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Sample records for improvement rf control

  1. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  2. Improvements of Low Level RF Control Systems for J-PARC LINAC 400-MeV Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Futatsukawa, K.; Fukui, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Michizono, S.; Sato, F.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E.

    The low level RF (LLRF) control systems have been successfully improved for the J-PARC LINAC upgrade. After the installation of 972-MHz high-β acceleration section behind the 324-MHz low-β section beginning in the summer of 2013, the proton beam was successfully accelerated to 400 MeV in January 2014. Many improvements in the LLRF control systems have been carried out to facilitate the operation of the J-PARC LINAC at 400 MeV. The reference 12-MHz signal delay settings for the feedback control systems have been optimized using 12-MHz delay modules. The stability performances of the 972-MHz RF&CLK (Clock) and Mixer&IQ (Mixer & IQ-modulator) boards have been improved using temperature-compensation techniques. By improving the hardware of the feedback control systems, very good stability of the RF systems has been achieved.

  3. Improved RF Isolation Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. L.; Macconnell, J.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit has high reverse isolation and wide bandwidth. Wideband isolation amplifier has low intermodulation distortion and high reverse isolation. Circuit does not require selected or matched components or directional coupling device. Circuit used in applications requiring high reverse isolation such as receiver intermediate-frequency (IF) strips and frequency distribution systems. Also applicable in RF and video signaling.

  4. NSLS RF system improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.; Thomas, M.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; D'Alsace, R.; Ackerman, H.; Biscardi, R.; Langenbach, H.; Ramirez, G.

    1985-01-01

    It is required that the NSLS x-ray accelerator reach an energy of 2.5 GeV. An additional accelerating cavity and power amplifier system were installed to meet this goal. A new control system was designed to include phase and amplitude servos as well as computer interfacing. Commissioning and operating experience will be reported.

  5. Low-level RF control for the AFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Plato, J.

    1994-09-01

    A limiting factor in the performance of the Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser (AFEL) is the stability of the RF accelerating field. A high-performance low-level RF control system has been implemented that uses analog feedback and digital feed forward to regulate the RF field. This low-level RF control system has achieved long-term amplitude and phase stabilities better than {+-}0.25% and {+-}0.33{degree} respectively. In order to improve the RF field stability further, a detailed system analysis and design is proceeding. Subsystem measurements are being used to model the system performance, predict the performance-limiting components, and determine possible improvements. Results to-date, modeling analyses, and suggested future improvements are presented.

  6. RF TECHNIQUES FOR IMPROVED LUMINOSITY IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.BLASKIEWICZ,J.BUTLER,J.DELONG,J.FISCHER,W.HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has improved significantly [1] over the first three physics runs. A number of special rf techniques have been developed to facilitate higher luminosity. The techniques described herein include: an ultra low-noise rf source for the 197 MHz storage rf system, a frequency shift switch-on technique for transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage system, synchronizing the rings during the energy ramp (including crossing the transition energy) to avoid incidental collisions, installation of dedicated 200 MHZ cavities to provide longitudinal Landau damping on the ramp, and the development of a bunch merging scheme in the Booster to increase the available bunch intensity from the injectors.

  7. High gain proportional rf control stability at TESLA cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Elmar

    2007-05-01

    Fast proportional rf control is used as the basis for rf field regulation in actual linear accelerator projects like the international linear collider (ILC) and the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) based on TESLA technology. Additional control loops improve the field regulation by treating repetitive effects and compensating the beam loading. Nevertheless, the ability for high gain operation of the fast loops is desirable for the strong suppression of nonpredictive and nonrepetitive disturbances. TESLA cavities host nine fundamental modes (FMs) where only one is used for beam acceleration. The unwanted FMs have a significant influence on the proportional rf control loop stability at high gains. Within this paper, the stability of proportional rf control loops taking the FMs and digitalization effects into account will be discussed in detail together with measures enabling a significant increase of the gain values.

  8. Auxiliary coil controls temperature of RF induction heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Auxiliary coil controls the temperature of an RF induction furnace that is powered by a relatively unstable RF generator. Manual or servoed adjustments of the relative position of the auxiliary coil, which is placed in close proximity to the RF coil, changes the looseness of the RF coil and hence the corresponding heating effect of its RF field.

  9. Control electronics of the PEP RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of the major components used for controlling the phase and field level of the PEP RF cavities is described. The control electronics of one RF station is composed of several control loops: each cavity has a tuners' servo loop which maintains the frequency constant and also keeps the fields of each cavity balanced; the total gap voltage developed by a pair of cavities is regulated by a gap voltage controller; finally, the phase variation along the amplification chain, the klystron and the cavities are compensated by a phase lock loop. The design criteria of each loop are set forth and the circuit implementation and test results are presented.

  10. Directions for rf-controlled intelligent microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderling, Stefan; Varadan, Vijay K.; Abbott, Derek

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the novel concept of a Radio Frequency (RF) controllable microvalve for different medical applications. Wireless communication via a Surface Acoustic Wave Identification-mark (SAW ID-tag) is used to control, drive and locate the microvalve inside the human body. The energy required for these functions is provided by RF pulses, which are transmitted to the valve and back by a reader/transmitter system outside of the body. These RF bursts are converted into Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), which propagate along the piezoelectric actuator material of the microvalve. These waves cause deflections, which are employed to open and close the microvalve. We identified five important areas of application of the microvalve in biomedicine: 1) fertility control; 2) artificial venous valves; 3) flow cytometry; 4) drug delivery and 5) DNA mapping.

  11. RF plasma heating improvement with EBG surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, Saul; Milanesio, Daniele; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    High impedance surfaces or electromagnetic band gap (EBG) surfaces have proved themselves to be useful in wireless communications applications due to their unique characteristics such as no propagating surface wave support, no conduction of RF current for a given bandwidth, in-phase electromagnetic reflection and non-inverted image of the electric charge in front of them [1]. These characteristics make possible to design compact antennas achieving better performance in terms of radiation and input impedance. ICRF plasma heating antennas in fusion experiments can take advantage of using EBG surfaces. One of the main issues in ICRF plasma heating is the low power coupling of the plasma facing antenna. The adoption of EBG surfaces in the antenna structure and the advantages offered by a predictive designing tool as TOPICA [2] offer the possibility to improve significantly the coupled power to plasma. [1] IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech., vol. 47, pp. 2059--2074, Nov. 1999. [2] Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476.

  12. Recent developments in superconducting cavity RF control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, Stefan

    2005-02-01

    Presently a large number of superconducting accelerators under construction or proposed impose stringent requirements on the rf control of the accelerating fields, operability, and reliability. The accelerator application range from linear colliders, UV-FELs and X-FELs, ERL based light sources, high power proton accelerators to heavy ion accelerators. Examples are TESLA and NLC, the European XFEL and Lux, the Cornell ERL based light source, the high power ERL based IR-FEL at JLAB, the neutron spallation source SNS, the heavy ion accelerator RIA, and the energy upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator at JLAB. The requirements on the rf systems range from low to high current, medium to high gradient, and relativistic to non-relativistics beam. With the technology in analog and digital electronics developing rapidly, the technology for rf feedback system is changing more and more from analog or hybrid systems towards fully digital systems. Todays DSPs and FPGAs can process sophisticated feedback algorithms on a time scale of some 100 ns to a few us with ADCs and DACs with about 100 MHz bandwidth at 14 bit and latencies less than 100 ns available to inter-face to the field detectors and field control actuators. Also fast analog multiplier technology allows for field detection and actuators for rf control with high linearity, measurement and control bandwidth while maintaining low noise levels.

  13. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  14. Real Time RF Simulator (RTS) and control

    SciTech Connect

    Cancelo, G.; Armiento, C.; Treptow, K.; Vignoni, A.; Zmuda, T.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The multi-cavity RTS allows LLRF algorithm development and lab testing prior to commissioning with real cavities and cryomodules. The RTS is a valuable tool since it models the functions, errors and disturbances of real RF systems. The advantage of a RTS over an off-line simulator is that it can be implemented on the actual LLRF hardware, on the same FPGA and processor, and run at the same speed of the LLRF control loop. Additionally the RTS can be shared by collaborators who do not have access to RF systems or when the systems are not available to LLRF engineers. The RTS simulator incorporates hardware, firmware and software errors and limitations of a real implementation, which would be hard to identify and time consuming to model in off-line simulations.

  15. Computer control of rf at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator is presently upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider project. The energy is to be increased from approximately 31 GeV to 50 GeV. Two electron beams and one positron beam are to be accelerated with high demands on the quality of the beams. The beam specifications are shown. To meet these specifications, all parameters influencing the beams have to be under tight control and continuous surveillance. This task is accomplished by a new computer system implemented at SLAC which has, among many other functions, control over rf accelerating fields. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Understanding and improving longevity in RF MEMS capacitive switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Chuck; Forehand, David; Scarbrough, Derek; Peng, Zheng; Palego, Cris; Hwang, James; Clevenger, Jason

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses issues relating to the reliability and methods for employing high-cycle life testing in capacitive RF MEMS switches. In order to investigate dielectric charging, transient current spectroscopy is used to characterize and model the ingress and egress of charges within the switch insulating layer providing an efficient, powerful tool to investigate various insulating materials without constructing actual MEMS switches. Additionally, an in-situ monitoring scheme has been developed to observe the dynamic evolution of switch characteristics during life testing. As an alternative to high-cycle life testing, which may require days or weeks of testing, a method for performing accelerated life tests is presented. Various methods for mitigating dielectric charging are presented including: reduced operating voltage, reduced dielectric area, and improved control waveforms. Charging models, accelerated life test results, and high-cycle life test results for state-of-the-art capacitive RF MEMS switches aid in the better understanding of MEMS switch reliability providing direction for improving materials and mechanical designs to increase the operation lifetime of MEMS capacitive switches.

  17. Measurements for low level RF control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, S. N.

    2007-08-01

    The low level RF control system for the European x-ray free electron laser, which is based on TESLA technology, requires information on a large number of signals and parameters which are either directly measurable as physical signals or must be derived from the physical signals. In most cases, calibrations are required to obtain the desired quantities. The measured signals are used in the real time feedback loops for field and resonance control, and for diagnostic purposes to support automation and exception handling. Good system models and powerful signal processors (including field programmable gate arrays and digital signal processors) combined with fast communication links allow for processing a large number of complex algorithms in real time. Several of these algorithms have been implemented at the free electron laser at Hamburg (FLASH) for evaluation and have increased the availability of the facility for user operation.

  18. Multiband RF pulses with improved performance via convex optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kerr, Adam; Reed, Galen; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Elkhaled, Adam; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Selective RF pulses are commonly designed with the desired profile as a low pass filter frequency response. However, for many MRI and NMR applications, the spectrum is sparse with signals existing at a few discrete resonant frequencies. By specifying a multiband profile and releasing the constraint on "don't-care" regions, the RF pulse performance can be improved to enable a shorter duration, sharper transition, or lower peak B1 amplitude. In this project, a framework for designing multiband RF pulses with improved performance was developed based on the Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) algorithm and convex optimization. It can create several types of RF pulses with multiband magnitude profiles, arbitrary phase profiles and generalized flip angles. The advantage of this framework with a convex optimization approach is the flexible trade-off of different pulse characteristics. Designs for specialized selective RF pulses for balanced SSFP hyperpolarized (HP) 13C MRI, a dualband saturation RF pulse for 1H MR spectroscopy, and a pre-saturation pulse for HP 13C study were developed and tested.

  19. Multiband RF pulses with improved performance via convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E Z; Kerr, Adam; Reed, Galen; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Elkhaled, Adam; Gordon, Jeremy W; Ohliger, Michael A; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Selective RF pulses are commonly designed with the desired profile as a low pass filter frequency response. However, for many MRI and NMR applications, the spectrum is sparse with signals existing at a few discrete resonant frequencies. By specifying a multiband profile and releasing the constraint on "don't-care" regions, the RF pulse performance can be improved to enable a shorter duration, sharper transition, or lower peak B1 amplitude. In this project, a framework for designing multiband RF pulses with improved performance was developed based on the Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) algorithm and convex optimization. It can create several types of RF pulses with multiband magnitude profiles, arbitrary phase profiles and generalized flip angles. The advantage of this framework with a convex optimization approach is the flexible trade-off of different pulse characteristics. Designs for specialized selective RF pulses for balanced SSFP hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C MRI, a dualband saturation RF pulse for (1)H MR spectroscopy, and a pre-saturation pulse for HP (13)C study were developed and tested. PMID:26754063

  20. An improved RF circuit for Overhauser magnetometer excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Di; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-08-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a high-precision device for magnetostatic field measurement, which can be used in a wide variety of purposes: UXO detection, pipeline mapping and other engineering and environmental applications. Traditional proton magnetometer adopts DC polarization, suffering from low polarization efficiency, high power consumption and low signal noise ratio (SNR). Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, nitroxide free radicals are used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). RF excitation is very important for electron resonance in nitrogen oxygen free radical solution, and it is primarily significant for the obtention of high SNR signal and high sensitive field observation. Therefore, RF excitation source plays a crucial role in the development of Overhauser magnetometer. In this paper, an improved design of a RF circuit is discussed. The new RF excitation circuit consists of two parts: Quartz crystal oscillator circuit and RF power amplifier circuit. Simulation and optimization designs for power amplifier circuit based on software ADS are presented. Finally we achieve a continuous and stable sine wave of 60MHz with 1-2.5 W output power, and the second harmonic suppression is close to -20dBc. The improved RF circuit has many merits such as small size, low-power consumption and high efficiency, and it can be applied to Overhauser magnetometer to obtain high sensitive field observation.

  1. The system of RF beam control for electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. M.; Chernousov, Yu. D.; Ivannikov, V. I.; Levichev, A. E.; Shebolaev, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    The system of RF control of three-electrode electron gun current is described. It consists of a source of microwave signal, coaxial line, coaxial RF switch and RF antenna lead. The system allows one to get the electron beam in the form of bunches with the frequency of the accelerating section to achieve the capture of particles in the acceleration mode close to 100%. The results of calculation and analysis of the elements of the system are presented. Characteristics of the devices are obtained experimentally. The results of using RF control in three-electrode electron gun at electron linear accelerator are described.

  2. RF Profile Control for Sustained Plasma Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosea, J.; Bernabei, S.; Leblanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    1999-11-01

    For advancing plasma operation regimes for AT tokamaks and steady state concepts, as well as for forming and sustaining alternate concepts, it is necessary to provide control of the spatial profiles for the important plasma parameters - pressure, current, etc.. RF techniques offer considerable promise for providing this control and should be further developed as rapidly as possible within the well established tokamak program for forming a basis for application to all confinement concepts. Notably, IBW promises to provide internal transport barrier control if the coupling physics can be understood and efficient antenna coupling to the Bernstein wave can be developed. We will review the IBW experience and discuss possible explanations and solutions for the coupling problems encountered. In particular, the competing roles of parametric decay instability and surface mode excitation will be examined in order to elucidate the increase in surface power losses for the larger devices DIII-D and TFTR. Also, issues which need to be understood for employing ICRF and LH techniques to best advantage, such as antenna bombardment and energetic electron excitation, respectively, will be outlined.

  3. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering ˜38 mA H- beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

  4. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H-ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Fuja, Raymond E; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hardek, Thomas W; Lee, Sung-Woo; McCarthy, Mike; Piller, Chip; Shin, Ki; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering 38 mA H beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride AlN plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  5. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y W; Fuja, R; Goulding, R H; Hardek, T; Lee, S-W; McCarthy, M P; Piller, M C; Shin, K; Stockli, M P; Welton, R F

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering approximately 38 mA H(-) beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. PMID:20192394

  6. A self-adaptive feedforward rf control system for linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renshan; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Xie, Jialin

    1993-01-01

    The design and performance of a self-adaptive feedforward rf control system are reported. The system was built for the linac of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Variables of time along the linac macropulse, such as field or phase are discretized and represented as vectors. Upon turn-on or after a large change in the operating-point, the control system acquires the response of the system to test signal vectors and generates a linearized system response matrix. During operation an error vector is generated by comparing the linac variable vectors and a target vector. The error vector is multiplied by the inverse of the system's matrix to generate a correction vector is added to an operating point vector. This control system can be used to control a klystron to produce flat rf amplitude and phase pulses, to control a rf cavity to reduce the rf field fluctuation, and to compensate the energy spread among bunches in a rf linac. Beam loading effects can be corrected and a programmed ramp can be produced. The performance of the control system has been evaluated on the control of a klystron's output as well as an rf cavity. Both amplitude and phase have been regulated simultaneously. In initial tests, the rf output from a klystron has been regulated to an amplitude fluctuation of less than ±0.3% and phase variation of less than ±0.6°. The rf field of the ATF's photo-cathode microwave gun cavity has been regulated to ±0.5% in amplitude and simultaneously to ±1° in phase. Regulating just the rf field amplitude in the rf gun cavity, we have achieved amplitude fluctuation of less than ±0.2%.

  7. UNCERTAIN SYSTEM MODELING OF SNS RF CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    S. KWON; A. REGAN; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system for SNS. The cascade of the klystron and the cavity is modeled as a nominal system. In the real world, high voltage power supply ripple, Lorentz Force Detuning, microphonics, cavity RF parameter perturbations, distortions in RF components, and loop time delay imperfection exist inevitably, which must be analyzed. The analysis is based on the accurate modeling of the disturbances and uncertainties. In this paper, a modern control theory is applied for modeling the disturbances, uncertainties, and for analyzing the closed loop system robust performance.

  8. Improved temperature regulation of APS linac RF components.

    SciTech Connect

    Dortwegt, R.

    1998-09-21

    The temperature of the APS S-Band linac's high-power rf components is regulated by water from individual closed-loop deionized (DI) water systems. The rf components are all made of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper and respond quickly to temperature changes. The SLED cavities are especially temperature-sensitive and cause beam energy instabilities when the temperature is not well regulated. Temperature regulation better than {+-} 0.1 F is required to achieve good energy stability. Improvements in the closed-loop water systems have enabled them to achieve a regulation of {+-} 0.05 F over long periods. Regulation philosophy and equipment are discussed and numerical results are presented.

  9. Improved Thermal Stability of RF Power BJT with Ballast Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Benqing; Zhang, Qingzhong

    2013-12-01

    To improve thermal stability and relieve current convergence in rf power bjts, an embedded active CMOS ballast circuit is proposed. By detecting the inhomogeneous temperature through distributed temperature sensors, the adjacent ballast circuit is triggered to shunt the base convergence current of the power BJT cell, performing the ballast protection for the device. Simulations and measurements validate the effectiveness of the proposed ballast circuit. Compared to conventional ballast resistor methods, the improved device integrated with ballast circuits exhibits superior electrical performance. The single ballast circuit only consumes 6.5 mW with additional occupied area of 2530 um2.

  10. Precise Heater Controller with rf-Biased Josephson Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Colin J.; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; Duncan, R. V.

    2003-01-01

    Paramagnetic susceptibility thermometers used in fundamental physics experiments are capable of measuring temperature changes with a precision of a part in 2 x 10(exp 10). However, heater controllers are only able to control open-loop power dissipation to about a part in 10(exp 5). We used an array of rf-biased Josephson junctions to precisely control the electrical power dissipation in a heater resistor mounted on a thermally isolated cryogenic platform. Theoretically, this method is capable of controlling the electrical power dissipation to better than a part in 10(exp 12). However, this level has not yet been demonstrated experimentally. The experiment consists of a liquid helium cell that also functions as a high-resolution PdMn thermometer, with a heater resistor mounted on it. The cell is thermally connected to a temperature-controlled cooling stage via a weak thermal link. The heater resistor is electrically connected to the array of Josephson junctions using superconducting wire. An rf-biased array of capacitively shunted Josephson junctions drives the voltage across the heater. The quantized voltage across the resistor is Vn = nf(h/2e), where h is Planck's constant, f is the array biasing frequency, e is the charge of an electron, and n is the integer quantum state of the Josephson array. This results in an electrical power dissipation on the cell of Pn = (Vn)(sup 2/R), where R is the heater resistance. The change of the quantum state of the array changes the power dissipated in the heater, which in turn, results in the change of the cell temperature. This temperature change is compared to the expected values based on the known thermal standoff resistance of the cell from the cooling stage. We will present our initial experimental results and discuss future improvements. This work has been funded by the Fundamental Physics Discipline of the Microgravity Science Office of NASA, and supported by a no-cost equipment loan from Sandia National Laboratories.

  11. RF control hardware design for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Pengzhan; Wei, Junyi; Xing, Jiansheng; Wang, Chuan

    2015-11-01

    The Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility project is being constructed by BRIF division of China Institute of Atomic Energy. In this project, a 100 MeV high intensity compact proton cyclotron is built for multiple applications. The first successful beam extraction of CYCIAE-100 cyclotron was done in the middle of 2014. The extracted proton beam energy is 100 MeV and the beam current is more than 20 μA. The RF system of the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron includes two half-wavelength cavities, two 100 kW tetrode amplifiers and power transmission line systems (all above are independent from each other) and two sets of Low Level RF control crates. Each set of LLRF control includes an amplitude control unit, a tuning control unit, a phase control unit, a local Digital Signal Process control unit and an Advanced RISC Machines based EPICS IOC unit. These two identical LLRF control crates share one common reference clock and take advantages of modern digital technologies (e.g. DSP and Direct Digital Synthesizer) to achieve closed loop voltage and phase regulations of the dee-voltage. In the beam commission, the measured dee-voltage stability of RF system is better than 0.1% and phase stability is better than 0.03°. The hardware design of the LLRF system will be reviewed in this paper.

  12. RF Transceivers for Wireless Body Area Network Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshra, Islam; Allam, Mootaz; Sayed, Alhassan; Benabid, Sorore; Aboushady, Hassan

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on the system and circuit level consideration of radio frequency front-end transceivers dedicated to WBAN controllers. We show how highly digitized transceivers employing sigma-delta modulators can achieve the frequency agility required by WBAN controllers. The paper compares the performance and highlights the pros and cons of I/Q transmitters and polar transmitters. For the receiver, different sigma-delta based RF receiver architectures are presented. These architectures are compared with more conventional architectures in terms of their suitability to WBAN controllers.

  13. Controlling satellite communication system unwanted emissions in congested RF spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald; Heymann, Roger

    2007-09-01

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU), a United Nations (UN) agency, is the agency that, under an international treaty, sets radio spectrum usage regulations among member nations. Within the United States of America (USA), the organization that sets regulations, coordinates an application for use, and provides authorization for federal government/agency use of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum is the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). In this regard, the NTIA defines which RF spectrum is available for federal government use in the USA, and how it is to be used. The NTIA is a component of the United States (U.S.) Department of Commerce of the federal government. The significance of ITU regulations is that ITU approval is required for U.S. federal government/agency permission to use the RF spectrum outside of U.S. boundaries. All member nations have signed a treaty to do so. U.S. federal regulations for federal use of the RF spectrum are found in the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management, and extracts of the manual are found in what is known as the Table of Frequency Allocations. Nonfederal government and private sector use of the RF spectrum within the U.S. is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). There is a need to control "unwanted emissions" (defined to include out-of-band emissions, which are those immediately adjacent to the necessary and allocated bandwidth, plus spurious emissions) to preclude interference to all other authorized users. This paper discusses the causes, effects, and mitigation of unwanted RF emissions to systems in adjacent spectra. Digital modulations are widely used in today's satellite communications. Commercial communications sector standards are covered for the most part worldwide by Digital Video Broadcast - Satellite (DVB-S) and digital satellite news gathering (DSNG) evolutions and the second generation of DVB-S (DVB-S2) standard

  14. High Gradient Operation with the CEBAF Upgrade RF Control System

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hovater; G. Davis; Hai Dong; Alicia Hofler; Lawrence King; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2006-08-16

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is presently a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. Energy will be upgraded to 12 GeV with the addition of 10 new high gradient cryomodules (17+ MV/m). The higher gradients pose significant challenges beyond what the present analog low level RF (LLRF) control systems can handle reliably; therefore, a new LLRF control system is needed. A prototype system has been developed incorporating a large FPGA and using digital down and up conversion to minimize the need for analog components. The new system is more flexible and less susceptible to drifts and component nonlinearities. Because resonance control is critical to reach high gradients quickly, the new cryomodules will include a piezoelectric tuner for each cavity, and the LLRF controls must incorporate both feedback and feed-forward methods to achieve optimal resonance control performance. This paper discusses development of the new RF system, system performance for phase and amplitude stability and resonance control under Lorentz detuning measured during recent tests on a prototype cryomodule.

  15. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  16. Controlling the dipole-dipole interaction using NMR composite rf pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Baudin, Emmanuel

    2014-08-07

    New composite rf pulses are proposed during which the average dipole-dipole interactions within a spin ensemble are controlled, while a global rotation is achieved. The method used to tailor the pulses is based on the average Hamiltonian theory and relies on the geometrical properties of the spin-spin dipolar interaction. I describe several such composite pulses and analyze quantitatively the improvement brought on the control of the NMR dynamics. Numerical simulations show that the magic sandwich pulse sequence, during which the average dipolar field is effectively reversed, is plagued by defects originating from the finite initial and final π/2 rf pulses. A numerical test based on a classical description of nuclear magnetic resonance is used to check that, when these pulses are replaced by magic composite pulses, the efficiency of the magic sandwich is improved.

  17. Pushing the Limits: RF Field Control at High Loaded Q

    SciTech Connect

    M. Liepe; S.A. Belomestnykh; J. Dobbins; R.P.K. Kaplan; C.R. Strohman; B.K. Stuhl; C. Hovater; T. Plawski

    2005-05-16

    The superconducting cavities in an Energy-Recovery-Linac will be operated with a high loaded Q of several 10{sup 7}, possible up to 10{sup 8}. Not only has no prior control system ever stabilized the RF field in a linac cavity with such high loaded Q, but also highest field stability in amplitude and phase is required at this high loaded Q. Because of a resulting bandwidth of the cavity of only a few Hz, this presents a significant challenge: the field in the cavity extremely sensitive to any perturbation of the cavity resonance frequency due to microphonics and Lorentz force detuning. To prove that the RF field in a high loaded Q cavity can be stabilized, and that Cornell's newly developed digital control system is able to achieve this, the system was connected to a high loaded Q cavity at the JLab IR-FEL. Excellent cw field stability--about 10{sup -4} rms in relative amplitude and 0.02 deg rms in phase--was achieved at a loaded Q of 2.1 x 10{sup 7} and 1.2 x 10{sup 8}, setting a new record in high loaded Q operation of a linac cavity. Piezo tuner based cavity frequency control proved to be very effective in keeping the cavity on resonance and allowed reliable to ramp up to high gradients in less than 1 second.

  18. RF control system of a parabolic solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecpoyotl-Torres, M.; Campos-Alvarez, J.; Tellez-Alanis, F.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Quiñones-Aguilar, J.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J.

    2007-09-01

    In this work we present the basic considerations of the solar concentrator design, operation and automatization. This concentrator is located at Temixco, Morelos, Mexico, where the geographic and climatic conditions are ideal for its operation because it accounts with the greatest constant illumination in Mexico. We have obtained up to 1000°C of temperature concentration with the corresponding setup (with an opening diameter plate of 332 cm). In order to optimize the operation of this concentrator we use a control circuit designed to track the apparent sun position, considering the variables corresponding to the specific place. The implementation of the remote control modules based on RF is necessary because of the computer, which controls all movements of the motors, must be isolated of the environment, making a suitable and practical arrange.

  19. Improved configuration and reduction of phase noise in a narrow linewidth ultrawideband optical RF source.

    PubMed

    Grund, David W; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J; Murakowski, Janusz; Prather, Dennis W

    2014-08-15

    In this Letter, we report on the improved configuration of a widely tunable optical RF generation system, particularly for the generation of low-frequency RF, as well as the reduction of phase noise in that same system. Using an amplitude modulator, a simplified system design was demonstrated with fewer components and improved phase noise performance, especially at RF frequencies below ∼36 GHz. Excess phase noise due to acoustic vibrations of the optical fibers was also successfully eliminated by mechanical isolation. A minimum phase noise of -124 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset was demonstrated at 4 GHz. PMID:25121844

  20. Controlling satellite communication system unwanted emissions in congested RF spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald; Heymann, Roger

    2007-09-01

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU), a United Nations (UN) agency, is the agency that, under an international treaty, sets radio spectrum usage regulations among member nations. Within the United States of America (USA), the organization that sets regulations, coordinates an application for use, and provides authorization for federal government/agency use of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum is the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). In this regard, the NTIA defines which RF spectrum is available for federal government use in the USA, and how it is to be used. The NTIA is a component of the United States (U.S.) Department of Commerce of the federal government. The significance of ITU regulations is that ITU approval is required for U.S. federal government/agency permission to use the RF spectrum outside of U.S. boundaries. All member nations have signed a treaty to do so. U.S. federal regulations for federal use of the RF spectrum are found in the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management, and extracts of the manual are found in what is known as the Table of Frequency Allocations. Nonfederal government and private sector use of the RF spectrum within the U.S. is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). There is a need to control "unwanted emissions" (defined to include out-of-band emissions, which are those immediately adjacent to the necessary and allocated bandwidth, plus spurious emissions) to preclude interference to all other authorized users. This paper discusses the causes, effects, and mitigation of unwanted RF emissions to systems in adjacent spectra. Digital modulations are widely used in today's satellite communications. Commercial communications sector standards are covered for the most part worldwide by Digital Video Broadcast - Satellite (DVB-S) and digital satellite news gathering (DSNG) evolutions and the second generation of DVB-S (DVB-S2) standard

  1. Active RF Pulse Compression using Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2008-01-30

    In this paper, we will present our recent results on the research of the ultra-fast high power RF switches based on silicon. We have developed a switch module at X-band which can use a silicon window as the switch. The switching is realized by generation of carriers in the bulk silicon. The carriers can be generated electrically or/and optically. The electrically controlled switches use PIN diodes to inject carrier. We have built the PIN diode switches at X-band, with <300ns switching time. The optically controlled switches use powerful lasers to excite carriers. By combining the laser excitation and electrical carrier generation, significant reduction in the required power of both the laser and the electrical driver is expected. High power test is under going.

  2. Active RF Pulse Compression Using An Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    First we review the theory of active pulse compression systems using resonant delay lines. Then we describe the design of an electrically controlled semiconductor active switch. The switch comprises an active window and an overmoded waveguide three-port network. The active window is based on a four-inch silicon wafer which has 960 PIN diodes. These are spatially combined in an overmoded waveguide. We describe the philosophy and design methodology for the three-port network and the active window. We then present the results of using this device to compress 11.4 GHz RF signals with high compression ratios. We show how the system can be used with amplifier like sources, in which one can change the phase of the source by manipulating the input to the source. We also show how the active switch can be used to compress a pulse from an oscillator like sources, which is not possible with passive pulse compression systems.

  3. A non-IQ sampling controller in low level RF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Cheng-Ke; Dai, Zhi-Min; Liu, Jian-Fei; Zhao, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Tong-Xuan; Fu, Ze-Chuan; Liu, Wei-Qing

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a non-IQ controller for digital Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback control. Based on this non-IQ sampling method, arbitrary frequency relationship between ADC/DAC sampling clocks and IF signals can be employed. The nonlinearity in digital conversion can be reduced and the system dynamic performance improved. This paper analyzes the nonlinearity in conventional IQ sampling, gives the state variable description of the non-IQ algorithm, presents an implementation and its synchronization, and compares its performances with IQ sampling. Supported by SSRF Project

  4. Low-Level RF Control of Microphonics in Superconducting Spoke-Loaded Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Z.A.; Kelly, M.P.; Sharamentov, S.I.; Shepard, K.W.; Davis, G.; Delayen, Jean; Doolittle, Lawrence

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents the results of cw RF frequency control and RF phase-stabilization experiments performed with a piezoelectric fast tuner mechanically coupled to a superconducting, 345 MHz, Ë = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity operating at 4.2K. The piezoelectric fast tuner damped low-frequency microphonic-noise by an order of magnitude. Two methods of RF phase-stabilization were characterized: overcoupling with negative phase feedback, and also fast mechanical tuner feedback. The Ë = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity RF field amplitude and phase errors were controlled to ±0.5% and ±30 respectively.

  5. Short range RF communication for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, Daniel White (Inventor); Hershey, John Erik (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method transmitting a message over at least one of a plurality of radio frequency (RF) channels of an RF communications network is provided. The method comprises the steps of detecting a presence of jamming pulses in the at least one of the plurality of RF channels. The characteristics of the jamming pulses in the at least one of the plurality of RF channels is determined wherein the determined characteristics define at least interstices between the jamming pulses. The message is transmitted over the at least one of the plurality of RF channels wherein the message is transmitted within the interstices of the jamming pulse determined from the step of determining characteristics of the jamming pulses.

  6. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.D.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Bowling, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feed forward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrix{sub x} software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system.

  7. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C. D.; Regan, A. H.; Lynch, M. T.; Bowling, P. S.

    1995-09-15

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of the RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feedforward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrixx software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system.

  8. Design and construction of the advanced photon source 352-MHz rf system switching control

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Solita, L.; Reigle, D.; Dimonte, N.

    1997-08-01

    A switching control system has been designed and built to provide the capability of rapidly switching the waveguide and low-level cabling between different klystrons to operate the Advanced Photon Source storage ring in the event of a failure of a klystron system or to perform necessary repairs and preventative maintenance. The twelve possible modes of operation allow for complete redundancy of the booster synchrotron rf system and either a maximum of two storage ring rf systems to be completely off-line or one system to be used as a power source for an rf test stand. A programmable controller is used to send commands to intermediate control panels which interface to WR2300 waveguide switches and phase shifters, rf cavity interlock and low-level rf distribution systems, and klystron power supply controls for rapid reconfiguration of the rf systems in response to a mode-selection command. Mode selection is a local manual operation using a keyswitch arrangement which prevents more than one mode from being selected at a time. The programmable controller also monitors for hardware malfunction and guards against {open_quotes}hot-switching{close_quotes} of the rf systems. The rf switching controls system is monitored via the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for remote system status check.

  9. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  10. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Goulding, R. H.

    2010-02-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering {approx}38 mA H{sup -} beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

  11. Rf stability, control and bunch lengthening in electron synchrotron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wachtel, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    A self-consistent theory for nonlinear longitudinal particle motion and rf cavity excitation in a high energy electron storage ring is developed. Coupled first order equations for the motion of an arbitrary number of particles and for the field in several rf cavities are given in the form used in control system theory. Stochastic quantum excitation of synchrotron motion is included, as are the effects of rf control system corrections. Results of computations for double cavity bunch lengthening are given. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Low power smartdust receiver with novel applications and improvements of an RF power harvesting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Thomas Steven, Jr.

    Smartdust is the evolution of wireless sensor networks to cubic centimeter dimensions or less. Smartdust systems have advantages in cost, flexibility, and rapid deployment that make them ideal for many military, medical, and industrial applications. This work addresses the limitations of prior works of research to provide sufficient lifetime and performance for Smartdust sensor networks through the design, fabrication and testing of a novel low power receiver for use in a Smartdust transceiver. Through the novel optimization of a multi-stage LNA design and novel application of a power matched Villard voltage doubler circuit, a 1.0 V, 1.6 mW low power On-Off Key (OOK) receiver operating at 2.2 GHz is fabricated using 0.13 um CMOS technology. To facilitate data transfer in adverse RF propagation environments (1/r3 loss), the chip receives a 1 Mbps data signal with a sensitivity of -90 dBm while consuming just 1.6 nJ/bit. The receiver operates without the addition of any external passives facilitating its application in Smartdust scale (cm 3) wireless sensor networks. This represents an order of magnitude decrease in power consumption over receiver designs of comparable sensitivity. In an effort to further extend the lifetime of the Smartdust transceiver, RF power harvesting is explored as a power source. The small scale of Smartdust sensor networks poses unique challenges in the design of RF power scavenging systems. To meet these challenges, novel design improvements to an RF power scavenging circuit integrated directly onto CMOS are presented. These improvements include a reduction in the threshold voltage of diode connected MOSFET and sources of circuit parasitics that are unique to integrated circuits. Utilizing these improvements, the voltage necessary to drive Smartdust circuitry (1 V) with a greater than 20% RF to DC conversion efficiency was generated from RF energy levels measured in the environment (66 uW). This represents better than double the RF to DC

  13. An amplitude and phase control system for the TFTR rf heating sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cutsogeorge, G.

    1989-04-01

    Feedback loops that control the amplitude and phase of the rf heating sources on TFTR are described. The method for providing arc protection is also discussed. Block diagrams and Bode plots are included. 6 figs.

  14. Confinement improvement with rf poloidal current drive in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Sarff, J.; Sovinec, C.; Uchimoto, E.

    1994-03-08

    External control of the current profile in a reversed-field pinch (RFP), by means such as rf poloidal current drive, may have beneficial effects well beyond the direct reduction of Ohmic input power due to auxiliary heating. Reduction of magnetic turbulence associated with the dynamo, which drives poloidal current in a conventional RFP, may allow operation at lower density and higher electron temperature, for which rf current drive becomes efficient and the RFP operates in a more favorable regime on the n{tau} vs T diagram. Projected parameters for RFX at 2 MA axe studied as a concrete example. If rf current drive allows RFX to operate with {beta} = 10% (plasma energy/magnetic energy) at low density (3 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}) with classical resistivity (i.e. without dynamo-enhanced power input), 40 ms energy confinement times and 3 keV temperatures will result, matching the performance of tokamaks of similar size.

  15. RF low-level control for the Linac4 H{sup −} source

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, A. Grudiev, A.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Schmitzer, C.; Nishida, K.

    2015-04-08

    The H{sup −} source for the Linac4 accelerator at CERN uses an RF driven plasma for the production of H{sup −}. The RF is supplied by a 2 MHz RF tube amplifier with a maximum power output of 100 kW and a pulse duration of up to 2 ms. The low-level RF signal generation and measurement system has been developed using standard CERN controls electronics in the VME form factor. The RF frequency and amplitude reference signals are generated using separate arbitrary waveform generator channels. The frequency and amplitude are both freely programmable over the duration of the RF pulse, which allows fine-tuning of the excitation. Measurements of the forward and reverse RF power signals are performed via directional couplers using high-speed digitizers, and permit the estimation of the plasma impedance and deposited power via an equivalent circuit model. The low-level RF hardware and software implementations are described, and experimental results obtained with the Linac4 ion sources in the test stand are presented.

  16. Modulation improvements in the 201 MHZ RF generators at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W M; Lyles, J T.M.; Harris, H W

    1992-01-01

    Radio-frequency generators, operating at 201 MHz, power the first four stages of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator. Each generator consists of four stages of seriesconnected, vacuum-tube amplifiers. The modulation scheme for each stage is different. The fist amplifier is a grid-modulated tetrode that produces 500 W peak-power. The second amplifier is a drive-modulated tetrode that produces 5 kill peak-power. The third stage is a grid- and plate-modulated tetrode that produces 130 kill peak-power. The last stage is a plate-modulated triode that produces 2.5 MW peak power. A modernization program has been initiated to improve the reliability of each of these stages. The first two stages of each generator are being replaced with a single, drive-modulated, solid-state amplifier. Specifications for the amplifier design, and requirements for integration into the system are presented. The third stage will be converted to a drive-modulated system using the current tetrode. This modification involves the development of a 17-kV, 15-A switching supply to replace the present plate-modulator. Design requirements for this switching supply are presented. The final stage will remain plate-modulated but will contain a new driver unit for the modulator tube.

  17. RF Field Visualization of RF Ablation at the Larmor Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John; Scott, Greig

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an effective minimally invasive treatment for tumors. One primary source of difficulty is monitoring and controlling the ablation region. Currently, RF ablation is performed at 460 kHz, for which MRI could play a role given its capability for temperature monitoring and tumor visualization. If instead the ablation were to be performed at the MRI Larmor frequency, then the MR capability for B1 field mapping could be used to directly visualize the RF fields created by the ablation currents. Visualizing the RF fields may enable better control of the ablation currents, enabling better control of lesion shape and size and improving repeatability. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing RF ablations at 64 MHz and show preliminary results from imaging the RF fields from the ablation. The post-ablation RF fields show an increase in current density in the ablated region, consistent with an increase in conductivity of the ablated tissue. PMID:21775256

  18. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    SciTech Connect

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  19. An improved drone tracking control system transponder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, James J.; Tannenholz, Philip H.

    A small, compact, and inexpensive method of achieving frequency stability of a solid state LO to +/- 1 MHz in the MD700C-1 drone tracking and control system C-band command and control transponder is described. The methodology for realizing improved RF rejection, local oscillator stability, automatic gain control, and power supply efficiency is discussed. A switching mode regulator and a nonsaturating power supply were designed to operate at 80 percent efficiency to reduce power consumption and heat while operating over a wide voltage range.

  20. Control of the RF waveform at the chuck of an industrial oxide-etch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    BERRY,LEE; MAYNARD,HELEN; MILLER,PAUL A.; MOORE,TONY; PENDLEY,MICHAEL; RESTA,VICTORIA; SPARKS,DENNIS; YANG,QUINGYUN

    2000-05-04

    Radio frequency (rf) power is applied to the chuck of a high-density plasma reactor in order to extract ions and to control the energy of the ions used for the fabrication of microelectronic devices. In many cases, the temporal shape of the rf waveform largely determines the shape of the spectrum of those extracted ions, thereby strongly affecting feature evolution. Using auxiliary rf circuits the authors successfully made major changes to the rf potential waveform at the chuck of an Applied Materials 5300 HDP Omega reactor without affecting the normal functioning of the reactor's control systems. This work established the practical feasibility of techniques for modifying the ion energy distribution functions of industrial reactors.

  1. Programmable RF photonic phase shifters based on FD-OP for optically controlled beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yongfeng; Huang, Shanguo; Gao, Xinlu; Gao, Chao; Wang, Qian; Gu, Wanyi

    2015-08-01

    Programmable RF photonic phase shifter that can achieve a full 360° phase shift with little RF signal amplitude variation and low phase noise (PN) is presented. It is based on a two-dimensional (2D) Fourier-domain optical processor (FD-OP) which comprises an array liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) pixels to control the amplitude and phase of the spectral components by programming. It can realize multiple photonic RF phase shifters simultaneously applied in optical controlled phased array antennas. Experimental results show the RF phase shifter can achieve a continuous 0-360° phase shift with low amplitude variation of <2.5 dB and a phase deviation of <2° at 15 GHz.

  2. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of the Laser Ablation Plume Controled by RF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Takuma; Mizuno, Manabu; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Sakai, Yosuke

    1999-10-01

    Recently, film deposition has been investigated using laser ablation methods which have a lot of advantages. For the purpose of control of the laser ablation plume, we introduced a radio frequency (RF) plasma. In this report we present position resolved optical emission spectra of the plume observed by an OMA (optical multichannel analyzer). The plume current is also measured. The RF plasma is generated in a helical coil installed between the substrate and the target. An ArF excimer laser (wavelength 193 nm, pulse duration time 20 ns) is used as a light source, and the target material is sintered carbon graphite. The laser fluence on the target surface is changed in a range from 1.2 to 6.4 J/cm^2. Ar gas is introduced to sustain the RF plasma. When the plume goes through the RF plasma, interaction of the plume with the plasma is expected. The possibility of control of the plume behavior is discussed.

  3. A digitally calibrated CMOS RMS power detector for RF automatic gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taotao, Yan; Hui, Wang; Jinbo, Li; Jianjun, Zhou

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a digitally calibrated CMOS wideband radio frequency (RF) root-mean-square (RMS) power detector for high accuracy RF automatic gain control (AGC). The proposed RMS power detector demonstrates accurate power detection in the presence of process, supply voltage, and temperature (PVT) variations by employing a digital calibration scheme. It also consumes low power and occupies a small chip area. The measurement results show that the scheme improves the accuracy of the detector to better than 0.3 dB over the PVT variations and wide operating frequency range from 0.2 to 0.8 GHz. Implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS process and occupying a small die area of 263 × 214 μm2, the proposed digitally calibrated CMOS RMS power detector only consumes 1.6 mA in power detection mode and 2.1 mA in digital calibration mode from a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  4. RF sputtering for controlling dihydride and monohydride bond densities in amorphous silicon hydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffery, F.R.; Shanks, H.R.

    1980-08-26

    A process is described for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicone produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous solicone hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  5. RF-modulated pulsed fiber optic lidar transmitter for improved underwater imaging and communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpel, F.; Chen, Y.; Fouron, J.-L.; Akbulut, M.; Engin, D.; Gupta, S.

    2011-03-01

    We present results on the design, development and initial testing of a fiber-optic based RF-modulated lidar transmitter operating at 532nm, for underwater imaging application in littoral waters. The design implementation is based on using state-of-the-art high-speed FPGAs, thereby producing optical waveforms with arbitrary digital-RF-modulated pulse patterns with carrier frequencies >= 3GHz, with a repetition rate of 0.5-1MHz, and with average powers >=5W (at 532nm). Use of RF-modulated bursts above 500MHz, instead of single optical pulse lidar detection, reduces the effect of volumetric backscatter for underwater imaging application, leading to an improved signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and contrast, for a given range. Initial underwater target detection tests conducted at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, MD, in a large water-tank facility, validates the advantages of this hybrid-lidar-radar (HLR) approach for improved underwater imaging, over a wide range of turbidity levels and both white and black targets. The compact, robust and power-efficient fiber laser architecture lends very well to lidar sensor integration on unmanned-underwater-vehicle (UUV) platforms. HLR transmitters can also provide similar advantages in active-sensing situations dominated by continuous backscatter, e.g. underwater communications, imaging through smoke and fire environment, rotor-craft landing in degraded visual environment, and pointing-tracking of active-EO sensors through fog.

  6. Control of a small robot using a hybrid optical modulating retro-reflector/RF link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James L.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Suite, Michele R.; Uecke, Stanley H.

    2014-06-01

    Tele-operated robots used for Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) are ordinarily controlled using a radio frequency (RF) link. Use of RF links on the battlefield presents several challenges including spectrum allocation and jamming effects (both by the enemy and friendly forces). Several solutions have been attempted including electrical or fiber optic umbilicals and spread spectrum radios with varying degrees of success. Modulating Retro-reflector Free Space Optical (MRR-FSO) communications links avoid these effects entirely but are limited to line of sight operation. We have developed a system consisting of an MRR-FSO link with a tracking optical terminal, a conventional RF link and a deployable pod to provide a relay node bridging the FSO link to the operator and the RF link to the robot. The MRRFSO link provides the capability to operate the robot in the presence of jamming while the RF link allows short range non line of sight operation. The operator uses the MRR-FSO link to drive the robot to a position downrange outside the influence of the jammer or other interference. Once the robot is positioned downrange near the area of operation the pod is deployed. This allows the robot to maneuver freely including venturing beyond line of sight using the short range RF link to maintain communications between the vehicle and pod while the FSO link maintains connectivity between the pod and the operator.

  7. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  8. RF Head Coil Design with Improved RF Magnetic Near-Fields Uniformity for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Higher magnetic field strength in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems offers higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and spatial resolution in MR images. However, the wavelength in ultra-high fields (7 tesla and beyond) becomes shorter than the human body at the Larmor frequency with increasing static magnetic field (B0) of MRI system. At short wavelengths, interference effect appears resulting in non- uniformity of the RF magnetic near-field (B1) over the subject and MR images may have spatially anomalous contrast. The B1 near-field generated by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil’s microstrip line element has a maximum near the center of its length and falls off towards both ends. In this study, a double trapezoidal shaped microstrip transmission line element is proposed to obtain uniform B1 field distribution by gradual impedance variation. Two multi-channel RF head coils with uniform and trapezoidal shape elements were built and tested with a phantom at 7T MRI scanner for comparison. The simulation and experimental results show stronger and more uniform B1+ near-field with the trapezoidal shape. PMID:25892746

  9. RF beam control system for the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; DeLong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-08-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  10. RF BEAM CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE BROOKHAVEN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER, RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; CAMPBELL,A.; DELONG,J.; HAYES,T.; ONILLON,E.; ROSE,J.; VETTER,K.

    1998-06-22

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency.

  11. Operator interface for the PEP-II low level RF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.; Claus, R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper focuses on the operational aspects of the low level RF control system being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. Subsystems requiring major operational considerations include displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors, and various client applications in the existing SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Since commissioning of PEP-II RF is currently in-progress, only those parts of the control system used during this phase are discussed in detail. Based on past experience with the SLC control system, it is expected that effort expended during commissioning on a solid user interface will result in smoother transition to full reliable 24-hour-a-day operation.

  12. Precision vector control of a superconducting RF cavity driven by an injection locked magnetron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chase, Brian; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Cullerton, Ed; Varghese, Philip

    2015-03-01

    The technique presented in this paper enables the regulation of both radio frequency amplitude and phase in narrow band devices such as a Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity driven by constant power output devices i.e. magnetrons [1]. The ability to use low cost high efficiency magnetrons for accelerator RF power systems, with tight vector regulation, presents a substantial cost savings in both construction and operating costs - compared to current RF power system technology. An operating CW system at 2.45 GHz has been experimentally developed. Vector control of an injection locked magnetron has been extensively tested and characterized with a SRFmore » cavity as the load. Amplitude dynamic range of 30 dB, amplitude stability of 0.3% r.m.s, and phase stability of 0.26 degrees r.m.s. has been demonstrated.« less

  13. Precision vector control of a superconducting RF cavity driven by an injection locked magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Brian; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Cullerton, Ed; Varghese, Philip

    2015-03-01

    The technique presented in this paper enables the regulation of both radio frequency amplitude and phase in narrow band devices such as a Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity driven by constant power output devices i.e. magnetrons [1]. The ability to use low cost high efficiency magnetrons for accelerator RF power systems, with tight vector regulation, presents a substantial cost savings in both construction and operating costs - compared to current RF power system technology. An operating CW system at 2.45 GHz has been experimentally developed. Vector control of an injection locked magnetron has been extensively tested and characterized with a SRF cavity as the load. Amplitude dynamic range of 30 dB, amplitude stability of 0.3% r.m.s, and phase stability of 0.26 degrees r.m.s. has been demonstrated.

  14. Measurement and control of field in RF GUN at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Koprek, W.; Pucyk, P.; Simrock, S.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the hardware and software architecture of a control and measurement system for electromagnetic field stabilization inside the radio frequency electron gun, in FLASH experiment. A complete measurement path has been presented, including I and Q detectors and FPGA based, low latency digital controller. Algorithms used to stabilize the electromagnetic field have been presented as well as the software environment used to provide remote access to the control device. An input signal calibration procedure has been described as a crucial element of measurement process.

  15. Use of Sensors and RF System Models to Control Inductively Coupled Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee A.

    1997-10-01

    Research for the development of plasma sources and processes for new generations of feature and wafer sizes must meet requirements in many dimensions including performance, cost, schedule, and yield. This last requirement is becoming increasingly difficult to meet because the process for submicron features frequently have narrow windows and it is difficult to have the needed tool to tool and wafer to wafer repeatability to consistently hit the window. Data from sensors, in particular post-match rf sensors, can be used to measure and control some of the critical process parameters. This work, in many respects, parallels previous work by Paul Miller on capacitively coupled tools. Three examples utilizing post-match rf sensor data will be presented. First, a common approach to auto-matching is to (separately) use the phase and magnitude of the reflected rf power signal to control two capacitors in the match box. At a minimum, presets must be changed for new processes and auto-matches sometimes fail. By utilizing error signals derived from both pre-and post-match rf sensors, we have developed and tested a new matching algorithm that accommodates a wide range of power and plasma conditions without the need for presets. Second, the same rf data can be used to infer power input to the plasma. Losses in match boxes range from 10-50%, depending on the both the rf system and desired plasma conditions. In addition, because of small, but significant differences in particular tool installation or rf components, there can be differences between the efficiencies of nominally the same tool under identical conditions. Thus machine control based on net power is needed for optimum control. Post-match sensors provide the data needed to separate the loses in the matchbox from power coupled to the plasma. The third use of rf system data is the measurement parameters that can be used to both characterize the tool and to indicate and help diagnose or even predict equipment failures. The

  16. FREQUENCY CONTROL OF RF HEATING OF GASEOUS PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Herold, E.W.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to the heating of gaseous plasma by radiofrequency ion-cyclotron resonance heating. The cyclotron resonance frequencies are varied and this invention provides means for automatically controlling the frequency of the radiofrequency to maximize the rate of heating. To this end, a servo-loop is provided to sense the direction of plasma heating with frequency and a control signal is derived to set the center frequency of the radiofrequency energy employed to heat the plasma. (AEC)

  17. Improved analog/RF performance of double gate junctionless MOSFET using both gate material engineering and drain/source extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebaki, E.; Djeffal, F.; Ferhati, H.; Bentrcia, T.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new Double Gate Junctionless (DGJ) MOSFET design based on both gate material engineering and drain/source extensions. Analytical models for the long channel device associated to the drain current, analog and radio-frequency (RF) performance parameters are developed incorporating the impact of dual-material gate engineering and two highly doped extension regions on the analog/RF performance of DGJ MOSFET. The transistor performance figures-of-merit (FoM), governing the analog/RF behavior, have also been analyzed. The analog/RF performance is compared between the proposed design and a conventional DGJ MOSFET of similar dimensions, where the proposed device shows excellent ability in improving the analog/RF performance and provides higher drain current and improved figures-of-merit as compared to the conventional DGJ MOSFET. The obtained results have been validated against the data obtained from TCAD software for a wide range of design parameters. Moreover, the developed analytical models are used as mono-objective function to optimize the device analog/RF performance using Genetic Algorithms (GAs). In comparison with the reported numerical data for Inversion-Mode (IM) DG MOSFET, our optimized performance metrics for JL device exhibit enhancement over the reported data for IM device at the same channel length.

  18. A low-level rf control system for a quarter-wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwon; Hwang, Churlkew

    2012-06-01

    A low-level rf control system was designed and built for an rf deflector, which is a quarter wave resonator, and was designed to deflect a secondary electron beam to measure the bunch length of an ion beam. The deflector has a resonance frequency near 88 MHz, its required phase stability is approximately ±1° and its amplitude stability is less than ±1%. The control system consists of analog input and output components and a digital system based on a field-programmable gate array for signal processing. The system is cost effective, while meeting the stability requirements. Some basic properties of the control system were measured. Then, the capability of the rf control was tested using a mechanical vibrator made of a dielectric rod attached to an audio speaker system, which could induce regulated perturbations in the electric fields of the resonator. The control system was flexible so that its parameters could be easily configured to compensate for the disturbance induced in the resonator.

  19. NSLS-II Digital RF Controller Logic and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Holub, B.; Gao, F.; Kulpin, J.; Marques, C.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) accelerator consists of the Storage Ring, the Booster Ring and Linac along with their associated cavities. Given the number, types and variety of functions of these cavities, we sought to limit the logic development effort by reuse of parameterized code on one hardware platform. Currently there are six controllers installed in the NSLS-II system. There are two in the Storage ring, two in the Booster ring, one in the Linac and one in the Master Oscillator Distribution system.

  20. Improving Negative Ion Beam Quality and Purity with a RF Quadrupole Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.

    2011-09-26

    Recent progress in the development of a gas-filled RF quadrupole ion cooler for cooling negative ions is reported. Experiments demonstrate that negative ion beams can be cooled to 2 eV FWHM energy spread with more than 50% transmission through the cooler. The RFQ cooler can potentially improve the purity of radioactive ion beams by magnetic mass separation. New developments on purifying negative ion beams by photodetachment in the RFQ cooler are presented. With a laser of proper photon energy, nearly 100% suppression of the unwanted negative ions in the RFQ cooler has been observed, while the desired ions remain mostly intact. A recent experimental study demonstrates that pure ground state negative ion beams can be obtained by state-selective photodetachment in the RFQ cooler.

  1. Improving Negative Ion Beam Quality And Purity With A RF Quadrupole Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of a gas-filled RF quadrupole ion cooler for cooling negative ions is reported. Experiments demonstrate that negative ion beams can be cooled to 2 eV FWHM energy spread with more than 50% transmission through the cooler. The RFQ cooler can potentially improve the purity of radioactive ion beams by magnetic mass separation. New developments on purifying negative ion beams by photodetachment in the RFQ cooler are presented. With a laser of proper photon energy, nearly 100% suppression of the unwanted negative ions in the RFQ cooler has been observed, while the desired ions remain mostly intact. A recent experimental study demonstrates that pure ground state negation ion beams can be obtained by state-selective photodetachment in the RFQ cooler.

  2. Improved RF performance of travelling wave MR with a high permittivity dielectric lining of the bore.

    PubMed

    Andreychenko, A; Bluemink, J J; Raaijmakers, A J E; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2013-09-01

    Application of travelling wave MR to human body imaging is restricted by the limited peak power of the available RF amplifiers. Nevertheless, travelling wave MR advantages like a large field of view excitation and distant location of transmit elements would be desirable for whole body MRI. In this work, improvement of the B1+ efficiency of travelling wave MR is demonstrated. High permittivity dielectric lining placed next to the scanner bore wall effectively reduces attenuation of the travelling wave in the longitudinal direction and at the same time directs the radial power flow toward the load. First, this is shown with an analytical model of a metallic cylindrical waveguide with the dielectric lining next to the wall and loaded with a cylindrical phantom. Simulations and experiments also reveal an increase of B1+ efficiency in the center of the bore for travelling wave MR with a dielectric lining. Phantom experiments show up to a 2-fold gain in B1+ with the dielectric lining. This corresponds to a 4-fold increase in power efficiency of travelling wave MR. In vivo experiments demonstrate an 8-fold signal-to-noise ratio gain with the dielectric lining. Overall, it is shown that dielectric lining is a constructive method to improve efficacy of travelling wave MR. PMID:23044511

  3. An RF front-end with an automatic gain control technique for a U/V band CMMB receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinxin, Zhao; Xueqing, Hu; Yin, Shi; Lei, Wang

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated RF front-end with an automatic gain control (AGC) scheme and a digitally controlled radio frequency varied gain amplifier (RFVGA) for a U/V band China Mobile Multimedia Broadcasting (CMMB) direct conversion receiver. The RFVGA provides a gain range of 50 dB with a 1.6 dB step. The adopted AGC strategy could improve immunity to adjacent channel signal, which is of importance for CMMB application. The front-end, composed of a low noise amplifier (LNA), an RFVGA, a mixer and AGC, achieves an input referred 3rd order intercept point (IIP3) of 4.9 dBm with the LNA in low gain mode and the RFVGA in medium gain mode, and a less than 4 dB double side band noise figure with both the LNA and the RFVGA in high gain mode. The proposed RF front-end is fabricated in a 0.35 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology and consumes 25.6 mA from a 3.0 V power supply.

  4. Improving School Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Few things are more important for school safety and security than controlling access to buildings and grounds. It is relatively easy to incorporate effective access control measures in new school designs but more difficult in existing schools, where most building and site features cannot be readily altered or reconfigured. The National…

  5. Low-level RF control development for the European X-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, S. N.

    2005-09-01

    The requirements for RF Control Systems for the European X-FEL are not only defined in terms of the quality of field control but also with respect to operability, availability, and maintainability of the RF System, and the interfaces to other subsystems. The field control of the vector-sum of many cavities driven by one klystron in pulsed mode at high gradients is a challenging task since severe Lorentz force detuning, microphonics and beam induced field errors must be suppressed by several orders of magnitude. This is accomplished by a combination of local and global feedback and feedforward control. Sensors monitor individual cavity probe signals, and forward and reflected wave as well as the beam properties including beam energy and phase while actuators control the incident wave of the klystron and individual cavity resonance frequencies. The operability of a large llrf system requires a high degree of automation while the high availability requires robust algorithms, redundancy, and extremely reliable hardware. The maintenance of the llrf demands sophisticated on-line diagnostics for the llrf subsystems to minimize downtime.

  6. Two-layer wireless distributed sensor/control network based on RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Li; Lin, Yuchi; Zhou, Jingjing; Dong, Guimei; Xia, Guisuo

    2006-11-01

    A project of embedded Wireless Distributed Sensor/Control Network (WDSCN) based on RF is presented after analyzing the disadvantages of traditional measure and control system. Because of high-cost and complexity, such wireless techniques as Bluetooth and WiFi can't meet the needs of WDSCN. The two-layer WDSCN is designed based on RF technique, which operates in the ISM free frequency channel with low power and high transmission speed. Also the network is low cost, portable and moveable, integrated with the technologies of computer network, sensor, microprocessor and wireless communications. The two-layer network topology is selected in the system; a simple but efficient self-organization net protocol is designed to fit the periodic data collection, event-driven and store-and-forward. Furthermore, adaptive frequency hopping technique is adopted for anti-jamming apparently. The problems about power reduction and synchronization of data in wireless system are solved efficiently. Based on the discussion above, a measure and control network is set up to control such typical instruments and sensors as temperature sensor and signal converter, collect data, and monitor environmental parameters around. This system works well in different rooms. Experiment results show that the system provides an efficient solution to WDSCN through wireless links, with high efficiency, low power, high stability, flexibility and wide working range.

  7. RF Control System for the SC cavity of the Tesla Test Facility Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosnier, A.; Chel, S.; Phung Ngoc, B.; Tessier, J. M.

    1997-05-01

    The superconducting cavity of the TTF injector, which operates in pulsed mode, must accelerate the non relativistic electron beam to an energy of 10 to 15 MeV. Lorentz forces and microphonics detunings are the major sources of cavity field fluctuation. In order to achieve amplitude and phase stabilities much smaller than 10-3 and 1 degree, an analog feedback system, mainly based on a self excited loop and I/Q modulators, has been developed. After a description of the RF control module, various measurements without and with beam are reported and compared with numerical simulations.

  8. System control and data acquisition of the two new FWCD RF systems at DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.E.; Allen, J.C.; Cary, W.P.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Ferguson, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    The Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system at DIII-D has increased its available radio frequency (RF) power capabilities with the addition of two new high power transmitters along with their associated transmission line systems. A Sun Sparc-10 workstation, functioning as the FWCD operator console, is being used to control transmitter operating parameters and transmission line tuning parameters, along with acquiring data and making data available for integration into the DIII-D data acquisition system. Labview, a graphical user interface application, is used to manage and control the above processes. This paper will discuss the three primary branches of the FWCD computer control system: transmitter control, transmission line tuning control, and FWCD data acquisition. The main control program developed uses VXI, GPIB, CAMAC, Serial, and Ethernet protocols to blend the three branches together into one cohesive system. The control of the transmitters utilizes VXI technology to communicate with the transmitter`s digital interface. A GPIB network allows for communication with various instruments and CAMAC crate controllers. CAMAC crates are located at each phase-shifter/stub-tuner station and are used to digitize transmission line parameters along with transmission line fault detection during RF transmission. The phase-shifter/stub-tuner stations are located throughout the DIII-D facility and are controlled from the FWCD operator console via the workstation`s Serial port. The Sun workstation has an Ethernet connection allowing for the utilization of the DIII-D data acquisition Open System architecture and of course providing communication with the rest of the world.

  9. System control and data acquisition of the two new FWCD RF systems at DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.E.; Allen, J.C.; Cary, W.P. Petty, C.C.

    1995-10-01

    The Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system at DIII-D has increased its available radio frequency (RF) power capabilities with the addition of two new high power transmitters along with their associated transmission line systems. A Sun Sparc-10 workstation, functioning as the FWCD operator console, is being used to control transmitter operating parameters and transmission line tuning parameters, along with acquiring data and making data available for integration into the DIII-D data acquisition system. Labview, a graphical user interface application, is used to manage and control the above processes. This paper will discuss the three primary branches of the FWCD computer control system: transmitter control, transmission line tuning control, and FWCD data acquisition. The main control program developed uses VXI, GPIB, CAMAC, Serial, and Ethernet protocols to blend the three branches together into one cohesive system. The control of the transmitters utilizes VXI technology to communicate with the transmitter`s digital interface. A GPIB network allows for communication with various instruments and CAMAC crate controllers. CAMAC crates are located at each phase-shifter/stub-tuner station and are used to digitize transmission line parameters along with transmission line fault detection during RF transmission. The phase-shifter/stub-tuner stations are located through out the DIII-D facility and are controlled from the FWCD operator console via the workstation`s Serial port. The Sun workstation has an Ethernet connection allowing for the utilization of the DIII-D data acquisition {open_quotes}Open System{close_quotes} architecture and of course providing communication with the rest of the world.

  10. Improved modeling on the RF behavior of InAs/AlSb HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, He; Lv, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuming; Zhang, Yimen

    2015-12-01

    The leakage current and the impact ionization effect causes a drawback for the performance of InAs/AlSb HEMTs due to the InAs channel with a very narrow band gap of 0.35 eV. In this paper, the conventional HEMT small-signal model was enhanced to characterize the RF behavior for InAs/AlSb HEMTs. The additional gate leakage current induced by the impact ionization was modeled by adding two resistances RGh1 and RGh2 shunting the Cgs-Ri and Cgd-Rj branches, respectively, and the ionized-drain current was characterized by an additional resistance Rmi parallel with the output resistance Rds, meanwhile the influence of the impact ionization on the transconductance was modeled by an additional current source gmi controlled by Vgs. The additional inductance, evaluated as a function of f(ω, R), was introduced to characterize the frequency dependency of impact ionization by using the impact ionization effective rate 1/τi and a new frequency response rate factor n, which guaranteed the enhanced model reliable for a wide frequency range. As a result, the enhanced model achieved good agreement with the measurements of the S-parameters and Y-parameters for a wide frequency range, moreover, the simulated results of the stability factor K, the cutoff frequency fT, the maximum frequency of oscillation fmax, and the unilateral Mason's gain U were estimated to approach the experimental results with a high degree.

  11. Selecting RF Amplifiers for Impedance Controlled LLRF Systems - Nonlinear Effects and System Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, John D.; Mastorides, Themis; Rivetta, Claudio Hector; Van Winkle, Daniel; /SLAC

    2007-07-06

    Several high-current accelerators use feedback techniques in the accelerating RF systems to control the impedances seen by the circulating beam. These Direct and Comb Loop architectures put the high power klystron and LLRF signal processing components inside feedback loops, and the ultimate behavior of the systems depends on the individual sub-component properties. Imperfections and non-idealities in the signal processing leads to reduced effectiveness in the impedance control loops. In the PEP-II LLRF systems non-linear effects have been shown to reduce the achievable beam currents, increase low-mode longitudinal growth rates and reduce the margins and stability of the LLRF control loops. We present measurements of the driver amplifiers used in the PEP-II systems, and present measurement techniques needed to quantify the small-signal gain, linearity, transient response and image frequency generation of these amplifiers.

  12. Controlled Fluxes of Silicon Nanoparticles By Extraction from a Pulsed RF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girshick, Steven; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Deposition of silicon nanoparticles onto substrates may be a means of growing monocrystalline silicon films at low substrate temperature if the nanoparticles' impact energy and size can be controlled to provide melting or amorphization of the nanoparticle without damaging the underlying film. In order to explore conditions that could produce such controlled fluxes of nanoparticles we numerically model a pulsed RF argon-silane plasma, with a positive DC bias applied during the afterglow phase of each pulse so as to extract and accelerate negatively charged silicon particles. Operating parameters studied include pulse on time, pulse off time, DC bias voltage, RF voltage and pressure. This set of parameters is tested to find conditions under which one can achieve a periodic steady state with repeatable pulse-to-pulse conditions that maximize silicon film growth rates while maintaining nanoparticle impact energies in the range 0.5-2.0 eV/atom. We utilize a previously developed 1-D dusty plasma numerical model, modified to consider pulsing and applied substrate bias. This model self-consistently solves for the coupled behavior of plasma, chemistry, and aerosol. Results show that it is possible by this method to produce nanoparticle fluxes that are tailored with respect to their distribution of impact energies and mass deposition rates. Partially supported by US Dept. of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Science (DE-SC0001939), US National Science Foundation (CHE-124752), and Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  13. Improvement of radio frequency (RF) heating-assisted alkaline pretreatment on four categories of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Taylor, Steven; Wang, Yifen

    2016-10-01

    Pretreatment plays an important role in making the cellulose accessible for enzyme hydrolysis and subsequent conversion because it destroys more or less resistance and recalcitrance of biomass. Radio frequency (RF)-assisted dielectric heating was utilized in the alkaline pretreatment on agricultural residues (corn stover), herbaceous crops (switchgrass), hardwood (sweetgum) and softwood (loblolly pine). Pretreatment was performed at 90 °C with either RF or traditional water bath (WB) heating for 1 h after overnight soaking in NaOH solution (0.2 g NaOH/g Biomass). Pretreated materials were characterized by chemical compositional analysis, enzyme hydrolysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The glucan yields of RF-heated four categories of hydrolysates were 89.6, 72.6, 21.7, and 9.9 %. Interestingly, RF heating raised glucan yield on switchgrass and sweetgum but not on corn stover or loblolly pine. The SEM images and FTIR spectra agreed with results of composition analysis and hydrolysis. GC-MS detected some compounds only from RF-heated switchgrass. These compounds were found by other researchers only in high-temperature (150-600 °C) and high-pressure pyrolysis processes. PMID:27262715

  14. Use of RF Metrology Subsystem for Formation Flying Command & Control Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sougmagne, R.; Andreis, O.; Dellandrea, B.; Mehlen, C.; Alison, B.

    2007-08-01

    The development of the "RF metrology and data-link instrument" for formation flying missions was initiated in 2001 by ESA/CNES for the DARWIN mission in order to define a subsystem able to provide both relative positioning service and inter-vehicle communication data link for formation flying missions. Today, the number of target missions is wide: SIMBOL-X, PEGASE, PROBA-3, XEUS, DARWIN, … THALES ALENIA SPACE is currently developing and manufacturing the first European multi-mission RF metrology and data link instrument (called FFRFS for Formation Flying Radio-Frequency Sensor) in the frame of the FFIORD (Formation Flying In Orbit RF Demonstration) contribution of CNES to the Swedish PRISMA mission: flight models will be delivered in early 2008. The first goal of the FFRFS is to provide relative positioning (accuracy better than 1cm for distance and 1 degree for the line of sight) for formation of 2 to 4 vehicles over a large operational range (3m to 30km). One of its key features is its omni-directional coverage, providing safe conditions during deployment phase or failure recovery situations. Moreover, it offers an omni- directional communication link for the formations allowing inter-vehicle data rate of 12kbps for transmission of telemetry, telecommands or GNC data. These characteristics make the FFRFS the key element of the command & control of a formation flying. The paper presents the outcomes of a study performed under CNES contract on the use of the FFRFS for: Data exchange between vehicles when the formation is established Synchronisation of the on-board time of all the formation's spacecrafts Failure Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) mainly for the anti-collision aspects. The proposed concepts are illustrated by their application to SIMBOL-X mission, an hard X-ray telescope constituted of 2 satellites flying at 20m distance, currently on study at THALES ALENIA SPACE under CNES phase A contract.

  15. Application of an RF Biased Langmuir Probe to Etch Reactor Chamber Matching, Fault Detection and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Douglas; Booth, Jean-Paul; Benjamin, Neil; Thorgrimsson, Chris; Brooks, Mitchell; Nagai, Mikio; Albarede, Luc; Kim, Jung

    2008-10-01

    Semiconductor device manufacturing typically occurs in an environment of both increasing equipment costs and per unit sale price shrinkage. Profitability in such a conflicted economic environment depends critically on yield, throughput and cost-of-ownership. This has resulted in increasing interest in improved fault detection, process diagnosis, and advanced process control. Achieving advances in these areas requires an integrated understanding of the basic physical principles driving the processes of interest and the realities of commercial manufacturing. Following this trend, this work examines the usefulness of an RF-biased planar Langmuir probe^1. This method delivers precise real-time (10 Hz) measurements of ion flux and tail weighted electron temperature. However, it is also mechanically non-intrusive, reliable and insensitive to contamination and deposition on the probe. Since the measured parameters are closely related to physical processes occurring at the wafer-plasma interface, significant improvements in process control, chamber matching and fault detection are achieved. Examples illustrating the improvements possible will be given. ^1J.P. Booth, N. St. J. Braithwaite, A. Goodyear and P. Barroy, Rev.Sci.Inst., Vol.71, No.7, July 2000, pgs. 2722-2727.

  16. Maintenance and operation procedure, and feedback controls of the J-PARC RF-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H- ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H- ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The maintenance and operation procedure to minimize the plasma chamber (PCH) replacement time on the beam line, which is very important to maximize the J-PARC beam time especially for an antenna failure, is presented in this paper. The PCH preserved by filling argon (Ar) gas inside after pre-conditioning including pre-cesiation to produce the required beam at a test-stand successfully produced the required beam on the beam line with slight addition of cesium (Cs). The methods of the feedback controls of a 2MHz-RF-matching, an H- ion beam intensity and the addition of Cs are also presented. The RF-matching feedback by using two vacuum variable capacitors (VVCs) and RF-frequency shift produced the almost perfect matching with negligibly small reflected RF-power. The H- ion beam intensity was controlled within errors of ±0.1mA by the RF-power feedback. The amount of Cs was also controlled by remotely opening a Cs-valve to keep the RF-power lower than a settled value.

  17. Effective arrangement of separated transmit-only/receive-only RF coil for improvement of B1 homogeneity at 7 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Geun Ho; Seo, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Heo, Phil; Chung, Julius Juhyun; Jang, Moon-Sun; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Sun I.

    2014-09-01

    This article presents an effective arrangement with shifted transmit (Tx)-only and receive (Rx)-only (TORO) radiofrequency (RF) coils in a single-channel surface coil for improving the magnetic flux ( B 1) homogeneity in an ultra-high field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The proposed new methodology for the coil arrangement using the shifted TORO RF coils was demonstrated for coils with 50-mm, 100-mm, and 150-mm-square surfaces and the results were compared to those for general Tx/Rx surface coils with the same dimensions. The computational analysis indicated that a homogeneous B1 field was achieved when the Rx-only coil was shifted in the two-dimensional xy-plane away from the Tx-only coils. Because the proposed coil configuration provides a unique opportunity for increasing the B 1 homogeneity, this feature is likely to increase the feasibility via new coil arrangements of UHF surface design and fabrication.

  18. RF MEMS Switches with SiC Microbridges for Improved Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Zorman, Christian A.; Oldham, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) microelectromechanical (MEMS) switches offer superior performance when compared to the traditional semiconductor devices such as PIN diodes or GaAs transistors. MEMS switches have a return loss (RL) better than -25 dB, negligible insertion loss (IL), isolation better than -30 dB, and near zero power consumption. However, RF MEMS switches have several drawbacks the most serious being long-term reliability. The ability for the switch to operate for millions or even billions of cycles is a major concern and must be addressed. MEMS switches are basically grouped in two categories, capacitive and metal-to-metal contact. The capacitive type switch consists of a movable metal bridge spanning a fixed electrode and separated by a narrow air gap and thin insulating material. The metal-to-metal contact type utilizes the same basic design but without the insulating material. After prolonged operation the metal bridges, in most of these switches, begin to sag and eventually fail to actuate. For the metal-to-metal type, the two metal layers may actually fuse together. Also if the switches are not packaged properly or protected from the environment moisture may build up and cause stiction between the top and bottom electrodes rendering them useless. Many MEMS switch designs have been developed and most illustrate fairly good RF characteristics. Nevertheless very few have demonstrated both great RF performance and ability to perform millions/billions of switching cycles. Of these, nearly all are of metal-to-metal type so as the frequency increases RF performance decreases.

  19. Racetrack microtron rf system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  20. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  1. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Nanocrystalline silicon film growth morphology control through RF waveform tailoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erik V.; Verbeke, Thomas; Vanel, Jean-Charles; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate the application of RF waveform tailoring to generate an electrical asymmetry in a capacitively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition system, and its use to control the growth mode of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited at low temperature (150 °C). A dramatic shift in the dc bias potential at the powered electrode is observed when simply inverting the voltage waveform from 'peaks' to 'troughs', indicating an asymmetric distribution of the sheath voltage. By enhancing or suppressing the ion bombardment energy at the substrate (situated on the grounded electrode), the growth of thin silicon films can be switched between amorphous and nanocrystalline modes, as observed using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. The effect is observed at pressures sufficiently low that the collisional reduction in average ion bombardment energy is not sufficient to allow nanocrystalline growth (<100 mTorr).

  2. Effect of low-frequency ambient magnetic fields on the control unit and RF head of a commercial SQUID magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The control unit and RF head of the SHE model 330XRFSQUID system are shown to be sensitive to ambient ac magnetic fields below 1 HZ, which cause the appearance of false signals corresponding to a magnetometer signal of 0.000001 phi(0) per gauss of field applied. The control unit shows a sensitivity that is linear with frequency, suggesting that the signal is generated by Faraday induction. In contrast, the RF head response is independent of frequency and shows a strong second-harmonic coversion. This response may be due to the magnetic field sensitivity of the ferrite core inductor in the tuned amplifier of the RF head. These signals induced by ambient fields are a potential source of error in Stanford's Relativity Gyroscope experiment, which uses SQUID's on board a rolling satellite as part of the gyroscope readout system. The extent of the magnetic field sensitivity in these components necessitates the use of additional magnetic shielding aboard the satellite.

  3. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  4. Improved manufacturing techniques for RF and laser hardening of missile domes. Phase I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlewicz, W.T.; Mann, I.B.; Martin, P.M.; Hays, D.D.; Graybeal, A.G.

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes key results and accomplishements during the first year of a Manufacturing Methods and Technology project to adapt an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high-power fusion-laser applications to the case of rf and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by the US Army (MICOM). The primary objective of the first year's work was to demonstrate rf hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06-micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings. The project thus involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat-sensitive plastic domes used on laser-guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals were an electrical sheet resistance of 10 Ohms/square, a coated-dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 Ohms/square was expected to result in an rf attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  5. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: Noise-canceling and IP3 improved CMOS RF front-end for DRM/DAB/DVB-H applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keping, Wang; Zhigong, Wang; Xuemei, Lei

    2010-02-01

    A CMOS RF (radio frequency) front-end for digital radio broadcasting applications is presented that contains a wideband LNA, I/Q-mixers and VGAs, supporting other various wireless communication standards in the ultra-wide frequency band from 200 kHz to 2 GHz as well. Improvement of the NF (noise figure) and IP3 (third-order intermodulation distortion) is attained without significant degradation of other performances like voltage gain and power consumption. The NF is minimized by noise-canceling technology, and the IP3 is improved by using differential multiple gate transistors (DMGTR). The dB-in-linear VGA (variable gain amplifier) exploits a single PMOS to achieve exponential gain control. The circuit is fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS technology. The S11 of the RF front-end is lower than -11.4 dB over the whole band of 200 kHz-2 GHz. The variable gain range is 12-42 dB at 0.25 GHz and 4-36 dB at 2 GHz. The DSB NF at maximum gain is 3.1-6.1 dB. The IIP3 at middle gain is -4.7 to 0.2 dBm. It consumes a DC power of only 36 mW at 1.8 V supply.

  6. HIGH POWER RF DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL FOR MULTI-CAVITY CRYOMODULE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Broyles, Michael R; Crofford, Mark T; Geng, Xiaosong; Kim, Sang-Ho; Lee, Sung-Woo; Phibbs, Curtis L; Shin, Ki; Strong, William Herb

    2011-01-01

    Qualification of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in the cryomodules for the accelerating performance needs to be done through high power processing. A four-way waveguide power distribution system with independent control of power outputs has been being developed for testing the multi-cavity cryomodules for the SNS linac. SNS is employing two types of cryomodules: one type with three medium beta six-cell cavities and the other with four high beta six-cell cavities. The cryomodule that is being manufactured as a spare and the new crymodules for the future power upgrade project (PUP) of SNS will be high beta types. The four-way power distribution with independently controlled power outputs was considered useful for powering all cavities at the same time with a klystron amplifier since the SNS test facility was configured for a single klystron operation. Since certain interaction between the cavities under severe field emission was suspected in existing cryomodules, this type of high power test can be valuable for characterization of SRF cavities. By implementing a vector modulator at each arm of the splitting system, the amplitudes and the phases of RF outputs can be controlled independently. This paper discusses the present status of the development.

  7. Improvement of RF magnetic shielding effect of an HTS cylinder: the superposition a bincho-charcoal square cylinder over a BPSCCO cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Keisuke; Sasai, Yohji; Hotta, Yukio; Itoh, Mineo

    2002-08-01

    With the rapid development in the field of information technology, attention must be directed toward electromagnetic environments and their associated problems. These problems have led to an increasing need for magnetic shielding vessels that can be applied to a wide range of fields. The ideal electromagnetic shielding vessel, in the radiofrequency (RF) region, can be realized by use of a high-critical-temperature superconductor, due to its property of perfect diamagnetism. The authors have improved the characteristics of the RF magnetic shielding effect for a Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BPSCCO) cylinder used as shielding vessel, by the superposition of a bincho-charcoal (very hard charcoal) square cylinder over the BPSCCO cylinder. The present paper examines the RF magnetic shielding effects of the new shielding system, including the characteristics of the RF magnetic shielding effects versus both the frequency f and the RF magnetic power. In addition, an examination is conducted of the RF electric shielding effects as a function of f and the RF electric power.

  8. Synthesis of ultrafine Si3N4 powder in RF-RF plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Michitaka; Nishio, Hiroaki

    1991-10-01

    A newly designed plasma-CVD apparatus mounted with the RF-RF type plasma torch was introduced to synthesize ultrafine powders of silicon nitride (Si3N4). The RF-RF plasma system (the combination of a main (lower) and controlling (upper) RF plasma) improved the stability of simple RF plasma and solved the impurity problem of dc-RF hybrid plasma. The reaction of SiCl4 and NH3, which were radially injected into the tail flames of the upper and lower plasmas, respectively, yielded near-stoichiometric amorphous powders of Si3N4. The nitrogen content in the products largely depended on the flow rate of the quenching gas, a mixture of NH3 (reactant) and H2. The oxygen content and metal impurities are 2-3 wt pct and less than 200 ppm, respectively. The powder particles had an average diameter of about 15 nm with a narrow size distribution, and showed extreme air sensitivity. Conspicuous crystallazation and particle growth occurred when heated at temperatures above 1400 C. These results suggested that the RF-RF system was a potential reactor for the synthesis of ultrafine powders with excellent sinterability at relatively low temperatures. 9 refs.

  9. Primary measurement of total ultrasonic power with improved accuracy in rf voltage measurement.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P K; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Joshi, Deepa

    2010-10-01

    Out of the various existing ultrasonic power measurement techniques, the radiation force balance method using microbalance is most widely used in low power (below 1 W) regime. The major source of uncertainty associated with this technique is the error in ac voltage measurement applied to the transducer for the generation of ultrasonic waves. The sources that deteriorate the ac voltage measurement accuracy include cable length and impedance mismatch. We introduce a new differential peak to peak measurement approach to reduce the ac voltage measurement error. The method holds the average peak amplitude of each polarity. Ultralow offset difference amplifier is used to measure peak to peak voltage. The method is insensitive to the variations in the dc offset of the source. The functionality of this method has been tested and compared with the conventional rf voltage measurement method. The output of this proposed technique is dc, which can be measured with an error of less than 0.1%. PMID:21034111

  10. Design and evaluation of a low-level RF control system analog/digital receiver for the ILC main Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Mavric, Uros; Vidmar, Matjaz; Chase, Brian; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The proposed RF distribution scheme for the two 15 km long ILC LINACs, uses one klystron to feed 26 superconducting RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. For a precise control of the vector sum of the signals coming from the SC cavities, the control system needs a high performance, low cost, reliable and modular multichannel receiver. At Fermilab we developed a 96 channel, 1.3 GHz analog/digital receiver for the ILC LINAC LLRF control system. In the paper we present a balanced design approach to the specifications of each receiver section, the design choices made to fulfill the goals and a description of the prototyped system. The design is tested by measuring standard performance parameters, such as noise figure, linearity and temperature sensitivity. Measurements show that the design meets the specifications and it is comparable to other similar systems developed at other laboratories, in terms of performance.

  11. Profile Control by Biased Electrodes in Large Diameter RF Produced Pl asma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Yoshinaka, Toshiro

    1998-10-01

    Control of the plasma profile has been carried out, using the voltage biasing method in the large diameter (45 cm) RF (radio frequency) produced plasma in the presence of the uniform magnetic field (less than 1200 G). Under the low filling pressure condition of 0.16 mTorr, changing the biasing voltages to the three individual end plates with concentric circular ring shapes, the radial electron density (about 10^10 cm-3) profile could be changed from the hollow to the peaked one. On the contrary, the nearly flat electron temperature (several eV) profile did not change appreciably. The azimuthal rotation velocity measured by the Mach probe, i.e. directional probe, showed the different radial profiles (but nearly uniform along the axis) depending on the biasing voltage. This velocity became slower with the low magnetic field (less than 200 G) or in the higher pressure regime up to 20 mTorr with the higher electron density. The experimental results by other biasing methods will also be presented.

  12. Improvement in B1+ Homogeneity and Average Flip Angle Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Excitation for Cardiac MRI in Swine Hearts.

    PubMed

    Schär, Michael; Ding, Haiyan; Herzka, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac MRI may benefit from increased polarization at high magnetic field strength of 3 Tesla but is challenged by increased field inhomogeneity. Initial human studies have shown that the radiofrequency (RF) excitation field (B1+) used for signal excitation in the heart is both inhomogeneous and significantly lower than desired, potentially leading to image artifacts and biased quantitative measures. Recently, multi-channel transmit systems have been introduced allowing localized patient specific RF shimming based on acquired calibration B1+ maps. Some prior human studies have shown lower than desired mean flip angles in the hearts of large patients even after RF shimming. Here, 100 cardiac B1+ map pairs before and after RF shimming were acquired in 55 swine. The mean flip angle and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the flip angle in the heart were determined before and after RF shimming. Mean flip angle, CV, and RF shim values (power ratio and phase difference between the two transmit channels) were tested for correlation with cross sectional body area and the Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio. RF shimming significantly increased the mean flip angle in swine heart from 74.4±6.7% (mean ± standard deviation) to 94.7±4.8% of the desired flip angle and significantly reduced CV from 0.11±0.03 to 0.07±0.02 (p<1e-10 for both). These results compare well with several previous human studies, except that the mean flip angle in the human heart only improved to 89% with RF shimming, possibly because the RF shimming routine does not consider safety constraints in very large patients. Additionally, mean flip angle decreased and CV increased with larger cross sectional body area, however, the RF shimming parameters did not correlate with cross sectional body area. RF shim power ratio correlated weakly with Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio but phase difference did not, further substantiating the need for subject specific cardiac RF shimming. PMID:26436658

  13. Improvement in B1+ Homogeneity and Average Flip Angle Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Excitation for Cardiac MRI in Swine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael; Ding, Haiyan; Herzka, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac MRI may benefit from increased polarization at high magnetic field strength of 3 Tesla but is challenged by increased field inhomogeneity. Initial human studies have shown that the radiofrequency (RF) excitation field (B1+) used for signal excitation in the heart is both inhomogeneous and significantly lower than desired, potentially leading to image artifacts and biased quantitative measures. Recently, multi-channel transmit systems have been introduced allowing localized patient specific RF shimming based on acquired calibration B1+ maps. Some prior human studies have shown lower than desired mean flip angles in the hearts of large patients even after RF shimming. Here, 100 cardiac B1+ map pairs before and after RF shimming were acquired in 55 swine. The mean flip angle and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the flip angle in the heart were determined before and after RF shimming. Mean flip angle, CV, and RF shim values (power ratio and phase difference between the two transmit channels) were tested for correlation with cross sectional body area and the Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio. RF shimming significantly increased the mean flip angle in swine heart from 74.4±6.7% (mean ± standard deviation) to 94.7±4.8% of the desired flip angle and significantly reduced CV from 0.11±0.03 to 0.07±0.02 (p<<1e-10 for both). These results compare well with several previous human studies, except that the mean flip angle in the human heart only improved to 89% with RF shimming, possibly because the RF shimming routine does not consider safety constraints in very large patients. Additionally, mean flip angle decreased and CV increased with larger cross sectional body area, however, the RF shimming parameters did not correlate with cross sectional body area. RF shim power ratio correlated weakly with Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio but phase difference did not, further substantiating the need for subject specific cardiac RF shimming. PMID:26436658

  14. Improving performance of the metal-to-metal contact RF MEMS switch with a Pt-Au microspring contact design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Lv, Zhiqiu; He, Xunjun; Liu, Meng; Hao, Yilong; Li, Zhihong

    2011-06-01

    Performances of the metal-to-metal contact radio frequency (RF) MEMS switches largely rely on the contacts. A novel contact employing the microspring structure is demonstrated in this paper. The microspring contact can achieve a stable contact at lower actuation voltage, alleviating mechanical wear on the contacts, and can effectively increase the fabrication tolerance. An in-line Pt-Au microspring contact switch was fabricated and characterized. To evaluate the improvement in performance, the results were compared with those of the Au-Au solid contact switch without a microspring design. The highest current handled by the Pt-Au microspring contact was 150 mA per contact, whereas only 20 mA was handled by the Au-Au solid contact. The insertion loss of the Pt-Au microspring contact switch was -0.2 dB at 20 GHz, which was comparable with that of the Au-Au solid contact switch. The isolation of the Pt-Au microspring contact switch was -22 dB at 20 GHz, and that of the Au-Au solid contact switch was -18 dB. With the Pt-Au microspring contact, the switch exceeds its power handling ability and reliability with comparable RF performances.

  15. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  16. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  17. Recent RF Experiments and Application of RF Waves to Real-Time Control of Safety Factor Profile in JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Isayama, A.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Oikawa, T.; Sakata, S.; Sueoka, M.; Hosoyama, H.; Seki, M.

    2005-09-26

    Two topics of applications of RF waves to current profile control in JT-60U are presented; application of lower-hybrid (LH) waves to safety factor profile control and electron cyclotron (EC) waves to neo-classical tearing mode (NTM) control. A real-time control system of safety factor (q) profile was developed. This system, for the first time, enables 1) real time evaluation of q profile using local magnetic pitch angle measurement by motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic and 2) control of current drive (CD) location ({rho}CD) by controlling the parallel refractive index N parallel of LH waves through control of phase difference ({delta}{phi}) of LH waves between multi-junction launcher modules. The method for real-time q profile evaluation was newly developed, without time-consuming reconstruction of equilibrium, so that the method requires less computational time. Safety factor profile by the real-time calculation agrees well with that by equilibrium reconstruction with MSE. The control system controls {rho}CD through {delta}{phi} in such a way to decrease the largest residual between the real-time evaluated q profile q(r) and its reference profile qref(r). The real-time control system was applied to a positive shear plasma (q(0){approx}1). The reference q profile was set to monotonic positive shear profile having qref(0)=1.3. The real-time q profile approached to the qref(r) during application of real-time control, and was sustained for 3s, which was limited by the duration of the injected LH power. Temporal evolution of current profile was consistent with relaxation of inductive electric field induced by theoretical LH driven current. An m/n=3/2 NTM that appeared at {beta}N{approx}3 was completely stabilized by ECCD applied to a fully-developed NTM. Precise ECCD at NTM island was essential for the stabilization. ECCD that was applied to resonant rational surface (q=3/2) before an NTM onset suppressed appearance of NTM. In order to keep NTM intensity below a

  18. Methods for improved hemorrhage control

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death from age 1 to 34 years and is the fifth leading cause of death overall in the USA, with uncontrolled hemorrhage being the leading cause of potentially preventable death. Improving our ability to control hemorrhage may represent the next major hurdle in reducing trauma mortality. New techniques, devices, and drugs for hemorrhage control are being developed and applied across the continuum of trauma care: prehospital, emergency room, and operative and postoperative critical care. This brief review focuses on drugs directed at life-threatening hemorrhage. The most important of these new drugs are injectable hemostatics, fibrin foams, and dressings. The available animal studies are encouraging and human studies are required. PMID:15196327

  19. DC characteristics and analog/RF performance of novel polarity control GaAs-Ge based tunnel field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Kondekar, Pravin; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, for the first time, DC characteristics and analog/RF performance of polarity control GaAs-Ge hetero TFET (GaAs-Ge H-TFET) structure have been analysed, using electrically doped dynamically configurable concept. For this, we have considered a hetero structure with two distinctive gates (Control gate and Polarity gate). Polarity gate induces p+ region at the source side and n+ region at the drain side, instead of relying on the abrupt doping profile at the junctions. Therefore, the fabrication process of the proposed device avoids ion-implantation, photo masking and complicated thermal budget. Hence, it shows high immunity against process variations, doping control issues and random dopant fluctuations (RDF). In order to optimize the device performance, interfacing of III-V groups materials with IV group semiconductor is done for hetero-junction. The introduction of hetero-junction and band gap engineering offer higher ION/IOFF ratio (5.1 × 1012), steep sub-threshold slope (18 mV/decade) and significantly change in analog/RF performance. The analog/RF figures of merit are analysed in term of transconductance (gm), output conductance (gds), gate to source capacitance (Cgs), gate to drain capacitance (Cgd), cutoff frequency (fT) and gain bandwidth (GBW) product. The proposed work would be beneficial for low power high frequency applications. The simulation results presented in this paper were carried out by using 2-D ATLAS.

  20. New RF control system for the 12 GeV energy upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plawski, T.; Allison, T.; Bachimanchi, R.; Dong, H.; Hovater, C.; Musson, J.

    2008-11-01

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab presently consists of 50 MeV injector, two anti-parallel superconducting linacs and two arcs for transporting beam between the linacs. By the mid-1990s, the accelerator was providing electrons up to 5.75 GeV. The 12 GeV Upgrade is a major accelerator project aimed at doubling the energy by adding 10 (five per linac) new high gradient cryomodules, each providing 100 MV of field. The new cryomodule will consist of eight 7-cell superconducting cavities operating at an average accelerating gradient of 19.5 mv/m and with an external Q = 3.2 x 107 The high gradient, very high quality factor and large Lorentz detuning coefficient (KL up to 4) pose significant challenges beyond what the present analog low level RF (LLRF) control systems can handle reliably; therefore, a new digital LLRF control system has been developed. The main highlights of the new RF Control system include: a RF frontend with low temperature drift and good linearity, a large FPGA platform for digital signal processing, an EPICS Input Output Computer (IOC) using a PC-104 and a digital Self Exciting Loop (SEL) based algorithm. This paper provides an overview of the 6 GeV and 12 GeV Upgrade CEBAF machines, a summary of sources of cavity field variation that drive LLRF system performance, and discusses recent developments and progress in Jefferson Lab's new LLRF system design.

  1. The Use of Metal Filled Via Holes for Improving Isolation in LTCC RF and Wireless Multichip Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Chun, Donghoon; Yook, Jong-Gwan; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1999-01-01

    LTCC MCMs (Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic MultiChip Module) for RF and wireless systems often use metal filled via holes to improve isolation between the stripline and microstrip interconnects. In this paper, results from a 3D-FEM electromagnetic characterization of microstrip and stripline interconnects with metal filled via fences for isolation are presented. It is shown that placement of a via hole fence closer than three times the substrate height to the transmission lines increases radiation and coupling. Radiation loss and reflections are increased when a short via fence is used in areas suspected of having high radiation. Also, via posts should not be separated by more than three times the substrate height for low radiation loss, coupling, and suppression of higher order modes in a package.

  2. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

    1985-04-16

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  3. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    DOEpatents

    Motley, Robert W.; Glanz, James

    1985-01-01

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  4. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  5. Improved optical and electrical properties of rf sputtered Al doped ZnO films on polymer substrates by low-damage processes

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Hyung Seob; Yang, Min Kyu; Lee, Jeon-Kook

    2009-03-15

    Three types of low-damage radio-frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering processes--an interruptive process, a rotating cylindrical holder method, and an off-axis sputtering method--were designed and studied to reduce the film surface temperature during deposition. Low-damage sputtering processes were investigated to improve the resistivity and optical transmittance in the visible range of Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films deposited on polymer substrates. In the case of the polyethersulfone substrate, AZO films with a resistivity of 1.0x10{sup -3} {omega} cm and an optical transmittance of 75% were obtained by the rotating repeat holder method during rf sputtering.

  6. Improving Control of Two Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program controls motors that drive translation stages in a metrology system that consists of a pair of two-axis cathetometers. This program is specific to Compumotor Gemini (or equivalent) motors and the Compumotor 6K-series (or equivalent) motor controller. Relative to the software supplied with the controller, this program affords more capabilities and is easier to use. Written as a Virtual Instrument in the LabVIEW software system, the program presents an imitation control panel that the user can manipulate by use of a keyboard and mouse. There are three modes of operation: command, movement, and joystick. In command mode, single commands are sent to the controller for troubleshooting. In movement mode, distance, speed, and/or acceleration commands are sent to the controller. Position readouts from the motors and from position encoders on the translation stages are displayed in marked fields. At any time, the position readouts can be recorded in a file named by the user. In joystick mode, the program yields control of the motors to a joystick. The program sends commands to, and receives data from, the controller via a serial cable connection, using the serial-communication portion of the software supplied with the controller.

  7. Improving the security and actuation of wireless controlled microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikka, Ajay Chandra; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek; Wong, Maggie S. K.; Schutz, Jordan D.

    2007-01-01

    A wireless microvalve would have a wide range of applications, including biomedical applications such as fertility control and nano-litre drug delivery. Arguably the most important aspect for such a device is a secure method to actuate the valve, such that it is not actuated through the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation already present in the surrounding environment. Additionally, many of the possible applications are sensitive to electromagnetic (EM) radiation so the device should be designed to only require the minimum amount of EM input to actuate the valve. To overcome this problem, we propose the use of a coded interdigital transducer (IDT) to respond only to a coded signal. For the wireless microvalve to be useful in biomedical applications, the IDT's response to a specifically coded RF signal must be much greater than its response to another coded RF signal, even if the two codes are very similar, i.e. improve the signal ratio of the device. In this research we demonstrate a number of code sequences that have a correlation function such that the peak response is unique and can be used to provide a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) surface acoustic wave. That results in a unique activation of the device when the interrogating RF signal code sequence matches the stored code sequence in the device. Also we will investigate the trade-off between the needed code length to ensure secure operation and the area constrain of the device within the context of biomedical application. For this purpose, the IDT is modelled as a pulse compression filter, which correlates the input signal with a stored replica.

  8. Interaction between beam control and rf feedback loops for high Q cavities an heavy beam loading. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K.; Kwan, C.M.; Yeung, K.S.

    1994-04-01

    An open-loop state space model of all the major low-level rf feedback control loops is derived. The model has control and state variables for fast-cycling machines to apply modern multivariable feedback techniques. A condition is derived to know when exactly we can cross the boundaries between time-varying and time-invariant approaches for a fast-cycling machine like the Low Energy Booster (LEB). The conditions are dependent on the Q of the cavity and the rate at which the frequency changes with time. Apart from capturing the time-variant characteristics, the errors in the magnetic field are accounted in the model to study the effects on synchronization with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The control model is useful to study the effects on beam control due to heavy beam loading at high intensities, voltage transients just after injection especially due to time-varying voltages, instability thresholds created by the cavity tuning feedback system, cross coupling between feedback loops with and without direct rf feedback etc. As a special case we have shown that the model agrees with the well known Pedersen model derived for the CERN PS booster. As an application of the model we undertook a detailed study of the cross coupling between the loops by considering all of them at once for varying time, Q and beam intensities. A discussion of the method to identify the coupling is shown. At the end a summary of the identified loop interactions is presented.

  9. Investigation of techniques for improving Saturn 5 RF tracking and ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. R., Jr.; Wetherington, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Results of theoretical analyses of 12 problems are presented and comparisons of theoretical and experimental results are given. The investigations covered were: (1) techniques for improving the Saturn radar altimeter, (2) performance of the phase lock loop of the offset Doppler transponder, (3) signal processing equipment design for an orbital altitude radar return experiment, (4) spectral studies of signals present in the command and communication system (CCS) up-link transmitter, (5) intermodulation in the CCS down-link data demodulators, (6) error rate performance of the CCS transponder command demodulator, (7) flame attenuation effects on telemetry transmissions during Saturn launches, (8) design of a digital television system which converts a standard monochrome picture to a slow-scan picture, (9) methods of obtaining an additional CCS 72-kilobit/sec telemetry channel, (10) computation of the CCS S-band down-link spectra, (11) modeling of portions of the communications systems, and (12) modeling of a telemetry transmitter.

  10. CONTROL OF THE INJECTED RF BEAM IN THE DIII-D ECH SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    K. KAJIWARA; C.B. BAXI; J.L. DOANE; R.E. ELLIS; M.E. FRIEND; M. GREEN; Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; C.P. MOELLER; R.I. PINSKER; D. PONCE; R. PRATER

    2002-08-01

    The DIII-D ECH system includes three launcher assemblies each of which can accommodate the rf beams from two gyrotrons. The launchers use four different designs for the mirrors which focus and direct the beams into the tokamak. The designs use molybdenum brazed to graphite, thin Glidcop or variable thickness Glidcop. A fourth design with laminated Glidcop/stainless steel construction has been operated, but no thermal data are available. All the mirrors operate without active cooling. This paper presents preliminary analyses and measurements of the thermal performance of the three designs for which data have been obtained.

  11. LPV Controller Interpolation for Improved Gain-Scheduling Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Kim, SungWan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new gain-scheduling control design approach is proposed by combining LPV (linear parameter-varying) control theory with interpolation techniques. The improvement of gain-scheduled controllers can be achieved from local synthesis of Lyapunov functions and continuous construction of a global Lyapunov function by interpolation. It has been shown that this combined LPV control design scheme is capable of improving closed-loop performance derived from local performance improvement. The gain of the LPV controller will also change continuously across parameter space. The advantages of the newly proposed LPV control is demonstrated through a detailed AMB controller design example.

  12. RF-Medisys: a radio frequency identification-based electronic medical record system for improving medical information accessibility and services at point of care.

    PubMed

    Ting, Jacky S L; Tsang, Albert H C; Ip, Andrew W H; Ho, George T S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative electronic medical records (EMR) system, RF-MediSys, which can perform medical information sharing and retrieval effectively and which is accessible via a 'smart' medical card. With such a system, medical diagnoses and treatment decisions can be significantly improved when compared with the conventional practice of using paper medical records systems. Furthermore, the entire healthcare delivery process, from registration to the dispensing or administration of medicines, can be visualised holistically to facilitate performance review. To examine the feasibility of implementing RF-MediSys and to determine its usefulness to users of the system, a survey was conducted within a multi-disciplinary medical service organisation that operates a network of medical clinics and paramedical service centres throughout Hong Kong Island, the Kowloon Peninsula and the New Territories. Questionnaires were distributed to 300 system users, including nurses, physicians and patients, to collect feedback on the operation and performance of RF-MediSys in comparison with conventional paper-based medical record systems. The response rate to the survey was 67%. Results showed a medium to high level of user satisfaction with the radiofrequency identification (RFID)-based EMR system. In particular, respondents provided high ratings on both 'user-friendliness' and 'system performance'. Findings of the survey highlight the potential of RF-MediSys as a tool to enhance quality of medical services and patient safety. PMID:21430306

  13. Maintenance and operation procedure, and feedback controls of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The maintenance and operation procedure to minimize the plasma chamber (PCH) replacement time on the beam line, which is very important to maximize the J-PARC beam time especially for an antenna failure, is presented in this paper. The PCH preserved by filling argon (Ar) gas inside after pre-conditioning including pre-cesiation to produce the required beam at a test-stand successfully produced the required beam on the beam line with slight addition of cesium (Cs). The methods of the feedback controls of a 2MHz-RF-matching, an H{sup −} ion beam intensity and the addition of Cs are also presented. The RF-matching feedback by using two vacuum variable capacitors (VVCs) and RF-frequency shift produced the almost perfect matching with negligibly small reflected RF-power. The H{sup −} ion beam intensity was controlled within errors of ±0.1mA by the RF-power feedback. The amount of Cs was also controlled by remotely opening a Cs-valve to keep the RF-power lower than a settled value.

  14. Improvement in the frequency characteristics of RF magnetic shielding: effects of the superposition of two ferrite plates over a BPSCCO plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikubo, T.; Endo, H.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, M.

    2008-02-01

    A high-critical temperature superconductor (HTS) is ideal for use as an RF electromagnetic shield. As one of the basic areas of research for the improvement of the electromagnetic environment by the use of a bulk HTS as an electromagnetic shield, the present paper has applied a Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BPSCCO) plate to the far field region. In the frequency region from 1 to 30 MHz, however, the RF magnetic shielding degree SDH, with an average value of approximately 30 dB for the single BPSCCO plate, is not sufficient enough to shield electromagnetic waves. Accordingly, the present research has improved the frequency characteristics of SDH for the single BPSCCO plate to realize shielding over a broadband frequency region of 1 MHz to 3 GHz by the superposition of two ferrite plates over a BPSCCO plate; termed the sandwiched plate. The frequency characteristics of SDH for the sandwiched plate was improved by an average value of approximately 30 dB over the frequency region of 1 to 30 MHz. Experimental results revealed several characteristics of the sandwiched plate, which include the value of SDH as a function of radio frequency, and the non-dependence of SDH on the value of RF output power.

  15. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE MECHANICAL TUNER OF THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER RF CAVITY.

    SciTech Connect

    RANK, J.; BEN-ZVI,I.; HAHN,G.; MCINTYRE,G.; DALY,E.; PREBLE,J.

    2005-05-16

    The ECX Project, Brookhaven Lab's predecessor to the RHIC e-Cooler, includes a prototype RF tuner mechanism capable of both coarse and fast tuning. This tuner concept, adapted originally from a DESY design, has longer stroke and significantly higher loads attributable to the very stiff ECX cavity shape. Structural design, kinematics, controls, thermal and RF issues are discussed and certain improvements are proposed.

  16. A novel RF resonator for human-body MRI at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Hyeok-Woo; Cho, Young-Ki; Yoo, Hyoungsuk

    2014-03-01

    A square-slot-loaded (SSL) radio-frequency (RF) resonator using a microstrip transmission line (MTL) is designed for human-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 T MRI. The SSL RF resonator shows improved RF magnetic fields resulting in more homogenous fields near the center of the phantom than traditional RF resonators using MTL. A multichannel body coil using the SSL RF resonators is also simulated and provides improved parallel excitation performance. In addition, RF shimming for homogenization can be effectively controlled by adjusting the inputs to the eight resonators. Numerical results are obtained by using a spherical phantom and a realistic human-body model at 3 T to calculate the B {1/+} fields.

  17. A short report on voltage-to-frequency conversion for HISTRAP RF system tuning control loops

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanul Basher, A.M.

    1991-09-01

    One of the requirements of the HISTRAP RF accelerating system is that the frequency of the accelerating voltage for the cavity must keep in step with the change in the magnetic field. As the energy of the particle increases, the magnetic field is increased to keep the radius of the particle orbit constant. At the same time, the frequency of the electric field must be changed to insure that it is synchronized with the angular movement of the particle. So we need to generate the frequency of the accelerating voltage in relation to the magnetic field. The frequency generation can be accomplished in two stages. The first stage of frequency generation consists of measuring the magnetic field in terms of voltage which is already developed. The second stage is to convert this voltage into frequency. Final frequency precision can be achieved by deriving a frequency-correcting signal from the beam position. This project is concerned with generating the frequency from the analog voltage. The speed of response required will place very stringent requirements on both hardware and software. Technology is available to carry out this task. A hardware configuration has been established and software has been developed. In the following section, we describe the implementation strategy, the hardware configuration, and the desired specifications. Next, we present the software developed, results obtained, along with capabilities and limitations of the system. Finally, we suggest alternate solutions to overcome some of the limitations toward meeting our goal. In the appendices, we include program listings.

  18. Coupling Factor Determination in the Control of Unintentionally Generated RF Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Matthew B.; Clark, Tony L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiated emissions and susceptibility requirements imposed in bands where intentional RF reception or transmission does not occur is problematical. It is often desired to compare radiated emissions with radiated susceptibility performance to assess system level compatibility. For reasons purely theoretical and because of practical measurement limitations, this not realistic. McCollum and Clark proposed a limit and test method that provided a direct comparison of radiated emissions and radiated susceptibility performance in those cases where only unintentional emissions and reception are of interest (non-tunable electronics). This test method, referred to as bulk current emissions (BCE) testing, and its associated limit is a complementary test method to bulk current injection testing and radiated susceptibility testing. Previous work utilized victim and culprit circuits with low common-mode loop impedance. Forward work identified in this publication was to determine how different loop impedance on culprit and victim circuits affected cable-to-cable coupling and the corresponding BCE test limit. Cable coupling factors for victim and culprit circuits with different loop impedance are investigated.

  19. Separate control of ion flux and energy in capacitively coupled RF discharges via the Electrical Asymmetry Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Julian; Donko, Zoltan; Heil, Brian; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2008-10-01

    Recently a novel approach towards achieving separate control of ion flux and energy in capacitively coupled RF discharges based on the Electrical Asymmetry Effect (EAE) was proposed using fluid models. If the applied voltage waveform contains an even harmonic of its fundamental frequency, the sheaths will not be electrically symmetric. In order to balance electron and ion fluxes at each electrode a DC self bias develops. The self bias and, consequently, the ion energy can be controlled by tuning the phase between the two applied voltages. This technique works in geometrically symmetric and asymmetric discharges. Here the EAE is verified using a PIC simulation of a geometrically symmetric discharge. The self bias is found to be a nearly linear function of the phase angle. If the phase is changed, the ion flux stays constant within 5%, while the self bias reaches values of up to 80% of the applied voltage amplitude and the ion energy is changed by a factor of three. The EAE is investigated at different pressures and electrode gaps with focus on separate control of ion flux and energy.

  20. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  1. Report on a computer-controlled automatic test platform for precision RF cavity characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Sanjari, M. S.; Piotrowski, J.; Hülsmann, P.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-11-01

    An automated test platform aiming at accurate and efficient cavity characterizations has recently been set up at GSI, Darmstadt. In this proceeding the composition of such a system, on both hardware and software sides, is described in detail. The amount of necessary human work is significantly reduced to the minimum, while the measurement precision is improved considerably.

  2. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving. PMID:27485132

  3. ICH rf system data acquisition and real time control using a microcomputer system

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, W.P.; Allen, J.A.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    On the basis of the rapidly increasing power, speed, and decreasing cost of the personal computer (microcomputer) it was felt that a real time data acquisition and control system could be configured quickly and very cost effectively. It was further felt that by using a high level or object-oriented programming language that considerable time and expense could be saved and at the same time increase system flexibility. This paper will attempt to address the desired system requirements and performance for both the control of the high power transmitters and for the data acquisition and presentation of the information.

  4. Behavioral interventions to improve infection control practices.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, E K; Larson, E L

    1998-06-01

    No single intervention has been successful in improving and sustaining such infection control practices as universal precautions and handwashing by health care professionals. This paper examines several behavioral theories (Health Belief Model, Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior, self-efficacy, and the Transtheoretic Model) and relates them to individual factors, also considering interpersonal and organizational factors. Further, this article includes recommendations of individual and organizational components to be addressed when planning a theoretically based intervention for improving infection control practices. A hypothetic framework to enhance handwashing practice is proposed. PMID:9638287

  5. Control Capabilities of Low-Inductance-Antenna-Driven RF Plasmas for Low-Damage Processing of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Cho, Ken; Ebe, Akinori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2008-10-01

    Low-damage processing of polymers is of key importance for fabrication of next-generation devices including electronics on polymers, which require development of plasma sources with reduced plasma potential in order to control interface between the polymer substrate and functional films without suffering degradations due to ion bombardment. Furthermore, applications to polymer-based displays and photovoltaic devices require ultra-large area processes at high throughput. To meet these requirements, we have developed plasma processing technologies with low-inductance antenna (LIA) modules to sustain inductively-coupled RF plasmas. Ion energy distributions showed considerably suppressed ion energy as low as 3.8 eV. The polymer surfaces after plasma exposure were analyzed via hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HXPES) at SPring8 (National SOR facility in Japan), which exhibited nano-surface modification of polymer surface without suffering degradation of molecular structures underneath. Furthermore, plasma-enhanced deposition of silicon films showed low-temperature (200 deg.C) formation of micro-crystalline silicon films due to sufficiently reduced damage during deposition.

  6. Metal–insulator transition of valence-controlled VO2 thin film prepared by RF magnetron sputtering using oxygen radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Takaaki; Shimazu, Yuichi; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Minohara, Makoto; Sakai, Enju; Horiba, Koji; Kumigashira, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Tohru

    2016-06-01

    We have prepared b-axis-oriented VO2 thin films by RF magnetron sputtering using oxygen radicals as the reactive gas. The VO2 thin films consist of a mixed-valence V3+/V4+ state formed by oxygen vacancies. The V3+ ratio strongly depends on the film thickness and the oxygen partial pressure of the radical gun during deposition. The lattice constant of the b-axis increases and the metal–insulator transition (MIT) temperature decreases with decreasing V3+ ratio, although the VO2 thin films with a high V3+ ratio of 42% do not exhibit MIT. The bandwidths and spectral weights of V 3d a1g and \\text{e}\\text{g}σ bands at around the Fermi level, which correspond to the insulating phase at 300 K, are smaller in the VO2 thin films with a low V3+ ratio. These results indicate that the control of the mixed-valence V3+/V4+ state is important for the MIT of b-axis-oriented VO2 thin films.

  7. DOOCS patterns: reusable software components for FPGA-based RF GUN field controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucyk, Piotr

    2006-10-01

    Modern accelerator technology combines software and hardware solutions to provide distributed, high efficiency digital systems for High Energy Physics experiments. Providing flexible, maintainable software is crucial for ensuring high availability of the whole system. In order to fulfill all these requirements, appropriate design and development techniques have to be used. Software patterns are well known solution for common programming issues, providing proven development paradigms, which can help to avoid many design issues. DOOCS patterns introduces new concepts of reusable software components for control system algorithms development and implementation in DOOCS framework. Chosen patterns have been described and usage examples have been presented in this paper.

  8. Compensator improvement for multivariable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. R.; Mcdaniel, W. L., Jr.; Gresham, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    A theory and the associated numerical technique are developed for an iterative design improvement of the compensation for linear, time-invariant control systems with multiple inputs and multiple outputs. A strict constraint algorithm is used in obtaining a solution of the specified constraints of the control design. The result of the research effort is the multiple input, multiple output Compensator Improvement Program (CIP). The objective of the Compensator Improvement Program is to modify in an iterative manner the free parameters of the dynamic compensation matrix so that the system satisfies frequency domain specifications. In this exposition, the underlying principles of the multivariable CIP algorithm are presented and the practical utility of the program is illustrated with space vehicle related examples.

  9. RF current profile control studies in the alcator C-mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Mikkelsen, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.

    1999-09-01

    Time dependent calculations of lower hybrid (LH) current profile control in Alcator C-Mod have been done using the TRANSP [1], FPPRF [2], and LSC [3] codes. Up to 3 MW of LH current drive power was applied in plasmas with high power ICRF minority heating (PICH=1.8-3 MW) and fast current ramp up. Using the experimentally measured temperature profiles, off-axis current generation resulted in nonmonotonic q-profiles with qmin~=1.6. Self-consistent effects of off-axis electron heating by the LH power were also included in the analysis and significant broadening of the electron temperature profile was found with qmin>~2 and a larger shear reversal radius.

  10. Size-controllable synthesis and bandgap modulation of single-layered RF-sputtered bismuth nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We here report a simple and efficient method to grow single-layer bismuth nanoparticles (BiNPs) with various sizes on glass substrates. Optimal conditions were found to be 200°C and 0.12 W/cm2 at a growth rate of 6 Å/s, with the deposition time around 40 s. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were used to calculate the particle size distribution statistics, and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were used to examine the chemical interactions between BiNPs and the substrates. By measuring the transmission spectra within the range of 300 to 1,000 nm, we found that the optical bandgap can be modulated from 0.45 to 2.63 eV by controlling the size of these BiNPs. These interesting discoveries offer an insight to explore the dynamic nature of nanoparticles. PMID:24917699

  11. The effects of RF plasma ashing on zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of YB-71, a white thermal control coating composed of zinc orthotitanate pigment in a potassium silicate binder, were exposed in air plasma and in oxygen plasma to determine optical property and surface chemistry changes. Results show that YB-71 undergoes a significant reflectance decrease upon exposure to the simulated LEO atomic oxygen environment provided by an air plasma asher. YB-71 samples exposed to the same effective fluence in oxygen plasma, or in a UV screening Faraday cage in air or oxygen, do not undergo as severe reflectance decreases as the samples exposed in the air plasma asher environment. The UV and VUV radiation present in the plasma ashers affects the YB-71 degradation. It is noted that, when using plasma ashers to determine LEO degradation, it is necessary to take into account the sensitivity of the material to the synergistic effects of atomic oxygen and accelerated UV radiation.

  12. Improved computed torque control for industrial robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uebel, Mark; Minis, Ioannis; Cleary, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    The authors examine the computed torque control problem for a robot arm with flexible, geared, joint drive systems which are typical in many industrial robots. The standard computed torque algorithm is not directly applicable to this class of manipulators due to the dynamics introduced by the joint drive systems. The proposed approach overcomes this problem by combining a novel computed torque algorithm with simple torque controllers at each joint of the robot. The control scheme is applied to a seven degree-of-freedom industrial manipulator, and the system performance in standard tasks is evaluated using both dynamic simulation and actual experiments. The results show that the proposed controller leads to improved tracking performance over a conventional PD (proportional plus derivative) controller.

  13. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  14. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    available surface micromachinable materials. For many potential applications, the hot filament CVD method demonstrated in this work is quite enabling, since it provides a much less expensive method than microwave CVD based alternatives for depositing doped CVD diamond over large wafers (e.g., 8") for batch fabrication. The first three methods described so far focus on a single vibrating disk resonator and improve its electrical equivalent modeling, C x/Co, and Q. Once we craft the resonator that meets the challenging design requirements of RF channel-select filters, the last method presents a design hierarchy that achieves the desired filter response with a specific center frequency, bandwidth, and filter termination resistance. The design procedure culminates in specific values for all mechanical geometry variables necessary for the filter layout, such as disk radii, and beam widths; and process design variables such as resonator material thickness and capacitive actuation gap spacing. Finally, the experimental results introduce a 39nm-gap capacitive transducer, voltage-controlled frequency tuning, and a stress relieving coupled array design that enable a 0.09% bandwidth 223.4 MHz channel-select filter with only 2.7dB of in-band insertion loss and 50dB rejection of out-of-band interferers. This amount of rejection is more than 23dB better than previous capacitive-gap transduced filter designs that did not benefit from sub-50nm gaps. It also comes in tandem with a 20dB shape factor of 2.7 realized by a hierarchical mechanical circuit design utilizing 206 micromechanical circuit elements, all contained in an area footprint of only 600mumx420mum. The key to such low insertion loss for this tiny percent bandwidth is Q's>8,800 supplied by polysilicon disk resonators employing for the first time capacitive transducer gaps small enough to generate coupling strengths of C x/Co ˜0.1%, which is a 6.1x improvement over previous efforts. The filter structure utilizes electrical

  15. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I.

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  16. Improving infection control in general practice.

    PubMed

    Farrow, S C; Zeuner, D; Hall, C

    1999-03-01

    Infection control measures in the health care setting should protect patients and staff from cross-infection. The prevention of harm is an essential part of good medical practice and failure might result in professional misconduct proceedings by the General Medical Council (GMC) and prosecution under the Health and Safety at Work legislation, as well as civil liability. For a health authority, overall responsibility for public health includes arrangements for the control of communicable diseases and infection in hospital and the community (NHS Management Executive, 1993), a function usually led by the Consultant in Communicable Disease Control (CCDC). This paper describes one district's collaborative approach between public health and GPs to assess and improve local infection control standards. PMID:10327810

  17. Infection prevention and control practitioners: improving engagement.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    Every healthcare worker plays a vital part in minimising the risk of cross infection. Infection prevention and control (IPC) practitioners have the skills and competencies to assist organisations in improving engagement among staff and play a vital part in achieving this. IPC practitioners have skills in clinical practice, education, research and leadership, and these skills ensure high-quality care for patients and support strategies for engaging staff. This article highlights how IPC practitioners' skills and competencies are required for preventing infection and improving staff engagement. Engaged staff generate positive outcomes for both patients and staff, which is a welcome result for all healthcare organisations. PMID:27019165

  18. Tore Supra LH transmitter upgrade, a new RF driver for the power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Berger-By, G.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Bouquey, F.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Lombard, G.; Magne, R.; Mollard, P.; Pagano, M.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Volpe, D.; Volpe, R.

    2011-12-23

    New real time tools have been developed for testing new 700kW/3.7GHz/CW klystrons and for the operations on very long plasma shots. After the commissioning of the 18 series tubes on the high power test bed facility, the installation of the first 8 klystrons in the Tore Supra transmitter and the adjustment tests on load, this upgrade work has been materialized during the last 2010 campaign by a successful operation on the Full Active Multijunction (FAM) C3 antenna, with new performances: 3.5MW/40s on plasma. The RF output power control in amplitude and phase has been improved for a better control of the wave spectrum launched into the plasma. The new klystrons have no modulating anode and the high cathode voltage must be adjusted with the RF input power in order to optimize the RF output power with a minimization of the thermal power losses in the collector. A new phase correction, depending on the 3 RF output power ranges used, has been introduced. The improvements made in 2009 and 2010 on the generic phase loop and the procedures used during the real time tests of the RF transfer functions in amplitude and phase are detailed below. All RF measurements systems, RF safety systems and the RF calibration procedures have been revised in order to have the best consistency, reproducibility and with a measurement error against the calorimetry measurement lower than 10%.

  19. Using mode of action information to improve regulatory decision-making: an ECETOC/ILSI RF/HESI workshop overview.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Neil; Bausen, Melanie; Boobis, Alan R; Cohen, Samuel M; Embry, Michelle; Fruijtier-Pölloth, Claudia; Greim, Helmut; Lewis, Richard; Bette Meek, M E; Mellor, Howard; Vickers, Carolyn; Doe, John

    2011-03-01

    The European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC), the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Research Foundation (RF), and the ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) hosted a workshop in November 2009 to review current practice in the application of mode of action (MOA) considerations in chemical risk assessment. The aim was to provide a rationale for a more general, but flexible approach and to propose steps to facilitate broader uptake and use of the MOA concept. There was consensus amongst the workshop participants that it will require substantial effort and cooperation from the multiple disciplines involved to embrace a common, consistent, and transparent approach. Setting up a repository of accepted MOAs and associated guidance concerning appropriate data to support specific MOAs for critical effects would facilitate categorization of chemicals and allow predictions of toxicity outcomes by read-across. This should in future contribute to the reduction of toxicity testing in animals. The workshop participants also acknowledged the value and importance of human data and the importance of integrating information from biological pathway analyses into current MOA/human relevance frameworks. PMID:21401325

  20. IgM rheumatoid factor (RF), IgA RF, IgE RF, and IgG RF detected by ELISA in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Gioud-Paquet, M; Auvinet, M; Raffin, T; Girard, P; Bouvier, M; Lejeune, E; Monier, J C

    1987-01-01

    One hundred patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), of whom 73 were seropositive by latex or Waaler-Rose (WR) assays, or both, 100 healthy subjects, and 102 diseased controls (22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 80 with bronchial asthma) were evaluated for the presence of IgM rheumatoid factor (RF), IgA RF, IgE RF, and IgG RF by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ninety two per cent, 65%, 68%, and 66% of the patients with RA were found to be positive for IgM, IgA, IgE, and IgG respectively. A positive correlation existed between the levels of IgM RF and IgA RF on the one hand and disease activity on the other, and the levels of IgM RF and IgA RF correlated with the levels of circulating immune complexes as measured by a C1q binding assay. The presence of extra-articular features also correlated positively with the levels of IgA RF and IgE RF. Five out of six patients with Sjögren's syndrome had very high levels of IgA RF. Of 47 patients typed for HLA-DR, DR1 and DR2 were significantly more frequent in those with the highest levels of IgM RF. Conversely, DR3 was associated with low levels or absence of IgA RF and IgE RF. These results suggest that immune response genes may regulate the level of different RF isotypes. The frequencies of IgM, IgA, IgE, and IgG RF were 59%, 36%, 9%, and 27% respectively in SLE and 25%, 2.5%, 70%, and 59% in bronchial asthma. PMID:3813676

  1. 60kV, 10Amp DC power supply multiple input control and monitoring provision for the operation of various high power RF generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Kirit M.; Srinivas, Y. S. S.; Kulkarni, S. V.; ICRH-RF Group

    2010-02-01

    A 60 kV, 10 A DC power supply is used for testing of high power RF and microwave tubes e.g. Klystron, Gyrotron. Two 500 kW, 3.7 GHz klystrons, and one 82.6 GHz Gyrotron are located in SST1 Hall where as 200 kW; 28 GHz Gyrotron is located in Aditya Hall. The same power supply is required to operate, control and monitor various systems at different locations with easy change over from one system to other as per experimental requirements. An off line, control change over system, is designed to accomplish the above requirements, with control panels installed at desired different locations. The input (0 to 11 kV) A.C. voltage to power supply is given from a motorized voltage variation system (VVS). The control panels provide indication of A.C. input voltage to power supply from 11 kV potential transformers of VVS. In addition, the control panel is provided with 11 kV circuit breaker status indication and control i.e. Emergency OFF switch. The control panels are designed and developed indigenously which are successfully installed and are in continuous use for the safe and easy operation of different high power rf systems from the same DC power supply. The paper presents the design of the controls, monitoring and indications. Safety aspects of the system are also highlighted.

  2. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) is a blood test that measures the amount of the RF antibody in the blood. ... these conditions still have a "normal" or low RF. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ...

  3. Photocathodes for RF photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelato, P.

    1997-02-01

    Over the past ten years photocathodes have been extensively used as high-brightness electron sources in RF guns. In this paper, I present a general review of the alkali-based high quantum efficiency (QE) photoemitters (e.g. Cs 3Sb, K 2CsSb and Cs 2Te), together with a comparative analysis of the different preparation procedures and the results obtained, both in the preparation chambers and in RF guns. The need to increase the photocathode reliability has provided the impetus to get an R&D activity to go over the alchemy of photocathode preparation procedure. In this paper, I will discuss the results so far obtained in different laboratories, both by using traditional investigation strategy (e.g. QE and RF behavior) and by means of surface science techniques as Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Alkali antimonides have been used at first in the RF gun due to the high QE response to the green light of the Nd:YLF second-harmonic radiation. Measurements have confirmed the high reactivity of the alkali antimonide photocathodes to the residual gases: this fact makes their use in RF guns not practical, mainly for short lifetimes. Further investigations have shown that the choice of the substratum preparation procedure and chemical composition plays a fundamental role in the photocathode performance, both from the point of view of the QE and the operative lifetime and ruggedness to gas exposition. Cesium telluride (Cs 2Te) prepared on a molybdenum substratum seems to be, nowadays, the best compromise, in terms of preparation procedure reliability and ruggedness, that now the characteristics and drawbacks of this material are well understood (e.g. the need of an UV laser source). Future possible developments will be discussed. In particular, the measurement and the control of the thermal emittance and the time response could be an important task.

  4. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) - Normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, CEST MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and RF irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the CEST MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work here extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (kws), with little dependence on bulk water T1, T2, RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments. PMID:21842497

  5. A novel RF-insensitive EED utilizing an integrated metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, Thomas A.; Baginski, Michael E.

    1990-05-01

    The description and characterization of an electroexplosive device (EED) are presented. The structure is designed, using microelectric fabrication techniques, to be inherently immune to radio frequency (RF) radiation and also offers protection against stray signals associated with RF-induced arcing. A detailed discussion of the structure, which includes the fundamental mechanisms of operation, fabrication techniques, the device's frequency response and sensitivity to RF-induced arcing, and its compatibility with present fire control systems, is provided. Preliminary test results of the prototype device are discussed and show a significant improvement in the system's overall EMI immunity. These results include bench and field measurements of the structure's RF response for frequencies of 10-225 MHz and field measurements of the device's sensitivity to RF-induced arcing. The measurements indicate a significant reduction in real power dissipated by an EED employing the structure over an EED employing a conventional bridgewire (20 dB at 90 MHz).

  6. Feasibility randomised controlled trial of Recovery-focused Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Older Adults with bipolar disorder (RfCBT-OA): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Elizabeth; Lobban, Fiona; Sutton, Chris; Depp, Colin; Johnson, Sheri; Laidlaw, Ken; Jones, Steven H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bipolar disorder is a severe and chronic mental health problem that persists into older adulthood. The number of people living with this condition is set to rise as the UK experiences a rapid ageing of its population. To date, there has been very little research or service development with respect to psychological therapies for this group of people. Methods and analysis A parallel two-arm randomised controlled trial comparing a 14-session, 6-month Recovery-focused Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Older Adults with bipolar disorder (RfCBT-OA) plus treatment as usual (TAU) versus TAU alone. Participants will be recruited in the North-West of England via primary and secondary mental health services and through self-referral. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of RfCBT-OA; therefore, a formal power calculation is not appropriate. It has been estimated that randomising 25 participants per group will be sufficient to be able to reliably determine the primary feasibility outcomes (eg, recruitment and retention rates), in line with recommendations for sample sizes for feasibility/pilot trials. Participants in both arms will complete assessments at baseline and then every 3 months, over the 12-month follow-up period. We will gain an estimate of the likely effect size of RfCBT-OA on a range of clinical outcomes and estimate parameters needed to determine the appropriate sample size for a definitive, larger trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of RfCBT-OA. Data analysis is discussed further in the Analysis section in the main paper. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by the UK National Health Service (NHS) Ethics Committee process (REC ref: 15/NW/0330). The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and local, participating NHS trusts. Trial registration number ISRCTN13875321; Pre

  7. Investigation of RF excited CW CO2 waveguide lasers local oscillator - RF excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1988-01-01

    A new local oscillator housing was built which seems to have improved laser life. Laser cooling was changed from internal water cooling to the more convenient thermal contact cooling. At the present time, a conclusion can not be made if the 20 percent reduction in power output is the result of poorer cooling or poorer grating alignment. The coupling-starting network was improved from 55 to about 90 percent. It can be adjusted by varying trimmers C sub 1 and C sub 2 to match RF power levels between 10 and 30 W. If the laser admittance changes greatly with laser life rematching will have to be achieved by remote control for space applications. The same holds true if the RF power level has to be changed with a maximum efficiency constraint.

  8. Conceptual design of data acquisition and control system for two Rf driver based negative ion source for fusion R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Jigensh; Yadav, R. K.; Patel, A.; Gahlaut, A.; Mistry, H.; Parmar, K. G.; Mahesh, V.; Parmar, D.; Prajapati, B.; Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Bansal, G.; Pandya, K.; Chakraborty, A.

    2013-02-01

    Twin Source - An Inductively coupled two RF driver based 180 kW, 1 MHz negative ion source experimental setup is initiated at IPR, Gandhinagar, under Indian program, with the objective of understanding the physics and technology of multi-driver coupling. Twin Source [1] (TS) also provides an intermediate platform between operational ROBIN [2] [5] and eight RF drivers based Indian test facility -INTF [3]. A twin source experiment requires a central system to provide control, data acquisition and communication interface, referred as TS-CODAC, for which a software architecture similar to ITER CODAC core system has been decided for implementation. The Core System is a software suite for ITER plant system manufacturers to use as a template for the development of their interface with CODAC. The ITER approach, in terms of technology, has been adopted for the TS-CODAC so as to develop necessary expertise for developing and operating a control system based on the ITER guidelines as similar configuration needs to be implemented for the INTF. This cost effective approach will provide an opportunity to evaluate and learn ITER CODAC technology, documentation, information technology and control system processes, on an operational machine. Conceptual design of the TS-CODAC system has been completed. For complete control of the system, approximately 200 Nos. control signals and 152 acquisition signals are needed. In TS-CODAC, control loop time required is within the range of 5ms - 10 ms, therefore for the control system, PLC (Siemens S-7 400) has been chosen as suggested in the ITER slow controller catalog. For the data acquisition, the maximum sampling interval required is 100 micro second, and therefore National Instruments (NI) PXIe system and NI 6259 digitizer cards have been selected as suggested in the ITER fast controller catalog. This paper will present conceptual design of TS -CODAC system based on ITER CODAC Core software and applicable plant system integration processes.

  9. Improving Symptom Control in Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused by a severe loss of pigmented dopamine-producing nigro-striatal neurons. Symptomatic therapies provide benefit for motor features by restoring dopamine receptor stimulation. Studies have demonstrated that delaying the introduction of dopaminergic medical therapy is associated with a rapid decline in quality of life. Nonmotor symptoms, such as depression, are common in early PD and also affect quality of life. Therefore, dopaminergic therapy should typically be initiated at, or shortly following, diagnosis. Monamine oxidase-B inhibitors provide mild symptomatic benefit, have excellent side effect profiles, and may improve long-term outcomes, making them an important first-line treatment option. Dopamine agonists (DAs) provide moderate symptomatic benefit but are associated with more side effects than levodopa. However, they delay the development of motor complications by delaying the need for levodopa. Levodopa (LD) is the most efficacious medication, but its chronic use is associated with the development of motor complications that can be difficult to resolve. Younger patients are more likely to develop levodopa-induced motor complications and they are therefore often treated with a DA before levodopa is added. For older patients, levodopa provides good motor benefit with a relatively low-risk of motor complications. Using levodopa with a dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor lessens adverse effects, and further adding a catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitor can improve symptom control. PMID:21180628

  10. Toward improved influenza control through vaccination.

    PubMed

    Falleiros Arlant, Luiza Helena; Ferro Bricks, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    In August 27/2014, SLIPE organized the Master Class "Towards improved influenza control through vaccination", a panel with international influenza experts who shared their understanding of the disease and the control measures available, focusing on the most recent information about this serious diseases. In this report Dr Falleiros and Dr Bricks summarized the following topics: Global influenza epidemiology, presented by Dr Puig-Barbera; Influenza vaccine recommendations and coverage in Latin American countries, presented by Dr Bricks; Influenza vaccines efficacy and effectiveness, presented by Dr Fedson: Influenza burden ;md rational for prevention in children, presented by Dr Muiioz; Influenza burden in pregnancy, presented by Dr Ribeiro; Influenza vaccination in health care workers, presented by Dr Macias; Influenza vaccination in the elderly, presented by Dr Ribeiro; Rational to increase vaccination coverage rates Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network, presented by Dr Puig-Barbera; Influenza B epidemiology and vaccine strain mismatch in Latin American Region, presented by Dr Bricks; Modeling for quadrivalent influenza vaccines impact, presented by Dr Blank; Rational for quadrivalent influenza vaccines and the clinical development of QIV s, presented by Dr Desauziers and Modelling quadrivalent influenza vaccines impact, presented by Dr Blank. PMID:26065453

  11. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-05-20

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron.

  12. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  13. Timing control improves seabed survey data quality

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.

    1996-04-01

    Seateam has completed development of and field-proven the Dolphin data acquisition and timing system for high-density surveys offshore. The Dolphin project was initiated to improve quality control of survey sensor data and ensure time synchronization, thus leading to faster turnaround of seabed terrain information. Data received from survey sensors is asynchronous, so the system must provide for data correlation. This includes establishment of data latency, i.e., the time difference between data creation and timing of the message at first-byte arrival at the recording system. Until recently, asynchronous data from multiple sensors was collected by a single computer, regardless of whether it had additional intelligent or non-intelligent serial cards. This computer was fully responsible for time stamping all incoming data, plus associated storage and distribution. Though this initially sufficed and is still applicable to low-density data, increasingly larger data volumes required an associated boost in the capability to time stamp data prior to eventual correction.

  14. 2 MW CW RF load for gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Ives, R.; Marsden, David; Mizuhara, Max; Collins, George; Neilson, Jeff; Borchard, Philipp

    2011-07-01

    Final design and assembly are in progress for a 2MW CW RF load for gyrotrons. Such loads are required for testing high power gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas. The research is building on experience with a 1 MW load to increase the power capability, reduce backscattered RF power, and improve the mechanical design. (author)

  15. The Murmansk Initiative - RF: Acceptance Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.; Wester, D. W.; Dyer, R. S.; Soerlie, A. A.; Moller, B.; Barnes, E.

    2002-02-26

    The Murmansk Initiative-RF (MI) was conceived to provide the Russian Federation (RF) with the capacity to manage low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW) and comply with the requirements of the London Convention that prohibit ocean dumping. The trilateral project among Norway, the RF, and the United States of America (U.S.) began in 1994 and was the first to utilize exclusively Russian subcontractors to upgrade and expand an existing LLRW treatment plant on the premises of RTP Atomflot in Murmansk, Russia. The project moved quickly through the design phase. Progress during the construction phase was somewhat slower because of difficulties with acquisition of hardware, inexperience with automated instrumentation and control equipment, and unexpected design changes in the cementation unit. The project advanced into the test-operation phase, which is currently underway, in June 2001. Initial runs with liquid waste have revealed that procedures for unloading spent ion-exchange sorbents could be improved and that sludges formed during removal of alkaline-earth metals should be compacted in order for the facility to operate at its full potential. Resolution of these issues is expected within the next few months.

  16. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Improved temperature control of liquid cooling garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flucher, C. W. G.

    1972-01-01

    Skin and auditory meatus temperature readings supply control signal for temperature control valve in fluid temperature control system which provides increased subject comfort and responds to directly measured physiological cooling needs. System applications include medical care and thermal protection garment manufacturing.

  18. THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Crofford, Mark T; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Hardek, Thomas W; Heidenreich, Dale A; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kang, Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has recently commissioned a cryomodule test facility for the repair and testing of the super-conducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. This facility utilizes the original 402.5/805 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Klystron Test Stand as its power source along with dual Low Level RF (LLRF) control systems. One control system is based on the standard SNS Linac LLRF controls with a second system for open-loop only control. The system is designed to allow simultaneous testing of devices in the test cave and other devices which can be tested outside of the enclosure. Initial tests have shown good results; some improvements are yet to be implemented.

  19. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  20. Rotorcraft flying qualities improvement using advanced control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Postlethwaite, I.; Howitt, J.; Foster, N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on recent experience gained when a multivariable helicopter flight control law was tested on the Large Motion Simulator (LMS) at DRA Bedford. This was part of a study into the application of multivariable control theory to the design of full-authority flight control systems for high-performance helicopters. In this paper, we present some of the results that were obtained during the piloted simulation trial and from subsequent off-line simulation and analysis. The performance provided by the control law led to level 1 handling quality ratings for almost all of the mission task elements assessed, both during the real-time and off-line analysis.

  1. Construction and evaluation of the novel DNA vaccine harboring the inhibin α (1–32) and the RF-amide related peptide-3 genes for improving fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Xingang; Han, Li; Riaz, Hasan; Luo, Xuan; Liu, Xiaoran; Chong, Zhenglu; Yang, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    To further improve fertility of animals, a novel gene RFRP-3 (RF-amide related peptide-3, RFRP-3) was used to construct DNA vaccines with INH α (1–32) (inhibin, INH) fragment for the first time. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of novel DNA vaccines on fertility in mice. Synthesized SINH and SRFRP (INH and RFRP genes were separately ligated to the C-terminus of the small envelope protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV-S) gene) fragments were inserted into multiple cloning site of pIRES vector to develop p-SINH/SRFRP. The synthesized tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) signal sequence was then inserted into the p-SINH/SRFRP to construct p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SFRFP. Meanwhile, p-SINH was prepared and considered as positive control. Forty Kunming mice were equally divided into four groups and respectively immunized by electroporation with p-SINH, p-SINH/SRFRP and p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SRFRP vaccine (three times at 2 weeks interval) and saline as control. Results showed that the average antibodies (P/N value) of anti-INH and anti-RFRP in mice inoculated with p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SFRFP were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those inoculated with p-SINH/SRFRP and the positive rates were 100% (anti-INH) and 90% (anti-RFRP) respectively, at 2 weeks after the third immunization. Litter size of mice immunized with the three recombinant plasmids was higher (P<0.05) than that of the control, and litter size of mice immunized with p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SRFRP significantly increased (P<0.05) compared with p-SINH. These results suggested that the p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SRFRP harboring INH and RFRP genes was successfully constructed and had good immunogenicity, and might effectively increase litter size. PMID:26437787

  2. Construction and evaluation of the novel DNA vaccine harboring the inhibin α (1-32) and the RF-amide related peptide-3 genes for improving fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Dan, Xingang; Han, Li; Riaz, Hasan; Luo, Xuan; Liu, Xiaoran; Chong, Zhenglu; Yang, Liguo

    2016-01-01

    To further improve fertility of animals, a novel gene RFRP-3 (RF-amide related peptide-3, RFRP-3) was used to construct DNA vaccines with INH α (1-32) (inhibin, INH) fragment for the first time. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of novel DNA vaccines on fertility in mice. Synthesized SINH and SRFRP (INH and RFRP genes were separately ligated to the C-terminus of the small envelope protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV-S) gene) fragments were inserted into multiple cloning site of pIRES vector to develop p-SINH/SRFRP. The synthesized tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) signal sequence was then inserted into the p-SINH/SRFRP to construct p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SFRFP. Meanwhile, p-SINH was prepared and considered as positive control. Forty Kunming mice were equally divided into four groups and respectively immunized by electroporation with p-SINH, p-SINH/SRFRP and p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SRFRP vaccine (three times at 2 weeks interval) and saline as control. Results showed that the average antibodies (P/N value) of anti-INH and anti-RFRP in mice inoculated with p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SFRFP were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those inoculated with p-SINH/SRFRP and the positive rates were 100% (anti-INH) and 90% (anti-RFRP) respectively, at 2 weeks after the third immunization. Litter size of mice immunized with the three recombinant plasmids was higher (P<0.05) than that of the control, and litter size of mice immunized with p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SRFRP significantly increased (P<0.05) compared with p-SINH. These results suggested that the p-TPA-SINH/TPA-SRFRP harboring INH and RFRP genes was successfully constructed and had good immunogenicity, and might effectively increase litter size. PMID:26437787

  3. 47 CFR 2.1046 - Measurements required: RF power output.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measurements required: RF power output. 2.1046... Measurements required: RF power output. (a) For transmitters other than single sideband, independent sideband and controlled carrier radiotelephone, power output shall be measured at the RF output terminals...

  4. Iron-control additives improve acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.; Dill, W. ); Besler, M. )

    1989-07-24

    Iron sulfide and sulfur precipitation in sour wells can be controlled with iron-sequestering agents and sulfide modifiers. Oil production has been routinely increased in sour wells where precipitation of iron sulfide and elemental sulfur has been brought under control. Production increases have been especially noteworthy on wells that had a history of rapid production decline after acid stimulation. Twenty-fold production increases have been recorded. Key to the production increase has been to increase permeability with: Iron chelating agents that control precipitation of iron sulfide. A sulfide modifier that reduces precipitation of solids in the presence of excessive amounts of hydrogen sulfide and prevents precipitation of elemental sulfur.

  5. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  6. Improving Instruction Using Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Ronald C.; Messer, George H.

    1990-01-01

    Two applications of statistical process control to the process of education are described. Discussed are the use of prompt feedback to teachers and prompt feedback to students. A sample feedback form is provided. (CW)

  7. RF Variable-Gain Amplifiers and AGC Loops for Digital TV Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Kunihiko; Koutani, Masato; Mitsunaka, Takeshi; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Toyoyama, Shinji; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Matsuzawa, Akira

    RF Variable Gain Amplifiers (RF-VGA) are important components for integrated TV broadcast receivers. Analog and digital controlled RF-VGAs are compared in terms of linearity and an AGC loop architecture suitable for digitally controlled RF-VGA is proposed. Further linearity enhancement applicable for CMOS implementation is also discussed.

  8. Magnetic Bearing Controller Improvements for High Speed Flywheel System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    A magnetic bearing control system for a high-speed flywheel system is described. The flywheel utilizes a five axis active magnetic bearing system, using eddy current sensors for position feedback to the bearing controller. Magnetic bearing controller features designed to improve flywheel operation and testing are described. Operational improvements include feed forward control to compensate for rotor imbalance, moving notch filtering to compensate for synchronous and harmonic rotational noise, and fixed notching to prevent rotor bending mode excitation. Testing improvements include adding safe gain, bearing current hold, bearing current zero, and excitation input features. Performance and testing improvements provided by these features are measured and discussed.

  9. Remotely controlled steerable sheath improves result and procedural parameters of atrial fibrillation ablation with magnetic navigation

    PubMed Central

    Errahmouni, Abdelkarim; Latcu, Decebal Gabriel; Bun, Sok-Sithikun; Rijo, Nicolas; Dugourd, Céline; Saoudi, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Aims The magnetic navigation (MN) system may be coupled with a new advancement system that fully controls both the catheter and a robotic deflectable sheath (RSh) or with a fixed-curve sheath and a catheter-only advancement system (CAS). We aimed to compare these approaches for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Methods and results Atrial fibrillation ablation patients (45, 23 paroxysmal and 22 persistent) performed with MN–RSh (RSh group) were compared with a control group (37, 18 paroxysmal and19 persistent) performed with MN–CAS (CAS group). Setup duration was measured from the procedure's start to operator transfer to control room. Ablation step duration was defined as the time from the beginning of the first radiofrequency (RF) pulse to the end of the last one and was separately acquired for the left and the right pulmonary vein (PV) pairs. Clinical characteristics, left atrial size, and AF-type distribution were similar between the groups. Setup duration as well as mapping times was also similar. Ablation step duration for the left PVs was similar, but was shorter for the right PVs in RSh group (46 ± 9 vs. 63 ± 12 min, P < 0.0001). Radiofrequency delivery time (34 ± 9 vs. 40 ± 11 min, P = 0.007) and procedure duration (227 ± 36 vs. 254 ± 62 min, P = 0.01) were shorter in RSh group. No complication occurred in RSh group. During follow-up, there were five recurrences (11%) in RSh group and 11 (29%) in CAS group (P = 0.027). Conclusion The use of the RSh for AF ablation with MN is safe and improves outcome. Right PV isolation is faster, RF delivery time and procedure time are reduced. PMID:25662989

  10. GC-directed control improves refining

    SciTech Connect

    Hail, G.F. )

    1991-02-01

    The increasing role of refinery product quality control is significant. Driven not only for meeting product specification and economic goals, refiners must also satisfy new purchaser demands. That is, the emphasis to monitor product quality on-line in an accurate, timely manner is greater now than ever, due largely to the expanding use of statistical methods (SQC/SPC) in analyzing and manipulating process operation. Consequently, the need for reliable composition control is essential in maintaining refinery prosperity. Process gas chromatographs are frequently used to monitor the performance of distillation, absorption and stripping towers by providing near-real-time stream composition, particular component concentration, or calculated parameter (Rvp, Btu content, etc.) information. This paper reports that appreciably greater benefit can be achieved when process gas chromatographs (or GCs) provide on-line feedback data to process control schemes.

  11. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Management Controls...

  12. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Management Controls...

  13. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Management Controls...

  14. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Management Controls...

  15. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Management Controls...

  16. R&D ERL: Low level RF

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2010-01-15

    A superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently under development at the Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The major components from an RF perspective are (a) a 5-cell SRF ERL cavity, (b) an SRF photocathode electron gun, and (c) a drive laser for the photocathode gun. Each of these RF subsystems has its own set of RF performance requirements, as well as common requirements for ensuring correct synchronism between them. A low level RF (LLRF) control system is currently under development, which seeks to leverage both technology and experience gained from the recently commissioned RHIC LLRF system upgrade. This note will review the LLRF system requirements and describe the system to be installed at the ERL.

  17. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  18. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  19. Implementing New Methods of Laser Marking of Items in the Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System at SSC RF-IPPE: An Automated Laser Marking System

    SciTech Connect

    Regoushevsky, V I; Tambovtsev, S D; Dvukhsherstnov, V G; Efimenko, V F; Ilyantsev, A I; Russ III, G P

    2009-05-18

    For over ten years SSC RF-IPPE, together with the US DOE National Laboratories, has been working on implementing automated control and accountability methods for nuclear materials and other items. Initial efforts to use adhesive bar codes or ones printed (painted) onto metal revealed that these methods were inconvenient and lacked durability under operational conditions. For NM disk applications in critical stands, there is the additional requirement that labels not affect the neutron characteristics of the critical assembly. This is particularly true for the many stainless-steel clad disks containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium that are used at SSC RF-IPPE for modeling nuclear power reactors. In search of an alternate method for labeling these disks, we tested several technological options, including laser marking and two-dimensional codes. As a result, the method of laser coloring was chosen in combination with Data Matrix ECC200 symbology. To implement laser marking procedures for the HEU disks and meet all the nuclear material (NM) handling standards and rules, IPPE staff, with U.S. technical and financial support, implemented an automated laser marking system; there are also specially developed procedures for NM movements during laser marking. For the laser marking station, a Zenith 10F system by Telesis Technologies (10 watt Ytterbium Fiber Laser and Merlin software) is used. The presentation includes a flowchart for the automated system and a list of specially developed procedures with comments. Among other things, approaches are discussed for human-factor considerations. To date, markings have been applied to numerous steel-clad HEU disks, and the work continues. In the future this method is expected to be applied to other MC&A items.

  20. Air Traffic Control Improvement Using Prioritized CSMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2001-01-01

    Version 7 simulations of the industry-standard network simulation software "OPNET" are presented of two applications of the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN), Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast mode (ADS-B), over VHF Data Link mode 2 (VDL-2). Communication is modeled for air traffic between just three cities. All aircraft are assumed to have the same equipage. The simulation involves Air Traffic Control (ATC) ground stations and 105 aircraft taking off, flying realistic free-flight trajectories, and landing in a 24-hr period. All communication is modeled as unreliable. Collision-less, prioritized carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) is successfully tested. The statistics presented include latency, queue length, and packet loss. This research may show that a communications system simpler than the currently accepted standard envisioned may not only suffice, but also surpass performance of the standard at a lower cost of deployment.

  1. Blending Gyro Signals To Improve Control Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Interference by structural vibrations reduced by adding signals from spatially separated gyros. Technique involves blending signals from rate gyroscopes located at different parts of structure to obtain composite signal that more nearly represents rotation of entire structure. Aircraft vibrations perpendicular to pitch axis contribute to rotations sensed by pitch-rate gyros. Proper blending of signals from gyros suppress contribution of dominant vibrational mode. Most likely applications of concept are flight-control systems for aircraft.

  2. How intense quality control improves hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, J.W.

    1996-11-01

    Not unlike the subject of Forced Closure, Intense Quality Control is probably misnamed. What actually is discussed in this article is pilot testing of the fracturing fluids actually pumped at in-situ conditions of temperature and shear. Presented here is development of the need for onsite testing, equipment used, shear and viscosity curves from several jobs showing what went wrong that would otherwise not have been known, and a discussion of borate gel fluids.

  3. A 32-Channel Combined RF and B0 Shim Array for 3T Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stockmann, Jason P.; Witzel, Thomas; Keil, Boris; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Mareyam, Azma; LaPierre, Cristen; Setsompop, Kawin; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We add user-controllable direct currents (DC) to the individual elements of a 32-channel radio-frequency (RF) receive array to provide B0 shimming ability while preserving the array’s reception sensitivity and parallel imaging performance. Methods Shim performance using constrained DC current (±2.5A) is simulated for brain arrays ranging from 8 to 128 elements. A 32-channel 3-tesla brain array is realized using inductive chokes to bridge the tuning capacitors on each RF loop. The RF and B0 shimming performance is assessed in bench and imaging measurements. Results The addition of DC currents to the 32-channel RF array is achieved with minimal disruption of the RF performance and/or negative side effects such as conductor heating or mechanical torques. The shimming results agree well with simulations and show performance superior to third-order spherical harmonic (SH) shimming. Imaging tests show the ability to reduce the standard frontal lobe susceptibility-induced fields and improve echo planar imaging geometric distortion. The simulation of 64- and 128-channel brain arrays suggest that even further shimming improvement is possible (equivalent to up to 6th-order SH shim coils). Conclusion Including user-controlled shim currents on the loops of a conventional highly parallel brain array coil is feasible with modest current levels and produces improved B0 shimming performance over standard second-order SH shimming. PMID:25689977

  4. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  5. Hom dampers for ALS storage ring RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, S.; Baptiste, K.; Byrd, J.; DeSantis, S.; Julian, J.; Low, R.; Lyn, L.; Plate, D.

    2003-05-08

    The main source of narrowband impedance in the Advanced Light Source (ALS) are higher order modes (HOMs) of the two main RF and three third harmonic cavities. These HOMs drive longitudinal and transverse coupled bunch instabilities, which are controlled using active beam feedback systems. The dominant longitudinal HOMs in both systems are TM011-like modes with the R/Q factor an order of magnitude higher than all other longitudinal modes. To reduce the growth rates within the range of the longitudinal feedback system (LFB), these modes were tuned away from beam resonances by means of cooling water temperature control (main rf system), and the combination of two tuners (third harmonic system). To improve the reliability of the longitudinal dampening system, we have built and installed E-type HOM dampers for the fundamental and harmonic cavities. We present the design, commissioning and performance of the HOM dampers in this paper.

  6. Electrical characterization of rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1991-08-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) electrical sources are commonly used to generate plasmas for processing of industrial materials and for related experimental work. Published descriptions of such plasmas usually include generator-power measurements, and occasionally include plasma dc-bias measurements. One or both of these quantitites are also used in industrial feedback ccontrol systems for setpoint regulation. Recent work at Sandia an elsewhere with an experimental rf discharge device (the GEC RF Reference Cell'') has shown that power and dc-bias levels are often insufficient information for specifying the state of the plasma. The plasma can have nonlinear electrical characteristics that cause harmonic generation, and the harmonic levels can depend sensitively on the impedance of the external circuitry at harmonic frequencies. Even though the harmonics may be low in amplitude, they can be directly related to large changes in plasma power and to changes in optical emission from the plasma. Consequently, in order for a worker to truly master the plasma-generation process, it is necessary to understand, measure, and control electrical characteristics of the plamsa. In this paper we describe technique that have been developed from work with the Reference Cell for making electrical measurements on rf plasmas, and we describe surprising observations of harmonic behavior. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Interactions of release factor RF3 with the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial release factor RF3 is a GTPase that has been implicated in multiple, incompletely understood steps of protein synthesis. This study explores the genetic interaction of RF3 with other components of the translation machinery. RF3 contributes to translation termination by recycling the class I release factors RF1 and RF2 off post-termination ribosomes. RF3 has also been implicated in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs from elongating ribosomes and in a post-peptidyltransferase quality control (post-PT QC) mechanism that selectively terminates ribosomes carrying erroneous peptides. A majority of the in vivo studies on RF3 have been carried out in K-12 strains of Escherichia coli which carry a partially defective RF2 protein with an Ala to Thr substitution at position 246. Here, the contribution of the K-12 specific RF2 variant to RF3 activities has been investigated. Strain reconstruction experiments in both E. coli and Salmonella enterica demonstrate that defects in termination and post-PT QC that are associated with RF3 loss, as well as phenotypes uncovered by phenotypic profiling, are all substantially ameliorated when the incompletely active K-12-specific RF2 protein is replaced by a fully active Ala246 RF2. These results indicate that RF3 loss is well tolerated in bacteria with fully active class I release factors, but that many of the previously reported phenotypes for RF3 deletion strains have been compromised by the presence of a partially defective RF2. PMID:25636454

  8. ACCELERATORS: RF system design and measurement of HIRF-CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhe; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Wang, Chun-Xiao; Xia, Jia-Wen; Zhan, Wen-Long; Bian, Zhi-Bin

    2009-05-01

    An RF system for the CSRe (cooling storage experimental ring) is designed and manufactured domestically. The present paper mainly describes the RF system design in five main sections: ferrite ring, RF cavity, RF generator, low level system and cavity cooling. The cavity is based on a type of coaxial resonator which is shorted at the end with one gap and loaded with domestic ferrite rings. The RF generator is designed in the push-pull mode and the low level control system is based on a DSP+FGPA+DDS+USB interface and has three feedback loops. Finally we give the results of the measurement on our system.

  9. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  10. An improved output feedback control of flexible large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lin, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A special output feedback control design technique for flexible large space structures is proposed. It is shown that the technique will increase both the damping and frequency of selected modes for more effective control. It is also able to effect integrated control of elastic and rigid-body modes and, in particular, closed-loop system stability and robustness to modal truncation and parameter variation. The technique is seen as marking an improvement over previous work concerning large space structures output feedback control.

  11. Improved Process control of wood waste fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Process Control Solutions, Inc.

    2004-01-30

    This project's principal aim was the conceptual and feasibility stage development of improved process control methods for wood-waste-fired water-tube boilers operating in industrial manufacturing applications (primarily pulp and paper). The specific objectives put forth in the original project proposal were as follows: (1) fully characterize the wood-waste boiler control inter-relationships and constraints through data collection and analysis; (2) design an improved control architecture; (3) develop and test an appropriate control and optimization algorithm; and (4) develop and test a procedure for reproducing the approach and deriving the benefits on similar pulp and paper wood-waste boilers. Detailed tasks were developed supporting these objectives.

  12. BN / Graphene / BN RF Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Taychatanapat, Thiti; Hsu, Allen; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Palacios, Tomas

    2011-03-01

    In this work we demonstrate the first BN/graphene/BN transistor for high frequency RF applications. This sandwich structure allows a significant improvement in the mobility of graphene, which reaches more than 18,000 cm2 /Vs at room temperature. Graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) have been fabricated with LDS = 800 nm and LG = 300 nm. The minimum conduction point of these devices is very close to zero, a result of the negligible substrate doping to the graphene. A current density in excess of 1 A/mm and DC transconductance above 200 mS/mm are achieved for both electron and hole conductions. RF characterization is performed for the first time on this device structure and initial results show a current-gain cut-off frequency fT = 10 GHz. These experimental results have been combined with simulations of the small-signal model to study the scaling potential of these GFETs for high frequency applications. The impact of the access resistances (Rs , Rd) , the capacitances (Cgs , Cgd , Cds) , and the transconductance (g m) on the frequency performance of the GFETs has also been studied. Finally, the fabricated devices have been compared to GFETs fabricated with Si O2 substrate and Al 2 O3 gate dielectrics. The improved performance obtained by the BN/graphene/BN structure is very promising to enable the next generation of high frequency RF electronics.

  13. Genetic improvement of tomato by targeted control of fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Uluisik, Selman; Chapman, Natalie H; Smith, Rebecca; Poole, Mervin; Adams, Gary; Gillis, Richard B; Besong, Tabot M D; Sheldon, Judith; Stiegelmeyer, Suzy; Perez, Laura; Samsulrizal, Nurul; Wang, Duoduo; Fisk, Ian D; Yang, Ni; Baxter, Charles; Rickett, Daniel; Fray, Rupert; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Powell, Ann L T; Harding, Stephen E; Craigon, Jim; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Fich, Eric A; Sun, Li; Domozych, David S; Fraser, Paul D; Tucker, Gregory A; Grierson, Don; Seymour, Graham B

    2016-09-01

    Controlling the rate of softening to extend shelf life was a key target for researchers engineering genetically modified (GM) tomatoes in the 1990s, but only modest improvements were achieved. Hybrids grown nowadays contain 'non-ripening mutations' that slow ripening and improve shelf life, but adversely affect flavor and color. We report substantial, targeted control of tomato softening, without affecting other aspects of ripening, by silencing a gene encoding a pectate lyase. PMID:27454737

  14. Station to instrumented aircraft L-band telemetry system and RF signal controller for spacecraft simulations and station calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaffidi, C. A.; Stocklin, F. J.; Feldman, M. B.

    1971-01-01

    An L-band telemetry system designed to provide the capability of near-real-time processing of calibration data is described. The system also provides the capability of performing computerized spacecraft simulations, with the aircraft as a data source, and evaluating the network response. The salient characteristics of a telemetry analysis and simulation program (TASP) are discussed, together with the results of TASP testing. The results of the L-band system testing have successfully demonstrated the capability of near-real-time processing of telemetry test data, the control of the ground-received signal to within + or - 0.5 db, and the computer generation of test signals.

  15. Benefits of Improved HP Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, Rafael; Albers, Bob; Sak, Wojciech; Seitzer, Ken; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the NASA Propulsion 21 program, GE Aircraft Engines was contracted to develop an improved high pressure turbine(HPT) active clearance control (ACC) system. The system is envisioned to minimize blade tip clearances to improve HPT efficiency throughout the engine operation range simultaneously reducing fuel consumption and emissions.

  16. Controlled surface modification of Ti-40Nb implant alloy by electrochemically assisted inductively coupled RF plasma oxidation.

    PubMed

    Göttlicher, Markus; Rohnke, Marcus; Helth, Arne; Leichtweiß, Thomas; Gemming, Thomas; Gebert, Annett; Eckert, Jürgen; Janek, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    Low temperature metal oxidation induced by plasma in the absence of liquid electrolytes can be useful for the surface preparation of orthopedic devices since residues from these may be harmful and need to be removed before implantation. In this study the oxidation of Ti-40Nb for biomedical application was achieved by employing an inductively coupled radio frequency oxygen plasma. The correlation between the growth mode of the surface oxide and the electric conductivity ratio of the plasma and the oxide phase were studied by varying the sample temperature, oxygen gas pressure and additional bias potential. The plasma treated samples were characterised by confocal laser microscopy, SEM, EBSD, XPS, TEM and ToF-SIMS. The surface energy was determined by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. Well adhering oxide layers consisting of TiO2 and Nb2O5 with thicknesses between 50 and 150 nm were obtained. Surface roughness values and microstructure indicate that the growth mode of the oxide can be well controlled by the sample temperature and oxygen gas pressure. At temperatures above 450°C a migration of Ti ions towards the surface controls the growth process. A bias potential higher than +50 V causes rough and defective surfaces with high surface energies. PMID:23891813

  17. Implementation of envelope tracking for RF solid state amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, Thomas Leigh

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is currently in its development stages at Michigan State University. The facility uses a large linear accelerator system to accelerate ionized particles which are then collided with other particles in the hopes of finding rare isotopes of elements. This accelerating action depends on several systems to function, with one of the major systems being superconducting cavity structures. These cavities are driven by high-power RF amplifiers which account for a large portion of the accelerator's power consumption. It is important to maximize the efficiency of these amplifiers in order to keep energy costs for the facility low. One of the ways to increase efficiency is to choose an amplifier topology that is highly efficient. A study was done for FRIB testing the prospect of using amplifiers with the envelope tracking (ET) topology. An amplifier's efficiency relies on its output power and the power supplied to it, which are in turn directly related to the output signal voltage and supply rail voltage. In an ET RF amplifier, the supply voltage is made to closely follow the envelope of the output signal voltage. This tracking action allows the RF amplifier to operate with much improved efficiency at low power levels and nearly constant efficiency at high power levels. The ET tests performed for FRIB attempted to verify the validity of ET efficiency gains for RF amplifiers. These tests included the characterization of an RF amplifier, development and verification of an ET control algorithm, and implementation of an ET test bench using FRIB equipment. These tests should attest to the purported increase in efficiency possible with ET and prove that the power consumption budget for the FRIB will benefit from the use of such amplifiers.

  18. Perpendicular cultivation for improved weed control in organic peanut production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensive cultivation in organic peanut is partially effective, but in-row weed control remains problematic. In an attempt to improve in-row weed control, trials were conducted to determine the feasibility of early-season cultivation perpendicular to row direction using a tine weeder when integrate...

  19. A High-performance Hybrid RF Isolation Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    A high-performance hybrid RF Isolation Amplifier (Iso-Amp) has been developed at JPL. The circuit exhibits a unique combination of RF characteristics at performance levels exceeding those of any commercially available device. Recent improvments in the design have resulted in significantly higher reverse isolation, a four-fold increase in bandwidth and improve reliability. These devices are very useful in RF and IF signal conditioners, instrumentation, and signal generation and distribution equipment. These Iso-Amps should find wide application in future DSN and R&D RF systems.

  20. An Approach to Bilateral Control System for Improvement of Operationality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Many types of bilateral control architectures to transmit force sensation have been proposed. Some control methods obtain good performance. Operationality is not satisfactory, however, when these methods are implemented in bilateral systems with large inertia and friction force. In this paper, a novel bilateral control method is proposed to improve operationality of bilateral systems with large inertia and friction force. The proposed method is compared with a conventional method, and the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by coordinate transformation and experiments.

  1. Achieving process control through improved grinding techniques for ferrite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, J.

    1995-09-01

    In manufacturing soft ferrite materials the particle size of the raw material has a significant impact on the reactivity of calcination. The control of particle size distribution and final formulation at wet milling after calcining impacts the reactivity during sintering and the magnetic properties of the final product. This paper will deal with steps taken to improve process control during the grinding operations of raw material and calcine in soft ferrite production. Equipment modifications as well as changes to the grinding and material handling techniques will be included. All examples of process control and improvements will be supported by data.

  2. Efficient high-resolution RF pulse design applied to simultaneous multi-slice excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigner, Christoph Stefan; Clason, Christian; Rund, Armin; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2016-02-01

    RF pulse design via optimal control is typically based on gradient and quasi-Newton approaches and therefore suffers from slow convergence. We present a flexible and highly efficient method that uses exact second-order information within a globally convergent trust-region CG-Newton method to yield an improved convergence rate. The approach is applied to the design of RF pulses for single- and simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) excitation and validated using phantom and in vivo experiments on a 3 T scanner using a modified gradient echo sequence.

  3. Investigation of Non-inductive Plasma Current Start-up by RF on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Masaki; Hanada, Kazuaki; Liu, Hiqing; Ogata, Ryota; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Tashima, Saya; Zushi, Hideki; Sato, Khonosuke; Fujisawa, Akihide; Nakamura, Kazuo; Idei, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Hasegawa, Makoto; Takase, Yuichi; Maekawa, Takashi; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Mitarai, Osamu; Kawasaki, Shoji; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Higashijima, Aki

    2014-05-01

    Formations of a closed flux surface (CFS) on QUEST are achieved by fully non-inductive current start-up driven by RF, which is 8.2GHz in frequency and more than 40kW in power. It found that appropriate magnetic configuration with positive n-index and reduction of particle recycling was crucial to achieve the non-inductive plasma current start-up (PCS) successfully. Especially the controllability of particle recycling should be improved by wall conditioning based on successive plasma production and wall cleaning with electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECR) plasmas induced by RF in frequency of 2.45GHz.

  4. Rf power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  6. The RF Design of an HOM Polarized RF Gun for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Miller, R.A.; Lewellen, J.W.; /Argonne

    2006-11-15

    The ILC requires a polarized electron beam. While a highly polarized beam can be produced by a GaAs-type cathode in a DC gun of the type currently in use at SLAC, JLAB and elsewhere, the ILC injector system can be simplified and made more efficient if a GaAs-type cathode can be combined with a low emittance RF gun. Since this type of cathode is known to be extremely sensitive to vacuum contamination including back bombardment by electrons and ions, any successful polarized RF gun must have a significantly improved operating vacuum compared to existing RF guns. We present a new RF design for an L-Band normal conducting (NC) RF gun for the ILC polarized electron source. This design incorporates a higher order mode (HOM) structure, whose chief virtue in this application is an improved conductance for vacuum pumping on the cathode. Computer simulation models have been used to optimize the RF parameters with two principal goals: first to minimize the required RF power; second to reduce the peak surface field relative to the field at the cathode in order to suppress field emitted electron bombardment. The beam properties have been simulated initially using PARMELA. Vacuum and other practical issues for implementing this design are discussed.

  7. Improved PWM control for GTO inverters with pulse number modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tadakuma, Susuma; Tanaka, Shigeru; Miura, Kazutoshi; Ofosu-Amaah, W.

    1996-05-01

    This paper proposes pulse number modulation (PNM)-assisted pulse-width modulation (PWM) control to improve the modulation factor of bridge inverters and to solve voltage uncontrollability in neutral point clamped (NPC) inverters. The basic idea is to enlarge the linear region of PWM control via PNM technology. The authors will show the following through simulation and experimental results: (1) conventional bridge inverters can utilize at most 80% of the nominal inverter capacity because of the limit of the modulation factor. The PWM and PNM combined control is able to improve the modulation factor up to approximately 1.0; (2) the PWM and PNM control enables linear voltage control in the NPC inverter even for an extremely small reference. The PNM technology also contributes to a reduction in switching losses.

  8. Power system stability improvement with multivariable self-tuning control

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J.Y.; Ortmeyer, T.H.; Mukundan, R. )

    1990-02-01

    A multivariable self-tuning adaptive control scheme is presented. This scheme is of a decentralized nature and is implemented locally for individual generating units. A discrete multivariable auto-regressive-moving-average model is developed to represent a generating unit. The recursive-least-squares (RLS) estimation algorithm with variable-forgetting factor and the generalized-minimum-variance control technique are utilized to synthesize the local controllers. A dynamic goal-point-generating model is introduced to provide varying goal point for the local controller which leads the subsystem output to its equilibrium gradually. Extensive simulations are performed on the IEEE 10-machine test system. The results show that the proposed multivariable adaptive control scheme is effective in damping the severe oscillations after large disturbances as well as improving the system dynamics under small oscillations and is better than the conventional PSS method. The controller demonstrates robustness and is compatible with the existing conventional controllers in multimachine systems.

  9. Use of controlled vocabularies to improve biomedical information retrieval tasks.

    PubMed

    Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Vishnyakova, Dina; Ruch, Patrick; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The high heterogeneity of biomedical vocabulary is a major obstacle for information retrieval in large biomedical collections. Therefore, using biomedical controlled vocabularies is crucial for managing these contents. We investigate the impact of query expansion based on controlled vocabularies to improve the effectiveness of two search engines. Our strategy relies on the enrichment of users' queries with additional terms, directly derived from such vocabularies applied to infectious diseases and chemical patents. We observed that query expansion based on pathogen names resulted in improvements of the top-precision of our first search engine, while the normalization of diseases degraded the top-precision. The expansion of chemical entities, which was performed on the second search engine, positively affected the mean average precision. We have shown that query expansion of some types of biomedical entities has a great potential to improve search effectiveness; therefore a fine-tuning of query expansion strategies could help improving the performances of search engines. PMID:23920842

  10. Organization features of the work control quality improvement project

    SciTech Connect

    Dulin, R.

    1994-12-31

    One consequence of {open_quotes}reengineering{close_quotes} - the systematic review, design, and implementation of process, technology, and organization - is improvement in process efficiency. This improvement also causes change in organization size and function. This paper describes some of the key changes to organizational function brought about by Duke Power Company`s reengineering of the work control process. The fundamental principle observed during the Duke nuclear stations` recent organizational realignment is focus on the process. The process of work control must satisfy the customer needs of the station equipment owners. The changes to the organization serve to fulfill the numerous process requirements.

  11. Advanced Synthesis of Spinnable MWCNT Forests by RF-Induction Heating Enhanced CVD Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Anvar; Holmes, William; UTD Solarno Team; Solarno UTD Team

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate here an advanced method to effectively grow tall multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) vertically oriented forests which are highly spinnable. Heating of the Fe catalyst is achieved extremely fast by RF induction heating using coils outside the quartz tube. This method and the new apparatus designed and presented in this paper allow separate control over the temperature of the substrate and the temperature of the incoming gases. In addition to temperature control, the fast T-ramping of the substrate preserves the catalyst nanoclusters from Ostwald ripening and other growth quenching effects such as carbon overgrowth of the catalyst. We show that the parametric sweet spot or bell curve of substrate spinnability can be increased significantly with this improved RF-CVD method. The catalyst nanoclusters also show a wide band of density arrangements that very positively effect spinnability and the drawing ratio. Drawing ratios can vary from 2 meters to 12 meters of sheets drawn from only 1cm of forest. RF-CVD method allows to grow fast (in several minuts) higher CNT forests at higher temperature of synthesis up to 800 K, and obtain dry-spinable CNTs, Characterization results of the samples created in the newRF-CVD system will be presented and compared to previous CNT sheet samples by conventional three-zone resistive heating CVD to measure the extent of property improvements of the CNT sheets and forests. Specifics of the experimental system will be addressed in detail and future property improvements and applications explored.

  12. RF Sheath Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2007-11-01

    RF sheath formation on the antennas and walls in ICRF-heated experiments can reduce the heating efficiency, limit the coupled power, and cause damage to plasma-facing structures. The sheaths are driven by a slow wave component of the rf field due to a mismatch between the magnetic field and the boundary (antenna or wall). Quantitative modeling of the highly nonlinear sheaths may now be feasible for the first time in massively-parallel-processing (MPP) codes developed in the RF SciDAC project. Recently, a new approach to sheath modeling was proposed,ootnotetextD.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). in which the sheath physics is incorporated into the RF wave computation by using a modified boundary condition (BC) on the RF fields in both wave propagation and antenna codes. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for near-field sheaths by a model calculation that includes electromagnetic effects and a simple antenna coupling model. Properties of the model (such as the role of sheath-plasma waves) and implications for antenna codes such as TOPICAootnotetextV. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006). will be discussed.

  13. Multi-Physics Analysis of the Fermilab Booster RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M.; Reid, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    After about 40 years of operation the RF accelerating cavities in Fermilab Booster need an upgrade to improve their reliability and to increase the repetition rate in order to support a future experimental program. An increase in the repetition rate from 7 to 15 Hz entails increasing the power dissipation in the RF cavities, their ferrite loaded tuners, and HOM dampers. The increased duty factor requires careful modelling for the RF heating effects in the cavity. A multi-physic analysis investigating both the RF and thermal properties of Booster cavity under various operating conditions is presented in this paper.

  14. Development and applications of Krotov method of global control improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasina, Irina V.; Trushkova, Ekaterina A.; Baturina, Olga V.; Bulatov, Alexander V.; Guseva, Irina S.

    2016-06-01

    This is a survey of works on main properties, application and development of the Krotov method of global control improvement very popular among researchers of modern problems in quantum physics and quantum chemistry, applying actively optimal control methods. The survey includes a brief description of the method in comparison with well known gradient method demonstrating such its serious advantage as absence of tuning parameters; investigations aimed to make its special version for the quantum system well defined and more effective; and generalization for wide classes of control systems, including the systems of heterogeneous structure.

  15. Process control improvements realized in a vertical reactor cluster tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkhoven, Chris J.; Granneman, E. H.; Lindow, E.

    1993-04-01

    Advance cell structures present in high-density memories and logic devices require high quality, ultra thin dielectric and conductor films. By controlling the interface properties of such films, remarkable process control enhancements of manufacturing proven, vertical LPCVD and oxidation processes are realized. To this end, an HF/H2O vapor etch reactor is integrated in a vacuum cluster tool comprising vertical reactors for the various LPCVD and oxidation processes. Data of process control improvement are provided for polysilicon emitters, polysilicon contacts, polysilicon gates, and NO capacitors. Finally, the cost of ownership of cluster tool use is compared with that of stand-along equipment.

  16. Piezoelectric actuator based phase locking system to improve the dynamics of the control scheme for a heavy ion superconducting linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. K.; Ahuja, R.; Kumar, Rajesh; Suman, S. K.; Mathuria, D. S.; Rai, A.; Patra, P.; Pandey, A.; Karmakar, J.; Chowdhury, G. K.; Dutt, R. N.; Joshi, G.; Ghosh, S.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2015-03-01

    The superconducting heavy ion linear accelerator at Inter-University Accelerator Centre Delhi has been in operation since 2007. Initially, the superconducting niobium Quarter Wave Resonators (QWRs) in the linac were phase locked using a combination of electronic and mechanical controls which operated in fast (~10 μsec) and slow (~sec) time scales respectively. In this scheme, fast control was achieved through dynamic phase control whereas slow control of the frequency was done through the niobium tuner bellows installed at the drift tube end of the resonator and flexed using helium gas to change the resonance frequency. In order to improve the dynamics of this control system, an alternate scheme using piezoelectric actuator, instead of helium gas, to flex the same niobium bellows, has been implemented in the QWRs of the second and third accelerating modules of the linac. The piezoelectric actuator is used in closed loop along with the fast dynamic phase control scheme. The feedback loop of the piezoelectric control includes a dual control scheme - an integral control loop to arrest the slow drift, and the positive position feedback (PPF) based control loop to damp the microphonics. This control scheme has been found to arrest slow drifts in the resonator frequency more tightly along with damping of low frequency microphonics (~few tens of Hz) picked up by the resonator from its surrounding environment. This has substantially eased the load from the fast electronic control, resulting in the reduction of the radio frequency (RF) power requirement during operation. In addition, it has improved the stability of phase and amplitude of the QWRs. The details of the new scheme along with results obtained during the online run of the linac for beam acceleration are presented.

  17. ACHIEVING IRRIGATION RETURN FLOW QUALITY CONTROL THROUGH IMPROVED LEGAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The key to irrigated agricultural return flow quality control is proper utilization and management of the resource itself, and an accepted tool in out society is the law. This project is designed to develop legal alternatives that will facilitate the implementation of improved wa...

  18. High voltage RF feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Grotz, Glenn F.

    1984-01-01

    Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for trmitting RF energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

  19. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  20. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  1. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  2. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    A. S. Hofler; P. Evtushenko; M. Krasilnikov

    2007-08-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. RF and SRF gun design is further complicated because the bunches are space charge dominated and require additional emittance compensation. A genetic algorithm has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs for Cornell* and Jefferson Lab**, and we propose studying how the genetic algorithm techniques can be applied to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize gun designs that have been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  3. The process of managerial control in quality improvement initiatives.

    PubMed

    Slovensky, D J; Fottler, M D

    1994-11-01

    The fundamental intent of strategic management is to position an organization with in its market to exploit organizational competencies and strengths to gain competitive advantage. Competitive advantage may be achieved through such strategies as low cost, high quality, or unique services or products. For health care organizations accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, continually improving both processes and outcomes of organizational performance--quality improvement--in all operational areas of the organization is a mandated strategy. Defining and measuring quality and controlling the quality improvement strategy remain problematic. The article discusses the nature and processes of managerial control, some potential measures of quality, and related information needs. PMID:10138526

  4. RF Ion Source-Driven IEC Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Yang, Y.; Webber, J.; Shaban, Y.; Momota, H.

    2005-05-15

    The next step needed to achieve higher neutron yields and improved neutron production efficiency with Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) sources requires operation with an external ion source so that the reaction chamber pressure is controlled separately for the source pressure. This paper presents recent progress in IEC research at the UIUC using a unique external ion source ILLIBS (Illinois Ion Beam Source). When filled with deuterium, the IEC provides {approx}10{sup 8} 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutrons/sec at steady-state. The design and operation of a radiofrequency (RF) ion gun designed for this purpose is also discussed.

  5. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation improves balance control in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Colnat-Coulbois, S; Gauchard, G; Maillard, L; Barroche, G; Vespignani, H; Auque, J; Perrin, P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common basal ganglia degenerative disease, affects balance control, especially when patients change balance strategy during postural tasks. Bilateral chronic stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is therapeutically useful in advanced PD, and reduces the motor signs of patients. Nevertheless, the effects of STN stimulation on postural control are still debatable. Aims: To assess the impact of bilateral STN stimulation on balance control in PD and to determine how basal ganglia related sensorimotor modifications act on neurosensorial organisation of balance and motor postural programming. Methods: Twelve subjects aged 45–70 years underwent unified Parkinson's disease rating scale motor (part III) clinical tests, static and dynamic posturography, including sensory organisation and adaptation tests, shortly before and six months after bilateral implantation of electrodes into the STN. Results: The postoperative static test showed an improvement in postural control precision both in eyes open and eyes closed conditions. The dynamic test highlighted the decreased number of falls and the ability of the patients to develop more appropriate sensorimotor strategies when stimulated. The sensory organisation test showed an improvement of equilibrium score and, thus, a better resolution of sensorial conflicts. Conclusions: STN stimulation allowed a reduction in rigidity and therefore an improvement in the ability to use muscular proprioception as reliable information, resulting in vestibulo-proprioceptive conflict suppression. STN stimulation has a synergistic effect with levodopa for postural control. Accordingly, non-dopaminergic pathways could be involved in postural regulation and STN stimulation may influence the functioning of these pathways. PMID:15897498

  6. Physician/Pharmacist Collaboration to Improve Blood Pressure Control

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Barry L.; Ardery, Gail; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; James, Paul A.; Bergus, George R.; Doucette, William R.; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A.; Franciscus, Carrie L.; Xu, Yinghui

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated that blood pressure (BP) control can be improved when clinical pharmacists assist with patient management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a physician/pharmacist intervention to improve BP control. Methods This was a prospective, cluster-randomized controlled clinical trial with clinics randomized to control (n=3) or intervention (n=3) groups. The study enrolled 402 patients with uncontrolled hypertension (mean age 58.3 years). Clinical pharmacists made drug-therapy recommendations to physicians based on national guidelines. Research nurses performed BP measurements and 24-hour BP monitoring. Results Guideline adherence scores increased from 49.4 ± 19.3 at baseline to 53.4 ± 18.1 at 6 months (9% increase) in the control group and from 40.4 ± 22.6 to 62.8 ± 13.5 (57% increase) in the intervention group (p=0.089 adjusted comparison between groups). Mean BP decreased 6.8/4.5 and 20.7/9.7 mm Hg in the control and intervention groups, respectively, (p<0.05 for between-group systolic BP (SBP) comparison). The adjusted difference in SBP was −12.0 (95% CI: −24.0, 0.0) mm Hg, while the difference in diastolic BP (DBP) was −1.8 (CI: −11.9, 8.3). The 24-hour BP levels showed similar effect sizes. BP was controlled in 29.9% of patients in the control group and 63.9% in the intervention group (adjusted odds ratio 3.2; CI: 2.0, 5.1; p<0.001). Conclusions A physician/pharmacist collaborative intervention achieved significantly better mean BP and overall BP control rates when compared to a control group. Additional research should be conducted to evaluate efficient strategies to implement team-based chronic disease management. PMID:19933962

  7. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  8. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    DOEpatents

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF HIGH POWER RF VECTOR MODULATORS*

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Wilson, Joshua L; Champion, Mark; Hardek, Thomas W; Kim, Sang-Ho; McCarthy, Mike; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2007-01-01

    A fan-out RF power distribution system can allow many accelerating cavities to be powered by a single high-power klystron amplifier. High-power vector modulators can perform independent control of amplitudes and phases of RF voltages at the cavities without changing the klystron signal. A prototype highpower RF vector modulator employing a quadrature hybrid and two ferrite phase shifters in coaxial TEM transmission lines has been built and tested for 402.5 MHz. RF properties of the design and results of high power testing are presented.

  10. Rf system considerations for a large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Raka, E.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss how we arrive at a particular choice of voltage and frequency; the type of acceleration structure that would be suitable for obtaining the required voltage and resonant impedance; static beam loading including a simplified beam stability criterion involving the beam current and total rf system shunt impedance; the basic principle of rf phase and frequency control loops; and the effect of rf noise and its interaction with these loops. Finally, we shall consider the need for and design of rf systems to damp independently coherent oscillations of individual bunches or groups of bunches. 30 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Low-Speed Longitudinal Stability and Lateral-Control Characteristics of a 0.3-Scale Model of the Republic RF-84F Airplane at a Reynolds Number of 9x10(exp 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollech, Thomas V.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel on a 0.3-scale model of the Republic RF-84F airplane to determine modifications which would eliminate the pitch-up that occurred near maximum lift during flight tests of the airplane. The effects of high-lift and stall-control devices, horizontal tail locations, external stores, and various inlets on the longitudinal characteristics of the model were investigated. For the most part, these tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 9.0 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.19. The results indicated that from the standpoint of stability the inlets should possess blunted side bodies. The horizontal tail located at either the highest or lowest position investigated improved the stability of the model. Three configurations were found for the model equipped with the production tail which eliminated the pitch-up through the lift range up to the maximum lift and provided a stable static margin which did not vary more than 15% of the mean aerodynamic chord through the lift range up to 85% of maximum lift. The three configurations are as follows: the production wing-fuselage-tail combination with an inlet similar to the production inlet but smaller in plan form in conjunction with either (1) a wing fence located at 65% of the win semispan or (2) an 11.7% chord leading-edge extension extending from 65.8 to 95.8% of the wing semispan and (3) the production wing-fuselage-tail combination with the production inlet and an 11.7% chord leading-edge extension extending from 70.8 to 95.8% of the wing semispan.

  12. Improved Continuous-Time Higher Harmonic Control Using Hinfinity Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Frank H.

    The helicopter is a versatile aircraft that can take-off and land vertically, hover efficiently, and maneuver in confined space. This versatility is enabled by the main rotor, which also causes undesired harmonic vibration during operation. This unwanted vibration has a negative impact on the practicality of the helicopter and also increases its operational cost. Passive control techniques have been applied to helicopter vibration suppression, but these methods are generally heavy and are not robust to changes in operating conditions. Feedback control offers the advantages of robustness and potentially higher performance over passive control techniques, and amongst the various feedback schemes, Shaw's higher harmonic control algorithm has been shown to be an effective method for attenuating harmonic disturbance in helicopters. In this thesis, the higher harmonic disturbance algorithm is further developed to achieve improved performance. One goal in this thesis is to determine the importance of periodicity in the helicopter rotor dynamics for control synthesis. Based on the analysis of wind tunnel data and simulation results, we conclude the helicopter rotor can be modeled reasonably well as linear and time-invariant for control design purposes. Modeling the helicopter rotor as linear time-invariant allows us to apply linear control theory concepts to the higher harmonic control problem. Another goal in this thesis is to find the limits of performance in harmonic disturbance rejection. To achieve this goal, we first define the metrics to measure the performance of the controller in terms of response speed and robustness to changes in the plant dynamics. The performance metrics are incorporated into an Hinfinity control problem. For a given plant, the resulting Hinfinity controller achieves the maximum performance, thus allowing us to identify the performance limitation in harmonic disturbance rejection. However, the Hinfinity controllers are of high order, and may

  13. Control systems improvements in a precision coordinate measuring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, S. S.; Babelay, E. F., Jr.; Igou, R. E.; Woodard, L. M.; Green, W. L.

    1981-09-01

    A conventional, manually driven Moore No. 3 coordinate measuring machine at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is being upgraded to provide a continuous-path numerical control capability and simultaneously serve as a vehicle for testing new machine slide-control concepts. Besides new lead screw drive motors, an NC machine control unit, and a closed-loop servo system, the machine has also been equipped with vibration isolation, air-bearing slideways, and laser interferometric position feedback. The present conventional slide servo system will be replaced with a digital servo system wherein various feedback and compensation techniques can be realized through the use of a high speed, dedicated digital processor. The improvements to data are described with emphasis on identification and compensation of the slide control systems.

  14. Instrumentation and control improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.J.; Planchon, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe instrumentation and control (I C) system improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11). The improvements are focused on three objectives; to keep the reactor and balance of plant (BOP) I C systems at a high level of reliability, to provide diagnostic systems that can provide accurate information needed for analysis of fuel performance, and to provide systems that will be prototypic of I C systems of the next generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) plants.

  15. Instrumentation and control improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.J.; Planchon, H.P.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe instrumentation and control (I&C) system improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11). The improvements are focused on three objectives; to keep the reactor and balance of plant (BOP) I&C systems at a high level of reliability, to provide diagnostic systems that can provide accurate information needed for analysis of fuel performance, and to provide systems that will be prototypic of I&C systems of the next generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) plants.

  16. A Design and Performance Analysis Tool for Superconducting RF Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilcher, Th.; Simrock, S. N.; Merminga, L.; Wang, D. X.

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at Jefferson Lab and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper we describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyse the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise. An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse stucture and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feedforward can be added to further supress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented.

  17. A design and performance analysis tool for superconducting RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    T. Schilcher; S.N. Simrock; L. Merminga; D.X. Wang

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall wall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper the authors describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyze the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise.An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse structure and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feed forward can be added to further suppress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented.

  18. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  19. The TESLA RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-12-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ˜600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components.

  20. A Metamaterial-Inspired Approach to RF Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Clayton; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    We demonstrate an RF energy harvesting rectenna design based on a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA). With the embedded Schottky diodes, the rectenna converts captured RF energy to DC currents. The Fabry-Perot cavity resonance of the MPA greatly improves the amount of energy captured and hence improves the rectification efficiency. Furthermore, the FP resonance exhibits high Q-factor and significantly increases the voltage across the Schottky diodes. This leads to a factor of 16 improvement of RF-DC conversion efficiency at ambient intensity level.

  1. A Metamaterial-Inspired Approach to RF Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Clayton; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an RF energy harvesting rectenna design based on a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA). With the embedded Schottky diodes, the rectenna converts captured RF energy to DC currents. The Fabry-Perot cavity resonance of the MPA greatly improves the amount of energy captured and hence improves the rectification efficiency. Furthermore, the FP resonance exhibits a high Q-factor and significantly increases the voltage across the Schottky diodes. This leads to a factor of 16 improvement of RF-DC conversion efficiency at ambient intensity level.

  2. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  3. Controlled architecture for improved macromolecular memory within polymer networks.

    PubMed

    DiPasquale, Stephen A; Byrne, Mark E

    2016-08-01

    This brief review analyzes recent developments in the field of living/controlled polymerization and the potential of this technique for creating imprinted polymers with highly structured architecture with macromolecular memory. As a result, it is possible to engineer polymers at the molecular level with increased homogeneity relating to enhanced template binding and transport. Only recently has living/controlled polymerization been exploited to decrease heterogeneity and substantially improve the efficiency of the imprinting process for both highly and weakly crosslinked imprinted polymers. Living polymerization can be utilized to create imprinted networks that are vastly more efficient than similar polymers produced using conventional free radical polymerization, and these improvements increase the role that macromolecular memory can play in the design and engineering of new drug delivery and sensing platforms. PMID:27322505

  4. Reduction of RF penetration effects in high field imaging.

    PubMed

    Foo, T K; Hayes, C E; Kang, Y W

    1992-02-01

    A method of correcting for the RF inhomogeneity in the body by dielectric loading of the coil-to-shield space in an RF resonator (coil and shield assembly) is described. The presence of the RF coil and RF shield have significant effects on RF homogeneity. Based on theoretical calculations, a method for adjusting the RF homogeneity by manipulating the axial propagation constant, kappa z, is proposed. This is accomplished by loading the coil-to-shield space with dielectric material of suitable relative permittivity so as to increase kappa z and decrease the radial propagation constant, kappa rho. In this manner, the radial wavelength (lambda rho = 2 pi/kappa rho) can be increased relative to the body dimensions, and the field amplitude variations in the axial plane minimized. Theoretical calculations indicate that a value of between 30 and 40 for the relative permittivity of the dielectric material in the coil-to-shield space would reduce the RF field inhomogeneity from +/- 15% to about +/- 3% over a central 30-cm-diameter region of a homogeneous 40-cm-diameter body at both 64 and 170 MHz. The theoretical model was verified in laboratory measurements of the [formula; see text] field generated in a test coil at 170 MHz which was scaled to correspond to a body at 64 MHz. However, the improved RF field homogeneity would be accompanied by increased RF power requirements and reduced coil sensitivity. PMID:1549043

  5. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Anlage, Steven

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  6. Improved Controller for a Three-Axis Piezoelectric Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Palmer, Dean

    2009-01-01

    An improved closed-loop controller has been built for a three-axis piezoelectric positioning stage. The stage can be any of a number of commercially available or custom-made units that are used for precise three-axis positioning of optics in astronomical instruments and could be used for precise positioning in diverse fields of endeavor that include adaptive optics, fabrication of semiconductors, and nanotechnology.

  7. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  8. Traffic improvement and transportation pollution control in Xiamen

    SciTech Connect

    Dongxing Yuan; Zilin, Wu

    1996-12-31

    in this paper, the urban traffic improvement and transportation control in Xiamen are highlighted. Xiamen is a port city and an economical special zone of China. As the economy grows, the transportation is developing dramatically and becoming the key for further economic development. The air quality is threatened by the rapid growth of the vehicles in the city. The most urgent task in improving urban traffic is to establish a sound traffic system. The municipal government takes great effort to improve the traffic condition, as well as to reduce green house gases and protect air environment. Some management and technical measures are carried out. Those management measures are mainly as follows: (1) systematic planning of the city arrangement and city functional division, and integrated planning of the urban roads system, (2) putting great emphasis on tail gas monitoring and management, and (3) establishing optimized utilization of motor vehicles. Those included in the main technical measures are (1) making the roads clear, (2) enlarging traffic capacity, and (3) developing the public transport. The most urgent task in improving urban traffic is to establish a sound traffic system. The city municipal government and Transportation Management Bureau plan to make a series of reforms to improve the urban traffic condition, such as building high quality road around the city, reducing the number of one way roads and replacing gasoline buses with electric buses. An optimized traffic system of Xiamen, taking public transport as the main means, is the key to meet the needs of both traffic improvement and urban transportation pollution control.

  9. Calculation of rf current drive in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2008-11-01

    The toroidal plasma current is a key parameter for controlling MHD stability and fusion performances in tokamaks. Among the various methods for driving current, rf waves are a flexible and powerful tool. Therefore, their role in the design and optimization of advanced scenarios is considerable. The universal ray-tracing code C3PO coupled with the fully implicit linearized 3-D bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker-Planck solver LUKE is an illustration of the present day effort for performing fast and realistic calculations of the rf driven plasma current. The versatility of this tool is highlighted by simulations concerning the lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves.

  10. Design of an Electrically Automated RF Transceiver Head Coil in MRI.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used nonionizing and noninvasive diagnostic instrument to produce detailed images of the human body. The radio-frequency (RF) coil is an essential part of MRI hardware as an RF front-end. RF coils transmit RF energy to the subject and receive the returning MR signal. This paper presents an MRI-compatible hardware design of the new automatic frequency tuning and impedance matching system. The system automatically corrects the detuned and mismatched condition that occurs due to loading effects caused by the variable subjects (i.e., different human heads or torsos). An eight-channel RF transceiver head coil with the automatic system has been fabricated and tested at 7 Tesla (T) MRI system. The automatic frequency tuning and impedance matching system uses digitally controlled capacitor arrays with real-time feedback control capability. The hardware design is not only compatible with current MRI scanners in all aspects but also it operates the tuning and matching function rapidly and accurately. The experimental results show that the automatic function increases return losses from 8.4 dB to 23.7 dB (maximum difference) and from 12.7 dB to 19.6 dB (minimum difference) among eight channels within 550 ms . The reflected RF power decrease from 23.1% to 1.5% (maximum difference) and from 5.3% to 1.1% (minimum difference). Therefore, these results improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in MR images with phantoms. PMID:25361512

  11. Translating research into improved outcomes in comprehensive cancer control.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Jon F; Guirguis-Blake, Janelle; Hennessy, Kevin D; Brounstein, Paul J; Vinson, Cynthia; Schwartz, Randy H; Myers, Bradford A; Briss, Peter

    2005-10-01

    A key question in moving comprehensive cancer control (CCC) plans into action is, to what extent should the knowledge gained from investments in cancer prevention and control research influence the actions taken by states, tribes, and territories during implementation? Underlying this 'should' is the assumption that evidence-based approaches (i.e., a public health or clinical intervention or policy that has resulted in improved outcomes when scientifically tested), when implemented in a real-world setting, will increase the likelihood of improved outcomes. This article elucidates the barriers and opportunities for integrating science with practice across the cancer control continuum. However, given the scope of CCC and the substantial investment in generating new knowledge through science, it is difficult for any one agency, on its own, to make a sufficient investment to ensure new knowledge is translated and implemented at a national, state, or local level. Thus, if greater demand for evidence-based interventions and increased resources for adopting them are going to support the dissemination initiatives described herein, new interagency partnerships must be developed to ensure that sufficient means are dedicated to integrating science with service. Furthermore, for these collaborations to increase both in size and in frequency, agency leaders must clearly articulate their support for these collaborative initiatives and explicitly recognize those collaborative efforts that are successful. In this way, the whole (in this context, comprehensive cancer control) can become greater than the sum of its parts. PMID:16208572

  12. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  13. Improved coke ovens thermal control at Italsider Taranto Works

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, L.; Castelli, M.; Gibellieri, E., De Franco, F.; Santis, L.

    1981-01-01

    The right determination of the flue temperatures shifting, according to coke ovens working cycle, has been carried out at Italsider Taranto Works with the cooperation of Centro Sperimentale Metallurgico by using an original method of elaboration and comparison of temperature data collected according to the usual ways by the operators. The results are immediately used for the appropriate control interventions. This technique, after the first experimental application, has been gradually extended to all eleven batteries for a total amount of 485 ovens and it is being used since more than four years. The data are processed out by a 1100 UNIVAC computer to which the access is possible through a remote terminal located in the cokeplant offices. In this way it has been possible to improve the batteries thermal state control with the result of improving considerably the temperatures uniformity both in the transverse and longitudinal axis of the ovens. These positive results had good effects on the stabilization of coke quality, on energy savings and on improvements of working conditions in the coke ovens area. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons from the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned.

  15. Controlled Delivery of Zoledronate Improved Bone Formation Locally In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiang; Lu, Qiang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Gao, Xupeng; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been widely used in clinical treatment of bone diseases with increased bone resorption because of their strong affinity for bone and their inhibition of bone resorption. Recently, there has been growing interest in their improvement of bone formation. However, the effect of local controlled delivery of BPs is unclear. We used polylactide acid-glycolic acid copolymer (PLGA) as a drug carrier to deliver various doses of the bisphosphonate zoledronate (Zol) into the distal femur of 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. After 6 weeks, samples were harvested and analyzed by micro-CT and histology. The average bone mineral density and mineralized bone volume fraction were higher with medium- and high-dose PLGA-Zol (30 and 300 µg Zol, respectively) than control and low-dose Zol (3 µg PLGA-Zol; p<0.05). Local controlled delivery of Zol decreased the numbers of osteoclast and increased the numbers of osteoblast. Moreover, local controlled delivery of medium- and high-dose Zol accelerated the expression of bone-formation markers. PLGA used as a drug carrier for controlled delivery of Zol may promote local bone formation. PMID:24618585

  16. Quality-control analytical methods: continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Venti, Eden M

    2006-01-01

    It is vital that all compounding pharmacies have a continuous quality improvement program in place by way of standard operating procedures to assure that patients receive high-quality preparations. The program should take into consideration any federal and state regulatory requirements, as well as professional association expectations. Quality control measurements and regular review of those measurements are the foundations of a good quality plan. All pharmacy personnel should be aware of the importance of reporting potential internal quality concerns or problems and should be encouraged to do so without fear of repercussions. Ideally, an error-free compounding pracitice would be the goal. Since this is not practical, quality issues should not be viewed as problems, but as opportunities to improve compounding practices by correcting, before they become pervasive, the processes used in the preparation of prescriptions. PMID:23974418

  17. Application of a tip-fin controller to the Shuttle Orbiter for improved yaw control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. W.; Freeman, D. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and flight control analyses have shown that the application of the tip-fin controller and removal of the centerline vertical tail does not produce improved flyability of the Shuttle Orbiter in the supersonic speed regime. Preliminary design studies show that removal of the centerline vertical tail and the installation of tip-fin controllers could result in savings up to 900 kg. It is also shown that the reaction control system could be deactivated much sooner than it is possible with the present nominal orbiter configuration.

  18. DASHBOARDS & CONTROL CHARTS EXPERIENCES IN IMPROVING SAFETY AT HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2006-02-27

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of safety methodology, quality tools, leadership, and teamwork at Hanford and their significant positive impact on safe performance of work. Dashboards, Leading Indicators, Control charts, Pareto Charts, Dr. W. Edward Deming's Red Bead Experiment, and Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge have been the principal tools and theory of an integrated management system. Coupled with involved leadership and teamwork, they have led to significant improvements in worker safety and protection, and environmental restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  19. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  20. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  1. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  2. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B.; Koettig, T.

    2014-01-29

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  3. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  4. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Koettig, T.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990's in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  5. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

    2007-09-30

    This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

  6. Improved Sensitivity Relations in State Constrained Optimal Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bettiol, Piernicola; Frankowska, Hélène; Vinter, Richard B.

    2015-04-15

    Sensitivity relations in optimal control provide an interpretation of the costate trajectory and the Hamiltonian, evaluated along an optimal trajectory, in terms of gradients of the value function. While sensitivity relations are a straightforward consequence of standard transversality conditions for state constraint free optimal control problems formulated in terms of control-dependent differential equations with smooth data, their verification for problems with either pathwise state constraints, nonsmooth data, or for problems where the dynamic constraint takes the form of a differential inclusion, requires careful analysis. In this paper we establish validity of both ‘full’ and ‘partial’ sensitivity relations for an adjoint state of the maximum principle, for optimal control problems with pathwise state constraints, where the underlying control system is described by a differential inclusion. The partial sensitivity relation interprets the costate in terms of partial Clarke subgradients of the value function with respect to the state variable, while the full sensitivity relation interprets the couple, comprising the costate and Hamiltonian, as the Clarke subgradient of the value function with respect to both time and state variables. These relations are distinct because, for nonsmooth data, the partial Clarke subdifferential does not coincide with the projection of the (full) Clarke subdifferential on the relevant coordinate space. We show for the first time (even for problems without state constraints) that a costate trajectory can be chosen to satisfy the partial and full sensitivity relations simultaneously. The partial sensitivity relation in this paper is new for state constraint problems, while the full sensitivity relation improves on earlier results in the literature (for optimal control problems formulated in terms of Lipschitz continuous multifunctions), because a less restrictive inward pointing hypothesis is invoked in the proof, and because

  7. RF potentials analysis using TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Sorba, Marco; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) heating is fully dependent on edge plasma conditions and particularly on the acceleration of charged particles which can damage the antennas and surroundings. Rectified RF field induces drifts on ions that can hit the first wall, causing hot spots, sputtering, impurities, fuel dilution and, eventually, disruption. These phenomena mainly depend on the antenna geometry and materials, on the plasma density profile at the edge and on the connection patterns. The heat flux attributed to accelerated ions is somehow proportional to the RF potential in front of the antenna. Because of this, the understanding of the RF potential generation in front of the antenna is crucial for every high RF power systems, in order to predict the deleterious particle flux and therefore mitigate its effect by means of a proper design. The TOPICA code, an innovative tool realized for the analysis and design of ICRH and LH antennas, has been upgraded to evaluate the RF potential in front of the antenna. The solution of the Maxwell's equations in plasma combined with the RF field map at the plasma edge (standard outputs of TOPICA calculation) allow for the computation of the RF fields also in the plasma region. A new TOPICA module has been developed to account for a rigorous procedure to obtain the RF potentials and RF potential mitigation techniques through antenna geometrical modifications have been studied and will be presented.

  8. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crombé, K.; Devaux, S.; D'Inca, R.; Faudot, E.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Heuraux, S.; Jacquot, J.; Louche, F.; Moritz, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  9. Booster Synchrotron RF System Upgrade for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghyun; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    Recent progress at the SPEAR3 includes the increase in stored current from 100 mA to 200 mA and top-off injection to allow beamlines to stay open during injection. Presently the booster injects 3.0 GeV beam to SPEAR3 three times a day. The stored beam decays to about 150 mA between the injections. The growing user demands are to increase the stored current to the design value of 500 mA, and to maintain it at a constant value within a percent or so. To achieve this goal the booster must inject once every few minutes. For improved injection efficiency, all RF systems at the linac, booster and SPEAR3 need to be phase-locked. The present booster RF system is basically a copy of the SPEAR2 RF system with 358.5 MHz and 40 kW peak RF power driving a 5-cell RF cavity for 1.0 MV gap voltage. These requirements entail a booster RF system upgrade to a scaled down version of the SPEAR3 RF system of 476.3 MHz with 1.2 MW cw klystron output power capabilities. We will analyze each subsystem option for their merits within budgetary and geometric space constraints. A substantial portion of the system will come from the decommissioned PEP-II RF stations.

  10. Simplified RF power system for Wideroe-type linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Fugitt, J.; Howard, D.; Crosby, F.; Johnson, R.; Nolan, M.; Yuen, G.

    1981-03-01

    The RF system for the SuperHILAC injector linac was designed and constructed for minimum system complexity, wide dynamic range, and ease of maintenance. The final amplifier is close coupled to the linac and operates in an efficient semilinear mode, eliminating troublesome transmission lines, modulators, and high level regulators. The system has been operated at over 250 kW, 23 MHz with good regulation. The low level RF electronics are contained in a single chassis adjacent to the RF control computer, which monitors all important operating parameters. A unique 360/sup 0/ phase and amplitude modular is used for precise control and regulation of the accelerating voltage.

  11. Improved Metabolic Control in Diabetes, HSP60, and Proinflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, Claudio; Kim, Eunjung; Knowlton, Anne A.

    2012-01-01

    The diabetes-atherosclerosis relationship remains to be fully defined. Repeated prolonged hyperglycemia, increased ROS production and endothelial dysfunction are important factors. One theory is that increased blood levels of heat shock protein (HSP)60 are proinflammatory, through activation of innate immunity, and contribute to the progression of vascular disease. It was hypothesized that improvement of diabetes control in patients presenting with metabolic syndrome would lower HSP60, and anti-HSP60 antibody levels and decrease inflammatory markers. Paired sera of 17 Italian patients, before and after intensive treatment, were assayed for cytokines, HSP60 and anti-HSP60 antibodies. As expected, intensive treatment was associated with a decrease in HgbA1C (P < 0.001) and BMI (P < 0.001). After treatment, there was a significant decrease in IL-6 (P < 0.05). HSP60 levels were before treatment −6.9 + 1.9, after treatment −7.1 + 2.0 ng/mL (P = ns). Overall HSP60 concentrations were lower than published reports. Anti-HSP60 antibody titers were high and did not decrease with treatment. In conclusion, improvement of diabetic control did not alter HSP60 concentrations or antiHSP60 antibody titers, but led to a reduction of IL-6 levels. PMID:22924123

  12. Limitation of linear colliders from transverse rf deflections

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Offaxis beam trajectories in a linear collider produce transverse wakefield and chromatic effects which cause emittance enlargement. One cause for non-centered trajectories in the accelerating structures is radial rf fields which produce transverse deflections. Static deflections can be compensated by static dipole magnetic fields. However, fluctuations of the rf fields cause variations in the deflections which must be managed or limited. Given the level of fluctuation of the phase and amplitude of an rf system, a limit on the allowable rf deflection can be calculated. Parameters, such as the beam emittance, lattice design, rf wavelength and the initial and final beam energies, influence the tolerances. Two tolerances are calculated: (1) one assumes that the wakefields are completely controlled, and that chromatic effects are the only enlarging mechanism (optimistic), and (2) the other assumes the limit is due to transverse wakefields without the aid of Landau damping (pessimistic).

  13. [Improvement of routine works and quality control in mycobacterial laboratory].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Higuchi, Takeshi

    2007-03-01

    Many new methods have been introduced into routine laboratory works in microbiology since 1990. Molecular biology, in particular, opened a new era and promoted a technician's skill much. PCR and hybridization technique have been ordinary one in many laboratories. Since old techniques such as smear and culture are still needed, amount of routine works is increasing gradually. Thus, improving efficiency and keeping quality of routine works are becoming more and more important issues. This symposium focused on such points, and four skilled technicians around Japan presented their own tips. 1. Coexistence of M. tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC) in the MGIT culture system: Yasushi WATANABE (Clinical Laboratory Division, NHO Nishi-Niigata Chuo National Hospital). Sputum samples of some tuberculosis patients yielded only MAC in the MGIT culture system. Such co-infected cases presented problems to mislead proper treatment and infection control. The detection rate of MAC was significantly high, and the growth speed of MAC was significantly rapid in the MGIT culture system, compared to those of M. tuberculosis. Additionally, M. tuberculosis was not detected with even more quantity than MAC in the small amount of mixed samples. Higher sensitivity and growth speed of MAC are the important characteristics of the MGIT system. 2. Internal quality control with ordinary examination results: Akio AONO (Department of Clinical Examination, Double-Barred Cross Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association). Our laboratory utilizes ordinary examination results as the internal quality control for specimen pretreatment, culture, and drug susceptibility testing. The contamination rate of MGIT culture system is useful for the evaluation of the decontamination process. It was 6.3% on average in our laboratory in 2005. The number of drug resistant strains is also useful to assess the performance of drug susceptibility testing. The incidence of each anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

  14. SIMULATION STUDY AND INITIAL TEST OF THESNS RING RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Hengjie; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Champion, Mark; Chu, Paul; Cousineau, Sarah M; Hardek, Thomas W; Plum, Michael A; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Piller, Chip

    2008-01-01

    The rfsimulator code was developed for the study of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) dual-harmonic ring RF control. It uses time-domain solvers to compute beam-cavity interactions and FFT methods to simulate the time responses of the linear RF system. The important elements of the system considered in the model include beam loading, dynamic cavity detuning, circuit bandwidth, loop delay, proportional-integral controller for feedback and adaptive feed forward, stochastic noise, width-in-turn loop parameter change, beam current fluctuation, and bunch leakage. As the beam power increases, beam loss in the ring goes up and thus precise control of the bunching RF phase and amplitude is required to limit beam loss. The code will help in the development of a functional RF control and in achieving the goal of minimizing beam loss in the accumulator ring.

  15. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360 deg. range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  16. Pharmacist Glycemic Control Team Improves Quality of Glycemic Control in Surgical Patients with Perioperative Dysglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Mularski, Karen SP; Yeh, Cynthia P; Bains, Jaspreet K; Mosen, David M; Hill, Ariel K; Mularski, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Context: Perioperative hyperglycemia is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. Improved glycemic control has been demonstrated to reduce surgical site infections, reduce perioperative morbidity, and reduce length of stay. However, safe and effective perioperative glycemic control can be limited by expert clinician availability. Objective: To improve quality by reliably providing safe and effective glycemic control to surgical patients with diabetes or stress hyperglycemia. Design: A designated group of pharmacists, the Glycemic Control Team (GCT), worked under protocol, on a consultation basis, to manage perioperative dysglycemia during hospitalization. We used a pre-post, observational study design to assess the effectiveness of the intervention and implementation of the GCT. Main Outcome Measures: The proportion of patients pre- and postintervention with good glycemic control and with hypoglycemia were measured and compared. We defined good glycemic control as having all, or all but one, point-of-care blood glucose values between 70–180 mg/dL in each 24-hour period. We defined hypoglycemia as having any point-of-care test glucose value <70mg/dL in any of the 3 days evaluated. Results: During the preimplementation period, 77.4% of postoperative patient days demonstrated good glycemic control. In the postimplementation period, this percentage increased to 90.3%. Over the same period, the rate of hypoglycemia decreased from 8.6% to 4.6%. Conclusion: Implementation of a pharmacist team to manage glycemic control in hospitalized, postoperative patients led to safer and better quality of glycemic care as measured by improved glycemic control and lower rates of hypoglycemia. PMID:22529756

  17. Advanced control strategy for plant heat rate improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.; Frerichs, D.K.; Kyr, D.

    1995-12-31

    Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) supplies electricity to about half of the population of Florida, roughly 6.5 million people. The load base is largely residential/business with the obvious seasonal extremes due to the climate. FPL`s generating capacity is 16,320 MW composed of 70% traditional fossil cycle, 18% nuclear, and 12% gas turbine. The system load profile coupled with bulk power purchases is such that the 400 MW class units (9 Foster Wheeler drum type units comprising 24% of total capacity) are now forced to cycle daily all year, and to come off line on weekends during the winter months. The current economic realities of power generation force utility companies to seek methods to improve plant heat rate, and FPL is no exception. FPL believed it possible to achieve the goal of lower heat rate and follow the required load demand with the 400 MW class units through the use of an advanced control strategy implemented totally within the unit`s Distributed Control System (DCS). As of the writing of this paper, the project is still ongoing. This paper will present the theory and methodology of the advanced control strategy along with the current design and implementation status and results obtained to date.

  18. Improved safety in advanced control complexes, without side effects

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, D.L.

    1997-12-01

    If we only look for a moment at the world around us, it is obvious that advances in digital electronic equipment and Human-System Interface (HSI) technology are occurring at a phenomenal pace. This is evidenced from our home entertainment systems to the dashboard and computer-based operation of our new cars. Though the nuclear industry has less vigorously embraced these advances, their application is being implemented through individual upgrades to current generation nuclear plants and as plant-wide control complexes for advanced plants. In both venues modem technology possesses widely touted advantages for improving plant availability as well as safety. The well-documented safety benefits of digital Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) include higher reliability resulting from redundancy and fault tolerance, inherent self-test and self-diagnostic capabilities which have replaced error-prone human tasks, resistance to setpoint drift increasing available operating margins, and the ability to run complex, real-time, computer-based algorithms directly supporting an operator`s monitoring and control task requirements. 22 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. RF system considerations for large high-duty-factor linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.; Ziomek, C.D.; Tallerico, P.J.; Regan, A.H.; Eaton, L.; Lawrence, G.

    1994-09-01

    RF systems are often a major cost item for linacs, but this is especially true for large high-duty-factor linacs (up to and including CW) such as the Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) or the Accelerator for Transmutation of nuclear Waste (ATW). In addition, the high energy and high average beam current of these machines (approximately 1 GeV, 100--200 mA) leads to a need for excellent control of the accelerating fields in order to minimize the possibility of beam loss in the accelerator and the resulting activation. This paper will address the key considerations and limitations in the design of the RF system. These considerations impact the design of both the high power RF components and the RF controls. As might be expected, the two concerns sometimes lead to conflicting design requirements. For example minimum RF operating costs lead to a desire for operation near saturation of the high power RF generators in order to maximize the operating efficiency. Optimal control of the RF fields leads to a desire for maximum overdrive capability in those same generators in order to respond quickly to disturbances of the accelerator fields.

  20. RF current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1998-11-10

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  1. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    SciTech Connect

    Warrant, Marilyn M.; Garcia, Rudy J.; Zhang, Pengchu; Arms, Robert M.; Herzer, John A.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Brabson, John M.

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis provides a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.

  2. RF modal quantity gaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanleuven, K.

    1989-05-01

    The primary objective is to provide a concept of a radio frequency (RF) modal resonance technique which is being investigated as a method for gaging the quantities of subcritical cryogenic propellants in metallic tanks. Of special interest are the potential applications of the technique to microgravity propellant gaging situations. The results of concept testing using cryogenic oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen, as well as paraffin simulations of microgravity fluid orientations, are reported. These test results were positive and showed that the gaging concept was viable.

  3. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis providesmore » a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.« less

  4. Transparency and Coherence in rf SQUID Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven; Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng

    We have developed active metamaterials capable of quickly tuning their electrical and magnetic responses over a wide frequency range. These metamaterials are based on superconducting elements to form low loss, physically and electrically small, highly tunable structures for fundamental studies of extraordinarily nonlinear media. The meta-atoms are rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that incorporate the Josephson effect. RF SQUIDs have an inductance which is strongly tunable with dc and rf magnetic fields and currents. The rf SQUID metamaterial is a richly nonlinear effective medium introducing qualitatively new macroscopic quantum phenomena into the metamaterials community, namely magnetic flux quantization and the Josephson effect. The coherent oscillation of the meta-atoms is strongly sensitive to the environment and measurement conditions, and we have developed several strategies to improve the coherence experimentally by exploiting ideas from nonlinear dynamics. The metamaterials also display a unique form of transparency whose development can be manipulated through multiple parametric dependences. We discuss these qualitatively new metamaterial phenomena. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE Programs through Grant No. ECCS-1158644 and the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  5. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  6. High-power RF testing of a 352-MHZ fast-ferrite RF cavity tuner at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Cherbak, E.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2006-01-01

    A 352-MHz fast-ferrite rf cavity tuner, manufactured by Advanced Ferrite Technology, was high-power tested on a single-cell copper rf cavity at the Advanced Photon Source. These tests measured the fast-ferrite tuner performance in terms of power handling capability, tuning bandwidth, tuning speed, stability, and rf losses. The test system comprises a single-cell copper rf cavity fitted with two identical coupling loops, one for input rf power and the other for coupling the fast-ferrite tuner to the cavity fields. The fast-ferrite tuner rf circuit consists of a cavity coupling loop, a 6-1/8-inch EIA coaxial line system with directional couplers, and an adjustable 360{sup o} mechanical phase shifter in series with the fast-ferrite tuner. A bipolar DC bias supply, controlled by a low-level rf cavity tuning loop consisting of an rf phase detector and a PID amplifier, is used to provide a variable bias current to the tuner ferrite material to maintain the test cavity at resonance. Losses in the fast-ferrite tuner are calculated from cooling water calorimetry. Test data will be presented.

  7. Alternative RF coupling configurations for H- ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briefi, S.; Gutmann, P.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    RF heated sources for negative hydrogen ions both for fusion and accelerators require very high RF powers in order to achieve the required H- current what poses high demands on the RF generators and the RF circuit. Therefore it is highly desirable to improve the RF efficiency of the sources. This could be achieved by applying different RF coupling concepts than the currently used inductive coupling via a helical antenna, namely Helicon coupling or coupling via a planar ICP antenna enhanced with ferrites. In order to investigate the feasibility of these concepts, two small laboratory experiments have been set up. The PlanICE experiment, where the enhanced inductive coupling is going to be investigated, is currently under assembly. At the CHARLIE experiment systematic measurements concerning Helicon coupling in hydrogen and deuterium are carried out. The investigations show that a prominent feature of Helicon discharges occurs: the so-called low-field peak. This is a local improvement of the coupling efficiency at a magnetic field strength of a few mT which results in an increased electron density and dissociation degree. The full Helicon mode has not been achieved yet due to the limited available RF power and magnetic field strength but it might be sufficient for the application of the coupling concept to ion sources to operate the discharge in the low-field-peak region.

  8. Silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous SiC matrix for third-generation solar cells: Microstructure control by RF discharge power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qijin; Levchenko, Igor; Song, Denyuan; Xu, Shuyan; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2015-04-01

    A low-frequency (460 kHz), low-pressure, thermally non-equilibrium, high-density inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has been used to synthesize a novel, advanced photovoltaic material suitable for fabrication of third-generation solar cells. Silicon quantum dots (SQDs) embedded in an amorphous silicon carbide matrix were prepared at a very low substrate temperature of approximately 200°C without any hydrogen dilution. The effect of the radio-frequency (RF) power of the plasma discharge on the morphology and structure of the embedded quantum dots was studied. A brief discussion on the possible mechanisms of the quantum dot formation in the ICP is presented. This study is relevant to third-generation photovoltaic solar cells.

  9. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  10. A wideband RF amplifier for satellite tuners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueqing, Hu; Zheng, Gong; Yin, Shi; Foster, Dai Fa

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the design and measured performance of a wideband amplifier for a direct conversion satellite tuner. It is composed of a wideband low noise amplifier (LNA) and a two-stage RF variable gain amplifier (VGA) with linear gain in dB and temperature compensation schemes. To meet the system linearity requirement, an improved distortion compensation technique and a bypass mode are applied on the LNA to deal with the large input signal. Wideband matching is achieved by resistive feedback and an off-chip LC-ladder matching network. A large gain control range (over 80 dB) is achieved by the VGA with process voltage and temperature compensation and dB linearization. In total, the amplifier consumes up to 26 mA current from a 3.3 V power supply. It is fabricated in a 0.35-μm SiGe BiCMOS technology and occupies a silicon area of 0.25 mm2.

  11. ECG-synchronized DSA exposure control: improved cervicothoracic image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, W.M.; Gould, R.; Norman, D.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cox, L.

    1984-10-01

    An electrocardiogram (ECG)-synchronized x-ray exposure sequence was used to acquire digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) images during 13 arterial injection studies of the aortic arch or carotid bifurcations. These gated images were compared with matched ungated DSA images acquired using the same technical factors, contrast material volume, and patient positioning. Subjective assessments by five experienced observers of edge definition, vessel conspicuousness, and overall diagnostic quality showed overall preference for one of the two acquisition methods in 69% of cases studied. Of these, the ECG-synchronized exposure series were rated superior in 76%. These results, as well as the relatively simple and inexpensive modifications required, suggest that routine use of ECG exposure control can facilitate improved arterial DSA evaluations of suspected cervicothoracic vascular disease.

  12. Radiant energy receiver having improved coolant flow control means

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, H.

    1980-10-29

    An improved coolant flow control for use in radiant energy receivers of the type having parallel flow paths is disclosed. A coolant performs as a temperature dependent valve means, increasing flow in the warmer flow paths of the receiver, and impeding flow in the cooler paths of the receiver. The coolant has a negative temperature coefficient of viscosity which is high enough such that only an insignificant flow through the receiver is experienced at the minimum operating temperature of the receiver, and such that a maximum flow is experienced at the maximum operating temperature of the receiver. The valving is accomplished by changes in viscosity of the coolant in response to the coolant being heated and cooled. No remotely operated valves, comparators or the like are needed.

  13. Improving immunization of programmable logic controllers using weighted median filters.

    PubMed

    Paredes, José L; Díaz, Dhionel

    2005-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of improving immunization of programmable logic controllers (PLC's) to electromagnetic interference with impulsive characteristics. A filtering structure, based on weighted median filters, that does not require additional hardware and can be implemented in legacy PLC's is proposed. The filtering operation is implemented in the binary domain and removes the impulsive noise presented in the discrete input adding thus robustness to PLC's. By modifying the sampling clock structure, two variants of the filter are obtained. Both structures exploit the cyclic nature of the PLC to form an N-sample observation window of the discrete input, hence a status change on it is determined by the filter output taking into account all the N samples avoiding thus that a single impulse affects the PLC functionality. A comparative study, based on a statistical analysis, of the different filters' performances is presented. PMID:15868861

  14. Compact vehicle drive module having improved thermal control

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Andreas A.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2006-01-03

    An electric vehicle drive includes a thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support, which may be controlled in a closed-loop manner. Interfacing between circuits, circuit mounting structure, and the support provide for greatly enhanced cooling. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  15. Modulator considerations for the SNS RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an intense neutron source for neutron scattering experiments. The project is in the research stage, with construction funding beginning next year. The SNS is comprised of an ion source, a 1,000 MeV, H{sup {minus}} linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, a neutron producing target, and experimental area to utilize the scattering of the neutrons. The linear accelerator is RF driven, and the peak beam current is 27 mA and the beam duty factor is 5.84%. The peak RF power required is 104 MW, and the H{sup {minus}} beam pulse length is 0.97 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RF pulses must be about 0.1 ms longer than the beam pulses, due to the Q of the accelerating cavities, and the time required to establish control of the cavity fields. The modulators for the klystrons in this accelerator are discussed in this paper. The SNS is designed to be expandable, so the beam power can be doubled or even quadrupled in the future. One of the double-power options is to double the beam pulse length and duty factor. The authors are specifying the klystrons to operate in this twice-duty-factor mode, and the modulator also should be expandable to 2 ms pulses at 60 Hz. Due to the long pulse length and low RF frequency of 805 MHz, the klystron power is specified at 2.5 MW peak, and the RF system will have 56 klystrons at 805 MHz, and three 1.25 MW peak power klystrons at 402.5 MHz for the low energy portion of the accelerator. The low frequency modulators are conventional floating-deck modulation anode control systems.

  16. Basic Study on the Generation of RF Plasmas in Premixed Oxy-combustion with Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaka, Yugo; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Razzak, M. A.; Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi; Uesugi, Yoshihiko

    Oxy-combustion generates a high temperature field (above 3000 K), which is applied to next generation power plants and high temperature industrial technologies because of N2 free processes. However, the combustion temperature is so high that the furnace wall may be fatally damaged. In addition, it is very difficult to control the heat flux and chemical species' concentrations because of rapid chemical reactions. We have developed a new method for controlling the flame by electromagnetic force on this field. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the power coupling between the premixed oxy-combustion with methane and radio frequency (RF) power through the induction coil. By optimizing the power coupling, we observed that the flame can absorb RF power up to 1.5 kW. Spectroscopic measurements also showed an increase in the emission intensity from OH radicals in the flame, indicating improved combustibility.

  17. NSLS-II RF BEAM POSITION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, K.; Della Penna, A. J.; DeLong, J.; Kosciuk, B.; Mead, J.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.; Tian, Y.; Ha, K.; Portmann, G.; Sebek J.

    2011-03-28

    An internal R&D program has been undertaken at BNL to develop a sub-micron RF Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the NSLS-II 3rd generation light source that is currently under construction. The BPM R&D program started in August 2009. Successful beam tests were conducted 15 months from the start of the program. The NSLS-II RF BPM has been designed to meet all requirements for the NSLS-II Injection system and Storage Ring. Housing of the RF BPM's in +-0.1 C thermally controlled racks provide sub-micron stabilization without active correction. An active pilot-tone has been incorporated to aid long-term (8hr min) stabilization to 200nm RMS. The development of a sub-micron BPM for the NSLS-II has successfully demonstrated performance and stability. Pilot Tone calibration combiner and RF synthesizer has been implemented and algorithm development is underway. The program is currently on schedule to start production development of 60 Injection BPM's starting in the Fall of 2011. The production of {approx}250 Storage Ring BPM's will overlap the Injection schedule.

  18. Superconductor Digital-RF Receiver Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhanov, Oleg A.; Kirichenko, Dmitri; Vernik, Igor V.; Filippov, Timur V.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Webber, Robert; Dotsenko, Vladimir; Talalaevskii, Andrei; Tang, Jia Cao; Sahu, Anubhav; Shevchenko, Pavel; Miller, Robert; Kaplan, Steven B.; Sarwana, Saad; Gupta, Deepnarayan

    Digital superconductor electronics has been experiencing rapid maturation with the emergence of smaller-scale, lower-cost communications applications which became the major technology drivers. These applications are primarily in the area of wireless communications, radar, and surveillance as well as in imaging and sensor systems. In these areas, the fundamental advantages of superconductivity translate into system benefits through novel Digital-RF architectures with direct digitization of wide band, high frequency radio frequency (RF) signals. At the same time the availability of relatively small 4K cryocoolers has lowered the foremost market barrier for cryogenically-cooled digital electronic systems. Recently, we have achieved a major breakthrough in the development, demonstration, and successful delivery of the cryocooled superconductor digital-RF receivers directly digitizing signals in a broad range from kilohertz to gigahertz. These essentially hybrid-technology systems combine a variety of superconductor and semiconductor technologies packaged with two-stage commercial cryocoolers: cryogenic Nb mixed-signal and digital circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology, room-temperature amplifiers, FPGA processing and control circuitry. The demonstrated cryocooled digital-RF systems are the world's first and fastest directly digitizing receivers operating with live satellite signals in X-band and performing signal acquisition in HF to L-band at ˜30GHz clock frequencies.

  19. The IPNS second harmonic RF upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, M. E.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Horan, D.; Kustom, R. L.; Lien, M. K.; McMichael, G. E.; Moser, M. R.; Nassiri, A.; Wang, S.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) is used to accelerate protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV, at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The original ring design included two identical rf systems, each consisting of an accelerating cavity, cavity bias supply, power amplifiers and low-level analog electronics. The original cavities are located 180 degrees apart in the ring and provide a total peak accelerating voltage of {approx}21 kV over the 2.21-MHz to 5.14-MHz revolution frequency sweep. A third rf system has been constructed and installed in the RCS. The third rf system is capable of operating at the fundamental revolution frequency for the entire acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak accelerating voltage of up to {approx}11 kV, or at the second harmonic of the revolution frequency for the first {approx}4 ms of the acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak voltage of up to {approx}11 kV for bunch shape control. We describe here the hardware implementation and operation to date of the third rf cavity in the second harmonic mode.

  20. RF Voltage Measurements on ICRF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, G. L.; Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Wilgen, J. B.; Zhang, H. M.; Ryan, P. M.; Syed, G. M. S.; Kaye, A. S.

    1996-11-01

    Particle and heat flux on the plasma facing surfaces of high-power RF antennas used in fusion devices can result in damage to the antenna structures. High impedance capacitive probe measurements of the RF voltages on Faraday shields of several loop antennas indicate that voltages as high as 30% of the drive voltage can exist for 0/0 phasing (D.J. Hoffman, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 355), 368 (Palm Spgs., CA, 1995).. These voltages can contribute to increased energy deposition on the antenna owing to increased RF sheath voltages. We report on continued efforts to understand the source and to control these RF voltages. E and B field distributions have been measured on the mock-up of the JET A2 antenna using standard B-dot probes and novel E-field probes positioned with a new automated scanning system. These data are compared with calculated fields from 3-D antenna models. The measurements demonstrate the dependency of the surface E-fields on the phasing of the strap currents and show the charge accumulation at the antenna top and bottom predicted by the models.

  1. NMR quantitation: influence of RF inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Raftery, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The NMR peak integral is ideally linearly dependent on the sine of excitation angle (θ), which has provided unsurpassed flexibility in quantitative NMR by allowing the use of a signal of any concentration as the internal concentration reference. Controlling the excitation angle is particularly critical for solvent proton concentration referencing to minimize the negative impact of radiation damping, and to reduce the risk of receiver gain compression. In practice, due to the influence of RF inhomogeneity for any given probe, the observed peak integral is not exactly proportional to sin θ. To evaluate the impact quantitatively, we introduce a RF inhomogeneity factor I(θ) as a function of the nominal pulse excitation angle and propose a simple calibration procedure. Alternatively, I(θ) can be calculated from the probe’s RF profile, which can be readily obtained as a gradient image of an aqueous sample. Our results show that without consideration of I(θ), even for a probe with good RF homogeneity, up to 5% error can be introduced due to different excitation pulse angles used for the analyte and the reference. Hence, a simple calibration of I(θ) can eliminate such errors and allow an accurate description of the observed NMR signal’s dependence on the excitation angle in quantitative analysis. PMID:21919056

  2. Improving Diffusing S-duct Performance by Secondary Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, Bruce A.; Wendt, Bruce J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study ways to reduce inlet flow distortion (i.e., total pressure nonuniformity) and improve total pressure recovery in a diffusing S-duct. This was accomplished by controlling the development of secondary flows within the duct through the use of tapered-fin type vortex generators. Reported are results for the bare duct and seven different configurations of vortex generators. Data presented for each configuration include surface static pressure, surface flow visualization, and exit plane total pressure and transverse velocity. The performance of each configuration was assessed by calculating total pressure recovery and inlet distortion descriptors from the data and comparing them to the values for the bare duct. The best configuration tested reduced distortion (as measured by the DC(45) and DC(90) descriptors) by more than 50 percent while improving total pressure recovery by 0.5 percent. These results should provide valuable guidance in designing vortex generator installations in ducts and for assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to calculate duct flows with installed vortex generators.

  3. Chaotic control of a piezomagnetoelastic beam for improved energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiyer, Daniel; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.

    2015-04-01

    Linear cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters do not typically operate efficiently through a large span of excitation frequencies. Beam theory dictates optimum displacement at resonance excitation; however, typical environments evolve and vary over time with no clear dominant frequency. Nonlinear, non-resonant harvesting techniques have been implemented, but none so far have embraced chaotic behavior as a desirable property of the system. This work aims to benefit from chaotic phenomena by stabilizing high energy periodic orbits located within a chaotic attractor to improve operating bandwidth. Delay coordinate embedding is used to reconstruct the system states from a single time series measurement of displacement. Orbit selection, local linearization, and control perturbation are all computed from the single time series independent of an explicit system model. Although chaos in non-autonomous systems is typically associated with harmonic inputs, chaotic attractor motion can also exist throughout other excitation sources. Accelerometer data from inside a commercial vehicle and a stochastic excitation signal are used to illustrate the existence of chaos in dynamic environments, allowing such environments to be likely candidates for the proposed bandwidth improving energy harvesting technique.

  4. Performance improvement of robots using a learning control scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna, Ramuhalli; Chiang, Pen-Tai; Yang, Jackson C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Many applications of robots require that the same task be repeated a number of times. In such applications, the errors associated with one cycle are also repeated every cycle of the operation. An off-line learning control scheme is used here to modify the command function which would result in smaller errors in the next operation. The learning scheme is based on a knowledge of the errors and error rates associated with each cycle. Necessary conditions for the iterative scheme to converge to zero errors are derived analytically considering a second order servosystem model. Computer simulations show that the errors are reduced at a faster rate if the error rate is included in the iteration scheme. The results also indicate that the scheme may increase the magnitude of errors if the rate information is not included in the iteration scheme. Modification of the command input using a phase and gain adjustment is also proposed to reduce the errors with one attempt. The scheme is then applied to a computer model of a robot system similar to PUMA 560. Improved performance of the robot is shown by considering various cases of trajectory tracing. The scheme can be successfully used to improve the performance of actual robots within the limitations of the repeatability and noise characteristics of the robot.

  5. Improved controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K. V.; Wu, Y.; Jacobsen, T.; Mogensen, M. B.; Theil Kuhn, L.

    2013-07-01

    To locally access electrochemical active surfaces and interfaces in operando at the sub-micron scale at high temperatures in a reactive gas atmosphere is of great importance to understand the basic mechanisms in new functional materials, for instance, for energy technologies, such as solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzer cells. Here, we report on advanced improvements of our original controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope, CAHT-SPM. The new microscope can employ a broad range of the scanning probe techniques including tapping mode, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy. The temperature of the sample can be as high as 850 °C. Both reducing and oxidizing gases such as oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen can be added in the sample chamber and the oxygen partial pressure (pO2) is monitored by an oxygen sensor. We present here some examples of its capabilities demonstrated by high temperature topography with simultaneously ac electrical conductance measurements during atmosphere changes, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at various temperatures, and measurements of the surface potential. The improved CAHT-SPM, therefore, holds a great potential for local sub-micron analysis of high-temperature and gas induced changes of a wide range of materials.

  6. A randomized controlled trial of an automated telephone intervention to improve blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Teresa N; Ho, Timothy S; Handler, Joel; Kanter, Michael H; Goldberg, Ruthie A; Reynolds, Kristi

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a telephonic outreach program to improve blood pressure (BP) control among patients with hypertension. The authors identified adults 18 years and older with uncontrolled BP within the previous 12 months. Patients received either an automated telephone call advising them to have a walk-in BP check (n=31,619) or usual care (n=33,154). The primary outcome was BP control at 4 weeks. Significantly more patients who received the intervention achieved BP control compared with the usual care group (32.5% vs 23.7%; P<.0001). Patients in the intervention arm with cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, or diabetes mellitus achieved better BP control. Older age, female sex, and having a household income above the median were associated with BP control. When designing quality-improvement interventions to increase BP control rates, health care organizations should consider utilizing an automated telephone outreach campaign. PMID:24034658

  7. Improved growth of GaN layers on ultra thin silicon nitride/Si (1 1 1) by RF-MBE

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Mahesh; Roul, Basanta; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Misra, P.; Kukreja, L.M.; Sinha, Neeraj; Kalghatgi, A.T.; Krupanidhi, S.B.

    2010-11-15

    High-quality GaN epilayers were grown on Si (1 1 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using a new growth process sequence which involved a substrate nitridation at low temperatures, annealing at high temperatures, followed by nitridation at high temperatures, deposition of a low-temperature buffer layer, and a high-temperature overgrowth. The material quality of the GaN films was also investigated as a function of nitridation time and temperature. Crystallinity and surface roughness of GaN was found to improve when the Si substrate was treated under the new growth process sequence. Micro-Raman and photoluminescence (PL) measurement results indicate that the GaN film grown by the new process sequence has less tensile stress and optically good. The surface and interface structures of an ultra thin silicon nitride film grown on the Si surface are investigated by core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and it clearly indicates that the quality of silicon nitride notably affects the properties of GaN growth.

  8. Reduction of Ag–Si electrical contact resistance by selective RF heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wijs, W.-J. A.; Ljevar, S.; van de Sande, M. J.; de With, G.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and selective inductive heating of pre-sintered silver lines on silicon as present in solar cells using 27 MHz radio-frequency inductive fields is shown. IR measurements of silicon substrates show that above 450 °C the heating rate of the samples increases sharply, indicating that both the silver and the silicon are heated. By moving the substrate with respect to the RF antenna and modulation of the RF field, silicon wafers were heated reproducibly above 450 °C with heating rates in excess of 200 °C s‑1. Furthermore, selective heating of lines of pre-sintered silver paste was shown below the 450 °C threshold on silicon substrates. The orientation of the silver tracks relative to the RF antenna appeared to be crucial for homogeneity of heating. Transmission line measurements show a clear effect on contact formation between the silver lines and the silicon substrate. To lower the contact resistance sufficiently for industrial feasibility, a high temperature difference between the Si substrate and the Ag tracks is required. The present RF heating process does not match the time scale needed for contact formation between silver and silicon sufficiently, but the significantly improved process control achieved shows promise for applications requiring fast heating and cooling rates.

  9. Gyrokinetic Calculations of Microinstabilities and Transport During RF H-Modes on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; C. Fiore; P. Bonoli; C. Bourdelle; R. Budny; W.D. Dorland; D. Ernst; G. Hammett; D. Mikkelsen; J. Rice; S. Wukitch

    2002-06-18

    Physics understanding for the experimental improvement of particle and energy confinement is being advanced through massively parallel calculations of microturbulence for simulated plasma conditions. The ultimate goal, an experimentally validated, global, non-local, fully nonlinear calculation of plasma microturbulence is still not within reach, but extraordinary progress has been achieved in understanding microturbulence, driving forces and the plasma response in recent years. In this paper we discuss gyrokinetic simulations of plasma turbulence being carried out to examine a reproducible, H-mode, RF heated experiment on the Alcator CMOD tokamak3, which exhibits an internal transport barrier (ITB). This off axis RF case represents the early phase of a very interesting dual frequency RF experiment, which shows density control with central RF heating later in the discharge. The ITB exhibits steep, spontaneous density peaking: a reduction in particle transport occurring without a central particle source. Since the central temperature is maintained while the central density is increasing, this also suggests a thermal transport barrier exists. TRANSP analysis shows that ceff drops inside the ITB. Sawtooth heat pulse analysis also shows a localized thermal transport barrier. For this ICRF EDA H-mode, the minority resonance is at r/a * 0.5 on the high field side. There is a normal shear profile, with q monotonic.

  10. Fail safe controllable output improved version of the Electromechanical battery

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition.

  11. Fail safe controllable output improved version of the electromechanical battery

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1999-01-19

    Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition. 4 figs.

  12. Improvements to tilt rotor performance through passive blade twist control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    A passive blade twist control is presented in which the twist distribution of a tilt rotor blade is elastically changed as a function of rotor speed. The elastic twist deformation is used to achieve two different blade twist distributions corresponding to the two rotor speeds used on conventional tilt rotors in hover and forward flight. By changing the blade twist distribution, the aerodynamic performance can be improved in both modes of flight. The concept presented obtains a change in twist distribution with extension-twist-coupled composite blade structure. This investigation first determines the linear twists which are optimum for each flight mode. Based on the optimum linear twist distributions, three extension-twist-coupled blade designs are developed using coupled-beam and laminate analyses integrated with an optimization analysis. The designs are optimized for maximum twist deformation subject to material strength limitations. The aerodynamic performances of the final designs are determined which show that the passive blade twist control concept is viable, and can enhance conventional tilt rotor performance.

  13. Digitoxin improves cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fardin, Núbia Mantovan; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Montemor, Jairo Augusto Silva; da Veiga, Glaucia Luciano; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Campos, Ruy R

    2016-06-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with digitoxin on arterial baroreceptor sensitivity for heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (rSNA) control, cardiopulmonary reflex, and autonomic HR control in an animal model of heart failure (HF) were evaluated. Wistar rats were treated with digitoxin, which was administered in their daily feed (1 mg/kg per day) for 60 days. The following 3 experimental groups were evaluated: sham, HF, and HF treated with digitoxin (HF + DIG). We observed an increase in rSNA in the HF group (190 ± 29 pps, n = 5) compared with the sham group (98 ± 14 pps, n = 5). Digitoxin treatment prevented an increase in rSNA (98 ± 14 pps, n = 7). Therefore, arterial baroreceptor sensitivity was decreased in the HF group (-1.24 ± 0.07 bpm/mm Hg, n = 8) compared with the sham group (-2.27 ± 0.23 bpm/mm Hg, n = 6). Digitoxin did not alter arterial baroreceptor sensitivity in the HF + DIG group. Finally, the HF group showed an increased low frequency band (LFb: 23 ± 5 ms(2), n = 8) and a decreased high frequency band (HFb: 77 ± 5 ms(2), n = 8) compared with the sham group (LFb: 14 ± 3 ms(2); HFb: 86 ± 3 ms(2), n = 9); the HF+DIG group exhibited normalized parameters (LFb: 15 ± 3 ms(2); HFb: 85 ± 3 ms(2), n = 9). In conclusion, the benefits of decreasing rSNA are not directly related to improvements in peripheral cardiovascular reflexes; such occurrences are due in part to changes in the central nuclei of the brain responsible for autonomic cardiovascular control. PMID:27082032

  14. A coordinated MIMO control design for a power plant using improved sliding mode controller.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Rahmat-Allah; Samani, Siavash Golmohammadi

    2014-03-01

    For the participation of the steam power plants in regulating the network frequency, boilers and turbines should be co-ordinately controlled in addition to the base load productions. Lack of coordinated control over boiler-turbine may lead to instability; oscillation in producing power and boiler parameters; reduction in the reliability of the unit; and inflicting thermodynamic tension on devices. This paper proposes a boiler-turbine coordinated multivariable control system based on improved sliding mode controller (ISMC). The system controls two main boiler-turbine parameters i.e., the turbine revolution and superheated steam pressure of the boiler output. For this purpose, a comprehensive model of the system including complete and exact description of the subsystems is extracted. The parameters of this model are determined according to our case study that is the 320MW unit of Islam-Abad power plant in Isfahan/Iran. The ISMC method is simulated on the power plant and its performance is compared with the related real PI (proportional-integral) controllers which have been used in this unit. The simulation results show the capability of the proposed controller system in controlling local network frequency and superheated steam pressure in the presence of load variations and disturbances of boiler. PMID:24112644

  15. Single-Lever Power Control for General Aviation Aircraft Promises Improved Efficiency and Simplified Pilot Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1997-01-01

    General aviation research is leading to major advances in internal combustion engine control systems for single-engine, single-pilot aircraft. These advances promise to increase engine performance and fuel efficiency while substantially reducing pilot workload and increasing flight safety. One such advance is a single-lever power control (SLPC) system, a welcome departure from older, less user-friendly, multilever engine control systems. The benefits of using single-lever power controls for general aviation aircraft are improved flight safety through advanced engine diagnostics, simplified powerplant operations, increased time between overhauls, and cost-effective technology (extends fuel burn and reduces overhaul costs). The single-lever concept has proven to be so effective in preliminary studies that general aviation manufacturers are making plans to retrofit current aircraft with the technology and are incorporating it in designs for future aircraft.

  16. The propagation of self-control: Self-control in one domain simultaneously improves self-control in other domains.

    PubMed

    Tuk, Mirjam A; Zhang, Kuangjie; Sweldens, Steven

    2015-06-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 144(3) of Journal of Experimental Psychology: General (see record 2015-24174-008). The affiliations for co-authors Kuangjie Zhang and Steven Sweldens were incorrect. All versions of this article have been corrected.] A rich tradition in self-control research has documented the negative consequences of exerting self-control in 1 task for self-control performance in subsequent tasks. However, there is a dearth of research examining what happens when people exert self-control in multiple domains simultaneously. The current research aims to fill this gap. We integrate predictions from the most prominent models of self-control with recent neuropsychological insights in the human inhibition system to generate the novel hypothesis that exerting effortful self-control in 1 task can simultaneously improve self-control in completely unrelated domains. An internal meta-analysis on all 18 studies we conducted shows that exerting self-control in 1 domain (i.e., controlling attention, food consumption, emotions, or thoughts) simultaneously improves self-control in a range of other domains, as demonstrated by, for example, reduced unhealthy food consumption, better Stroop task performance, and less impulsive decision making. A subset of 9 studies demonstrates the crucial nature of task timing-when the same tasks are executed sequentially, our results suggest the emergence of an ego depletion effect. We provide conservative estimates of the self-control facilitation (d = |0.22|) as well as the ego depletion effect size (d = |0.17|) free of data selection and publication biases. These results (a) shed new light on self-control theories, (b) confirm recent claims that previous estimates of the ego depletion effect size were inflated due to publication bias, and (c) provide a blueprint for how to handle the power issues and associated file drawer problems commonly encountered in multistudy research projects. PMID

  17. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  18. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  19. RF plugging of mirror plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Kuzmin, S.G.

    1996-12-01

    Discovery of superconducting materials that operate at high temperatures revives interest in the use of rf field for plasma confinement. This paper discusses feasibility of a scheme where resonant rf cavities are attached to the mirror ends of an open system for plasma confinement. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  1. Studies on human eRF3-PABP interaction reveal the influence of eRF3a N-terminal glycin repeat on eRF3-PABP binding affinity and the lower affinity of eRF3a 12-GGC allele involved in cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Jerbi, Soumaya; Jolles, Béatrice; Bouceba, Tahar; Jean-Jean, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) has been involved in the control of mRNA degradation through its association with the cytoplasmic Poly(A) Binding Protein, PABP. In mammals, eRF3 N-terminal domain contains two overlapping PAM2 motifs which specifically recognize the MLLE domain of PABP. In humans, eRF3a/GSPT1 gene contains a stable GGC repeat encoding a repeat of glycine residues in eRF3a N-terminus. There are five known eRF3a/GSPT1 alleles in the human population, encoding 7, 9, 10, 11 and 12 glycines. Several studies have reported that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele is correlated with an increased risk of cancer development. Using surface plasmon resonance, we have studied the interaction of the various allelic forms of eRF3a with PABP alone or poly(A)-bound PABP. We found that the N-terminal glycine repeat of eRF3a influences eRF3a-PABP interaction and that eRF3a 12-GGC allele has a decreased binding affinity for PABP. Our comparative analysis on eRF3a alleles suggests that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele could modify the coupling between translation termination and mRNA deadenylation. PMID:26818177

  2. Studies on human eRF3-PABP interaction reveal the influence of eRF3a N-terminal glycin repeat on eRF3-PABP binding affinity and the lower affinity of eRF3a 12-GGC allele involved in cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jerbi, Soumaya; Jolles, Béatrice; Bouceba, Tahar; Jean-Jean, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) has been involved in the control of mRNA degradation through its association with the cytoplasmic Poly(A) Binding Protein, PABP. In mammals, eRF3 N-terminal domain contains two overlapping PAM2 motifs which specifically recognize the MLLE domain of PABP. In humans, eRF3a/GSPT1 gene contains a stable GGC repeat encoding a repeat of glycine residues in eRF3a N-terminus. There are five known eRF3a/GSPT1 alleles in the human population, encoding 7, 9, 10, 11 and 12 glycines. Several studies have reported that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele is correlated with an increased risk of cancer development. Using surface plasmon resonance, we have studied the interaction of the various allelic forms of eRF3a with PABP alone or poly(A)-bound PABP. We found that the N-terminal glycine repeat of eRF3a influences eRF3a-PABP interaction and that eRF3a 12-GGC allele has a decreased binding affinity for PABP. Our comparative analysis on eRF3a alleles suggests that the presence of eRF3a 12-GGC allele could modify the coupling between translation termination and mRNA deadenylation. PMID:26818177

  3. RF Front End Interface and AGC Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The latest RF front end built by Burhans (Mini-L-82) was successfully interfaced to the Ohio University LORAN-C receiver. In order for the front end to operate optimally, modifications were made to existing automatic gain control (AGC) circuitry already developed for the Ohio University LORAN-C receiver. The hardware modifications to the AGC and other interface circuitry, as well as some preliminary results are discussed.

  4. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

    2005-12-01

    This project is investigating the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point would improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In Phase I, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. In phase II of the project, described in this report, we demonstrate that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. We also establish that analysis algorithms can be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications, and show that it may be possible to use sensor network pulse rate to distinguish the number of occupants in a space. Finally, in this phase of the project we also developed a prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy. This basic capability will be extended in the future by applying an algorithm-based inference to the sensor network data stream, so that the web page displays the likelihood that each monitored office or area is occupied, as a supplement to the actual status of each sensor.

  5. rf-driven ion sources for industrial applications (invited) (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-02-15

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been developing rf-driven ion sources for the last two decades. These sources are being used to generate both positive and negative ion beams. Some of these sources are operating in particle accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, while others are being employed in various industrial ion beam systems. There are four areas where the rf-driven ion sources are commonly used in industry. (1) In semiconductor manufacturing, rf-driven sources have found important applications in plasma etching, ion beam implantation, and ion beam lithography. (2) In material analysis and surface modification, miniature rf-ion sources can be found in focused ion beam systems. They can provide ion beams of essentially any element in the Periodic Table. The newly developed combined rf ion-electron beam unit improves greatly the performance of the secondary ion mass spectrometry tool. (3) For neutron production, rf ion source is a major component of compact, high flux D-D, D-T, or T-T neutron generators. These neutron sources are now being employed in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as well as in neutron imaging and material interrogation. (4) Large area rf-driven ion source will be used in an industrial design neutral beam diagnostic system for probing fusion plasmas. Such sources can be easily scaled to provide large ion beam current for future fusion reactor applications.

  6. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  7. A 300 mV sub-threshold region 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator and frequency divider with transformer technique for ultralow power RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yasunori; Ishikawa, Keisuke; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    A new ultralow voltage 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and a divide-by-2 frequency divider circuits operating in a CMOS sub-threshold region using a transformer technique have been developed. In the sub-threshold region, the CMOS transistor high frequency performances are decreased to the point where oscillation and frequency division are challenging to achieve. The new proposed VCO uses the transformer feedback complementary VCO technique to improves VCO negative feedback gain. The circuits have been fabricated in a 65 nm standard CMOS process. The oscillation frequency is designed at 2.4 GHz under a 300 mV supply voltage. The total power consumption is 202 µW with noise performance of -96 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. The new proposed frequency divider circuit consists of two stages master-slave D-type flip-flop (DFF). The DFF differential input is coupled to a transformer circuit instead of transistors to reduce the number of stacks. The minimum operating supply voltage is 300 mV with power consumption of 34 µW with a free-run frequency of 1.085 GHz.

  8. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  9. Controlling incipient oxidation of pyrite for improved rejection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.E.; Tao, D.P.

    1996-04-01

    It is well known that superficial oxidation of pyrite produces a hydrophobic sulfur-rich surface and creates problems in separating the mineral from coal using surface-based processes such as flotation and agglomeration. Numerous studies of pyrite oxidation have been conducted but most of them were concerned with the advanced stages of oxidation, and as a result it was not possible to establish a relationship between oxidation and flotation behavior. A better understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of the incipient oxidation reactions, which may vary with the origin, morphology, texture, and solid state properties of pyrite, can lead to the development of new processes that can improve pyrite rejection from coal. This project is aimed at better understanding of the mechanisms involved during the initial stages of pyrite oxidation to foster the development of advanced coal cleaning technologies. Studies were conducted by fracturing pyrite electrodes in-situ in an electrochemical cell to create virgin surfaces. Electrochemical and photoelectrochemical techniques were employed to characterize the incipient oxidation of pyrite in aqueous solutions. Microflotation tests were conducted to obtain information on the hydrophobicity of pyrite under controlled E{sub h} and pH conditions, and the results were correlated with electrochemical studies.

  10. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  11. Adaptive myoelectric pattern recognition toward improved multifunctional prosthesis control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The non-stationary property of electromyography (EMG) signals in real life settings usually hinders the clinical application of the myoelectric pattern recognition for prosthesis control. The classical EMG pattern recognition approach consists of two separate steps: training and testing, without considering the changes between training and testing data induced by electrode shift, fatigue, impedance changes and psychological factors, and often results in performance degradation. The aim of this study was to develop an adaptive myoelectric pattern recognition system, aiming to retrain the classifier online with the testing data without supervision, providing a self-correction mechanism for suppressing misclassifications. This paper presents an adaptive unsupervised classifier based on support vector machine (SVM) to improve the classification performance. Experimental data from 15 healthy subjects were used to evaluate performance. Preliminary study on intra-session and inter-session EMG data was conducted to verify the performance of the unsupervised adaptive SVM classifier. The unsupervised adaptive SVM classifier outperformed the conventional SVM by 3.3% and 8.0% for the combination of time-domain and autoregressive features in the intra-session and inter-session tests, respectively. The proposed approach is capable of incorporating the useful information in testing data to the classification model by taking into account the overtime changes in the testing data with respect to the training data to retrain the original classifier, therefore providing a self-correction mechanism for suppressing misclassifications. PMID:25749182

  12. Improved control configuration of PWM rectifiers based on neuro-fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Hakan; Kececioglu, O Fatih; Gani, Ahmet; Yildiz, Ceyhun; Sekkeli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that rectifiers are used widely in many applications required AC/DC transformation. With technological advances, many studies are performed for AC/DC converters and many control methods are proposed in order to improve the performance of these rectifiers in recent years. Pulse width modulation (PWM) based rectifiers are one of the most popular rectifier types. PWM rectifiers have lower input current harmonics and higher power factor compared to classical diode and thyristor rectifiers. In this study, neuro-fuzzy controller (NFC) which has robust, nonlinear structure and do not require the mathematical model of the system to be controlled has been proposed for PWM rectifiers. Three NFCs are used in control scheme of proposed PWM rectifier in order to control the dq-axis currents and DC voltage of PWM rectifier. Moreover, simulation studies are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed control scheme at MATLAB/Simulink environment in terms of rise time, settling time, overshoot, power factor, total harmonic distortion and power quality. PMID:27504240

  13. Multi-harmonic RF test stand for RF breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y.; Shchelkunov, S.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2012-12-21

    A multi-harmonic RF test stand is under construction at Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. It includes a frequency multiplier which can generate high power harmonics efficiently that are phase locked to the fundamental drive frequency. In a bi-modal asymmetric cavity powered by this RF source, the cavity may experience reduced exposure time to peak fields and sweeping of peak fields across their surfaces, and strong asymmetry between surfaces that may experience cathode-and anode-like fields; these phenomena are to be assessed for their influence on RF breakdown probabilities.

  14. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  15. Rugged Ceramic Window for RF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Michael; Johnson, Rolland P.; Rimmer, Robert; Elliot, Tom; Stirbet, Mircea

    2009-05-04

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  16. ILC RF System R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

  17. Photonic generation and independent steering of multiple RF signals for software defined radars.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Pinna, Sergio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2013-09-23

    As the improvement of radar systems claims for digital approaches, photonics is becoming a solution for software defined high frequency and high stability signal generation. We report on our recent activities on the photonic generation of flexible wideband RF signals, extending the proposed architecture to the independent optical beamforming of multiple signals. The scheme has been tested generating two wideband signals at 10 GHz and 40 GHz, and controlling their independent delays at two antenna elements. Thanks to the multiple functionalities, the proposed scheme allows to improve the effectiveness of the photonic approach, reducing its cost and allowing flexibility, extremely wide bandwidth, and high stability. PMID:24104176

  18. Improving Apple IPM by maximizing opportunities for biological control.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of biological control in controlling arthropod pests in commercial apple production is for the most part not well understood. We make the case that conditions at this time are especially good for making a concerted effort to integrate biological control into IPM systems. Pest control progr...

  19. Improvement in the synchronization between the radio frequency signal and the image detector in an acousto-optic tunable filter imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huijie; Li, Chongchong; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Zefu

    2014-04-10

    An improved synchronization between the radio frequency (RF) signal and the image detector in an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer is proposed to optimize power consumption and eliminate image smear. The RF signal is controlled on and off alternately to match the exposure of the image sensor. This scheme reduces the RF power and rejects the light illumination on the image sensor in the interval of charge transfer. An experiment using a visible AOTF, a frame transfer charge-coupled device camera, and an incandescent lamp is conducted for demonstration. The average RF power decreases 7.6%, and the image smear is eliminated. PMID:24787400

  20. Mixed application MMIC technologies - Progress in combining RF, digital and photonic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swirhun, S.; Bendett, M.; Sokolov, V.; Bauhahn, P.; Sullivan, C.; Mactaggart, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Hibbs-Brenner, M.; Mondal, J.

    1991-01-01

    Approaches for future 'mixed application' monolithic integrated circuits (ICs) employing optical receive/transmit, RF amplification and modulation and digital control functions are discussed. We focus on compatibility of the photonic component fabrication with conventional RF and digital IC technologies. Recent progress at Honeywell in integrating several parts of the desired RF/digital/photonic circuit integration suite required for construction of a future millimeter-wave optically-controlled phased-array element are illustrated.

  1. 3D positional control of magnetic levitation system using adaptive control: improvement of positioning control in horizontal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Toshimasa; Fujitani, Yasuhiro; Kato, Norihiko; Tsuda, Naoaki; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish a technique that levitates and conveys a hand, a kind of micro-robot, by applying magnetic forces: the hand is assumed to have a function of holding and detaching the objects. The equipment to be used in our experiments consists of four pole-pieces of electromagnets, and is expected to work as a 4DOF drive unit within some restricted range of 3D space: the three DOF are corresponding to 3D positional control and the remaining one DOF, rotational oscillation damping control. Having used the same equipment, Khamesee et al. had manipulated the impressed voltages on the four electric magnetics by a PID controller by the use of the feedback signal of the hand's 3D position, the controlled variable. However, in this system, there were some problems remaining: in the horizontal direction, when translating the hand out of restricted region, positional control performance was suddenly degraded. The authors propose a method to apply an adaptive control to the horizontal directional control. It is expected that the technique to be presented in this paper contributes not only to the improvement of the response characteristic but also to widening the applicable range in the horizontal directional control.

  2. DESIGN OF A DC/RF PHOTOELECTRON GUN.

    SciTech Connect

    YU,D.NEWSHAM,Y.SMIRONOV,A.YU,J.SMEDLEY,J.SRINIVASAN RAU,T.LEWELLEN,J.ZHOLENTS,A.

    2003-05-12

    An integrated dc/rf photoelectron gun produces a low-emittance beam by first rapidly accelerating electrons at a high gradient during a short ({approx}1 ns), high-voltage pulse, and then injecting the electrons into an rf cavity for subsequent acceleration. Simulations show that significant improvement of the emittance appears when a high field ({approx} 0.5-1 GV/m) is applied to the cathode surface. An adjustable dc gap ({le} 1 mm) which can be integrated with an rf cavity is designed for initial testing at the Injector Test Stand at Argonne National Laboratory using an existing 70-kV pulse generator. Plans for additional experiments of an integrated dc/rf gun with a 250-kV pulse generator are being made.

  3. RF Magnetic Shielding Effects of a Bincho-Charcoal Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Keisuke; Itoh, Mineo

    Recently, there has been increased interest for electromagnetic shielding in the radio frequency (RF) region. The use of effective electromagnetic shields has, moreover, been required to improve the electromagnetic environment. The present paper has applied bincho-charcoal, a high quality charcoal found in Japan, to improve RF electromagnetic shields. Bincho-charcoal makes an excellent shield, due to a very large value of relative permittivity in the RF region. In the present research, the evaluation of the RF magnetic shielding degree SDH of the bincho-charcoal was limited to a plate being exposed to an electromagnetic wave. The SDH of the single plate was found to increase with an increase in RF frequency over the range from 1 MHz to 1 GHz. The value of SDH at 100 MHz was found to be about 15 dB. The present authors have, furthermore, improved the value of SDH by the use of a triple plate, constructed from three bincho-charcoal plates. The SDH of the triple plate at 100 MHz was found to be improved by about 15 dB over that of the single plate. In addition, the SDH was shown to be improved by the superposition of a copper plate over the triple plate.

  4. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, L.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N.C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Timing and low-level rf system for an x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Yuji; Maesaka, Hirokazu; Matsubara, Shinich; Hosoda, Naoyasu; Ohshima, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    An x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), SACLA, designed to open up new science, was constructed for generating coherent x rays with a peak power of more than 10 GW and a very short pulse of below 30 fs. This feature demands a very highly short-term temporal stability of less than 50 fs to the acceleration rf field of SACLA. For this reason, we developed a timing and low-level rf (LLRF) system for SACLA based on that of the SPring8 compact SASE source (SCSS) test accelerator for verifying the feasibility of an XFEL. The performance of the system using the in-phase and quadrature rf manipulation method was improved from SCSS's system. Since the facility length of SACLA is 700 m, which is 10 times longer than that of the SCSS test accelerator, a phase-stabilized optical-fiber system designed to transmit time standard rf signals with low loss was also developed and deployed. This optical-fiber system equips fiber optical-length feedback control in order to mitigate environmental effects, such as temperature and humidity changes. On the other hand, the demanded maximum rf temporal stability is less than 50 fs, which is almost 10 times smaller than that of the SCSS test accelerator. Hence, reducing electric noise and increasing the temperature stability around timing and LLRF instruments were necessary and realized with a very low-noise power supply and a hemathermal 19-inch enclosure. The short-term temporal performance of the timing LLRF system finally attained a temporal stability of less than 13.6 fs in rms measured by a beam arrival-time measurement. This stability greatly helps to achieve the stable x-ray lasing of SACLA for routine operation during user experiments.

  6. RF Pulse Signal Integrity Analysis for Nonlinear Ended Microstrip Line Atom-Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Delamare, A.; Normand, A.; Delaroche, F.; Latry, O.; Vurpillot, F.; Ravelo, B.

    2016-03-01

    A signal integrity (SI) analysis of high voltage rectangular short pulses for the atom- probe system is explored in this paper. The operated RF transient pulse is considered for exciting on material sample inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) cryogenic chamber. The ns- duration pulse signal is injected into the cryogenic analysis chamber through the transmitting system mainly constituted by a microstrip interconnect line ended by optical controlled nonlinear load. The whole system frequency characterization is performed based on the S- parameter measurements. As expected, a challenging ultra-short rectangular shape pulse is exhibited by the pulser. Promising experimental results with the improvement of ion mass spectrum is demonstrated with the designed RF pulser.

  7. Controlled Delivery of FK506 to Improve Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Labroo, Pratima; Ho, Scott; Sant, Himanshu; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-09-01

    Autologous nerve grafts are the current "gold standard" for repair of large nerve gaps. However, they cause morbidity at the donor nerve site, only a limited amount of nerve can be harvested, and there is the potential for mismatches in size and fascicular patterns between the nerve stumps and the graft. Nerve conduits are a promising alternative to autografts and can act as guidance cues for the regenerating axons and allow for tension free bridging, without the need to harvest donor nerve. Separately, FK506, and FDA-approved small molecule, has been shown to enhance axon growth and peripheral nerve regeneration. This article describes the design of a novel drug delivery apparatus integrated with a poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-based nerve guide conduit for controlled local delivery of FK506. An FK506 dosage curve was acquired to determine the minimum in vitro concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells, then PLGA devices were designed and tested in a diffusion chamber, and finally the bioactivity of the released media was evaluated by measuring axon growth in DRG cells exposed to the media for 72 h. The combined drug delivery nerve guide was able to release FK506 for 20 days at concentrations (1-20 ng/mL) that were shown to enhance DRG axon growth. Furthermore, the released FK506 was bioactive and able to enhance DRG axon growth. The combined drug delivery nerve guide can release FK506 for extended periods of time and enhance axon growth, and has the potential to improve nerve regeneration after a peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27058050

  8. Eicosanoids: Exploiting Insect Immunity to Improve Biological Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, David; Haas, Eric; Miller, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Insects, like all invertebrates, express robust innate, but not adaptive, immune reactions to infection and invasion. Insect immunity is usually resolved into three major components. The integument serves as a physical barrier to infections. Within the hemocoel, the circulating hemocytes are the temporal first line of defense, responsible for clearing the majority of infecting bacterial cells from circulation. Specific cellular defenses include phagocytosis, microaggregation of hemocytes with adhering bacteria, nodulation and encapsulation. Infections also stimulate the humoral component of immunity, which involves the induced expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and activation of prophenoloxidase. These peptides appear in the hemolymph of challenged insects 6–12 hours after the challenge. Prostaglandins and other eicosanoids are crucial mediators of innate immune responses. Eicosanoid biosynthesis is stimulated by infection in insects. Inhibition of eicosanoid biosynthesis lethally renders experimental insects unable to clear bacterial infection from hemolymph. Eicosanoids mediate specific cell actions, including phagocytosis, microaggregation, nodulation, hemocyte migration, hemocyte spreading and the release of prophenoloxidase from oenocytoids. Some invaders have evolved mechanisms to suppress insect immunity; a few of them suppress immunity by targeting the first step in the eicosanoid biosynthesis pathways, the enzyme phospholipase A2. We proposed research designed to cripple insect immunity as a technology to improve biological control of insects. We used dsRNA to silence insect genes encoding phospholipase A2, and thereby inhibited the nodulation reaction to infection. The purpose of this article is to place our view of applying dsRNA technologies into the context of eicosanoid actions in insect immunity. The long-term significance of research in this area lies in developing new pest management technologies to contribute to food security in

  9. A HIGH STABILITY, LOW NOISE RF DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Dorel

    2002-08-20

    Next generation linear colliders require high stability, low noise distribution of RF phase and timing signals. We describe a fiber-optics system that transmits phase at 357MHz, at a 1500nm wavelength, over a distance of 15 kilometers. Phase length errors in the transmission fiber are measured using the phase of the signal reflected from the fiber end. Corrections are performed by controlling the temperature of a 6-kilometer fiber spool placed in series with the main transmission fiber. This system has demonstrated a phase stability better than 10 femtoseconds per degree C, per kilometer, an improvement of a factor of >2000 relative to un-stabilized fiber. This system uses standard low cost telecom fiber and components.

  10. RF tuning element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor); Lubecke, Victor M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device for tuning a circuit includes a substrate, a transmission line on the substrate that includes first and second conductors coupled to a circuit to be tuned, and a movable short-circuit for varying the impedance the transmission line presents to the circuit to be tuned. The movable short-circuit includes a dielectric layer disposed atop the transmission line and a distributed shorting element in the form of a conductive member that is configured to be slid along at least a portion of the transmission line atop the dielectric layer. The conductive member is configured to span the first and second conductors of the transmission line and to define at least a first opening that spans the two conductors so that the conductive member includes first and second sections separated by the first opening. The first and second sections of the conductive member combine with the first and second conductors of the transmission line to form first and second low impedance sections of transmission line, and the opening combines with the first and second conductors of the transmission line and the dielectric layer to form a first high impedance section of transmission line intermediate the first and second low impedance sections. Each of the first low impedance section and the first high impedance section have a length along the transmission line of approximately one-quarter wavelength, thus providing a periodic variation of transmission line impedance. That enhances reflection of rf power.

  11. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  12. Broadband RF front-end using microwave photonics filter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Minghua; Liang, Yunhua; Chen, Hongwei; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-01-26

    We propose and demonstrate a novel RF front-end with broadened processing bandwidth, where a tunable microwave photonic filter based on optical frequency comb (OFC) is incorporated to accomplish simultaneous down-conversion and filtering. By designing additional phase shaping and time delay controlling, the frequency tunability of the system could be enhanced. More importantly, the beating interferences generated from broadband RF input could also be suppressed, which help to break the limitation on the processing bandwidth. In our experiments, a photonics RF receiver front-end for RF input with wide bandwidth of almost 20 GHz was realized using 10-GHz-space OFC, where the center frequency of the pass band signals could be tuned continuously. PMID:25835844

  13. A single session of open kinetic chain movements emphasizing speed improves speed of movement and modifies postural control in stroke.

    PubMed

    Gray, Vicki L; Ivanova, Tanya D; Garland, S Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Little attention has been given to training speed of movement, even though functional activities require quick submaximal contractions. Closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercises are considered more functional; however, the best method for training speed is not known. A single bout of open kinetic chain (OKC) exercises emphasizing speed was performed to determine whether movement velocity and muscle activation would improve in a single session and whether the improvements transfer to a physiological balance task. Eleven participants <1 year post-stroke performed an arm raise task before and after a single session of fast OKC exercises. Surface electromyography (EMG) from soleus (SOL), tibialis anterior (TA), biceps femoris (BF) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, peak velocity and average power were recorded during the OKC exercises. EMG from SOL, TA, BF and RF and center of pressure (COP) velocity were measured during arm raise task. At the end of the OKC exercises, velocity, power and TA, BF and RF EMG area increased. The arm acceleration and BF EMG area increased significantly during the arm raise. The improvements observed at the end of the OKC exercises transferred to the arm raise task. The improvements in balance were comparable to those previously seen after CKC exercises. PMID:26863374

  14. Improving the Internal Accounting Controls of Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apostolou, Nicholas G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Accounting controls are primarily concerned with methods and procedures that safeguard an entity's assets and ensure the reliability of its financial records. This article discusses internal control objectives as applied to educational institutions, outlines specific steps necessary to develop an effective internal control system, and mentions…

  15. Variable power combiner for RF mode shimming in 7-T MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Pedram; Solbach, Klaus; Bitz, Andreas K

    2012-09-01

    This contribution discusses the utilization of RF power in an MRI system with RF mode shimming which enables the superposition of circularly polarized modes of a transmit RF coil array driven by a Butler matrix. Since the required power for the individual modes can vary widely, mode-shimming can result in a significant underutilization of the total available RF power. A variable power combiner (VPC) is proposed to improve the power utilization: it can be realized as a reconfiguration of the MRI transmit system by the inclusion of one additional matrix network which receives the power from all transmit amplifiers at its input ports and provides any desired (combined) power distribution at its output ports by controlling the phase and amplitude of the amplifiers' input signals. The power distribution at the output ports of the VPC is then fed into the "mode" ports of the coil array Butler matrix in order to superimpose the spatial modes at the highest achievable power utilization. The VPC configuration is compared to the standard configuration of the transmit chain of our MRI system with 8 transmit channels and 16 coils. In realistic scenarios, improved power utilization was achieved from 17% to 60% and from 14% to 55% for an elliptical phantom and a region of interest in the abdomen, respectively, and an increase of the power utilization of 1 dB for a region of interest in the upper leg. In general, it is found that the VPC allows significant improvement in power utilization when the shimming solution demands only a few modes to be energized, while the technique can yield loss in power utilization in cases with many modes required at high power level. PMID:22752102

  16. Combining dynamical decoupling with optimal control for improved QIP.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Dominy, Jason; Witzel, Wayne

    2010-03-01

    Constructing high-fidelity control pulses that are robust to control and system/environment fluctuations is a crucial objective for quantum information processing (QIP). We combine dynamical decoupling (DD) with optimal control (OC) to identify control pulses that achieve this objective numerically. Previous DD work has shown that general errors up to (but not including) third order can be removed from {pi}- and {pi}/2-pulses without concatenation. By systematically integrating DD and OC, we are able to increase pulse fidelity beyond this limit. Our hybrid method of quantum control incorporates a newly-developed algorithm for robust OC, providing a nested DD-OC approach to generate robust controls. Motivated by solid-state QIP, we also incorporate relevant experimental constraints into this DD-OC formalism. To demonstrate the advantage of our approach, the resulting quantum controls are compared to previous DD results in open and uncertain model systems.

  17. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  18. RF signal switching and distribution techniques in civil aviation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugweje, Okechukwu C.; Nguyen, Hung D.; Ngo, Duc H.; Kerczewski, Robert; Miranda, Felix

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, we present the findings of a study on the radio frequency (RF) signal switching and distribution techniques in a civil aviation aircraft. Using the Boeing Aircraft 777 as a model, method and mode of RF signal switching and distribution were investigated. The aim is to evaluate system performance and if possible determine methods of improvement. The performance of the system was measured in terms of savings in system parameters such as weight, size and length of the associated components. Instead of using coaxial cables or twisted pair wire for routing the RF signals, optical fibers cables were suggested as a method of improvement. During this study, the difficulty of achieving this objective became obvious due to the complexity of the problem. However, suggestions were made on possible methods of improvements.

  19. Modern control technology for improved nuclear reactor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, L.C.

    1986-12-01

    One of the main complaints leveled at reactor control systems by utility spokesmen is complexity. One only has to look inside a power reactor control room to appreciate this viewpoint. The high reliability and versatility of modern microprocessors makes possible distributed control systems with only performance data and abnormal conditions being relayed to the control room. In a sense, this emulates the human-body control system where routine repetitive actions are handled in an involuntary manner. The significance of expert systems to the nuclear reactor control and safety systems is their ability to capture human and other expertise and make it available, upon demand, and under almost all circumstances. Thus, human problem-solving skills acquired by the learning process over a long period of time can be captured and employed with the reliability inherent in computers. This is especially important in nuclear plants when human operators are burdened by stress and emotional factors that have a dramatic effect on performance level.

  20. Signal pulses superimposed on power supply lines improve electrical control

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    To manipulate or monitor the operation of cranes and hoists, control engineers typically create control schemes that add numerous conductors, festoon systems, bulky dedicated conductor rails, radio and infrared controls. With modern power line communication equipment, power and intelligence can be combined to: add an unlimited number of control circuits without adding a single wire; have data communication without special cables; and eliminate bulky festoon systems and heavy cable track. Available from US Safety Trolley Corp., a SmartRail system superimposes data and control information on the power line to create a fully functional Local Area Network (LAN). The system network is based on the CEBus protocol EIA/IS-60 and uses a spread spectrum power line carrier technology. The heart of this system is the controller which manages all communication and control tasks. A power line coupling circuit couples the data signal from the controller to the a-c power conductors. These power conductors are often TRI-BAR/FOUR-BAR continuous conductor bar systems or existing conductor bar systems. The combination results in a secure data communications and control system for moving equipment.

  1. RF cavity with co -based amorphous core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, M.; Misu, T.; Sugiura, A.; Sato, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kusaka, T.

    2006-10-01

    A compact cavity for acceleration has been developed with cobalt-based amorphous cores, which is a part of research and development (R&D) for a synchrotron in a cancer therapy facility. This core has high permeability that enables the cavity length to be made short, and its low Q-value of about 0.5 permits an RF system without tuning control of the cavity. The developed acceleration cavity consists of two acceleration gaps; at both sides of the gap there are quarter-wave coaxial resonators. The total length of the cavity is as short as 1.5 m and the inner diameter of the vacuum chamber is 190 mm. Considering the requirements for easy operation and maintenance, a transistor RF amplifier was used instead of the commonly used tetrode in the final stage. Each resonator has a maximum impedance of 400 Ω at 2 MHz, and a 1:9 impedance transformer has been attached to use a solid state amplifier of 50 Ω output impedance. In the frequency range from 0.4 to 8 MHz, an acceleration voltage of more than 4 kV can be obtained with a total input RF power of 8 kW. In this paper the structure of the cavity, the obtained core impedance, and their performances under high-power test are presented.

  2. A photocathode RF gun for x-ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1995-12-31

    A 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun was developed by a BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration for X-ray FEL and other applications. The objective of the collaboration is to develop a cost effective and more reliable photocathode RF gun based on the operational experience of the original BNL gun. The new photocathode RF gun is cable of producing 1 mm-mrad normalized rms emittance photocurrent with a peak current of 100 A. The half-cell length of the new RF gun was lengthened to reduce the peak field on the cavity surface, the side-coupled scheme for cavity and waveguide coupling was replaced by a symmetrized coupling to the full-cell. The cavity aperture was increased to improve the coupling between two cells and for flat beam application. The experimental results of cold testing the RF gun will be presented. We will also present an injector design based on the new photocathode RF gun and emittance compensation technique.

  3. High Power RF Transmitters for ICRF Applications on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yuzhou; Yuan, Shuai; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Xinjun; Chen, Gen; Kumazawa, R.; Cheng, Yan; Wang, Lei; Ju, Songqing; Deng, Xu; Qin, Chengming; Yang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    An Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) system with a radio frequency (RF) power of 4 × 1.5 MW was developed for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). High RF power transmitters were designed as a part of the research and development (R&D) for an ICRF system with long pulse operation at megawatt levels in a frequency range of 25 MHz to 70 MHz. Studies presented in this paper cover the following parts of the high power transmitter: the three staged high power amplifier, which is composed of a 5 kW wideband solid state amplifier, a 100 kW tetrode drive stage amplifier and a 1.5 MW tetrode final stage amplifier, and the DC high voltage power supply (HVPS). Based on engineering design and static examinations, the RF transmitters were tested using a matched dummy load where an RF output power of 1.5 MW was achieved. The transmitters provide 6 MW RF power in primary phase and will reach a level up to 12 MW after a later upgrade. The transmitters performed successfully in stable operations in EAST and HT-7 devices. Up to 1.8 MW of RF power was injected into plasmas in EAST ICRF heating experiments during the 2010 autumn campaign and plasma performance was greatly improved.

  4. Vapor-modulated heat pipe for improved temperature control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. K.; Eninger, J. E.; Ludeke, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Dryout induced by vapor throttling makes control of equipment temperature less dependent on variations in sink environment. Mechanism controls flow of vapor in heat pipe by using valve in return path to build difference in pressure and also difference in saturation temperature of the vapor. In steady state, valve closes just enough to produce partial dryout that achieves required temperature drop.

  5. Silicon Sheet Quality is Improved By Meniscus Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, D. A.; Hatch, A. E.; Goldsmith, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Better quality silicon crystals for solar cells are possible with instrument that monitors position of meniscus as sheet of solid silicon is drawn from melt. Using information on meniscus height, instrument generates feedback signal to control melt temperature. Automatic control ensures more uniform silicon sheets.

  6. Observation of temporal evolution following laser triggered rf breakdown in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiahang; Chen, Huaibi; Du, Yingchao; Gai, Wei; Huang, Wenhui; Jing, Chunguang; Shi, Jiaru; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wang, Faya; Yan, Lixin

    2014-07-01

    Radio frequency breakdown is one of the fundamental phenomena that limits the operational performance of most of high power and high gradient vacuum rf devices. We report on experimental results of rf breakdown in an S-band photocathode gun triggered by an intensity controlled laser. Through measurement and analysis of the time dependence of the collected current at the gun exit and the stored rf energy in the cavity, one can gain insight into the time evolution of the rf breakdown process. Multiple breakdowns were observed within one rf pulse due to power flow between cells after the initial emission. Similarities of the laser-triggered breakdowns to those occurring in the course of cavity conditioning and normal operation are found by comparing the postbreakdown signals in both cases. It is shown that an intense laser can offer a more controllable and flexible method for rf breakdown studies.

  7. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  8. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE CRYOGENIC CONTROL SYSTEM ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    HOLTROP,K.L; ANDERSON,P.M; MAUZEY,P.S

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The cryogenic facility that is part of the DIII-D tokamak system supplies liquid nitrogen and liquid helium to the superconducting magnets used for electron cyclotron heating, the D{sub 2} pellet injection system, cryopumps in the DIII-D vessel, and cryopanels in the neutral beam injection system. The liquid helium is liquefied on site using a Sulzer liquefier that has a 150 l/h liquefaction rate. Control of the cryogenic facility at DIII-D was initially accomplished through the use of three different programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Recently, two of those three PLCs, a Sattcon PLC controlling the Sulzer liquefier and a Westinghouse PLC, were removed and all their control logic was merged into the remaining PLC, a Siemens T1555. This replacement was originally undertaken because the removed PLCs were obsolete and unsupported. However, there have been additional benefits from the replacement. The replacement of the RS-232 serial links between the graphical user interface and the PLCs with a high speed Ethernet link allows for real-time display and historical trending of nearly all the cryosystem's data. this has greatly increased the ability to troubleshoot problems with the system, and has permitted optimization of the cryogenic system's performance because of the increased system integration. To move the control logic of the Sattcon control loops into the T1555, an extensive modification of the basic PID control was required. These modifications allow for better control of the control loops and are now being incorporated in other control loops in the system.

  9. 77 FR 14805 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the... Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health...

  10. Low Level RF System for Jefferson Lab Cryomodule Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski; Trent Allison; Jean Delayen; J. Hovater; Thomas Powers

    2003-05-01

    The Jefferson Lab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) has been upgraded to test and commission SNS and CEBAF Energy Upgrade cryomodules. Part of the upgrade was to modernize the superconducting cavity instrumentation and control. We have designed a VXI based RF control system exclusively for the production testing of superconducting cavities. The RF system can be configured to work either in Phase Locked Loop (PLL) or Self Excited Loop (SEL) mode. It can be used to drive either SNS 805 MHz or CEBAF Energy Upgrade 1497 MHz superconducting cavities and can be operated in pulsed or continuous wave (CW) mode. The base design consists of RF-analog and digital sections. The RF-analog section includes a Voltage Control Oscillator (VCO), phase detector, I&Q modulator and ''low phase shift'' limiter. The digital section controls the analog section and includes ADC, FPGA, and DAC . We will discuss the design of the RF system and how it relates to the support of cavity testing.

  11. A New RF System for the CEBAF Normal Conducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Hovater; Hai Dong; Alicia Hofler; George Lahti; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. CEBAF also has numerous normal conducting cavities for beam conditioning in the injector and for RF extraction to the experimental halls. The RF systems that presently control these cavities are becoming expensive to maintain, therefore a replacement RF control system is now being developed. For the new RF system, cavity field control is maintained digitally using an FPGA which contains the feedback algorithm. The system incorporates digital down conversion, using quadrature under-sampling at an IF frequency of 70 MHz. The VXI bus-crate was chosen as the operating platform because of its excellent RFI/EMI properties and its compatibility with the EPICS control system. The normal conducting cavities operate at both the 1497 MHz accelerating frequency and the sub-harmonic frequency of 499 MHz. To accommodate this, the ne w design will use different receiver-transmitter daughter cards for each frequency. This paper discusses the development of the new RF system and reports on initial results.

  12. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.

    1997-09-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning.

  13. RF hyperthermia using conductive nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gach, H. Michael; Balachandrasekaran, Arvind; Nair, Tejas

    2010-02-01

    Specific absorption rate (SAR) heating using radiofrequency (RF) waves is affected by the RF frequency and amplitude, and the conductivity of the tissue. Recently, conductive nanoparticles were demonstrated to induce hyperthermia in vitro and in vivo upon irradiation with an external 13.56 MHz RF field. The addition of conductive nanoparticles was assumed to increase the tissue conductivity and SAR. However, no quantitative studies have been performed that characterize the conductivities of biocompatible colloids or tissues containing nanoparticles, and relate the conductivity to SAR. The complex permittivities were measured for colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in normal saline with 0.32% w/v Pluronic F108 nonionic surfactant. The carbon concentrations of the colloids ranged from 0 to 88 mM. The permittivities were measured using a dielectric probe and RF network analyzer for RF frequencies from 200 MHz to 3 GHz. The nonionic surfactant was added to the colloids to minimize flocculation of the nanotubes during the RF heating experiments. The results were compared with prior measurements of colloids containing 0.02% Pluronic F108. The dielectric and conductivity of the 0.02% Pluronic colloids rose linearly with carbon concentration but the 0.32% Pluronic colloids varied from linearity. Based on the permittivity results, selected colloid samples were placed inside a Bruker 7T/20 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) system and irradiated at 300 MHz using a high duty cycle RF pulse sequence. The temperature changes were measured directly using fiber-optic thermometers and indirectly using MR thermometry and spectroscopy. Temperature changes were consistent with the colloid conductivities.

  14. Reducing bunch disruption in transition crossing by modification of the rf waveform

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.; Griffin, J.; Crawford, C.; Wildman, D.; Bhat, C.; Martens, M.

    1992-07-01

    We investigate the utility of accelerating during the nonadiabatic period surrounding the time of transition with an rf waveform modified by a second or third harmonic component to eliminate rf focusing. Simulation study shows this scheme not only to control momentum spread but also to have apparent advantage with respect to microwave instability. An experimental test has been initiated in the Fermilab Main Ring using a cavity at the third harmonic of the rf.

  15. Controllable Solid Propulsion Combustion and Acoustic Knowledge Base Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, Rachel; Fischbach, Sean; Fredrick, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Controllable solid propulsion systems have distinctive combustion and acoustic environments that require enhanced testing and analysis techniques to progress this new technology from development to production. In a hot gas valve actuating system, the movement of the pintle through the hot gas exhibits complex acoustic disturbances and flow characteristics that can amplify induced pressure loads that can damage or detonate the rocket motor. The geometry of a controllable solid propulsion gas chamber can set up unique unsteady flow which can feed acoustic oscillations patterns that require characterization. Research in this area aids in the understanding of how best to design, test, and analyze future controllable solid rocket motors using the lessons learned from past government programs as well as university research and testing. This survey paper will give the reader a better understanding of the potentially amplifying affects propagated by a controllable solid rocket motor system and the knowledge of the tools current available to address these acoustic disturbances in a preliminary design. Finally the paper will supply lessons learned from past experiences which will allow the reader to come away with understanding of what steps need to be taken when developing a controllable solid rocket propulsion system. The focus of this survey will be on testing and analysis work published by solid rocket programs and from combustion and acoustic books, conference papers, journal articles, and additionally from subject matter experts dealing currently with controllable solid rocket acoustic analysis.

  16. FUZZY LOGIC MOTOR CONTROL FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND IMPROVED ENERGY EFFICIENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an EPA program investigating fuzzy logic motor control for improved pollution prevention and energy efficiency. nitial computer simulation and laboratory results have demonstrated that fuzzy logic energy optimizers can consistently improve motor operational ef...

  17. RF Testing Of Microwave Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Ponchak, G. E.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    Fixtures and techniques are undergoing development. Four test fixtures and two advanced techniques developed in continuing efforts to improve RF characterization of MMIC's. Finline/waveguide test fixture developed to test submodules of 30-GHz monolithic receiver. Universal commercially-manufactured coaxial test fixture modified to enable characterization of various microwave solid-state devices in frequency range of 26.5 to 40 GHz. Probe/waveguide fixture is compact, simple, and designed for non destructive testing of large number of MMIC's. Nondestructive-testing fixture includes cosine-tapered ridge, to match impedance wavequide to microstrip. Advanced technique is microwave-wafer probing. Second advanced technique is electro-optical sampling.

  18. Modular open RF architecture: extending VICTORY to RF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melber, Adam; Dirner, Jason; Johnson, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency products spanning multiple functions have become increasingly critical to the warfighter. Military use of the electromagnetic spectrum now includes communications, electronic warfare (EW), intelligence, and mission command systems. Due to the urgent needs of counterinsurgency operations, various quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) have been fielded to enhance warfighter capability. Although these QRCs were highly successfully in their respective missions, they were designed independently resulting in significant challenges when integrated on a common platform. This paper discusses how the Modular Open RF Architecture (MORA) addresses these challenges by defining an open architecture for multifunction missions that decomposes monolithic radio systems into high-level components with welldefined functions and interfaces. The functional decomposition maximizes hardware sharing while minimizing added complexity and cost due to modularization. MORA achieves significant size, weight and power (SWaP) savings by allowing hardware such as power amplifiers and antennas to be shared across systems. By separating signal conditioning from the processing that implements the actual radio application, MORA exposes previously inaccessible architecture points, providing system integrators with the flexibility to insert third-party capabilities to address technical challenges and emerging requirements. MORA leverages the Vehicular Integration for Command, Control, Communication, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)/EW Interoperability (VICTORY) framework. This paper concludes by discussing how MORA, VICTORY and other standards such as OpenVPX are being leveraged by the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Communications Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC) to define a converged architecture enabling rapid technology insertion, interoperability and reduced SWaP.

  19. IMPROVED STREET SWEEPERS FOR CONTROLLING URBAN INHALABLE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental program to develop design modifications that can be used to improve the ability of municipal street sweepers to remove inhalable dust particles from streets. (Dust emissions from paved roads are a major source of urban inhalable particu...

  20. FAB (Functionally Alert Behavior Strategies) to Improve Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the FAB (Functionally Alert Behavior) Strategies approach to improve behavior in children and adolescents with complex behavioral challenges. FAB Strategies include evidence-based environmental adaptations, sensory modulation, positive behavioral support, and physical self-regulation strategies. FAB Strategies can be used by…

  1. Ion extraction from a saddle antenna RF surface plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Breitschopf, J.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm2 per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency and SPS reliability and availability. At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ˜1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ˜4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H- beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the AlN discharge chamber for a long time at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the small test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to 1.8 kW from the generator (˜1.2 kW in the plasma) with production up to Ic=7 mA. Long term operation was tested with 1.2 kW from the RF generator (˜0.8 kW in the plasma) with production of Ic=5 mA, Iex ˜15 mA (Uex=8 kV, Uc=14 kV).

  2. Ion extraction from a saddle antenna RF surface plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V. Johnson, R. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Breitschopf, J.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H{sup +} and H{sup −} ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm{sup 2} per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H{sup −} ion production efficiency and SPS reliability and availability. At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm{sup 2} per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H{sup −} beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the AlN discharge chamber for a long time at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the small test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to 1.8 kW from the generator (∼1.2 kW in the plasma) with production up to Ic=7 mA. Long term operation was tested with 1.2 kW from the RF generator (∼0.8 kW in the plasma) with production of Ic=5 mA, Iex ∼15 mA (Uex=8 kV, Uc=14 kV)

  3. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  4. Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors Improve Micturition Control in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Simonetto, Marialaura; Claus, Mirko; Ballabio, Maurizio; Caretta, Antonio; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Poor micturition control may cause profound distress, because proper voiding is mandatory for an active social life. Micturition results from the subtle interplay of central and peripheral components. It involves the coordination of autonomic and neuromuscular activity at the brainstem level, under the executive control of the prefrontal cortex. We tested the hypothesis that administration of molecules acting as reuptake inhibitors of serotonin, noradrenaline or both may exert a strong effect on the control of urine release, in a mouse model of overactive bladder. Mice were injected with cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg), to increase micturition acts. Mice were then given one of four molecules: the serotonin reuptake inhibitor imipramine, its metabolite desipramine that acts on noradrenaline reuptake, the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine or its active metabolite 4-hydroxy-duloxetine. Cyclophosphamide increased urine release without inducing overt toxicity or inflammation, except for increase in urothelium thickness. All the antidepressants were able to decrease the cyclophosphamide effects, as apparent from longer latency to the first micturition act, decreased number of urine spots and volume of released urine. These results suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors exert a strong and effective modulatory effect on the control of urine release and prompt to additional studies on their central effects on brain areas involved in the social and behavioral control of micturition. PMID:25812116

  5. Improving Control in a Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borders, James; Pearson, David; Prina, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    A report discusses a modified design of a Joule-Thomson (JT) refrigerator under development to be incorporated into scientific instrumentation aboard a spacecraft. In most other JT refrigerators (including common household refrigerators), the temperature of the evaporator (the cold stage) is kept within a desired narrow range by turning a compressor on and off as needed. This mode of control is inadequate for the present refrigerator because a JT-refrigerator compressor performs poorly when the flow from its evaporator varies substantially, and this refrigerator is required to maintain adequate cooling power. The proposed design modifications include changes in the arrangement of heat exchangers, addition of a clamp that would afford a controlled heat leak from a warmer to a cooler stage to smooth out temperature fluctuations in the cooler stage, and incorporation of a proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control system that would regulate the heat leak to maintain the temperature of the evaporator within a desired narrow range while keeping the amount of liquid in the evaporator within a very narrow range in order to optimize the performance of the compressor. Novelty lies in combining the temperature- and cooling-power-regulating controls into a single control system.

  6. Active Wake Redirection Control to Improve Energy Yield (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Fleming, P.; DeGeorge, E.; Bulder, B; White, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    Wake effects can dramatically reduce the efficiency of waked turbines relative to the unwaked turbines. Wakes can be deflected, or 'redirected,' by applying yaw misalignment to the turbines. Yaw misalignment causes part of the rotor thrust vector to be pointed in the cross-stream direction, deflecting the flow and the wake. Yaw misalignment reduces power production, but the global increase in wind plant power due to decreased wake effect creates a net increase in power production. It is also a fairly simple control idea to implement at existing or new wind plants. We performed high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics simulations of the wake flow of the proposed Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW) that predict that under certain waking conditions, wake redirection can increase plant efficiency by 10%. This means that by applying wake redirection control, for a given watersheet area, a wind plant can either produce more power, or the same amount of power can be produced with a smaller watersheet area. With the power increase may come increased loads, though, due to the yaw misalignment. If misalignment is applied properly, or if layered with individual blade pitch control, though, the load increase can be mitigated. In this talk we will discuss the concept of wake redirection through yaw misalignment and present our CFD results of the FACW project. We will also discuss the implications of wake redirection control on annual energy production, and finally we will discuss plans to implement wake redirection control at FACW when it is operational.

  7. Enhancing supply chain performance with improved order-control policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilakantan, K.

    2010-09-01

    This article takes up the study of the dynamics of a single product in a prototype three-stage supply chain system, at the downstream warehouse end of the chain, under a responsive chain strategy. The dynamics under various ordering policies and the parameters which will yield desired responses are systematically analysed, both for deterministic and stochastic systems. Higher-order control policies are then proposed and analysed. The considered key performance criteria are the permanent inventory deviations from the desired levels, or the offset, the maximum dip in inventory, the 'undershoot', the damping effect and decay rates, and the duration of time in the negative region, for deterministic systems; and additionally, the inventory variance for stochastic systems. It is shown that the disadvantages of the conventional (proportional-integral-derivative) control policies, like large negative deviations, low decay rates, and high inventory variance, can be overcome by the use of higher-order control policies proposed herein.

  8. Compact Microscope Imaging System With Intelligent Controls Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) with intelligent controls is a diagnostic microscope analysis tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. This compact miniature microscope, which can perform tasks usually reserved for conventional microscopes, has unique advantages in the fields of microscopy, biomedical research, inline process inspection, and space science. Its unique approach integrates a machine vision technique with an instrumentation and control technique that provides intelligence via the use of adaptive neural networks. The CMIS system was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center specifically for interface detection used for colloid hard spheres experiments; biological cell detection for patch clamping, cell movement, and tracking; and detection of anode and cathode defects for laboratory samples using microscope technology.

  9. Improved figure control with edge application of forces and moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspinwall, D. M.; Karr, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    A new actuation scheme for mirror figure control, introducing a complete set of membrane shear and bending stresses onto the edges of the mirror, is presented. Thermoelastic response of both segmented and continuous mirrors is analyzed from a closed form solution of the 'exact' Love theory of thin spherical shells. There are significant departures from Reissner's theory of shallow shells. Very low residual figure error is possible by edge control alone, lower than with interior point loads. Minimum rms residual error stress profiles are computed. Engineering applications are discussed.

  10. Quantum effects improve the energy efficiency of feedback control.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jordan M; Jacobs, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    The laws of thermodynamics apply equally well to quantum systems as to classical systems, and because of this, quantum effects do not change the fundamental thermodynamic efficiency of isothermal refrigerators or engines. We show that, despite this fact, quantum mechanics permits measurement-based feedback control protocols that are more thermodynamically efficient than their classical counterparts. As part of our analysis, we perform a detailed accounting of the thermodynamics of unitary feedback control and elucidate the sources of inefficiency in measurement-based and coherent feedback. PMID:24827219

  11. Compact superconducting rf-dipole cavity designs for deflecting and crabbing applications

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Subashini; Delayen, Jean R.; Castilla, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    Over the years the superconducting parallel-bar design has evolved into an rf-dipole cavity with improved properties. The new rf-dipole design is considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications. Some of those applications are the 499 MHz rf separator system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, the 400 MHz crabbing cavity system for the proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade, and the 750 MHz crabbing cavity for the medium energy electron-ion collider in Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the optimized rf design in terms of rf performance including rf properties, higher order modes (HOM) properties, multipacting and multipole expansion for the above mentioned applications.

  12. Design and test results of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.; Bradley, J. III; Cummings, K.; Lynch, M.; Regan, A.; Rohlev, T.; Roybal, W.; Wang, Y.M.

    1998-12-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The APT accelerator requires over 200 RF systems each with a continuous wave output power of 1 MW. The reliability and availability of these RF systems is critical to the successful operation of the APT plant and prototypes of these systems are being developed and demonstrated on LEDA. The RF system design for LEDA includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz continuous wave (CW), RF systems driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and one, 1.0 MW, CW, RF system driving a coupled-cavity drift tube linac (CCDTL). This paper presents the design and test results for these RF systems including the klystrons, cathode power supply, circulators, RF vacuum windows, accelerator field and resonance control system, and RF transmission components. The three RF systems driving the RFQ use the accelerating structure as a power combiner, and this places some unique requirements on the RF system. These requirements and corresponding operational implications will be discussed.

  13. Asthma and Adolescents: Review of Strategies to Improve Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy-Harstad, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    One of every 10 adolescents in the United States has asthma. Adolescents who lack asthma control are at increased risk for severe asthma episodes and death. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2007 asthma guidelines and research studies indicated that school nurses are instrumental in assisting adolescents to monitor their asthma, learn…

  14. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  15. Systematic control of nonmetallic materials for improved fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The elements of a systematic fire safety program are summarized and consist of fire safety criteria, design considerations, testing of materials, development of nonmetallic materials, nonmetallic materials information systems, design reviews, and change control. The system described in this report was developed for the Apollo spacecraft. The system can, however, be tailored to many industrial, commercial, and military activities.

  16. Can external quality control improve pig AI efficiency?

    PubMed

    Waberski, D; Petrunkina, A M; Töpfer-Petersen, E

    2008-11-01

    External quality control programmes carried out by central laboratories have been long established in human andrology with the aim of enhancing the accuracy and reproducibility of semen assessment. Compared to human, demands on boar semen assessment in AI stations are more complex, with the need both to identify boars with poor ejaculate quality and to monitor individual boar differences for semen storage. Additionally, appropriate assessment serves as a control instrument to ensure the security and efficiency of semen processing. Despite current limitations regarding the ability of sperm assays to estimate the potential fertility of males, it is evident that boar fertility is related to certain conventional semen tests, e.g. sperm morphology. In central studies carried out on stored semen from 11 AI stations, flow cytometric assessment of plasma and acrosome membrane integrity proved to be more sensitive in detecting sperm damage associated with ageing and temperature stress as compared to light microscopy. Membrane integrity of stored semen differed between AI stations indicating significant influences of semen processing on sperm quality. Thus external control of semen quality in reference laboratories may be useful to monitor the efficiency of internal semen quality control in individual AI stations, to identify males with lower semen quality and/or poor response to semen storage, and to verify the precision of sperm counting. The possibility that central laboratories with sufficient resources may be able to identify functionally different responding sperm subpopulations for better estimation of fertility is discussed. Ideally, external quality control schemes for AI stations would comprise application of validated tests with high relevance for fertility (including bacterial status), analysis of semen processing on the AI station, and training courses for laboratory personnel. PMID:18656253

  17. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R D effort here at SLAC.

  18. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R&D effort here at SLAC.

  19. Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Genfa; Phillips, Harry Lawrence

    2008-12-30

    A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

  20. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  1. Liquid Metal Droplet and Micro Corrugated Diaphragm RF-MEMS for reconfigurable RF filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, Wasim

    Widely Tunable RF Filters that are small, cost-effective and offer ultra low power consumption are extremely desirable. Indeed, such filters would allow drastic simplification of RF front-ends in countless applications from cell phones to satellites in space by replacing switched-array of static acoustic filters and YIG filters respectively. Switched array of acoustic filters are de facto means of channel selection in mobile applications such as cell phones. SAW and BAW filters satisfy most criteria needed by mobile applications such as low cost, size and power consumption. However, the trade-off is a significant loss of 3-4 dB in modern cell phone RF front-end. This leads to need for power-hungry amplifiers and short battery life. It is a necessary trade-off since there are no better alternatives. These devices are in mm scale and consume mW. YIG filters dominate applications where size or power is not a constraint but demand excellent RF performance like low loss and high tuning ratio. These devices are measured in inches and require several watts to operate. Clearly, a tunable RF filter technology that would combine the cost, size and power consumption benefits of acoustic filters with excellent RF performance of YIG filters would be extremely desirable and imminently useful. The objective of this dissertation is to develop such a technology based upon RF-MEMS Evanescent-mode cavity filter. Two highly novel RF-MEMS devices have been developed over the course of this PhD to address the unique MEMS needs of this technology. The first part of the dissertation is dedicated to introducing the fundamental concepts of tunable cavity resonators and filters. This includes the physics behind it, key performance metrics and what they depend on and requirements of the MEMS tuners. Initial gap control and MEMS attachment method are identified as potential hurdles towards achieving very high RF performance. Simple and elegant solutions to both these issues are discussed in

  2. Design of a 0.18 μm CMOS multi-band compatible low power GNSS receiver RF frontend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Li; Yiqi, Zhuang; Qiang, Long; Zhao, Jin; Zhenrong, Li; Gang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a fully integrated multi-band RF receiver frontend for GNSS applications on L-band. A single RF signal channel with a low-IF architecture is adopted for multi-band operation on the RF section, which mainly consists of a low noise amplifier (LNA), a down-converter, polyphase filters and summing circuits. An improved cascode source degenerated LNA with a multi-band shared off-chip matching network and band switches is implemented in the first amplifying stage. Also, a re-designed wideband double balance mixer is implemented in the down conversion stage, which provides better gain, noise figure and linearity performances. Using a TSMC 0.18 μm 1P4M RF CMOS process, a compact 1.27 GHz/1.575 GHz dual-band GNSS frontend is realized in the proposed low-IF topology. The measurements exhibit the gains of 45 dB and 43 dB, and noise figures are controlled at 3.35 dB and 3.9 dB of the two frequency bands, respectively. The frontend model consumes about 11.8-13.5 mA current on a 1.8 V power supply. The core occupies 1.91 × 0.53 mm2 while the total die area with ESD is 2.45 × 2.36 mm2.

  3. Single-chip fully integrated direct-modulation CMOS RF transmitters for short-range wireless applications.

    PubMed

    El-Desouki, Munir M; Qasim, Syed Manzoor; BenSaleh, Mohammed; Deen, M Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-low power radio frequency (RF) transceivers used in short-range application such as wireless sensor networks (WSNs) require efficient, reliable and fully integrated transmitter architectures with minimal building blocks. This paper presents the design, implementation and performance evaluation of single-chip, fully integrated 2.4 GHz and 433 MHz RF transmitters using direct-modulation power voltage-controlled oscillators (PVCOs) in addition to a 2.0 GHz phase-locked loop (PLL) based transmitter. All three RF transmitters have been fabricated in a standard mixed-signal CMOS 0.18 µm technology. Measurement results of the 2.4 GHz transmitter show an improvement in drain efficiency from 27% to 36%. The 2.4 GHz and 433 MHz transmitters deliver an output power of 8 dBm with a phase noise of -122 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, while drawing 15.4 mA of current and an output power of 6.5 dBm with a phase noise of -120 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, while drawing 20.8 mA of current from 1.5 V power supplies, respectively. The PLL transmitter delivers an output power of 9 mW with a locking range of 128 MHz and consumes 26 mA from 1.8 V power supply. The experimental results demonstrate that the RF transmitters can be efficiently used in low power WSN applications. PMID:23917260

  4. Systematic uncertainties in RF-based measurement of superconducting cavity quality factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbauer, J. P.; Pischalnikov, Yu.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Schappert, W.; Smith, S.

    2016-09-01

    Q0 determinations based on RF power measurements are subject to at least three potentially large systematic effects that have not been previously appreciated. Instrumental factors that can systematically bias RF based measurements of Q0 are quantified and steps that can be taken to improve the determination of Q0 are discussed.

  5. Systematic uncertainties in RF-based measurement of superconducting cavity quality factors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holzbauer, J. P.; Pischalnikov, Yu.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Schappert, W.; Smith, S.

    2016-05-10

    Q0 determinations based on RF power measurements are subject to at least three potentially large systematic effects that have not been previously appreciated. Here, instrumental factors that can systematically bias RF based measurements of Q0 are quantified and steps that can be taken to improve the determination of Q0 are discussed.

  6. Improved Intrapulse Raman Scattering Control via Asymmetric Airy Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Wabnitz, Stefan; Kashyap, Raman; Chen, Zhigang; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility of tuning the frequency of a laser pulse via the use of an Airy pulse-seeded soliton self-frequency shift. The intrinsically asymmetric nature of Airy pulses, typically featured by either leading or trailing oscillatory tails (relatively to the main lobe), is revealed through the nonlinear generation of both a primary and a secondary Raman soliton self-frequency shift, a phenomenon which is driven by the soliton fission processes. The resulting frequency shift can be carefully controlled by using time-reversed Airy pulses or, alternatively, by applying an offset to the cubic phase modulation used to generate the pulses. When compared with the use of conventional chirped Gaussian pulses, our technique brings about unique advantages in terms of both efficient frequency tuning and feasibility, along with the generation and control of multicolor Raman solitons with enhanced tunability. Our theoretical analysis agrees well with our experimental observations.

  7. Improving stability margins in discrete-time LQG controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oranc, B. Tarik; Phillips, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Some of the problems are discussed which are encountered in the design of discrete-time stochastic controllers for problems that may adequately be described by the Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) assumptions; namely, the problems of obtaining acceptable relative stability, robustness, and disturbance rejection properties. A dynamic compensator is proposed to replace the optimal full state feedback regulator gains at steady state, provided that all states are measurable. The compensator increases the stability margins at the plant input, which may possibly be inadequate in practical applications. Though the optimal regulator has desirable properties the observer based controller as implemented with a Kalman filter, in a noisy environment, has inadequate stability margins. The proposed compensator is designed to match the return difference matrix at the plant input to that of the optimal regulator while maintaining the optimality of the state estimates as directed by the measurement noise characteristics.

  8. Controlled environment vitrification system: an improved sample preparation technique.

    PubMed

    Bellare, J R; Davis, H T; Scriven, L E; Talmon, Y

    1988-09-01

    The controlled environment vitrification system (CEVS) permits cryofixation of hydrated biological and colloidal dispersions and aggregates from a temperature- and saturation-controlled environment. Otherwise, specimens prepared in an uncontrolled laboratory atmosphere are subject to evaporation and heat transfer, which may introduce artifacts caused by concentration, pH, ionic strength, and temperature changes. Moreover, it is difficult to fix and examine the microstructure of systems at temperatures other than ambient (e.g., biological systems at in vivo conditions and colloidal systems above room temperature). A system has been developed that ensures that a liquid or partially liquid specimen is maintained in its original state while it is being prepared before vitrification and, once prepared, is vitrified with little alteration of its microstructure. A controlled environment is provided within a chamber where temperature and chemical activity of volatile components can be controlled while the specimen is being prepared. The specimen grid is mounted on a plunger, and a synchronous shutter is opened almost simultaneously with the release of the plunger, so that the specimen is propelled abruptly through the shutter opening into a cryogenic bath. We describe the system and its use and illustrate the value of the technique with TEM micrographs of surfactant microstructures in which specimen preparation artifacts were avoided. We also discuss applications to other instruments like SEM, to other techniques like freeze-fracture, and to novel "on the grid" experiments that make it possible to freeze successive instants of dynamic processes such as membrane fusion, chemical reactions, and phase transitions. PMID:3193246

  9. Automated Boiler Combustion Controls for Emission Reduction and Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-02

    In the late 1980s, then President Bush visited Krakow, Poland. The terrible air quality theremotivated him to initiate a USAID-funded program, managed by DOE, entitled �Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program.� The primary objective of this program was to encourage the formation of commercial ventures between U.S. and Polish firms to provide equipment and/or services to reduce pollution from low-emission sources in Krakow, Poland. This program led to the award of a number of cooperative agreements, including one to Control Techtronics International. The technical objective of CTI�s cooperative agreement is to apply combustion controls to existing boiler plants in Krakow and transfer knowledge and technology through a joint U.S. and Polish commercial venture. CTI installed automatic combustion controls on five coal boilers for the district heating system in Krakow. Three of these were for domestic hot-water boilers, and two were for steam for industrial boilers. The following results have occurred due to the addition of CTI�s combustion controls on these five existing boilers: ! 25% energy savings ! 85% reduction in particulate emissions The joint venture company CTI-Polska was then established. Eleven additional technical and costing proposals were initiated to upgrade other coal boilers in Krakow. To date, no co-financing has been made available on the Polish side. CTI-Polska continues in operation, serving customers in Russia and Ukraine. Should the market in Poland materialize, the joint venture company is established there to provide equipment and service.

  10. Improving overlay control through proper use of multilevel query APC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Timothy H.; Carlson, Alan; Crow, David A.

    2003-06-01

    Many state-of-the-art fabs are operating with increasingly diversified product mixes. For example, at Cypress Semiconductor, it is not unusual to be concurrently running multiple technologies and many devices within each technology. This diverse product mix significantly increases the difficulty of manually controlling overlay process corrections. As a result, automated run-to-run feedforward-feedback control has become a necessary and vital component of manufacturing. However, traditional run-to-run controllers rely on highly correlated historical events to forecast process corrections. For example, the historical process events typically are constrained to match the current event for exposure tool, device, process level and reticle ID. This narrowly defined process stream can result in insufficient data when applied to lowvolume or new-release devices. The run-to-run controller implemented at Cypress utilizes a multi-level query (Level-N) correlation algorithm, where each subsequent level widens the search criteria for available historical data. The paper discusses how best to widen the search criteria and how to determine and apply a known bias to account for tool-to-tool and device-to-device differences. Specific applications include offloading lots from one tool to another when the first tool is down for preventive maintenance, utilizing related devices to determine a default feedback vector for new-release devices, and applying bias values to account for known reticle-to-reticle differences. In this study, we will show how historical data can be leveraged from related devices or tools to overcome the limitations of narrow process streams. In particular, this paper discusses how effectively handling narrow process streams allows Cypress to offload lots from a baseline tool to an alternate tool.

  11. Scrubber and remote control system improves productivity and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Kost, J.

    1984-07-01

    The paper describes the development of a scrubber and remote control system for a continuous miner. Test results using the system and a greater depth of cut showed that productivity was increased without any sacrifice to health and safety. Approval has been obtained from MSHA for operation under a ventilation plan which allows a 40 aft cut and a face-to-brattice distance of 40 ft when the scrubber is in operation.

  12. Moderate variability in stimulus presentation improves motor response control.

    PubMed

    Wodka, Ericka L; Simmonds, Daniel J; Mahone, E Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2009-05-01

    To examine the impact of interstimulus "jitter" (i.e., randomization of the interval between successive stimulus events) on response control during continuous task performance, 41 healthy adults completed four go/no-go tasks that were identical except for interstimulus interval (ISI) jitter: a 0% jitter task with a fixed (1,000-ms) ISI, a 10% jitter task with an ISI range of 900-1,100 ms, a 30% jitter task with an ISI range of 700-1,300 ms, and a 50% jitter task with an ISI range of 500-1,500 ms. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a quadratic effect of jitter on commissions across the group and on intrasubject reaction time variability in men; in both cases, performance was best for the 10% jitter condition. A linear effect of jitter was observed for reaction time (RT) with high levels of jitter (50%) resulting in longer RT. Findings suggest that response selection, including inhibition, is optimized by moderate increases in ISI jitter. More deliberate and controlled responding observed with increasing jitter may have important treatment implications for disorders (e.g., attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ADHD), associated with impaired response control. PMID:18686112

  13. A Practical Approach to Improving Pain Control in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Malcolm L.; Barnett, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    Despite a wealth of recent articles, many patients with cancer pain continue to suffer needlessly. The satisfactory treatment of cancer pain requires a variety of practical management strategies. Practicing physicians need a wider understanding of both the basic principles of analgesic therapy and the pharmacologic features of analgesics. Certain analgesics are best not used in cancer care. The use of pharmacologic adjuncts may lessen overall narcotic requirements and side effects. The appropriate use of alternative therapies can dramatically improve the quality of patients' overall survival. PMID:2884781

  14. Design, construction and operational results of the IGBT controlled solid state modulator high voltage power supply used in the high power RF systems of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator of the accelerator production of tritium (APT) project

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.T. III; Rees, D.; Przeklasa, R.S.; Scott, M.C.

    1998-12-31

    The 1700 MeV, 100 mA Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Proton Linac will require 244 1 MW, continuous wave RF systems. 1 MW continuous wave klystrons are used as the RF source and each klystron requires 95 kV, 17 A of beam voltage and current. The cost of the DC power supplies is the single largest percentage of the total RF system cost. Power supply reliability is crucial to overall RF system availability and AC to DC conversion efficiency affects the operating cost. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will serve as the prototype and test bed for APT. The design of the RF systems used in LEDA is driven by the need to field test high efficiency systems with extremely high reliability before APT is built. The authors present a detailed description and test results of one type of advanced high voltage power supply system using Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) that has been used with the LEDA High Power RF systems. The authors also present some of the distinctive features offered by this power supply topology, including crowbarless tube protection and modular construction which allows graceful degradation of power supply operation.

  15. Stochastic excitation and Hadamard correlation spectroscopy with bandwidth extension in RF FT-EPR

    PubMed Central

    Pursley, Randall H.; Kakareka, John; Salem, Ghadi; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Tschudin, Rolf G.; Krishna, Murali C.; Pohida, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The application of correlation spectroscopy employing stochastic excitation and the Hadamard transform to time-domain Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance (FT-EPR) spectroscopy in the radiofrequency (RF) band is described. An existing, time-domain FT-EPR spectrometer system with a Larmor frequency (Lf) of 300 MHz was used to develop this technique by incorporating a pseudo-random pulse sequence generator to output the maximum length binary sequence (MLBS, 10- and 11-bit). Software developed to control the EPR system setup, acquire the signals, and post process the data, is outlined. The software incorporates the Hadamard transform algorithm to perform the required cross-correlation of the acquired signal and the MLBS after stochastic excitation. To accommodate the EPR signals, bandwidth extension was accomplished by sampling at a rate many times faster than the RF pulse repetition rate, and subsequent digital signal processing of the data. The results of these experiments showed that there was a decrease in the total acquisition time, and an improved free induction decay (FID) signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio compared to the conventional coherent averaging approach. These techniques have the potential to reduce the RF pulse power to the levels used in continuous wave (CW) EPR while retaining the advantage of time-domain EPR methods. These methods have the potential to facilitate the progression to in vivo FT-EPR imaging of larger volumes. PMID:12762981

  16. Does Reducing Physician Uncertainty Improve Hypertension Control? Rationale and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pavlik, Valory N.; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Pool, James; Haidet, Paul; Hyman, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hypertension affects nearly one-third of the U.S. population overall, and the prevalence rises sharply with age. In spite of public educational campaigns and professional education programs to encourage blood pressure measurement and control of both systolic and diastolic control to < 140/90 mmHg (or 130/80 mmHg if diabetic), 43% of treated hypertensives do not achieve the recommended JNC VII target. Among African-Americans, 48% are uncontrolled on treatment. The majority of persons classified as poorly controlled hypertensives have mild systolic blood pressure elevation (in the range of 140–160 mmHg). We hypothesized that physician uncertainty regarding the patient’s usual blood pressure, as well as uncertainty regarding the extent of medication non-adherence represent an important barrier to further reductions in the proportion of uncontrolled hypertensives in the U.S. Methods Using cluster randomization, ten primary care clinics (six from a public health care system and four from a private clinic system) were randomized to either the uncertainty reduction intervention condition or to usual care. An average of 68 patients per clinic were recruited to serve as units of observation. Physicians in the five intervention clinics were provided with a specially designed study form that included a graph of recent blood pressure measurements in their study patients, a check box to indicate their assessment of the adequacy of the patient’s blood pressure control, and a menu of services they could order to aid in patient management. These menu options included: 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM); electronic bottle cap assessment of medication adherence, followed by medication adherence counseling in patients found to be non-adherent; and lifestyle assessment and counseling followed by 24-hour ABPM. Physicians in the five usual practice clinics did not have access to these services, but were informed of which patients had been enrolled in

  17. (abstract) Mission Operations and Control Assurance: Flight Operations Quality Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Linda L.; Bruno, Kristin J.; Kazz, Sheri L.; Witkowski, Mona M.

    1993-01-01

    Mission Operations and Command Assurance (MO&CA), a recent addition to flight operations teams at JPL. provides a system level function to instill quality in mission operations. MO&CA's primary goal at JPL is to help improve the operational reliability for projects during flight. MO&CA tasks include early detection and correction of process design and procedural deficiencies within projects. Early detection and correction are essential during development of operational procedures and training of operational teams. MO&CA's effort focuses directly on reducing the probability of radiating incorrect commands to a spacecraft. Over the last seven years at JPL, MO&CA has become a valuable asset to JPL flight projects. JPL flight projects have benefited significantly from MO&CA's efforts to contain risk and prevent rather than rework errors. MO&CA's ability to provide direct transfer of knowledge allows new projects to benefit directly from previous and ongoing experience. Since MO&CA, like Total Quality Management (TQM), focuses on continuous improvement of processes and elimination of rework, we recommend that this effort be continued on NASA flight projects.

  18. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  19. Scrubber and remote control system improves productivity and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Kust, J.

    1984-07-01

    The test program conducted at NREC No. 1 Mine clearly indicated that methane levels did not increase with greater depths of cut (up to 40 ft) and corresponding increases in the face-to-brattice distance and methane and respirable dust levels remained well within acceptable levels. By using the scrubber, remote control, and greater depth of cut, productivity is increased without any sacrifice to miner health and safety. Based on the test results, NREC recently received approval from MSHA to operate under a ventilation plan which allows a 40-ft cut and face-to-brattice distance of 40 ft when the scrubber is in operation.

  20. RF Reference Switch for Spaceflight Radiometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuble, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this technology is to provide improved calibration and measurement sensitivity to the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) radiometer. While RF switches have been used in the past to calibrate microwave radiometers, the switch used on SMAP employs several techniques uniquely tailored to the instrument requirements and passive remote-sensing in general to improve radiometer performance. Measurement error and sensitivity are improved by employing techniques to reduce thermal gradients within the device, reduce insertion loss during antenna observations, increase insertion loss temporal stability, and increase rejection of radar and RFI (radio-frequency interference) signals during calibration. The two legs of the single-pole double-throw reference switch employ three PIN diodes per leg in a parallel-shunt configuration to minimize insertion loss and increase stability while exceeding rejection requirements at 1,413 MHz. The high-speed packaged diodes are selected to minimize junction capacitance and resistance while ensuring the parallel devices have very similar I-V curves. Switch rejection is improved by adding high-impedance quarter-wave tapers before and after the diodes, along with replacing the ground via of one diode per leg with an open circuit stub. Errors due to thermal gradients in the switch are reduced by embedding the 50-ohm reference load within the switch, along with using a 0.25-in. (approximately equal to 0.6-cm) aluminum prebacked substrate. Previous spaceflight microwave radiometers did not embed the reference load and thermocouple directly within the calibration switch. In doing so, the SMAP switch reduces error caused by thermal gradients between the load and switch. Thermal issues are further reduced by moving the custom, highspeed regulated driver circuit to a physically separate PWB (printed wiring board). Regarding RF performance, previous spaceflight reference switches have not employed high-impedance tapers to improve

  1. Improved UHMWPE through the control of sterilization dose and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. V.; Schmidt, M. B.; Greer, K. W.; Shah, C.

    1998-06-01

    In this study, the effects of sterilization dose and atmosphere on UHMWPE wear properties and crosslinking were examined. The relationship between crosslinking and adhesive / abrasive wear mechanisms of acetabular cups was investigated. The use of a vacuum sterilization atmosphere resulted in improvements in the wear resistance of UHMWPE for the adhesive/abrasive wear mechanisms for the doses examined in this study. The two measures of crosslinking, swelling ratio and gel fraction, values can be used to predict hip simulator wear rates over the sterilization dose range of 0 to 50 kGy for the vacuum atmosphere samples. Of the two measures, the swelling ratio is a more sensitive measure of the extent of crosslinking, particularly for highly crosslinked materials and therefore a more sensitive predictor of adhesive/abrasive wear rates.

  2. Improvement of sweep efficiency and mobility control in gas flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Strycker, A.; Llave, F.M.

    1991-04-01

    The application of carbon dioxide or other gases to extract crude oil from depleted reservoirs has been shown to be a technically successful process. However, optimized recoveries are often compromised by poor sweep efficiencies because of low gas viscosities and densities. A new process was investigated that potentially could improve sweep efficiencies by enhancing extractability properties of the injected gas with entrainers. Use of a capillary viscometer to evaluate enhanced viscosities appeared to be the best procedure for evaluating candidate compounds. A mathematical treatment was proposed based on predicting entrainer solubilities and minimum miscibility pressure alterations for carbon dioxide. However, use of many assumptions and approximations limited the effectiveness of this approach to qualitative evaluations. Some 87 compounds were evaluated using this mathematical treatment, and certain monoaromatic compounds were identified for further laboratory testing. 33 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. CSMA Versus Prioritized CSMA for Air-Traffic-Control Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2001-01-01

    OPNET version 7.0 simulations are presented involving an important application of the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN), Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) over the Very High Frequency Data Link, Mode 2 (VDL-2). Communication is modeled for essentially all incoming and outgoing nonstop air-traffic for just three United States cities: Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Detroit. There are 32 airports in the simulation, 29 of which are either sources or destinations for the air-traffic of the aforementioned three airports. The simulation involves 111 Air Traffic Control (ATC) ground stations, and 1,235 equally equipped aircraft-taking off, flying realistic free-flight trajectories, and landing in a 24-hr period. Collisionless, Prioritized Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) is successfully tested and compared with the traditional CSMA typically associated with VDL-2. The performance measures include latency, throughput, and packet loss. As expected, Prioritized CSMA is much quicker and more efficient than traditional CSMA. These simulation results show the potency of Prioritized CSMA for implementing low latency, high throughput, and efficient connectivity.

  4. Using Decision Analysis to Improve Malaria Control Policy Making

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Randall; Dickinson, Katherine L.; Anderson, Richard M.; Fowler, Vance G.; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Mutero, Clifford M.; Saterson, Kathryn A.; Wiener, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria and other vector-borne diseases represent a significant and growing burden in many tropical countries. Successfully addressing these threats will require policies that expand access to and use of existing control methods, such as insecticide-treated bed nets and artemesinin combination therapies for malaria, while weighing the costs and benefits of alternative approaches over time. This paper argues that decision analysis provides a valuable framework for formulating such policies and combating the emergence and re-emergence of malaria and other diseases. We outline five challenges that policy makers and practitioners face in the struggle against malaria, and demonstrate how decision analysis can help to address and overcome these challenges. A prototype decision analysis framework for malaria control in Tanzania is presented, highlighting the key components that a decision support tool should include. Developing and applying such a framework can promote stronger and more effective linkages between research and policy, ultimately helping to reduce the burden of malaria and other vector-borne diseases. PMID:19356821

  5. RF noise suppression using the photodielectric effect in semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.

    1969-01-01

    Technique using photodielectric effect of semiconductor in high-Q superconductive cavity gives initial improvement of 2-4 db in signal-to-noise enhancement of conventional RF communication systems. Wide band signal plus noise can be transmitted through a narrow-band cavity due to parametric perturbation of the cavity frequency or phase.

  6. A study on high isolation RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lingling; Hu, Guoqing; Lin, Zonghua; Liu, Wenyan

    2006-01-01

    A new type of high isolation RF MEMS switch is studied in this paper. The structure of cantilever beam with electrodes Sandwiched between Si and SiO2 layers has been evaluated. The top and bottom dielectric materials separate two conducting electrodes when actuated. Therefore the reliability has been improved greatly. The curves of the cantilever beam and the voltage have been simulated.

  7. Automatic calorimetry system monitors RF power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harness, B. W.; Heiberger, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Calorimetry system monitors the average power dissipated in a high power RF transmitter. Sensors measure the change in temperature and the flow rate of the coolant, while a multiplier computes the power dissipated in the RF load.

  8. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

  9. Breakdown-Resistant RF Connectors for Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caro, Edward R.; Bonazza, Walter J.

    1987-01-01

    Resilient inserts compensate for insulation shrinkage. Coaxial-cable connector for radio-frequency (RF) energy resists electrical breakdown in vacuum. Used on RF equipment in vacuum chambers as well as in spaceborne radar and communication gear.

  10. Spacecraft control section for the improved Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    The upgraded spacecraft control section for the Small Astronomy Satellite is able to point its thrust axis to any direction in space; it can also spin or slow its outer body rotation to zero for star-locked pointing of side viewing experiments. A programmable telemetry system and delayed command system enhance the inherent capability of a spacecraft designed to be used for a variety of experiments, each of which can be built independently and attached just prior to final acceptance testing and launch. The design of this new spacecraft, whose first launch is scheduled for 1975, is provided in sufficient detail to permit the reader to ascertain its suitability for specific experiments. A summary of the spacecraft characteristics, project reliability requirements, and environmental test conditions are included in the appendices.

  11. Improved current control makes inverters the power sources of choice

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, H.; Harada, S.; Ueyama, T.

    1997-02-01

    It is now generally understood that by increasing the operating or switching frequency of a power source the size of the main transformer and main reactor can be shrunk. Thus, a 300-A DC welding power source weighing well under 100 lb can be produced. This makes the inverter power source an ideal choice for applications requiring equipment maneuverability. It is also generally understood that due to higher switching frequencies, a smoother output is obtained from inverter power sources. In the late 1980s, the company developed a new double-inverter power source by which inverted DC weld output is inverted back to AC weld output. This product was the first of its kind in the world. Again, the small compact size of this product was of great interest. Utilizing current waveform control, it was realized that fast response switching from electrode negative to electrode positive could be accurately controlled, offering benefits such as AC GTA welding with high-frequency start only, even at a low welding current. The primary benefit is the ability to limit the electrode positive half cycle to less than 5%. The electrode positive half cycle is responsible for tungsten erosion, which also creates the balling effect of a tungsten electrode. By limiting the electrode positive portion of the AC cycle to a very low level, a rather sharp point can be maintained on the tungsten, which creates a very concentrated, focused arc column. This ability provides excellent joint penetration in fillet welding of aluminum alloys, especially on thick plate. It also reduces the heat-affected zone in AC GTA welding of aluminum.

  12. CONVERGING REDUNDANT SENSOR NETWORK INFORMATION FOR IMPROVED BUILDING CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

    2004-11-01

    Knowing how many people occupy a building, and where they are located, is a key component of building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, however, current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of both energy management and security systems. This topical report describes results from the first phase of a project to design, implement, validate, and prototype new technologies to monitor occupancy, control indoor environment services, and promote security in buildings. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In this project phase a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Analysis tools based on Bayesian probability theory were applied to the occupancy data generated by the sensor network. The inference of primary importance is a probability distribution over the number of occupants and their locations in a building, given past and present sensor measurements. Inferences were computed for occupancy and its temporal persistence in individual offices as well as the persistence of sensor status. The raw sensor data were also used to calibrate the sensor belief network, including the occupancy transition matrix used in the Markov model, sensor sensitivity, and sensor failure models. This study shows that the belief network framework can be applied to the analysis of data streams from sensor networks, offering significant benefits to building operation compared to current practice.

  13. An analog RF gap voltage regulation system for the Advanced Photon Source storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.

    1999-04-13

    An analog rf gap voltage regulation system has been designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory to maintain constant total storage ring rf gap voltage, independent of beam loading and cavity tuning effects. The design uses feedback control of the klystron mod-anode voltage to vary the amount of rf power fed to the storage ring cavities. The system consists of two independent feedback loops, each regulating the combined rf gap voltages of eight storage ring cavities by varying the output power of either one or two rf stations, depending on the mode of operation. It provides full operator control and permissive logic to permit feedback control of the rf system output power only if proper conditions are met. The feedback system uses envelope-detected cavity field probe outputs as the feedback signal. Two different methods of combining the individual field probe signals were used to generate a relative DC level representing one-half of the total storage ring rf voltage, an envelope-detected vector sum of the field probe rf signals, and the DC sum of individual field probe envelope detector outputs. The merits of both methods are discussed. The klystron high-voltage power supply (HVPS) units are fitted with an analog interface for external control of the mod-anode voltage level, using a four-quadrant analog multiplier to modulate the HVPS mod-anode voltage regulator set-point in response to feedback system commands.

  14. High-Power Rf Load

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Vlieks, Arnold E.

    1998-09-01

    A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

  15. Cathodic arc grown niobium films for RF superconducting cavity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Lorkiewicz, J.; Tazzari, S.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Sadowski, M.; Andreone, A.; Cifariello, G.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Russo, R.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental results on the characterization of the linear and non-linear microwave properties of niobium film produced by UHV cathodic arc deposition are presented. Surface impedance Zs as a function of RF field and intermodulation distortion (IMD) measurement have been carried out by using a dielectrically loaded resonant cavity operating at 7 GHz. The experimental data show that these samples have a lower level of intrinsic non-linearities at low temperature and low circulating power in comparison with Nb samples grown by sputtering. These results make UHV cathodic arc deposition a promising technique for the improvement of RF superconducting cavities for particle accelerators.

  16. Coating power RF components with TiN

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Hahn, E.

    1995-03-01

    A facility for coating RF power components with thin films of Ti and/or TiN has been in operation for some time at Fermilab supporting the Accelerator Division RF development work and the TESLA program. It has been experimentally verified that such coatings improve the performance of these components as far as withstanding higher electric fields. This is attributed to a reduction in the secondary electron emission coefficient of the surfaces when coated with a thin film containing titanium. The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to describe the facility and the procedure used.

  17. Depth Sensing for Improved Control of Lower Limb Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Nili Eliana; Lenzi, Tommaso; Hargrove, Levi J

    2015-11-01

    Powered lower limb prostheses have potential to improve the quality of life of individuals with amputations by enabling all daily activities. However, seamless ambulation mode recognition is necessary to achieve this goal and is not yet a clinical reality. Current intent recognition systems use mechanical and EMG sensors to estimate prosthesis and user status. We propose to complement these systems by integrating information about the environment obtained through the depth sensing. This paper presents the design, characterization, and the early validation of a novel stair segmentation system based on Microsoft Kinect. Static and dynamic tests were performed. A first experiment showed how the resolution of the depth camera affects the speed and the accuracy of segmentation. A second test proved the robustness of the algorithm to different staircases. Finally, we performed an online walking test with the stair segmentation and related measures recorded online at >5 frames/s. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm allows for an accurate estimate of distance, angle of intersection, number of steps, stair height, and stair depth for a set of stairs in the environment. The online test produced an estimate of whether the individual was approaching stairs in real time with approximately 98.8% accuracy. PMID:26111386

  18. Biological control of vaginosis to improve reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Mastromarino, P.; Hemalatha, R.; Barbonetti, A.; Cinque, B.; Cifone, M.G.; Tammaro, F.; Francavilla, F.

    2014-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiota plays an important role in the maintenance of a woman's health, as well as of her partner's and newborns’. When this predominantly Lactobacillus community is disrupted, decreased in abundance and replaced by different anaerobes, bacterial vaginosis (BV) may occur. BV is associated with ascending infections and obstetrical complications, such as chorioamnionitis and preterm delivery, as well as with urinary tract infections and sexually transmitted infections. In BV the overgrowth of anaerobes produces noxious substances like polyamines and other compounds that trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β and IL-8. BV can profoundly affect, with different mechanisms, all the phases of a woman's life in relation to reproduction, before pregnancy, during fertilization, through and at the end of pregnancy. BV can directly affect fertility, since an ascending dissemination of the involved species may lead to tubal factor infertility. Moreover, the increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases contributes to damage to reproductive health. Exogenous strains of lactobacilli have been suggested as a means of re-establishing a normal healthy vaginal flora. Carefully selected probiotic strains can eliminate BV and also exert an antiviral effect, thus reducing viral load and preventing foetal and neonatal infection. The administration of beneficial microorganisms (probiotics) can aid recovery from infection and restore and maintain a healthy vaginal ecosystem, thus improving female health also in relation to reproductive health. PMID:25673551

  19. Look at European RF industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Roussy, G; Willmann, B

    2001-01-01

    The authors review the European RF industrial applications. European RF technology produced the 50omega-technology, which has been the basis for many successful applications in classical industrial domains such as food tempering and defrosting, rubber curing but also in new domains such as RF for curing of many car products. These new applications make clear the fundamental advantage of fast processing with RF technology. PMID:15038560

  20. The Electrical Asymmetry Effect - A novel and simple method for separate control of ion energy and flux in capacitively coupled RF discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, U.; Heil, B. G.; Schulze, J.; Donkó, Z.; Mussenbrock, T.; Brinkmann, R. P.

    2009-04-01

    If a temporally symmetric voltage waveform is applied to a capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharge, that contains one or more even harmonics of the fundamental frequency, the sheaths in front of the two electrodes will necessarily be asymmetric even in a geometrically symmetric discharge. Optimally this is achieved with a dual-frequency discharge driven at a phase locked fundamental frequency and its second harmonic, e.g. 13.56 MHz and 27.12 MHz. An analytical model, a hybrid fluid/Monte-Carlo kinetic model as well as a Particle in Cell (PIC) simulation show that this Electrical Asymmetry Effect (EAE) leads to the generation of a DC self bias as a function of the phase between the applied voltage harmonics in geometrically symmetric as well as asymmetric discharges. The DC self bias depends almost linearly on the phase angle and the role of the electrodes (powered and grounded) can be reversed. At low pressures the EAE is self-amplifying due to the conservation of ion flux in the sheaths. By tuning the phase, precise and convenient control of the ion energy at the electrodes can be achieved, while the ion flux remains constant. The maximum ion energy can typically be changed by a factor of about three at both electrodes. At the same time the ion flux is constant within ±5%.

  1. Dynamic Event Tree advancements and control logic improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Sen, Ramazan Sonat; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    The RAVEN code has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory since 2012. Its main goal is to create a multi-purpose platform for the deploying of all the capabilities needed for Probabilistic Risk Assessment, uncertainty quantification, data mining analysis and optimization studies. RAVEN is currently equipped with three different sampling categories: Forward samplers (Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Stratified, Grid Sampler, Factorials, etc.), Adaptive Samplers (Limit Surface search, Adaptive Polynomial Chaos, etc.) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) samplers (Deterministic and Adaptive Dynamic Event Trees). The main subject of this document is to report the activities that have been done in order to: start the migration of the RAVEN/RELAP-7 control logic system into MOOSE, and develop advanced dynamic sampling capabilities based on the Dynamic Event Tree approach. In order to provide to all MOOSE-based applications a control logic capability, in this Fiscal Year an initial migration activity has been initiated, moving the control logic system, designed for RELAP-7 by the RAVEN team, into the MOOSE framework. In this document, a brief explanation of what has been done is going to be reported. The second and most important subject of this report is about the development of a Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampler named “Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (HDET) and its Adaptive variant “Adaptive Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (AHDET). As other authors have already reported, among the different types of uncertainties, it is possible to discern two principle types: aleatory and epistemic uncertainties. The classical Dynamic Event Tree is in charge of treating the first class (aleatory) uncertainties; the dependence of the probabilistic risk assessment and analysis on the epistemic uncertainties are treated by an initial Monte Carlo sampling (MCDET). From each Monte Carlo sample, a DET analysis is run (in total, N trees). The Monte Carlo employs a pre-sampling of the

  2. Improved Control of Charging Voltage for Li-Ion Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2006-01-01

    were controlled by a computer, then this method of charge control could readily be implemented in software.

  3. Improvement of process closed-loop control systems for power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenko, V. A.; Mikushevich, E. E.; Nikol'Skii, D. Yu.; Rogachev, R. L.; Romanov, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    We describe the results of activities carried out at ZAO Interavtomatika (Interautomatika AG) on the development and putting into use of improved systems for closed-loop control of the main process values of Russian power units equipped with once-through boilers. We also consider a general approach for improving control systems and describe specific technical solutions taken for furnishing the main technological items of coal-and gas-and-oil-fired power units with closed-loop control systems.

  4. Identifying crater potential improves shallow gas kick control

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, L.A. ); Bourgoyne, A.T. )

    1993-12-27

    An understanding of sea floor crater mechanisms can help drillers determine whether to divert or shut in a shallow gas kick. Proper well planning that considers potential shallow gas sources can eliminate some of the more common failure situations with both diverting and shutting in of a well. Current well control practice for land and bottom-supported marine rigs usually calls for shutting in the well when a kick is detected, providing sufficient casing has been set to keep any flow underground. The casing and surface equipment must have an adequately high working pressure to ensure that formation fracture occurs before the equipment fails. Even for high shut-in pressures, an underground blowout is preferable to a surface blowout. An operator may choose to divert the flow if the surface casing is not set deep enough to keep the underground flow outside the casing from breaking through the sediments to the surface. Once the flow reaches the surface, a crater may form at the sea bed, possibly sinking or damaging the rig. Craters increase the difficulty and time required to kill a blowout. The paper describes shallow gas environments, the decision to divert or shut in the well, fluid migration, cement bond failure, hydraulic fracture, shear failure, the effect of fault planes, crater mechanisms, formation liquefaction, piping, caving, historical cases, and a deepwater crater.

  5. Gas migration modeling improves volumetric method of well control

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, C.P.; Quentin, K.M. )

    1994-12-26

    In the volumetric method, gas expansion during gas migration is allowed for by bleeding small quantities of fluid through the choke. When gas first reaches the choke, the influx is distributed near the surface in the annulus. Rapid gas migration then occurs, and mud and gas may need to be bled to maintain constant bottom hole pressure. The volumetric method is a technique for controlling gas kicks when circulation is not possible. The industry-recognized method is based on simple calculations which assume a single bubble of gas, the classic kick. This technique can now be evaluated by using more realistic, deterministic kick models. The results from such models cast double on some of the conventional procedures taught and used in the industry. This article details the analysis of influx behavior following a typical volumetric method. Numerical modeling of fluid losses as the surface pressure rises, gas migration, and dispersion are included to correspond accurately with field observations of kicks. Revised procedures are suggested to deal with these events better, such that the goals of the volumetric method are still attained.

  6. Improving electrokinetic microdevice stability by controlling electrolysis bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi Yong; Barber, Cedrick; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    The voltage-operating window for many electrokinetic microdevices is limited by electrolysis gas bubbles that destabilize microfluidic system causing noise and irreproducible responses above ∼3 V DC and less than ∼1 kHz AC at 3 Vpp. Surfactant additives, SDS and Triton X-100, and an integrated semipermeable SnakeSkin® membrane were employed to control and assess electrolysis bubbles from platinum electrodes in a 180 by 70 μm, 10 mm long microchannel. Stabilized current responses at 100 V DC were observed with surfactant additives or SnakeSkin® barriers. Electrolysis bubble behaviors, visualized via video microscopy at the electrode surface and in the microchannels, were found to be influenced by surfactant function and SnakeSkin® barriers. Both SDS and Triton X-100 surfactants promoted smaller bubble diameters and faster bubble detachment from electrode surfaces via increasing gas solubility. In contrast, SnakeSkin® membranes enhanced natural convection and blocked bubbles from entering the microchannels and thus reduced current disturbances in the electric field. This data illustrated that electrode surface behaviors had substantially greater impacts on current stability than microbubbles within microchannels. Thus, physically blocking bubbles from microchannels is less effective than electrode functionalization approaches to stabilize electrokinetic microfluidic systems. PMID:24648277

  7. Quality Improvement in Surgery Combining Lean Improvement Methods with Teamwork Training: A Controlled Before-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; New, Steve; Pickering, Sharon; Hadi, Mohammed; Collins, Gary; Rivero Arias, Oliver; Griffin, Damian; McCulloch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the effectiveness of combining teamwork training and lean process improvement, two distinct approaches to improving surgical safety. We conducted a controlled interrupted time series study in a specialist UK Orthopaedic hospital incorporating a plastic surgery team (which received the intervention) and an Orthopaedic theatre team acting as a control. Study Design We used a 3 month intervention with 3 months data collection period before and after it. A combined teamwork training and lean process improvement intervention was delivered by an experienced specialist team. Before and after the intervention we evaluated team non-technical skills using NOTECHS II, technical performance using the glitch rate and WHO checklist compliance using a simple 3 point scale. We recorded complication rate, readmission rate and length of hospital stay data for 6 months before and after the intervention. Results In the active group, but not the control group, full compliance with WHO Time Out (T/O) increased from 14 to 71% (p = 0.032), Sign Out attempt rate (S/O) increased from 0% to 50% (p<0.001) and Oxford NOTECHS II scores increased after the intervention (P = 0.058). Glitch rate decreased in the active group and increased in the control group (p = 0.001). Complications and length of stay appeared to rise in the control group and fall in the active group. Conclusions Combining teamwork training and systems improvement enhanced both technical and non-technical operating team process measures, and were associated with a trend to better safety outcome measures in a controlled study comparison. We suggest that approaches which address both system and culture dimensions of safety may prove valuable in reducing risks to patients. PMID:26381643

  8. rf streak camera based ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Tran, T

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the possibility of using a rf streak camera to time resolve in a single shot structural changes at the sub-100 fs time scale via relativistic electron diffraction. We experimentally tested this novel concept at the UCLA Pegasus rf photoinjector. Time-resolved diffraction patterns from thin Al foil are recorded. Averaging over 50 shots is required in order to get statistics sufficient to uncover a variation in time of the diffraction patterns. In the absence of an external pump laser, this is explained as due to the energy chirp on the beam out of the electron gun. With further improvements to the electron source, rf streak camera based ultrafast electron diffraction has the potential to yield truly single shot measurements of ultrafast processes. PMID:19191429

  9. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  10. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies.

  11. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Patrick H.; Yu, David U. L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  12. Short-term intensive glycemic control improves vibratory sensation in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukushima, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Taniguchi, Ataru; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Kuroe, Akira; Yasuda, Koichiro; Hosokawa, Masaya; Yamada, Yuichiro; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka

    2008-04-01

    Strict long-term glycemic control has been reported to prevent or improve diabetic peripheral neuropathy, but the effects of short-term glycemic control have not been clarified in patients with type 2 diabetes. To investigate reversibility of impaired vibratory sensation by short-term glycemic control, we used the TM31 liminometer and C64 tuning fork methods to measure peripheral neuropathy. Thirty-one type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c: 10.8+/-0.4%, mean+/-S.E.M., range from 7.9% to 16.2%) were administered strict glycemic control. Vibratory sensation before and after short-term glycemic control was evaluated, and the metabolic profile including plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and free fatty acid (FFA) was measured. After 20.0+/-2.1 days of strict glycemic control, vibratory sensation improved significantly in both upper and lower extremities, assessed by TM31 liminometer and C64 tuning fork. Along with the improved glycemic control, lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, triglyceride and FFA) was significantly improved. Thus, short-term intensive glycemic control can improve vibratory sensation, metabolic changes in glucose and lipid metabolism being the factors responsible for improved of peripheral nerve function. PMID:18262304

  13. RF H- Ion Source with Saddle Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim G; Johnson, Rolland P; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    In this project we are developing an RF H- surface plasma source (SPS) which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high pulsed and average current, higher brightness, longer lifetime and higher reliability by improving a power efficiency. Several versions of new plasma generators with different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in a small AlN test chamber in the SNS ion source Test Stand. Then a prototype saddle antenna was installed in the Test Stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved a peak current of 67 mA and an apparent efficiency of 1.6 mA/kW. These values are comparable to those of the present SNS sources and can be expected to be improved when the prototype is developed into an operational version in the next phase of the project.

  14. Does self-control improve with practice? Evidence from a six-week training program.

    PubMed

    Miles, Eleanor; Sheeran, Paschal; Baird, Harriet; Macdonald, Ian; Webb, Thomas L; Harris, Peter R

    2016-08-01

    Can self-control be improved through practice? Several studies have found that repeated practice of tasks involving self-control improves performance on other tasks relevant to self-control. However, in many of these studies, improvements after training could be attributable to methodological factors (e.g., passive control conditions). Moreover, the extent to which the effects of training transfer to real-life settings is not yet clear. In the present research, participants (N = 174) completed a 6-week training program of either cognitive or behavioral self-control tasks. We then tested the effects of practice on a range of measures of self-control, including lab-based and real-world tasks. Training was compared with both active and no-contact control conditions. Despite high levels of adherence to the training tasks, there was no effect of training on any measure of self-control. Trained participants did not, for example, show reduced ego depletion effects, become better at overcoming their habits, or report exerting more self-control in everyday life. Moderation analyses found no evidence that training was effective only among particular groups of participants. Bayesian analyses suggested that the data were more consistent with a null effect of training on self-control than with previous estimates of the effect of practice. The implication is that training self-control through repeated practice does not result in generalized improvements in self-control. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27359129

  15. 75 FR 28261 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Improved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Improved Diagnostics for Lyme Borreliosis, Funding Opportunity... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces...

  16. Improving catalytic selectivity through control of adsorption orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Simon H.

    monolayer formed by 1,2-benzenedithiol, we determined that hydrodeoxygenation selectively occurred on catalyst particle steps and edges from an upright structure, whereas decarbonylation occurred on particle terraces from a flat-lying structure. Control of furfural adsorption orientation was also achieved through the use of NiCu bimetallic catalysts. The aromatic furan ring was repelled from surface Cu, leading to an upright structure. However, under hydrogenation conditions, Ni tended to be near the surface of thin films and catalysts, leading to less dramatic selectivity enhancement. The presence of a 1-octadecanethiol monolayer kinetically stabilized the surface termination, allowing Cu to remain at the surface.

  17. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Trepanowski, John F; Varady, Krista A

    2015-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals. PMID:24922183

  18. Evolutional Trend of Mixed Analog and Digital RF Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi

    This paper describes recent technology trend of mixed analog digital RF circuits. With the progress of CMOS technology, large-scale digital signal process and control function can be integrated in an RF integrated circuit and some analog signal process blocks can be translated to digital signal processing units. At the same time, the design of remaining analog functional blocks becomes very hard. In this paper, those integration techniques for receiver and transmitter in these 20 years are reviewed. As a typical example of digital assisted systems, synthesizer based transmitters are discussed in detail.

  19. Application of rf-thruster technique for fusion plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freisinger, J.; Loeb, H. W.

    On the basis of RF ion thruster devices, a family of RF injector generators (RIGs) for the heating of fusion plasmas up to the temperature of thermonuclear burn has been developed. Hydrogen ion beams of 10-40 amps can be accelerated by means of the RIGs to 30 kV, so that ion beam densities of more than 250 mA/sq cm are achievable at uniform profiles within only 1 deg of divergence angle. The use of electrodeless quartz ionizers yields a very high atomic ion fraction, low admixture of impurities, long lifetime, high reliability, simple mechanical elements, and easy control.

  20. A new chemical analysis system using a photocathode RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasushi; Yang, Jinfeng; Hirose, Masafumi; Sakai, Fumio; Tsunemi, Akira; Yorozu, Masafumi; Okada, Yasuhiro; Endo, Akira; Wang, Xijie; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2000-11-01

    A compact chemical analysis (pulse radiolysis) apparatus using a BNL-type s-band photocathode RF gun (GUN-IV) is now under development at Sumitomo Heavy Industries (SHI). Using the apparatus, fast chemical reactions induced by 3.5 ps pulse of electron beam can be analyzed by means of time-resolved photo-absorption spectroscopy with 10 ps laser pulses in the wavelength range of 210-2000 nm. The high-precision control of RF phase makes 10 ps of time-resolution possible for the analysis.

  1. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.W. Kang; D.E. Anderson; I.E. Campisi; M. Champion; M.T. Crofford; R.E. Fuja; P.A. Gurd; S. Hasan; K.-U. Kasemir; M.P. McCarthy; D. Stout; J.Y. Tang; A.V. Vassioutchenko; M. Wezensky; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; T. Powers; M. Stirbet

    2005-05-16

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components.

  2. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  3. 56. Building 105, close view of ion return RF balance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Building 105, close view of ion return RF balance tube adjustment controls. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Overview and status of RF systems for the SSC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Mynk, J.; Grippe, J.; Cutler, R.I.; Rodriguez, R.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linear Accelerator (Linac) produces a 600-MeV, 35-{mu}s, H-beam at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The beam is accelerated by a series of RF cavities. These consist of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), two bunchers, and four Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks at 427.617 MHz, and two bunchers, nine side-coupled Linac modules, and an energy compressor at 1282.851 MHz. The RFQ amplifier and the low-frequency buncher cavity amplifiers use gridded tubes, while the other cavities use klystron amplifier systems. The RF control system consists of a reference line and cavity feedback and feedforward loops for each amplifier. The RF amplifier system for each of these accelerator cavities is described, and the current status of each system is presented.

  5. Design of Multidimensional Shinnar-Le Roux RF Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To generalize the conventional Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) method for the design of multidimensional RF pulses. Methods Using echo-planar gradients, the multidimensional RF pulse design problem was converted into a series of 1D polynomial design problems. Each of the 1D polynomial design problems was solved efficiently. B0 inhomogeneity compensation and design of spatial-spectral pulses were also considered. Results The proposed method was used to design 2D excitation and refocusing pulses. The results were validated through Bloch equation simulation and experiments on a 3.0 T scanner. Large-tip-angle, equiripple-error, multidimensional excitation was achieved with ripple levels closely matching the design specifications. Conclusion The conventional SLR method can be extended to design multidimensional RF pulses. The proposed method achieves almost equiripple excitation errors, allows easy control of the tradeoff among design parameters, and is computationally efficient. PMID:24578212

  6. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator.

    PubMed

    Thorette, Aurélien; Romanelli, Marco; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-06-15

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is experimentally and numerically studied in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits isolation of a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found, and phase noise spectra allow us to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator, even in the chaotic regime. PMID:27304302

  7. High gradient RF breakdown studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa Leanne

    Higher accelerating gradients are required by future demands for TeV electron linear colliders. With higher energy comes the challenge of handling stronger electromagnetic fields in the accelerator structures and in the microwave sources that supply the power. A limit on the maximum field gradient is imposed by rf electrical breakdown. Investigating methods to achieve higher gradients and to better understand the mechanisms involved in the rf breakdown process has been the focal point of this study. A systematic series of rf breakdown experiments have been conducted at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center utilizing a transmission cavity operating in the TM020 mode. A procedure was developed to examine the high gradient section of the cavity in an electron microscope. The results have revealed that breakdown asymmetry exists between opposing high gradient surfaces. During breakdown, a plasma formation is detected localized near the surface with no visible evidence of an arc traversing the gap. These findings support the theory that high frequency rf breakdown is a single surface phenomenon. Other results from this study have shown that breakdown can occur at relatively low voltages when surface irregularities exist and along grain boundaries. A series of steps have been developed through this study that have significantly reduced the number of breakdowns that occur along grain boundaries. Testing under various vacuum conditions (10-11--10 -5 Torr) have revealed that while the breakdown threshold remained the same, the field emitted current density increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This suggests that the total field emitted current density is not the critical parameter in the initiation of high frequency vacuum breakdown. In the course of this study, microparticles were carefully tracked before and after rf processing. The outcome of this research suggests that expensive cleanroom facilities may not offer any advantage over practicing good cleaning and

  8. Micro-emitter heating by rf current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    One factor limiting the accelerating gradients in radiofrequency (rf) cavities are field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters. The value of emitter heating power plays a key role in theories of an rf cavity processing allowing to enhance the accelerating gradient. In this paper, the emitter heating by rf current is studied. This heating mechanism associates with a large heating power (by several orders of magnitude higher than the power of field emission current) and demonstrates explicit dependence on the frequency of the electromagnetic rf field (scales with the square of the rf field frequency).

  9. Pulsed RF Plasma Source for Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiruddin, Abutaher Mohammad

    A pulsed rf plasma source was evaluated for materials processing. A pulsed rf discharge of carbon tetrafluoride (CF_4), sulfur hexafluoride (SF _6), oxygen (O_2), or acetylene (C_2H_2 ) created the plasmas. The frequency and duration of the rf discharge were about 290 kHz and 30 musec, respectively. The repetition rate was 1 discharge per minute. Plasma diagnostics included Langmuir probes, a photodiode dectector, an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA), and a microwave interferometer. Langmuir probe measurements showed that at a position 67 cm away from the rf coil, CF_4 plasma arrived in separate packets. Plasma densities and electron temperatures at this position were in the range 4 times 10^{11} cm ^{-3} to 1.8 times 10^{13} cm ^{-3} and 2 eV to 8.3 eV, respectively. The OMA measurements identified neutral atomic fluorine in the CF_4 plasma and neutral atomic oxygen in the O_2 plasma. A plasma slab model of the microwave interferometer was applied to predict the interferometer response. The measured response was found to be almost identical to the predicted response. The influence of different reactor parameters on plasma parameters was studied. Metal barriers of different geometry were used to control the ratio of charged particles to atomic neutrals in the plasma chamber. Four plasma structures were identified: precursor plasma, shock induced plasma, driver plasma, and delayed glow plasma. Pulsed CF _4 and SF_6 plasmas were used to etch silicon dioxide (SiO_2 ) grown on silicon wafers. The SF_6 plasma etched SiO_2 at a rate of about 0.71 A per discharge and the CF_4 plasma deposited a non-uniform film (possibly polymer) instead of etching. The C_2H _2 plasma deposited plasma polymerized acetylene on a KBr pellet with a deposition rate of 127 A per discharge. An FT-IR spectrum of the deposited film showed that carbon -to-carbon double bonds as well as carbon-to-hydrogen bonds were present. This device can be used in plasma assisted deposition and/or synthesis

  10. Performance improvement of gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separators using passive control system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Mohan, R.; Shoham, O.; Kouba, G.

    1998-12-31

    The performance of Gas Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) separators can be improved by reducing or eliminating liquid carry-over into the gas stream or gas carry-under through liquid stream, utilizing suitable liquid level control. In this study, a new passive control system has been developed for the GLCC, in which the control is achieved by utilizing only the liquid flow energy. Passive control system is highly desirable for remote, unmanned location operated with no external power source. Salient features of this design are presented here. Detailed experimental and modeling studies have been conducted to evaluate the improvement in the GLCC operational envelope for liquid carry-over with the passive control system. The results demonstrate that a passive control system is feasible for operation in normal slug flow conditions. The result of this study could also form the basis for future development of active control systems using classical control approach.

  11. RF switching network: a novel technique for IR sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechtel, Deborah M.; Jenkins, R. Brian; Joyce, Peter J.; Nelson, Charles L.

    2016-05-01

    Rapid sensing of near infrared (IR) energy on a composite structure would provide information that could mitigate damage to composite structures. This paper describes a novel technique that implements photoconductive sensors in a radio frequency (RF) switching network designed to locate in real time the position and intensity of IR radiation incident on a composite structure. In the implementation described here, photoconductive sensors act as rapid response switches in a two layer RF network embedded in an FR-4 laminate. To detect radiation, phosphorous doped silicon photoconductive sensors are inserted in GHz range RF transmission lines. Photoconductive sensors use semiconductor materials that are optically sensitive at material dependent wavelengths. Incident radiation at the appropriate wavelength produces hole-electron pairs, so that the semiconductor becomes a conductor. By permitting signal propagation only when a sensor is illuminated, the RF signals are selectively routed from the lower layer transmission lines to the upper layer lines, thereby pinpointing the location and strength of incident radiation on a structure. Simulations based on a high frequency 3D planar electromagnetics model are presented and compared to experimental results. Experimental results are described for GHz range RF signal control for 300 mW and 180 mW incident energy from 975 nm and 1060 nm wavelength lasers respectively, where upon illumination, RF transmission line signal output power doubled when compared to non-illuminated results. Experimental results are reported for 100 W incident energy from a 1060 nm laser. Test results illustrate that real-time signal processing would permit a structure or vehicle to be controlled in response to incident radiation

  12. A new technique for RF distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, Robyn; Wildman, David

    2014-07-01

    For independent phase and amplitude control, RF cavities are often driven by one power source per cavity. In many cases it would be advantageous in terms of cost to instead use one higher power source for many cavities. Vector modulators have been developed, which, when used with a single source provide for the independent phase and amplitude control which would have been otherwise lost. The key components of these vector modulators are a novel type of phase shifter — adjustable fast phase shifters with perpendicularly biased garnets. The vector modulators have been constructed and used with a single klystron in a 3.4 MeV test linac to successfully accelerate proton beam.

  13. Double rf system for bunch shortening

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-11-01

    It was suggested by Zisman that the combination of the two systems (double rf system) may be more effective to shorten a bunch, compromising between the desirable and the undesirable effects mentioned above. In this paper, we demonstrate that a double rf system is, in fact, quite effective in optimizing the rf performance. The parameters used are explained, and some handy formulae for bunch parameters are derived. We consider an example of bunch shortening by adding a higher-harmonic rf system to the main rf system. The parameters of the main rf system are unchanged. The double rf system, however, can be used for another purpose. Namely, the original bunch length can be obtained with a main rf voltage substantially lower than for a single rf system without necessitating a high-power source for the higher-harmonic cavities. Using a double rf system, the momentum acceptance remains large enough for ample beam lifetime. Moreover, the increase in nonlinearity of the rf waveform increases the synchrotron tune spread, which potentially helps a beam to be stabilized against longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities. We will show some examples of this application. We discuss the choice of the higher-harmonic frequency.

  14. Publication of Proceedings for the 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003)

    SciTech Connect

    Victor L. Granatstein

    2004-08-08

    The 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003) was held from June 22 to June 26 at the Coolfont Resort and Conference Center in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. The Workshop was hosted by the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP) of the University of Maryland, College Park and by the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC. As its name implies this was the sixth in a series of biennial workshops devoted to exchanging information and ideas on high power microwave sources and components. The applications addressed included particle accelerators, radar, HPM, space exploration, neutron sources and plasma heating and current driven in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. This Final Report includes a brief description of the RF 2003 Workshop and the distribution of the published proceedings.

  15. RF microalgal lipid content characterization.

    PubMed

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Taher, Hanifa; Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Most conventional techniques for the determination of microalgae lipid content are time consuming and in most cases are indirect and require excessive sample preparations. This work presents a new technique that utilizes radio frequency (RF) for rapid lipid quantification, without the need for sample preparation. Tests showed that a shift in the resonance frequency of a RF open-ended coaxial resonator and a gradual increase in its resonance magnitude may occur as the lipids content of microalgae cells increases. These response parameters can be then calibrated against actual cellular lipid contents and used for rapid determination of the cellular lipids. The average duration of lipid quantification using the proposed technique was of about 1 minute, which is significantly less than all other conventional techniques, and was achieved without the need for any time consuming treatment steps. PMID:24870372

  16. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  17. Control Improvement for Jump-Diffusion Processes with Applications to Finance

    SciTech Connect

    Baeuerle, Nicole; Rieder, Ulrich

    2012-02-15

    We consider stochastic control problems with jump-diffusion processes and formulate an algorithm which produces, starting from a given admissible control {pi}, a new control with a better value. If no improvement is possible, then {pi} is optimal. Such an algorithm is well-known for discrete-time Markov Decision Problems under the name Howard's policy improvement algorithm. The idea can be traced back to Bellman. Here we show with the help of martingale techniques that such an algorithm can also be formulated for stochastic control problems with jump-diffusion processes. As an application we derive some interesting results in financial portfolio optimization.

  18. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-01

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  19. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-10

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  20. Micropower RF transponder with superregenerative receiver and RF receiver with sampling mixer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-05-13

    A micropower RF transponder employs a novel adaptation of the superregenerative receiver wherein the quench oscillator is external to the regenerative transistor. The quench oscillator applies an exponentially decaying waveform rather than the usual sinewave to achieve high sensitivity at microampere current levels. Further improvements include circuit simplifications for antenna coupling, extraction of the detected signal, and a low-voltage bias configuration that allows operation with less than a 1-volt rail voltage. The inventive transponder is expected to operate as long as the battery shelf life. 13 figs.