or the boundary conditions.

  13. Methane emissions of differently fed dairy cows and corresponding methane and nitrogen emissions from their manure during storage.

    PubMed

    Külling, D R; Dohme, Frigga; Menz, H; Sutter, F; Lischer, P; Kreuzer, M

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of supplementing 40 g lauric acid (C12) kg(-1) dry matter (DM) in feed on methane emissions from early-lactating dairy cows and the associated effects on methane, nitrous oxide and ammonia release from the manure during storage. Stearic acid (C18), a fatty acid without assumed methane-suppressing potential in the digestive tract of ruminants, was added at 40 g kg(-1) DM to a control diet. The complete feed consisted of forage and concentrate in a ratio of 1.5:1 (DM basis). The manure was stored for 14 weeks either as complete slurry or, separately, as urine-rich slurry and farmyard manure representing two common storage systems. Methane release of the cows, as measured in respiratory chambers, was lower with C12 by about 20%, but this was mostly resulting from a reduced feed intake and, partly, from a lower rate of fibre digestion. As milk yield declined less than feed intake, methane emission per kg of milk was significantly lower with C12 (11.4 g) than with C18 (14.0 g). Faeces of C12-fed cows had a higher proportion of undigested fibre and accordingly methane release from their manure was higher compared with the manure obtained from the C18-fed cows. Overall, manure-derived methane accounted for 8.2% and 15.4% of total methane after 7 and 14 weeks of storage, respectively. The evolution of methane widely differed between manure types and dietary treatments, with a retarded onset of release in complete slurry particularly in the C12 treatment. Emissions of nitrous oxide were lower in the manures from the C12 treatment. This partially compensated for the higher methane release from the C12 manure with respect to the greenhouse gas potential. The total greenhouse gas potential (cow and manure together) accounted for 8.7 and 10.5 kg equivalents of CO2 cow(-1) d(-1) with C12 and C18, respectively. At unaffected urine-N proportion ammonia and total nitrogen losses from stored manure were lower with C12 than with C18 corresponding

  14. [Effect of Different Purple Parent Rock on Removal Rates of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Organics in Landscape Water].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue-jiao; Liu, Xiao-chen; Li, Zhen-lun; Shi, Wen-hao; Yang, Shan

    2015-05-01

    In order to understand the impacts of physicochemical properties of purple parent rock on the removal rates of nitrogen, phosphorus and organics in landscape water systems, four types of purple parent rocks including Peng-lai-zhen Formation (S1) , Sha-xi-miao Formation (S2) , Fei-xian-guan Formation (S3) and Sui-ning Formation (S4) , which distribute widely in Chongqing, were selected and autoclaved, and added to unsterile landscape water collected from Chong-de Lake in Southwest University, and the landscape water only was used as control. And several indicators such as total nitrogen and phosphorus and so on of every disposal were investigated periodically. The results indicated that: (1) The highest removal rates of total nitrogen, total phosphorus and Ammonia nitrogen were observed in Sl, which were 45.1%, 62.3% and 90%, respectively; the highest removal rate of COD was 94.5% in S4; the ammonia nitrogen content in the purple parent rocks was not obviously changed before and after the experiments, which indicated that the adsorption of ammonia nitrogen on purple parent rock surface was not the main reason for the decrease of ammonia nitrogen in water. (2) Arsenate had inhibitory effect on the sulfate-reducing bacteria, while copper and magnesium had promoting effect on gram-negative bacteria. (3) The microbial diversity was positively correlated to total nitrogen in water. (4) Based on the PCA analyses of microbial community structure and environmental factors, the mineral elements released from parent rock affected the structure and composition of microbial community in the test water, and then influenced the removal rates of nitrogen, phosphorus and organics in water systems. PMID:26314110

  15. [Coating modification of anthracite substrates in vertical-flow constructed wetlands by LDHs synthesized from different metal compounds and the nitrogen removal efficiencies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Ling; Guo, Lu; Chen, Jun-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Ting; Xu, Lu; Chen, Qiao-Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Xiao

    2014-08-01

    As one kind of vertical-flow constructed wetlands substrates, anthracite was selected in this experiment. LDHs (layered double hydroxides) were synthesized in alkaline conditions by co-precipitation of different kinds of metal compounds, such as CaCl2, ZnCl2, MgCl2, FeCl3, AlCl3, CoCl3. The synthesized LDHs were in-situ coated onto the surface of anthracite substrate to achieve the aim of modification. Simulated test columns were constructed to study the nitrogen removal efficiency of the urban sewage using the original anthracite substrates and 9 kinds of modified anthracite substrates. The results showed that: LDHs synthesized by all the 9 different kinds of methods could effectively modify the anthracite substrate by in-situ coating. With Mg2+ involved in the synthesis of modified substrates, good TN and ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies were observed. The modified anthracite substrates coated with MgCo-LDHs had the optimal performance with average TN and ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies of higher than 80% and 85%, respectively. The ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies by the modified anthracite substrates coated by LDHs reacted with Mg2+ and Fe3+ were also high. The ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies by modified anthracite substrates coated with CaFe-LDHs and MgFe-LDHs were higher than 85%. PMID:25340214

  16. Influence of residue and nitrogen fertilizer additions on carbon mineralization in soils with different texture and cropping histories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using soil sampled from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ul...

  17. Incorporating tracer-tracee differences into models to improve accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The ideal tracer for metabolic studies is one that behaves exactly like the tracee. Compounds labeled with isotopes come the closest to this ideal because they are chemically identical to the tracee except for the substitution of a stable or radioisotope at one or more positions. Even this substitution, however, can introduce a difference in metabolism that may be quantitatively important with regard to the development of the mathematical model used to interpret the kinetic data. The doubly labeled water method for the measurement of carbon dioxide production and hence energy expenditure in free-living subjects is a good example of how differences between the metabolism of the tracers and the tracee can influence the accuracy of the carbon dioxide production rate determined from the kinetic data.

  18. Improved Miscible Nitrogen Flood Performance Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Laterals in a Class I Reservoir - East Binger (Marchand) Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Sinner

    2004-06-30

    The DOE-sponsored project at the East Binger Unit is an investigation into the benefits of reservoir characterization and horizontal wells in this particular setting of geologic and recovery method. The geologic setting is a tight (average porosity of 7% and average permeability of less than 1 millidarcy) Pennsylvanian-age sandstone at about 10,000 feet, and the recovery method is a miscible nitrogen flood. The projected oil recovery of the East Binger Unit, prior to the initiation of this project, was about 25%. Gravity segregation of nitrogen and crude oil was believed to be the principal cause of the poor sweep efficiency, and it was envisioned that with horizontal producing wells in the lower portion of the reservoir and horizontal injection wells near the top, the process could be converted from a lateral displacement process to a vertical displacement/gravity assisted process. Through the characterization and field development work completed in Budget Periods 1 and 2, Binger Operations, LLC (BOL) has developed a different interpretation of the sweep problem as well as a different approach to improving recovery. The sweep problem is now believed to be one of an areal nature, due to a combination of natural and hydraulic fracturing. Vertical wells have provided a much better economic return than have the horizontal wells. The natural and hydraulic fracturing manifests itself as a direction of higher permeability, and the flood is being converted to a line drive flood aligned with this orientation. Consistent with this concept, horizontal wells have been drilled along the line of the fracture orientation, such that hydraulic fracturing leads to 'longitudinal' fractures, in line with the wellbore. As such, the hydraulically fractured horizontal wells are not significantly different than hydraulically fractured vertical wells - save for the potential for a much longer fracture face. This Topical Report contains data from new wells, plus new and updated production

  19. Different responses of soil respiration and its components to nitrogen addition among biomes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyan; Zhou, Xuhui; Zhang, Baocheng; Lu, Meng; Luo, Yiqi; Liu, Lingli; Li, Bo

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenic activities have increased nitrogen (N) deposition by threefold to fivefold over the last century, which may considerably affect soil respiration (Rs). Although numerous individual studies and a few meta-analyses have been conducted, it remains controversial as to how N addition affects Rs and its components [i.e., autotrophic (Ra) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh)]. To reconcile the difference, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 295 published studies to examine the responses of Rs and its components to N addition in terrestrial ecosystems. We also assessed variations in their responses in relation to ecosystem types, environmental conditions, and experimental duration (DUR). Our results show that N addition significantly increased Rs by 2.0% across all biomes but decreased by 1.44% in forests and increased by 7.84% and 12.4% in grasslands and croplands, respectively (P < 0.05). The differences may largely result from diverse responses of Ra to N addition among biomes with more stimulation of Ra in croplands and grasslands compared with no significant change in forests. Rh exhibited a similar negative response to N addition among biomes except that in croplands, tropical and boreal forests. Methods of partitioning Rs did not induce significant differences in the responses of Ra or Rh to N addition, except that Ra from root exclusion and component integration methods exhibited the opposite responses in temperate forests. The response ratios (RR) of Rs to N addition were positively correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT), with being more significant when MAT was less than 15 °C, but negatively with DUR. In addition, the responses of Rs and its components to N addition largely resulted from the changes in root and microbial biomass and soil C content as indicated by correlation analysis. The response patterns of Rs to N addition as revealed in this study can be benchmarks for future modeling and experimental studies. PMID:24323545

  20. Responses of hydraulics at the whole-plant level to simulated nitrogen deposition of different levels in Fraxinus mandshurica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-Ying; Wang, Miao; Yang, Da; Song, Jia; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Han, Shi-Jie; Hao, Guang-You

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is expected to have great impact on forest ecosystems by affecting many aspects of plant-environmental interactions, one of which involves its influences on plant water relations through modifications of plant hydraulic architecture. However, there is a surprising lack of integrative study on tree hydraulic architecture responses to N deposition, especially at the whole-plant level. In the present study, we used a 5-year N addition experiment to simulate the effects of six different levels of N deposition (20-120 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) on growth and whole-plant hydraulic conductance of a dominant tree species (Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr.) from the typical temperate forest of NE China. The results showed that alleviation of N limitation by moderate concentrations of fertilization (20-80 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) promoted plant growth, but further N additions on top of the threshold level showed negative effects on plant growth. Growth responses of F. mandshurica seedlings to N addition of different concentrations were accompanied by corresponding changes in whole-plant hydraulic conductance; higher growth rate was accompanied by reduced whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant) and higher leaf water-use efficiency. A detailed analysis on hydraulic conductance of different components of the whole-plant water transport pathway revealed that changes in root and leaf hydraulic conductance, rather than that of the stem, were responsible for Kplant responses to N fertilization. Both plant growth and hydraulic architecture responses to increasing levels of N addition were not linear, i.e., the correlation between measured parameters and N availability exhibited bell-shaped curves with peak values observed at medium levels of N fertilization. Changes in hydraulic architecture in response to fertilization found in the present study may represent an important underlying mechanism for the commonly observed changes in water-related tree performances

  1. Interspecific temporal and spatial differences in the acquisition of litter-derived nitrogen by ectomycorrhizal fungal assemblages.

    PubMed

    Pena, Rodica; Tejedor, Javier; Zeller, Bernd; Dannenmann, Michael; Polle, Andrea

    2013-07-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of, and interspecific differences in, the acquisition of litter-derived nitrogen (N) by natural assemblages of ectomycorrhizal root tips are poorly understood. Small cylindrical mesh bags containing (15)N-labelled beech (Fagus sylvatica) leaf litter that permit hyphal but not root ingrowth were inserted vertically into the top soil layer of an old-growth beech forest. The lateral transfer of (15)N into the circumjacent soil, roots, microbes and ectomycorrhizas was measured during an 18-month exposure period. Ectomycorrhial fungi (EMF) showed large interspecific variation in the temporal pattern and extent of (15)N accumulation. Initially, when N was mainly available from the leachate, microbes were more efficient at N immobilization than the majority of EMF, but distinct fungal species also showed significant (15)N accumulation. During later phases, the enrichment of (15)N in Tomentella badia was higher than in microbes and other EMF species. Roots and soil accumulated (15)N with a large delay compared with microbes and EMF. Because approximately half of the studied fungal species had direct access to N from leaf litter and the remainder to N from leached compounds, we suggest that EMF diversity facilitates the N utilization of the host by capturing N originating from early-released solutes and late degradation products from a recalcitrant source. PMID:23594339

  2. Carbon and nitrogen fixation differ between successional stages of biological soil crusts in the Colorado Plateau and Chihuahuan Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Housman, D.C.; Powers, H.H.; Collins, A.D.; Belnap, J.

    2006-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (cyanobacteria, mosses and lichens collectively) perform essential ecosystem services, including carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fixation. Climate and land-use change are converting later successional soil crusts to early successional soil crusts with lower C and N fixation rates. To quantify the effect of such conversions on C and N dynamics in desert ecosystems we seasonally measured diurnal fixation rates in different biological soil crusts. We classified plots on the Colorado Plateau (Canyonlands) and Chihuahuan Desert (Jornada) as early (Microcoleus) or later successional (Nostoc/Scytonema or Placidium/Collema) and measured photosynthesis (Pn), nitrogenase activity (NA), and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) on metabolically active (moist) soil crusts. Later successional crusts typically had greater Pn, averaging 1.2-1.3-fold higher daily C fixation in Canyonlands and 2.4-2.8-fold higher in the Jornada. Later successional crusts also had greater NA, averaging 1.3-7.5-fold higher daily N fixation in Canyonlands and 1.3-25.0-fold higher in the Jornada. Mean daily Fv/Fm was also greater in later successional Canyonlands crusts during winter, and Jornada crusts during all seasons except summer. Together these findings indicate conversion of soil crusts back to early successional stages results in large reductions of C and N inputs into these ecosystems.

  3. Different approaches for improving skin accumulation of topical corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Senyiğit, Taner; Padula, Cristina; Ozer, Ozgen; Santi, Patrizia

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effect of vehicle, chemical enhancer and iontophoresis on the skin accumulation of clobetasol propionate (CP) and mometasone furoate (MF). In vitro permeation experiments were performed using pig ear skin as barrier and HPLC as quantification method. The formulations tested were chitosan gels, sodium-deoxycholate gels and commercial creams of CP and MF. The results obtained indicate that Na-DOC gel had an enhancing effect on the skin accumulation of both active agents. This effect was more evident with CP especially in the stratum corneum and epidermis which are the target sites of topical steroidal treatment. Two terpene derivatives (D-limonene and nerolidol) and Transcutol P were evaluated as chemical penetration enhancers. Nerolidol produced considerable increase in the amount of CP and MF accumulated without any permeation across the skin. The application of electric current (anodal iontophoresis) to the gels improved the accumulation of MF while it did not effect the accumulation of CP. Due to the best accumulation results of nerolidol, the enhancement effect in combination with iontophoresis was also investigated. It was shown that, the combination of anodal iontophoresis and chemical enhancer (nerolidol) produced no further enhancement for both active agents. PMID:19635541

  4. Nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment using different anox-circulation flow rates and ethanol as a carbon source.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, H; Laitinen, S; Pradhan, S; Pessi, M; Heinonen-Tanski, H

    2010-05-01

    We studied the optimization of nitrogen reduction from municipal wastewater in a laboratory-scale modified Ludzack-Ettinger activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The unit consisted of primary denitrification, secondary nitrification, a sludge clarifier and a post-denitrification unit. The process simulates the Kuopio WWTP, which provided the influent utilized. We describe the effect of varying anox-circulation schemes on the nitrogen removal efficiency. We further compare the denitrification efficiencies of ethanol and methanol applied in the post-denitrification unit, and compare the properties and costs of these chemicals as carbon sources. Maximum efficiency of total nitrogen removal (70.8%) was obtained with 256% anox-circulation. The process was, however, not very sensitive, as a wide range of 150-400% of anox-circulations gave good results for nitrogen reduction. The unit achieved high BOD, and COD reductions of wastewater also when nitrogen reduction was moderate. The addition of 40 mg/L/day of ethanol to the post-denitrification tank meant that the nitrate-levels of effluent could be controlled to below 10 mg/L of nitrate nitrogen. Methanol and ethanol were equally effective for denitrification. The use of ethanol instead of methanol could reduce treatment costs by 30% to 0.02 E/m3 of treated wastewater according to 2008 market prices. PMID:20540423

  5. Does the integration of the dynamic nitrogen cycle in a terrestrial biosphere model improve the long-term trend of the leaf area index?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenet, B.; Cadule, P.; Zaehle, S.; Piao, S. L.; Peylin, P.; Maignan, F.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2013-05-01

    The carbon cycle strongly interacts with the nitrogen cycle. Several observations show that the effects of global change on primary production and carbon storage in plant biomass and soils are partially controlled by N availability. Nevertheless, only a small number of terrestrial biosphere models represent explicitly the nitrogen cycle, despite its importance on the carbon cycle and on climate. These models are difficult to evaluate at large spatiotemporal scales because of the scarcity of data at the global scale over a long time period. In this study, we benchmark the capacity of the O-CN global terrestrial biosphere model to reproduce temporal changes in leaf area index (LAI) at the global scale observed by NOAA_AVHRR satellites over the period 1982-2002. Using a satellite LAI product based on the normalized difference vegetation index of global inventory monitoring and modelling studies dataset, we estimate the long-term trend of LAI and we compare it with the results from the terrestrial biosphere models, either with (O-CN) or without (O-C) a dynamic nitrogen cycle coupled to the carbon-water-energy cycles. In boreal and temperate regions, including a dynamic N cycle (O-CN) improved the fit between observed and modeled temporal changes in LAI. In contrast, in the tropics, simulated LAI from the model without the dynamic N cycle (O-C) better matched observed changes in LAI over time. Despite differential regional trends, the satellite estimate suggests an increase in the global average LAI during 1982-2002 by 0.0020 m2 m-2 y-1. Both versions of the model substantially overestimated the rate of change in LAI over time (0.0065 m2 m-2 y-1 for O-C and 0.0057 m2 m-2 y-1 for O-CN), suggesting that some additional limitation mechanisms are missing in the model. We also estimated the relative importance of climate, CO2 and N deposition as potential drivers of the temporal changes in LAI. We found that recent climate change better explained temporal changes in LAI when

  6. Improved finite difference schemes for transonic potential calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Osher, S.; Whitlow, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Engquist and Osher (1980) have introduced a finite difference scheme for solving the transonic small disturbance equation, taking into account cases in which only compression shocks are admitted. Osher et al. (1983) studied a class of schemes for the full potential equation. It is proved that these schemes satisfy a new discrete 'entropy inequality' which rules out expansion shocks. However, the conducted analysis is restricted to steady two-dimensional flows. The present investigation is concerned with the adoption of a heuristic approach. The full potential equation in conservation form is solved with the aid of a modified artificial density method, based on flux biasing. It is shown that, with the current scheme, expansion shocks are not possible.

  7. Effects of different media and nitrogen sources and levels on growth and lipid of green microalga Botryococcus braunii KMITL and its biodiesel properties based on fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Ruangsomboon, Suneerat

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to find an optimum culture medium for green microalga Botryococcus braunii KMITL and investigate its biodiesel properties based on fatty acid composition. Four different media were tested. Chlorella medium was the best medium for lipid yield. Among four nitrogen sources tested, KNO3 produced the highest lipid yield. When varied the nitrogen concentrations, this strain gave the highest lipid yield at the highest nitrogen level. When cultivated in the best medium and nitrogen source and level for 30 days, and then cultivated further for 14 days in the medium with no nitrogen, the highest lipid content and yield were 49.94±0.82% and 2.71±0.02 g L(-1), respectively. C16:0 fatty acid was the major fatty acid found. Fatty acid profiles of B. braunii KMITL cultivated in Chlorella medium with 1.25 g L(-1) KNO3 gave the best biodiesel properties with the lowest iodine value, maximum cetane number, and lowest degree of unsaturation. PMID:25677535

  8. Twospotted spider mite population level, distribution, and damage on ivy geranium in response to different nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization regimes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Opit, George P; Jonas, Valerie M; Williams, Kimberly A; Nechols, James R; Margolies, David C

    2007-12-01

    The influence of plant nutrition on arthropod pests has often been studied by comparing plants provided suboptimal nutrients with those provided sufficient or luxurious nutrients, but such results have limited applicability to commercially produced crops because nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are almost never limiting in greenhouse production. We conducted a series of experiments with ivy geranium, Pelargonium peltatum (L.) L'Hŕ. ex Aiton 'Amethyst 96' to determine the response of twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acarina: Tetranychidae), to six combinations of N (8 or 24 mM) and P (0.32, 0.64, or 1.28 mM) that reflected commercial production practices. All six combinations resulted in saleable plants when plants were free of spider mites, but tissue N and P concentrations among fertilizer combinations were different. On mite-infested plants, no difference in mite numbers or plant damage was found in response to N fertilization rates. Phosphorus had no effect on mite population level until week 8, at which time plants fertilized with 0.64 mM P had slightly more mites than plants fertilized with 0.32 mM. However, overall quality and dry weight of plants fertilized by 0.32 mM P was lower than that of 0.64 and 1.28 mM, which suggests that ivy geranium plants fertilized with the higher P rates may better compensate for mite feeding damage. Positive correlations were found between within-plant distribution of mites and the corresponding tissue N and P concentrations in three foliage strata, suggesting that tissue nutrient content may influence mite selection of feeding sites. PMID:18232399

  9. Controlling pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic, and molecular nitrogen in multi-wall carbon nanotubes using precursors with different N/C ratios in aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Bulusheva, L G; Okotrub, A V; Fedoseeva, Yu V; Kurenya, A G; Asanov, I P; Vilkov, O Y; Koós, A A; Grobert, N

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen-containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes (N-MWCNTs) were synthesized using aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques in conjunction with benzylamine:ferrocene or acetonitrile:ferrocene mixtures. Different amounts of toluene were added to these mixtures in order to change the N/C ratio of the feedstock. X-ray photoelectron and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy detected pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic, and molecular nitrogen forms in the N-MWCNT samples. Analysis of the spectral data indicated that whilst the nature of the nitrogen-containing precursor has little effect on the concentrations of the different forms of nitrogen in N-MWCNTs, the N/C ratio in the feedstock appeared to be the determining factor. When the N/C ratio was lower than ca. 0.01, all four forms existed in equal concentrations, for N/C ratios above 0.01, graphitic and molecular nitrogen were dominant. Furthermore, higher concentrations of pyridinic nitrogen in the outer shells and N2 molecules in the core of the as-produced N-MWCNTs suggest that the precursors were decomposed into individual atoms, which interacted with the catalyst surface to form CN and NH species or in fact diffused through the bulk of the catalyst particles. These findings are important for a better understanding of possible growth mechanisms for heteroatom-containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and therefore paving the way for controlling the spatial distribution of foreign elements in the CNTs using CVD processes. PMID:26104737

  10. Improving dielectric properties of epitaxial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films on silicon by nitrogen doping

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Chaudhuri, Ayan; Osten, H. J.; Fissel, A.; Archakam, V. R.

    2013-01-14

    We report about the effect of nitrogen doping on the electrical properties of epitaxial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. Epitaxial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:N thin films were grown on Si (111) substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy using nitrous oxide as the nitridation agent. Substitutional nitrogen incorporation into the dielectric layer was confirmed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Substantial reduction of the leakage current density and disappearance of hysteresis in capacitance-voltage characteristics observed in the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:N layers indicate that nitrogen incorporation in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} effectively eliminates the adverse effects of the oxygen vacancy induced defects in the oxide layer.

  11. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation for photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Fisher, R. A.; Travis, B. J.; Wilson, C. J.; McDowell, N. G.

    2011-12-01

    photosynthesis rate. Our model can predict the variability of relationship between leaf nitrogen and photosynthesis at different light, CO2 and temperature conditions and thus provides a better understanding of nitrogen limitation for photosynthesis. We expect that our model will improve the prediction accuracy for vegetation growth and thus global carbon cycles under future climate that has not been experienced by the current plants if the model is incorporated in global earth system models.

  12. Phytoextraction of Cadmium and Zinc By Sedum plumbizincicola Using Different Nitrogen Fertilizers, a Nitrification Inhibitor and a Urease Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Arnamwong, Suteera; Wu, Longhua; Hu, Pengjie; Yuan, Cheng; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) phytoavailability and their phytoextraction by Sedum plumbizincicola using different nitrogen fertilizers, nitrification inhibitor (dicyandiamide, DCD) and urease inhibitor (N-(n-Butyl) thiophosphoric triamide, NBPT) were investigated in pot experiments where the soil was contaminated with 0.99 mg kg(-1) of Cd and 241 mg kg(-1) Zn. The soil solution pH varied between 7.30 and 8.25 during plant growth which was little affected by the type of N fertilizer. The (NH4)2SO4+DCD treatment produced higher NH4+-N concentrations in soil solution than the (NH4)2SO4 and NaNO3 treatment which indicated that DCD addition inhibited the nitrification process. Shoot Cd and Zn concentrations across all treatments showed ranges of 52.9-88.3 and 2691-4276 mg kg(-1), respectively. The (NH4)2SO4+DCD treatment produced slightly higher but not significant Cd and Zn concentrations in the xylem sap than the NaNO3 treatment. Plant shoots grown with NaNO3 had higher Cd concentrations than (NH4)2SO4+DCD treatment at 24.0 and 15.4 mg kg(-1), respectively. N fertilizer application had no significant effect on shoot dry biomass. Total Cd uptake in the urea+DCD treatment was higher than in the control, urea+NBPT, urea+NBPT+DCD, or urea treatments, by about 17.5, 23.3, 10.7, and 25.1%, respectively. PMID:25409252

  13. Impact of different nitrogen emission sources on tree physiology as assessed by a triple stable isotope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrieri, M. R.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.; Saurer, M.; Jäggi, M.; Cherubini, P.; Ripullone, F.; Borghetti, M.

    The importance that nitrogen (N) deposition has in driving the carbon (C) sequestration of forests has recently been investigated using both experimental and modeling approaches. Whether increased N deposition has positive or negative effects on such ecosystems depends on the status of the N and the duration of the deposition. By combining δ13C, δ18O, δ15N and dendrochronological approaches, we analyzed the impact of two different sources of NO x emissions on two tree species, namely: a broadleaved species ( Quercus cerris) that was located close to an oil refinery in Southern Italy, and a coniferous species ( Picea abies) located close to a freeway in Switzerland. Variations in the ci/ ca ratio and the distinction between stomatal and photosynthetic responses to NO x emissions in trees were assessed using a conceptual model, which combines δ13C and δ18O. δ15N in leaves, needles and tree rings was found to be a bioindicator of N input from anthropogenic emissions, especially at the oil refinery site. We observed that N fertilization had a stimulatory effect on tree growth near the oil refinery, while the opposite effect was found for trees at the freeway site. Changes in the ci/ ca ratio were mostly related to variations in δ13C at the freeway site and, thus, were driven by photosynthesis. At the oil refinery site they were mainly related to stomatal conductance, as assessed using δ18O. This study demonstrates that a single method approach does not always provide a complete picture of which physiological traits are more affected by N emissions. The triple isotope approach combined with dendrochronological analyses proved to be a very promising tool for monitoring the ecophysiological responses of trees to long-term N deposition.

  14. Ammonia volatilization from a Chinese cabbage field under different nitrogen treatments in the Taihu Lake Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Shan, Linan; He, Yunfeng; Chen, Jie; Huang, Qian; Wang, Hongcai

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) volatilization is a major pathway of nitrogen (N) loss from soil-crop systems. As vegetable cultivation is one of the most important agricultural land uses worldwide, a deeper understanding of NH3 volatilization is necessary in vegetable production systems. We therefore conducted a 3-year (2010-2012) field experiment to characterize NH3 volatilization and evaluate the effect of different N fertilizer treatments on this process during the growth period of Chinese cabbage. Ammonia volatilization rate, rainfall, soil water content, pH, and soil NH4(+) were measured during the growth period. The results showed that NH3 volatilization was significantly and positively correlated to topsoil pH and NH4(+) concentration. Climate factors and fertilization method also significantly affected NH3 volatilization. Specifically, organic fertilizer (OF) increased NH3 volatilization by 11.77%-18.46%, compared to conventional fertilizer (CF, urea), while organic-inorganic compound fertilizer (OIF) reduced NH3 volatilization by 8.82%-12.67% compared to CF. Furthermore, slow-release fertilizers had significantly positive effects on controlling NH3 volatilization, with a 60.73%-68.80% reduction for sulfur-coated urea (SCU), a 71.85%-78.97% reduction for biological Carbon Power® urea (BCU), and a 77.66%-83.12% reduction for bulk-blend controlled-release fertilizer (BBCRF) relative to CF. This study provides much needed baseline information, which will help in fertilizer choice and management practices to reduce NH3 volatilization and encourage the development of new strategies for vegetable planting. PMID:26702964

  15. Nitrogen retention and transport differ by hillslope aspect at the rain-snow transition of the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Eve-Lyn S.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Anderson, Suzanne P.; Williams, Mark W.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2014-07-01

    Over a decade of research in the alpine zone of the Colorado Front Range has shown that atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition originating from source areas in low elevation, developed areas, has changed ecosystem stoichiometry, nutrient transformations, and aquatic community structure. Less research has occurred in the montane zone, which sits at the current rain-snow transition and is vulnerable to climate change, land cover disturbances, and increased N loading. We conducted lithium bromide and 15N-nitrate (15NO3-) tracer studies during spring snowmelt to determine the immediate fate of N in a forested catchment. Measurements of N species and applied tracers in ecosystem pools and soil solution on north and south facing slopes provided a means of determining export pathways and uptake of deposited N. Our results indicate that NO3- residence time is longer within north than south facing slope soils, due to longer contact with the soil matrix, greater microbial biomass N, and a larger soil organic matter pool. On the north facing slope, >50% of the 1 kg ha-1 of 15NO3- applied was retained in soil and vegetation pools. On the south facing slope, rapid transport during sporadic snowmelt events reduced total recovery of the 15N label in ecosystem pools to 16-34%. Our results suggest that snowmelt events quickly transport N through south facing slope soils, potentially contributing more N to aquatic systems than north facing slopes. Thus, it is important to consider how the fate of N differs by hillslope aspect when predicting catchment-scale N export and determining ecosystem N status across the Colorado Front Range.

  16. Gender Difference Does Not Mean Genetic Difference: Externalizing Improves Performance in Mental Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    The fear of underperforming owing to stereotype threat affects women's performance in tasks such as mathematics, chess, and spatial reasoning. The present research considered mental rotation and explored effects on performance and on regulatory focus of instructions pointing to different explanations for gender differences. Two hundred and one…

  17. Two Different Strategies to Facilitate Involvement in Healthcare Improvements: A Swedish County Council Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Idvall, Ewa; Perseius, Kent-Inge; Elg, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    Background: From a management point of view, there are many different approaches from which to choose to engage staff members in initiatives to improve performance. Objective: The present study evaluated how two different types of improvement strategies facilitate and encourage involvement of different professional groups in health-care organizations. Methods/Design: Empirical data of two different types of strategies were collected within an improvement project in a County Council in Sweden. The data analysis was carried out through classifying the participants' profession, position, gender, and the organizational administration of which they were a part, in relation to their participation. Setting: An improvement project in a County Council in Sweden. Participants: Designed Improvement Processes consisted of n=105 teams and Intrapreneurship Projects of n=202 projects. Intervention: Two different types of improvement strategies, Designed Improvement Processes and Intrapreneurship Projects. Main Outcome Measures: How two different types of improvement strategies facilitate and encourage involvement of different professional groups in healthcare organizations. Results: Nurses were the largest group participating in both improvement initiatives. Physicians were also well represented, although they seemed to prefer the less structured Intrapreneurship Projects approach. Assistant nurses, being the second largest staff group, were poorly represented in both initiatives. This indicates that the benefits and support for one group may push another group aside. Conclusions: Managers need to give prerequisites and incentives for staff who do not participate in improvements to do so. Comparisons of different types of improvement initiatives are an underused research strategy that yields interesting and thoughtful results. PMID:25568821

  18. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Most biogeochemical models of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling include a simplified representation of the soil microbial community as a single pool, despite good evidence that shifts in the composition or relative abundance of microbial taxa can affect process rates. Incorporating a more realistic depiction of the microbial community in these models may increase their predictive accuracy, but this must be balanced against the feasibility of modeling the enormous diversity present in soil. We propose that explicitly including two major microbial functional groups with distinct physiologies, fungi and bacteria, will improve model predictions. To this end, we created the fungi and bacteria (FAB) model, building off previous enzyme-driven biogeochemical models that explicitly represent microbial physiology. We compared this model to a complementary biogeochemical model that does not include microbial community structure (';single-pool'). We also performed a cross-ecosystem meta-analysis of fungi-to-bacteria ratios to determine if model predictions of community structure matched empirical data. There were large differences in process rates and pool sizes between the single-pool and FAB models. In the FAB model, inorganic N pools were reduced by 5-95% depending on the soil C:N ratio due to bacterial immobilization of fungal mineralization products. This nitrogen subsidy also increased microbial biomass at some C:N ratios. Although there were changes in some components of respiration, particularly overflow respiration, there was no net effect of community structure on total respiration fluxes. The FAB model predicted a breakpoint in the relationship between the ratio of fungi to bacteria and soil C:N, after which the fungi-to-bacteria ratio should begin to increase. Break-point analysis of the meta-analysis data set revealed a consistent pattern and matched the slope of the change in F:B with soil C:N, but not the precise breakpoint. We argue that including microbial

  19. [Responses of ecosystem carbon budget to increasing nitrogen deposition in differently degraded Leymus chinensis steppes in Inner Mongolia, China].

    PubMed

    Qi, Yu-Chun; Peng, Qin; Dong, Yun-She; Xiao, Sheng-Sheng; Jia, Jun-Qiang; Quo, Shu-Fang; He, Yun-Long; Yan, Zhong-Qing; Wang, Li-Qin

    2015-02-01

    Based on a field manipulative nitrogen (N) addition experiment, the effects of atmospheric N deposition level change on the plant biomass and net primary productivity (NPP), soil respiration (Rs) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were investigated respectively in 2009 and 2010 in two differently degraded Leymus chinensis steppes in Inner Mongolia of China, and the difference in the response of NEE to equal amount of N addition [10 g x (M2 x a)(-1), MN] between the two steppes was also discussed. The results indicated that for the light degraded Leymus chinensis steppe (site A) , the average plant aboveground biomass (AGB) in MN treatment were 21.5% and 46.8% higher than those of CK in these two years. But for the moderate degraded Leymus chinensis steppe (site B), the N addition decreased the plant AGB and ANPP in 2009, while showed positive effects in 2010. N addition increased the belowground biomass (BGB) of the both sites and belowground NPP (BNPP) of site B in both years, but decreased the BNPP of site A in 2010. The increase of N input in the two steppes did not change the seasonal variation of Rs. The cumulative annual soil C emissions in MN treatment in site A showed an increase of about 14.6% and 25.7% of those in the CK respectively for these two years, while were decreased by about 10.4% and 11.3%, respectively in site B. The NEE of MN treatments, expressed by C, for the two steppes were 59.22 g x (m2 x a)(1) and 166.68 g x (m2 x a)(-1), as well as 83.27 g x (m2 x a)(-1) and 117.47 g x (m2 x a)(-1), respectively in these two years. The increments in NEE originated from N addition for these two years were 15.79 g x (M2 x a)(-1) and 82.94 g x (M2 x a)(-1) in site A and 74.54 g x (M2 x a)(-1) and 101.23 g x (M2 x a)(-1) in site B. The N input per unit could obtain greater C sink effect in the steppe with lower initial N level. PMID:26031092

  20. Nonprotein nitrogen is absorbed from the large intestine and increases nitrogen balance in growing pigs fed a valine-limiting diet.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Daniel A; Lapierre, Hélène; Htoo, John K; de Lange, Cornelis F M

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen absorption from the large intestine, largely as ammonia and possibly as amino acids (AAs), is generally thought to be of little nutritional value to nonruminant animals and humans. Ammonia-nitrogen absorbed from the large intestine, however, may be recycled into the small intestine as urea and incorporated into microbial AAs, which may then be used by the host. A cecal infusion study was performed to determine the form in which nitrogen is absorbed from the large intestine and the impact of large intestine nitrogen supply on nitrogen balance in growing pigs. Eighteen cecally cannulated barrows (initial body weight: 22.4 ± 1.2 kg) were used to determine the effect of supplying nitrogen into the large intestine from either casein or urea on whole-body nitrogen retention and urea kinetics. Treatments were cecal infusions of saline (control), casein, or urea with nitrogen infused at a rate of 40% of nitrogen intake. In a subsample of 9 pigs, (15)N(15)N-urea was infused via i.v. during the nitrogen-balance period to determine urea kinetics. All pigs were fed a valine-limiting cornstarch-soybean meal-based diet. More than 80% of infused nitrogen was apparently absorbed. Urea flux and urinary nitrogen excretion increased (P ≤ 0.05) by the same amount for both nitrogen sources, but this increase did not fully account for the increase in nitrogen absorption from the large intestine. Whole-body nitrogen retention improved with nitrogen infusions (129 vs. 114 g/d; P < 0.01) and did not differ (P > 0.05) between nitrogen sources. Absorption of nitrogen from the large intestine appears to be in the form of nonprotein nitrogen, which appears to be returned to the small intestine via urea and used there for microbial AA production and should therefore be considered when determining nitrogen and AA supply and requirements. PMID:24647394

  1. Release of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium during the decomposition of apple (Malus domestica) leaf litter under different fertilization regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The decomposition of apple (Malus domestica) leaf litters has a pivotal role in nutrient release in orchard ecosystems. We have studied the decomposition rate and subsequent release of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) nutrients over 24-months using litterbags method. From three types ...

  2. Microarray and growth analyses identify differences and similarities of early corn response to weeds, shade, and nitrogen stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed interference with crop growth is often attributed to water, nutrient, or light competition; however, specific physiological responses to these stresses are not well described. This study’s objective was to compare growth, yield, and gene expression responses of corn to nitrogen (N), low light (...

  3. Fluxed of fixed nitrogen species contributed by two adjacent wetland streams with different flow-source terms in Watkinsville, GA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inorganic, fixed nitrogen from agricultural settings often is introduced to first-order streams via surface runoff and shallow ground-water flow. Best management practices for limiting the flux of fixed N to surface waters often include buffers such as wetlands. However, the efficiency of wetlands t...

  4. Alfalfa baleage with increased concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates supplemented with a corn-based concentrate did not improve production and nitrogen utilization in early lactation dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Brito, A F; Tremblay, G F; Bertrand, A; Castonguay, Y; Bélanger, G; Michaud, R; Lafrenière, C; Martineau, R; Berthiaume, R

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of feeding alfalfa baleage with different concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) supplemented with a common corn-based concentrate on performance, ruminal fermentation profile, N utilization, and omasal flow of nutrients in dairy cows during early lactation. Ten multiparous (8 ruminally cannulated) and 8 primiparous Holstein cows were randomly assigned to treatments (high- or low-NSC diet) in a crossover design. The difference in NSC concentration between the 2 alfalfa baleages fed from d14 to 21 averaged 14 g of NSC/kg of dry matter (DM). Forages and concentrate were offered in separate meals with forages fed once and concentrate offered 3 times daily. Except for the molar proportion of valerate, which was lowest in cows fed the high-NSC diet, no other changes in ruminal fermentation were observed. Omasal flows of most nitrogenous fractions, including bacterial nonammonia N and AA, were not affected by treatments. Apparent ruminal digestibilities of neutral and acid detergent fiber and N were lowest, whereas that of total ethanol-soluble carbohydrates was highest when feeding the high-NSC diet. Postruminal digestibilities of DM, organic matter, fiber, and N were highest in cows fed the high-NSC diet, resulting in no difference in total-tract digestibilities. Total-tract digestibility of total ethanol-soluble carbohydrates was highest in cows fed the high-NSC diet, but that of starch did not differ across treatments. Although milk yield and total DM intake did not differ between treatments, yields of milk fat and 4% fat-corrected milk decreased significantly in cows fed the high-NSC diet. Milk concentration of urea N was lowest, and that of ruminal NH3-N highest, in cows fed the high-NSC diet. Plasma urea N concentration tended to be decreased in cows fed the high-NSC diet, but concentrations of AA were not affected by treatments, with the exception of Asp and Cys, both of which were lowest in

  5. Adapt-N: A Cloud-Based Computational Tool for Crop Nitrogen Management that Improves Production and Environmental Outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Harold; Sela, Shai; Marjerison, Rebecca; Melkonian, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    Maize production accounts for the largest share of crop land area in the US and is the largest consumer of nitrogen (N) fertilizers, while also having low N use efficiency. Routine application of N fertilizer has led to well-documented environmental problems and social costs. Adapt-N is a computational tool that combines soil, crop and management information with near-real-time weather data to estimate optimum N application rates for maize. Its cloud-based implementation allows for tracking and timely management of the dynamic gains and losses of N in cropping systems. This presentation will provide an overview of the tool and its implementation of farms. We also evaluated Adapt-N tool during five growing seasons (2011-to-2015) using a large dataset of both side-by-side (SBS) strip trials and multi-N rate experiments. The SBS trials consisted of 115 on-farm strip trials in Iowa and New York, each trial including yield results from replicated field-scale plots involving two sidedress N rate treatments: Adapt-N-estimated and Grower-selected (conventional). The Adapt-N rates were on average 53 and 30 kg ha-1 lower than Grower rates for NY and IA, respectively (-34% overall), with no statistically significant difference in yields. On average, Adapt-N rates increased grower profits by 63.9 ha-1 and resulted in an Adapt-N estimated decrease of 28 kg ha-1 (38%) in environmental N losses. A second set of strip trials involved multiple N-rate experiments in Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio and NY, which allowed for the comparison of Adapt-N and conventional static recommendations to an Economic Optimum N Rate (determined through response model fitting). These trials demonstrated that Adapt-N can achieve the same profitability with greatly reduced average N inputs of 20 lbs N/ac for the Midwest and 65 lbs N/ac for the Northeast, resulting in significantly lower environmental losses. In conclusion, Adapt-N recommendations resulted in both increased growers profits and decreased

  6. Landscape-level estimation of nitrogen removal in coastal Louisiana wetlands: potential sinks under different restoration scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.; Branoff, Benjamin; Meselhe, Ehab; McCorquodale, Alex; Dortch, Mark; Steyer, Gregory D.; Visser, Jenneke; Wang, Hongqing

    2013-01-01

    Coastal eutrophication in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is the primary anthropogenic contributor to the largest zone of hypoxic bottom waters in North America. Although biologically mediated processes such as denitrification (Dn) are known to act as sinks for inorganic nitrogen, it is unknown what contribution denitrification makes to landscape-scale nitrogen budgets along the coast. As the State of Louisiana plans the implementation of a 2012 Coastal Master Plan (MP) to help restore its wetlands and protect its coast, it is critical to understand what effect potential restoration projects may have in altering nutrient budgets. As part of the MP, a spatial statistical approach was developed to estimate nitrogen removal under varying scenarios of future conditions and coastal restoration project implementation. In every scenario of future conditions under which MP implementation was modeled, more nitrogen (NO3- was removed from coastal waters when compared with conditions under which no action is taken. Overall, the MP increased coast-wide average nitrogen removal capacity (NRC) rates by up to 0.55 g N m−2 y−1 compared with the “future without action” (FWOA) scenario, resulting in a conservative estimate of up to 25% removal of the annual NO3- + NO2- load of the Mississippi-Atchafalaya rivers (956,480 t y−1). These results are spatially correlated, with the lower Mississippi River and Chenier Plain exhibiting the greatest change in NRC. Since the implementation of the MP can maintain, and in some regions increase the NRC, our results show the need to preserve the functionality of wetland habitats and use this ecosystem service (i.e. Dn) to decrease eutrophication of the GOM.

  7. Alterations in the Ure2 αCap domain elicit different GATA factor responses to rapamycin treatment and nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Feller, Andre; Georis, Isabelle; Tate, Jennifer J; Cooper, Terrance G; Dubois, Evelyne

    2013-01-18

    Ure2 is a phosphoprotein and central negative regulator of nitrogen-responsive Gln3/Gat1 localization and their ability to activate transcription. This negative regulation is achieved by the formation of Ure2-Gln3 and -Gat1 complexes that are thought to sequester these GATA factors in the cytoplasm of cells cultured in excess nitrogen. Ure2 itself is a dimer the monomer of which consists of two core domains and a flexible protruding αcap. Here, we show that alterations in this αcap abolish rapamycin-elicited nuclear Gln3 and, to a more limited extent, Gat1 localization. In contrast, these alterations have little demonstrable effect on the Gln3 and Gat1 responses to nitrogen limitation. Using two-dimensional PAGE we resolved eight rather than the two previously reported Ure2 isoforms and demonstrated Ure2 dephosphorylation to be stimulus-specific, occurring after rapamycin treatment but only minimally if at all in nitrogen-limited cells. Alteration of the αcap significantly diminished the response of Ure2 dephosphorylation to the TorC1 inhibitor, rapamycin. Furthermore, in contrast to Gln3, rapamycin-elicited Ure2 dephosphorylation occurred independently of Sit4 and Pph21/22 (PP2A) as well as Siw14, Ptc1, and Ppz1. Together, our data suggest that distinct regions of Ure2 are associated with the receipt and/or implementation of signals calling for cessation of GATA factor sequestration in the cytoplasm. This in turn is more consistent with the existence of distinct pathways for TorC1- and nitrogen limitation-dependent control than it is with these stimuli representing sequential steps in a single regulatory pathway. PMID:23184930

  8. Growth and Content of Spirulina Platensis Biomass Chlorophyll Cultivated at Different Values of Light Intensity and Temperature Using Different Nitrogen Sources

    PubMed Central

    Godoy Danesi, Eliane Dalva; Oliveira Rangel-Yagui, Carlota; Sato, Sunao; Monteiro de Carvalho, João Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The effects of light intensity and temperature in S. platensis cultivation with potassium nitrate or urea as nitrogen source were investigated, as well as the biomass chlorophyll contents of this cyanobacteria, through the Response Surface Methodology. Experiments were performed at temperatures from 25 to 34.5ºC and light intensities from 15 to 69 µmol photons m−2 s−1, in mineral medium. In cultivations with both sources of nitrogen, KNO3 and urea, statistic evaluation through multiple regression, no interactions of such independent variables were detected in the results of the dependent variables maximum cell concentration, chlorophyll biomass contents, cell and chlorophyll productivities, as well as in the nitrogen-cell conversion factor. In cultivation performed with both sources of nitrogen, it was possible to obtain satisfactory adjustments to relate the dependent variables to the independent variables. The best results were achieved at temperature of 30ºC, at light intensity of 60 µmol photons m−2s−1, for cell growth, with cell productivity of approximately 95 mg L−1 d−1 in cultivations with urea. For the chlorophyll biomass content, the most adequate light intensity was 24 µmol photons m−2 s−1. PMID:24031643

  9. [Responses of rhizosphere nitrogen and phosphorus transformations to different acid rain intensities in a hilly red soil tea plantation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Chen, Fu-sheng; Ye, Su-qiong; Yu, Su-qin; Fang, Xiang-min; Hu, Xiao-fei

    2015-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) plantation in hilly red soil region has been long impacted by acid deposition, however its effects on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) transformations in rhizosphere soils remain unclear. A 25-year old tea plantation in a typical hilly red soil region was selected for an in situ simulation experiment treated by pH 4.5, pH 3.5, pH 2.5 and control. Rhizosihere and bulk soils were collected in the third year from the simulated acid deposition experiment. Soil mineral N, available P contents and major enzyme activities were analyzed using the chemical extraction and biochemical methods, and N and P mineralization rates were estimated using the indoor aerobic incubation methods. Our results showed that compared to the control, the treatments of pH 4.5, pH 3.5 and pH 2.5, respectively decreased 7.1%, 42.1% and 49.9% NO3(-)-N, 6.4%, 35.9% and 40.3% mineral N, 10.5%, 41.1% and 46.9% available P, 18.7%, 30.1% and 44.7% ammonification rate, 3.6%, 12.7% and 38.8% net N-mineralization rate, and 31.5%, 41.8% and 63.0% P mineralization rate in rhizosphere soils; however, among the 4 treatments, rhizosphere soil nitrification rate was not significantly different, the rhizosphere soil urease and acid phosphatase activities generally increased with the increasing intensity of acid rain (P<0.05). In bulk soil, compared with the control, the treatments of pH 4.5, pH 3.5 and pH 2.5 did not cause significant changes in NO3(-)-N, mineral N, available P as well as in the rates of nitrification, ammonification, net N-mineralization and P mineralization. With increasing the acid intensity, the rhizosphere effects of NH4+-N, NO3(-)-N, mineral N, ammonification and net N-mineralization rates were altered from positive to negative effects, those of urease and acid phosphatease showed the opposite trends, those of available P and P mineralization were negative and that of nitrification was positive. In sum, prolonged elevated acid rain could reduce N and P transformation

  10. A new step aeration approach towards the improvement of nitrogen removal in a full scale Carrousel oxidation ditch.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengkang; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Xiaochang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Jin, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Two aeration modes, step aeration and point aeration, were used in a full-scale Carrousel oxidation ditch with microporous aeration. The nitrogen removal performance and mechanism were analyzed. With the same total aeration input, both aeration modes demonstrated good nitrification outcomes with the average efficiency in removing NH4(+)-N of more than 98%. However, the average removal efficiencies for total nitrogen were 89.3% and 77.6% under step aeration and point aeration, respectively. The results indicated that an extended aerobic zone followed the aeration zones could affect the proportion of anoxic and oxic zones. The step aeration with larger anoxic zones indicated better TN removal efficiency. More importantly, step aeration provided the suitable environment for both nitrifiers and denitrifiers. The diversity and relative abundance of denitrifying bacteria under the step aeration (1.55%) was higher than that under the point aeration (1.12%), which resulted in an overall higher TN removal efficiency. PMID:26363498

  11. UREA-NITROGEN RECYCLING AND NITROGEN BALANCE IN LAMBS FED A HIGH-CONCENTRATE DIET AND INFUSED WITH DIFFERING PROPORTIONS OF CASEIN IN THE RUMEN AND ABOMASUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-five wether lambs (34 +/- 0.9 kg) fitted with ruminal and abomasal infusion catheters were used in a completely randomized design to determine the effects of differing proportions of ruminal and abomasal casein infusion on urea-N recycling and N balance in lambs fed a high-concentrate diet (1...

  12. Reducing Soil CO2 Emission and Improving Upland Rice Yield with no-Tillage, Straw Mulch and Nitrogen Fertilization in Northern Benin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossou-Yovo, E.; Brueggemann, N.; Naab, J.; Huat, J.; Ampofo, E.; Ago, E.; Agbossou, E.

    2015-12-01

    To explore effective ways to decrease soil CO2 emission and increase grain yield, field experiments were conducted on two upland rice soils (Lixisols and Gleyic Luvisols) in northern Benin in West Africa. The treatments were two tillage systems (no-tillage, and manual tillage), two rice straw managements (no rice straw, and rice straw mulch at 3 Mg ha-1) and three nitrogen fertilizers levels (no nitrogen, recommended level of nitrogen: 60 kg ha-1, and high level of nitrogen: 120 kg ha-1). Potassium and phosphorus fertilizers were applied to be non-limiting at 40 kg K2O ha-1 and 40 kg P2O5 ha-1. Four replications of the twelve treatment combinations were arranged in a randomized complete block design. Soil CO2 emission, soil moisture and soil temperature were measured at 5 cm depth in 6 to 10 days intervals during the rainy season and every two weeks during the dry season. Soil moisture was the main factor explaining the seasonal variability of soil CO2 emission. Much larger soil CO2 emissions were found in rainy than dry season. No-tillage planting significantly reduced soil CO2 emissions compared with manual tillage. Higher soil CO2 emissions were recorded in the mulched treatments. Soil CO2 emissions were higher in fertilized treatments compared with non fertilized treatments. Rice biomass and yield were not significantly different as a function of tillage systems. On the contrary, rice biomass and yield significantly increased with application of rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer. The highest response of rice yield to nitrogen fertilizer addition was obtained for 60 kg N ha-1 in combination with 3 Mg ha-1 of rice straw for the two tillage systems. Soil CO2 emission per unit grain yield was lower under no-tillage, rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer treatments. No-tillage combined with rice straw mulch and 60 kg N ha-1 could be used by smallholder farmers to achieve higher grain yield and lower soil CO2 emission in upland rice fields in northern Benin.

  13. Ruthenium nitrosyls derived from polypyridine ligands with carboxamide or imine nitrogen donor(s): isoelectronic complexes with different NO photolability.

    PubMed

    Rose, Michael J; Patra, Apurba K; Alcid, Eric A; Olmstead, Marylin M; Mascharak, Pradip K

    2007-03-19

    As part of our search for photoactive ruthenium nitrosyls, a set of {RuNO}6 nitrosyls has been synthesized and structurally characterized. In this set, the first nitrosyl [(SBPy3)Ru(NO)](BF4)3 (1) is derived from a polypyridine Schiff base ligand SBPy3, while the remaining three nitrosyls are derived from analogous polypyridine ligands containing either one ([(PaPy3)Ru(NO)](BF4)2 (2)) or two ([(Py3P)Ru(NO)]BF4 (3) and [(Py3P)Ru(NO)(Cl)] (4)) carboxamide group(s). The coordination structures of 1 and 2 are very similar except that in 2, a carboxamido nitrogen is coordinated to the ruthenium center in place of an imine nitrogen in case of 1. In 3 and 4, the ruthenium center is coordinated to two carboxamido nitrogens in the equatorial plane and the bound NO is trans to a pyridine nitrogen (in 3) and chloride (in 4), respectively. Complexes 1-3 contain N6 donor set, and the NO stretching frequencies (nuNO) correlate well with the N-O bond distances. All four diamagnetic {RuNO}(6) nitrosyls are photoactive and release NO rapidly upon illumination with low-intensity (5-10 mW) UV light. Interestingly, photolysis of 1 generates the diamagnetic Ru(II) photoproduct [(SBPy3)Ru(MeCN)](2+) while 2-4 afford paramagnetic Ru(III) species in MeCN solution. The quantum yield values of NO release under UV illumination (lambda(max) = 302 nm) lie in the range 0.06-0.17. Complexes 3 and 4 also exhibit considerable photoactivity under visible light. The efficiency of NO release increases in the order 2 < 3 < 4, indicating that photorelease of NO is facilitated by (a) the increase in the number of coordinated carboxamido nitrogen(s) and (b) the presence of negatively charged ligands (like chloride) trans to the bound NO. PMID:17315866

  14. [Carbon/nitrogen Removal and Bacterial Community Structure Change in an A/O Activated Sludge System Under Different Dissolved Oxygen Conditions].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Guo-hua; Fan, Qiang; Wang, Jun-yan; Qi, Lu; Wang, Hong-chen

    2015-07-01

    Carbon and nitrogen removal performance and microbial community structure under different dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (3, 2, 1 and 0. 5 mg . L -1) in an anoxic/oxic (A/O) system were investigated. The results showed that the A/O activated sludge system still had an excellent performance in removing carbon and nutrient under low DO condition (0. 5 mg . L-1). The removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia (NH4+ -N) and total nitrogen (TN) were 89. 7%, 98. 3% and 88. 0% respectively. The PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the bacterial community structure changed greatly under different DO conditions. However, there was still a high bacterial diversity even at low DO level, which ensured the functional stability of the A/O system. On the basis of the results of the phylogenetic tree, bacterial communities were observed to be very abundant, and Proteobacteria was identified as the dominant bacteria. PMID:26489332

  15. Burkholderia ambifaria and B. caribensis Promote Growth and Increase Yield in Grain Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus and A. hypochondriacus) by Improving Plant Nitrogen Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Cota, Fannie I.; Peña-Cabriales, Juan J.; de los Santos-Villalobos, Sergio; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma A.; Délano-Frier, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Grain amaranth is an emerging crop that produces seeds having high quality protein with balanced amino-acid content. However, production is restricted by agronomic limitations that result in yields that are lower than those normally produced by cereals. In this work, the use of five different rhizobacteria were explored as a strategy to promote growth and yields in Amaranthus hypochondriacus cv. Nutrisol and A. cruentus cv. Candil, two commercially important grain amaranth cultivars. The plants were grown in a rich substrate, high in organic matter, nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) and under greenhouse conditions. Burkholderia ambifaria Mex-5 and B. caribensis XV proved to be the most efficient strains and significantly promoted growth in both grain amaranth species tested. Increased grain yield and harvest index occurred in combination with chemical fertilization when tested in A. cruentus. Growth-promotion and improved yields correlated with increased N content in all tissues examined. Positive effects on growth also occurred in A. cruentus plants grown in a poor soil, even after N and P fertilization. No correlation between non-structural carbohydrate levels in roots of inoculated plants and growth promotion was observed. Conversely, gene expression assays performed at 3-, 5- and 7-weeks after seed inoculation in plants inoculated with B. caribensis XV identified a tissue-specific induction of several genes involved in photosynthesis, sugar- and N- metabolism and transport. It is concluded that strains of Burkholderia effectively promote growth and increase seed yields in grain amaranth. Growth promotion was particularly noticeable in plants grown in an infertile soil but also occurred in a well fertilized rich substrate. The positive effects observed may be attributed to a bio-fertilization effect that led to increased N levels in roots and shoots. The latter effect correlated with the differential induction of several genes involved in carbon and N metabolism

  16. Burkholderia ambifaria and B. caribensis promote growth and increase yield in grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus and A. hypochondriacus) by improving plant nitrogen uptake.

    PubMed

    Parra-Cota, Fannie I; Peña-Cabriales, Juan J; de Los Santos-Villalobos, Sergio; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma A; Délano-Frier, John P

    2014-01-01

    Grain amaranth is an emerging crop that produces seeds having high quality protein with balanced amino-acid content. However, production is restricted by agronomic limitations that result in yields that are lower than those normally produced by cereals. In this work, the use of five different rhizobacteria were explored as a strategy to promote growth and yields in Amaranthus hypochondriacus cv. Nutrisol and A. cruentus cv. Candil, two commercially important grain amaranth cultivars. The plants were grown in a rich substrate, high in organic matter, nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) and under greenhouse conditions. Burkholderia ambifaria Mex-5 and B. caribensis XV proved to be the most efficient strains and significantly promoted growth in both grain amaranth species tested. Increased grain yield and harvest index occurred in combination with chemical fertilization when tested in A. cruentus. Growth-promotion and improved yields correlated with increased N content in all tissues examined. Positive effects on growth also occurred in A. cruentus plants grown in a poor soil, even after N and P fertilization. No correlation between non-structural carbohydrate levels in roots of inoculated plants and growth promotion was observed. Conversely, gene expression assays performed at 3-, 5- and 7-weeks after seed inoculation in plants inoculated with B. caribensis XV identified a tissue-specific induction of several genes involved in photosynthesis, sugar- and N- metabolism and transport. It is concluded that strains of Burkholderia effectively promote growth and increase seed yields in grain amaranth. Growth promotion was particularly noticeable in plants grown in an infertile soil but also occurred in a well fertilized rich substrate. The positive effects observed may be attributed to a bio-fertilization effect that led to increased N levels in roots and shoots. The latter effect correlated with the differential induction of several genes involved in carbon and N metabolism

  17. Soil Nitrogen Budgets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) recoveries are commonly 45% to 70% for modern field-crop systems. Nitrogen budgets are a valuable tool for improving N efficiency because they assess the size of various N pools, N gains from the atmosphere, N losses to the environment, and the interactions among soil-N-cycle processes...

  18. Iron-nitrogen-activated carbon as cathode catalyst to improve the power generation of single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yajun; Mo, Xiaoping; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao; Liu, Di; Yang, Tingting

    2016-04-01

    In order to improve the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC), iron-nitrogen-activated carbon (Fe-N-C) as an excellent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst was prepared here using commercial activated carbon (AC) as matrix and employed in single chamber MFC. In MFC, the maximum power density increased to 2437±55mWm(-2), which was 2 times of that with AC. The open circuit potential (OCP) of Fe-N-C cathode (0.47) was much higher than that of AC cathode (0.21V). The R0 of Fe-N-C decreased by 47% from 14.36Ω (AC) to 7.6Ω (Fe-N-C). From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species were present, which played an important role in the ORR performance of Fe-N-C. These results demonstrated that the as-prepared Fe-N-C material provided a potential alternative to Pt in AC air cathode MFC for relatively desirable energy generation and wastewater treatment. PMID:26898678

  19. [Nitrogen uptake rate and use efficiency by rice under different levels of the controlled-release N fertilizers (CRF) in the Nansi Lake basin].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Wen; Du, Chun-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Wei; Li, Gui-Chun; Wang, Ming

    2011-07-01

    The nitrogen (N) fertilizers overused or misused are the main contributors for water eutrophication of the Nansi Lake in eastern China. A field experiment with different application levels of controlled-release N fertilizer (CRF) was carried out at a rice field in the Nansi lake basin to provide information on the nitrogen uptake rate and use efficiency by rice with CRF application at different growth stages of rice. The fertilization levels for the controlled fertilizer in this study were 0, 300, 337.5 and 375 kg/hm2, respectively, and 375 kg/hm2 for conventional urea (CU). We estimated the N uptake rate in different growing season and apparent recovery of fertilizer in root, stover and grain of rice. The result showed that grain yield increased by higher N rate. However, the N uptake rate did not increase linearly with the nitrogen application amount. The highest N uptake rate was 22.48 mg/(plant x d) under the fertilization amount of 337.5 kg/hm2 during the young panicle differentiation stage. Apparent N recovery efficiency for CU with traditional application amount of 375 kg/hm2 was 21.86%. Apparent N recovery efficiency for CRF with application amount of 337.5 kg/hm2 was highest with 37.17%. Based on the statistical data, with CU of traditional urea application amount of 375 kg/hm2, nitrogen loss and soil N residue at one growing season are 130.07 x 10(3) t for Jining city and 11.4 x 10(3) t for Yutai county of the Nansi Lake basin. If using CRF with the optimized application amount of 337.5 kg/hm2, nitrogen loss and soil residual at one growing season is 10.46 x 10(4) t for Jining city. It could reduce losses of 2.55 x 10(4) t N for Jining city and 2 235.26 t N for Yutai county per year. Because of releasing patterns more closely matched to crop N uptake patterns, controlled release N fertilizer could be a good way to prevent water eutrophication due to nitrogen fertilizer overused or misused in the Nansi Lake. PMID:21922808

  20. Nitrogen removal from wastewater and bacterial diversity in activated sludge at different COD/N ratios and dissolved oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Bernat, Katarzyna; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Sobolewska, Joanna; Wojnowska-Baryła, Irena

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the organic carbon to nitrogen ratio (chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N) in wastewater and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on carbon and nitrogen removal efficiency, and total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) communities in activated sludge in constantly aerated sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) was determined. At DO of 0.5 and 1.5 mg O2/L during the aeration phase, the efficiency of ammonia oxidation exceeded 90%, with nitrates as the main product. Nitrification and denitrification achieved under the same operating conditions suggested the simultaneous course of these processes. The most effective nitrogen elimination (above 50%) was obtained at the COD/N ratio of 6.8 and DO of 0.5 mg O2/L. Total bacterial diversity was similar in all experimental series, however, for both COD/N ratios of 6.8 and 0.7, higher values were observed at DO of 0.5 mg O2/L. The diversity and abundance of AOB were higher in the reactors with the COD/N ratio of 0.7 in comparison with the reactors with the COD/N of 6.8. For both COD/N ratios applied, the AOB population was not affected by oxygen concentration. Amplicons with sequences indicating membership of the genus Nitrosospira were the determinants of variable technological conditions. PMID:23505865

  1. Maize Varieties Released in Different Eras Have Similar Root Length Density Distributions in the Soil, Which Are Negatively Correlated with Local Concentrations of Soil Mineral Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Peng; Li, Sa; White, Philip J.; Li, Chunjian

    2015-01-01

    Larger, and deeper, root systems of new maize varieties, compared to older varieties, are thought to have enabled improved acquisition of soil resources and, consequently, greater grain yields. To compare the spatial distributions of the root systems of new and old maize varieties and their relationships with spatial variations in soil concentrations of available nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), two years of field experiments were performed using six Chinese maize varieties released in different eras. Vertical distributions of roots, and available N, P and K in the 0–60 cm soil profile were determined in excavated soil monoliths at silking and maturity. The results demonstrated that new maize varieties had larger root dry weight, higher grain yield and greater nutrient accumulation than older varieties. All varieties had similar total root length and vertical root distribution at silking, but newer varieties maintained greater total root length and had more roots in the 30–60 cm soil layers at maturity. The spatial variation of soil mineral N (Nmin) in each soil horizon was larger than that of Olsen-P and ammonium-acetate-extractable K, and was inversely correlated with root length density (RLD), especially in the 0–20 cm soil layer. It was concluded that greater acquisition of mineral nutrients and higher yields of newer varieties were associated with greater total root length at maturity. The negative relationship between RLD and soil Nmin at harvest for all varieties suggests the importance of the spatial distribution of the root system for N uptake by maize. PMID:25799291

  2. Enhancing nitrogen removal efficiency and reducing nitrate liquor recirculation ratio by improving simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) process.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    An integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) process (G1) and an activated sludge anoxic-oxic process (G2) were operated at nitrate liquor recirculation ratio (R) of 100, 200 and 300% to investigate the feasibility of enhancing nitrogen removal efficiency (RTN) and reducing R by improving simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) in the IFAS process. The results showed that the effluent NH4(+)-N and total nitrogen (TN) of G1 at R of 200% were less than 1.5 and 14.5 mg/L, satisfying the Chinese discharge standard (NH4(+)-N < 5 mg/L; TN < 15 mg/L). However, the effluent NH4(+)-N and TN of G2 at R of 300% were higher than 8.5 and 15.3 mg/L. It indicated that better RTN could be achieved at a lower R in the IFAS process. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results implied that nitrifiers and denitrifiers co-existed in one microbial community, facilitating the occurrence of SND in the aerobic reactor of G1, and the contribution of SND to TN removal efficiency ranged 15-19%, which was the main reason that the RTN was improved in the IFAS process. Therefore, the IFAS process was an effective method for improving RTN and reducing R. In practical application, this advantage of the IFAS process can decrease the electricity consumption for nitrate liquor recirculation flow, thereby saving operational costs. PMID:26901725

  3. Inter-Comparison of Nitrogen Dioxide Column Densities Retrieved by Ground-Based Max-Doas Under Different Instrumental Conditions Over Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchkouski, I.; Dziomin, V.; Ortega, I.; Volkamer, R.; Krasouski, A.

    2013-12-01

    This study is dedicated to the instrumental differences between ground-based MAX-DOAS measurement devices. Our MAX-DOAS instrument, which has been developed at the National Ozone Monitoring Research & Education Center of the Belarusian State University for the purpose of nitrogen dioxide and other atmospheric trace gases monitoring over Belarus, features a rotating mirror and a telescope directly connected to the spectrometer with a two-dimensional CCD detector. Using a mirror instead of an optical fibre makes it possible to change the field of view of the telescope, and the whole instrument is rather compact and all its components are placed outdoors in the open air. However, this makes it quite difficult to ensure a top-quality thermostabilization. In the course of the MAX-DOAS campaign, which took place in the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany in summer of 2013, we had a great opportunity to compare our instrument with other devices of different types. In the present study we make a comparison of nitrogen dioxide slant column densities (SCDs) during several days obtained by our instrument with that measured by the device from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado (Boulder), which has a thermostabilization level of about 0.01 degrees Celsius. We investigate the influence of the spectrometer parts thermostabilization on nitrogen dioxide SCDs retrieval. Furthermore, it was possible to modify the telescope field of view for our instrument from 0.005 to 1.3 degrees, so we performed nitrogen dioxide SCDs retrieval for different fields of view at the same angle of elevation. We analyze these measurement results and obtain an optimal field of view with the aim to achieve the highest possible signal to noise ratio.

  4. Effects of varying nitrogen sources on amino acid synthesis costs in Arabidopsis thaliana under different light and carbon-source conditions.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Anne; Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Plants as sessile organisms cannot escape their environment and have to adapt to any changes in the availability of sunlight and nutrients. The quantification of synthesis costs of metabolites, in terms of consumed energy, is a prerequisite to understand trade-offs arising from energetic limitations. Here, we examine the energy consumption of amino acid synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. To quantify these costs in terms of the energy equivalent ATP, we introduce an improved cost measure based on flux balance analysis and apply it to three state-of-the-art metabolic reconstructions to ensure robust results. We present the first systematic in silico analysis of the effect of nitrogen supply (nitrate/ammonium) on individual amino acid synthesis costs as well as of the effect of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions, integrating day/night-specific regulation. Our results identify nitrogen supply as a key determinant of amino acid costs, in agreement with experimental evidence. In addition, the association of the determined costs with experimentally observed growth patterns suggests that metabolite synthesis costs are involved in shaping regulation of plant growth. Finally, we find that simultaneous uptake of both nitrogen sources can lead to efficient utilization of energy source, which may be the result of evolutionary optimization. PMID:25706533

  5. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Chonggang; Fisher, Rosie; Wullschleger, Stan D; Wilson, Cathy; Cai, Michael; McDowell, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions

  6. Performance of Spodoptera litura Fabricius on different host plants: influence of nitrogen and total phenolics of plants and mid-gut esterase activity of the insect.

    PubMed

    Ghumare, S S; Mukherjee, S N

    2003-08-01

    Five host plants [castor, Ricinus communis (Carolus Linnaeus); cotton, Gossypium hirsutm (Carolus Linnaeus); tomato, Lycopersicum esculentum (Philip Miller); mint, Mentha arvensis (Carolus Linnaeus) and cabbage, Brassica oleracea (Carolus Linnaeus)] belonging to different families were used to study the performance of the Asian armyworm, Spodoptera litura larvae. Highest consumption of food and dry weight gain was observed in larvae fed on castor. Mint did not support optimum larval growth because of low digestibility and low efficiency of conversion of digested food to body matter. Dry weight gain ranged from 26.64 mg on mint to 86.80 mg in castor. These differences tend to be related to nitrogen and total phenolics content of the leaf tissues; however, the most clear-cut correlation is an inverse one between the host plant preference and the ratio of total phenolics to nitrogen in the leaf tissues. Mid-gut esterase activity in larvae showed an increasing trend with the increase in total phenolics: nitrogen ratio in the test plants and the order of mid-gut esterase activity in larvae was mint > cabbage > cotton > tomato > castor. PMID:15248492

  7. Evaluation of the performance of different atmospheric chemical transport models and inter-comparison of nitrogen and sulphur deposition estimates for the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, A. J.; Carslaw, D. C.; Braban, C.; Cain, M.; Chemel, C.; Conolly, C.; Derwent, R. G.; Griffiths, S. J.; Hall, J.; Hayman, G.; Lawrence, S.; Metcalfe, S. E.; Redington, A.; Simpson, D.; Sutton, M. A.; Sutton, P.; Tang, Y. S.; Vieno, M.; Werner, M.; Whyatt, J. D.

    2015-10-01

    An evaluation has been made of a number of contrasting atmospheric chemical transport models, of varying complexity, applied to estimate sulphur and nitrogen deposition in the UK. The models were evaluated by comparison with annually averaged measurements of gas, aerosol and precipitation concentrations from the national monitoring networks. The models were evaluated in relation to performance criteria. They were generally able to satisfy a criterion of 'fitness for purpose' that at least 50% of modelled concentrations should be within a factor of two of measured values. The second criterion, that the magnitude of the normalised mean bias should be less than 20%, was not always satisfied. Considering known uncertainties in measurement techniques, this criterion may be too strict. Overall, simpler models were able to give a good representation of measured gas concentrations whilst the use of dynamic meteorology, and complex photo-chemical reactions resulted in a generally better representation of measured aerosol and precipitation concentrations by more complex models. The models were compared graphically by plotting maps and cross-country transects of wet and dry deposition as well as calculating budgets of total wet and dry deposition to the UK for sulphur, oxidised nitrogen and reduced nitrogen. The total deposition to the UK varied by ±22-36% amongst the different models depending on the deposition component. At a local scale estimates of both dry and wet deposition for individual 5 km × 5 km model grid squares were found to vary between the different models by up to a factor of 4.

  8. Using dual isotopes to identify sources and transformations of nitrogen in water catchments with different land uses, Loess Plateau of China.

    PubMed

    Xing, Meng; Liu, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution in rivers is a research hotspot in the field of biogeochemistry. However, the types and sources of pollution have historically been poorly understood in the water catchments of the Loess Plateau in China. In this study, we have chosen the main waterway and four lesser branches of the Jinghe River that vary by land use. We investigated the concentrations and isotopic signatures of nitrogen in river water. Our results revealed that nitrate was the dominant nitrogen type in river catchments of the Loess Plateau. The δ(15)N and δ(18)O values showed that NO3 (-) ions in the studied river samples were derived from precipitation, manure, sewage, soil organic nitrogen, and synthetic NO3 (-) fertilizer. The δ(18)O-NO3 (-) values during July 2012 (mean ± SD = +18.1 ± 1.5‰) were higher than those during the September 2013 (mean ± SD = +7.8 ± 3.7‰), which indicated that mixing with atmospheric NO3 (-) resulted in the high δ(18)O values during July 2012. It appears that no intense nitrification and denitrification occurred in all five rivers according to the isotopic and chemical data. A Bayesian model was used to determine the contributions of four NO3 (-) sources to all five rivers. Results showed that source contributions differ significantly between July and September, and the four potential NO3 (-) sources also showed high variability between the different land use areas. PMID:26308924

  9. Comparison of quasisteady-state performance of the DEAMOX process under intermittent and continuous feeding and different nitrogen loading rates.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey; Gladchenko, Marina; Mulder, Arnold; Versprille, Bram

    2007-07-01

    The recently developed denitrifying ammonium oxidation (DEAMOX) process combines the anammox reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulfide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite from nitrate within an anaerobic biofilm. This paper compares a quasisteady-state performance of this process for treatment of baker's yeast wastewater under intermittent and continuous feeding and increasing nitrogen loading rate (NLR) from 300 till 858 mg N/L/d. The average total nitrogen removal slightly decreased on increasing the NLR: from 86 to 79% (intermittent feeding) and from 87 to 84% (continuous feeding). The better performance under continuous feeding was due to a more complete nitrate removal in the former case whereas the ammonia removal was similar for both feeding regimes under the comparable NLR. A possible explanation can be that, during continuous feeding (simultaneous supply of nitrate and sulfide), there were less mass transfer limitations for sulfide oxidizing denitrifiers presumably located in the outer layer of sludge aggregates. On the contrary, the ammonia oxidisers presumably located inside the aggregates apparently suffered from nitrite mass transfer limitations under both the feedings. The paper further describes some characteristics of the DEAMOX sludge. PMID:17427996

  10. Different Effects of Transgenic Maize and Nontransgenic Maize on Nitrogen-Transforming Archaea and Bacteria in Tropical Soils

    PubMed Central

    Cotta, Simone Raposo; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Marriel, Ivanildo Evódio; Andreote, Fernando Dini; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the rhizosphere microbiome is a result of interactions between plant roots, soil, and environmental conditions. The impact of genetic variation in plant species on the composition of the root-associated microbiota remains poorly understood. This study assessed the abundances and structures of nitrogen-transforming (ammonia-oxidizing) archaea and bacteria as well as nitrogen-fixing bacteria driven by genetic modification of their maize host plants. The data show that significant changes in the abundances (revealed by quantitative PCR) of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities occurred as a result of the maize host being genetically modified. In contrast, the structures of the total communities (determined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) were mainly driven by factors such as soil type and season and not by plant genotype. Thus, the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities but not structures of those communities were revealed to be responsive to changes in maize genotype, allowing the suggestion that community abundances should be explored as candidate bioindicators for monitoring the possible impacts of cultivation of genetically modified plants. PMID:25107970

  11. Different effects of transgenic maize and nontransgenic maize on nitrogen-transforming archaea and bacteria in tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Cotta, Simone Raposo; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Marriel, Ivanildo Evódio; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Seldin, Lucy; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-10-01

    The composition of the rhizosphere microbiome is a result of interactions between plant roots, soil, and environmental conditions. The impact of genetic variation in plant species on the composition of the root-associated microbiota remains poorly understood. This study assessed the abundances and structures of nitrogen-transforming (ammonia-oxidizing) archaea and bacteria as well as nitrogen-fixing bacteria driven by genetic modification of their maize host plants. The data show that significant changes in the abundances (revealed by quantitative PCR) of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities occurred as a result of the maize host being genetically modified. In contrast, the structures of the total communities (determined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) were mainly driven by factors such as soil type and season and not by plant genotype. Thus, the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal communities but not structures of those communities were revealed to be responsive to changes in maize genotype, allowing the suggestion that community abundances should be explored as candidate bioindicators for monitoring the possible impacts of cultivation of genetically modified plants. PMID:25107970

  12. Emission characteristics of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing odorous compounds during different sewage sludge chemical conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Luo, Guang-Qian; Hu, Hong-Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Jia-Kuan; Yao, Hong

    2012-10-15

    Chemical conditioners are often used to enhance sewage sludge dewaterability through altering sludge properties and flocs structure, both affect odorous compounds emissions not only during sludge conditioning but also in subsequent sludge disposal. This study was to investigate emission characteristics of ammonia (NH(3)), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) generated from sewage sludge conditioned by three representative conditioners, i.e., organic polymers, iron salts and skeleton builders, F-S (Fenton's reagent and skeleton builders) composite conditioner. The results demonstrate that polyacrylamide (PAM) has an insignificant effect on emission characteristics of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing odorous compounds, because the properties, sulfur and nitrogen speciations are similar in PAM-conditioned sludge and raw sludge (RS). Significant increases of SO(2) and H(2)S emissions in the H(2)SO(4) conditioning process were observed due to the accelerated decomposition of sulfur-containing amino acids in acidic environment. Fenton peroxidation facilitates the formation of COS. CaO can reduce sulfur-containing gases emission via generation of calcium sulfate. However, under strong alkaline conditions, free ammonia or protonated amine in sludge can be easily converted to volatile ammonia, resulting in a significant release of NH(3). PMID:22902143

  13. The rhizosphere and hyphosphere differ in their impacts on carbon and nitrogen cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO₂.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ina C; Pritchard, Seth G; Brzostek, Edward R; McCormack, M Luke; Phillips, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    While multiple experiments have demonstrated that trees exposed to elevated CO₂ can stimulate microbes to release nutrients from soil organic matter, the importance of root- versus mycorrhizal-induced changes in soil processes are presently unknown. We analyzed the contribution of roots and mycorrhizal activities to carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) turnover in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forest exposed to elevated CO₂ by measuring extracellular enzyme activities at soil microsites accessed via root windows. Specifically, we quantified enzyme activity from soil adjacent to root tips (rhizosphere), soil adjacent to hyphal tips (hyphosphere), and bulk soil. During the peak growing season, CO₂ enrichment induced a greater increase of N-releasing enzymes in the rhizosphere (215% increase) than in the hyphosphere (36% increase), but a greater increase of recalcitrant C-degrading enzymes in the hyphosphere (118%) than in the rhizosphere (19%). Nitrogen fertilization influenced the magnitude of CO₂ effects on enzyme activities in the rhizosphere only. At the ecosystem scale, the rhizosphere accounted for c. 50% and 40% of the total activity of N- and C-releasing enzymes, respectively. Collectively, our results suggest that root exudates may contribute more to accelerated N cycling under elevated CO₂ at this site, while mycorrhizal fungi may contribute more to soil C degradation. PMID:25348688

  14. The optimization of biomass and lipid yields of Chlorella sorokiniana when using wastewater supplemented with different nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Ramanna, Luveshan; Guldhe, Abhishek; Rawat, Ismail; Bux, Faizal

    2014-09-01

    The potential of nitrogen sources supplementing domestic wastewater for the cultivation of microalgae was assessed. Urea, potassium nitrate, sodium nitrate and ammonium nitrate were evaluated for their effect on cultivation and lipid production of Chlorella sorokiniana. Urea showed the highest biomass yield of 0.220 g L(-1) and was selected for further experimentation. Urea concentrations (0-10 g L(-1)) were assessed for their effect on growth and microalgal physiology using pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry. A concentration of 1.5 g L(-1) urea produced 0.218 g L(-1) biomass and 61.52% lipid by relative fluorescence. Physiological stress was evident by the decrease in relative Electron Transport Rate from 10.45 to 6.77 and quantum efficiency of photosystem II charge separation from 0.665 to 0.131. Gas chromatography analysis revealed that C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3 were the major fatty acids produced by C. sorokiniana. Urea proved to be an effective nitrogen supplement for cultivation of C. sorokiniana in wastewater. PMID:24768415

  15. Improved electrochemical performance of lithium iron phosphate in situ coated with hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped graphene-like membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhang, Yue; Huang, Yudai; Wang, Xingchao; Guo, Yong; Jia, Dianzeng; Tang, Xincun

    2016-02-01

    LiFePO4 in situ coated with hierarchical porous nitrogen-doped graphene-like membrane (HPNGM) composite derived from a electrospun polymer membrane (EPM) precursor has been achieved for the first time. The N-doped graphene-like membrane which is in situ coating on LiFePO4 can provide a highly conductive layer, and the hierarchical porous structure facilitates Li+ transfer. The composite exhibits a high reversible capacity (171 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C), excellent high-rate capability and cycling stability. In addition to construct the traditional structure of nanofiber or nanowire, the EPM can also form graphene-like structure after annealing, which is a new application in constructing sheet structure by electrospinning.

  16. Effect of different levels of Quebracho tannin on nitrogen utilization and growth performance of Najdi sheep fed alfalfa (Medicago sativa) hay as a sole diet.

    PubMed

    Al-Dobaib, Soliman N

    2009-10-01

    A commercial tannin source (Quebracho tannin, QT), containing 75% condensed tannins (CT) in dry matter (DM) was used to evaluate the effects of addition of different levels of QT to alfalfa hay on the in vitro degradation kinetics of organic matter (OM) and nitrogen (N) in experiment 1 (Exp. 1), N utilization and microbial N synthesis (MNS) in experiment 2 (Exp. 2) and growth performance of growing Najdi lambs in experiment 3 (Exp. 3). Alfalfa hay was treated with QT at the levels of 0, 1, 2 and 3% of DM to form four treatments of QT0, QT1, QT2 and QT3 to have actual levels of CT being 0, 0.75, 1.5 and 2.25% of DM, respectively. Degradation rate and the effective degradability of N were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) for QT2 and QT3 as compared with the QT0. In Exp. 2, digestibility coefficients for OM, neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) at QT3, whereas QT1 and QT2 showed no difference to QT0. In the metabolism trial (Exp. 2), digested N (DN) and urinary N (UN) excretion for QT2 and QT3 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared to QT0 and QT1. The DN and UN as percentage of N intake were 79.2, 76.9, 75.5 and 69.8%; and 24.4, 22.6, 19.9 and 19.6% for QT0, QT1, QT2 and QT3, respectively. QT2 had the highest MNS and the lowest value was in QT3, the MNS of the treatments were 18.1, 18.7, 19.2 and 15.8 g/day for QT0, QT1, QT2 and QT3, respectively. In the growth trial of 56 days duration (Exp. 3, n = 24 lambs), the addition of QT at the level of QT2 enhanced (P < 0.05) the average daily gain and feed conversion rate compared with the QT0, while, QT1 and QT3 had intermediate values. It is concluded that alfalfa hay treated with QT at the level of 2% of DM could be used to protect alfalfa N from ruminal degradation that would lead to improve growth performance of lambs. PMID:20163617

  17. Boron and Nitrogen Codoped Carbon Layers of LiFePO4 Improve the High-Rate Electrochemical Performance for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinli; Nie, Ning; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jiao; Yu, Feng; Gu, Junjie; Li, Wei

    2015-09-16

    An evolutionary composite of LiFePO4 with nitrogen and boron codoped carbon layers was prepared by processing hydrothermal-synthesized LiFePO4. This novel codoping method is successfully applied to LiFePO4 for commercial use, and it achieved excellent electrochemical performance. The electrochemical performance can be improved through single nitrogen doping (LiFePO4/C-N) or boron doping (LiFePO4/C-B). When modifying the LiFePO4/C-B with nitrogen (to synthesis LiFePO4/C-B+N) the undesired nonconducting N-B configurations (190.1 and 397.9 eV) are generated. This decreases the electronic conductivity from 2.56×10(-2) to 1.30×10(-2) S cm(-1) resulting in weak electrochemical performance. Nevertheless, using the opposite order to decorate LiFePO4/C-N with boron (to obtain LiFePO4/C-N+B) not only eliminates the nonconducting N-B impurity, but also promotes the conductive C-N (398.3, 400.3, and 401.1 eV) and C-B (189.5 eV) configurations-this markedly improves the electronic conductivity to 1.36×10(-1) S cm(-1). Meanwhile the positive doping strategy leads to synergistic electrochemical activity distinctly compared with single N- or B-doped materials (even much better than their sum capacity at 20 C). Moreover, due to the electron and hole-type carriers donated by nitrogen and boron atoms, the N+B codoped carbon coating tremendously enhances the electrochemical property: at the rate of 20 C, the codoped sample can elevate the discharge capacity of LFP/C from 101.1 mAh g(-1) to 121.6 mAh g(-1), and the codoped product based on commercial LiFePO4/C shows a discharge capacity of 78.4 mAh g(-1) rather than 48.1 mAh g(-1). Nevertheless, the B+N codoped sample decreases the discharge capacity of LFP/C from 101.1 mAh g(-1) to 95.4 mAh g(-1), while the commercial LFP/C changes from 48.1 mAh g(-1) to 40.6 mAh g(-1). PMID:26305802

  18. BLENDED FILMS OF NOVEL CASEIN WITH FOUR DIFFERENT CARRAGEENANS TO IMPROVE PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel CO2-precipitated casein (CO2CAS) forms films that are excellent oxygen barriers and moderate moisture barriers. CO2CAS films are strong, but elongation needs improvement. Blending biopolymers can improve properties of films. It is known that different types of carrageenans (kappa, iota, a...

  19. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signaling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A.; Djordjevic, Michael A.; Imin, Nijat

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules. PMID:24098303

  20. Further improvement in ganoderic acid production in static liquid culture of Ganoderma lucidum by integrating nitrogen limitation and calcium ion addition.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Jun; Zhang, De-Huai; Han, Li-Liang; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To further improve the ganoderic acid (GA) production, a novel integrated strategy by combining nitrogen limitation and calcium ion addition was developed. The effects of the integrated combination on the content of GA-T (one powerful anticancer compound), their intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and on the transcription levels of GA biosynthetic genes in G. lucidum fermentation were investigated. The maximum GA-T content with the integrated strategy were 1.87 mg/ 100 mg dry cell weight, which was 2.1-4.2 fold higher than that obtained with either calcium ion addition or nitrogen limitation alone, and it is also the highest record as ever reported in submerged fermentation of G. lucidum. The squalene content was increased by 3.9- and 2.2-fold in this case compared with either individual strategy alone. Moreover, the transcription levels of the GA biosynthetic genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and lanosterol synthase were also up-regulated by 3.3-7.5 and 1.3-2.3 fold, respectively. PMID:26508324

  1. IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Sinner

    2003-01-31

    Implementation of the work program of Budget Period 2 of the East Binger Unit (''EBU'') DOE Project continues. Major development work planned for the project includes the drilling of three horizontal production and one vertical injection wells, the conversion of five wells from production to injection service, and the expansion of injection capacity at the nitrogen management facility. Other work items include initiation of project monitoring and continued reservoir simulation. EBU 74G-2, the injection well planned to support the production of EBU 64-3H, has been drilled. Completion was underway at the time of this report. EBU 64-3H was fracture-stimulated during the period, further increasing production from this new horizontal well. Drilling of the final two wells of the pilot project is planned for 2003. Both are planned as horizontal producing wells. Work also began on projects aimed at increasing injection in the pilot area. The project to add compression and increase injection capacity at the nitrogen management facility was initiated, with completion targeted for March 2003. Additional producer-to-injector conversions are expected to be implemented around the same time. The revised history match of the simulation model has been completed, and work has begun to evaluate options with forecast simulations. The quality of the history match is significantly improved over the prior match. The predicted distribution of remaining reserves in the field is significantly changed. Decisions on projects planned for implementation later in Budget Period 2 will be guided by new forecasts.

  2. Improvements of anti-corrosion and mechanical properties of NiTi orthopedic materials by acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2005-08-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are useful materials in orthopedics and orthodontics due to their unique super-elasticity and shape memory effects. However, the problem associated with the release of harmful Ni ions to human tissues and fluids has been raising safety concern. Hence, it is necessary to produce a surface barrier to impede the out-diffusion of Ni ions from the materials. We have conducted acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) into NiTi alloys in an attempt to improve the surface properties. All the implanted and annealed samples surfaces exhibit outstanding corrosion and Ni out-diffusion resistance. Besides, the implanted layers are mechanically stronger than the substrate underneath. XPS analyses disclose that the layer formed by C2H2 PIII is composed of mainly TiCx with increasing Ti to C concentration ratios towards the bulk. The nitrogen PIII layer is observed to be TiN, whereas the oxygen PIII layer is composed of oxides of Ti4+, Ti3+ and Ti2+.

  3. Nitrogen In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M. D.; Baragiola, R.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions in the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to our models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  4. [Effects of different long-term fertilization on the activities of enzymes related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in a red soil].

    PubMed

    Fan, Miao-zhen; Yin, Chang; Fan, Fen-liang; Song, A-lin; Wang, Bo-ren; Li, Dong-chu; Liang, Yong-chao

    2015-03-01

    Using a microplate fluorimetric assay method, five fertilization treatments, i.e. no-fertilizer control (CK) , sole application of nitrogen (N), balanced application of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilizer (NPK), application of pig manure (M), and combination of pig manure with balanced chemical fertilizer (MNPK) were selected to investigate the effects of different long-term fertilization regimes on the activity of five enzymes (β-1, 4-glucosidase, βG; cellobiohydrolase, CBH; β-1, 4-xylosidase, βX; β-1, 4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, NAG; acid phosphatase, AP) in a red soil sampled from Qiyang, Hunnan Province. The results showed that compared with CK treatment, N treatment had no impact on βG, βX, CBH, and NAG activities but reduced AP activity, while NPK, M and MNPK treatments increased the activities of all the five enzymes. Correlation analysis indicated that all the five enzyme activities were positively correlated with the content of nitrate (r=0.465-0.733) , the content of available phosphorus (r=0.612-0.947) , soil respiration (r=0.781-0.949) and crop yield (r=0.735-0.960), while βG, CBH and AP were positively correlated with pH (r= 0.707-0.809), only AP was significantly correlated with dissolvable organic carbon (r = -0.480). These results suggested that the activities of the measured enzymes could be used as indicators of red soil fertility under different fertilization regimes, but the five enzymes tested provided limited information on the degree of acidification induced by application of mineral nitrogen. PMID:26211066

  5. Production of sensory compounds by means of the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis in different nitrogen sources with the prospect of producing cachaça.

    PubMed

    Castro Parente, Denise; Vidal, Esteban Espinosa; Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; de Barros Pita, Will; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The distilled spirit made from sugar cane juice, also known as cachaça, is a traditional Brazilian beverage that in recent years has increased its market share among international distilled beverages. Several volatile compounds produced by yeast cells during the fermentation process are responsible for the unique taste and aroma of this drink. The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has acquired increasing importance in the fermented beverage production, as the different metabolites produced by this yeast may be either beneficial or harmful to the end-product. Since D. bruxellensis is often found in the fermentation processes carried out in ethanol fuel distillation in Brazil, we employed this yeast to analyse the physiological profile and production of aromatic compounds and to examine whether it is feasible to regard it as a cachaça-producing microorganism. The assays were performed on a small scale and simulated the conditions for the production of handmade cachaça. The results showed that the presence of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids in the medium has a strong influence on the metabolism and production of flavours by D. bruxellensis. The assimilation of these alternative nitrogen sources led to different fermentation yields and the production of flavouring compounds. The influence of the nitrogen source on the metabolism of fusel alcohols and esters in D. bruxellensis highlights the need for further studies of the nitrogen requirements to obtain the desired level of sensory compounds in the fermentation. Our results suggest that D. bruxellensis has the potential to play a role in the production of cachaça. PMID:25345668

  6. Genetic Improvements in Rice Yield and Concomitant Increases in Radiation- and Nitrogen-Use Efficiency in Middle Reaches of Yangtze River.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guanglong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The yield potential of rice (Oryza sativa L.) has experienced two significant growth periods that coincide with the introduction of semi-dwarfism and the utilization of heterosis. In present study, we determined the annual increase in the grain yield of rice varieties grown from 1936 to 2005 in Middle Reaches of Yangtze River and examined the contributions of RUE (radiation-use efficiency, the conversion efficiency of pre-anthesis intercepted global radiation to biomass) and NUE (nitrogen-use efficiency, the ratio of grain yield to aboveground N accumulation) to these improvements. An examination of the 70-year period showed that the annual gains of 61.9 and 75.3 kg ha(-1) in 2013 and 2014, respectively, corresponded to an annual increase of 1.18 and 1.16% in grain yields, respectively. The improvements in grain yield resulted from increases in the harvest index and biomass, and the sink size (spikelets per panicle) was significantly enlarged because of breeding for larger panicles. Improvements were observed in RUE and NUE through advancements in breeding. Moreover, both RUE and NUE were significantly correlated with the grain yield. Thus, our study suggests that genetic improvements in rice grain yield are associated with increased RUE and NUE. PMID:26876641

  7. Genetic Improvements in Rice Yield and Concomitant Increases in Radiation- and Nitrogen-Use Efficiency in Middle Reaches of Yangtze River

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guanglong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The yield potential of rice (Oryza sativa L.) has experienced two significant growth periods that coincide with the introduction of semi-dwarfism and the utilization of heterosis. In present study, we determined the annual increase in the grain yield of rice varieties grown from 1936 to 2005 in Middle Reaches of Yangtze River and examined the contributions of RUE (radiation-use efficiency, the conversion efficiency of pre-anthesis intercepted global radiation to biomass) and NUE (nitrogen-use efficiency, the ratio of grain yield to aboveground N accumulation) to these improvements. An examination of the 70-year period showed that the annual gains of 61.9 and 75.3 kg ha−1 in 2013 and 2014, respectively, corresponded to an annual increase of 1.18 and 1.16% in grain yields, respectively. The improvements in grain yield resulted from increases in the harvest index and biomass, and the sink size (spikelets per panicle) was significantly enlarged because of breeding for larger panicles. Improvements were observed in RUE and NUE through advancements in breeding. Moreover, both RUE and NUE were significantly correlated with the grain yield. Thus, our study suggests that genetic improvements in rice grain yield are associated with increased RUE and NUE. PMID:26876641

  8. High permeability heavy oil reservoir nitrogen injection EOR research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yining; Wang, Ruihe; Han, Guoqing; An, Yongsheng

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen chemically very unreactive under normal showed great inertia. It is difficult to burn , dry, non-explosive , non-toxic , non-corrosive , and thus the use of safe and reliable. Coefficient of variation of nitrogen increases with increasing pressure , less affected by temperature . Under the same conditions, the ratio of the nitrogen gas formation volume factor carbon dioxide gas is high, about three times the carbon dioxide , the greater the elastic expansion of nitrogen play a beneficial role in flooding . EOR project trends increase the number of oil and gas injection gas injection from the calendar view, carbon dioxide miscible flooding gas injection EOR is the focus of the flue gas project currently has less to carry , nitrogen flooding is still subject to considerable attention. Note the nitrogen requirements of the basic conditions for enhanced oil recovery from major tectonic conditions , reservoir properties of crude nature of the gas injection timing and other aspects to consider , for different reservoir injected in different ways. Oilfield against a thick , high permeability and other characteristics, to improve oil recovery by injecting nitrogen indoor experiments conducted nitrogen injection process factors and supporting technical studies ; and introduced the field of nitrogen injection EOR field test conditions .

  9. The core root microbiome of sugarcanes cultivated under varying nitrogen fertilizer application.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Yun Kit; Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat; Dennis, Paul G; Robinson, Nicole; Ragan, Mark A; Schmidt, Susanne; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2016-05-01

    Diazotrophic bacteria potentially supply substantial amounts of biologically fixed nitrogen to crops, but their occurrence may be suppressed by high nitrogen fertilizer application. Here, we explored the impact of high nitrogen fertilizer rates on the presence of diazotrophs in field-grown sugarcane with industry-standard or reduced nitrogen fertilizer application. Despite large differences in soil microbial communities between test sites, a core sugarcane root microbiome was identified. The sugarcane root-enriched core taxa overlap with those of Arabidopsis thaliana raising the possibility that certain bacterial families have had long association with plants. Reduced nitrogen fertilizer application had remarkably little effect on the core root microbiome and did not increase the relative abundance of root-associated diazotrophs or nif gene counts. Correspondingly, low nitrogen fertilizer crops had lower biomass and nitrogen content, reflecting a lack of major input of biologically fixed nitrogen, indicating that manipulating nitrogen fertilizer rates does not improve sugarcane yields by enriching diazotrophic populations under the test conditions. Standard nitrogen fertilizer crops had improved biomass and nitrogen content, and corresponding soils had higher abundances of nitrification and denitrification genes. These findings highlight that achieving a balance in maximizing crop yields and minimizing nutrient pollution associated with nitrogen fertilizer application requires understanding of how microbial communities respond to fertilizer use. PMID:26032777

  10. Effect of different levels of nitrogen on rhizosphere bacterial community structure in intensive monoculture of greenhouse lettuce.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Gang; Shen, Min-Chong; Hou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ling; Wu, Jun-Xia; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pyrosequencing-based analyses revealed significant effects among low (N50), medium (N80), and high (N100) fertilization on community composition involving a long-term monoculture of lettuce in a greenhouse in both summer and winter. The non-fertilized control (CK) treatment was characterized by a higher relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi; however, the average abundance of Firmicutes typically increased in summer, and the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes increased in winter in the N-fertilized treatments. Principle component analysis showed that the distribution of the microbial community was separated by a N gradient with N80 and N100 in the same group in the summer samples, while CK and N50 were in the same group in the winter samples, with the other N-level treatments existing independently. Redundancy analysis revealed that available N, NO3(-)-N, and NH4(+)-N, were the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of the bacterial community. Correlation analysis showed that nitrogen affected the shifts of microbial communities by strongly driving the shifts of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria in summer samples, and Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in winter samples. The study demonstrates a novel example of rhizosphere bacterial diversity and the main factors influencing rizosphere microbial community in continuous vegetable cropping within an intensive greenhouse ecosystem. PMID:27121918

  11. Effect of different levels of nitrogen on rhizosphere bacterial community structure in intensive monoculture of greenhouse lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Gang; Shen, Min-Chong; Hou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ling; Wu, Jun-Xia; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pyrosequencing-based analyses revealed significant effects among low (N50), medium (N80), and high (N100) fertilization on community composition involving a long-term monoculture of lettuce in a greenhouse in both summer and winter. The non-fertilized control (CK) treatment was characterized by a higher relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi; however, the average abundance of Firmicutes typically increased in summer, and the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes increased in winter in the N-fertilized treatments. Principle component analysis showed that the distribution of the microbial community was separated by a N gradient with N80 and N100 in the same group in the summer samples, while CK and N50 were in the same group in the winter samples, with the other N-level treatments existing independently. Redundancy analysis revealed that available N, NO3−-N, and NH4+-N, were the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of the bacterial community. Correlation analysis showed that nitrogen affected the shifts of microbial communities by strongly driving the shifts of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria in summer samples, and Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in winter samples. The study demonstrates a novel example of rhizosphere bacterial diversity and the main factors influencing rizosphere microbial community in continuous vegetable cropping within an intensive greenhouse ecosystem. PMID:27121918

  12. Effect of different levels of nitrogen on rhizosphere bacterial community structure in intensive monoculture of greenhouse lettuce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Gang; Shen, Min-Chong; Hou, Jin-Feng; Li, Ling; Wu, Jun-Xia; Dong, Yuan-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Pyrosequencing-based analyses revealed significant effects among low (N50), medium (N80), and high (N100) fertilization on community composition involving a long-term monoculture of lettuce in a greenhouse in both summer and winter. The non-fertilized control (CK) treatment was characterized by a higher relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Chloroflexi; however, the average abundance of Firmicutes typically increased in summer, and the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes increased in winter in the N-fertilized treatments. Principle component analysis showed that the distribution of the microbial community was separated by a N gradient with N80 and N100 in the same group in the summer samples, while CK and N50 were in the same group in the winter samples, with the other N-level treatments existing independently. Redundancy analysis revealed that available N, NO3‑-N, and NH4+-N, were the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of the bacterial community. Correlation analysis showed that nitrogen affected the shifts of microbial communities by strongly driving the shifts of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria in summer samples, and Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria in winter samples. The study demonstrates a novel example of rhizosphere bacterial diversity and the main factors influencing rizosphere microbial community in continuous vegetable cropping within an intensive greenhouse ecosystem.

  13. Pedestal and edge localized mode characteristics with different first wall materials and nitrogen seeding in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. A.; Barrera Orte, L.; Burckhart, A.; Dunne, M. G.; Fuchs, C.; Gude, A.; Kurzan, B.; Suttrop, W.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) discharges performed with carbon and the full tungsten wall shows that the pedestal performance at low triangularity is not altered without gas puffing. The pedestal electron pressure is the same for both wall materials as is the confinement. With the tungsten wall the natural density is higher even without an additional gas puff. In typical operation with gas puffing the density is again higher in tungsten. This results in a higher collisionality with the tungsten wall. Pedestal pressure and plasma confinement, however, are not degraded until very large amounts of deuterium are puffed. The edge localized mode (ELM) crash in typical AUG discharges is observed to be composed of two independent phases. This is observed for both the carbon and the tungsten wall. The 1st phase of the crash is unaffected by scans of the plasma parameters as long as the pedestal pressure remains constant. The duration of the 2nd phase is strongly anti-correlated with the separatrix density and can be suppressed by the application of nitrogen seeding for divertor cooling. A consistent explanation for the two phases of the ELM crash does not seem possible when considering only the pre-ELM pedestal profiles. The scrape off layer (SOL) plasma provides the necessary free parameter for a consistent explanation, indicating the importance of the SOL in understanding the ELM crash evolution.

  14. A novel mobile dual-wavelength laser altimetry system for improved site-specific Nitrogen fertilizer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel, J.; Magney, T. S.; Vierling, L. A.; Brown, T. T.; Huggins, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Reducing fertilizer inputs while maintaining yield would increase farmer's profits and similarly lessen the adverse environmental effects of production agriculture. The development of technologies that allow precise, site-specific application of Nitrogen (N) fertilizer has thus been an important research goal over the past decades. Remote sensing of foliar crop properties and function with tractor-mountable optical sensors has thought to be useful to optimize N fertilizer applications. However, on-the-go sensing of foliar crop properties and function has proven difficult, particularly during early crop growth stages when fertilizer decisions are often made. This difficulty arises from the fact that the spectral signal measured by on-the-go sensors is dominated by soil reflectance during early crop growth stages. Here, we present the basic principles behind a novel, dual-wavelength, tractor mountable laser altimetry system that measures the laser return intensity of the reflected green and red laser light. The green (532 nm) and the red (660 nm) wavelength combination allows calculation of a modified Photochemical Reflectance Index (mPRI) that have shown to be sensitive to both crop function and foliar chemistry. The small field of view of the laser points (diameter: 4 mm) combined with its high sampling rate (1000 points sec-1) allows vegetation returns to be isolated from ground returns by using simple thresholds. First tests relating foliar N of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with laser derived mPRI are promising (r2 = 0.72). Further research is needed to test the relationship between laser derived spectral indices and crop function.

  15. Synthesis of a further improved porous polymer for the separation of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon monoxide by gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A further improvement has been made in the synthesis of an N-type porous polymer for the separation of permanent gases. Changing the ratios of reactants and diluting the Hi-DVB with styrene led to a porous polymer gas chromatographic packing which is superior to commercial products and to the author's own previously reported custom-made polymer.

  16. Physiological and Morphological Responses of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (Wrinkled Grass) to Different Nitrogen Rates and Rice Seeding Rates

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Tahir Hussain; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Cruz, Pompe C. Sta.

    2014-01-01

    Ischaemum rugosum is a competitive weed in direct-seeded rice systems. Developing integrated weed management strategies that promote the suppression of weeds by crop density, cultivar selection, and nutrition requires better understanding of the extent to which rice interferes with the growth of this weed and how it responds to resource limitation due to rice interference. The growth of I. rugosum was studied when grown with four rice seeding rates (0, 25, 50, and 100 kg ha−1) and four nitrogen (N) rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 kg ha−1). Compared to the weed plants grown alone, weed tiller number was reduced by 63–80%, leaf number by 68–77%, leaf area by 69–77%, leaf biomass by 72–84%, and inflorescence biomass by 81–93% at the rice seeding rates of 25–100 kg ha−1. All these parameters increased with increasing rates of N from 0 to 150 kg ha−1. At weed maturity, I. rugosum plants were 100% taller than rice at 0 kg N ha−1, whereas, with added N, the weeds were only 50% taller than rice. Weed biomass increased by 82–160%, whereas rice biomass increased by 92–229%, with the application of 50–150 kg N ha−1. Added N favored rice biomass production more than it did the weed. Rice interference reduced the height and biomass of I. rugosum, but did not suppress its growth completely. I. rugosum showed the ability to reduce the effects of rice interference by increasing leaf area, leaf weight ratio, and specific leaf area, and by decreasing the root-shoot weight ratio in comparison to the weed plants grown alone. The results suggest that rice crop interference alone may reduce I. rugosum growth but may not provide complete control of this weed. The need for integrated weed management practices to effectively control this weed species is highlighted. PMID:24910995

  17. Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from rice paddy fields under different nitrogen fertilization loads in Chongming Island, Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianxian; Yin, Shan; Li, Yinsheng; Zhuang, Honglei; Li, Changsheng; Liu, Chunjiang

    2014-02-15

    Rice is one of the major crops of southern China and Southeast Asia. Rice paddies are one of the largest agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources in this region because of the application of large quantities of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to the plants. In particular, the production of methane (CH4) is a concern. Investigating a reasonable amount of fertilizers to apply to plants is essential to maintaining high yields while reducing GHG emissions. In this study, three levels of fertilizer application [high (300 kg N/ha), moderate (210 kg N/ha), and low (150 kg N/ha)] were designed to examine the effects of variation in N fertilizer application rate on carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from the paddy fields in Chongming Island, Shanghai, China. The high level (300 kg N/ha) represented the typical practice adopted by the local farmers in the area. Maximum amounts of CH4 and N2O fluxes were observed upon high-level fertilizer application in the plots. Cumulative N2O emissions of 23.09, 40.10, and 71.08 mg N2O/m(2) were observed over the growing season in 2011 under the low-, moderate-, and high-level applications plots, respectively. The field data also indicated that soil temperatures at 5 and 10 cm soil depths significantly affected soil respiration; the relationship between Rs and soil temperature in this study could be described by an exponential model. Our study showed that reducing the high rate of fertilizer application is a feasible way of attenuating the global-warming potential while maintaining the optimum yield for the studied paddy fields. PMID:24295754

  18. Physiological and morphological responses of Ischaemum rugosum Salisb. (wrinkled grass) to different nitrogen rates and rice seeding rates.

    PubMed

    Awan, Tahir Hussain; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Cruz, Pompe C Sta

    2014-01-01

    Ischaemum rugosum is a competitive weed in direct-seeded rice systems. Developing integrated weed management strategies that promote the suppression of weeds by crop density, cultivar selection, and nutrition requires better understanding of the extent to which rice interferes with the growth of this weed and how it responds to resource limitation due to rice interference. The growth of I. rugosum was studied when grown with four rice seeding rates (0, 25, 50, and 100 kg ha(-1)) and four nitrogen (N) rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 kg ha(-1)). Compared to the weed plants grown alone, weed tiller number was reduced by 63-80%, leaf number by 68-77%, leaf area by 69-77%, leaf biomass by 72-84%, and inflorescence biomass by 81-93% at the rice seeding rates of 25-100 kg ha(-1). All these parameters increased with increasing rates of N from 0 to 150 kg ha(-1). At weed maturity, I. rugosum plants were 100% taller than rice at 0 kg N ha(-1), whereas, with added N, the weeds were only 50% taller than rice. Weed biomass increased by 82-160%, whereas rice biomass increased by 92-229%, with the application of 50-150 kg N ha(-1). Added N favored rice biomass production more than it did the weed. Rice interference reduced the height and biomass of I. rugosum, but did not suppress its growth completely. I. rugosum showed the ability to reduce the effects of rice interference by increasing leaf area, leaf weight ratio, and specific leaf area, and by decreasing the root-shoot weight ratio in comparison to the weed plants grown alone. The results suggest that rice crop interference alone may reduce I. rugosum growth but may not provide complete control of this weed. The need for integrated weed management practices to effectively control this weed species is highlighted. PMID:24910995

  19. Improved Recovery from Gulf of Mexico Reservoirs, Volume 4, Comparison of Methane, Nitrogen and Flue Gas for Attic Oil. February 14, 1995 - October 13, 1996. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Joanne; Shayegi, Sara

    1997-01-13

    Gas injection for attic oil recovery was modeled in vertical sandpacks to compare the process performance characteristics of three gases, namely methane, nitrogen and flue gas. All of the gases tested recovered the same amount of oil over two cycles of gas injection. Nitrogen and flue gas recovered oil more rapidly than methane because a large portion of the methane slug dissolved in the oil phase and less free gas was available for oil displacement. The total gas utilization for two cycles of gas injection was somewhat better for nitrogen as compared to methane and flue gas. The lower nitrogen utilization was ascribed to the lower compressibility of nitrogen.

  20. Improving the optoelectronic property and photoactivity of nano-structured titanuim dioxide: Effect of particle size, oxygen vacancy, and nitrogen doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong-Ying

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been proven to be one of the most important and widely used photocatalyst for applications such as gas/liquid phase environmental cleaning, solar hydrogen generation, sensitized solar cell, UV filtration, etc. The biggest challenge in the applications of this semiconductor photocatalyst is its large band gap (˜ 3.2 eV) which limits the utilizable spectrum of photons from the solar light (˜ 4 to 5 %). To improve the optical sensitivity of TiO2 in the visible light region, the band gap of TiO2 needs to be tailored. The reduction of TiO2 band gap can be achieved by controlling of its electronic structure via two routes: changing the particle size and doping it with impurities. To precisely control the size of TiO2 particles, anatase TiO 2 nanocrystallines (17 to 29 nm) were synthesized by metallo-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method with moderate control on system parameters (i.e. pressure and gas flow rates). The results of band gap change as a function of particle size agreed well with what was predicted using the Brus' effective mass model (EMM). However, the observations from photocatalytic oxidation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) showed that the smaller the particle size, the faster the degradation rate. This is attributed in part to the combined effect of band gap change relative to the spectrum of the light source and the specific surface area (or particle size) of the photocatalysts. Our results indicate that the gain in specific surface area due to the smaller particle size outweighs the improvement on its optical property (e.g. reduction in bandgap) under similar experimental condition. Our observation also showed the secondary particle size to be time dependent due to the aggregation and is highly correlated with its primary particle size. The nitrogen doped TiO2 thin film synthesis was carried out with two different approaches: (1) oxidation of the titanium nitride (TiN) thin film and (2) reactive pulsed laser deposition

  1. Initial ammonia and nitrous oxide emission from land application of different livestock wastes and nitrogen-base fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal waste disposal and odor control have become a major issue for animal production facilities. As an attempt to improve efficiency and profit margins, many livestock operations have become large concentrated rearing facilities. As a result, many concerns over potentially adverse environmental ...

  2. To study of different level of nitrogen manure and density on yield and yield component of variety of K.S.C 704 in dry region of sistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmardeh, M.; Forghani, F.; Khammari, E.

    2008-01-01

    Out of three grain of the world, Corn is one of the best, About 7 to 10 thousand years ago in south of Mexico corn become domesticated. In the year 1995 culfivation of corn in the world was 130 mil/ha, and to Total production of the world of corn is 507 M/Tons. Average yield of corn in the year 1995 Among Producer countries was 7.78 To 7.60 t/ha in fance and united state was state was 2.36 To 2.20 t/ha, but in Brazil and Mexico Production of corn was different. With this regards, special manner has been arranged for the suitable cultivation or suitable density plants in one heactar on cultivation variety of K.S.C 704 corn. Also suitable level of Nitrogen manure, this Protect in climatic condition of Sistan region done, sith complete block design with 3 replication. Experiment has been selected as split plot, the main plot with 4 different concentration level such as (200-250-3500 and 350 Kg/ha) and sub plot density with 3 different level such as 111000,83000 and 66000 plan/ha respectively. From stage growth up to harvesting of corn in this reache having Data for each treat. ment, After harvesting Analysis of variance and companion of Average of each treatment has been done by DunKan method. Results has been shown, Measurment of characteristics (yield component) seed yield effected different density level of manure, with increasing of manure weight of one thousand seed yield and also in high density showed high significant differente amoung each other. These are with suitable climatic condition of sistan region if enough water will be available ed using Amount of 350 ks/ha Nitrogen manure and with density 111000 plants/ha we can product suitable seed yield Biological yield.

  3. To study of different level of nitrogen manure and density on yield and yield component of variety of K.S.C 704 in dry region of sistan

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmardeh, M.; Forghani, F.; Khammari, E.

    2008-01-30

    Out of three grain of the world, Corn is one of the best, About 7 to 10 thousand years ago in south of Mexico corn become domesticated. In the year 1995 culfivation of corn in the world was 130 mil/ha, and to Total production of the world of corn is 507 M/Tons. Average yield of corn in the year 1995 Among Producer countries was 7.78 To 7.60 t/ha in fance and united state was state was 2.36 To 2.20 t/ha, but in Brazil and Mexico Production of corn was different. With this regards, special manner has been arranged for the suitable cultivation or suitable density plants in one heactar on cultivation variety of K.S.C 704 corn. Also suitable level of Nitrogen manure, this Protect in climatic condition of Sistan region done, sith complete block design with 3 replication. Experiment has been selected as split plot, the main plot with 4 different concentration level such as (200-250-3500 and 350 Kg/ha) and sub plot density with 3 different level such as 111000,83000 and 66000 plan/ha respectively. From stage growth up to harvesting of corn in this reache having Data for each treat. ment, After harvesting Analysis of variance and companion of Average of each treatment has been done by DunKan method. Results has been shown, Measurment of characteristics (yield component) seed yield effected different density level of manure, with increasing of manure weight of one thousand seed yield and also in high density showed high significant differente amoung each other. These are with suitable climatic condition of sistan region if enough water will be available ed using Amount of 350 ks/ha Nitrogen manure and with density 111000 plants/ha we can product suitable seed yield Biological yield.

  4. Evaluation of Different Yeast Species for Improving In vitro Fermentation of Cereal Straws

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zuo; He, Zhixiong; Beauchemin, Karen A.; Tang, Shaoxun; Zhou, Chuanshe; Han, Xuefeng; Wang, Min; Kang, Jinhe; Odongo, Nicholas E.; Tan, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    Information on the effects of different yeast species on ruminal fermentation is limited. This experiment was conducted in a 3×4 factorial arrangement to explore and compare the effects of addition of three different live yeast species (Candida utilis 1314, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1355, and Candida tropicalis 1254) at four doses (0, 0.25×107, 0.50×107, and 0.75×107 colony-forming unit [cfu]) on in vitro gas production kinetics, fiber degradation, methane production and ruminal fermentation characteristics of maize stover, and rice straw by mixed rumen microorganisms in dairy cows. The maximum gas production (Vf), dry matter disappearance (IVDMD), neutral detergent fiber disappearance (IVNDFD), and methane production in C. utilis group were less (p<0.01) than other two live yeast supplemented groups. The inclusion of S. cerevisiae reduced (p<0.01) the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), isobutyrate, and isovalerate compared to the other two yeast groups. C. tropicalis addition generally enhanced (p<0.05) IVDMD and IVNDFD. The NH3-N concentration and CH4 production were increased (p<0.05) by the addition of S. cerevisiae and C. tropicalis compared with the control. Supplementation of three yeast species decreased (p<0.05) or numerically decreased the ratio of acetate to propionate. The current results indicate that C. tropicalis is more preferred as yeast culture supplements, and its optimal dose should be 0.25×107 cfu/500 mg substrates in vitro. PMID:26732448

  5. Virulence Differences among Melissococcus plutonius Strains with Different Genetic Backgrounds in Apis mellifera Larvae under an Improved Experimental Condition.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shiraishi, Akiyo; Kobayashi, Sota; Harada, Mariko; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Osaki, Makoto; Okura, Masatoshi; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    European foulbrood (EFB) caused by Melissococcus plutonius is an important bacterial disease of honeybee larvae. M. plutonius strains can be grouped into three genetically distinct groups (CC3, CC12 and CC13). Because EFB could not be reproduced in artificially reared honeybee larvae by fastidious strains of CC3 and CC13 previously, we investigated a method to improve experimental conditions using a CC3 strain and found that infection with a potassium-rich diet enhanced proliferation of the fastidious strain in larvae at the early stage of infection, leading to the appearance of clear clinical symptoms. Further comparison of M. plutonius virulence under the conditions revealed that the representative strain of CC12 was extremely virulent and killed all tested bees before pupation, whereas the CC3 strain was less virulent than the CC12 strain, and a part of the infected larvae pupated. In contrast, the tested CC13 strain was avirulent, and as with the non-infected control group, most of the infected brood became adult bees, suggesting differences in the insect-level virulence among M. plutonius strains with different genetic backgrounds. These strains and the improved experimental infection method to evaluate their virulence will be useful tools for further elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of EFB. PMID:27625313

  6. Effects of Boron Nutrition and Water Stress on Nitrogen Fixation, Seed δ15N and δ13C Dynamics, and Seed Composition in Soybean Cultivars Differing in Maturities

    PubMed Central

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Mengistu, Alemu

    2015-01-01

    Therefore, the objective of the current research was to investigate the effects of foliar B nutrition on seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars under water stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using different maturity group (MG) cultivars. Plants were well-watered with no foliar B (W − B), well-watered with foliar B (W + B), water-stressed with no foliar B (WS − B), and water-stressed with foliar B (WS + B). Foliar B was applied at rate of 0.45 kg·ha−1 and was applied twice at flowering and at seed-fill stages. The results showed that seed protein, sucrose, fructose, and glucose were higher in W + B treatment than in W − B, WS + B, and WS − B. The increase in protein in W + B resulted in lower seed oil, and the increase of oleic in WS − B or WS + B resulted in lower linolenic acid. Foliar B resulted in higher nitrogen fixation and water stress resulted in seed δ15N and δ13C alteration. Increased stachyose indicated possible physiological and metabolic changes in carbon and nitrogen pathways and their sources under water stress. This research is beneficial to growers for fertilizer management and seed quality and to breeders to use 15N/14N and 13C/12C ratios and stachyose to select for drought tolerance soybean. PMID:25667936

  7. Nondestructive Optical Sensing of Flavonols and Chlorophyll in White Head Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata subvar. alba) Grown under Different Nitrogen Regimens.

    PubMed

    Agati, Giovanni; Tuccio, Lorenza; Kusznierewicz, Barbara; Chmiel, Tomasz; Bartoszek, Agnieszka; Kowalski, Artur; Grzegorzewska, Maria; Kosson, Ryszard; Kaniszewski, Stanislaw

    2016-01-13

    A multiparametric optical sensor was used to nondestructively estimate phytochemical compounds in white cabbage leaves directly in the field. An experimental site of 1980 white cabbages (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata subvar. alba), under different nitrogen (N) treatments, was mapped by measuring leaf transmittance and chlorophyll fluorescence screening in one leaf/cabbage head. The provided indices of flavonols (FLAV) and chlorophyll (CHL) displayed the opposite response to applied N rates, decreasing and increasing, respectively. The combined nitrogen balance index (NBI = CHL/FLAV) calculated was able to discriminate all of the plots under four N regimens (0, 100, 200, and 400 kg/ha) and was correlated with the leaf N content determined destructively. CHL and FLAV were properly calibrated against chlorophyll (R(2) = 0.945) and flavonol (R(2) = 0.932) leaf contents, respectively, by using a homographic fit function. The proposed optical sensing of cabbage crops can be used to estimate the N status of plants and perform precision fertilization to maintain acceptable crop yield levels and, additionally, to rapidly detect health-promoting flavonol antioxidants in Brassica plants. PMID:26679081

  8. High functional diversity within species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is associated with differences in phosphate and nitrogen uptake and fungal phosphate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Jerry A; Koch, Alexander M; Antunes, Pedro M; Kiers, E Toby; Hart, Miranda; Bücking, Heike

    2015-10-01

    Plant growth responses following colonization with different isolates of a single species of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus can range from highly beneficial to detrimental, but the reasons for this high within-species diversity are currently unknown. To examine whether differences in growth and nutritional benefits are related to the phosphate (P) metabolism of the fungal symbiont, the effect of 31 different isolates from 10 AM fungal morphospecies on the P and nitrogen (N) nutrition of Medicago sativa and the P allocation among different P pools was examined. Based on differences in the mycorrhizal growth response, high, medium, and low performance isolates were distinguished. Plant growth benefit was positively correlated to the mycorrhizal effect on P and N nutrition. High performance isolates increased plant biomass by more than 170 % and contributed substantially to both P and N nutrition, whereas the effect of medium performance isolates particularly on the N nutrition of the host was significantly lower. Roots colonized by high performance isolates were characterized by relatively low tissue concentrations of inorganic P and short-chain polyphosphates and a high ratio between long- to short-chain polyphosphates. The high performance isolates belonged to different morphospecies and genera, indicating that the ability to contribute to P and N nutrition is widespread within the Glomeromycota and that differences in symbiotic performance and P metabolism are not specific for individual fungal morphospecies. PMID:25708401

  9. Optimality of nitrogen distribution among leaves in plant canopies.

    PubMed

    Hikosaka, Kouki

    2016-05-01

    The vertical gradient of the leaf nitrogen content in a plant canopy is one of the determinants of vegetation productivity. The ecological significance of the nitrogen distribution in plant canopies has been discussed in relation to its optimality; nitrogen distribution in actual plant canopies is close to but always less steep than the optimal distribution that maximizes canopy photosynthesis. In this paper, I review the optimality of nitrogen distribution within canopies focusing on recent advancements. Although the optimal nitrogen distribution has been believed to be proportional to the light gradient in the canopy, this rule holds only when diffuse light is considered; the optimal distribution is steeper when the direct light is considered. A recent meta-analysis has shown that the nitrogen gradient is similar between herbaceous and tree canopies when it is expressed as the function of the light gradient. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain why nitrogen distribution is suboptimal. However, hypotheses explain patterns observed in some specific stands but not in others; there seems to be no general hypothesis that can explain the nitrogen distributions under different conditions. Therefore, how the nitrogen distribution in canopies is determined remains open for future studies; its understanding should contribute to the correct prediction and improvement of plant productivity under changing environments. PMID:27059755

  10. What Do Direct Care Workers Say Would Improve Their Jobs? Differences across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Peter; Heier, Brigitt; Barry, Teta; Brannon, Diane; Angelelli, Joe; Vasey, Joe; Anderson-Knott, Mindy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The study's goals were to understand what changes in management practices would most improve the jobs of frontline workers from the perspective of workers themselves and to analyze differences across settings. Design and Methods: The baseline survey of direct care workers (N = 3,468) conducted as part of the National Study of the Better…

  11. Dopant Enriched Nitrogen Gas Combined with Sheathless Capillary Electrophoresis-Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Improved Sensitivity and Repeatability in Glycopeptide Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Kohler, Isabelle; Jansen, Bas C; Hensbergen, Paul J; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Falck, David; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years, numerous strategies have been proposed to enhance both ionization efficiency and spray stability in electrospray ionization (ESI), in particular for nanospray applications. In nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS), a better ESI performance has been observed when a coaxial gas flow is added around the ESI emitter. Moreover, enrichment of the gas with an organic dopant has led to an improved desolvation and ionization efficiency with an overall enhanced sensitivity. In this study, the use of a dopant enriched nitrogen (DEN)-gas combined with sheathless capillary electrophoresis (CE)-ESI-MS was evaluated for glycopeptide analysis. Using acetonitrile as a dopant, an increased sensitivity was observed compared to conventional sheathless CE-ESI-MS. Up to 25-fold higher sensitivities for model glycopeptides were obtained, allowing for limits of detection unachieved by state-of-the-art nano-LC-ESI-MS. The effect of DEN-gas on the repeatability and intermediate precision was also investigated. When compared to previously reported nano-LC-ESI-MS measurements, similar values were found for CE-ESI-MS with DEN-gas. The enhanced repeatability fosters the use of DEN-gas sheathless CE-ESI-MS in protein glycosylation analysis, where precision is essential. The use of DEN-gas opens new avenues for highly sensitive sheathless CE-ESI-MS approaches in glycoproteomics research, by significantly improving sensitivity and precision. PMID:27119460

  12. Corrosion inhibition of stainless steel type AISI 304 by Mn coating and subsequent annealing with flow of nitrogen at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayeli-Korpi, Ali-Reza; Savaloni, Hadi; Habibi, Maryam

    2013-07-01

    This work reports the enhancement of stainless steel corrosion resistance coated with Mn and post-annealed with flow of nitrogen at different annealing temperatures. Crystallographic variation of the samples by annealing temperature is studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) while their surface morphology and surface roughness was obtained by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses before and after corrosion test respectively. Elemental analysis of samples after corrosion test was investigated by energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS) analysis. The corrosion behaviour of the samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization test in 0.6 M NaCl solution. A critical annealing temperature is found at which the highest corrosion resistance can be achieved. Correlation between corrosion resistance, structural and surface morphology results is obtained.

  13. Farming for a Better Climate by Improving Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions (FarmClim)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, Barbara; Winiwarter, Wilfried; Schröck, Andrea; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kasper, Martina; Sigmund, Elisabeth; Schaller, Lena; Moser, Tobias; Baumgarten, Andreas; Dersch, Georg; Zethner, Gerhard; Anderl, Michael; Kitzler, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    The project FarmClim (Farming for a better climate) assesses impacts of agriculture on N and GHG fluxes in Austria and proposes measures for improving N efficiency and mitigating emissions, including their economic assessment. This paper focuses on animal husbandry and crop production measures, and on N2O emissions from soils. FarmClim applies national inventory reporting methods to assess Austrian NH3 and GHG fluxes in order to develop flux estimates with implementation of mitigation measures. Based on scientific literature and on the outcome of the Austrian working group agriculture and climate protection a list of potential mitigation measures has been produced: phase feeding, dairy cattle diet, biogas production. Data cover resulting production levels as well as GHG mitigation. In crop production, an optimisation potential remains with respect to N fertilization and nutrient uptake efficiency. Projected regional yield data and information on the N content of arable crops have been delivered from field experiments. These data complement official statistics and allow assessing the effect of increasing proportions of legume crops in crop rotations and reducing fertilizer input on a regional scale. Economic efficiency of measures is a crucial factor for their future implementation on commercial farms. The economic model evaluates investment costs as well as changes in direct costs, labour costs and economic yield. Biophysical modelling with Landscape DNDC allows establishing a framework to move from the current approach of applying the IPCC default emission factor for N2O emissions from soils. We select two Austrian model regions to calculate N fluxes taking into account region and management practices. Hot spots and hot moments as well as mitigation strategies are identified. Two test regions have been identified for soil emission modelling. The Marchfeld is an intensively used agricultural area in North-East Austria with very fertile soils and dry climate. The

  14. Effects of extreme experimental drought and rewetting on CO2 and CH4 exchange in mesocosms of 14 European peatlands with different nitrogen and sulfur deposition.

    PubMed

    Estop-Aragonés, Cristian; Zając, Katarzyna; Blodau, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The quantitative impact of intense drought and rewetting on gas exchange in ombrotrophic bogs is still uncertain. In particular, we lack studies investigating multitudes of sites with different soil properties and nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) deposition under consistent environmental conditions. We explored the timing and magnitude of change in CO2 (Respiration, Gross Primary Production - GPP, and Net Exchange - NE) and CH4 fluxes during an initial wet, a prolonged dry (~100 days), and a subsequent wet period (~230 days) at 12 °C in 14 Sphagnum peat mesocosms collected in hollows from bogs in the UK, Ireland, Poland, and Slovakia. The relationship of N and S deposition with GPP, respiration, and CH4 exchange was investigated. Nitrogen deposition increased CO2 fluxes and GPP more than respiration, at least up to about 15 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . All mesocosms became CO2 sources during drying and most of them when the entire annual period was considered. Response of GPP to drying was faster than that of respiration and contributed more to the change in NE; the effect was persistent and few sites recovered "predry" GPP by the end of the wet phase. Respiration was higher during the dry phase, but did not keep increasing as WT kept falling and peaked within the initial 33 days of drying; the change was larger when differences in humification with depth were small. CH4 fluxes strongly peaked during early drought and water table decline. After rewetting, methanogenesis recovered faster in dense peats, but CH4 fluxes remained low for several months, especially in peats with higher inorganic reduced sulfur content, where sulfate was generated and methanogenesis remained suppressed. Based on a range of European sites, the results support the idea that N and S deposition and intense drought can substantially affect greenhouse gas exchange on the annual scale. PMID:26810035

  15. Impacts of off-road vehicles on nitrogen cycles in biological soil crusts: Resistance in different U.S. deserts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.

    2002-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are an important component of desert ecosystems, as they influence soil stability and fertility. This study examined and compared the short-term vehicular impacts on lichen cover and nitrogenase activity (NA) of biological soil crusts. Experimental disturbance was applied to different types of soil in regions throughout the western U.S. (Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, Sonoran, Chihuahuan, and Mojave deserts). Results show that pre-disturbance cover of soil lichens is significantly correlated with the silt content of soils, and negatively correlated with sand and clay. While disturbance appeared to reduce NA at all sites, differences were statistically significant at only 12 of the 26 sites. Cool desert sites showed a greater decline than hot desert sites, which may indicate non-heterocystic cyanobacterial species are more susceptible to disturbance than non-heterocystic species. Sandy soils showed greater reduction of NA as sand content increased, while fine-textured soils showed a greater decline as sand content increased. At all sites, higher NA before the disturbance resulted in less impact to NA post-disturbance. These results may be useful in predicting the impacts of off-road vehicles in different regions and different soils. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Relationship between biomass production and nitrogen fixation under drought stress conditions in peanut genoytpes with different levels of drought resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between biomass production and N2 fixation under drought stress conditions in peanut genotypes with different levels of drought resistance is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of drought on biomass production and N2 fixation by evaluating t...

  17. Improved Creep Behavior of a High Nitrogen Nb-Stabilized 15Cr-15Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Strengthened by Multiple Nanoprecipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Vu The; Jung, Woo Sang; Suh, Jin Yoo

    2011-11-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are expected to be a major material for boiler tubes and steam turbines in future ultra-supercritical (USC) fossil power plants. It is of great interest to maximize the creep strength of the materials without increasing the cost. Precipitation strengthening was found to be the best and cheapest way for increasing the creep strength of such steels. This study is concerned with improving creep properties of a high nitrogen Nb-stabilized 15Cr-15Ni austenitic alloy through introducing a high number of nanosized particles into the austenitic matrix. The addition of around 4 wt pct Mn and 0.236 wt pct N into the 15Cr-15Ni-0.46Si-0.7Nb-1.25Mo-3Cu-Al-B-C matrix in combination with a special multicycled aging-quenching heat treatment resulted in the fine dispersion of abundant quantities of thermally stable (Nb,Cr,Fe)(C,N) precipitates with sizes of 10 to 20 nm. Apart from the carbonitrides, it was found that a high number of coherent copper precipitates with size 40 to 60 nm exist in the microstructure. Results of creep tests at 973 K and 1023 K (700 °C and 750 °C) showed that the creep properties of the investigated steel are superior compared to that of the commercial NF709 alloy. The improved creep properties are attributed to the improved morphology and thermal stability of the carbonitrides as well as to the presence of the coherent copper precipitates inside the austenitic matrix.

  18. Effectiveness of a community-based intervention to improve nutrition in young children in Senegal: a difference in difference analysis.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Harold; Ndiaye, Biram; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Ka, Abdoulaye; Rokx, Claudia; Dieng, Khadidiatou; Mulder-Sibanda, Menno

    2009-05-01

    There are few studies of community growth promotion as a means of addressing malnutrition that are based on longitudinal analysis of large-scale programmes with adequate controls to construct a counterfactual. The current study uses a difference in difference comparison of cohorts to assess the impact on the proportion of underweight children who lived in villages receiving services provided by the Senegal Nutrition Enhancement Project between 2004 and 2006. The project, designed to extend nutrition and growth promotion intervention into rural areas through non-governmental organisation service providers, significantly lowered the risk of a child having a weight more than 2 sd below international norms. The odds ratio of being underweight for children in programme villages after introduction of the intervention was 0.83 (95% CI 0.686, 1.000), after controlling for regional trends and village and household characteristics. Most measured aspects of health care and health seeking behaviour improved in the treatment relative to the control. PMID:18559130

  19. Evaluation of Different Yeast Species for Improving In vitro Fermentation of Cereal Straws.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuo; He, Zhixiong; Beauchemin, Karen A; Tang, Shaoxun; Zhou, Chuanshe; Han, Xuefeng; Wang, Min; Kang, Jinhe; Odongo, Nicholas E; Tan, Zhiliang

    2016-02-01

    Information on the effects of different yeast species on ruminal fermentation is limited. This experiment was conducted in a 3×4 factorial arrangement to explore and compare the effects of addition of three different live yeast species (Candida utilis 1314, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1355, and Candida tropicalis 1254) at four doses (0, 0.25×10(7), 0.50×10(7), and 0.75×10(7) colony-forming unit [cfu]) on in vitro gas production kinetics, fiber degradation, methane production and ruminal fermentation characteristics of maize stover, and rice straw by mixed rumen microorganisms in dairy cows. The maximum gas production (Vf), dry matter disappearance (IVDMD), neutral detergent fiber disappearance (IVNDFD), and methane production in C. utilis group were less (p<0.01) than other two live yeast supplemented groups. The inclusion of S. cerevisiae reduced (p<0.01) the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), isobutyrate, and isovalerate compared to the other two yeast groups. C. tropicalis addition generally enhanced (p<0.05) IVDMD and IVNDFD. The NH3-N concentration and CH4 production were increased (p<0.05) by the addition of S. cerevisiae and C. tropicalis compared with the control. Supplementation of three yeast species decreased (p<0.05) or numerically decreased the ratio of acetate to propionate. The current results indicate that C. tropicalis is more preferred as yeast culture supplements, and its optimal dose should be 0.25×10(7) cfu/500 mg substrates in vitro. PMID:26732448

  20. An improved finite-difference analysis of uncoupled vibrations of tapered cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure for determining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of tapered cantilever beams undergoing uncoupled vibrations is presented. Boundary conditions are derived in the form of simple recursive relations involving the second order central differences. Results obtained by using the conventional first order central differences and the present second order central differences are compared, and it is observed that the present second order scheme is more efficient than the conventional approach. An important advantage offered by the present approach is that the results converge to exact values rapidly, and thus the extrapolation of the results is not necessary. Consequently, the basic handicap with the classical finite difference method of solution that requires the Richardson's extrapolation procedure is eliminated. Furthermore, for the cases considered herein, the present approach produces consistent lower bound solutions.

  1. Integration of microbial fuel cell techniques into activated sludge wastewater treatment processes to improve nitrogen removal and reduce sludge production.

    PubMed

    Gajaraj, Shashikanth; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-12-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems are emerging for wastewater treatment, yet little is known about how well they can be integrated with current wastewater treatment processes. In this bench-scale study, the microbial fuel cell (MFC) technique was incorporated into the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) process (phase I) and later with the membrane bioreactor (MBR) process (phase II) to evaluate the performance of MFC assisted wastewater treatment systems (i.e., MLE-MFC and MBR-MFC). There was no significant difference in the effluent NH4(+)-N concentration between the systems integrating MFC and the open circuit controls. The average effluent COD concentration was significantly lower in the MLE-MFC, but it did not change much in the MBR-MFC because of the already low COD concentrations in MBR operation. The MLE-MFC and MBR-MFC systems increased the NO3(-)-N removal efficiencies by 31% (±12%) and 20% (±12%), respectively, and reduced sludge production by 11% and 6%, respectively, while generating an average voltage of 0.13 (±0.03) V in both systems. Analysis of the bacterial specific oxygen uptake rate, the sludge volume index, and ammonia-oxidizing bacterial population (dominated by Nitrosomonas through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis) indicated that there was no significant difference in sludge activity, settling property, and nitrifying community structure between the MFC assisted systems and the open circuit controls. The results suggest that the wastewater treatment systems could achieve higher effluent water quality and lower sludge production if it is integrated well with MFC techniques. PMID:25014565

  2. Simultaneous detection of fluquinconazole and flusilazole in lettuce using gas chromatography with a nitrogen phosphorus detector: decline patterns at two different locations.

    PubMed

    Im, So Jeong; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Sung-Woo; Kabir, Humayun; Farha, Waziha; Lieu, Truong; Lee, Young-Jun; Jung, Da-I; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Shin, Ho-Chul; Im, Geon-Jae; Hong, Su-Myeong; Shim, Jae-Han

    2016-06-01

    Method validations in addition to decline patterns of fluquinconazole and flusilazole in lettuce grown under greenhouse conditions at two different locations were investigated. Following the application of fluquinconazole and flusilazole at a dose rate of 20 mL/20 L water, lettuce samples were collected randomly for up to 7 days post-application, and simultaneously extracted with acetone, purified through solid-phase extraction, analyzed via gas chromatography with a nitrogen phosphorus detector, and confirmed through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linearity was excellent, with determination coefficients (R(2) ) between 0.9999 and 1.0. The method was validated in triplicate at two different spiking levels (0.2 and 1.0 mg/kg) with satisfactory recoveries between 75.7 and 97.9% and relative standard deviations of <9. The limit of quantification was 0.01 mg/kg. Both analytes declined very quickly, as can be seen from the short half-life time of <4 days. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between residues at different days of sampling, except at 7 days post-application (triple application). At that point, the decline patterns of fluquinconazole and flusilazole were independent of application rate, location, temperature and humidity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26480018

  3. Improving Composite Resin Performance Through Decreasing its Viscosity by Different Methods

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Said

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to present the different current methods of decreasing viscosity of resin composite materials such as (using flowable composites, lowering the viscosity of the monomer mixture, heating composites and applying sonic vibration) and furnish dentists with a basis that can provide criteria for choosing one or another to suit their therapeutic requirements. The four discussed methods proved that lowering composite viscosity improves its handling and facilitates its application to cavities with complicated forms, decreasing time for procedure and improving marginal adaptation. Other properties improved by decreasing composite resin viscosity were controversial between the four methods and affected by other factors such as composite brand and light cure unit. PMID:26312094

  4. Improved Miscible Nitrogen Flood Performance Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Laterals in a Class I Reservoir--East Binger (Marchand) Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Sinner

    2006-05-18

    A significant work program was implemented from 2002 to 2005 in the East Binger Unit (''EBU'') miscible nitrogen injection project in an effort to reduce gas cycling and economically increase ultimate oil recovery. This work included the drilling of new wells, both horizontal and vertical, as well as pattern realignment through producer-to-injector conversions. Monitoring of overall performance of the pilot area continues. Response to the various projects continues to be very favorable. Injection into the pilot area, despite being limited at times by problems in the Air Separation Unit of the Nitrogen Management Facility, has increased an average of 60% over levels prior to the project. Meanwhile, gas production and nitrogen content of produced gas have both decreased. After decreasing to 20-25% early in the project, nitrogen recycle (produced nitrogen volume divided by injected nitrogen volume) within the pilot area has risen to about 40%, still far below the 72% prior to initiation of the project. Poor areal sweep efficiency appears to be the primary cause of nitrogen cycling. Seven vertical and three horizontal wells have been drilled in the pilot area throughout the project, and most have had initial produced gas oil ratios and gas nitrogen contents significantly below the field averages. Given similar reservoir conditions of net thickness and gas sweep, vertical wells are performing nearly as well as horizontal wells. Additional vertical well drilling was completed in 2005 following the success of wells drilled from 2002 through 2004.

  5. Investigation of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) cultivar differences on nitrogen balance and fecal egg count in artificially infected lambs.

    PubMed

    Azuhnwi, B N; Hertzberg, H; Arrigo, Y; Gutzwiller, A; Hess, H D; Mueller-Harvey, I; Torgerson, P R; Kreuzer, M; Dohme-Meier, F

    2013-05-01

    Research in ruminant nutrition and helminth control with forages, which contain condensed tannins (CT), suggests that varying responses may depend not only on CT concentration but also on CT composition. An experiment was designed to test this by feeding 2 dried sainfoin cultivars (Visnovsky and Perly), which differed in CT properties, to lambs that were artificially infected with the abomasal blood-sucking nematode Haemonchus contortus. Twenty-four infected lambs received 1 of these 2 cultivars; the feeds were either untreated or treated with the CT-binding polyethylene glycol over 4 wk (n = 6). The 2 cultivars were also fed to 2 × 6 uninfected lambs. Nutrient digestibility, N balance, ADG, plasma urea, together with indicators of infection [fecal egg count (FEC), abomasal worm count, per capita female fecundity, erythrocytic indices, and serum protein], were determined. The specific effects of sainfoin cultivar, CT, and infection were evaluated by contrast analysis. Digestibility of both NDF and ADF were less (P < 0.001) with Perly compared with Visnovsky. The apparent nutrient digestibility was reduced (P < 0.001) by CT. However, no clear cultivar effects were evident on N excretion and retention. Condensed tannins reduced (P = 0.05) body N retention and shifted (P < 0.001) N excretion from urine to feces. Unlike cultivar and CT, infection decreased (P = 0.002) ADG. Plasma urea concentration was decreased (P = 0.007) in Perly- compared with Visnovsky-fed lambs and was decreased (P < 0.001) by CT. Plasma concentrations of essential and semiessential AA were increased (P < 0.001) by CT. The groups of infected lambs did not clearly differ in abomasal worm counts and erythrocytic indicators. In the last 2 to 3 wk of the experiment, FEC was decreased (P ≤ 0.01) when feeding CT. The lack of substantial cultivar effects suggests that the differences in CT properties may have been too small to result in nutritional and anthelmintic effects. The present results

  6. N-fertilization has different effects on the growth, carbon and nitrogen physiology, and wood properties of slow- and fast-growing Populus species

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how N-fertilization affects the growth, carbon and nitrogen (N) physiology, and wood properties of poplars with contrasting growth characteristics, slow-growing (Populus popularis, Pp) and fast-growing (P. alba×P. glandulosa, Pg) poplar saplings were exposed to different N levels. Above-ground biomass, leaf area, photosynthetic rates (A), instantaneous photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE i), chlorophyll and foliar sugar concentrations were higher in Pg than in Pp. Foliar nitrate reductase (NR) activities and root glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities were higher in Pg than in Pp as were the N amount and NUE of new shoots. Lignin contents and calorific values of Pg wood were less than that of Pp wood. N-fertilization reduced root biomass of Pg more than of Pp, but increased leaf biomass, leaf area, A, and PNUEi of Pg more than of Pp. Among 13 genes involved in the transport of ammonium or nitrate or in N assimilation, transcripts showed more pronounced changes to N-fertilization in Pg than in Pp. Increases in NR activities and N contents due to N-fertilization were larger in Pg than in Pp. In both species, N-fertilization resulted in lower calorific values as well as shorter and wider vessel elements/fibres. These results suggest that growth, carbon and N physiology, and wood properties are more sensitive to increasing N availability in fast-growing poplars than in slow-growing ones, which is probably due to prioritized resource allocation to the leaves and accelerated N physiological processes in fast-growing poplars under higher N levels. PMID:23028021

  7. Improved nitrogen removal in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors by incorporation of Anammox bacteria into the granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J E; Batstone, D J; Angelidaki, I

    2004-01-01

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors may offer a number of advantages over conventional mixed-tank, SBR, and biofilm reactors, including high space-loading, low footprint, and resistance to shocks and toxins. In this study, we assessed the use of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor technology as applied to anaerobic ammonia removal, or Anammox. Four 200 ml UASB reactors were inoculated with 50% (by volume) anaerobic granular sludge and 50% flocular sludge from different sources (all with the potential for containing Anammox organisms). Tools used to assess the reactors included basic analyses, fluorescent in-situ hybridisation, and mathematical modelling, with statistical non-linear parameter estimation. Two of the reactors showed statistically identical Anammox activity (i.e., identical kinetic parameters), with good ammonia and nitrite removal (0.14 kgNHx m(-3) reactor day(-1), with 99% ammonia removal). The third reactor also demonstrated significant Anammox activity, but with poor identifiability of parameters. The fourth reactor had no statistical Anammox activity. Modelling indicated that poor identifiability and performance in the third and fourth reactors were related to an excess of reduced carbon, probably originating in the inoculum. Accumulation of Anammox organisms was confirmed both by a volume loading much lower than the growth rate, and response to a probe specific for organisms previously reported to mediate Anammox processes. Overall, the UASB reactors were effective as Anammox systems, and identifiability of the systems was good, and repeatable (even compared to a previous study in a rotating biological contactor). This indicates that operation, design, and analysis of Anammox UASB reactors specifically, and Anammox systems in general, are reliable and portable, and that UASB systems are an appropriate technology for this process. PMID:15303725

  8. Evaluation of the use of moss transplants (Pseudoscleropodium purum) for biomonitoring different forms of air pollutant nitrogen compounds.

    PubMed

    Varela, Z; García-Seoane, R; Arróniz-Crespo, M; Carballeira, A; Fernández, J A; Aboal, J R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated whether three different types of moss transplants (devitalized moss bags with and without cover and auto-irrigated moss transplants) are suitable for use as biomonitors of the deposition of oxidised and/or reduced forms of N. For this purpose, we determined whether the concentration of atmospheric NO2 was related to the % N, δ(15)N and the activity of the enzyme biomarkers phosphomonoesterase (PME) and nitrate reductase (NR) in the tissues of moss transplants. We exposed the transplants in 5 different environments of Galicia (NW Spain) and Cataluña (NE Spain): industrial environments, urban and periurban environments, the surroundings of a cattle farm and in a monitoring site included in the sampling network of the European Monitoring Programme. The results showed that the moss in the auto-irrigated transplants was able of incorporating the N in its tissues because it was metabolically active, whereas in devitalized moss bags transplants, moss simply intercepts physically the N compounds that reached it in particulate or gaseous form. In addition, this devitalization could limit the capacity of moss to capture gaseous compounds (i.e. reduced N) and to reduce the oxidised compounds that reach the specimens. These findings indicate that devitalized moss transplants cannot be used to monitor either oxidised or reduced N compounds, whereas transplants of metabolically active moss can be used for this purpose. Finally, the NR and PME biomarkers should be used with caution because of the high variability in their activities and the limits of quantification should be evaluated in each case. PMID:27038571

  9. Nitrogen cycle in microbial mats: completely unknown?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coban, O.; Bebout, B.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are thought to have originated around 3.7 billion years ago, most likely in the areas around submarine hydrothermal vents, which supplied a source of energy in the form of reduced chemical species from the Earth's interior. Active hydrothermal vents are also believed to exist on Jupiter's moon Europa, Saturn's moon Enceladus, and on Mars, earlier in that planet's history. Microbial mats have been an important force in the maintenance of Earth's ecosystems and the first photosynthesis was also originated there. Microbial mats are believed to exhibit most, if not all, biogeochemical processes that exist in aquatic ecosystems, due to the presence of different physiological groups of microorganisms therein. While most microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations have been shown to occur within microbial mats, the nitrogen cycle in the microbial mats has received very little study in spite of the fact that nitrogen usually limits growth in marine environments. We will present the first results in the determination of a complete nitrogen budget for a photosynthetic microbial mat. Both in situ sources and sinks of nitrogen in photosynthetic microbial mats are being measured using stable isotope techniques. Our work has a particular focus on recently described, but poorly understood, processes, e.g., anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and an emphasis on understanding the role that nitrogen cycling may play in generating biogenic nitrogen isotopic signatures and biomarker molecules. Measurements of environmental controls on nitrogen cycling should offer insight into the nature of co-evolution of these microbial communities and their planets of origin. Identifying the spatial (microscale) as well as temporal (diel and seasonal) distribution of nitrogen transformations, e.g., rates of nitrification and denitrification, within mats, particularly with respect to the distribution of photosynthetically-produced oxygen, is anticipated. The results

  10. Environmentally friendly slow-release nitrogen fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Ni, Boli; Liu, Mingzhu; Lü, Shaoyu; Xie, Lihua; Wang, Yanfang

    2011-09-28

    To sustain the further world population, more fertilizers are required, which may become an environmental hazard, unless adequate technical and socioeconomic impacts are addressed. In the current study, slow-release formulations of nitrogen fertilizer were developed on the basis of natural attapulgite (APT) clay, ethylcellulose (EC) film, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose/hydroxyethylcellulose (CMC/HEC) hydrogel. The structural and chemical characteristics of the product were examined. The release profiles of urea, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium chloride as nitrogen fertilizer substrates were determined in soil. To further compare the release profiles of nitrogen from different fertilizer substrates, a mathematical model for nutrient release from the coated fertilizer was applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient D. The influence of the product on water-holding and water-retention capacities of soil was determined. The experimental data indicated that the product can effectively reduce nutrient loss, improve use efficiency of water, and prolong irrigation cycles in drought-prone environments. PMID:21848295

  11. Improved cycling stability of lithium-sulfur batteries using a polypropylene-supported nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon hybrid separator as polysulfide adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balach, Juan; Jaumann, Tony; Klose, Markus; Oswald, Steffen; Eckert, Jürgen; Giebeler, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The lithium/sulfur couple is garnering tremendous interest as the next-generation of cost-efficient rechargeable battery systems capable to fulfill emerging energy storage demands. However, the viable commercialization of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries is still an obstacle by fast capacity fading and poor cycling stability mostly caused by the polysulfide shuttle and active sulfur material loss. In this contribution, we show that the surface modification of the commercial polypropylene separator with a nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon enhances the interfacial interaction between the N-dopants on carbon-coating and the sulfur-related species by coupling interactions. These unique physical and interfacial chemical properties of the N-doped mesoporous carbon-coating promote the chemical adsorption and confinement of lithium (poly)sulfide intermediates in the cathode side, improving the active material utilization and hence the overall electrochemical performance of Li-S batteries: high initial discharge capacity of 1364 mAh g-1 at 0.2C and notable cycling stability with high reversible capacity of 566 mAh g-1 and negligible degradation rate of 0.037% after 1200 cycles at 0.5C. Furthermore, despite the use of a simple-mixed sulfur-carbon black cathode with high-sulfur loading of 3.95 mg cm-2, the cell with a hybrid separator delivers a high areal capacity of ˜3 mAh cm-2.

  12. An interdisciplinary research strategy to improve symbiotic nitrogen fixation and yield of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in salinised areas of the Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Drevon, J J; Abdelly, C; Amarger, N; Aouani, E A; Aurag, J; Gherbi, H; Jebara, M; Lluch, C; Payre, H; Schump, O; Soussi, M; Sifi, B; Trabelsi, M

    2001-10-01

    The main findings of a cooperative research group of agronomists, plant breeders, microbiologists, physiologists and molecularists to improve the symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) and N2-dependent yield of common bean under moderate salinity in the Mediterranean basin are summarised. Agronomic surveys in reference production areas show large spatial and temporal variations in plant nodulation and growth, and in efficiency of utilisation of the rhizobial symbiosis. The latter was associated with a large rhizobial diversity, including new bean nodulating species. Macrosymbiont diversity in SNF and adaptation to NaCl was found. However, contrasts between plant genotypes could be altered by specific interactions with some native rhizobia. Therefore, variations in soil rhizobial population, in addition to agronomic practices and environmental constraints, may have contributed to erratic results observed in field inoculations. At the mechanistic level, nodule C and N metabolisms, and abcissic acid content, were related to SNF potential and tolerance to NaCl. Their relation with nodule conductance to O2 diffusion was addressed by in situ hybridisation of candidate carbonic anhydrase and aquaporin genes in nodule cortex. The limits and prospects of the cooperative strategy are discussed. PMID:11566396

  13. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.

  14. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in themore » earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.« less

  15. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Umesh P; Ayre, Brian G; Bush, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models. PMID:25954297

  16. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models. PMID:25954297

  17. Implementation of Sustainable Soil Management Practices to Improve Crop Production in the Different Ethiopian Agro Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Moreno, R.; Gameda, S.; Diaz Alvarez, M. C.; Selasie, Y. G.

    2012-04-01

    Agriculture in Ethiopia is one of first priority since close to 10 In this context, the Ethiopian crop production faces to the following soil management challenges: lack of updated soil data, macro and micro nutrient depletion, acidity, salinity and soil surface erosion and crusting. One of the biggest issues is the loss of arable land, above 137 T/yr, reaching during some particularly dried periods until 300 T/yr. In this context, the authors constituted a working group of experts from Spanish and Ethiopian universities, local producers and international and governmental organisms to analyse the problems related to the different agro ecological zones found in Ethiopia and the management practices of different local producers. The study produced the trends to implement in the different areas to improve soil management practices in order to contribute to increase the crop production mainly to achieve food security problems. The analyse produced different working fields for the next years for addressing soil degradation, improving land resources management practices, increasing agricultural productivity, updating the available soil data, developing an international program of education, transferring of knowledge from similar study cases and implementing economical tools to help producers to assure income after severe edapho-climatic events. The practical work and the projects developed for the next period is addressed to smallholder farms belonging to the different 34 agro ecological zones identified in Ethiopia, each of them with very specific environmental, cultural and soil management practices.

  18. Improving sub-grid scale accuracy of boundary features in regional finite-difference models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative to grid refinement, the concept of a ghost node, which was developed for nested grid applications, has been extended towards improving sub-grid scale accuracy of flow to conduits, wells, rivers or other boundary features that interact with a finite-difference groundwater flow model. The formulation is presented for correcting the regular finite-difference groundwater flow equations for confined and unconfined cases, with or without Newton Raphson linearization of the nonlinearities, to include the Ghost Node Correction (GNC) for location displacement. The correction may be applied on the right-hand side vector for a symmetric finite-difference Picard implementation, or on the left-hand side matrix for an implicit but asymmetric implementation. The finite-difference matrix connectivity structure may be maintained for an implicit implementation by only selecting contributing nodes that are a part of the finite-difference connectivity. Proof of concept example problems are provided to demonstrate the improved accuracy that may be achieved through sub-grid scale corrections using the GNC schemes.

  19. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse

    PubMed Central

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J.; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R. W.; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A. S.; Bleyenberg, Tanja E.; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Visser, Petra M.

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs. PMID:27353576

  20. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J.; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R. W.; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A. S.; Bleyenberg, Tanja E.; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Visser, Petra M.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs.

  1. Nitrogen and phosphorus uptake rates of different species from a coral reef community after a nutrient pulse.

    PubMed

    den Haan, Joost; Huisman, Jef; Brocke, Hannah J; Goehlich, Henry; Latijnhouwers, Kelly R W; van Heeringen, Seth; Honcoop, Saskia A S; Bleyenberg, Tanja E; Schouten, Stefan; Cerli, Chiara; Hoitinga, Leo; Vermeij, Mark J A; Visser, Petra M

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island of Curaçao (Southern Caribbean). To understand how benthic reef organisms make use of such nutrient pulses, we determined ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake rates for one abundant coral species, turf algae, six macroalgal and two benthic cyanobacterial species in a series of laboratory experiments. Nutrient uptake rates differed among benthic functional groups. The filamentous macroalga Cladophora spp., turf algae and the benthic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula had the highest uptake rates per unit biomass, whereas the coral Madracis mirabilis had the lowest. Combining nutrient uptake rates with the standing biomass of each functional group on the reef, we estimated that the ammonium and phosphate delivered during runoff events is mostly taken up by turf algae and the two macroalgae Lobophora variegata and Dictyota pulchella. Our results support the often proposed, but rarely tested, assumption that turf algae and opportunistic macroalgae primarily benefit from episodic inputs of nutrients to coral reefs. PMID:27353576

  2. Ectomycorrhizal Communities on the Roots of Two Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Populations from Contrasting Climates Differ in Nitrogen Acquisition in a Common Environment.

    PubMed

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Bilela, Silvija; Meier, Rudolf; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Schloter, Michael; Polle, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica), a dominant forest species in Central Europe, competes for nitrogen with soil microbes and suffers from N limitation under dry conditions. We hypothesized that ectomycorrhizal communities and the free-living rhizosphere microbes from beech trees from sites with two contrasting climatic conditions exhibit differences in N acquisition that contribute to differences in host N uptake and are related to differences in host belowground carbon allocation. To test these hypotheses, young trees from the natural regeneration of two genetically similar populations, one from dryer conditions (located in an area with a southwest exposure [SW trees]) and the other from a cooler, moist climate (located in an area with a northeast exposure [NE trees]), were transplanted into a homogeneous substrate in the same environment and labeled with (13)CO2 and (15)NH4 (+). Free-living rhizosphere microbes were characterized by marker genes for the N cycle, but no differences between the rhizospheres of SW or NE trees were found. Lower (15)N enrichment was found in the ectomycorrhizal communities of the NE tree communities than the SW tree communities, whereas no significant differences in (15)N enrichment were observed for nonmycorrhizal root tips of SW and NE trees. Neither the ectomycorrhizal communities nor the nonmycorrhizal root tips originating from NE and SW trees showed differences in (13)C signatures. Because the level of (15)N accumulation in fine roots and the amount transferred to leaves were lower in NE trees than SW trees, our data support the suggestion that the ectomycorrhizal community influences N transfer to its host and demonstrate that the fungal community from the dry condition was more efficient in N acquisition when environmental constraints were relieved. These findings highlight the importance of adapted ectomycorrhizal communities for forest nutrition in a changing climate. PMID:26092464

  3. Ectomycorrhizal Communities on the Roots of Two Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Populations from Contrasting Climates Differ in Nitrogen Acquisition in a Common Environment

    PubMed Central

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Bilela, Silvija; Meier, Rudolf; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Schloter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica), a dominant forest species in Central Europe, competes for nitrogen with soil microbes and suffers from N limitation under dry conditions. We hypothesized that ectomycorrhizal communities and the free-living rhizosphere microbes from beech trees from sites with two contrasting climatic conditions exhibit differences in N acquisition that contribute to differences in host N uptake and are related to differences in host belowground carbon allocation. To test these hypotheses, young trees from the natural regeneration of two genetically similar populations, one from dryer conditions (located in an area with a southwest exposure [SW trees]) and the other from a cooler, moist climate (located in an area with a northeast exposure [NE trees]), were transplanted into a homogeneous substrate in the same environment and labeled with 13CO2 and 15NH4+. Free-living rhizosphere microbes were characterized by marker genes for the N cycle, but no differences between the rhizospheres of SW or NE trees were found. Lower 15N enrichment was found in the ectomycorrhizal communities of the NE tree communities than the SW tree communities, whereas no significant differences in 15N enrichment were observed for nonmycorrhizal root tips of SW and NE trees. Neither the ectomycorrhizal communities nor the nonmycorrhizal root tips originating from NE and SW trees showed differences in 13C signatures. Because the level of 15N accumulation in fine roots and the amount transferred to leaves were lower in NE trees than SW trees, our data support the suggestion that the ectomycorrhizal community influences N transfer to its host and demonstrate that the fungal community from the dry condition was more efficient in N acquisition when environmental constraints were relieved. These findings highlight the importance of adapted ectomycorrhizal communities for forest nutrition in a changing climate. PMID:26092464

  4. Abscisic acid and aldehyde oxidase activity in maize ear leaf and grain relative to post-flowering photosynthetic capacity and grain-filling rate under different water/nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shujun; Zhang, Zongzheng; Ning, Tangyuan; Ren, Shizhong; Su, Licheng; Li, Zengjia

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated changes in leaf abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations and grain ABA concentrations in two maize cultivars and analyzed the following relationships under different water/nitrogen treatments: leaf ABA concentrations and photosynthetic parameters; leaf ABA concentrations and grain ABA concentrations; leaf/grain ABA concentrations and grain-filling parameters; and aldehyde oxidase (AO, EC 1.2.3.1) activities and ABA concentrations. The ear leaf average AO activities and ABA concentrations were lower in the controlled release urea treatments compared with the conventional urea treatments. The average AO activities in the grains were higher in the controlled release urea treatments, and the ABA concentrations were significantly increased at 11-30 DAF. The Pn and ABA concentrations in ear leaves were negatively correlated. And the Gmean were positively correlated with the grain ABA concentrations at 11-30 DAF and negatively correlated with the leaf ABA concentrations at 20 and 40-50 DAF. The grain ABA concentrations and leaf ABA concentrations were positively correlated. Thus, the Gmean were closely related to the AO activities and to the ear leaf and grain ABA concentrations. As compared to other treatments, the subsoiling and controlled release urea treatment promoted the uptake of water and nitrogen by maize, increased the photosynthetic capacity of the ear leaves, increased the grain-filling rate, and improved the movement of photosynthetic assimilates toward the developing grains. In the cultivar Z958, higher ABA concentrations in grains at 11-30 DAF and lower ABA concentrations in ear leaves during the late grain-filling stage, resulted in higher grain-filling rate and increased accumulation of photosynthetic products (relative to the cultivar D3). PMID:23770596

  5. Improving spatial localization in MEG inverse imaging by leveraging intersubject anatomical differences

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric; Maddox, Ross K.; Lee, Adrian K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques enable non-invasive observation of ongoing neural processing, with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in particular providing direct measurement of neural activity with millisecond time resolution. However, accurately mapping measured MEG sensor readings onto the underlying source neural structures remains an active area of research. This so-called “inverse problem” is ill posed, and poses a challenge for source estimation that is often cited as a drawback limiting MEG data interpretation. However, anatomically constrained MEG localization estimates may be more accurate than commonly believed. Here we hypothesize that, by combining anatomically constrained inverse estimates across subjects, the spatial uncertainty of MEG source localization can be mitigated. Specifically, we argue that differences in subject brain geometry yield differences in point-spread functions, resulting in improved spatial localization across subjects. To test this, we use standard methods to combine subject anatomical MRI scans with coregistration information to obtain an accurate forward (physical) solution, modeling the MEG sensor data resulting from brain activity originating from different cortical locations. Using a linear minimum-norm inverse to localize this brain activity, we demonstrate that a substantial increase in the spatial accuracy of MEG source localization can result from combining data from subjects with differing brain geometry. This improvement may be enabled by an increase in the amount of available spatial information in MEG data as measurements from different subjects are combined. This approach becomes more important in the face of practical issues of coregistration errors and potential noise sources, where we observe even larger improvements in localization when combining data across subjects. Finally, we use a simple auditory N100(m) localization task to show how this effect can influence localization using a recorded neural dataset

  6. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use. PMID:25471320

  7. Patient and clinician's ratings of improvement in methadone-maintained patients: Differing perspectives?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the last few years there seems to be an emerging interest for including the patients' perspective in assessing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), with treatment satisfaction surveys being the most commonly-used method of incorporating this point of view. The present study considers the perspective of patients on MMT when assessing the outcomes of this treatment, acknowledging the validity of this approach as an indicator. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the concordance between improvement assessment performed by two members of the clinical staff (a psychiatrist and a nurse) and assessment carried out by MMT patients themselves. Method Patients (n = 110) and their respective psychiatrist (n = 5) and nurse (n = 1) completed a scale for assessing how the patient's condition had changed from the beginning of MMT, using the Patient Global Impression of Improvement scale (PGI-I) and the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement scale (CGI-I), respectively. Results The global improvement assessed by patients showed weak concordance with the assessments made by nurses (Quadratic-weighted kappa = 0.13, p > 0.05) and by psychiatrists (Quadratic-weighted kappa = 0.19, p = 0.0086), although in the latter, concordance was statistically significant. The percentage of improved patients was significantly higher in the case of the assessments made by patients, compared with those made by nurses (90.9% vs. 80%, Z-statistic = 2.10, p = 0.0354) and by psychiatrists (90.9% vs. 50%, Z-statistic = 6.48, p < 0.0001). Conclusions MMT patients' perception of improvement shows low concordance with the clinical staff's perspective. Assessment of MMT effectiveness should also focus on patient's evaluation of the outcomes or changes achieved, thus including indicators based on the patient's experiences, provided that MMT aim is to be more patient centred and to cover different needs of patients themselves. PMID:21871064

  8. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen pools and surface flux under different brackish marsh vegetation types, common reed (Phragmites australis) and salt hay (Spartina patens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windham-Myers, L.

    2005-01-01

    The current expansion of Phragmites australis into the high marsh shortgrass (Spartina patens, Distichlis spicata) communities of eastern U.S. salt marshes provided an opportunity to identify the influence of vegetation types on pools and fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). Two brackish tidal marshes of the National Estuarine Research Reserve system were examined, Piermont Marsh of the Hudson River NERR in New York and Hog Island in the Jacques Coustaeu NERR of New Jersey. Pools of DIN in porewater and rates of DIN surface flux were compared in replicated pairs of recently-expanded P. australis and neighboring S. patens-dominated patches on the high marsh surface. Both marshes generally imported nitrate (NO3-) and exported ammonium (NH4+), such that overall DIN was exported. No differences in surface exchange of NO3- or NH4+ were observed between vegetation types. Depth-averaged porewater NH4+ concentrations over the entire growing season were 56% lower under P. australis than under S. patens (average 1.4 vs. 3.2 mg NH4+ L-1) with the most profound differences in November. Porewater profiles showed an accumulation of NH4+ at depth in S. patens and constant low concentrations in P. australis from the soil surface to 50 cm depth, with no significant differences in porewater salinity. Despite these profound differences in porewater, NH 4+ diffusion from soils of P. australis and S. patens were not measurably different, were similar to other published rates, and were well below estimated rates based on passive diffusion alone. Rapid adsorption and uptake by litter and microbes in surface soils of both communities may buffer NH4+ loss to flooding tides in both communities, thereby reducing the impact of P. australis invasion on NH4+ flux to flooding waters. ?? Springer 2005.

  9. Differences in somatosensory and motor improvement during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sens, Elisabeth; Knorr, Christin; Preul, Christoph; Meissner, Winfried; Witte, Otto W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Temporary functional deafferentation is of interest to become an additional tool in neurorehabilitative treatments. Temporary functional deafferentation is known to improve sensory and motor outcomes in chronic stroke patients and healthy subjects. The present study soughts to indicate differences in the efficiency of pharmacologically induced temporary functional deafferentation between chronic stroke patients and matched healthy subjects. 46 chronic stroke patients and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were deafferented on one forearm by an anesthetic cream. Somatosensory performance was assessed using von-Frey Hair testing and Grating orientation task; motor performance was assessed by means of a shape-sorter-drum task. Grating orientation task and shape-sorter-drum task were significantly improved during temporary functional deafferentation in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Von-Frey Hair testing revealed no improvement of absolute tactile thresholds during temporary functional deafferentation in both groups. Furthermore, the stroke patients showed deficits at baseline measurement in all assessments except the von-Frey Hair test. Temporary functional deafferentation of a forearm by an anesthetic cream results in improvements of motor performance and somatosensory discrimination in stroke patients but not in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is reasonable to test in a next step whether temporary functional deafferentation might become an additional tool in motor rehabilitation of post stroke patients. PMID:23735321

  10. [Study on nitrogen cycling and transformations in a duckweed pond by means of modeling analysis].

    PubMed

    Peng, Jian-feng; Song, Yong-hui; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Bao-zhen

    2006-10-01

    Based on the simulated results from N cycling and transformation model of duckweed pond, the influences of different major transfer pathways on various nitrogen removal performances are investigated. The effects of seasonal variations of water conditions on nitrogen transformations are determined. The simulated results show that nitrification and denitrification were the major removal pathways for nitrogen in duckweed pond, and the removal contributions of organic nitrogen sedimentation and ammonia volatilization for total nitrogen removal were less than 2.1%. Furthermore, in duckweed pond, nitrification and denitrification decided the removal efficiencies of ammonia and NOx., respectively; both algae decaying and organic nitrogen ammonification controlled primarily the organic nitrogen removal performances; both organic nitrogen sedimentation and mineralization of sedimentary nitrogen determined the variations of sedimentary nitrogen. Duckweed pond with duckweed growing largely can increase sharply algae mortality and keep the low content of algae in effluent. Besides, through accelerating the nitrification and denitrification rate, duckweed can evidently improve the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen. PMID:17256592

  11. The influence of nitrogen and antimony on the optical quality of InNAs(Sb) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latkowska, M.; Baranowski, M.; Linhart, W. M.; Janiaka, F.; Misiewicz, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Zhuang, Q.; Krier, A.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present detailed studies of the influence of nitrogen and antimony on the optical quality of InNAs(Sb) alloys. We employed photoluminescence, photoreflectance and positron annihilation spectroscopy to reveal the role of antimony and nitrogen on the improvement/degradation of the optical qualities of InNAs(Sb) alloys. A series of 1 μm-thick InNAs(Sb) layers with different nitrogen and antimony concentrations were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results of these investigations show that Sb atoms serve as a surfactant which effectively improves the optical quality of InNAsSb alloys. The influence of nitrogen on the optical quality however is not the same as to what has been reported for other dilute nitrides. We observed an improvement of the optical quality for some nitrogen contents. These issues are comprehensively examined and explained.

  12. Distribution of atmospheric reactive nitrogen at two sites of different socio- economic characteristics in IndoGangetic Plain(IGP) region, India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Sharma, A.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2015-12-01

    In India, most of the human population lives in rural areas. People depends on agriculture products to meet the demand of food supply. In order to get higher yield of agriculture and food product, increased practice of fertilizer application has added extra burden of nutrients especially, the reactive nitrogen (Nr) species viz NH3 and NOx. Growing energy demands has resulted in increased emissions of NOx from coal combustion in thermal power plant and the petroleum combustion in transport sector. In addition, biomass burning in traditional cooking and heating has become significant source of NH3 and NOx in Indian region. Significance of the study lies in the fact that increasing Nr emissions have adverse impact on human health, plant, soil and water bodies directly and to see the effect, knowledge of emission and deposition for Nr at different sites. Hence, the selection of the sites for present study was done very carefully. Delhi city and Mai village were selected to represent typical characteristics of high and low socioeconomic region respectively. Delhi is the capital of India, known for higher income group urban cluster where rural site having agricultural dominance has its importance in Indian scenario because still in India our primary source of income is agriculture. Atmospheric abundance of two major gaseous inorganic (Nr) species i.e NH3 and NO2 has been measured for one year, on monthly basis. Average concentrations of NH3 at urban and rural site have been recorded as 40.4 ±16.8 and 51.57 ±22.8 μg/m3 respectively. The average concentrations of NO2 have been recorded as 24.4 ±13.5 and 18.8 ± 12.6 μg/m3 at urban & rural site respectively. Study, also presents seasonal and diurnal variations of gaseous reactive nitrogen species at urban & rural sites to observe the contribution of different the sources of atmospheric Nr. Dynamics of Nr at both sites will be discussed in details at the conference.

  13. Characterization of the growth, chlorophyll content and lipid accumulation in a marine microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta under different nitrogen to phosphorus ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Donghui; Xi, Bo; Sun, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Microalgal lipids are regarded as main future feedstock of biofuels for its higher efficiency of accumulation and sustainable production. In order to investigate the effect of various nitrogen to phosphorus ratios on cells growth, chlorophyll content and accumulation of lipids in Dunaliella tertiolecta, experiments were carried out in modified microalgal medium with inorganic nitrogen (nitrate-nitrogen) or organic nitrogen (urea-nitrogen) as the sole nitrogen source at initial N:P ratios ranging from 1:1 to 32:1. The favorable N:P of 16:1 in the nitrate-N or urea-N medium yielded the maximum cell density and specific growth rate. Decrease in chlorophyll content were observed at the N:P of 4:1 in both nitrate-N and urea-N cultures. It was also observed that the maximum lipids concentration was obtained at the N:P of 4:1 in both nitrate and urea nutrient medium. The lipid productivity and lipid content of cultures in the urea-N medium at the N:P of 4:1were markedly higher than those from cultures with other N:P ratios ( p < 0.05). The results of this work illustrate the possibility that higher ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus have enhancing effect on cells growth of D. tertiolecta. Conversely, higher lipid accumulation is associated with a decrease in chlorophyll content under lower ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus. The results confirm the hypothesis of this study that a larger metabolic flux has been channeled to lipid accumulation in D. tertiolecta cells when the ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus drop below a critical level.

  14. IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Sinner

    2002-03-26

    The objective of this project is two-fold. It will demonstrate use of nitrogen as a widely available, cost-effective and environmentally superior injectant for miscible floods. It will also demonstrate the effectiveness of horizontal wellbores in reducing gas breakthrough and cycling. It is expected that the demonstration will lead to implementation of nitrogen injection projects in areas without readily available carbon dioxide sources. Technology transfer will occur throughout the project.

  15. Switching circuit to improve the frequency modulation difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, N. K.; Dean, P.; Khanna, S. P.; Salih, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.

    2015-04-24

    We demonstrate new switching circuit for difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) imaging by amplitude modulation and lock in detection. The switching circuit is designed to improve the frequency modulation so that it can stably lock the amplitude modulation of the QCL and the detector output. The combination of a voltage divider and a buffer in switching circuit to quickly switch the amplitude of the QCL biases of 15.8 V and 17.2 V is successfully to increase the frequency modulation up to ∼100 Hz.

  16. Nitrogen Uptake in Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J.; VanBenthem, P.

    2013-12-01

    A plant's absorption of nitrogen can be encouraged by a variety of environmental factors, especially the application of fertilizers. As a common limiting factor in plant growth, not up taking enough nitrogen can be a result of an unhealthy plant. Moreover, as farmers seek out methods to increase growth of plants, fertilizers are used as a solution to the issue of nitrogen deficiency to incorporate additional nitrogen from chemical or organic sources, by not using the right fertilizer can greatly affect the plats. The point of this research project is to determine the effect of various fertilizers on the plant growth, and to correlate the measured nitrogen, water and chlorophyll content in spinach leaves. Spinach leaves were used because they are known to quickly uptake chemicals in the environment. The spinach plants were exposed to four different growing parameters, which are referred to as control, ammonium nitrate, MiracleGro , and organic. The spinach was originally placed in nitrogen deficient soil with only 2.2x10 4 weight percent (wt. %) nitrogen. The leaves in the control group were grown in this nitrogen deficient soil without any fertilizer added. Ammomium nitrate and MiracleGro were added to the spinach in the A and MG groups, respectively, and organic chicken stool was used for the O group. By using a spectral imaging system and flame combustion techniques, the chlorophyll content can be related to the nitrogen content in the spinach leaves. In these spinach leaves, nitrogen and chlorophyll content were measured, chlorophyll is a green pigment that plays a crucial role in producing nutrients for green plants. The lack of chlorophyll will allow the plant to become susceptible to diseases, so it is extremely important that the plants have a high content of chlorophyll. The role of nitrogen in chlorophyll is very important and helps in the creation of chlorophyll; therefore it is necessary that an appropriate amount of nitrogen is added for optimal growth

  17. Characteristics of maize biochar with different pyrolysis temperatures and its effects on organic carbon, nitrogen and enzymatic activities after addition to fluvo-aquic soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiubin; Zhou, Wei; Liang, Guoqing; Song, Dali; Zhang, Xiaoya

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the characteristics of maize biochar produced at different pyrolysis temperatures (300, 450 and 600°C) and its effects on organic carbon, nitrogen and enzymatic activities after addition to fluvo-aquic soil were investigated. As pyrolysis temperature increased, ash content, pH, electrical conductivity, surface area, pore volume and aromatic carbon content of biochar increased while yield, ratios of oxygen:carbon and hydrogen: carbon and alkyl carbon content decreased. During incubation, SOC, total N, and ammonium-N contents increased in all biochar-amended treatments compared with the urea treatment; however, soil nitrate-N content first increased and then decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature of the applied biochar. Extracellular enzyme activities associated with carbon transformation first increased and then decreased with biochars pyrolyzed at 450 and 600°C. Protease activity markedly increased with increased pyrolysis temperatures, whereas pyrolysis temperature had limited effect on soil urease activity. The results indicated that the responses of extracellular enzymes to biochar were dependent on the pyrolysis temperature, the enzyme itself and incubation time as well. PMID:26298256

  18. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuqing; Shi, Jian; Lv, Wen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2013-01-01

    Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5L/kg VS(feed), while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6L/kg VS(feed). The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3g CaCO(3)/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents. PMID:22958949

  19. Revisiting the Stӧber method: Design of nitrogen-doped porous carbon spheres from molecular precursors of different chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hao; Liu, Jian; O'Donnell, Kane; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Xinmei; Yan, Zifeng; Liu, Shaomin; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2016-08-15

    Porous polymer resins and carbon spheres have been successfully prepared by an extended Stӧber method using phenol derivatives of different functionality. Herein, the Stӧber method is revised and used for the preparation of phenolic resin spheres from a series of hetero-atoms containing phenol derivatives (such as nitrophenol, aminophenol and halide-substituted phenols), which upon carbonization are converted to heteroatom-doped carbon spheres. The use of 4-amino-3-nitrophenol affords monodispersed carbon spheres with unprecedentedly high nitrogen content of about 11.9wt%. In this synthesis phenolic resin is initially formed by polymerizing formaldehyde with one of the aforementioned phenol derivatives, which acts as a resin precursor and source of heteroatoms to be doped. When amino group in aminophenol is in meta position the monodisperse phenolic resin and subsequently converted-doped carbon spheres are obtained. The resultant carbon spheres were examined as potential CO2 adsorbents and electrode materials for supercapacitors, reaching CO2 uptake of 89cm(3) STP/g (at 273K and 1.0bar), and the electrochemical capacitance of 127 F/g under basic conditions, respectively. This study provides some guidelines for design of carbon spheres by selecting phenolic resin precursors with desired molecular structures and functionalities for specific applications. PMID:27208436

  20. Influence of different mineral nitrogen sources (NO3(-)-N vs. NH4(+)-N) on arbuscular mycorrhiza development and N transfer in a Glomus intraradices-cowpea symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ngwene, Benard; Gabriel, Elke; George, Eckhard

    2013-02-01

    Labeled nitrogen ((15)N) was applied to a soil-based substrate in order to study the uptake of N by Glomus intraradices extraradical mycelium (ERM) from different mineral N (NO(3)(-) vs. NH(4)(+)) sources and the subsequent transfer to cowpea plants. Fungal compartments (FCs) were placed within the plant growth substrate to simulate soil patches containing root-inaccessible, but mycorrhiza-accessible, N. The fungus was able to take up both N-forms, NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+). However, the amount of N transferred from the FC to the plant was higher when NO(3)(-) was applied to the FC. In contrast, analysis of ERM harvested from the FC showed a higher (15)N enrichment when the FC was supplied with (15)NH(4)(+) compared with (15)NO(3)(-). The (15)N shoot/root ratio of plants supplied with (15)NO(3)(-) was much higher than that of plants supplied with (15)NH(4)(+), indicative of a faster transfer of (15)NO(3)(-) from the root to the shoot and a higher accumulation of (15)NH (4)(+) in the root and/or intraradical mycelium. It is concluded that hyphae of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus may absorb NH(4)(+) preferentially over NO(3)(-) but that export of N from the hyphae to the root and shoot may be greater following NO(3)(-) uptake. The need for NH(4)(+) to be assimilated into organically bound N prior to transport into the plant is discussed. PMID:22810583

  1. Improved finite-difference computation of the van der Waals force: One-dimensional case

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2009-10-15

    We present an improved demonstration of the calculation of Casimir forces in one-dimensional systems based on the recently proposed numerical imaginary frequency Green's function computation approach. The dispersion force on two thick lossy dielectric slabs separated by an empty gap and placed within a perfectly conducting cavity is obtained from the Green's function of the modified Helmholtz equation by means of an ordinary finite-difference method. In order to demonstrate the possibility to develop algorithms to explore complex geometries in two and three dimensions to higher order in the mesh spacing, we generalize existing classical electromagnetism algebraic methods to generate the difference equations for dielectric boundaries not coinciding with any grid points. Diagnostic tests are presented to monitor the accuracy of our implementation of the method and follow-up applications in higher dimensions are introduced.

  2. Comprehensive Numerical Analysis of Finite Difference Time Domain Methods for Improving Optical Waveguide Sensor Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Samak, M. Mosleh E. Abu; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Kashif, Muhammad; Zan, Mohd Saiful Dzulkifly

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses numerical analysis methods for different geometrical features that have limited interval values for typically used sensor wavelengths. Compared with existing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods, the alternating direction implicit (ADI)-FDTD method reduces the number of sub-steps by a factor of two to three, which represents a 33% time savings in each single run. The local one-dimensional (LOD)-FDTD method has similar numerical equation properties, which should be calculated as in the previous method. Generally, a small number of arithmetic processes, which result in a shorter simulation time, are desired. The alternating direction implicit technique can be considered a significant step forward for improving the efficiency of unconditionally stable FDTD schemes. This comparative study shows that the local one-dimensional method had minimum relative error ranges of less than 40% for analytical frequencies above 42.85 GHz, and the same accuracy was generated by both methods.

  3. Comparative studies on nitrogen budgets of closed shrimp polyculture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhen-Xiong; Li, De-Shang; Zhang, Man-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2001-09-01

    April to October, 1997 comparative studies on the nitrogen budgets of closed shrimp polyculture systems showed that, in all the studied polyculture systems, nitrogen from feeds and fertilizers were the main input items, which comprised 70.7% 83.9% of the total input nitrogen 3.2% 7.4% of which was provided by nitrogen fixation. It was in monoculture enclosures (Y-4, Y-11 and Y-12) that the percentage reached the maximum value. The output nitrogen in harvested products comprised 10.8% 24.6% of total input nitrogen, and the highest percentage, 24.6%, was found in shrimp-fish-tagelus polyculture systems. In shrimp monoculture and shrimp-fish polyculture systems, they were 19.1% and 21.9% respectively. The nitrogen utilization efficiency was different and varied from 12.2% was found in shrimp-tagelus polyculture systems. The lowest, 12.2%, was found in shrimp monoculture systems. All the nitrogen utilization efficiencies in shrimp-fish systems or shrimp-scallop systems seemed to be higher than that of the monoculture system, but they showed little statistical difference. The main outputs of nitrogen were found in sediment mud, and comprised 48.2% 60.8% of the total, input, the lowest percentage was found in shrimp-fish-tagelus polyculture systems, and the highest percentage in shrimp-scallop systems. During the experiment, nitrogen lost through denitrification and ammonia volatilization comprised 1.9% 6. 2%, averaged 2.8%, of the total input, and the loss through seepage comprised 5.9% 8.9% of the total. The estimated nitrogen attached to the enclosure wall comprised 3.7% 13.3% of the total, and was highest in shrimp monoculture systems. Compared with the classic shrimp farming industry, the closed shrimp polyculture systems may improve the nitrogen utilization efficiency, and hence reduce the environmental impacts on coastal waters. The nitrogen discharging rates for all the studied polyculture systems ranged from 3.0% to 6. 0% of total input nitrogen.

  4. Influence of different kind of peats on some physic-chemical properties, biochemical activity, the content of different forms of nitrogen and fractions of humic substances of The Great Vasyugan Mire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    Mires, or peatlands belong to the wetlands ecosystems where carbon is bounded in primary production and deposited as peat in water saturated, anoxic conditions. In those conditions, the rate of the supply of new organic matter has exceeded that the decomposition, resulting in carbon accumulation. Place of sampling belongs to an oligotrophic landscapes of the river Klyuch basin in spurs of Vasyugan mire. The catchment represents reference system for Bokchar swampy area (political district of Tomsk region). Landscape profile crosses main kinds of swampy biogeocoenosis (BGC) toward the mire center: paludal tall mixed forest, pine undershrub Sphagnum (high riam, trans-accumulative part of a profile, P2), pine-undershrub Sphagnum (low riam, transit part, P3), sedge-moss swamp (eluvial part, P5). The latter represents an eluvial part of a slope of watershed massif where it is accomplished discharge of excess, surface, soil-mire waters. The depth of peat deposit of sedge-moss swamp reaches 2,5m. To the depth of 0,6m there is a layer of Sphagnum raised bog peat, then it is a mesotrophic Scheuchzeria Sphagnum layer and at the bottom there is a thick layer of low-mire horsetail peat. The samples of peats were taken from two places (P2 and P3), both from the depth 0-75 cm of the great Vasyugan Mire. These materials represent (P2) Sphagnum fuscum peat (ash content ranged from 10.8 to 15.1%), but samples P3 belong to low-moor sedge peat (ash content ranged from 4.5-4.8%). The differences in water level, redox potential, pH, degree of degradation, bulk density, number of microorganisms, activity of enzymes, different kinds of nitrogen and humic substances were studied in two different peat soils characterized by different type of peat. In general in P2 the redox potential changed from 858 to /-140/ mV, higher activity of xanthine oxidase and peroxidase, different kinds of microorganisms (ammonifing bacteria and cellulose decomposing microorganisms) and different kinds of

  5. Missing nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasmund, Norbert; Struck, Ulrich; Hansen, Anja; Flohr, Anita; Nausch, Günther; Grüttmüller, Annett; Voss, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Opposing opinions on the importance of nitrogen fixation in the northern Benguela upwelling region provoked us to investigate the magnitude of nitrogen fixation in front of northern Namibia and southern Angola. Measurements of nitrogen fixation rates using the 15N method at 66 stations during seven cruises from 2008 to 2014 showed that, in general, the 15N content in the biomass did not increase after tracer incubation with 15N2, indicating that no nitrogen fixation occurred. Correspondingly, the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium was almost not present. The abundant picocyanobacteria did obviously not perform nitrogen fixation to a significant degree. The artificial improvement of conditions for nitrogen fixation in mesocosm experiments, including phosphate and iron additions and a warmer temperature, failed to induce nitrogen fixation. A plausible explanation of these findings is a lack of conditioned cells for nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region.

  6. Nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; McCormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  7. Nitrogen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, J. E.; Brasseur, G.; Coffey, M. T.; Fischer, H.; Gille, J.; Jones, R.; Louisnard, N.; Mccormick, M. P.; Noxon, J.; Owens, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Total odd nitrogen, NO(y), may be defined as the sum of all active nitrogen species that interchange photochemically with one another on a time scale of the order of weeks or less. As noted, NO + NO2 reactions dominate the processes controlling the ozone balance in the contemporary stratosphere. The observational data from non-satellite platforms are reviewed. The growth in available satellite data in the past four years is considered. Some of the most important scientific issues are discussed, taking into account new results from atmospheric models (mainly 2-D). The model results are compared with the observational data.

  8. Improving the performance of BICM-ID and MLC systems with different FEC codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa, T.; Sauer-Greff, W.; Urbansky, R.

    2013-07-01

    In bandwidth limited communication systems, the high data rate transmission with performance close to capacity limits is achieved by applying multilevel modulation schemes in association with powerful forward error correction (FEC) coding, i.e. coded modulation systems. The most important practical approaches to coded modulation systems are multilevel coding with multistage decoding (MLC/MSD) and bit interleaved coded modulation with iterative demapping and decoding (BICM-ID). Multilevel modulation formats such as M-QAM, which can be used as a part of coded modulation systems, have the capability of multilevel protection. Based on this fact, we investigate the methods to improve the performance of BICM-ID using multiple interleavers with different binary channel coding schemes such as convolutional codes, turbo codes and low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. Moreover, an MLC system with parallel decoding on levels (PDL) at the receiver is considered. In our contribution, we propose to design the individual coding schemes using the extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) charts for individual bit levels in the constellation. Our simulation results show that the BICM-ID systems, taking into account different bit-level protections, can provide an improvement of 0.65 dB, 1.2 dB and 1.5 dB for 256-QAM with turbo, LDPC and convolutional codes, respectively. On the other hand, MLC systems with PDL designed using EXIT charts for individual bit levels can slightly improve the performance and eliminate the error floor compared to the systems with MSD.

  9. Preprototype nitrogen supply subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Fort, J. H.; Schubert, F. H.

    1982-01-01

    The design and development of a test stand for the Nitrogen Generation Module (NGM) and a series of tests which verified its operation and performance capability are described. Over 900 hours of parametric testing were achieved. The results from this testing were then used to design an advanced NGM and a self contained, preprototype Nitrogen Supply Subsystem. The NGM consists of three major components: nitrogen generation module, pressure controller and hydrazine storage tank and ancillary components. The most important improvement is the elimination of all sealing surfaces, achieved with a total welded or brazed construction. Additionally, performance was improved by increasing hydrogen separating capability by 20% with no increase in overall packaging size.

  10. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian; Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang; Li Yebo

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  11. Effects of stress annealing in nitrogen on the effective contact-potential difference, charges, and traps at the Si/SiO2 interface of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przewlocki, Henryk M.; Massoud, Hisham Z.

    2002-08-01

    In this article, we report the results of a study of the effects of high-temperature stress annealing in nitrogen on the electrical properties of metal/oxide/semiconductor devices. In this study, we have experimentally characterized the dependence of the reduced effective contact-potential difference, the effective oxide charge (Neff), and the midgap interface trap density (Dit) on the annealing conditions in nitrogen. We have correlated such properties with the dependence of the index of refraction and oxide stress on the annealing conditions and oxide thickness in a companion article. We consider the contributions of the thermal-relaxation and nitrogen-incorporation processes in determining changes in the electrical properties with annealing time. This model description is consistent with other annealing studies carried out in argon where only the thermal-relaxation process is present.

  12. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  13. Nitrogen as a friendly addition to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Interstitial alloying with nitrogen or carbon is a common means of enhancing properties of iron-based alloys. Interstitial nitrogen addition to fcc-phase Fe-Cr-Mn/Ni alloys results in improved mechanical properties, whereas addition of carbon can result in the formation of unwanted carbides. Carbon addition to low alloy, bcc-phase iron alloys significantly improves strength through the formation of carbides, whereas addition of nitrogen in bcc-phase iron alloys can result in porous casting and reduced mechanical properties. This study will show that alloying iron-based alloys with both nitrogen and carbon can produce positive results. Nitrogen addition to Fe-C and Fe-Cr-C alloys, and both nitrogen and nitrogen-carbon additions to Fe-Cr-Mn/Ni alloys altered the microstructure, improved mechanical properties, increased hardness, and reduced wear by stabilizing the fcc-phase and altering (possibly eliminating) precipitate formation.

  14. Improving semi-text-independent method of writer verification using difference vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Ding, Xiaoqing

    2009-01-01

    The semi-text-independent method of writer verification based on the linear framework is a method that can use all characters of two handwritings to discriminate the writers in the condition of knowing the text contents. The handwritings are allowed to just have small numbers of even totally different characters. This fills the vacancy of the classical text-dependent methods and the text-independent methods of writer verification. Moreover, the information, what every character is, is used for the semi-text-independent method in this paper. Two types of standard templates, generated from many writer-unknown handwritten samples and printed samples of each character, are introduced to represent the content information of each character. The difference vectors of the character samples are gotten by subtracting the standard templates from the original feature vectors and used to replace the original vectors in the process of writer verification. By removing a large amount of content information and remaining the style information, the verification accuracy of the semi-text-independent method is improved. On a handwriting database involving 30 writers, when the query handwriting and the reference handwriting are composed of 30 distinct characters respectively, the average equal error rate (EER) of writer verification reaches 9.96%. And when the handwritings contain 50 characters, the average EER falls to 6.34%, which is 23.9% lower than the EER of not using the difference vectors.

  15. Long-term musical training may improve different forms of visual attention ability.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Carolina; Loureiro, Maurício Alves; Caramelli, Paulo

    2013-08-01

    Many studies have suggested that structural and functional cerebral neuroplastic processes result from long-term musical training, which in turn may produce cognitive differences between musicians and non-musicians. We aimed to investigate whether intensive, long-term musical practice is associated with improvements in three different forms of visual attention ability: selective, divided and sustained attention. Musicians from symphony orchestras (n=38) and non-musicians (n=38), who were comparable in age, gender and education, were submitted to three neuropsychological tests, measuring reaction time and accuracy. Musicians showed better performance relative to non-musicians on four variables of the three visual attention tests, and such an advantage could not solely be explained by better sensorimotor integration. Moreover, in the group of musicians, significant correlations were observed between the age at the commencement of musical studies and reaction time in all visual attention tests. The results suggest that musicians present augmented ability in different forms of visual attention, thus illustrating the possible cognitive benefits of long-term musical training. PMID:23694752

  16. Combining double-difference relocation with regional depth-phase modelling to improve hypocentre accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shutian; Eaton, David W.

    2011-05-01

    Precise and accurate earthquake hypocentres are critical for various fields, such as the study of tectonic process and seismic-hazard assessment. Double-difference relocation methods are widely used and can dramatically improve the precision of event relative locations. In areas of sparse seismic network coverage, however, a significant trade-off exists between focal depth, epicentral location and the origin time. Regional depth-phase modelling (RDPM) is suitable for sparse networks and can provide focal-depth information that is relatively insensitive to uncertainties in epicentral location and independent of errors in the origin time. Here, we propose a hybrid method in which focal depth is determined using RDPM and then treated as a fixed parameter in subsequent double-difference calculations, thus reducing the size of the system of equations and increasing the precision of the hypocentral solutions. Based on examples using small earthquakes from eastern Canada and southwestern USA, we show that the application of this technique yields solutions that appear to be more robust and accurate than those obtained by standard double-difference relocation method alone.

  17. Selection of effective macroalgal species and tracing nitrogen sources on the different part of Yantai coast, China indicated by macroalgal δ(15)N values.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Liu, Dongyan; Richard, Pierre; Di, Baoping

    2016-01-15

    To determine the dominant nitrogen sources and select effective macroalgal species for monitoring eutrophication along the Yantai coast, the total carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ(15)N) in macroalgal tissue were analyzed in conjunction with environmental variables in seawater along the Yantai coastline. The ranges of macroalgal tissue δ(15)N values together with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) composition indicated that except for the atmospheric deposition, there were three dominant types of nitrogen sources along the Yantai coast, with the agricultural fertilizer usage and factorial wastewater input at the S1 (Zhifu Island coast), the sewage discharge at S2 (the Moon Bay coast), the sewage discharge together with aquaculture impacts at S3 (Fisherman Wharf coast) and S4 (the Horse Island coast). Macroalgal growth were not limited by DIN but limited by P at S2, S3 and S4. Macroalgal species suitable or not for DIN source tracing along the Yantai coast were discussed. For sites with low DIN concentration, many species of three phyla could be used for DIN sources tracing with Laurencia okamurai, Gloiopeltis furcata and Ulva pertusa being ideal species. For site with high DIN concentration, however, species of Rhodophyta were not suitable and only Scytosiphon lomentaria and Monostroma nitidium were chosen. PMID:26519590

  18. A comparative study of expected improvement-assisted global optimization with different surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Ye, Fan; Li, Enying; Li, Guangyao

    2016-08-01

    Efficient global optimization (EGO) uses the surrogate uncertainty estimator called expected improvement (EI) to guide the selection of the next sampling candidates. Theoretically, any modelling methods can be integrated with the EI criterion. To improve the convergence ratio, a multi-surrogate efficient global optimization (MSEGO) was suggested. In practice, the EI-based optimization methods with different surrogates show widely divergent characteristics. Therefore, it is important to choose the most suitable algorithm for a certain problem. For this purpose, four single-surrogate efficient global optimizations (SSEGOs) and an MSEGO involving four surrogates are investigated. According to numerical tests, both the SSEGOs and the MSEGO are feasible for weak nonlinear problems. However, they are not robust for strong nonlinear problems, especially for multimodal and high-dimensional problems. Moreover, to investigate the feasibility of EGO in practice, a material identification benchmark is designed to demonstrate the performance of EGO methods. According to the tests in this study, the kriging EGO is generally the most robust method.

  19. An improved method for correction of air temperature measured using different radiation shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinghong; Su, Debin; Li, Deping; Chen, Lu; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Meilin; Li, Yongcheng; Yue, Zhizhong; Wang, Zijing

    2014-11-01

    The variation of air temperature measurement errors using two different radiation shields (DTR502B Vaisala, Finland, and HYTFZ01, Huayun Tongda Satcom, China) was studied. Datasets were collected in the field at the Daxing weather station in Beijing from June 2011 to May 2012. Most air temperature values obtained with these two commonly used radiation shields were lower than the reference records obtained with the new Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) Stevenson screen. In most cases, the air temperature errors when using the two devices were smaller on overcast and rainy days than on sunny days; and smaller when using the imported rather than the Chinese shield. The measured errors changed sharply at sunrise and sunset, and reached maxima at noon. Their diurnal variation characteristics were, naturally, related to changes in solar radiation. The relationships between the record errors, global radiation, and wind speed were nonlinear. An improved correction method was proposed based on the approach described by Nakamura and Mahrt (2005) (NM05), in which the impact of the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the temperature error is considered and extreme errors due to changes in SZA can be corrected effectively. Measurement errors were reduced significantly after correction by either method for both shields. The error reduction rate using the improved correction method for the Chinese and imported shields were 3.3% and 40.4% higher than those using the NM05 method, respectively.

  20. Effects of different regulatory methods on improvement of greenhouse saline soils, tomato quality, and yield.

    PubMed

    Maomao, Hou; Xiaohou, Shao; Yaming, Zhai

    2014-01-01

    To identify effective regulatory methods scheduling with the compromise between the soil desalination and the improvement of tomato quality and yield, a 3-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate and compare the effect of straw mulching and soil structure conditioner and water-retaining agent on greenhouse saline soils, tomato quality, and yield. A higher salt removing rate of 80.72% in plough layer with straw mulching was obtained based on the observation of salt mass fraction in 0 ~ 20 cm soil layer before and after the experiment. Salts were also found to move gradually to the deeper soil layer with time. Straw mulching enhanced the content of soil organic matter significantly and was conductive to reserve soil available N, P, and K, while available P and K in soils of plough layer with soil structure conditioner decreased obviously; thus a greater usage of P fertilizer and K fertilizer was needed when applying soil structure conditioner. Considering the evaluation indexes including tomato quality, yield, and desalination effects of different regulatory methods, straw mulching was recommended as the main regulatory method to improve greenhouse saline soils in south China. Soil structure conditioner was the suboptimal method, which could be applied in concert with straw mulching. PMID:25147873

  1. Improved cancer diagnostics by different image processing techniques on OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Lengenfelder, Benjamin; Marini Menezes, Tassiana; Hohmann, Martin; Kopfinger, Stefan; Hohmann, Tim; Grabiec, Urszula; Klämpfl, Florian; Gonzales Menezes, Jean; Waldner, Maximilian; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Optical-coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising non-invasive, high-resolution imaging modality which can be used for cancer diagnosis and its therapeutic assessment. However, speckle noise makes detection of cancer boundaries and image segmentation problematic and unreliable. Therefore, to improve the image analysis for a precise cancer border detection, the performance of different image processing algorithms such as mean, median, hybrid median filter and rotational kernel transformation (RKT) for this task is investigated. This is done on OCT images acquired from an ex-vivo human cancerous mucosa and in vitro by using cultivated tumour applied on organotypical hippocampal slice cultures. The preliminary results confirm that the border between the healthy and the cancer lesions can be identified precisely. The obtained results are verified with fluorescence microscopy. This research can improve cancer diagnosis and the detection of borders between healthy and cancerous tissue. Thus, it could also reduce the number of biopsies required during screening endoscopy by providing better guidance to the physician.

  2. Effects of Different Regulatory Methods on Improvement of Greenhouse Saline Soils, Tomato Quality, and Yield

    PubMed Central

    Xiaohou, Shao; Yaming, Zhai

    2014-01-01

    To identify effective regulatory methods scheduling with the compromise between the soil desalination and the improvement of tomato quality and yield, a 3-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate and compare the effect of straw mulching and soil structure conditioner and water-retaining agent on greenhouse saline soils, tomato quality, and yield. A higher salt removing rate of 80.72% in plough layer with straw mulching was obtained based on the observation of salt mass fraction in 0~20 cm soil layer before and after the experiment. Salts were also found to move gradually to the deeper soil layer with time. Straw mulching enhanced the content of soil organic matter significantly and was conductive to reserve soil available N, P, and K, while available P and K in soils of plough layer with soil structure conditioner decreased obviously; thus a greater usage of P fertilizer and K fertilizer was needed when applying soil structure conditioner. Considering the evaluation indexes including tomato quality, yield, and desalination effects of different regulatory methods, straw mulching was recommended as the main regulatory method to improve greenhouse saline soils in south China. Soil structure conditioner was the suboptimal method, which could be applied in concert with straw mulching. PMID:25147873

  3. Voice quality improvement after management of unilateral vocal cord paralysis with different techniques.

    PubMed

    Bihari, A; Mészáros, K; Reményi, A; Lichtenberger, G

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively evaluate the voices of patients suffering from unilateral vocal cord paralysis, before and after endoscopic augmentation and thyroplasty. In the past, we used injectable Teflon to treat this condition; later techniques included collagen injection and Isshiki thyroplasty. In the last 7 years, preferred treatment methods have included Bioplastique injection and lipoaugmentation of the vocal cords as well as medialization thyroplasty using a titanium implant according to Friedrich. Pre- and postoperative data was evaluated and compared to 25 patients. Appropriate glottic closure of the vocal cords was achieved in every case, in most cases after the first intervention. We used voice range profile measurements to evaluate the results. An objective evaluation was performed using the Friedrich dysphonia index. Significant improvements were found: the dysphonia index decreased in every case, from an average of 2.47, preoperatively, to an average of 1.18 postoperatively. In agreement with earlier studies, voice pitch range was the only parameter that not significantly improved. There was no statistical difference between the lipoaugmentation and thyroplasty according to Friedrich. We concluded that both endoscopic methods and thyroplasty can be used to achieve an optimal result. Cases must be evaluated individually so that the best technique, or combination of methods can be determined. PMID:16896756

  4. Together we can make a difference: the case for transnational action for improved health in prisons.

    PubMed

    Easley, Cheryl E

    2011-10-01

    In spite of international differences in the treatment of incarcerated persons, as a group, they are vulnerable to poor health status and lack of access to quality health care. The health care of prisoners is affected by knowledge and commitment to ideas of human rights and social justice, as well as economic conditions. Prisoners are at increased risk of both acute and chronic diseases, and may constitute a threat to the health of other prisoners, their attendants or outside communities upon release. Mental illness and related problems of substance abuse are prevalent in prison populations, with many US prisons serving as modern asylums. Public health workers and organizations can stimulate and implement action to improve health in prisons. The World Federation of Public Health Associations can play a leadership role in co-ordinating and facilitating collaborative international action and research to enhance the health of prisoners and their communities worldwide. PMID:21968088

  5. Differences between Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii in the Molecular Mechanisms Governing Utilization of D-Amino Acids as the Sole Nitrogen Source

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun C.; Khanal Lamichhane, Ami; Bradley, James; Rodgers, Laura; Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to grow on media containing certain D-amino acids as a sole nitrogen source is widely utilized to differentiate Cryptococcus gattii from C. neoformans. We used the C. neoformans H99 and C. gattii R265 strains to dissect the mechanisms of D-amino acids utilization. We identified three putative D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) genes in both strains and showed that each DAO gene plays different roles in D-amino acid utilization in each strain. Deletion of DAO2 retarded growth of R265 on eleven D-amino acids suggesting its prominent role on D-amino acid assimilation in R265. All three R265 DAO genes contributed to growth on D-Asn and D-Asp. DAO3 was required for growth and detoxification of D-Glu by both R265 and H99. Although growth of H99 on most D-amino acids was poor, deletion of DAO1 or DAO3 further exacerbated it on four D-amino acids. Overexpression of DAO2 or DAO3 enabled H99 to grow robustly on several D-amino acids suggesting that expression levels of the native DAO genes in H99 were insufficient for growth on D-amino acids. Replacing the H99 DAO2 gene with a single copy of the R265 DAO2 gene also enabled its utilization of several D-amino acids. Results of gene and promoter swaps of the DAO2 genes suggested that enzymatic activity of Dao2 in H99 might be lower compared to the R265 strain. A reduction in virulence was only observed when all DAO genes were deleted in R265 but not in H99 indicating a pathobiologically exclusive role of the DAO genes in R265. These results suggest that C. neoformans and C. gattii divergently evolved in D-amino acid utilization influenced by their major ecological niches. PMID:26132227

  6. [Effects of different re-vegetation patterns on soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in the wind-water erosion crisscross region, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-tong; Wei, Yan-chun; Yang, Xian-long; Hao, Ming-de; Wei, Xiao-rong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the responses of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) to three typical re-vegetation patterns, i.e., grassland, alfalfa land and peashrub land on the Loess Plateau of China, and also to assess the dynamics of SOC and TN with re-vegetation age. The results showed that all the three re-vegetation practices increased the concentrations of SOC and TN in the 0-10 cm soil layer, but their effects differed with re-vegetation age. Compared with adjacent croplands, the concentrations of SOC and TN in the 0-10 cm soil layer in grassland did not change within 10 years of succession, but increased after 20 years of succession. In alfalfa land, the concentrations of SOC and TN increased by 51.6%-82.9% and 43.4%-67.0% in the 0-10 cm soil layer, with the increasing rates of stocks of SOC and TN being 0.17-0.46 and 0.015-0.043 t · hm⁻² · a⁻¹, respectively. However, SOC and TN were not affected by re-vegetation age in alfalfa land. The increases of concentrations of SOC and TN remained high in the first 20 years after conversion of cropland to peashrub land, but decreased after 40 years of conversion. In conclusion, the conversion of croplands to peashrub or alfalfa land could be better in contributing to high stocks of SOC and TN than natural succession of grassland. However, their positive effects on the enrichment of SOC and TN may not be sustainable due to the scarcity of soil moisture and high water consumption of these two re-vegetation plants. PMID:27228597

  7. Large difference of inhibitive effect of nitrogen deposition on soil methane oxidation between plantations with N-fixing tree species and non-N-fixing tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Xiaomin; Liu, Lei; Fu, Shenglei; Chen, Hao; Huang, Juan; Lu, Xiankai; Liu, Zhanfeng; Mo, Jiangming

    2012-12-01

    The responses of soil methane (CH4) net fluxes to nitrogen (N) addition in a N-fixing tree species (Acacia auriculiformis (AA)) and a non-N-fixing tree species (Eucalyptus citriodora (EU)) plantation were studied in southern China. Treatments were conducted at each plantation with three N levels (0, 50, and 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1 for control, medium-N, and high-N treatment, respectively, abbreviated as C, MN, and HN). From August 2010 to July 2011, CH4 flux was measured biweekly using a static chamber and gas chromatography technique. The soils of both sites acted as sink of atmospheric CH4. The CH4 uptake rate in control of the AA site (36.3 ± 3.2 μg CH4-C m-2 h-1) was greater than that of the EU plantation (29.9 ± 0.9 μg CH4-C m-2 h-1). In the AA plantation, the averaged rates of CH4 uptake for the MN (28.6 ± 2.3 μg CH4-C m-2 h-1) and HN treatment (23.8 ± 2.8 μg CH4-C m-2 h-1) were decreased by 21% and 35%, respectively, compared to the control. However, there was no change of soil CH4 uptake between N-treated plots and the controls in the EU site. Our results indicated that there might be large difference of inhibitive effect of N deposition on soil CH4 oxidation between the AA and EU plantations. The projected increase of N deposition would weaken the capability of N-fixing tree species plantations for atmospheric CH4 sink in tropical and subtropical regions.

  8. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals.

    PubMed

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Becker, Martin A; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent factors and/or governed by root-mediated signals. Therefore, the N-efficient and stay-green cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex were reciprocally grafted with the N-inefficient and early-senesci