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Sample records for improves technical outcomes

  1. Improved technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Improved technical specifications for nuclear power plants are outlined. The objectives of this work are to improve safety, provide a clearer understanding of safety significance, and ease NRC and industry administrative burdens. Line item improvements, bases, and implementation of the specifications are discussed.

  2. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  3. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients' assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  4. Simulation: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abi; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Crofts, Joanna; Draycott, Tim

    2013-06-01

    Effective training has been shown to improve perinatal care and outcome, decrease litigation claims and reduce midwifery sick leave. To be effective, training should be incentivised, in a realistic context, and delivered to inter-professional teams similar to those delivering actual care. Teamwork training is a useful addition, but it should be based on the characteristics of effective teamwork as derived from the study of frontline teams. Implementation of simulation and teamwork training is challenging, with constraints on staff time, facilities and finances. Local adoption and adaptation of effective programmes can help keep costs down, and make them locally relevant whilst maintaining effectiveness. Training programmes need to evolve continually in line with new evidence. To do this, it is vital to monitor outcomes and robustly evaluate programmes for their impact on patient care and outcome, not just on participants. PMID:23721770

  5. Databases Improve Technical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graube, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    In Lower Saxony, technology studies as part of preparing technical education teachers for primary and partly for secondary education can be studied only at two universities--the Technical University of Brunswick and the University of Oldenburg. Technology education is not available at the Gymnasium (a type of secondary school leading to the…

  6. The Quest for Continuous Improvement: A Qualitative Study on Diffusion of Outcomes Assessment among Career and Technical Education Faculty Members at Rocky Mountain States Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The following qualitative multicase study presents an examination of outcomes assessment adoption as it relates to Career and Technical Education faculty at community colleges and outlines recommendations for postsecondary education administration as they introduce innovations to faculty members. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  7. Method to improve cosmetic outcome following craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Sato, M; Nishizawa, M; Oizumi, T; Hiwatari, M; Kajiwara, T; Ishikawa, M; Inamasu, G; Kawase, T

    2001-06-01

    This technical note describes a simple method for reducing the dead space created by craniotome due to the loss of bone dust and improving the cosmetic outcome following a craniotomy. After drilling the burr holes for the craniotomy, the bone between the holes is drilled away in a standard fashion except that multiple regions of about 1 cm in length are left intact. These intact regions are broken using a periosteal elevator and fixed like a bridge when the bone is replaced. The resulting bone flap is readily returned to its original position without making the dead space created by regular craniotomy. The amount of the dead space caused by losing the bone dust is reduced and a good cosmetic recovery is obtained. This technique is useful for both craniotomy and facial bone surgery, which requires cosmetic results. PMID:11428512

  8. Researching College- and Career Ready Standards to Improve Student Outcomes: Technical Working Group Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, August 19-20, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Education Sciences, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In August, IES worked with the National Science Foundation and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to convene a technical working group to discuss research objectives related to college- and career-ready standards in English language arts and mathematics. Forty people (including researchers,…

  9. Improvements to Technical Specifications surveillance requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Lobel, R.; Tjader, T.R.

    1992-12-01

    In August 1983 an NRC task group was formed to investigate problems with surveillance testing required by Technical Specifications, and to recommend approaches to effect improvements. NUREG-1024 ( Technical Specifications-Enhancing Safety Impact'') resulted, and it contained recommendations to review the basis for test frequencies; to ensure that the tests promote safety and do not degrade equipment; and to review surveillance tests so that they do not unnecessarily burden personnel. The Technical Specifications Improvement Program (TSIP) was established in December 1984 to provide the framework for rewriting and improving the Technical Specifications. As an element of the TSIP, all Technical Specifications surveillance requirements were comprehensively examined as recommended in NUREG-1024. The results of that effort are presented in this report. The study found that while some testing at power is essential to verify equipment and system operability, safety can be improved, equipment degradation decreased, and unnecessary personnel burden relaxed by reducing the amount of testing at power.

  10. Using Chronic Pain Outcomes Data to Improve Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neel; Inturrisi, Charles E; Horn, Susan D; Witkin, Lisa R

    2016-06-01

    Standardization of care that is derived from analysis of outcomes data can lead to improvements in quality and efficiency of care. The outcomes data should be validated, standardized, and integrated into ongoing patient care with minimal burden on the patient and health care team. This article describes the organization and workflow of a chronic pain clinic registry designed to collect and analyze patient data for quality improvement and dissemination. Future efforts in using mobile technology and integrating patient-reported outcome data in the electronic health records have the potential to offer new and improved models of comprehensive pain management. PMID:27208717

  11. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  12. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  13. Rethinking Ovarian Cancer: Recommendations for Improving Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I.; Bast Jr., Robert C.; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S.; Brenton, James D.; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C.; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B.; Lord, Chris J.; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Oza, Amit M.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Perspective. PMID:21941283

  14. Staff Development for Improving Student Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asayesh, Gelareh

    1993-01-01

    Several educators highlight aspects of effective staff development programs that have resulted in improved student outcomes, agreeing that staff development is an important ingredient in the elusive formula of success. The article includes a list of eight examples of what experts say about staff development. (SM)

  15. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  16. Paclitaxel improves outcome from traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Donna J.; Garwin, Gregory G.; Cline, Marcella M.; Richards, Todd L.; Yarnykh, Vasily; Mourad, Pierre D.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) hold promise to improve outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine if the microtubule stabilizing therapeutic paclitaxel used for more than 20 years in chemotherapy would improve outcome after TBI. We assessed neurological outcome in mice that received direct application of paclitaxel to brain injury from controlled cortical impact (CCI). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess injury-related morphological changes. Catwalk Gait analysis showed significant improvement in the paclitaxel group on a variety of parameters compared to the saline group. MRI analysis revealed that paclitaxel treatment resulted in significantly reduced edema volume at site-of-injury (11.92 ± 3.0 and 8.86 ± 2.2 mm3 for saline vs. paclitaxel respectively, as determined by T2-weighted analysis; p ≤ 0.05), and significantly increased myelin tissue preservation (9.45 ± 0.4 vs. 8.95 ± 0.3, p ≤ 0.05). Our findings indicate that paclitaxel treatment resulted in improvement of neurological outcome and MR imaging biomarkers of injury. These results could have a significant impact on therapeutic developments to treat traumatic brain injury. PMID:26086366

  17. A multidisciplinary approach for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sierchio, Grace P

    2003-01-01

    The healthcare environment has been impacted tremendously by higher patient acuity, cost-cutting measures, an increase in litigation, and increased expectations by an educated generation of healthcare consumers. This has led to the need to continually measure, assess, and improve quality. These activities must consider not only patient clinical outcomes, but also customer service ratings and financial outcomes. Quality improvement requires a collaborative approach to succeed, and the need to build a cohesive and effective multidisciplinary team is critical for positive outcomes. Strategies to build a culture of teamwork include incorporating total quality management principles into every level of the organization, seeking participation from every discipline and level of the organization, and recognizing employees for their efforts. Infusion nurses have an excellent opportunity to contribute their expertise to any multidisciplinary team that impacts the outcomes of infusion patients. In addition, team-building and quality improvement may prove to be excellent career moves for infusion nurses looking to further specialize their practice. PMID:12544365

  18. Rethinking ovarian cancer: recommendations for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I; Bast, Robert C; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S; Brenton, James D; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B; Lord, Chris J; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A; McNeish, Iain A; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B; Nephew, Kenneth P; Oza, Amit M; Sood, Anil K; Stronach, Euan A; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D; Balkwill, Frances R

    2011-10-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies that are collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Opinion article. PMID:21941283

  19. Trading water to improve environmental flow outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Jeffery D.; Franklin, Brad; Loch, Adam; Kirby, Mac; Wheeler, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-01

    As consumptive extractions and water scarcity pressures brought about by climate change increase in many world river basins, so do the risks to water-dependent ecological assets. In response, public or not for profit environmental water holders (EWHs) have been established in many areas and bestowed with endowments of water and mandates to manage water for ecological outcomes. Water scarcity has also increasingly spawned water trade arrangements in many river basins, and in many instances, EWHs are now operating in water markets. A number of EWHs, especially in Australia, begin with an endowment of permanent water entitlements purchased from irrigators. Such water entitlements typically have relatively constant interannual supply profiles that often do not match ecological water demand involving flood pulses and periods of drying. This article develops a hydrologic-economic simulation model of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling Basin to assess the scope of possibilities to improve environmental outcomes through EWH trading on an annual water lease market. We find that there are some modest opportunities for EWHs to improve environmental outcomes through water trade. The best opportunities occur in periods of drought and for ecological outcomes that benefit from moderately large floods. We also assess the extent to which EWH trading in annual water leases may create pecuniary externalities via bidding up or down the water lease prices faced by irrigators. Environmental water trading is found to have relatively small impacts on water market price outcomes. Overall our results suggest that the benefits of developing EWH trading may well justify the costs.

  20. Does wound eversion improve cosmetic outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Kappel, Stefani; Kleinerman, Rebecca; King, Thomas H.; Sivamani, Raja; Taylor, Sandra; Nguyen, UyenThao; Eisen, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Wound edge eversion has been hypothesized to improve aesthetic outcomes after cutaneous wound closure. Data supporting this assertion are sparse. Objective We sought to determine if wound eversion, achieved with interrupted subcuticular sutures, improves aesthetic outcome compared with planar closures. Methods We undertook a prospective, randomized, split-scar intervention in patients who underwent cutaneous surgery. Half of the wound was randomized to an everted or planar repair; the other side received the opposite one. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, both the patient and 2 blinded observers evaluated the wound using the Patient Observer Self-Assessment Scale (POSAS). Results The total observer POSAS score for the everted (13.59, 12.26) and planar (12.91, 12.98) sides did not differ significantly at 3 or 6 months, respectively. Similarly, there was not a significant difference in patient assessment between the everted (16.23, 12.84) and planar (15.07, 12.79) sides at 3 or 6 months, respectively. Finally, there was no significant difference between the 2 closure methods in terms of scar height or width at follow-up. Limitations This was a single-center trial, which used a validated but still subjective scar assessment instrument. Conclusion Wound eversion was not significantly associated with improved overall scar assessments by blinded observers or patient assessment. PMID:25619206

  1. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  2. Open Stented Grafts for Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique: Technical Aspects and Current Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Zheng, Jun; Sun, Li-Zhong; Elefteriades, John A.

    2015-01-01

    With growing experience in patients with aneurysms and dissections in the arch and proximal descending aorta, the frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique has been shown to be safe and effective, and has achieved favorable short to mid-term outcomes. As the FET technique is gaining wider acceptance, there is a growing need for versatile, technically simple, and highly durable open stented grafts involving less complicated deployment mechanisms enabling use in various indications. This paper gives a brief review on the technical aspects and clinical outcomes of currently available open stented grafts used in the FET technique, including the E-vita Open Plus, Thoraflex Hybrid, Cronus, and J Graft. While none of these grafts can claim to be an ideal device, technology continues to improve towards this goal. As newer devices and systems are developed, more widespread use of the FET technique can be expected; such progress promises to improve the clinical outcomes and quality of life for patients with complex aortic diseases. PMID:27069943

  3. Can Probiotics Improve Your Surgical Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Ward, Tina; Nichols, Misty; Nutter, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Despite ongoing advances in medical technology, postoperative infections and infectious complications continue to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Surgical trauma and prophylactic antibiotics disrupt the balance of the intestinal microbiota and barrier function of the gut, potentiating an enhanced inflammatory response and further immune system depression. With the increasing costs of health care and emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, alternative approaches must be explored. Many clinical studies have demonstrated that the use of probiotics, prebiotics, or a combination of both (synbiotics) as a part of innovative strategies can improve outcomes of elective abdominal and gastrointestinal surgical procedures. It has been demonstrated that probiotics play a role in gut barrier improvement and immunomodulation. However, it is evident that additional research is needed including larger, multicenter, randomized controlled trials to validate the safety and efficacy of their use in surgical patients. The purpose of this article is to discuss background of probiotic use in abdominal/gastrointestinal surgery, risk and benefits, clinical relevance for health care providers, and further implications for research. PMID:27254237

  4. Improving Outcomes for Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Ivan M.; Blaisdell, Carol J.; Abman, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of improving lung health through lung disease research, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a workshop of multidisciplinary experts for the following purpose: (1) to review the current scientific knowledge underlying the basis for treatment of adults and children with pulmonary vascular diseases (PVDs); (2) to identify gaps, barriers, and emerging scientific opportunities in translational PVD research and the means to capitalize on these opportunities; (3) to prioritize new research directions that would be expected to affect the clinical course of PVDs; and (4) to make recommendations to the NHLBI on how to fill identified gaps in adult and pediatric PVD clinical research. Workshop participants reviewed experiences from previous PVD clinical trials and ongoing clinical research networks with other lung disorders, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive lung disease, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as well. Bioinformatics experts discussed strategies for applying cutting-edge health information technology to clinical studies. Participants in the workshop considered approaches in the following broad concept areas: (1) improved phenotyping to identify potential subjects for appropriate PVD clinical studies; (2) identification of potential new end points for assessing key outcomes and developing better-designed PVD clinical trials; and (3) the establishment of priorities for specific clinical research needed to advance care of patients with various subsets of PVDs from childhood through adulthood. This report provides a summary of the objectives and recommendations to the NHLBI concentrating on clinical research efforts that are needed to better diagnose and treat PVDs. PMID:22335936

  5. Improving Alcohol Withdrawal Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Melson, Jo; Kane, Michelle; Mooney, Ruth; McWilliams, James; Horton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Context Excessive alcohol consumption is the nation’s third leading cause of preventable deaths. If untreated, 6% of alcohol-dependent patients experience alcohol withdrawal, with up to 10% of those experiencing delirium tremens (DT), when they stop drinking. Without routine screening, patients often experience DT without warning. Objective: Reduce the incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT, restraint use, and transfers to the intensive care unit (ICU) in patients with DT. Design: In October 2009, the alcohol withdrawal team instituted a care management guideline used by all disciplines, which included tools for screening, assessment, and symptom management. Data were obtained from existing datasets for three quarters before and four quarters after implementation. Follow-up data were analyzed and showed a great deal of variability in transfers to the ICU and restraint use. Percentage of patients who developed DT showed a downward trend. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT and, in patients with DT, restraint use and transfers to the ICU. Results: Initial data revealed a decrease in percentage of patients with alcohol withdrawal who experienced DT (16.4%–12.9%). In patients with DT, restraint use decreased (60.4%–44.4%) and transfers to the ICU decreased (21.6%–15%). Follow-up data indicated a continued downward trend in patients with DT. Changes were not statistically significant. Restraint use and ICU transfers maintained postimplementation levels initially but returned to preimplementation levels by third quarter 2012. Conclusion: Early identification of patients for potential alcohol withdrawal followed by a standardized treatment protocol using symptom-triggered dosing improved alcohol withdrawal management and outcomes. PMID:24867561

  6. Using AMLO to Improve the Quality of Teacher Education Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shammari, Zaid

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to find ways to improve learning outcomes in teacher education courses by using an Analysis Model for Learning Outcomes (AMLO). It addresses the improvement of the quality of teacher education by analyzing learning outcomes and implementing curriculum modifications related to specific learning objectives and their effects on…

  7. Do microfractures improve high tibial osteotomy outcome?

    PubMed

    Pascale, Walter; Luraghi, Simone; Perico, Laura; Pascale, Valerio

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if microfractures improve the outcome of high tibial osteotomy in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritis in genu varum. Forty patients presenting with Outerbridge grade III and IV chondropathies on the femoral and/or the tibial joint surface underwent high tibial osteotomy with Puddu plates (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, Florida) for primary medial compartment osteoarthritis in genu varum at our institution. Patients were randomly assigned to either the high tibial osteotomy plus microfractures group (A; n=20) or the high tibial osteotomy alone group (B; n=20). Final assessment was conducted 5 years postoperatively, including clinical response measured by the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm score, and patient satisfaction score. All patients were blinded to the treatment received and followed the same rehabilitation protocol. A statistically significant improvement between pre- and postoperative values was observed for Lysholm and IKDC scores in both groups, without any statistically significant difference between them. Regarding the satisfaction score, there were no differences between the 2 groups in terms of preoperative self-assessment (P>.05), whereas postoperative subjective satisfaction at 5-year follow-up was significantly higher in group A than in group B (P=.0036).Our study results provide further evidence that medial tibial osteotomy is an effective surgical option for treating a varus knee associated with medial degenerative arthritis in patients wishing to continue accustomed levels of physical activity. In particular, patient satisfaction was higher among those who underwent the combined treatment involving high tibial osteotomy to correct femorotibial angle and microfractures. PMID:21717984

  8. Improving maternal nutrition for better pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nnam, N M

    2015-11-01

    Much has been learned during the past several decades about the role of maternal nutrition in the outcome of pregnancy. While the bulk of the data is derived from animal models, human observations are gradually accumulating. There is need to improve maternal nutrition because of the high neonatal mortality rate especially in developing countries. The author used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors into account when interpreting study findings. Nutrition plays a vital role in reducing some of the health risks associated with pregnancy such as risk of fetal and infant mortality, intra-uterine growth retardation, low birth weight and premature births, decreased birth defects, cretinism, poor brain development and risk of infection. Adequate nutrition is essential for a woman throughout her life cycle to ensure proper development and prepare the reproductive life of the woman. Pregnant women require varied diets and increased nutrient intake to cope with the extra needs during pregnancy. Use of dietary supplements and fortified foods should be encouraged for pregnant women to ensure adequate supply of nutrients for both mother and foetus. The author concludes that nutrition education should be a core component of Mother and Child Health Clinics and every opportunity should be utilised to give nutrition education on appropriate diets for pregnant women. PMID:26264457

  9. Motivational tools to improve probationer treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Taxman, Faye S.; Walters, Scott T.; Sloas, Lincoln B.; Lerch, Jennifer; Rodriguez, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Background Motivational interviewing (MI) is a promising practice to increase motivation, treatment retention, and reducing recidivism among offender populations. Computer-delivered interventions have grown in popularity as a way to change behaviors associated with drug and alcohol use. Methods/Design Motivational Assistance Program to Initiate Treatment (MAPIT) is a three arm, multisite, randomized controlled trial, which examines the impact of Motivational Interviewing (MI), a Motivational Computer Program (MC), and Supervision as Usual (SAU) on addiction treatment initiation, engagement, and retention. Secondary outcomes include drug/alcohol use, probation progress, recidivism (i.e., criminal behavior) and HIV/AIDS testing and treatment among probationers. Participant characteristics are measured at baseline, 2, and 6 months after assignment. The entire study will include 600 offenders, with each site recruiting 300 offenders (Baltimore City, Maryland and Dallas, Texas). All participants will go through standard intake procedures for probation and participate in probation requirements as usual. After standard intake, participants will be recruited and screened for eligibility. Discussion The results of this clinical trial will fill a gap in knowledge about ways to motivate probationers to participate in addiction treatment and HIV care. This randomized clinical trial is innovative in the way it examines the use of in-person vs. technological approaches to improve probationer success. Trial Registration NCT01891656 PMID:26009023

  10. Comparisons: Technical-Tactical and Time-Motion Analysis of Mixed Martial Arts by Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miarka, Bianca; Vecchio, Fabrício B D; Camey, Suzi; Amtmann, John A

    2016-07-01

    Miarka, B, Vecchio, FBD, Camey, S, and Amtmann, JA. Comparisons: technical-tactical and time-motion analysis of mixed martial arts by outcomes. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1975-1984, 2016-The aim of this study was to compare time-motion and technical-tactical analysis between paired outcomes and rounds of mixed martial arts (MMA) matches. The sample consisted of 645 rounds of MMA competition paired by outcomes (first round, winners n = 215 and losers n = 215; second round, winners n = 215 and losers n = 215; third round, winners n = 215 and losers n = 215). The time-motion variables were categorized into low-intensity or high-intensity, stand-up or groundwork situations. Stand-up techniques were analyzed by observing total strikes to the head and body, and takedowns. The actions on the ground were analyzed by observing submission activity, including successful choking and joint locking actions, and also positional improvements, including advances to the mount, half guard, and side and back positions. Chi-squared and Wilcoxon tests were conducted with a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results showed that winners had higher values for total strikes and submissions in all rounds, and also positional improvements, over losers. The standing combat with low-intensity comparisons presented differences between the rounds first, with a median of 2:33.5 (P25-P75%: 1:20-3:56) minute, second, with 2:37 (1:24-3:59) minute, and third, with 2:07 (1:06-3:39.2) minute. These data suggest a focus on the intermittent demand presented in combat phases with a special attention to the strike and ground technical-tactical skills; strength and conditioning coaches could emphasize the effort pause ratios for both standing and ground combat that mimic the requirements of MMA, especially during the third round. PMID:26670995

  11. Mini incision open pyeloplasty - Improvement in patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Garg, Manish; Sharma, Pradeep; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the subjective and objective outcomes of mini-incision dismembered Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty in the treatment of primary ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Materials and Methods: Between January 2008 to January 2013, Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty was performed in 71 patients diagnosed with primary UPJO. Small subcostal muscle splitting incision was used in all cases. Sixteen patients with renal calculi underwent concomitant pyelolithotomy. Subjective outcome was assessed using visual pain analogue score (VAS). For objective assessment, the improvement in differential renal function (DRF) and radio-tracer wash out time (T1/2) on Tc-99m DTPA scan and decrease in hydronephrosis (HDN) on renal ultrasound (USG) and urography (IVU) were assessed. Results: Mean incision length was 5.2 cm. The average operating time and postoperative hospital stay was 63 (52-124) minutes and 2.5 (2–6) days respectively. Concomitant renal calculi were successfully removed in all the patients. Overall complication rates were 8.4% and overall success rate was 98.6% at median follow-up of 16 months. There was significant improvement in pain score (p=0.0001) and significant decrease in HDN after the procedure. While preoperative mean T1/2 was 26.7±6.4 minutes, postoperative half-time decreased to 7.8±4.2 minutes at 6 months and to 6.7±3.3 minutes at 1 year. Mean pre-operative DRF was 26.45% and it was 31.38% and 33.19% at 6 months and 1 year respectively. Conclusions: Mini-incision pyeloplasty is a safe and effective technique with combined advantage of high success rates of standard open pyeloplasty with decreased morbidity of laparoscopic approach. Excellent functional and objective outcomes can be achieved without extra technical difficulty. PMID:26689518

  12. Improving Outcomes for Workers with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornes, Sandra; Rocco, Tonette S.; Rosenberg, Howard

    2008-01-01

    This research presents an analysis of factors predicting job retention, job satisfaction, and job performance of workers with mental retardation. The findings highlight self-determination as a critical skill in predicting the three important employee outcomes. The study examined a hypothesized job retention model and the outcome of the three…

  13. Does Cooperative Learning Improve Student Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamarik, Steven

    2007-01-01

    What is the effect of small-group learning on student learning outcomes in economic instruction? In spring 2002 and fall 2004, the author applied cooperative learning to one section of intermediate macroeconomics and taught another section using a traditional lecture format. He identified and then tracked measures of student learning outcomes.…

  14. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient's perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient's recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  15. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  16. Can restoring incomplete microcirculatory reperfusion improve stroke outcome after thrombolysis?

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Turgay; Arsava, Ethem Murat

    2012-01-01

    Substantial experimental data and recent clinical evidence suggesting that tissue reperfusion is a better predictor of outcome after thrombolysis than recanalization necessitate that patency of microcirculation after recanalization should be reevaluated. If indeed microcirculatory blood flow cannot be sufficiently reinstituted despite complete recanalization as commonly observed in coronary circulation, it may be one of the factors contributing to low efficacy of thrombolysis in stroke. Although microvascular no-reflow is considered an irreversible process that prevents tissue recovery from injury, emerging evidence suggests that it might be reversed with pharmacological agents administered early during recanalization. Therefore, therapeutic approaches aiming at reducing microvascular obstructions may improve success rate of recanalization therapies. Importantly, promoting oxygen delivery to the tissue, where entrapped erythrocytes cannot circulate in capillaries, with ongoing serum flow may improve survival of the underreperfused tissue. Altogether, these developments bring about the exciting possibility that benefit of reperfusion therapies can be further improved by restoring microcirculatory function because survival in the penumbra critically depends on adequate blood supply. Here, we review the available evidence suggesting presence of an ‘incomplete microcirculatory reperfusion' (IMR) after focal cerebral ischemia and discuss potential means that may help investigate IMR in stroke patients after recanalization therapies despite technical limitations. PMID:23047270

  17. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  18. Evaluating Practice: Does It Improve Treatment Outcome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Anson, Yonatan

    1998-01-01

    Single-case design methodology is evaluated for its effect on treatment outcomes. Participants were juvenile delinquents treated by probation officers with social work degrees in Israel. A quasi-experimental design used measures of the functioning of participants in several settings as dependent variables. Results are presented and discussed. (EMK)

  19. High-Leverage Leadership: Improving Outcomes in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongon, Denis; Chapman, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Globalisation of world trade, international media, technological innovation and social change are creating opportunities and challenges that today's pupils will inherit and build on. A pupil's academic, technical and social capacity will define their success or failure. Therefore, educational outcomes and well-being for young people across…

  20. Professional Development of Preceptors Improves Nurse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Elizabeth; Dienemann, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    This hospital preceptor program includes processes to recruit, select, and provide ongoing evaluation of preceptor function. After volunteering, candidates are chosen by peer vote. A blended training program includes online, commercially available modules and nursing professional development practitioner-led sessions that engage preceptors in reflection and problem-solving. Preceptor education allows nurses to further develop their skills over 2 years. Formal evaluation found that preceptors gained efficiency in their role with low turnover rate and positive patient outcomes. PMID:27434318

  1. How regional trauma systems improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-10-01

    Management of severely injured patients is complex and requires organised, expert care. Regionalised trauma systems are relatively new in the UK and aim to deliver optimal, timely care to injured patients at the most appropriate location. This article discusses the drivers, organisation, processes and outcomes of regionalised trauma care. It also describes the challenges and benefits of working within a trauma system to enable emergency practitioners to reflect on their roles in contemporary trauma care. PMID:26451941

  2. Assembling a Career: Labor Market Outcomes for Manufacturing Program Students in Two-Year Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheny, Christopher J.; Chan, Hsun-yu; Wang, Xueli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Research on labor market outcomes for individuals who enroll in technical colleges is limited, with even less attention to the effects of short-term certificates than associate degrees. Also, despite the importance of manufacturing programs, there is a lack of research on employment outcomes for individuals who enroll in these programs…

  3. Improving outcome of sensorimotor functions after traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In the rehabilitation of a patient suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI), the exploitation of neuroplasticity is well established. It can be facilitated through the training of functional movements with technical assistance as needed and can improve outcome after an SCI. The success of such training in individuals with incomplete SCI critically depends on the presence of physiological proprioceptive input to the spinal cord leading to meaningful muscle activations during movement performances. Some actual preclinical approaches to restore function by compensating for the loss of descending input to spinal networks following complete/incomplete SCI are critically discussed in this report. Electrical and pharmacological stimulation of spinal neural networks is still in the experimental stage, and despite promising repair studies in animal models, translations to humans up to now have not been convincing. It is possible that a combination of techniques targeting the promotion of axonal regeneration is necessary to advance the restoration of function. In the future, refinement of animal models according to clinical conditions and requirements may contribute to greater translational success. PMID:27303641

  4. Improving outcomes in anaesthesiology education on research.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Pamela C

    2011-12-01

    For more than 30 years in the United States, we have been lamenting the fate of the clinician-scientist in anaesthesiology. In the past 5 years, attention to the issues has escalated and a number of new training pathways have emerged. This chapter summarizes programs which have innovative curricula, analyzes current research needs and discusses the limited studies in regards to best practices for research training in graduate medical education. It also proposes further development of residency research curricula through the application of basic educational concepts and explores funding issues and resources that remain relevant to all faculty and departments training the residents. We hope the ideas proposed here will promote the academic caliber of our profession; however, much more data and outcomes research needs to be done to determine our best practices for the future. PMID:22099917

  5. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Daniel E.; Alexander, Karen; Brindis, Ralph G.; Curtis, Anne B.; Maurer, Mathew; Rich, Michael W.; Sperling, Laurence; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age.  Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase management risks (e.g., bleeding, falls, and rehospitalization) and uncertainty of outcomes.  In this review, state-of-the-art advances in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, atrial fibrillation, amyloidosis, and CVD prevention are discussed.  Conceptual benefits of treatments are considered in relation to the challenges and ambiguities inherent in their application to older patients. PMID:26918183

  6. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Forman, Daniel E; Alexander, Karen; Brindis, Ralph G; Curtis, Anne B; Maurer, Mathew; Rich, Michael W; Sperling, Laurence; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age.  Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase management risks (e.g., bleeding, falls, and rehospitalization) and uncertainty of outcomes.  In this review, state-of-the-art advances in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, atrial fibrillation, amyloidosis, and CVD prevention are discussed.  Conceptual benefits of treatments are considered in relation to the challenges and ambiguities inherent in their application to older patients. PMID:26918183

  7. Improving STEM Student Learning Outcomes with GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Longitudinal data collection initiated a decade ago as part of a successful NSF-CCLI grant proposal has resulted in a large - and growing - sample (200+) of students who report on their perceptions of self-improvement in Technology, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Reasoning proficiencies upon completion of an introductory (200-level) GIS course at New Jersey City University, a Hispanic-Serving and Minority Institution in Jersey City, NJ. Results from student satisfaction surveys indicate that, not surprisingly, 80% of respondents report improved confidence in Technology Literacy. Critical Thinking proficiency is judged to be significantly improved by 60% of respondents. On the other hand, Quantitative Reasoning proficiency confidence is improved in only 30% of students. This latter finding has prompted the instructor to search for more easily recognizable (to the student) ways of embedding quantitative reasoning into the course, as it is obvious to any GIS professional that there is an enormous amount of quantitative reasoning associated with this technology. A second post-course questionnaire asks students to rate themselves in these STEM proficiency areas using rubrics. Results mirror those from the self-satisfaction surveys. On a 5-point Likkert scale, students tend to see themselves improving about one letter grade on average in each proficiency area. The self-evaluation rubrics are reviewed by the instructor and are judged to be accurate for about 75% of the respondents.

  8. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  9. Role of Video Games in Improving Health-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Primack, Brian A.; Carroll, Mary V.; McNamara, Megan; Klem, Mary Lou; King, Brandy; Rich, Michael O.; Chan, Chun W.; Nayak, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Context Video games represent a multibillion-dollar industry in the U.S. Although video gaming has been associated with many negative health consequences, it may also be useful for therapeutic purposes. The goal of this study was to determine whether video games may be useful in improving health outcomes. Evidence acquisition Literature searches were performed in February 2010 in six databases: the Center on Media and Child Health Database of Research, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Reference lists were hand-searched to identify additional studies. Only RCTs that tested the effect of video games on a positive, clinically relevant health consequence were included. Study selection criteria were strictly defined and applied by two researchers working independently. Study background information (e.g., location, funding source), sample data (e.g., number of study participants, demographics), intervention and control details, outcomes data, and quality measures were abstracted independently by two researchers. Evidence synthesis Of 1452 articles retrieved using the current search strategy, 38 met all criteria for inclusion. Eligible studies used video games to provide physical therapy, psychological therapy, improved disease self-management, health education, distraction from discomfort, increased physical activity, and skills training for clinicians. Among the 38 studies, a total of 195 health outcomes were examined. Video games improved 69% of psychological therapy outcomes, 59% of physical therapy outcomes, 50% of physical activity outcomes, 46% of clinician skills outcomes, 42% of health education outcomes, 42% of pain distraction outcomes, and 37% of disease self-management outcomes. Study quality was generally poor; for example, two thirds (66%) of studies had follow-up periods of <12 weeks, and only 11% of studies blinded researchers. Conclusions There is potential promise for video games to improve

  10. Improving Learning Outcome Using Six Sigma Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetteh, Godson A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is to apply the Six Sigma methodology to identify the attributes of a lecturer that will help improve a student's prior knowledge of a discipline from an initial "x" per cent knowledge to a higher "y" per cent of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: The data collection method…

  11. Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures. PMID:21949881

  12. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  13. Implementing change: involving employees to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2014-11-01

    Increasingly, pharmacy workplaces are larger organizations that rely on policy and clinical guidelines to direct professional practice. Often, cost-cutting, profit-making, service-improving, and process-streamlining ideas are needed but difficult to identify or implement. By involving employees more closely in the change process using participative management (PM), managers reap tremendous reward. PM focuses on employee collaboration to develop and implement consistent, effective policies and procedures. This process recognizes employees' creative, emotional and intellectual needs and often improves the organization's public face as well. In addition, consumers perceive this approach to be socially responsible management. Managers can implement PM in a number of ways, applying it to problems or processes. PM has some pitfalls, but overall, if the workplace culture adapts to accommodate its principles, PM usually provides numerous benefits for organizations, their employees, and their customers. PMID:25369185

  14. Innovative strategies to improve diabetes outcomes in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, J S; Poindexter, M; Gary-Webb, T L; Walker, E A; Davis, N J

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes disproportionately affects disadvantaged populations. Eighty percent of deaths directly caused by diabetes occurred in low- and middle-income countries. In high-income countries, there are marked disparities in diabetes control among racial/ethnic minorities and those with low socio-economic status. Innovative, effective and cost-effective strategies are needed to improve diabetes outcomes in these populations. Technological advances, peer educators and community health workers have expanded methodologies to reach, educate and monitor individuals with diabetes. In the present manuscript we review the outcomes of these strategies, and describe the barriers to and facilitators of these approaches for improving diabetes outcomes. PMID:27194172

  15. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds: Improving Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Joseph A; Vlad, Lucian G; Gumus, Tuna

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing awareness that chronic wound healing is very dependent on the patient's nutritional status, but there are no clearly established and accepted assessment protocols or interventions in clinical practice. Much of the data used as guidelines for chronic wound patients are extrapolated from acutely wounded trauma patients, but the 2 groups are very different patient populations. While most trauma patients are young, healthy, and well-nourished before injury, the chronic wound patient is usually old, with comorbidities and frequently malnourished. We suggest the assumption that all geriatric wound patients are malnourished until proved otherwise. Evaluation should include complete history and physical and a formal nutritional evaluation should be obtained. Laboratory studies can be used in conjunction with this clinical information to confirm the assessment. While extensive studies are available in relation to prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers and perioperative nutrition, less is known of the effect of nutritional deficits and supplementation of the diabetic foot ulcer and venous stasis ulcer patient. This does not necessarily mean that nutritional support of these patients is not helpful. In the pursuit of wound healing, we provide systemic support of cardiac and pulmonary function and cessation of smoking, improve vascular inflow, improve venous outflow, decrease edema, and treat with hyperbaric oxygen. If we address all of these other conditions, why would we not wish to support the most basic of organismal needs in the form of nutrition? PMID:27556777

  16. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  17. Improving outcomes in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Tidman, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a heterogeneous inflammatory disorder that targets the skin and joints. It affects 1.3-2% of the population. The diagnosis of plaque psoriasis is usually straightforward, a helpful diagnostic clue is the tendency for silver scales to appear after gentle scratching of a lesion. Stress, streptococcal infection and drugs including beta-blockers, antimalarials and lithium may precipitate or exacerbate psoriasis. Psoriasis, especially when severe, predisposes to metabolic syndrome, and patients with psoriasis are at increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidaemia. Additionally, psoriasis sufferers appear at increased risk of uveitis, inflammatory boweldisease, lymphoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, COPD and venous thromboembolism. Psoriasis should be assessed on the basis of: severity, impact on physical, psychological and social wellbeing, symptoms of arthritis and the presence of comorbidities. Poor response to topical therapy may be as much to do with lack of compliance as with lack of efficacy. The number of treatments each day should be kept to a minimum, and patients should be reviewed after four weeks when initiating or changing topical therapy to improve adherence to treatment and assess response. The majority of patients with psoriasis can be managed in primary care, although specialist care may be necessary at some point in up to 60% of cases. Patients with erythrodermic or generalised pustular psoriasis should be referred for a same day dermatological opinion, and if psoriatic arthritis is suspected, early referral for a rheumatological opinion is recommended. PMID:23469725

  18. Vitamin d and rehabilitation: improving functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shinchuk, Leonid M; Shinchuk, Leonid; Holick, Michael F

    2007-06-01

    Vitamin D inadequacy is pandemic among rehabilitation patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Male and female patients of all ages and ethnic backgrounds are affected. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia, precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis, causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia, and worsens proximal muscle strength and postural sway. Vitamin D inadequacy can be prevented by sensible sun exposure and adequate dietary intake with supplementation. Vitamin D status is determined by measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The recommended healthful serum level is between 30 and 60 ng/mL. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels of >30 ng/mL are sufficient to suppress parathyroid hormone production and to maximize the efficiency of dietary calcium absorption from the small intestine. This can be accomplished by ingesting 1000 IU of vitamin D(3) per day, or by taking 50,000 IU of vitamin D(2) every 2 weeks. Vitamin D toxicity is observed when 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels exceed 150 ng/mL. Identification and treatment of vitamin D deficiency reduces the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures by improving bone health and musculoskeletal function. Vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or myositis. There is a need for better education of health professionals and the general public regarding the optimization of vitamin D status in the care of rehabilitation patients. PMID:17507730

  19. Improving the Outcome of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Marco J

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is the most common indication for hospital admission and its incidence is rising. It has a variable prognosis, which is mainly dependent upon the development of persistent organ failure and infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the past few years, based on large-scale multicenter randomized trials, some novel insights regarding clinical management have emerged. In patients with infected pancreatic necrosis, a step-up approach of percutaneous catheter drainage followed by necrosectomy only when the patient does not improve, reduces new-onset organ failure and prevents the need for necrosectomy in about a third of patients. A randomized pilot study comparing surgical to endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis showed a striking reduction of the pro-inflammatory response following endoscopic necrosectomy. These promising results have recently been tested in a large multicenter randomized trial whose results are eagerly awaited. Contrary to earlier data from uncontrolled studies, a large multicenter randomized trial comparing early (within 24 h) nasoenteric tube feeding compared with an oral diet after 72 h, did not show that early nasoenteric tube feeding was superior in reducing the rate of infection or death in patients with AP at high risk for complications. Although early ERCP does not have a role in the treatment of predicted mild pancreatitis, except in the case of concomitant cholangitis, it may ameliorate the disease course in patients with predicted severe pancreatitis. Currently, a large-scale randomized study is underway and results are expected in 2017. PMID:27336312

  20. Early diagnosis improves outcomes in hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael H; Dillon, John F

    2015-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection affects 0.8-1.0% of the UK population, with up to 70% having ongoing chronic infection. HCV is curable but if left untreated can progress to end stage liver disease and potentially hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV management options have changed dramatically over the past five years, with improvement in cure rates and tolerability; cure rates of more than 90% can now be achieved. The main risk factors for acquiring HCV infection in the UK are injecting drug use and sharing drug using equipment. Other risk factors include receipt of blood products in the UK before 1991; tattooing or acupuncture with non-sterile equipment; medical procedures; needlestick injuries and contact with blood from an infected person. Acute hepatitis C infection has mild symptoms only and is likely to go undiagnosed. The estimated diagnosis rate in England is 35%, suggesting that 65% of the total HCV-positive population remains undiagnosed. The most common method of detecting HCV is case finding in high- risk groups. Those who test positive for HCV antibodies should be tested for persisting viral presence through HCV PCR testing - a positive result confirms active infection. GPs can play a major role in identifying those at risk of the disease, which includes patients with known risk factors and those with unexplained abnormal liver function tests, providing information and arranging testing. Patients with confirmed active HCV infection should be referred to the local specialist hepatology or infectious disease service in accordance with locally agreed pathways. PMID:26753270

  1. The Paradox of Reducing Class Size and Improving Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses four questions: What are the effects of reducing class size? How important are these effects? How can we explain these effects? and How can we improve the outcomes when class sizes are reduced? A major aim is to provide directions for resolving the paradox as to "Why reducing class size has not led to major improvements in…

  2. The role of expectations in patients' reports of post-operative outcomes and improvement following therapy.

    PubMed

    Flood, A B; Lorence, D P; Ding, J; McPherson, K; Black, N A

    1993-11-01

    Outcomes research typically focuses on the technical capabilities associated with treatment that predicts patients' post-therapy outcomes adjusting for health-related factors. Research on the ability of placebo therapy to alter outcomes suggests that a patient's expectations about therapy can also influence outcomes. Few studies have examined the effects of expectations and their implications for assessing outcomes. This study followed 348 patients who had surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Four hypotheses are tested: whether positive expectations about improvement influence: 1) patients' postoperative reports of symptoms; 2) their belief that they have improved; 3) their overall health after treatment; and 4) whether these effects persist during the year following treatment. Using step-wise regression to control for sociodemographic and clinical factors, we found positive expectations did not appear to strongly influence a patient's report of postoperative symptoms or their overall health. However, we found strong support for positive expectations increasing the likelihood of reporting they felt better after surgery, even after controlling for symptom changes. This effect persisted throughout the postoperative year. We conclude that positive expectations result in a more optimistic view of improvement after surgery rather than altering reports of outcomes or health. PMID:7694013

  3. Cost Effectiveness in Evaluation Technical Assistance: Different Aspects of Measuring Cost and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Gary D.

    The paper focuses on the Title I Evaluation Technical Assistance Centers to illustrate issues of measuring costs and deciding on outcome criteria before promoting "cost-effective" approaches. Effects are illustrated for varying resource allocations among personnel, travel, materials, and phone costs as a function of emphasizing workshops, on-site…

  4. Technical Characteristics of General Outcome Measures (GOMs) in Reading for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri; Ticha, Renata; Gustafson, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the technical characteristics of newly created general outcome measures (GOMs) in reading for students with significant cognitive disabilities. The participants were 31 students with significant cognitive disabilities, and the GOMs used produced reliable data. Early results establishing the validity of the GOMs suggest that…

  5. Efforts to Improve Perinatal Outcomes for Women Enrolled in Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Daniel-Robinson, Lekisha; Cha, Stephen; Lillie-Blanton, Marsha

    2015-08-01

    Improving women's health and perinatal health outcomes is a high priority for Medicaid, the jointly financed federal-state health coverage program. The authorities provided by the Affordable Care Act give Medicaid new resources and opportunities to improve coverage and perinatal care. Given that the Medicaid program currently covers almost half of all births in the United States, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in partnership with states and other stakeholders, is using new and existing authorities to improve birth outcomes. Quality measurement, quality-improvement projects, and expanded models of care underscore the major quality approach of the center. As an outgrowth of an expert panel that included membership of several state Medicaid medical directors, Medicaid providers, and consumer representatives, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services launched the Maternal and Infant Health Initiative, which aims to increase postpartum visit rates and the use of effective contraception among women covered by Medicaid. This Initiative provides focus on key opportunities and strategies to improve the rate, measurement, timing, and content of postpartum visits. Additionally, a focus on contraception will serve to improve pregnancy planning and spacing and prevent unintended pregnancy. As the Initiative evolves, the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services plans to identify policy, service delivery, and reimbursement policies to advance the Initiative's goals and improve outcomes for women covered by Medicaid. PMID:26241435

  6. Breast center's redesign improves outcomes, cuts costs, attracts MCOs.

    PubMed

    1997-07-01

    Slashing breast cancer screening costs and improving outcomes: Implementing an innovative multidisciplinary approach to diagnosing breast cancer and narrowing its team to dedicated "breast specialists" has helped this community hospital's breast center win more MCO contracts--despite its location in the shadow of a world-renowned center. Here's how the new program works. PMID:10175553

  7. Improving outcome for mental disorders by enhancing memory for treatment.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Allison G; Lee, Jason; Smith, Rita L; Gumport, Nicole B; Hollon, Steven D; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Hein, Kerrie; Dolsen, Michael R; Haman, Kirsten L; Kanady, Jennifer C; Thompson, Monique A; Abrons, Deidre

    2016-06-01

    Patients exhibit poor memory for treatment. A novel Memory Support Intervention, derived from basic science in cognitive psychology and education, is tested with the goal of improving patient memory for treatment and treatment outcome. Adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) were randomized to 14 sessions of cognitive therapy (CT)+Memory Support (n = 25) or CT-as-usual (n = 23). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment and 6 months later. Memory support was greater in CT+Memory Support compared to the CT-as-usual. Compared to CT-as-usual, small to medium effect sizes were observed for recall of treatment points at post-treatment. There was no difference between the treatment arms on depression severity (primary outcome). However, the odds of meeting criteria for 'response' and 'remission' were higher in CT+Memory Support compared with CT-as-usual. CT+Memory Support also showed an advantage on functional impairment. While some decline was observed, the advantage of CT+Memory Support was evident through 6-month follow-up. Patients with less than 16 years of education experience greater benefits from memory support than those with 16 or more years of education. Memory support can be manipulated, may improve patient memory for treatment and may be associated with an improved outcome. PMID:27089159

  8. Purchasing population health: aligning financial incentives to improve health outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the concept of population health, including its definition, measurement, and determinants, and to suggest an approach for aligning financial incentives toward this goal. DATA SOURCE, STUDY DESIGN, DATA EXTRACTION. Literature review, policy analysis PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The article presents the argument that a major reason for our slow progress toward health outcome improvement is that there is no operational definition of population health and that financial incentives are not aligned to this goal. Current attempts at process measures as indicators of quality or outcome are not adequate for the task. It is suggested that some measure of health-adjusted life expectancy be adopted for this purpose, and that integrated delivery systems and other agents responsible for nonmedical determinants be rewarded for improvement in this measure. This will require the development of an investment portfolio across the determinants of health based on relative marginal return to health, with horizontal integration strategies across sectoral boundaries. A 20-year three-phase development strategy is proposed, including components of research and acceptance, integrated health system implementation, and cross-sectoral integration. CONCLUSIONS: The U.S. healthcare system is a $1 trillion industry without a definition of its product. Until population outcome measures are developed and rewarded for, we will not solve the twenty-first century challenge of maximizing health outcome improvement for the resources available. Images Figure 1 PMID:9618669

  9. Trial for Enhancing Technical Writing Skills to Improve Training Efficiency in Writing Technical Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneda, Michio; Ishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    One of the important undertakings of student in laboratory education practiced in higher educational institutions, such as universities, is the development of technical communication skills based on training in technical writing for preparing not only bachelor‧s and master‧s theses but also papers to be submitted to society journals. However, technical writing is difficult for students who are not trained in writing papers, and it might become a burden for the teaching staff. Considering this situation, we have examined methods that may enhance the technical writing skills of students and also improve the training efficiency of the teaching staff. Specifically, the methods include distributing checklists to students, providing as few corrections as possible using underlines and adding comments when correcting students‧ writings, and instructing students to exchange their writings to check each other‧s work. In this paper, we summarize and analyze the effects of practicing the above methods on the basis of the answers to a questionnaire provided by students.

  10. Interdisciplinary ICU Cardiac Arrest Debriefing Improves Survival Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Heather; Zebuhr, Carleen; Topjian, Alexis A.; Nishisaki, Akira; Niles, Dana E.; Meaney, Peter A.; Boyle, Lori; Giordano, Rita T.; Davis, Daniela; Priestley, Margaret; Apkon, Michael; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Sutton, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In-hospital cardiac arrest is an important public health problem. High-quality resuscitation improves survival but is difficult to achieve. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing program to improve survival outcomes after in-hospital pediatric chest compression events. Design, Setting, and Patients Single-center prospective interventional study of children who received chest compressions between December 2008 and June 2012 in the ICU. Interventions Structured, quantitative, audiovisual, interdisciplinary debriefing of chest compression events with front-line providers. Measurements and Main Results Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included survival of event (return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min) and favorable neurologic outcome. Primary resuscitation quality outcome was a composite variable, termed “excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation,” prospectively defined as a chest compression depth ≥ 38 mm, rate ≥ 100/min, ≤ 10% of chest compressions with leaning, and a chest compression fraction > 90% during a given 30-second epoch. Quantitative data were available only for patients who are 8 years old or older. There were 119 chest compression events (60 control and 59 interventional). The intervention was associated with a trend toward improved survival to hospital discharge on both univariate analysis (52% vs 33%, p = 0.054) and after controlling for confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.91–6.8; p = 0.075), and it significantly increased survival with favorable neurologic outcome on both univariate (50% vs 29%, p = 0.036) and multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.01–7.5; p = 0.047). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation epochs for patients who are 8 years old or older during the debriefing period were 5.6 times more likely to meet targets of excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (95% CI, 2.9–10

  11. Improving Literacy Outcomes for Years 5-8 Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a small action research project carried out by a Special Education Needs Coordinator (SENCO) in a small rural, full primary school in New Zealand. It focused on improving the literacy outcomes for Years 5-8 boys in the school by way of a boys'-only writing group. Results show that the boys'-only learning group had a positive…

  12. Music as intervention: a notable endeavor to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    White, J M

    2001-03-01

    Music interventions have been used in medicine and nursing throughout history. Music therapy is an easy-to-administer, relatively inexpensive, noninvasive intervention that has been used to reduce heart rate, blood pressure, myocardial oxygen consumption, gastrointestinal function, anxiety, and pain. A review of theoretic and empirical base for the use of music therapy to improve patient outcomes in a variety of areas of clinical practice is presented. Implications for practice and future research are suggested. PMID:11342404

  13. Can Technical Factors Explain the Volume-Outcome Relationship in Gastric Bypass Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. D.; Patterson, E.; Wahed, A. S.; Belle, S. H.; Courcoulas, A. P.; Flum, D.; Khandelwal, S.; Mitchell, J. E.; Pomp, A.; Pories, W. J.; Wolfe, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background The existence of a relationship between surgeon volume and patient outcome has been demonstrated for different complex surgical operations. This relationship has also been confirmed for patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) study. Despite multiple studies demonstrating volume-outcome relationships, fewer studies investigate the causes of this relationship. Objective The purpose of the present study is to understand possible explanations for the volume-outcome relationship in LABS. Setting Multiple Clinical Centers – University and Private Practice, United States. Methods LABS includes a 10-center, prospective study examining 30-day outcomes following bariatric surgery. The relationship between surgeon annual RYGB volume and incidence of a composite endpoint (CE) has been published previously. Technical aspects of RYGB surgery were compared between high and low volume surgeons. The previously published model was adjusted for select technical factors. Results High volume surgeons (>100 RYGBs/year) were more likely to perform a linear stapled gastrojejunostomy, use fibrin sealant and place a drain at the gastrojejunostomy compared to low volume surgeons (<25 RYGBs/year), and less likely to perform an intraoperative leak test. After adjusting for the newly identified technical factors, the relative risk of CE was 0.93 per 10 RYGB/year increase in volume, compared to 0.90 for clinical risk adjustment alone. Conclusion High volume surgeons exhibited certain differences in technique when compared to low volume surgeons. After adjusting for these differences, the strength of the volume-outcome relationship previously found was reduced only slightly, suggesting that other factors are also involved. PMID:23274125

  14. Quality improvement in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: Moving forward to improve outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Pauline; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Benchimol, Eric I

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, pediatric health care has embraced the concept of quality improvement to improve patient outcomes. As quality improvement efforts are implemented, network collaboration (where multiple centers and practices implement standardized programs) is a popular option. In a collaborative network, improvement in the conduct of structural, process and outcome quality measures can lead to improvements in overall health, and benchmarks can be used to assess and compare progress. In this review article, we provided an overview of the quality improvement movement and the role of quality indicators in this movement. We reviewed current quality improvement efforts in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as other pediatric chronic illnesses. We discussed the need to standardize the development of quality indicators used in quality improvement networks to assess medical care, and the validation techniques which can be used to ensure that process indicators result in improved outcomes of clinical significance. We aimed to assess current quality improvement efforts in pediatric IBD and other diseases, such as childhood asthma, childhood arthritis, and neonatal health. By doing so, we hope to learn from their successes and failures and to move the field forward for future improvements in the care provided to children with IBD. PMID:24151355

  15. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection: for Further Improvement of Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite improved outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD), many patients die at the moment of onset, and hospital mortality is still high. This article reviews the latest literature to seek the best possible way to optimize outcomes. Delayed diagnosis is caused by variation in or absence of typical symptoms, especially in patients with neurological symptoms. Misdiagnosis as acute myocardial infarction is another problem. Improved awareness by physicians is needed. On arrival, quick admission to the OR is desirable, followed by assessment with transesophageal echocardiography, and malperfusion already exists or newly develops in the OR; thus, timely diagnosis without delay with multimodality assessment is important. Although endovascular therapy is promising, careful introduction is mandatory so as not to cause complications. While various routes are used for the systemic perfusion, not a single route is perfect, and careful monitoring is essential. Surgical treatment on octogenarians is increasingly performed and produces better outcomes than conservative therapy. Complications are not rare, and consent from the family is essential. Prevention of AAAD is another important issue because more patients die at its onset than in the following treatment. In addition to hereditary diseases, including bicuspid aortic valve disease, the management of blood pressure is important. PMID:23555530

  16. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

  17. Technical Assistance for School Improvement. Knowledge Use and School Improvement--1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsand, Jean

    This document gathers together nine papers prepared in conjunction with a series of four seminars, held from January through May 1982, on the Role of Technical Assistance in the Long Range Plan for School Improvement. The seminars included participants from higher education, intermediate units, and public school superintendents. The following…

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  20. New approaches for improving outcomes in breast cancer in Europe.

    PubMed

    Di Leo, Angelo; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Diéras, Véronique; Malorni, Luca; Sotiriou, Christos; Swanton, Charles; Thompson, Alastair; Tutt, Andrew; Piccart, Martine

    2015-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made in breast cancer treatment in Europe over the past three decades, yet survival rates for metastatic disease remain poor, underlining the need for further advances. While the use of predictive biomarkers for response to systemic therapy could improve drug development efficiency, progress in identifying such markers has been slow. The currently inadequate classification of breast cancer subtypes is a further challenge. Improved understanding of the molecular pathology of the disease has led to the identification of new targets for drug treatment, and evolving classifications should reflect these developments. Further ongoing challenges include difficulties in finding optimal combinations and sequences of systemic therapies, circumventing multidrug resistance and intra-tumor heterogeneity, problems associated with fragmentation in clinical trials and translational research efforts. Adoption of some of the strategies identified in this article may lead to further improvements in outcomes for patients with the disease. PMID:25840656

  1. Improving stroke outcome: the benefits of increasing availability of technology.

    PubMed Central

    Heller, R. F.; Langhorne, P.; James, E.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A decision analysis was performed to explore the potential benefits of interventions to improve the outcome of patients admitted to hospital with a stroke, in the context of the technology available in different parts of the world. METHODS: The outcome of death or dependency was used with a six-month end-point. RESULTS: Four settings were identified that would depend on the resources available. The proportion of stroke patients who were dead or dependent at six months was 61.5% with no intervention at all. Setting 4, with the only intervention being the delayed introduction of aspirin, produced a 0.5% absolute improvement in outcome (death or dependency), and the addition of an organized stroke unit (Setting 3) produced the largest incremental improvement, of 2.7%. Extra interventions associated with non-urgent computed tomography and thus the ability to avoid anticoagulation or aspirin for those with a haemorrhagic stroke (Setting 2), and immediate computed tomography scanning to allow the use of thrombolytics in non-haemorrhagic stroke (Setting 1), produced only small incremental benefits of 0.4% in each case. DISCUSSION: To reduce the burden of illness due to stroke, efforts at primary prevention are essential and likely to have a greater impact than even the best interventions after the event. In the absence of good primary prevention, whatever is possible must be done to reduce the sequelae of stroke. This analysis provides a rational basis for beginning the development of clinical guidelines applicable to the economic setting of the patient. PMID:11143194

  2. Chemotherapy: Does Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Therapy Improve Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Canter, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Since preoperative chemotherapy has been clearly shown to improve outcomes for patients with Ewing sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and osteosarcoma, practitioners have attempted to extend the use of adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy to other types of adult soft tissue sarcoma. Given the high risk of distant recurrence and disease-specific death for patients with soft tissue sarcoma tumors larger than 10 cm, these patients should be considered candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as investigational therapies. Yet, potential toxicity from cytotoxic chemotherapy is substantial, and there remains little consensus and wide variation regarding the indications for use of chemotherapy in the adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting. PMID:27591503

  3. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  4. Improving Outcomes in State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs

    PubMed Central

    Linas, Benjamin P.; Losina, Elena; Rockwell, Annette; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Cranston, Kevin; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) provide antiretroviral medications to patients with no access to medications. Resource constraints limit many ADAPs' ability to meet demand for services. Objective To determine ADAP eligibility criteria that minimize morbidity and mortality and contain costs. Methods We used Discrete Event Simulation to model the progression of HIV-infected patients and track utilization of an ADAP. Outcomes included five-year mortality and incidence of first opportunistic infection or death, and time to starting ART. We compared expected outcomes for two policies: 1) first-come, first-served (FCFS) eligibility for all with CD4 count ≤350/μl (current standard), and 2) CD4 count prioritized eligibility for those with CD4 counts below a defined threshold. Results In the base case, prioritizing patients with CD4 counts ≤250/μl led to lower five-year mortality than FCFS eligibility [2.77 vs. 3.27 deaths/1,000 person months], and to a lower incidence of first opportunistic infection or death [5.55 vs. 6.98 events/1,000 person months]. CD4-based eligibility reduced the time to starting ART for patients with CD4 counts ≤200/μl. In sensitivity analyses, CD4-based eligibility consistently led to lower morbidity and mortality than FCFS eligibility. Conclusions When resources are limited, programs that provide ART can improve outcomes by prioritizing patients with low CD4 counts. PMID:19561518

  5. Salpingitis Isthmica Nodosa: Technical Success and Outcome of Fluoroscopic Transcervical Fallopian Tube Recanalization

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J. Graeme; Machan, Lindsay S.

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the technical success and outcome of fallopian tube recanalization (FTR) in salpingitis isthmica nodosa (SIN). Methods: SIN is a well-recognized pathological condition affecting the proximal fallopian tube and is associated with infertility and ectopic pregnancy. We reviewed the presentations, films, and case records of all patients attending for FTR for infertility from 1990 to 1994. Technical success and total, intrauterine, and ectopic pregnancy rates at follow-up were determined. Results: SIN was observed in 22 of 349 (6%) patients. FTR was attempted in 34 tubes in these 22 patients. Technical success was achieved in 23 of 34 (68%) tubes affected by SIN. In 5 of the 11 failed recanalizations, failure was due to distal obstruction. At least one tube was patent on selective postprocedural salpingography in 17 of 22 (77%) patients. There were no recorded perforations or complications. At follow-up (mean 14 months), total, intrauterine, and ectopic pregnancy rates were 23%, 18%, and 4.5%, respectively. Conclusion: FTR in SIN is technically successful and, compared with previously reported results in unselected infertility patients, is associated with only a slightly less favorable intrauterine pregnancy rate and a comparable ectopic pregnancy rate. The findings of SIN at FTR should not discourage attempted fluoroscopic transcervical recanalization.

  6. Improving Outcome of Psychosocial Treatments by Enhancing Memory and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Lee, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Hollon, Steven D.; Walker, Matthew P.; Thompson, Monique A.; Smith, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Mental disorders are prevalent and lead to significant impairment. Progress toward establishing treatments has been good. However, effect sizes are small to moderate, gains may not persist, and many patients derive no benefit. Our goal is to highlight the potential for empirically-supported psychosocial treatments to be improved by incorporating insights from cognitive psychology and research on education. Our central question is: If it were possible to improve memory for content of sessions of psychosocial treatments, would outcome substantially improve? This question arises from five lines of evidence: (a) mental illness is often characterized by memory impairment, (b) memory impairment is modifiable, (c) psychosocial treatments often involve the activation of emotion, (d) emotion can bias memory and (e) memory for psychosocial treatment sessions is poor. Insights from scientific knowledge on learning and memory are leveraged to derive strategies for a transdiagnostic and transtreatment cognitive support intervention. These strategies can be applied within and between sessions and to interventions delivered via computer, the internet and text message. Additional novel pathways to improving memory include improving sleep, engaging in exercise and imagery. Given that memory processes change across the lifespan, services to children and older adults may benefit from cognitive support. PMID:25544856

  7. Improving Outcome of Psychosocial Treatments by Enhancing Memory and Learning.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Allison G; Lee, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Hollon, Steven D; Walker, Matthew P; Thompson, Monique A; Smith, Rita

    2014-03-01

    Mental disorders are prevalent and can lead to significant impairment. Some progress has been made toward establishing treatments; however, effect sizes are small to moderate, gains may not persist, and many patients derive no benefit. Our goal is to highlight the potential for empirically supported psychosocial treatments to be improved by incorporating insights from cognitive psychology and research on education. Our central question is: If it were possible to improve memory for the content of sessions of psychosocial treatments, would outcome substantially improve? We leverage insights from scientific knowledge on learning and memory to derive strategies for transdiagnostic and transtreatment cognitive support interventions. These strategies can be applied within and between sessions and to interventions delivered via computer, the Internet, and text message. Additional novel pathways to improving memory include improving sleep, engaging in exercise, and using imagery. Given that memory processes change across the lifespan, services to children and older adults may benefit from different types and amounts of cognitive support. PMID:25544856

  8. Translating research into improved outcomes in comprehensive cancer control.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Jon F; Guirguis-Blake, Janelle; Hennessy, Kevin D; Brounstein, Paul J; Vinson, Cynthia; Schwartz, Randy H; Myers, Bradford A; Briss, Peter

    2005-10-01

    A key question in moving comprehensive cancer control (CCC) plans into action is, to what extent should the knowledge gained from investments in cancer prevention and control research influence the actions taken by states, tribes, and territories during implementation? Underlying this 'should' is the assumption that evidence-based approaches (i.e., a public health or clinical intervention or policy that has resulted in improved outcomes when scientifically tested), when implemented in a real-world setting, will increase the likelihood of improved outcomes. This article elucidates the barriers and opportunities for integrating science with practice across the cancer control continuum. However, given the scope of CCC and the substantial investment in generating new knowledge through science, it is difficult for any one agency, on its own, to make a sufficient investment to ensure new knowledge is translated and implemented at a national, state, or local level. Thus, if greater demand for evidence-based interventions and increased resources for adopting them are going to support the dissemination initiatives described herein, new interagency partnerships must be developed to ensure that sufficient means are dedicated to integrating science with service. Furthermore, for these collaborations to increase both in size and in frequency, agency leaders must clearly articulate their support for these collaborative initiatives and explicitly recognize those collaborative efforts that are successful. In this way, the whole (in this context, comprehensive cancer control) can become greater than the sum of its parts. PMID:16208572

  9. Technical and Clinical Outcome of Talent versus Endurant Endografts for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mensel, Birger; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Träger, Tobias; Dührkoop, Martin; v. Bernstorff, Wolfram; Rosenberg, Christian; Hoene, Andreas; Puls, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Objective The technical evolution of endografts for the interventional management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) has allowed a continuous expansion of indications. This study compares the established Talent endograft with its successor, the Endurant endograft, taking individual aortoiliac anatomy into account. Methods From June 2007 to December 2010, 35 patients with AAA were treated with a Talent endograft (33 men) and 36 patients with an Endurant endograft (34 men). Aortoiliac anatomy was evaluated in detail using preinterventional computed tomography angiography. The 30-day outcome of both groups were compared regarding technical and clinical success as well as complications including endoleaks. Results The Endurant group included more patients with unfavorable anatomy (kinking of pelvic arteries, p = 0.017; shorter proximal neck, p = 0.084). Primary technical success was 91.4% in the Talent group and 100% in the Endurant group (p = 0.115). Type 1 endoleaks occurred in 5.7% of patients in the Talent group and in 2.8% of those in the Endurant group (p = 0.614). Type 3 endoleaks only occurred in the Talent group (2.9% of patients; p = 0.493). Type 2 endoleaks were significantly less common in the Endurant group than in the Talent group (8.3% versus 28.6%; p = 0.035). Rates of major and minor complications were not significantly different between both groups. Primary clinical success was significantly better in the Endurant group (97.2%) than in the Talent group (80.0%) (p = 0.028). Conclusion Endurant endografts appear to have better technical and clinical outcome in patients with difficult aortoiliac anatomy, significantly reducing the occurrence of type 2 endoleaks. PMID:22715384

  10. The Effects of Career Technical Education on Student Outcomes in a High-Minority Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The study set out to determine the effects of Career Technical Education Career Academy participation on student outcome measures in a high minority urban school district. Three research questions explored student participation in career academies and student outcomes in the area of grade point average, credit completion and/or attendance rates.…

  11. Technical Assistance as a Prevention Capacity-Building Tool: A Demonstration Using the Getting to Outcomes[R] Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Sarah B.; Chinman, Matthew; Ebener, Patricia; Imm, Pam; Wandersman, Abraham; Ryan, Gery W.

    2009-01-01

    Demands on community-based prevention programs for performance accountability and positive outcomes are ever increasing in the face of constrained resources. Relatively little is known about how technical assistance (TA) should be structured to benefit community-based organizations and to lead to better outcomes. In this study, data from multiple…

  12. The Role of Technical Advances in the Adoption and Integration of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Roxanne E.; Rothrock, Nan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Spiegel, Brennan; Tucker, Carole A.; Crane, Heidi M.; Forrest, Christopher B.; Patrick, Donald L.; Fredericksen, Rob; Shulman, Lisa M.; Cella, David; Crane, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are gaining recognition as key measures for improving the quality of patient care in clinical care settings. Three factors have made the implementation of PROs in clinical care more feasible: increased use of modern measurement methods in PRO design and validation, rapid progression of technology (e.g., touch screen tablets, Internet accessibility, and electronic health records (EHRs)), and greater demand for measurement and monitoring of PROs by regulators, payers, accreditors, and professional organizations. As electronic PRO collection and reporting capabilities have improved, the challenges of collecting PRO data have changed. Objectives To update information on PRO adoption considerations in clinical care, highlighting electronic and technical advances with respect to measure selection, clinical workflow, data infrastructure, and outcomes reporting. Methods Five practical case studies across diverse healthcare settings and patient populations are used to explore how implementation barriers were addressed to promote the successful integration of PRO collection into the clinical workflow. The case studies address selecting and reporting of relevant content, workflow integration, pre-visit screening, effective evaluation, and EHR integration. Conclusions These case studies exemplify elements of well-designed electronic systems, including response automation, tailoring of item selection and reporting algorithms, flexibility of collection location, and integration with patient health care data elements. They also highlight emerging logistical barriers in this area, such as the need for specialized technological and methodological expertise, and design limitations of current electronic data capture systems. PMID:25588135

  13. Improved facial outcome assessment using a 3D anthropometric mask.

    PubMed

    Claes, P; Walters, M; Clement, J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity to process three-dimensional facial surfaces to objectively assess outcomes of craniomaxillofacial care is urgently required. Available surface registration techniques depart from conventional facial anthropometrics by not including anatomical relationship in their analysis. Current registrations rely on the manual selection of areas or points that have not moved during surgery, introducing subjectivity. An improved technique is proposed based on the concept of an anthropometric mask (AM) combined with robust superimposition. The AM is the equivalent to landmark definitions, as used in traditional anthropometrics, but described in a spatially dense way using (∼10.000) quasi-landmarks. A robust superimposition is performed to align surface images facilitating accurate measurement of spatial differences between corresponding quasi-landmarks. The assessment describes magnitude and direction of change objectively and can be displayed graphically. The technique was applied to three patients, without any modification and prior knowledge: a 4-year-old boy with Treacher-Collins syndrome in a resting and smiling pose; surgical correction for hemimandibular hypoplasia; and mandibular hypoplasia with staged orthognathic procedures. Comparisons were made with a reported closest-point (CP) strategy. Contrasting outcomes were found where the CP strategy resulted in anatomical implausibility whilst the AM technique was parsimonious to expected differences. PMID:22103995

  14. Improved outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Guzzo, Marco; Tomatis, Stefano Ph.D.; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Potepan, Paolo; Quattrone, Pasquale; Cantu, Giulio

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy at a single institution. Methods and materials: From 1990 to 1999, 171 consecutive patients with NPC were treated with conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy. Tumor histology was undifferentiated in 82% of cases. Tumor-node-metastasis Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 1997 system) was I in 6%, II in 36%, III in 22%, and IV in 36% of patients. Mean total radiation dose was 68.4 Gy. Chemotherapy was given to 62% of the patients. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.3 years (range, 3.1-13.1 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival rates were 72%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. The 5-year local, regional, and distant control rates were 84%, 80%, and 83% respectively. Late effects of radiotherapy were prospectively recorded in 100 patients surviving without relapse; 44% of these patients had Grade 3 xerostomia, 33% had Grade 3 dental damage, and 11% had Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusions: This analysis shows an improved outcome for patients treated from 1990 to 1999 compared with earlier retrospective series, despite the use of two-dimensional radiotherapy. Late toxicity, however, was substantial with conventional radiotherapy.

  15. Postoperative management of hip fractures: interventions associated with improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S

    2012-01-01

    The annual number of hip fractures worldwide is expected to exceed 6 million by 2050. Currently, nearly 50% of hip fracture patients will develop at least one short-term complication including infection, delirium, venous thromboembolism (VTE), pressure ulcers or cardiovascular events. More than half will experience an adverse long-term outcomes including worsened ambulation or functional status, additional fractures and excess mortality. This paper summarizes current evidence for postoperative interventions attempting to improve these outcomes, including pain management, anemia management, delirium prevention strategies, VTE prophylaxis, rehabilitation type, nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids and secondary fracture prevention. Models of care that have been tested in this population including interdisciplinary orthogeriatric services, clinical pathways and hospitalist care are summarized. In general, good quality evidence supports routine use of VTE prophylaxis, and moderate quality evidence supports multifactorial delirium prevention protocols, and a conservative transfusion strategy. Aggressive pain control with higher doses of opiates and/or regional blocks are associated with lower delirium rates. Low-moderate quality evidence supports the use of clinical pathways, and dedicated orthogeriatric consultative services or wards. After hospital discharge, good quality evidence supports the use of bisphosphonates for secondary fracture prevention and mortality reduction. Rehabilitation services are important, but evidence to guide quantity, type or venue is lacking. Additional research is needed to clarify the role of nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids, home care and psychosocial interventions. PMID:24340216

  16. Valuing preferences over stormwater management outcomes including improved hydrologic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LondoñO Cadavid, Catalina; Ando, Amy W.

    2013-07-01

    Stormwater runoff causes environmental problems such as flooding, soil erosion, and water pollution. Conventional stormwater management has focused primarily on flood reduction, while a new generation of decentralized stormwater solutions yields ancillary benefits such as healthier aquatic habitat, improved surface water quality, and increased water table recharge. Previous research has estimated values for flood reduction from stormwater management, but no estimates exist for the willingness to pay (WTP) for some of the other environmental benefits of alternative approaches to stormwater control. This paper uses a choice experiment survey of households in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, to estimate the values of several attributes of stormwater management outcomes. We analyzed data from 131 surveyed households in randomly selected neighborhoods. We find that people value reduced basement flooding more than reductions in yard or street flooding, but WTP for basement flood reduction in the area only exists if individuals are currently experiencing significant flooding themselves. Citizens value both improved water quality and improved hydrologic function and aquatic habitat from runoff reduction. Thus, widespread investment in low impact development stormwater solutions could have very large total benefits, and stormwater managers should be wary of policies and infrastructure plans that reduce flooding at the expense of water quality and aquatic habitat.

  17. Preparing the patient for surgery to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levett, Denny Z H; Edwards, Mark; Grocott, Mike; Mythen, Monty

    2016-06-01

    The time between contemplation of surgery and the procedure offers a window of opportunity to optimize patients' nutritional, functional and psychological state prior to surgery. Traditionally, preoperative pathways have focused on the underlying disease process and 'fitness for surgery' with physical pre-assessment and risk counselling late in the pathway when little time is available to intervene. With an increasingly elderly and co-morbid surgical population, early physiological assessment and multidisciplinary collaborative decision-making is increasingly important. Multimodal prehabilitation programmes may improve surgical outcome, facilitating rapid recovery from surgery and limiting post-operative functional dependence. Patient education and engagement is important if compliance with behavioural change is to be achieved and maintained. To date, there has been evidence supporting preoperative exercise training, smoking cessation, reduction in alcohol intake, anaemia management and psychosocial support. Further research is needed to identify the most effective elements of these complex preoperative interventions, as well as their optimum timing and duration. PMID:27396803

  18. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants’ ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed. PMID:22923854

  19. Anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibodies improve traumatic brain injury outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid with a potentially causative role in neurotrauma. Blocking LPA signaling with the LPA-directed monoclonal antibody B3/Lpathomab is neuroprotective in the mouse spinal cord following injury. Findings Here we investigated the use of this agent in treatment of secondary brain damage consequent to traumatic brain injury (TBI). LPA was elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with TBI compared to controls. LPA levels were also elevated in a mouse controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of TBI and B3 significantly reduced lesion volume by both histological and MRI assessments. Diminished tissue damage coincided with lower brain IL-6 levels and improvement in functional outcomes. Conclusions This study presents a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of TBI by blocking extracellular LPA signaling to minimize secondary brain damage and neurological dysfunction. PMID:24576351

  20. Improving MILSATCOM (Military Satellite Communication) acquisition outcomes: Lease versus buy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinneen, P. M.; Quinn, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    This study was requested by the Director of Space Systems and Command, Control, and Communications, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff (Research, Development, and Acquisition), Headquarters United States Air Force, to assist in improving the outcomes of military satellite communication (MILSATCOM) programs. In view of rapidly rising costs of military space systems, leasing has been suggested as one way of controlling these costs. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to identify and analyze the central considerations relevant to determining whether to lease or by MILSATCOM services. The results of this report should be of interest to members of MILSATCOM acquisition community and others concerned with making lease versus buy decisions in the public sector. The work was conducted under the MILSATCOM Acquisition Policy project of the Project Air Force Resource Management Program.

  1. Defining lactation acuity to improve patient safety and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mannel, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    While substantial evidence exists identifying risks factors associated with premature weaning from breastfeeding, there are no previously published definitions of patient acuity in the lactation field. This article defines evidence-based levels of lactation acuity based on maternal and infant characteristics. Patient acuity, matching severity of illness to intensity of care required, is an important determinant of patient safety and outcomes. It is often used as part of a patient classification system to determine staffing needs and acceptable workloads in health care settings. As acuity increases, more resources, including more skilled clinicians, are needed to provide optimal care. Developing an evidence-based definition of lactation acuity can help to standardize terminology, more effectively distribute health care staff resources, encourage research to verify the validity and reliability of lactation acuity, and potentially improve breastfeeding initiation and duration rates. PMID:21527797

  2. Improving pregnancy outcome during imprisonment: a model residential care program.

    PubMed

    Siefert, K; Pimlott, S

    2001-04-01

    The female prison population has increased dramatically in recent years. Most women prisoners are involved with drugs, and as many as 25 percent are pregnant or have delivered within the past year. Reproductive health and drug treatment services for women in prison are inadequate, if they are available at all, and although illicit drugs are readily available in prison, drug-involved pregnant women often are incarcerated to protect fetal health. Studies of pregnancy outcome among women prisoners have demonstrated high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. This article examines issues related to pregnancy among women prisoners and describes an innovative residential program designed for pregnant, drug-dependent women in a state adult corrections system. Social workers can play an important role in promoting policy reform and improved services for this underserved population. PMID:11329642

  3. Nonshaved cranial surgery in black Africans: technical report and a medium-term prospective outcome study.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Amos O

    2016-07-01

    Nonshaved neurosurgery, cranial or spinal, is well reported among Caucasians but hardly among native Africans. The ungroomed scalp hairs of black Africans have unique anthropological characteristics needing special attention for shaveless cranial surgery. A technical report of the execution of this surgical procedure among an indigenous patient population in a sub-Sahara African country is presented, as well as an outcome analysis in a prospective cohort over a 7-year period. A total of 303 patients (211 males, 70 %) fulfilled the criteria for this study. The surgical procedure was primary in 278 (92 %) and redo in 8 %. It was emergency surgery in 153 (51 %). They were trauma craniotomies or decompressive craniectomies in 95 cases (31 %), craniotomies for tumour resections in 86 (28 %), and the surgical dissections for other conditions in 122 (41 %). The duration of surgery ranged from 30 min to 8.5 h, mean 2.5 (SD, 1.6), median 2. In-hospital clinical outcome was good (normal status or moderate deficit on dichotomized Glasgow outcome scale (GOS)) in 273 (90.1 %) cases while surgical site infections occurred in only 10 cases (3.3 %). The type of surgery, redo or primary, did not have any significant association with the in-hospital outcome (p = 0.5), nor with the presence of surgical site infection (SSI) (p = 0.7). The length of follow-up ranged from 2 to 63 months (mean, 7) with no untoward complications reported so far. Medium-term outcome of nonshaved neurosurgery in this indigenous black Africans remains favourable with no attendant significant adverse after-effects. PMID:26873745

  4. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  5. Technical Skill Attainment and Post-Program Outcomes: An Analysis of Pennsylvania Secondary Career and Technical Education Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staklis, Sandra; Klein, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) has required all students concentrating in career and technical education (CTE) programs to complete a standardized technical skill assessment at or near the end of their program. Results of technical skill assessments are used for a number of purposes, including recognizing…

  6. Can States Simultaneously Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Health Outcome Disparities?

    PubMed Central

    Lardinois, Nicholas; Chatterjee, Debanjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reducing racial health disparities is often stated as a population health goal, but specific targets for such improvement are seldom set. It is often assumed that improving overall health outcomes will be linked to disparity reduction, but this is not necessarily the case. Methods We compared the annual change from 1999 through 2013 in combined-race (black and white) mortality with the annual change in absolute and relative racial mortality disparities for US states. Results Median annual improvement in combined-race mortality was 1.08% per year. Annual overall mortality rate reductions ranged from 0.24% per year in Oklahoma to 1.83% per year in Maryland. For disparities, the median for the black–white absolute gap was 3.60% per year, and the median for the relative black-to-white ratio was 1.19% per year. There was no significant correlation between the combined-race measure and either the absolute (0.03) or relative disparity measure reductions (−0.17). Conclusion For mortality in US states over a recent period, improvement in the population mean and disparity reduction do not usually occur together. The disparity reduction rates observed may provide realistic guidance for public and private policy makers in setting goals for reducing population health disparity and creating investment priorities. As a starting point for discussion, the observed national median annual percentage improvement of 1.1 per year combined, 3.6% per year absolute gap reduction, and 1.2% per year relative gap reduction would be modest and reasonable goals. PMID:27560720

  7. DoMINO: Donor milk for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of mother’s own milk is the optimal way to feed infants, including very low birth weight infants (VLBW, <1500 g). Importantly for VLBW infants, who are at elevated risk of neurologic sequelae, mother’s own milk has been shown to enhance neurocognitive development. Unfortunately, the majority of mothers of VLBW infants are unable to provide an adequate supply of milk and thus supplementation with formula or donor milk is necessary. Given the association between mother’s own milk and neurodevelopment, it is important to ascertain whether provision of human donor milk as a supplement may yield superior neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to formula. Our primary hypothesis is that VLBW infants fed pasteurized donor milk compared to preterm formula as a supplement to mother’s own milk for 90 days or until hospital discharge, whichever comes first, will have an improved cognitive outcome as measured at 18 months corrected age on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 3rd ed. Secondary hypotheses are that the use of pasteurized donor milk will: (1) reduce a composite of death and serious morbidity; (2) support growth; and (3) improve language and motor development. Exploratory research questions include: Will use of pasteurized donor milk: (1) influence feeding tolerance and nutrient intake (2) have an acceptable cost effectiveness from a comprehensive societal perspective? Methods/Design DoMINO is a multi-centre, intent-to-treat, double blinded, randomized control trial. VLBW infants (n = 363) were randomized within four days of birth to either (1) pasteurized donor milk or (2) preterm formula whenever mother’s own milk was unavailable. Study recruitment began in October 2010 and was completed in December 2012. The 90 day feeding intervention is complete and long-term follow-up is underway. Discussion Preterm birth and its complications are a leading cause long-term morbidity among Canadian children. Strategies to mitigate this

  8. Improved outcome of referrals for intestinal transplantation in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Girish L; Beath, Susan V; Protheroe, Sue; Murphy, M Stephen; Davies, Paul; Sharif, Khalid; McKiernan, Patrick J; de Ville de Goyet, Jean; Booth, Ian W; Kelly, Deirdre A

    2007-01-01

    Aim To describe the outcome of children with intestinal failure referred to Birmingham Children's Hospital (BCH) for consideration of intestinal transplantation (ITx), to determine factors for an adverse outcome and to analyse the impact of post‐1998 strategies on survival. Subjects and methods A retrospective analysis was performed of children referred for ITx assessment from January 1989 to December 2003. Children were assessed by a multidisciplinary team and categorised into: (a) stable on parenteral nutrition; (b) unsuitable for transplantation (Tx); and (c) recommended for Tx. To analyse the impact of the post‐1998 strategies on survival, a comparison was made between the two eras (pre‐1998 and post‐1998). Results 152 children with chronic intestinal failure were identified (63M:89F, median age 10 months (range 1–170)). After assessment, 69 children were considered stable on parenteral nutrition (5‐year survival 95%); 28 children were unsuitable for Tx (5‐year survival 4%); and 55 children were recommended for Tx (5‐year survival 35%, which includes 14 children who died waiting for size‐matched organs). Twenty three ITx and nine isolated liver transplants (iLTx) were performed. In a multivariate analysis, the following factors in combination had an adverse effect on survival: the presence of a primary mucosal disorder (p = 0.007, OR ratio 3.16, 95% CI 1.37 to 7.31); absence of involvement of a nutritional care team at the referring hospital (p = 0.001, OR ratio 2.55, 95% CI 1.44 to 4.52); and a serum bilirubin>100 µmol/l (p = 0.001, OR ratio 3.70, 95% CI 1.84 to 7.47). Earlier referral (median serum bilirubin 78 µmol/l in the post‐1998 era compared with 237 µmol/l in the pre‐1998 era, p = 0.001) may be a contributory factor to improved survival. The strategies of combined en bloc reduced liver/small bowel transplantation and iLTx resulted in fewer deaths on the waiting list in the post‐1998 era (2 deaths in

  9. Improving Technical Competence: How the CTE Community Is Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI) has been serving the career and technical education (CTE) community for almost 45 years. It is in the unique position to produce longitudinal data that indicates technical competence levels based on end-of-program testing across the country. NOCTI's data confirms that CTE is indeed…

  10. Edwin I. Hatch nuclear plant implementation of improved technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, S.R.; Pendry, D.

    1994-12-31

    Edwin I. Hatch nuclear plant consists of two General Electric boiling water reactor/4 units, with a common control room and a common refueling floor. In March 1993, Hatch began conversion of both units` technical specifications utilizing NUREG 1433. The technical specifications amendment request was submitted February 25, 1994. Issuance is scheduled for October 21, 1994, with implementation on March 15, 1994. The current unit-1 technical specifications are in the {open_quotes}custom{close_quotes} format, and the unit-2 technical specifications are in the old standard format. Hatch previously relocated the fire protection and radiological technical specifications requirements. The Hatch conversion will provide consistency between the two units, to the extent practicable.

  11. [Improvement of outcomes by primary treatment for temporomandibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shigeru; Kino, Koji; Iwaki, Hiroshi; Amagasa, Teruo

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the current state of the temporomandibular joint disorder treatment in our clinic and to confirm the therapeutic outcomes. The subjects in this study were recruited from among the patients with temporomandibular disorders who attended the Temporomandibular Disorder Special Clinic, Department of Oral Surgery, Hitachi Yokohama Hospital during one year period from February 2007 to January 2008. A total of 100 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders were selected for the study. Pain intensity and the degree to which daily function was limited before and after treatment were evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) score was evaluated simultaneously, and the correlation with changes in symptom was evaluated. The median (25th, 75th percentiles) of pain intensity (VAS value) before treated was 45 (25.0, 65.0) and the degree of limitation of daily function (VAS value) was 15 (0.0, 50.0). The median (25th, 75th percentiles) of pain intensity at 4 weeks after was 10 (0.0, 30.0), and significantly lower than that before treatment (p = 0.000). The degree of limitation of daily function was 0 (0.0, 10.0), also significantly lower than that before treatment (p = 0.000). The BDI-II score decreased from 8 (2.0, 11.8) before treatment to 5 (2.0, 11.0, p = 0.024) and showed no significant correlation with the improvement in outcomes by primary treatment for temporomandibular disorders. PMID:19044015

  12. Can prebiotics and probiotics improve therapeutic outcomes for undernourished individuals?

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Paul O; Bindels, Laure B; Saulnier, Delphine M; Reid, Gregor; Nova, Esther; Holmgren, Kerstin; O'Toole, Paul W; Bunn, James; Delzenne, Nathalie; Scott, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that the human intestinal microbiota plays an important role in maintaining health and thus is an attractive target for clinical interventions. Scientists and clinicians have become increasingly interested in assessing the ability of probiotics and prebiotics to enhance the nutritional status of malnourished children, pregnant women, the elderly, and individuals with non-communicable disease-associated malnutrition. A workshop was held by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP), drawing on the knowledge of experts from industry, medicine, and academia, with the objective to assess the status of our understanding of the link between the microbiome and under-nutrition, specifically in relation to probiotic and prebiotic treatments for under-nourished individuals. These discussions led to four recommendations:   (1) The categories of malnourished individuals need to be differentiated To improve treatment outcomes, subjects should first be categorized based on the cause of malnutrition, additional health-concerns, differences in the gut microbiota, and sociological considerations. (2) Define a baseline “healthy” gut microbiota for each category Altered nutrient requirement (for example, in pregnancy and old age) and individual variation may change what constitutes a healthy gut microbiota for the individual. (3) Perform studies using model systems to test the effectiveness of potential probiotics and prebiotics against these specific categories These should illustrate how certain microbiota profiles can be altered, as members of different categories may respond differently to the same treatment. (4) Perform robust well-designed human studies with probiotics and/or prebiotics, with appropriate, defined primary outcomes and sample size These are critical to show efficacy and understand responder and non-responder outcomes. It is hoped that these recommendations will lead to new approaches

  13. Social protection: potential for improving HIV outcomes among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, Lucie D; Hodes, Rebecca J; Sherr, Lorraine; Mark Orkin, F; Meinck, Franziska; Lim Ah Ken, Patricia; Winder-Rossi, Natalia E; Wolfe, Jason; Vicari, Marissa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Advances in biomedical technologies provide potential for adolescent HIV prevention and HIV-positive survival. The UNAIDS 90–90–90 treatment targets provide a new roadmap for ending the HIV epidemic, principally through antiretroviral treatment, HIV testing and viral suppression among people with HIV. However, while imperative, HIV treatment and testing will not be sufficient to address the epidemic among adolescents in Southern and Eastern Africa. In particular, use of condoms and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain haphazard, with evidence that social and structural deprivation is negatively impacting adolescents’ capacity to protect themselves and others. This paper examines the evidence for and potential of interventions addressing these structural deprivations. Discussion New evidence is emerging around social protection interventions, including cash transfers, parenting support and educational support (“cash, care and classroom”). These interventions have the potential to reduce the social and economic drivers of HIV risk, improve utilization of prevention technologies and improve adherence to ART for adolescent populations in the hyper-endemic settings of Southern and Eastern Africa. Studies show that the integration of social and economic interventions has high acceptability and reach and that it holds powerful potential for improved HIV, health and development outcomes. Conclusions Social protection is a largely untapped means of reducing HIV-risk behaviours and increasing uptake of and adherence to biomedical prevention and treatment technologies. There is now sufficient evidence to include social protection programming as a key strategy not only to mitigate the negative impacts of the HIV epidemic among families, but also to contribute to HIV prevention among adolescents and potentially to remove social and economic barriers to accessing treatment. We urge a further research and programming agenda: to actively combine

  14. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L5-S1 through a Unilateral Approach: Technical Feasibility and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Suh; Kim, Jin-Sung; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Hur, Jung-Woo; Seong, Ji-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Minimally invasive spinal transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) at L5-S1 is technically more demanding than it is at other levels because of the anatomical and biomechanical traits. Objective. To determine the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIS-TLIF for treatment of single-level spinal stenosis low-grade isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis at L5-S1. Methods. Radiological data and electronic medical records of patients who underwent MIS-TLIF between May 2012 and December 2014 were reviewed. Fusion rate, cage position, disc height (DH), disc angle (DA), disc slope angle, segmental lordotic angle (SLA), lumbar lordotic angle (LLA), and pelvic parameters were assessed. For functional assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and patient satisfaction rate (PSR) were utilized. Results. A total of 21 levels in 21 patients were studied. DH, DA, SLA, and LLA had increased from their preoperative measures at the final follow-up. Fusion rate was 86.7% (18/21) at 12 months' follow-up. The most common cage position was anteromedial (15/21). The mean VAS scores for back and leg pain mean ODI scores improved significantly at the final follow-up. PSR was 88%. Cage subsidence was observed in 33.3% (7/21). Conclusions. The clinical and radiologic outcomes after MIS-TLIF at L5-S1 in patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis are generally favorable. PMID:27433472

  15. Does Functional Outcome Improve with Time Postsurgery for Hirschsprung Disease?

    PubMed

    Aworanti, Olugbenga Michael; McDowell, Dermot Thomas; Martin, Ian Michael; Quinn, Feargal

    2016-04-01

    Purpose Constipation and incontinence are significant problems following pull-through surgery for Hirschsprung disease (HD). There is evidence that these problems improve with time. However, there is also evidence showing no improvements and furthermore, significant long-term data are lacking for the newer endorectal pull-through. We aim to determine if there is clinical evidence that show improvements in functional outcomes with time after an endorectal pull-through surgery for HD. Methods We utilized the validated pediatric incontinence and constipation scoring system (PICSS) to score 51 consecutive children 3 months to 15 years posttransabdominal or transanal endorectal pull-through for HD. Cases of total colonic aganglionosis and Down syndrome were excluded. PICSS scores below the age-specific lower limit 95% confidence interval scores represent incomplete continence or constipation, respectively. We performed linear regression to analyze the relationship between PICSS scores and the follow-up duration and then compared the demographics of children with and without incomplete continence and constipation, respectively. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results The median age at PICSS interview was 71 months (range, 6-191 months). Incontinence scores obtained from 42 children older than 35 months showed a positive relationship with the follow-up duration (p = 0.03). Constipation scores obtained from 51 children were unrelated to follow-up duration (p = 0.486). When demographics were compared, the continent children had longer follow-up than those with incomplete continence (mean, 111.64 vs. 69.19 months; p = 0.051), however follow-up duration did not differ in the group of constipated children compared with the nonconstipated group (mean, 61.88 vs. 71.80 months; p = 0.321). Conclusion These findings suggest that after an endorectal pull-through, improved continence should be expected with time but constipation often continues to be an

  16. Certified kitchen managers: do they improve restaurant inspection outcomes?

    PubMed

    Cates, Sheryl C; Muth, Mary K; Karns, Shawn A; Penne, Michael A; Stone, Carmily N; Harrison, Judy E; Radke, Vincent J

    2009-02-01

    Restaurants are associated with a significant number of foodborne illness outbreaks in the United States. Certification of kitchen managers through an accredited training and testing program may help improve food safety practices and thus prevent foodborne illness. In this study, relationships between the results of routine restaurant inspections and the presence of a certified kitchen manager (CKM) were examined. We analyzed data for 4461 restaurants in Iowa that were inspected during 2005 and 2006 (8338 total inspections). Using logistic regression analysis, we modeled the outcome variable (0 = no critical violations [CVs]; 1 = one or more CVs) as a function of presence or absence of a CKM and other explanatory variables. We estimated separate models for seven inspection categories. Restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were less likely to have a CV for personnel (P < 0.01), food source or handling (P < 0.01), facility or equipment requirements (P < 0.05), ware-washing (P < 0.10), and other operations (P < 0.10). However, restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were equally likely to have a CV for temperature or time control and plumbing, water, or sewage as were restaurants without a CKM present. Analyses by type of violation within the temperature and time control category revealed that restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were less likely to have a CV for hot holding (P < 0.05), but the presence of a CKM did not affect other types of temperature and time control violations. Our analyses suggest that the presence of a CKM is protective for most types of CVs, and we identify areas for improving training of CKMs. PMID:19350984

  17. Fertility Treatments in the United States: Improving Access and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kissin, Dmitry M; Boulet, Sheree L; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-08-01

    The recently released National Public Health Action Plan for the Detection, Prevention, and Management of Infertility calls for better access to high-quality infertility services and improved safety of fertility treatments. Both assisted reproductive technology (ART) and non-ART fertility treatments have allowed millions of patients worldwide to overcome infertility-a disease of the reproductive system and important public health issue. However, there are substantial disparities in access to effective treatments in the United States, largely attributable to high out-of-pocket costs, especially for ART. Moreover, the outcomes of fertility treatments are often complicated by the large proportion of multiple births with substantial health risks for both neonates and mothers. Prevention of multiple births is difficult during non-ART fertility treatments but can be effective with single-embryo transfer during ART. Several U.S. states have enacted legislative mandates that require private insurers to cover some portion of the costs associated with fertility treatments and thus reduce the financial pressure to transfer multiple embryos during ART. Although studies have shown that insurance coverage reduces per-cycle multiple births to a certain degree, states with insurance mandates have more ART-related multiple births attributable to substantially larger number of ART-conceived neonates. Experience from other countries shows that access to ART can be improved without concomitant increases in multiple births by providing reimbursement for ART in combination with restrictions on the number of embryos transferred per cycle. Such approaches may or may not be successful in the United States with its unique and complex health care system. PMID:27399992

  18. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual's competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been

  19. Premature ovarian insufficiency: how to improve reproductive outcome?

    PubMed

    Ben-Nagi, J; Panay, N

    2014-06-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a life-changing condition that affects women in their reproductive age. The condition is not necessarily permanent but is associated with intermittent and unpredictable ovarian activity. Hence, spontaneous pregnancies have been reported to be 5-10%. However, pregnancy in patients with POI is still unlikely and rare. Although, there are reviews on POI in the literature, there is a lack of reports which focus on how to improve the reproductive outcome of these women who wish to conceive spontaneously or use assisted conception with their own oocytes. We found that there is no conclusive evidence of which treatment is optimal for women with POI who wish to conceive using their own gametes. However, one could surmise that it is important to lower gonadotropin levels into the physiological range before embarking on any treatment, even if natural conception is the only choice for the woman/couple. In the future, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials should be carried out, which may entail recruitment of patients from various centers nationally and internationally to increase the sample size and therefore achieve a powered study. This may standardize the treatment of women with POI who wish to conceive and ultimately have their biological child. PMID:24341612

  20. Improving conservation outcomes with insights from local experts and bureaucracies.

    PubMed

    Haenn, Nora; Schmook, Birgit; Reyes, Yol; Calmé, Sophie

    2014-08-01

    We describe conservation built on local expertise such that it constitutes a hybrid form of traditional and bureaucratic knowledge. Researchers regularly ask how local knowledge might be applied to programs linked to protected areas. By examining the production of conservation knowledge in southern Mexico, we assert local expertise is already central to conservation. However, bureaucratic norms and social identity differences between lay experts and conservation practitioners prevent the public valuing of traditional knowledge. We make this point by contrasting 2 examples. The first is a master's thesis survey of local experts regarding the biology of the King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa) in which data collection took place in communities adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve. The second is a workshop sponsored by the same reserve that instructed farmers on how to monitor endangered species, including the King Vulture. In both examples, conservation knowledge would not have existed without traditional knowledge. In both examples, this traditional knowledge is absent from scientific reporting. On the basis of these findings, we suggest conservation outcomes may be improved by recognizing the knowledge contributions local experts already make to conservation programming. PMID:24628468

  1. Improving periodontal outcomes: merging clinical and behavioral science.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Rebecca S; Bray, Kimberly S

    2016-06-01

    New data indicate that periodontal diseases are much more prevalent than previously thought, which means that there are large numbers of patients who will need to be diagnosed and treated for periodontal disease in a general dental practice. Oral hygiene procedures performed by patients between office visits are important for gingival health. No particular type of toothbrush has consistently been shown to have superior plaque-removal ability over another. Although studies on powered brushes have shown evidence for efficacy of biofilm removal and increased patient compliance, they are of short duration, making evaluation of long-term effects difficult to achieve. Interdental cleaning with dental floss can be effective but it is technique-sensitive. Interdental brushes have been shown to be superior to floss in plaque index scores, but not in gingival inflammation reduction. A systematic review of oral irrigation reported a beneficial adjunctive effect on bleeding and gingival indices and pocket depth. Antimicrobials in mouthrinses and toothpastes have shown significant reductions in plaque and gingivitis when used correctly. Even though it is considered essential for patients to utilize biofilm-removal techniques on a frequent basis, studies on adherence show that approximately 30-60% of health information is forgotten within 1 h, and 50% of health recommendations are not followed. Incorporating psychosocial aspects of behavioral change, including well-established counseling strategies, such as motivational interviewing, may elicit improved patient outcomes. PMID:27045431

  2. Improving outcomes in pancreatic cancer: key points in perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Alamo, José M; Marín, Luis M; Suarez, Gonzalo; Bernal, Carmen; Serrano, Juan; Barrera, Lydia; Gómez, Miguel A; Muntané, Jordi; Padillo, Francisco J

    2014-10-21

    This review focused in the perioperative management of patients with pancreatic cancer in order to improve the outcome of the disease. We consider that the most controversial points in pancreatic cancer management are jaundice management, vascular resection and neo-adjuvant therapy. Preoperative biliary drainage is recommended only in patients with severe jaundice, as it can lead to infectious cholangitis, pancreatitis and delay in resection, which can lead to tumor progression. The development of a phase III clinical trial is mandatory to clarify the role of neo-adjuvant radiochemotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Venous resection does not adversely affect postoperative mortality and morbidity, therefore, the need for venous resection should not be a contraindication to surgical resection in selected patients. The data on arterial resection alone, or combined with vascular resection at the time of pancreatectomy are more heterogeneous, thus, patient age and comorbidity should be evaluated before a decision on operability is made. In patients undergoing R0 resection, arterial resection can also be performed. PMID:25339810

  3. 75 FR 27341 - Increasing Market and Planning Efficiency Through Improved Software; Notice of Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Software May 7, 2010. Take notice that Commission staff will convene technical conferences on the following dates to discuss increasing market and planning efficiency through improved software. ] The development... Energy Regulatory Commission Increasing Market and Planning Efficiency Through Improved Software;...

  4. How to Improve the Design and Delivery of High-Quality Technical Assistance. Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Educators often use the term technical assistance to define services delivered or received in the pursuit of school- and district-improvement initiatives. More specifically, technical assistance can be defined as any assistance that identifies, selects, or designs research-based solutions and practices to support school improvement (Mattson &…

  5. Aortic Center: specialized care improves outcomes and decreases mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Marcela da Cunha; Frota Filho, José Dario; Aguzzoli, Cristiane; Souza, Leonardo Dornelles; Rösler, Álvaro Machado; Lucio, Eraldo Azevedo; Leães, Paulo Ernesto; Pontes, Mauro Ricardo Nunes; Lucchese, Fernando Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare in-hospital outcomes in aortic surgery in our cardiac surgery unit, before and after foundation of our Center for Aortic Surgery (CTA). Methods Prospective cohort with non-concurrent control. Foundation of CTA required specialized training of surgical, anesthetic and intensive care unit teams, routine neurological monitoring, endovascular and hybrid facilities, training of the support personnel, improvement of the registry and adoption of specific protocols. We included 332 patients operated on between: January/2003 to December/2007 (before-CTA, n=157, 47.3%); and January/2008 to December/2010 (CTA, n=175, 52.7%). Baseline clinical and demographic data, operative variables, complications and in-hospital mortality were compared between both groups. Results Mean age was 58±14 years, with 65% male. Group CTA was older, had higher rate of diabetes, lower rates of COPD and HF, more non-urgent surgeries, endovascular procedures, and aneurysms. In the univariate analysis, CTA had lower mortality (9.7 vs. 23.0%, P=0.008), which occurred consistently across different diseases and procedures. Other outcomes which were reduced in CTA included lower rates of reinterventions (5.7 vs 11%, P=0.046), major complications (20.6 vs. 33.1%, P=0.007), stroke (4.6 vs. 10.9%, P=0.045) and sepsis (1.7 vs. 9.6%, P=0.001), as compared to before-CTA. Multivariable analysis adjusted for potential counfounders revealed that CTA was independently associated with mortality reduction (OR=0.23, IC 95% 0.08 – 0.67, P=0.007). CTA independent mortality reduction was consistent in the multivariable analysis stratified by disease (aneurysm, OR=0.18, CI 95% 0.03 – 0.98, P=0.048; dissection, OR=0.31, CI 95% 0.09 – 0.99, P=0.049) and by procedure (hybrid, OR=0.07, CI 95% 0.007 – 0.72, P=0.026; Bentall, OR=0.18, CI 95% 0.038 – 0.904, P=0.037). Additional multivariable predictors of in-hospital mortality included creatinine (OR=1.7 [1.1-2.6], P=0.008), urgent surgery (OR=5

  6. Customer's self-audit to improve the technical quality of maternity care in Tabriz: a community trial.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, K; Tabrizi, J S; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M; Iezadi, S; Farshbaf, N; Rahbar-Farzam, F; Afsharniya, F

    2016-05-01

    Pregnant women have a major role to play in assessing and improving their own quality of care. This study in Tabriz, Islamic Republic of Iran, aimed to assess the effectiveness of an intervention for pregnant women-based on education and support groups and involvement in quality assessment activities-in order to improve the technical quality of public maternity care at public health centres. The intervention phase began in September 2011 and lasted 8 months. The outcome measure was health-care providers' degree of adherence to the Iranian maternity care standards. An intervention group of 92 pregnant women from 10 health centres was compared with a control group of 93 pregnant women from 11 centres. Logistic regression analysis showed that the self-assessed technical quality of maternity care received by the women was significantly better in the intervention that the control group for several of the standards concerning clinical examinations, maternal education and vitamin and mineral supplements. PMID:27553397

  7. Advanced Technology in Pediatric Intensive Care Units: Have They Improved Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Frederick, Sean A

    2016-04-01

    In medicine, providers strive to produce quality outcomes and work to continually improve those outcomes. Whether it is reducing cost, decreasing length of stay, mitigating nosocomial infections, or improving survival, there are a myriad of complex factors that contribute to each outcome. One of the greatest challenges to outcome improvement is in pediatric intensive care units, which tend to host the sickest, most complex, smallest, and frailest of pediatric patients. This article highlights some studies and advances in informatics that have influenced intensive care unit outcomes. PMID:27017036

  8. Can targeting glutamate receptors with long-term heat acclimation improve outcomes following hypoxic injury?

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Brett R; Brunt, Vienna E; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Long-term heat acclimation appears to improve tolerance to hypoxic insults in various tissues, including brain, providing a promising avenue to improve functional outcomes following cerebrovascular events. Glutamate discharge is implicated in dysfunction following hypoxic stress and thus, targeting glutamate receptors with heat acclimation could improve cognitive outcomes following hypoxic injury. PMID:27227003

  9. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Amberg, Norbert; Woltmann, Rainer; Walther, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various health-care service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia has implemented a networked care concept in the German federal state of Lower Saxony that integrates various stakeholders of the health care system. In this initiative, office-based psychiatrists, specialized nursing staff, psychologists, social workers, hospitals, psychiatric institutional outpatient’s departments, and other community-based mental health services work together in an interdisciplinary approach. Much emphasis is placed on psychoeducation. Additional efforts cover socio-therapy, visiting care, and family support. During the period from October 2010 (start of the initiative) to December 2012, first experiences and results of quality indicators were collected of 713 registered patients and summarized in a quality monitoring report. In addition, standardized patient interviews were conducted, and duration of hospital days was recorded in 2013. By the end of 2012, patients had been enrolled for an average of 18.7 months. The overall patient satisfaction measured in a patient survey in June 2013 was high and the duration of hospital days measured in a pre–post analysis in July 2013 was reduced by 44%. Two years earlier than planned, the insurance fund will continue the successfully implemented Integrated Care Initiative and adopt it in the regular care setting. This initiative can serve as a learning case for how to set up and measure integrated care systems that may improve outcomes for patients suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:26779043

  10. Improving vascular access outcomes: attributes of arteriovenous fistula cannulation success

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Lori E.; Wilson, Barbara M.; Oudshoorn, Abe

    2016-01-01

    Background Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are the preferred access for hemodialysis (HD) yet they are underutilized. Cannulation of the fistula is a procedure requiring significant skill development and refinement and if not done well can have negative consequences for patients. The nurses' approach, attitude and skill with cannulation impacts greatly on the patient experience. Complications from miscannulation or an inability to needle fistulas can result in the increased use of central venous catheters. Some nurses remain in a state of a ‘perpetual novice’ resulting in a viscous cycle of negative patient consequences (bruising, pain), further influencing patients' decisions not to pursue a fistula or abandon cannulation. Method This qualitative study used organizational development theory (appreciative inquiry) and research method to determine what attributes/activities contribute to successful cannulation. This can be applied to interventions to promote change and skill development in staff members who have not advanced their proficiency. Eighteen HD nurses who self-identified with performing successful cannulation participated in audio-recorded interviews. The recordings were transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Four common themes, including patient-centered care, teamwork, opportunity and skill and nurse self-awareness, represented successful fistula cannulation. Successful cannulation is more than a learned technique to correctly insert a needle, but rather represents contextual influences and interplay between the practice environment and personal attributes. Conclusions Practice changes based on these results may improve cannulation, decrease complications and result in better outcomes for patients. Efforts to nurture positive patient experiences around cannulation may influence patient decision-making regarding fistula use. PMID:26985384

  11. Reconstruction of the System for Technical Education and Improvement of Teachers' Abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shioiri, Mutsuo

    It is necessary to reconstruct the system for technical education and to improve teachers' abilities in order to educate children who have a great interest in creation. This paper describes that, the revised education ministry guidelines, the relation between the reconstruction of system for technical education and the combined primary and junior-high school, the improvement of teachers' abilities, the change of teacher service examination, the technical education in junior high school, and the advertisement of the importance of technical education according to the report of the central education council.

  12. Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Current Management and Future Development—Improved Outcomes with Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Yoji; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Currently, surgical resection is the treatment strategy offering the best long-term outcomes in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Especially for advanced HCC, surgical resection is the only strategy that is potentially curative, and the indications for surgical resection have expanded concomitantly with the technical advances in hepatectomy. A major problem is the high recurrence rate even after curative resection, especially in the remnant liver. Although repeat hepatectomy may prolong survival, the suitability may be limited due to multiple tumor recurrence or background liver cirrhosis. Multimodality approaches combining other local ablation or systemic therapy may help improve the prognosis. On the other hand, minimally invasive, or laparoscopic, hepatectomy has become popular over the last decade. Although the short-term safety and feasibility has been established, the long-term outcomes have not yet been adequately evaluated. Liver transplantation for HCC is also a possible option. Given the current situation of donor shortage, however, other local treatments should be considered as the first choice as long as liver function is maintained. Non-transplant treatment as a bridge to transplantation also helps in decreasing the risk of tumor progression or death during the waiting period. The optimal timing for transplantation after HCC recurrence remains to be investigated. PMID:21994868

  13. Causal Effects of Career-Technical Education on Postsecondary Work Outcomes of Individuals with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Heok In; Rojewski, Jay W.; Gregg, Noel

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2, a propensity score analysis revealed significant causal effects for a secondary career and technical education (CTE) concentration on the postsecondary work outcomes of adolescents with high-incidence disabilities. High school students identified as CTE concentrators (three or more high…

  14. Applying Quality Improvement into Systems-based Learning to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Moreo, Kathleen; Sapir, Tamar; Greene, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    In the U.S., where the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, many patients with this disease are treated by primary care physicians in community-based systems, including accountable care organisations (ACOs). To address gaps in the quality of diabetes care, national quality measures have been established, including patient-centered measures adopted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for its Shared Savings Program for ACOs. From a patient-centered perspective, high-quality diabetes care depends on effective communication between clinicians and patients, along with patient education and counseling about medications and lifestyle. We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) program for 30 primary care physicians treating patients with type 2 diabetes in three structurally similar but geographically diverse ACOs. Retrospective chart audits were conducted before (n = 300) and after (n = 300) each physician participated in accredited continuing medical education (CME) courses that focused on QI strategies. Randomly selected charts were audited to measurably assess essential interventions for improved outcomes in type 2 diabetes including the physicians' documentation of patient counseling and assessment of side effects, and patients' medication adherence status and changes in hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and body mass index (BMI). Paced educational interventions included a private performance improvement Internet live course conducted for each physician, small-group Internet live courses involving peer discussion, and a set of enduring materials, which were also multi-accredited for all clinicians in the physician's practice. Continual improvement cycles were guided by analysis of the baseline chart audits, quantitative survey data, and qualitative feedback offered by participants. To extend the benefit of the education, the enduring materials were offered to the interprofessional team of clinicians throughout the U.S. who did

  15. Applying Quality Improvement into Systems-based Learning to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Moreo, Kathleen; Sapir, Tamar; Greene, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    In the U.S., where the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, many patients with this disease are treated by primary care physicians in community-based systems, including accountable care organisations (ACOs). To address gaps in the quality of diabetes care, national quality measures have been established, including patient-centered measures adopted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for its Shared Savings Program for ACOs. From a patient-centered perspective, high-quality diabetes care depends on effective communication between clinicians and patients, along with patient education and counseling about medications and lifestyle. We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) program for 30 primary care physicians treating patients with type 2 diabetes in three structurally similar but geographically diverse ACOs. Retrospective chart audits were conducted before (n = 300) and after (n = 300) each physician participated in accredited continuing medical education (CME) courses that focused on QI strategies. Randomly selected charts were audited to measurably assess essential interventions for improved outcomes in type 2 diabetes including the physicians’ documentation of patient counseling and assessment of side effects, and patients’ medication adherence status and changes in hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and body mass index (BMI). Paced educational interventions included a private performance improvement Internet live course conducted for each physician, small-group Internet live courses involving peer discussion, and a set of enduring materials, which were also multi-accredited for all clinicians in the physician's practice. Continual improvement cycles were guided by analysis of the baseline chart audits, quantitative survey data, and qualitative feedback offered by participants. To extend the benefit of the education, the enduring materials were offered to the interprofessional team of clinicians throughout the U.S. who

  16. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22

    the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a

  17. Using Cross-Cultural Dimensions Exercises to Improve and Measure Learning Outcomes in International Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuba, Mohamed; Rahal, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for using cross-cultural dimensions exercises to improve and measure learning outcomes in international business courses. The following key issues are highlighted: (a) what are the targeted learning outcomes to be assessed, (b) how to measure the accomplishment of these learning outcomes, (c) the input measures…

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Educational Data Mining on Improvements in Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlShammari, Iqbal A.; Aldhafiri, Mohammed D.; Al-Shammari, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    A meta-synthesis study was conducted of 60 research studies on educational data mining (EDM) and their impacts on and outcomes for improving learning outcomes. After an overview, an examination of these outcomes is provided (Romero, Ventura, Espejo, & Hervas, 2008; Romero, "et al.", 2011). Then, a review of other EDM-related research…

  19. Recent improvements in the NASA technical report server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maa, Ming-Hokng; Nelson, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), a World Wide Web (WWW) report distribution service, has been modified to allow parallel database queries, significantly decreasing user access time by an average factor of 2.3, access from clients behind firewalls and/or proxies which truncate excessively long Uniform Resource Locators (URL's), access to non-Wide Area Information Server (WAIS) databases, and compatibility with the Z39-50.3 protocol.

  20. Improving energy audit process and report outcomes through planning initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprau Coulter, Tabitha L.

    Energy audits and energy models are an important aspect of the retrofit design process, as they provide project teams with an opportunity to evaluate a facilities current building systems' and energy performance. The information collected during an energy audit is typically used to develop an energy model and an energy audit report that are both used to assist in making decisions about the design and implementation of energy conservation measures in a facility. The current lack of energy auditing standards results in a high degree of variability in energy audit outcomes depending on the individual performing the audit. The research presented is based on the conviction that performing an energy audit and producing a value adding energy model for retrofit buildings can benefit from a revised approach. The research was divided into four phases, with the initial three phases consisting of: 1.) process mapping activity - aimed at reducing variability in the energy auditing and energy modeling process. 2.) survey analysis -- To examine the misalignment between how industry members use the top energy modeling tools compared to their intended use as defined by software representatives. 3.) sensitivity analysis -- analysis of the affect key energy modeling inputs are having on energy modeling analysis results. The initial three phases helped define the need for an improved energy audit approach that better aligns data collection with facility owners' needs and priorities. The initial three phases also assisted in the development of a multi-criteria decision support tool that incorporates a House of Quality approach to guide a pre-audit planning activity. For the fourth and final research phase explored the impacts and evaluation methods of a pre-audit planning activity using two comparative energy audits as case studies. In each case, an energy audit professionals was asked to complete an audit using their traditional methods along with an audit which involved them first

  1. Improving Service Quality in Technical Education: Use of Interpretive Structural Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Roma Mitra; Shankar, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the relevant enablers and barriers related to technical education. It seeks to critically analyze the relationship amongst them so that policy makers can focus on relevant parameters to improve the service quality of technical education. Design/methodology/approach: The present study employs the…

  2. 77 FR 39226 - Applications for New Awards: Technical Assistance and Dissemination To Improve Services and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards: Technical Assistance and Dissemination To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities--Technical Assistance Center To Support Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices AGENCY: Office of Special Education...

  3. Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal dearterialization/transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization: Technical evolution and outcomes after 20 years.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Campos, Fábio Guilherme

    2016-03-27

    In the setting of Hemorrhoidal Disease treatment, the option of conventional hemorrhoidectomy is highly effective, but it is still associated with postoperative pain and discomfort. For this reason, technical alternatives have been developed in order to reduce complications and to provide better postoperative recovery. To accomplish this aim, non-excisional techniques such as stapled hemorrhoidectomy and Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal ligation have been introduced into clinical practice with high expectations. The aim of this article is to revise the literature about transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization technique in the treatment of hemorrhoidal disease, looking into its evolution, results and possible benefits over other modalities of surgical treatment. The literature review showed that Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal dearterialization is a safe and effective method to treat grades II to IV hemorrhoidal disease. Outcomes in patients presenting prolapse are satisfactory and the association of anopexy is an important aspect of this operation. Anal physiology disturbances are rarely observed and mainly transitory. This technique is an excellent option for every patient, especially in those with previous anal surgeries and in patients with previous alterations of fecal continence, when an additional procedure might represent a risk of definitive incontinence. PMID:27022450

  4. Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal dearterialization/transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization: Technical evolution and outcomes after 20 years

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Campos, Fábio Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    In the setting of Hemorrhoidal Disease treatment, the option of conventional hemorrhoidectomy is highly effective, but it is still associated with postoperative pain and discomfort. For this reason, technical alternatives have been developed in order to reduce complications and to provide better postoperative recovery. To accomplish this aim, non-excisional techniques such as stapled hemorrhoidectomy and Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal ligation have been introduced into clinical practice with high expectations. The aim of this article is to revise the literature about transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization technique in the treatment of hemorrhoidal disease, looking into its evolution, results and possible benefits over other modalities of surgical treatment. The literature review showed that Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal dearterialization is a safe and effective method to treat grades II to IV hemorrhoidal disease. Outcomes in patients presenting prolapse are satisfactory and the association of anopexy is an important aspect of this operation. Anal physiology disturbances are rarely observed and mainly transitory. This technique is an excellent option for every patient, especially in those with previous anal surgeries and in patients with previous alterations of fecal continence, when an additional procedure might represent a risk of definitive incontinence. PMID:27022450

  5. Improving Education Outcomes in the Slovak Republic. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 578

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, David

    2007-01-01

    Improving education outcomes is vital for achieving convergence with GDP per capita levels in Western European countries and for reducing income inequality. While some education outcomes are favourable, such as the low secondary-school drop-out rate, others have room for improvement: education achievement is below the OECD average and strongly…

  6. Improving Student Performance Outcomes and Graduation Rates through Institutional Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roggow, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores a grant-sponsored program and examines the role of departmental and institutional collaborations in advancing student performance outcomes. It provides a theoretical framework and a description of best practices for ensuring the success of first-generation urban community college students.

  7. Inside Quality Reform: Early Results on Using Outcomes for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Khawas, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This article offers evidence on ways in which assessment of student learning outcomes made a difference for some academic institutions in the United States. It offers perspectives on the internal changes that took place, especially within academic programmes. Even after the capacity for assessment was developed, challenges remained in evaluating…

  8. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy…

  9. Partnership for Improving Outcomes in Indigenous Education: Relationship or Business?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma Rhea, Zane

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the Australian government's Indigenous policy by interrogating the concept of partnership between governments and Indigenous communities through three examples. Increasingly, the Australian federal government is focusing attention on the poor literacy and numeracy outcomes for Indigenous children in remote and very remote…

  10. The Relationship between School Leadership and School Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silins, Halia C.

    This paper tests the degree of overlap between operational definitions of transformational and transactional leadership, the nature of the relationships between the constructs of transformational and transactional leadership, and specified outcomes in an empirically derived data set by the application of two forms of analysis. Based on Bass's…

  11. Behind the Numbers: Redefining Leadership to Improve Outcomes for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tefs, Michael; Telfer, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    "Moving Your Numbers", a technical assistance and dissemination initiative begun in 2010 by the National Center on Educational Outcomes, described the work of 10 school districts that were using assessment and accountability to increase performance for students with disabilities as part of their overall district reform and improvement…

  12. Improving Literature Searching in a Technical Information Center, an Internship and a Staff Improvement Course at the Owens-Illinois Technical Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terbille, Charles I.

    A staff improvement course was developed by an intern at the technical information center (TIC) at Owens-Illinois, Inc. (O-I). First an analysis was made of the information center itself--its goals, services, literature search procedures, information sources, and the function of the information representative-analysts. Next a comparison was made…

  13. Iliac Arteries: How Registries Can Help Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tapping, Charles Ross; Uberoi, Raman

    2014-01-01

    There are many publications reporting excellent short and long-term results with endovascular techniques. Patients included in trials are often highly selected and may not represent real world practice. Registries are important to interventional radiologists for several reasons; they reflect prevailing practice and can be used to establish real world standards of care and safety profiles. This information allows individuals and centers to evaluate their outcomes compared with national norms. The British Iliac Angioplasty and Stenting (BIAS) registry is an example of a mature registry that has been collecting data since 2000 and has been reporting outcomes since 2001. This article discusses the evidence to support both endovascular and surgical intervention for aortoiliac occlusive disease, the role of registries, and optimal techniques for aortoiliac intervention. PMID:25435659

  14. Outcome measures in MMN revisited: further improvement needed.

    PubMed

    Pruppers, Mariëlle H J; Draak, Thomas H P; Vanhoutte, Els K; Van der Pol, W-Ludo; Gorson, Kenneth C; Léger, Jean-Marc; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Lewis, Richard A; van den Berg, Leonard H; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide an overview of the outcome measures (OMs) applied in clinical trials in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and to determine the responsiveness of a core set of selected OMs as part of the peripheral neuropathy outcome measures standardization (PeriNomS) study. The following OMs were serially applied in 26 patients with newly diagnosed or relapsing MMN, receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (assessments: T0/T3/T12 months): 14 muscle pairs MRC (Medical Research Council) scale, the Neuropathy Impairment Scale motor-subset, a self-evaluation scale, grip strength, and MMN-RODS© (Rasch-built overall disability scale). All data, except the grip strength, were subjected to Rasch analyses before determining responsiveness. For grip strength, responsiveness was examined using a combined anchor- (SF-36 question-2) and distribution-based (½ × SD) minimum clinically important difference (MCID) techniques, determining the proportion of patients exceeding both the identified cut-offs. For the remaining scales, the magnitude of change for each patient on each scale was determined using the MCID related to the individual SE (responder definition: MCID-SE ≥ 1.96). Overall, a great assortment of measures has been used in MMN trials with different responsiveness definitions. For the selected OMs, responsiveness was poor and only seen in one fourth to one third of the patients, the grip strength being more responsive. Despite the efforts taken to standardize outcome assessment, further clinimetric responsiveness studies are needed in MMN. PMID:26115442

  15. The role of APD in the improvement of outcomes in an ESRD program.

    PubMed

    Van Biesen, Wim; Veys, Nic; Vanholder, Raymond; Lameire, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    We review the role of automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) in improving outcomes of an end-stage renal disease (ESRD) program. As the "integrated care approach" becomes accepted as the preferred strategy for treatment of ESRD patients, we looked for the potential place of APD in such an approach. APD has probably the same advantages as CAPD as a first-line renal replacement modality in suitable patients willing to perform PD. There is currently no hard evidence that residual renal function (RRF) should decline more rapidly in APD than in CAPD, at least if a dry abdomen during the day is avoided. The detection of peritonitis is probably more delayed in APD, but the frequency of peritonitis is lower, and there is no hard evidence pointing to a poorer outcome of peritonitis in APD as compared to CAPD. Quality of life is at least as good in APD, which is mostly related to the increased possibilities for adapting the exchange pattern to employment-related time frames. APD also has the potential to prolong technique success in patients failing CAPD rather than transferring them to hemodialysis. Nevertheless, APD remains more expensive and technically complicated, thereby missing the beauty of CAPD's simplicity. Therefore we believe that APD has its role in an integrated approach and that all patients should be informed of its potential. It would, however, not be correct to present APD as the preferred PD method for all patients, as it also has some drawbacks that make it less suitable for some categories of patients. In all cases, patients should have a free and informed choice. PMID:12437538

  16. Outcomes from the Productivity Places Program 2009: Technical Notes. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper was produced as an added resource for the report "Outcomes from the Productivity Places Program 2009." "Outcomes from the Productivity Places Program 2009" presents information about the outcomes of students who completed their vocational education and training (VET) under the Productivity Places Program (PPP) graduates during 2008.…

  17. Student Outcomes and Performance Standards: Issues and Challenges for Community and Technical Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolte, Walter H.

    During the last few years, there has been a general emphasis in higher education on quality issues and the use of outcomes measures to assess institutional effectiveness. The quality emphasis in education suggests that previously defined performance standards are met through a review of outcomes assessment. This emphasis on outcomes measures…

  18. Matching State Goals to a Model of Outcomes and Indicators for Grade 8. Technical Report 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seppanen, Patricia; And Others

    A national survey of state-articulated student goals and outcomes led to the analysis of documents from 30 states for correspondence with the outcomes specified for grade 8 in the conceptual model developed by the National Center on Educational Outcomes for Students with Disabilities (NCEO). All of the 30 states' goal documents included statements…

  19. Methods for Improving the User-Computer Interface. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Patrick H.

    This summary of methods for improving the user-computer interface is based on a review of the pertinent literature. Requirements of the personal computer user are identified and contrasted with computer designer perspectives towards the user. The user's psychological needs are described, so that the design of the user-computer interface may be…

  20. Managing Program Improvement: One State's Approach; Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCage, Ronald D.

    Described in this paper is one state's approach to the development and operation of a Research Coordinating Unit (RCU), which is designed to orchestrate research and development activities in vocational education within a state. This approach, based on Illinois's model, depicts program improvement as a continuous process involving such activities…

  1. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  2. Surgical management of symptomatic brain stem cavernoma in a developing country: technical difficulties and outcome.

    PubMed

    Farhoud, Ahmed; Aboul-Enein, Hisham

    2016-07-01

    Brain stem cavernomas (BSCs) are angiographically occult vascular malformations in an intricate location. Surgical excision of symptomatic BSCs represents a neurosurgical challenge especially in developing countries. We reviewed the clinical data and surgical outcome of 24 consecutive cases surgically treated for brain stem cavernoma at the Neurosurgery Department, Alexandria University, between 2006 and 2014. All patients were followed up for at least 12 months after surgery and the mean follow-up period was 45 months. All patients suffered from at least two clinically significant hemorrhagic episodes before surgery. There were 10 males and 14 females. The mean age was 34 years (range 12 to 58 years). Fourteen cases had pontine cavernomas, 7 cases had midbrain cavernomas, and in 3 cases, the lesion was found in the medulla oblongata. The most commonly used approach in this series was the midline suboccipital approach with or without telovelar exposure (9 cases). There was a single postoperative mortality in this series due to pneumonia. Fourteen cases (58.3 %) showed initial worsening of their preoperative neurological status, most of which was transient and only three patients had permanent new deficits and one case had a permanent worsening of her preoperatively existing hemiparesis. There was neither immediate nor long-term rebleeding in any of our cases. In spite of the significant associated risks, surgery for BSCs in properly selected patients can have favorable outcomes in most cases. Surgery markedly improves the risk of rebleeding and should be considered in patients with accessible lesions. PMID:27053221

  3. Cognitive behavioral therapy for suicidal behaviors: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mewton, Louise; Andrews, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review provides an overview of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing suicidal cognitions and behavior in the adult population. We identified 15 randomized controlled trials of CBT for adults (aged 18 years and older) that included suicide-related cognitions or behaviors as an outcome measure. The studies were identified from PsycINFO searches, reference lists, and a publicly available database of psychosocial interventions for suicidal behaviors. This review identified some evidence of the use of CBT in the reduction of both suicidal cognitions and behaviors. There was not enough evidence from clinical trials to suggest that CBT focusing on mental illness reduces suicidal cognitions and behaviors. On the other hand, CBT focusing on suicidal cognitions and behaviors was found to be effective. Given the current evidence, clinicians should be trained in CBT techniques focusing on suicidal cognitions and behaviors that are independent of the treatment of mental illness. PMID:27042148

  4. Toward Improved Public Health Outcomes From Urban Nature

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Robert; Gaston, Kevin J.; Dean, Julie H.; Barber, Elizabeth; Fuller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities. PMID:25602866

  5. Diabetic microvascular complications: possible targets for improved macrovascular outcomes

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Bayliss, George; Roshan, Bijan; Maski, Manish; Gleason, Ray E; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    The results of recent outcome trials challenge hypotheses that tight control of both glycohemoglobin and blood pressure diminishes macrovascular events and survival among type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant questions exist regarding the adequacy of glycohemoglobin alone as a measure of diabetes control. Are we ignoring mechanisms of vasculotoxicity (profibrosis, altered angiogenesis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and endothelial injury) inherent in current antihyperglycemic medications? Is the polypharmacy for lowering cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and systolic blood pressure producing drug interactions that are too complex to be clinically identified? We review angiotensin–aldosterone mechanisms of tissue injury that magnify microvascular damage caused by hyperglycemia and hypertension. Many studies describe interruption of these mechanisms, without hemodynamic consequence, in the preservation of function in type 1 diabetes. Possible interactions between the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and physiologic glycemic control (through pulsatile insulin release) suggest opportunities for further clinical investigation. PMID:21694944

  6. Toward improved public health outcomes from urban nature.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Danielle F; Lin, Brenda B; Bush, Robert; Gaston, Kevin J; Dean, Julie H; Barber, Elizabeth; Fuller, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities. PMID:25602866

  7. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates. PMID:27580282

  8. Does Cryotherapy Improve Outcomes With Soft Tissue Injury?

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Denegar, Craig R

    2004-09-01

    REFERENCE: Bleakley C, McDonough S, MacAuley D. The use of ice in the treatment of acute soft-tissue injury: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Am J Sport Med. 2004; 32:251-261. CLINICAL QUESTION: What is the clinical evidence base for cryotherapy use? DATA SOURCES: Studies were identified by using a computer-based literature search on a total of 8 databases: MEDLINE, Proquest, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) on Ovid, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) on Ovid, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Central). This was supplemented with citation tracking of relevant primary and review articles. Search terms included surgery,orthopaedics,sports injury,soft tissue injury,sprains and strains,contusions,athletic injury,acute,compression, cryotherapy,ice,RICE, andcold. STUDY SELECTION: To be included in the review, each study had to fulfill the following conditions: be a randomized, controlled trial of human subjects; be published in English as a full paper; include patients recovering from acute soft tissue or orthopaedic surgical interventions who received cryotherapy in inpatient, outpatient, or home-based treatment, in isolation or in combination with placebo or other therapies; provide comparisons with no treatment, placebo, a different mode or protocol of cryotherapy, or other physiotherapeutic interventions; and have outcome measures that included function (subjective or objective), pain, swelling, or range of motion. DATA EXTRACTION: The study population, interventions, outcomes, follow-up, and reported results of the assessed trials were extracted and tabulated. The primary outcome measures were pain, swelling, and range of motion. Only 2 groups reported adequate data for return to normal function. All eligible articles were rated for methodologic quality using the PEDro scale. The

  9. Does Cryotherapy Improve Outcomes With Soft Tissue Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.

    2004-01-01

    Reference: Bleakley C, McDonough S, MacAuley D. The use of ice in the treatment of acute soft-tissue injury: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Am J Sport Med. 2004; 32:251–261. Clinical Question: What is the clinical evidence base for cryotherapy use? Data Sources: Studies were identified by using a computer-based literature search on a total of 8 databases: MEDLINE, Proquest, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) on Ovid, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) on Ovid, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Central). This was supplemented with citation tracking of relevant primary and review articles. Search terms included surgery,orthopaedics,sports injury,soft tissue injury,sprains and strains,contusions,athletic injury,acute,compression, cryotherapy,ice,RICE, andcold. Study Selection: To be included in the review, each study had to fulfill the following conditions: be a randomized, controlled trial of human subjects; be published in English as a full paper; include patients recovering from acute soft tissue or orthopaedic surgical interventions who received cryotherapy in inpatient, outpatient, or home-based treatment, in isolation or in combination with placebo or other therapies; provide comparisons with no treatment, placebo, a different mode or protocol of cryotherapy, or other physiotherapeutic interventions; and have outcome measures that included function (subjective or objective), pain, swelling, or range of motion. Data Extraction: The study population, interventions, outcomes, follow-up, and reported results of the assessed trials were extracted and tabulated. The primary outcome measures were pain, swelling, and range of motion. Only 2 groups reported adequate data for return to normal function. All eligible articles were rated for methodologic quality using the PEDro scale. The

  10. Technical improvements in 19th century Belgian window glass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauriks, Leen; Collette, Quentin; Wouters, Ine; Belis, Jan

    Glass was used since the Roman age in the building envelope, but it became widely applied together with iron since the 19th century. Belgium was a major producer of window glass during the nineteenth century and the majority of the produced window glass was exported all over the world. Investigating the literature on the development of 19th century Belgian window glass production is therefore internationally relevant. In the 17th century, wood was replaced as a fuel by coal. In the 19th century, the regenerative tank furnace applied gas as a fuel in a continuous glass production process. The advantages were a clean production, a more constant and higher temperature in the furnace and a fuel saving. The French chemist Nicolas Leblanc (1787-1793) and later the Belgian chemist Ernest Solvay (1863) invented processes to produce alkali out of common salt. The artificial soda ash improved the quality and aesthetics of the glass plates. During the 19th century, the glass production was industrialized, influencing the operation of furnaces, the improvement of raw materials as well as the applied energy sources. Although the production process was industrialized, glassblowing was still the work of an individual. By improving his work tools, he was able to create larger glass plates. The developments in the annealing process followed this evolution. The industry had to wait until the invention of the drawn glass in the beginning of the 20th century to fully industrialise the window glass manufacture process.

  11. Providing Outcomes Information to Nursing Homes: Can It Improve Quality of Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether providing outcomes information to 120 nursing homes facilitated improvements in quality over a 12-month period, as compared with 1,171 facilities not receiving this information. The outcomes information provided consisted of a report mailed to administrators that examined six measures of care quality. These…

  12. The Effectiveness Of The Manchester Even Start Program In Improving Literacy Outcomes for Preschool Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    Although widely implemented, the effectiveness of the Even Start program and other programs involving home-visiting and bilingual education in improving preschool literacy outcomes, particularly among Latino students, is uncertain. This study used a non-equivalent groups design to compare preschool literacy outcomes (measured by the PALS-PreK…

  13. 76 FR 28022 - Increasing Market and Planning Efficiency Through Improved Software; Notice of Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Increasing Market and Planning Efficiency Through Improved Software; Notice... Software Take notice that Commission staff will convene a technical conference on June 28-30, 2011, from 8... efficiency through improved software. This conference will bring together diverse experts from ISOs/RTOs,...

  14. External Technical Support for School Improvement: Critical Issues from the Chilean Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osses, Alejandra; Bellei, Cristián; Valenzuela, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    To what extent school improvement processes can be initiated and sustained from the outside has been a relevant question for policy-makers seeking to increase quality in education. Since 2008, the Chilean Government is strongly promoting the use of external technical support (ETS) services to support school improvement processes, as part of the…

  15. 77 FR 46658 - Proposed Priority; Technical Assistance To Improve State Data Capacity-National Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... target its future improvement activities. Leadership and Coordination Activities (a) Consult with a group... Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys . At this site you... economy of $100 million or more, or adversely affect a sector of the economy, productivity,...

  16. An Association of Cancer Physicians' strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  17. An Association of Cancer Physicians’ strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  18. Improving Outcomes for Learners through Self-Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document supplements the advice given in "How good is our school?" (HGIOS)--third edition and "The Child at the Centre"--second edition which set out comprehensive quality frameworks and provide helpful advice on the process of improvement through self-evaluation. In particular, this document provides advice on the application of the three…

  19. A Measurement Model of Microgenetic Transfer for Improving Instructional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I., Jr.; Yudelson, Michael; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to improve instructional task design often make reference to the mental structures, such as "schemas" (e.g., Gick & Holyoak, 1983) or "identical elements" (Thorndike & Woodworth, 1901), that are common to both the instructional and target tasks. This component based (e.g., Singley & Anderson, 1989) approach…

  20. Does residential mobility improve educational outcomes? Evidence from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Haelermans, Carla; De Witte, Kristof

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of residential mobility on educational outcomes. By considering a large Dutch city with substantial internal residential mobility, we examine how residential mobility influences the decision of students to drop out of school. The paper exploits a rich administrative dataset with extensive information on educational, individual, family, housing and moving characteristics of students. It combines a matching design with a multivariate regression analysis, such that the evaluation draws on a well-comparable control group for the treated students. Accounting for individual, family, educational, neighborhood and housing characteristics, as well as for school and year fixed effects, we observe that residential mobility increases the probability of school dropout in the first few years after moving. The estimated effect changes, however, to a lower risk of early school leaving after an initial period, and then changes again to a higher risk after 6years. This effect remains, regardless the level of education the students attended, or whether the student moves to a better or a worse neighborhood. PMID:26004467

  1. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  2. Pediatric kidney disease: tracking onset and improving clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M; Charlton, Jennifer R; Ferris, Maria E; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; Warady, Bradley A; Moxey-Mims, Marva M

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies confirm that much of adult kidney disease may have its origins in childhood, often as a result of abnormal or suboptimal fetal kidney development. Understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of CKD in children is rapidly evolving because of robust longitudinal clinical data, identification of monogenic mutations related to common causes of CKD, and improved knowledge of factors that influence the onset and progression of CKD. The Kidney Research National Dialogue, supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, asked the research and clinical communities to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve understanding of kidney function and diseases. This commentary outlines high-priority research objectives to assess factors associated with the predisposition to develop renal disease in children, and address the unique challenges in treating this population. PMID:24651076

  3. Improving Patient Outcomes With Oral Heart Failure Medications.

    PubMed

    Sherrod, Melissa M; Cheek, Dennis J; Seale, Ashlie

    2016-05-01

    Hospitals are under immense pressure to reduce heart failure readmissions that occur within 30 days of discharge, and to improve the quality of care for these patients. Penalties mandated by the Affordable Care Act decrease hospital reimbursement and ultimately the overall cost of caring for these patients increases if they are not well managed. Approximately 25% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are at high risk for readmission and these rates have not changed over the past decade. As a result of an aging population, the incidence of heart failure is expected to increase to one in five Americans over the age of 65. Pharmacologic management can reduce the risk of death and help prevent unnecessary hospitalizations. Healthcare providers who have knowledge of heart failure medications and drug interactions and share this information with their patients contribute to improved long-term survival and physical functioning as well as fewer hospitalizations and a delay of progressive worsening of heart failure. PMID:27145405

  4. Febuxostat improves outcome in a rat model of cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Masaaki; Pelgrim, Loes; Tschirner, Anika; Baumgarten, Anna; von Haehling, Stephan; Palus, Sandra; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; Springer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Background Activity of xanthine oxidase is induced in cancer cachexia, and its inhibition by allopurinol or oxypurinol improves survival and reduces wasting in the Yoshida hepatoma cancer cachexia model. Here, we tested the effects of the second-generation xanthine oxidase inhibitor febuxostat compared with placebo in the same model as used previously by our group. Methods Wistar rats (∽200 g) were treated daily with febuxostat at 5 mg/kg/day or placebo via gavage for a maximum of 17 days. Weight change, quality of life, and body composition were analysed. After sacrifice, proteasome activity in the gastrocnemius muscle was measured. Muscle-specific proteins involved in metabolism were analysed by western blotting. Results Treatment of the tumour-bearing rats with febuxostat led to a significantly improved survival compared with placebo (hazard ratio: 0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.22–0.93, P = 0.03). Loss of body weight was reduced (−26.3 ± 12.4 g) compared with placebo (−50.2 ± 2.1 g, P < 0.01). Wasting of lean mass was attenuated (−12.7 ± 10.8 g) vs. placebo (−31.9 ± 2.1 g, P < 0.05). While we did not see an effect of febuxostat on proteasome activity at the end of the study, the pAkt/Akt ratio was improved by febuxostat (0.94 ± 0.09) vs. placebo (0.41 ± 0.05, P < 0.01), suggesting an increase in protein synthesis. Conclusions Febuxostat attenuated cachexia progression and improved survival of tumour-bearing rats. PMID:26136193

  5. OPTIMIZED FLUID MANAGEMENT IMPROVES OUTCOMES OF PEDIATRIC BURN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Leonard, Katrina R; Jeschke, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the major determinants for survival of severely burned patients is appropriate fluid resuscitation. At present, fluid resuscitation is calculated based on bodyweight or body surface area, burn size, and urinary output. However, recent evidence suggests that fluid calculation is inadequate and that over- and under-resuscitation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We hypothesize that optimizing fluid administration during the critical initial phase using a transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution monitoring device (PiCCO) would have beneficial effects on the outcome of burned patients. Methods A cohort of seventy-six severely burned pediatric patients with burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA) who received adjusted fluid resuscitation using the PiCCO (P) system were compared to 76 conventionally monitored patients (C). Clinical hemodynamic measurements, organ function (DENVER2 score), and biomarkers were recorded prospectively for the first 20 days after burn injury. Results Both cohorts were similar in demographic and injury characteristics. Patients in the PiCCO group received significantly less fluids (p<0.05) with similar urinary output, resulting in a significantly lower positive fluid balance (p<0.05). The central venous pressure (CVP) in the P group was maintained in a more controlled range (p<0.05), associated with a significantly lower heart rate and significantly lower incidence of cardiac and renal failure, p<0.05. Conclusions Fluid resuscitation guided by transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution during hospitalization represents an effective adjunct and is associated with beneficial effects on post-burn morbidity. PMID:22703982

  6. Implementation of quality improvement techniques for management and technical processes in the ACRV project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiman, Laura B.

    1992-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a cooperative form of doing business that relies on the talents of everyone in an organization to continually improve quality and productivity, using teams and an assortment of statistical and measurement tools. The objective of the activities described in this paper was to implement effective improvement tools and techniques in order to build work processes which support good management and technical decisions and actions which are crucial to the success of the ACRV project. The objectives were met by applications in both the technical and management areas. The management applications involved initiating focused continuous improvement projects with widespread team membership. The technical applications involved applying proven statistical tools and techniques to the technical issues associated with the ACRV Project. Specific activities related to the objective included working with a support contractor team to improve support processes, examining processes involved in international activities, a series of tutorials presented to the New Initiatives Office and support contractors, a briefing to NIO managers, and work with the NIO Q+ Team. On the technical side, work included analyzing data from the large-scale W.A.T.E.R. test, landing mode trade analyses, and targeting probability calculations. The results of these efforts will help to develop a disciplined, ongoing process for producing fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide the ACRV organization .

  7. Implementation of quality improvement techniques for management and technical processes in the ACRV project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiman, Laura B.

    1992-12-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a cooperative form of doing business that relies on the talents of everyone in an organization to continually improve quality and productivity, using teams and an assortment of statistical and measurement tools. The objective of the activities described in this paper was to implement effective improvement tools and techniques in order to build work processes which support good management and technical decisions and actions which are crucial to the success of the ACRV project. The objectives were met by applications in both the technical and management areas. The management applications involved initiating focused continuous improvement projects with widespread team membership. The technical applications involved applying proven statistical tools and techniques to the technical issues associated with the ACRV Project. Specific activities related to the objective included working with a support contractor team to improve support processes, examining processes involved in international activities, a series of tutorials presented to the New Initiatives Office and support contractors, a briefing to NIO managers, and work with the NIO Q+ Team. On the technical side, work included analyzing data from the large-scale W.A.T.E.R. test, landing mode trade analyses, and targeting probability calculations. The results of these efforts will help to develop a disciplined, ongoing process for producing fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide the ACRV organization .

  8. Value Driven Outcomes (VDO): a pragmatic, modular, and extensible software framework for understanding and improving health care costs and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Martin, Cary J; Williams, Kip; Tu, Ming-Chieh; Park, Charlton G; Hunter, Cheri; Staes, Catherine J; Bray, Bruce E; Deshmukh, Vikrant G; Holbrook, Reid A; Morris, Scott J; Fedderson, Matthew B; Sletta, Amy; Turnbull, James; Mulvihill, Sean J; Crabtree, Gordon L; Entwistle, David E; McKenna, Quinn L; Strong, Michael B; Pendleton, Robert C; Lee, Vivian S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop expeditiously a pragmatic, modular, and extensible software framework for understanding and improving healthcare value (costs relative to outcomes). Materials and methods In 2012, a multidisciplinary team was assembled by the leadership of the University of Utah Health Sciences Center and charged with rapidly developing a pragmatic and actionable analytics framework for understanding and enhancing healthcare value. Based on an analysis of relevant prior work, a value analytics framework known as Value Driven Outcomes (VDO) was developed using an agile methodology. Evaluation consisted of measurement against project objectives, including implementation timeliness, system performance, completeness, accuracy, extensibility, adoption, satisfaction, and the ability to support value improvement. Results A modular, extensible framework was developed to allocate clinical care costs to individual patient encounters. For example, labor costs in a hospital unit are allocated to patients based on the hours they spent in the unit; actual medication acquisition costs are allocated to patients based on utilization; and radiology costs are allocated based on the minutes required for study performance. Relevant process and outcome measures are also available. A visualization layer facilitates the identification of value improvement opportunities, such as high-volume, high-cost case types with high variability in costs across providers. Initial implementation was completed within 6 months, and all project objectives were fulfilled. The framework has been improved iteratively and is now a foundational tool for delivering high-value care. Conclusions The framework described can be expeditiously implemented to provide a pragmatic, modular, and extensible approach to understanding and improving healthcare value. PMID:25324556

  9. Bariatric surgery is associated with improvement in kidney outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex R; Chen, Yuan; Still, Christopher; Wood, G Craig; Kirchner, H Lester; Lewis, Meredith; Kramer, Holly; Hartle, James E; Carey, David; Appel, Lawrence J; Grams, Morgan E

    2016-07-01

    Severe obesity is associated with increased risk of kidney disease. Whether bariatric surgery reduces the risk of adverse kidney outcomes is uncertain. To resolve this we compared the risk of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline of ≥30% and doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 985 patients who underwent bariatric surgery with 985 patients who did not undergo such surgery. Patients were matched on demographics, baseline body mass index, eGFR, comorbidities, and previous nutrition clinic use. Mean age was 45 years, 97% were white, 80% were female, and 33% had baseline eGFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Mean 1-year weight loss was 40.4 kg in the surgery group compared with 1.4 kg in the matched cohort. Over a median follow-up of 4.4 years, 85 surgery patients had an eGFR decline of ≥30% (22 had doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD). Over a median follow-up of 3.8 years, 177 patients in the matched cohort had an eGFR decline of ≥30% (50 had doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD). In adjusted analysis, bariatric surgery patients had a significant 58% lower risk for an eGFR decline of ≥30% (hazard ratio 0.42, 95% confidence interval 0.32-0.55) and 57% lower risk of doubling of serum creatinine or ESRD (hazard ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.71) compared with the matched cohort. Results were generally consistent among subgroups of patients with and without eGFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), hypertension, and diabetes. Thus, bariatric surgery may be an option to prevent kidney function decline in severely obese individuals. PMID:27181999

  10. Effective colonoscopy training techniques: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Karatzas, Pantelis S; Varytimiadis, Lazaros T; Tsigaridas, Athanasios; Galanopoulos, Michail; Viazis, Nikos; Karamanolis, Dimitrios G

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy has substantially evolved during the last 20 years and many different training techniques have been developed in order to improve the performance of endoscopists. The most known are mechanical simulators, virtual reality simulators, computer-simulating endoscopy, magnetic endoscopic imaging, and composite and explanted animal organ simulators. Current literature generally indicates that the use of simulators improves performance of endoscopists and enhances safety of patients, especially during the initial phase of training. Moreover, newer endoscopes and imaging techniques such as high-definition colonoscopes, chromocolonoscopy with dyes spraying, and third-eye retroscope have been incorporated in everyday practice, offering better visualization of the colon and detection of polyps. Despite the abundance of these different technological features, training devices are not widely used and no official guideline or specified training algorithm or technique for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy has been evolved. In this review, we present the most important training methods currently available and evaluate these using existing literature. We also try to propose a training algorithm for novice endoscopists. PMID:27099542

  11. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  12. Routine outcomes monitoring to support improving care for schizophrenia: report from the VA Mental Health QUERI.

    PubMed

    Young, Alexander S; Niv, Noosha; Chinman, Matthew; Dixon, Lisa; Eisen, Susan V; Fischer, Ellen P; Smith, Jeffrey; Valenstein, Marcia; Marder, Stephen R; Owen, Richard R

    2011-04-01

    In schizophrenia, treatments that improve outcomes have not been reliably disseminated. A major barrier to improving care has been a lack of routinely collected outcomes data that identify patients who are failing to improve or not receiving effective treatments. To support high quality care, the VA Mental Health QUERI used literature review, expert interviews, and a national panel process to increase consensus regarding outcomes monitoring instruments and strategies that support quality improvement. There was very good consensus in the domains of psychotic symptoms, side-effects, drugs and alcohol, depression, caregivers, vocational functioning, and community tenure. There are validated instruments and assessment strategies that are feasible for quality improvement in routine practice. PMID:20658320

  13. Engaging with blended learning to improve students' learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Rebecca; Shannon, Susan J.

    2013-08-01

    When blended learning is embraced to enhance learning in engineering (architectural), design and architecture, we argue it is a best-practice instructional mode. Blended learning is the seamless amalgamation of carefully selected online modules with face-to-face instruction. This paper evaluates case studies of the introduction of blended learning in these disciplines. It demonstrates that students who do not engage with blended learning are academically disadvantaged. Alignment of the blended mode of delivery and the mode of assessment is next considered. Two case studies of the introduction of blended modes of assessment, for improved student satisfaction with feedback, are evaluated. Finally, the reliance upon non-faculty to provide both blended learning and assessment is evaluated using qualitative research methods to establish the barriers to adoption of what is now considered best educational practice.

  14. Hypothesis: selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition improves outcome in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Downing, J W; Ramasubramanian, R; Johnson, R F; Minzter, B H; Paschall, R L; Sundell, H W; Engelhardt, B; Lewis, R

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of preeclampsia stems from aberrant changes at the placental interface. The trophoblastic endovascular invasion of tonic spiral arteries that converts them to passive conduits falters. Uteroplacental insufficiency and fetoplacental hypoxemia result. Secondary maternal oxidative stress and an excessive inflammatory response to pregnancy generate the clinical syndrome of preeclampsia. Current treatment focuses on preventing seizures, controlling hypertension, preserving renal function and delivering the baby. We propose that the pathophysiological changes induced by preeclampsia in the placenta parallel those caused by persistent hypoxemia in the lungs at high altitude or with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Unrelenting pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction induces pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. Inhalation of nitric oxide and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors opposes pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction, alleviates pulmonary hypertension and improves systemic oxygenation. Notably nitric oxide donor therapy also counters hypoxemic fetoplacental vasoconstriction, a biological response analogous to pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction. Fetal oxygenation and nutrition improve. Placental upstream resistance to umbilical arterial blood flow decreases. Fetal right ventricular impedance falls. Heart failure (cor placentale) is avoided. Emergency preterm delivery can be postponed. Other than low dose aspirin and antioxidants vitamins C and E no available therapy specifically targets the underlying disease profile. We hypothesize that, like nitric oxide donation, pharmacological inhibition of placental phosphodiesterase-5 will also protect the fetus but for a longer time. Biological availability of guanosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate is boosted due to slowed hydrolysis. Adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monphosphate levels increase in parallel. Cyclic nucleotide accumulation dilates intact tonic spiral arteries and counters hypoxemic fetoplacental vasoconstriction

  15. Thrombomodulin Improves Early Outcomes After Intraportal Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, W.; Wilson, J. T.; Wen, J.; Angsana, J.; Qu, Z.; Haller, C. A.; Chaikof, E. L.

    2009-01-01

    Primary islet nonfunction due to an instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) leads to an increase in donor islet mass required to achieve euglycemia. In the presence of thrombin, thrombomodulin generates activated protein C (APC), which limits procoagulant and proinflammatory responses. In this study, we postulated that liposomal formulations of thrombomodulin (lipo-TM), due to its propensity for preferential uptake in the liver, would enhance intraportal engraftment of allogeneic islets by inhibiting the IBMIR. Diabetic C57BL/6J mice underwent intraportal transplantation with B10.BR murine islets. In the absence of treatment, conversion to euglycemia was observed among 29% of mice receiving 250 allo-islets. In contrast, a single infusion of lipo-TM led to euglycemia in 83% of recipients (p = 0.0019). Fibrin deposition (p< 0.0001), neutrophil infiltration (p < 0.0001), as well as expression TNF-α and IL-β (p<0.03)were significantly reduced. Significantly, thrombotic responses mediated by human islets in contact with human blood were also reduced by this approach. Lipo-TM improves the engraftment of allogeneic islets through a reduction in local thrombotic and inflammatory processes. As an enzyme-based pharmacotherapeutic, this strategy offers the potential for local generation of APC at the site of islet infusion, during the initial period of elevated thrombin production. PMID:19459803

  16. Smoking cessation strategies for patients with asthma: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Jennifer L; Bonevski, Billie; McDonald, Christine F; Abramson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is common in adults with asthma, yet a paucity of literature exists on smoking cessation strategies specifically targeting this subgroup. Adverse respiratory effects from personal smoking include worse asthma control and a predisposition to lower lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some data suggest that individuals with asthma are more likely than their non-asthmatic peers to smoke regularly at an earlier age. While quit attempts can be more frequent in smokers with asthma, they are also of shorter duration than in non-asthmatics. Considering these asthma-specific characteristics is important in order to individualize smoking cessation strategies. In particular, asthma-specific information such as “lung age” should be provided and longer-term follow-up is advised. Promising emerging strategies include reminders by cellular phone and web-based interventions using consumer health informatics. For adolescents, training older peers to deliver asthma education is another promising strategy. For smokers who are hospitalized for asthma, inpatient nicotine replacement therapy and counseling are a priority. Overall, improving smoking cessation rates in smokers with asthma may rely on a more personalized approach, with the potential for substantial health benefits to individuals and the population at large. PMID:27445499

  17. How measurement artifacts affect cerebral autoregulation outcomes: A technical note on transfer function analysis.

    PubMed

    Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S S; de Jong, Daan L K; Lagro, Joep; Panerai, Ronney B; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is the mechanism that aims to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion during changes in blood pressure (BP). Transfer function analysis (TFA), the most reported method in literature to quantify CA, shows large between-study variability in outcomes. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of measurement artifacts in this variation. Specifically, the role of distortion in the BP and/or CBFV measurementon TFA outcomes was investigated. The influence of three types of artifacts on TFA outcomes was studied: loss of signal, motion artifacts, and baseline drifts. TFA metrics of signals without the simulated artifacts were compared with those of signals with artifacts. TFA outcomes scattered highly when more than 10% of BP signal or over 8% of the CBFV signal was lost, or when measurements contained one or more artifacts resulting from head movement. Furthermore, baseline drift affected interpretation of TFA outcomes when the power in the BP signal was 5 times the power in the LF band. In conclusion, loss of signal in BP and loss in CBFV, affects interpretation of TFA outcomes. Therefore, it is vital to validate signal quality to the defined standards before interpreting TFA outcomes. PMID:26935320

  18. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia: outcomes from a clinical process improvement program.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, C L

    1995-01-01

    At EHS Christ Hospital and Medical Center, an eight-step process improvement model was developed that incorporates continuous quality improvement concepts for monitoring, evaluating and improving patient care. Nursing home residents admitted with pneumonia were identified as the group having the most influence on mortality and costs associated with treatment of pneumonia at our hospital. A multidisciplinary team evaluated clinical resource use and patient care processes, and identified root causes of various influencing treatment. Clinical guidelines were created and outcomes were defined, resulting in significant improvement in the clinical management of these patients. Average length of stay decreased from 8.6 days in 1992 to 7.6 days in 1993, with a charge reduction of $1830 per patient. The methodologic framework of a process improvement program combines epidemiologic, clinical, and quality improvement sciences. This mix is essential in improving patient care and quantifying outcomes. PMID:7753691

  19. Using Outcome to Improve a Career Development Course: Closing the Scientist-Practitioner Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Robert J.; Miller, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    The use of outcome data can serve as an important catalyst for improving career interventions. A follow-up to the Reese and Miller study was conducted over a 2-year period to assess whether modifications made to the course using the Reese and Miller data as a baseline resulted in subsequent improvements. Using a prepost group design that compared…

  20. A Measurement Feedback System (MFS) Is Necessary to Improve Mental Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickman, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    The importance of measurement feedback system (MFS) for the improvement of mental health services for youths is discussed. As feedback obtained from clients and families is subject to distortions, a standardized MFS including clinical processes, contexts, outcomes, and feedback to clinicians and supervisors is necessary for improvement in quality…

  1. Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martei, Yehoda M; Matro, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence has important implications not only for enabling the ability to provide accurate information to patients but also the potential to improve patient outcomes. Patients at high recurrence risk can be offered appropriate treatment to improve the overall survival. However, the major challenge is identifying patients with early-stage breast cancer at lower risk who may be spared potentially toxic therapy. The successful integration of molecular assays into clinical practice may address the problem of overtreatment and improve overall patient outcomes. PMID:26504408

  2. Platlet Rich Plasma (PRP) Improves Fat Grafting Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Modarressi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer offers many qualities of a ideal soft tissue filler. Main advantages of fat grafting ensue from the fact that the lipoaspirate tissue is an abundant source of regenerative pluripotential cells. However, the reported rates of fat cell survival vary greatly in the medical literature (10-90%). Different techniques of harvesting, processing, and reinjecting the fat cells are so claimed to be responsible for these differences, without any agreement concerning the best way to process. To address this important disadvantage, we propose the addition of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) which is known as a natural reservoir of growth factors stimulating tissue repair and regeneration. This approach is completely autologous and immediately employed without any type of preconditioning. Platelets rich plasma (PRP) preparation included bleeding of 8 ml of blood from patient's peripheral vein in Regen Lab© tubes containing sodium citrate anticoagulant. The whole blood was centrifugated at 1500 g during 3 min. As Regen-tubes contained a special gel separator, 99 % of red blood cells were discarded from the plasma at the bottom of the gel, and >90% of platelets were harvested in 4 ml of plasma on the top of the gel, called the platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The purified fat prepared by Coleman technique was mixed with different amount of PRP for in vitro, in vivo (mice) and clinical experiments: >50% of PRP for skin rejuvenation, superficial scars correction, infraorbital region, ..., and for 20% of PRP with 80% of purified fat for deep filler indication (nasolabial folds, lips, or soft tissue defect). In vitro studies demonstrated that PRP increased fat cells survival rate and stem cells differentiation. Animal models showed that fat graft survival rate was significantly increased by addition of PRP. Several clinical cases confirmed the improvement of wound healing and fat grafting survival in facial reconstruction and aesthetic cases by association of

  3. Platlet Rich Plasma (PRP) Improves Fat Grafting Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Modarressi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer offers many qualities of a ideal soft tissue filler. Main advantages of fat grafting ensue from the fact that the lipoaspirate tissue is an abundant source of regenerative pluripotential cells. However, the reported rates of fat cell survival vary greatly in the medical literature (10-90%). Different techniques of harvesting, processing, and reinjecting the fat cells are so claimed to be responsible for these differences, without any agreement concerning the best way to process. To address this important disadvantage, we propose the addition of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) which is known as a natural reservoir of growth factors stimulating tissue repair and regeneration. This approach is completely autologous and immediately employed without any type of preconditioning. Platelets rich plasma (PRP) preparation included bleeding of 8 ml of blood from patient’s peripheral vein in Regen Lab© tubes containing sodium citrate anticoagulant. The whole blood was centrifugated at 1500 g during 3 min. As Regen-tubes contained a special gel separator, 99 % of red blood cells were discarded from the plasma at the bottom of the gel, and >90% of platelets were harvested in 4 ml of plasma on the top of the gel, called the platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The purified fat prepared by Coleman technique was mixed with different amount of PRP for in vitro, in vivo (mice) and clinical experiments: >50% of PRP for skin rejuvenation, superficial scars correction, infraorbital region, ..., and for 20% of PRP with 80% of purified fat for deep filler indication (nasolabial folds, lips, or soft tissue defect). In vitro studies demonstrated that PRP increased fat cells survival rate and stem cells differentiation. Animal models showed that fat graft survival rate was significantly increased by addition of PRP. Several clinical cases confirmed the improvement of wound healing and fat grafting survival in facial reconstruction and aesthetic cases by association of

  4. Enhanced Physical Activity Improves Selected Outcomes in Children With ADHD: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Song, MinKyoung; Lauseng, Deborah; Lee, Soohee; Nordstrom, Megan; Katch, Victor

    2016-09-01

    This review examines associations between physical activity (PA) and cognitive, behavioral, and physiological outcomes in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We reviewed studies on participants ≤18 years old, published in English between January 1998 and December 2014, in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Reviews. Twenty-six studies were grouped into two categories: those that did and did not account for effects of ADHD medications. The first category showed lower levels of PA and improved cognitive and behavioral outcomes in youth whose ADHD was treated with medications. The second category showed a positive association between PA levels and cognitive and behavioral outcomes in youth whose ADHD was not treated with medications. For both categories of studies, results were inconclusive regarding physiological outcomes. Randomized controlled trials are needed to better clarify the relationship between PA and outcomes in youth with ADHD, and particularly to understand the impact of ADHD medications on that relationship. PMID:27226208

  5. Visual working memory in deaf children with diverse communication modes: improvement by differential outcomes.

    PubMed

    López-Crespo, Ginesa; Daza, María Teresa; Méndez-López, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Although visual functions have been proposed to be enhanced in deaf individuals, empirical studies have not yet established clear evidence on this issue. The present study aimed to determine whether deaf children with diverse communication modes had superior visual memory and whether their performance was improved by the use of differential outcomes. Severely or profoundly deaf children who employed spoken Spanish, Spanish Sign Language (SSL), and both spoken Spanish and SSL modes of communication were tested in a delayed matching-to-sample task for visual working memory assessment. Hearing controls were used to compare performance. Participants were tested in two conditions, differential outcome and non-differential outcome conditions. Deaf groups with either oral or SSL modes of communication completed the task with less accuracy than bilingual and control hearing children. In addition, the performances of all groups improved through the use of differential outcomes. PMID:22119682

  6. Supporting Minority-Serving Institutions in Their Program Improvement Efforts: A Responsive Technical Assistance Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Mary; Lopez-Reyna, Norma A.; Guillory, Barbara L.

    2012-01-01

    To reform a special education teacher preparation program can be gratifying, difficult, complex, political, and urgently needed. The Monarch Center, a federally funded technical assistance center, was established to guide and support minority-serving institutions in their efforts to improve their teacher preparation programs. Four guidelines…

  7. School Improvement in Pennsylvania--Curriculum and Instruction Issues for the Technical Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFlaminis, John A.; Nicely, Robert F., Jr.

    The following considerations are of major importance to the persons who act as technical assisters for the Long Range Plan for School Improvement (LRPSI) in Pennsylvania: (1) long-range planning should be viewed as a deliberative and participative process; its steps should not be considered in isolation from each other; (2) comprehensive needs…

  8. 76 FR 48822 - Applications for New Awards; Technical Assistance and Dissemination To Improve Services and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Technical Assistance and Dissemination To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities--Transition to College and Careers Center AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department...

  9. 78 FR 18974 - Increasing Market and Planning Efficiency Through Improved Software; Notice of Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... including electric system operators, software developers, government, research centers and academia for the... Energy Regulatory Commission Increasing Market and Planning Efficiency Through Improved Software; Notice... Software Take notice that Commission staff will convene a technical conference on June 24, 25, and 26,...

  10. Towards Quality Technical Vocational Education and Training (Tvet) Programmes in Nigeria: Challenges and Improvement Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayonmike, Chinyere Shirley; Okwelle, P. Chijioke; Okeke, Benjamin Chukwumaijem

    2015-01-01

    Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) is widely recognized as a vital driving force for the socio-economic growth and technological development of nations. In achieving the goals and objectives of TVET in Nigeria, the quality of the programme needs to be improved and sustained. The purpose of this study is to ascertain the challenges…

  11. 77 FR 19280 - Increasing Market and Planning Efficiency Through Improved Software; Notice of Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Increasing Market and Planning Efficiency Through Improved Software; Notice... Software Take notice that Commission staff will convene a technical conference on June 25, 26, and 27, 2012... software. A detailed agenda with the list of and times for the selected speakers will be published on...

  12. 76 FR 50189 - Applications for New Awards; Technical Assistance and Dissemination To Improve Services and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Technical Assistance and Dissemination To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities AGENCY: Office of Special Education Programs, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information...

  13. Counselor Technical Activity in Cases with Improving Working Alliances and Continuing-Poor Working Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Schmitz, Patrick J.

    1992-01-01

    Clients, 15 student volunteers paired with 15 counselors trainees for 4 sessions, rated strength of working alliance for each counseling session and scored counselor technical activity on various dimensions. Counselors were rated as relatively more challenging, thematically focused, and here-and-now oriented in improving dyads (eight dyads) than…

  14. Improving post-intensive care unit neuropsychiatric outcomes: understanding cognitive effects of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ramona O; Suchyta, Mary R; Farrer, Thomas J; Needham, Dale

    2012-12-15

    Critical illness and its treatment often result in long-term neuropsychiatric morbidities. Consequently, there is a need to focus on means to prevent or ameliorate these morbidities. Animal models provide important data regarding the neurobiological effects of physical activity, including angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and release of neurotrophic factors that enhance plasticity. Studies in noncritically ill patients demonstrate that exercise is associated with increased cerebral blood flow, neurogenesis, and brain volume, which are associated with improved cognition. Clinically, research in both healthy and diseased human subjects suggests that exercise improves neuropsychiatric outcomes. In the critical care setting, early physical rehabilitation and mobilization are safe and feasible, with demonstrated improvements in physical functional outcomes. Such activity may also reduce the duration of delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) and improve neuropsychiatric outcomes, although data are limited. Barriers exist regarding implementing ICU rehabilitation in routine care, including use of sedatives and lack of awareness of post-ICU cognitive impairments. Further research is necessary to determine whether prior animal and human research, in conjunction with preliminary results from existing ICU studies, can translate into improvements for neuropsychiatric outcomes in critically ill patients. Studies are needed to evaluate biological mechanisms, risk factors, the role of pre-ICU functional level, and the timing, duration, and type of physical activity for optimal patient outcomes. PMID:23065013

  15. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. PMID:27099511

  16. Internal Consistency of General Outcome Measures in Grades 1-8. Technical Report # 0915

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel; Tindal, Gerald; Alonzo, Julie

    2009-01-01

    We developed alternate forms of a math test for use in both screening students at risk of failure and monitoring their progress over time. In this technical report, we present results of the screener, used in the fall of 2009. The 48-item test was aligned to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum Focal Point Standards…

  17. Examining an Online Content General Outcome Measure: Technical Features of the Static Score

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Paul; McCarter, Kevin S.; Russo, Robert J., Jr.; Blackwood, Danielle L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate technical adequacy features of an online adaptation of vocabulary matching known as critical content monitoring. Validity and reliability studies were conducted with a sample of 106 students from one school in fifth-grade science content. Participants were administered 20 parallel forms of the general…

  18. Developing an Instrument to Assess Non-Technical Outcomes of Occupational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, John J.

    Occupational education has an impact on students in the form of economic returns to the individual and society through the development of technical skills. The Association of Vocational Education Administrators (AVEA) launched this study to test the hypothesis that vocational programs also have a positive impact on student's social, affective and…

  19. Improving lung cancer outcomes by improving the quality of surgical care

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the most important curative treatment modality for non-small cell lung cancer, but variations in short- and long-term surgical outcomes jeopardize the benefit of surgery for certain patients, operated on by certain types of surgeons, at certain types of institutions. We discuss current understanding of surgical quality measures, and their role in promoting understanding of the causes of outcome disparities after lung cancer surgery. We also discuss the use of minimally invasive surgical resection approaches to expand the playing field for surgery in lung cancer care, and end with a discussion of the future role of surgery in a world of alternative treatment possibilities. PMID:26380183

  20. The improving outcomes in intermittent exotropia study: outcomes at 2 years after diagnosis in an observational cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate current patterns of management and outcomes of intermittent distance exotropia [X(T)] in the UK. Methods This was an observational cohort study which recruited 460 children aged < 12 years with previously untreated X(T). Eligible subjects were enrolled from 26 UK hospital ophthalmology clinics between May 2005 and December 2006. Over a 2-year period of follow-up, clinical data were prospectively recorded at standard intervals from enrolment. Data collected included angle, near stereoacuity, visual acuity, control of X(T) measured with the Newcastle Control Score (NCS), and treatment. The main outcome measures were change in clinical outcomes (angle, stereoacuity, visual acuity and NCS) in treated and untreated X(T), 2 years from enrolment (or, where applicable, 6 months after surgery). Change over time was tested using the chi-square test for categorical, Wilcoxon test for non-parametric and paired-samples t-test for parametric data. Results At follow-up, data were available for 371 children (81% of the original cohort). Of these: 53% (195) had no treatment; 17% (63) had treatment for reduced visual acuity only (pure refractive error and amblyopia); 13% (50) had non surgical treatment for control (spectacle lenses, occlusion, prisms, exercises) and 17% (63) had surgery. Only 0.5% (2/371) children developed constant exotropia. The surgically treated group was the only group with clinically significant improvements in angle or NCS. However, 8% (5) of those treated surgically required second procedures for overcorrection within 6 months of the initial procedure and at 6-month follow-up 21% (13) were overcorrected. Conclusions Many children in the UK with X(T) receive active monitoring only. Deterioration to constant exotropia, with or without treatment, is rare. Surgery appears effective in improving angle of X(T) and NCS, but rates of overcorrection are high. PMID:22257496

  1. Breast Reconstruction Using Contour Fenestrated AlloDerm: Does Improvement in Design Translate to Improved Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Jordan D.; Alperovich, Michael; Weichman, Katie E.; Wilson, Stelios C.; Hazen, Alexes; Saadeh, Pierre B.; Levine, Jamie P.; Choi, Mihye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices are used in implant-based breast reconstruction. The introduction of contour fenestrated AlloDerm (Life-Cell, Branchburg, N.J.) offers sterile processing, a crescent shape, and prefabricated fenestrations. However, any evidence comparing reconstructive outcomes between this newer generation acellular dermal matrices and earlier versions is lacking. Methods: Patients undergoing implant-based breast reconstruction from 2010 to 2014 were identified. Reconstructive outcomes were stratified by 4 types of implant coverage: aseptic AlloDerm, sterile “ready-to-use” AlloDerm, contour fenestrated AlloDerm, or total submuscular coverage. Outcomes were compared with significance set at P < 0.05. Results: A total of 620 patients (1019 reconstructions) underwent immediate, implant-based breast reconstruction; patients with contour fenestrated AlloDerm were more likely to have nipple-sparing mastectomy (P = 0.0001, 0.0004, and 0.0001) and immediate permanent implant reconstructions (P = 0.0001). Those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm coverage had lower infection rates requiring oral (P = 0.0016) and intravenous antibiotics (P = 0.0012) compared with aseptic AlloDerm coverage. Compared with sterile “ready-to-use” AlloDerm coverage, those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm had similar infection outcomes but significantly more minor mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.0023). Compared with total submuscular coverage, those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm coverage had similar infection outcomes but significantly more explantations (P = 0.0001), major (P = 0.0130) and minor mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.0001). Significant independent risk factors for increased infection were also identified. Conclusions: Contour fenestrated AlloDerm reduces infections compared with aseptic AlloDerm, but infection rates are similar to those of sterile, ready-to-use AlloDerm and total submuscular coverage. PMID:26495218

  2. The RAISE Connection Program for Early Psychosis: Secondary Outcomes and Mediators and Moderators of Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Leslie; Nossel, Ilana; Choi, Jean C.; Nuechterlein, Keith; Wang, Yuanjia; Essock, Susan; Bennett, Melanie; McNamara, Karen; Mendon, Sapna; Dixon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore secondary outcomes of a coordinated specialty care program for persons with early psychosis, including quality of life and recovery, as well as to explore mediators and moderators of improvement in occupational and social functioning and symptoms. Sixty-five individuals across two sites were enrolled and received services for up to two years. Trajectories for individuals’ outcomes, over time were examined using linear and quadratic mixed-effects models with repeated measures. In addition, baseline prognostic factors of participant improvement in social and occupational functioning were explored based on previous literature and expert opinion of the analytic team. Results demonstrate that the program was effective in improving quality of life and recovery, over time. Furthermore, processing speed was identified as a significant moderator of improvement in occupational GAF, and treatment fidelity, engagement, and family involvement were identified as mediators of improvement in social and occupational functioning. PMID:25900546

  3. IRT Analysis of General Outcome Measures in Grades 1-8. Technical Report # 0916

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Tindal, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    We present scaling outcomes for mathematics assessments used in the fall to screen students at risk of failing to learn the knowledge and skills described in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Focal Point Standards. At each grade level, the assessment consisted of a 48-item test with three 16-item sub-test sets aligned to the…

  4. The Children of the Cost, Quality, and Outcomes Study Go to School. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen. S.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Clifford, Richard M.; Yazejian, Noreen; Culkin, Mary L.; Zelazo, Janice; Howes, Carollee; Byler, Patricia; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Rustici, Jean

    Since a substantial majority of preschoolers participate in some form of child care before coming to school, the Cost, Quality, and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers Study (CQO) was designed to examine the influence of typical center-based child care on children's development during their preschool years and as they move into formal elementary…

  5. Expert System Development in the Classroom: Processes and Outcomes. Technical Report 91-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wideman, Herbert H.; Owston, Ronald D.

    This study examined cognitive processes and outcomes associated with student knowledge base development. Sixty-nine students from two grade 8 classes were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a knowledge base development (KBD) group, a problem-solving software group, and a control group. Those in the KBD group received relevant instruction…

  6. Health Care Improvement and Continuing Interprofessional Education: Continuing Interprofessional Development to Improve Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcock, Peter M.; Janes, Gillian; Chambers, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Health care improvement and continuing professional education must be better understood if we are to promote continuous service improvement through interprofessional learning in the workplace. We propose that situating interprofessional working, interprofessional learning, work-based learning, and service improvement within a framework of social…

  7. 12-Month Outcomes of Community Engagement Versus Technical Assistance to Implement Depression Collaborative Care: A Partnered, Cluster, Randomized, Comparative-Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Bowen; Ong, Michael; Ettner, Susan L.; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; McCreary, Michael; Sherbourne, Cathy; Ngo, Victoria; Koegel, Paul; Tang, Lingqi; Dixon, Elizabeth; Miranda, Jeanne; Belin, Thomas R.; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression collaborative care implementation using community engagement and planning (CEP) across programs compared to technical assistance to individual programs (Resources for Services, RS) in minority communities improves 6-month client outcomes. However, 12-month outcomes are unknown. Objective To compare effects of CEP and RS collaborative care implementation interventions on depressed clients’ mental health-related quality of life (MHRQL) and services use at 12-months. Design Matched health and community programs (n=93) in two communities randomized to CEP or RS. Measurements Self-reported client MHRQL, and services use at baseline, 6, and 12-months. Setting Los Angeles. Patients Adults (n=1018) with depressive symptoms (8-item Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-8]≥10); 85% ethnic minority. Interventions CEP and RS to implement depression collaborative care. Measurements Primary outcome: Poor MHRQL (12-item Mental Composite Score [MCS-12]≤40) at baseline, 6, and 12-months; Secondary outcomes: 12-months services use. Results At 6-months, the finding that CEP outperformed RS to reduce poor MHRQL was significant, but sensitive to underlying statistical assumptions. Similarly, at 12-months, some analyses suggested that CEP was advantageous on MHRQL, while other analyses did not confirm a significant difference favoring CEP. The finding that CEP reduced behavioral health hospitalizations at 6-months was not clear at 12-months with findings sensitive to underlying statistical assumptions. Other services use was not significantly different between interventions at 12-months. Limitations Self-reported data. Findings are sensitive to modeling assumptions. Conclusions In contrast to 6-month results, our findings did not show consistent CEP effects on reducing the likelihood of poor client MHRQL and behavioral health hospitalizations at 12-months. Still given under-resourced communities’ needs, CEP's favorable profile, and the absence of evidence

  8. Improving patient outcomes with technology and social media in paediatric diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze May

    2015-01-01

    The UK has the highest number of children and young people with diagnosed Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in Europe, but the lowest numbers attaining good diabetes control (1, 2). Novel strategies and incorporation of digital strategies were identified in the team for development to improve overall patient care and outcomes in our population of children and young people with T1DM. Within a dual-site integrated care organisation, 3 digital initiatives were proposed from 2012-2013 to 1) establish Facebook communications with parents/patients, 2) to implement an electronic diabetes information management system (using Twinkle.Net) and 3) to undertake routine uploading of blood glucose meters and insulin pumps (using DIASEND®) with the aim to improve outcomes in paediatric diabetes care. Key objectives for the three initiatives were aimed to optimise the following outcomes: • Reduce HbA1c levels • Decrease emergency admissions, reduce diabetes-related complications and minimise the length of hospital stays • Improve patient satisfaction and communication • Improve efficiencies with mandatory audit submissions • Empower patients, parents, and the multidisciplicnary team with accurate, real-time information. These digital initiatives showed effective use of technology and social media in achieving significant improvements in all the outcomes within the objectives. PMID:26734405

  9. Differential outcomes training improves face recognition memory in children and in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Laura; Plaza, Victoria; López-Crespo, Ginesa; Vivas, Ana B; Estévez, Angeles F

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the differential outcomes procedure (DOP), which involves paring a unique reward with a specific stimulus, enhances discriminative learning and memory performance in several populations. The present study aimed to further investigate whether this procedure would improve face recognition memory in 5- and 7-year-old children (Experiment 1) and adults with Down syndrome (Experiment 2). In a delayed matching-to-sample task, participants had to select the previously shown face (sample stimulus) among six alternatives faces (comparison stimuli) in four different delays (1, 5, 10, or 15s). Participants were tested in two conditions: differential, where each sample stimulus was paired with a specific outcome; and non-differential outcomes, where reinforcers were administered randomly. The results showed a significantly better face recognition in the differential outcomes condition relative to the non-differential in both experiments. Implications for memory training programs and future research are discussed. PMID:24713518

  10. Parental Leave Policy as a Strategy to Improve Outcomes among Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Jennifer C; Klawetter, Susanne

    2016-02-01

    Although gains have been made in premature birth rates among racial and ethnic minority and low socioeconomic status populations, tremendous disparities still exist in both prematurity rates and health outcomes for preterm infants. Parental involvement is known to improve health outcomes for preterm babies. However, a gap in evidence exists around whether parental involvement can help ameliorate the disparities in both short- and long-term out-comes for their preterm children. Families more likely to experience preterm birth are also less likely to have access to paid leave and thus experience significant systemic barriers to involvement, especially when their newborns are hospitalized. This article describes the research gap in this area and explores pathways by which social workers may ameliorate disparities in preterm birth outcomes through practice, policy, and research. PMID:26946882

  11. Do larger femoral heads improve the functional outcome in total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Allen, Charlotte L; Hooper, Gary J; Frampton, Christopher M A

    2014-02-01

    Use of larger diameter femoral heads has been popularised in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Recent studies have implicated larger femoral heads in early failure. We evaluated what effect the size of the femoral head had on the early functional outcome in order to determine the optimal head size for the maximal functional outcome. There were 726 patients who underwent elective THA and were divided into 3 groups according to head size then compared with respect to functional outcome scores and dislocation rates. This study failed to show that increasing the size of the femoral head significantly improved the functional outcome at 1 year after total hip arthroplasty but that the use of a 36 mm or greater femoral head did reduce the dislocation rate. PMID:23891058

  12. Effects of improved patient participation in primary care on health-related outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Ariëtte R J; van Weeghel, Inge; Vogelaar, Maartje; Verheul, William; Pieters, Ron H M; de Wit, Niek J; Bensing, Jozien M

    2013-01-01

    Background. In primary care, many consultations address symptom-based complaints. Recovery from these complaints seldom exceeds placebo effects. Patient participation, because of its supposed effects on trust and patient expectancies, is assumed to benefit patients’ recovery. While the idea is theoretically promising, it is still unclear what the effects of increased patient participation are on patient outcomes. Aim. To review the effects of controlled intervention studies aiming to improve patient participation in face-to-face primary care consultations on patient-oriented and/or disease-oriented outcomes. Methods. This study is a systematic review. A systematic search was undertaken for randomized controlled trials designed to measure the effects of interventions that aimed to improve adult patients’ participation in primary care visits. The CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched. Results. Seven different trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Three of the studies were related to symptom-based complaints. Five studies measured patient-oriented outcomes, the primary outcome of interest for this review. All studies suffered from substantial bias. Studies varied widely in their aims, types of complaints/diseases, strength of the interventions and their outcomes. The effects on patient-oriented outcomes and disease-oriented outcomes were ambiguous. Conclusion. Little research has been performed on health outcomes of interventions aiming to increase patient participation in general practice visits among patients suffering from symptom-based complaints. The results still are non-conclusive. The quality of the trials has been weak, possibly due to the complexity of the concept. This weak quality may explain the lack of conclusive results. Proposals for future research designs are offered. PMID:23629738

  13. Effect of Smoking on Joint Replacement Outcomes: Opportunities for Improvement Through Preoperative Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik; Tzeng, Tony H; Ginnetti, Michael; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Jamal K; Saleh, Jasmine; Lane, J M; Mihalko, William M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-01-01

    Because orthopaedic surgeons focus on identifying serious potential complications, such as heart attack, stroke, and deep vein thrombosis, during the preoperative assessment, correctable factors, such as smoking, may be overlooked. Chronic exposure to nicotine has been correlated with perioperative complications that lead to worse outcomes, including decreased patient satisfaction, longer hospitalization periods, and an increased rate of hospital readmission. It has been proven that smoking is a negative risk factor for decreased bone mineral density, which leads to increased fracture risk, heightened pain, postoperative wound and bone healing complications, decreased fusion rates, and postoperative tendon and ligament healing complications. Physician-led preoperative smoking cessation programs that include, but are not limited to, pharmacotherapy plans have been shown to improve primary surgical outcomes and smoking cessation rates. Smoking has detrimental effects on specialty-specific physiology; however, there are many effective options for intervention that can improve primary outcomes. PMID:27049216

  14. Integrating Hospital Administrative Data to Improve Health Care Efficiency and Outcomes: “The Socrates Story”

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Justin; Delaney, Conor P.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of health care outcomes has become increasingly important as we strive to improve quality and efficiency while controlling cost. Many groups feel that analysis of large datasets will be useful in optimizing resource utilization; however, the ideal blend of clinical and administrative data points has not been developed. Hospitals and health care systems have several tools to measure cost and resource utilization, but the data are often housed in disparate systems that are not integrated and do not permit multisystem analysis. Systems Outcomes and Clinical Resources AdministraTive Efficiency Software (SOCRATES) is a novel data merging, warehousing, analysis, and reporting technology, which brings together disparate hospital administrative systems generating automated or customizable risk-adjusted reports. Used in combination with standardized enhanced care pathways, SOCRATES offers a mechanism to improve the quality and efficiency of care, with the ability to measure real-time changes in outcomes. PMID:24436649

  15. Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Charles A; Asinger, Richard W; Berger, Alan K; Charytan, David M; Díez, Javier; Hart, Robert G; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; McCullough, Peter A; Passman, Rod S; DeLoach, Stephanie S; Pun, Patrick H; Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international group of experts defined the current state of knowledge and the implications for patient care in important topic areas, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, peripheral arterial disease, and sudden cardiac death. Although optimal strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and management of these complications likely should be modified in the presence of CKD, the evidence base for decision making is limited. Trials targeting CVD in patients with CKD have a large potential to improve outcomes. PMID:21750584

  16. Integrating hospital administrative data to improve health care efficiency and outcomes: "the socrates story".

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Justin; Delaney, Conor P

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of health care outcomes has become increasingly important as we strive to improve quality and efficiency while controlling cost. Many groups feel that analysis of large datasets will be useful in optimizing resource utilization; however, the ideal blend of clinical and administrative data points has not been developed. Hospitals and health care systems have several tools to measure cost and resource utilization, but the data are often housed in disparate systems that are not integrated and do not permit multisystem analysis. Systems Outcomes and Clinical Resources AdministraTive Efficiency Software (SOCRATES) is a novel data merging, warehousing, analysis, and reporting technology, which brings together disparate hospital administrative systems generating automated or customizable risk-adjusted reports. Used in combination with standardized enhanced care pathways, SOCRATES offers a mechanism to improve the quality and efficiency of care, with the ability to measure real-time changes in outcomes. PMID:24436649

  17. Guidance on feedback of outcome data to improve performance in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Mimi M; Shalhoub, Joseph; Davies, Alun H; Maruthappu, Mahiben

    2016-08-01

    Feedback of performance data is a well-established method of performance improvement in the health-care setting, although guidance has been limited in the context of surgical performance. This article outlines how optimal feedback can be achieved using surgeon outcome data. PMID:27487059

  18. Improved Characters and Student Learning Outcomes through Development of Character Education Based General Physics Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derlina; Sabani; Mihardi, Satria

    2015-01-01

    Education Research in Indonesia has begun to lead to the development of character education and is no longer fixated on the outcomes of cognitive learning. This study purposed to produce character education based general physics learning model (CEBGP Learning Model) and with valid, effective and practical peripheral devices to improve character…

  19. Improving the Transition Outcomes of Low-Income Minority Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcazar, Fabricio E.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina; Dimpfl, Shawn; Portillo-Pena, Nelson; Guzman, Alberto; Schiff, Rachel; Murvay, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the results of a program developed to improve the transition outcomes of low-income minority youth with disabilities. The program relies on case management support to facilitate interagency collaboration. The participants included 164 graduates from special education and 26 youth from an equivalent comparison group. Two case…

  20. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S.; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as…

  1. The LLEN: The Purpose of Local Partnerships in the Provision of Improved Outcomes for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Local Learning and Employment Networks (LLENs) are incorporated organizations and groups whose mission is to facilitate local partnerships for the purpose of improving young people's education and training outcomes in Australia. LLENs are supported by grants from Australia's Department of Education and Training. Of the 31 LLENs currently existing…

  2. How Can Placement Policy Improve Math Remediation Outcomes? Evidence from Experimentation in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Federick; Melguizo, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Changing placement policy may help to improve developmental education student outcomes in community colleges, but there is little understanding of the impacts of these reforms. We take advantage of heterogeneous placement policy in a large urban community college district in California to compare the effects of math remediation under different…

  3. Improving Education Outcomes in Germany. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 611

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, David

    2008-01-01

    Improving education outcomes is important for Germany's long-term economic performance and social cohesion. While student achievement is above the OECD average in science and at the OECD average in reading and mathematics according to the 2006 OECD PISA study, weaker students tend to do badly by international comparison and socio-economic and/or…

  4. Pregnancy Medical Home Care Pathways Improve Quality of Perinatal Care and Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Berrien, Kate; Ollendorff, Arthur; Menard, M Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The clinical leadership of the Pregnancy Medical Home (PMH) program develops and disseminates clinical pathways to promote evidence-based practice and to improve quality of care and outcomes. PMH pathways represent the first standardized clinical guidance for obstetric providers statewide across all care settings. PMID:26509523

  5. How Learning and Cognitive Science Can Improve Student Outcomes. Middle School Matters Program No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Art; Rodriguez, Gina; Brasiel, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    There are research-based principles and practices from the learning and cognitive sciences that can be applied to all content areas in middle grades education to improve student outcomes. Even teachers of courses like Physical Education can consider these strategies for assisting students in remembering rules of sports, different sports…

  6. Information Landscapes and Exploratory User Interfaces: Redesigning To Improve Learning Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedberg, John G.; And Others

    This paper examines improving learning outcomes through redesigning information landscapes. The concept of information landscapes has been a constant theme in the development of interactive multimedia packages. For the user interface to this information to be effective and efficient, consideration must be given to the cognitive load placed on the…

  7. Revised Models and Conceptualisation of Successful School Principalship for Improved Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulford, Bill; Silins, Halia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to present revised models and a reconceptualisation of successful school principalship for improved student outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: The study's approach is qualitative and quantitative, culminating in model building and multi-level statistical analyses. Findings: Principals who promote both capacity building…

  8. Does Prison-Based Adult Basic Education Improve Postrelease Outcomes for Male Prisoners in Florida?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Rosa Minhyo; Tyler, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The authors use administrative data from Florida to determine the extent to which prison-based adult basic education (ABE) improves inmate's postrelease labor market outcomes, such as earnings and employment. Using two nonexperimental comparison groups, the authors find evidence that ABE participation is associated with higher postrelease…

  9. Achievement for All: improving psychosocial outcomes for students with special educational needs and disabilities.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Barlow, Alexandra; Wigelsworth, Michael; Squires, Garry

    2013-04-01

    Students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are at a greatly increased risk of experiencing poor psychosocial outcomes. Developing effective interventions that address the cause of these outcomes has therefore become a major policy priority in recent years. We report on a national evaluation of the Achievement for All (AfA) programme that was designed to improve outcomes for students with SEND through: (1) academic assessment, tracking and intervention, (2) structured conversations with parents, and (3) developing provision to improve wider outcomes (e.g. positive relationships). Using a quasi-experimental, pre-test-post-test control group design, we assessed the impact of AfA on teacher ratings of the behaviour problems, positive relationships and bullying of students with SEND over an 18-month period. Participants were 4758 students with SEND drawn from 323 schools across England. Our main impact analysis demonstrated that AfA had a significant impact on all three response variables when compared to usual practice. Hierarchical linear modelling of data from the intervention group highlighted a range of school-level contextual factors and implementation activities and student-level individual differences that moderated the impact of AfA on our study outcomes. The implications of our findings are discussed, and study strengths and limitations are noted. PMID:23380579

  10. Do high rates of OSCAR deficiencies prompt improved nursing facility processes and outcomes?

    PubMed

    Klopfenstein, Kristin; Lockhart, Charles; Giles-Sims, Jean

    2011-10-01

    Recently, some researchers have argued that high state rates of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) nursing facility deficiencies indicate stringent enforcement, leaving the impression of better-quality care soon to follow; others maintain that the rank ordering of states' quality of nursing facility care remains fairly constant, resting on deep-seated state characteristics that change slowly, so that short-term improvement in poor-quality care is unlikely. The authors examine change in the process and outcome quality of states' Medicare nursing facility long-term care programs across 1999 to 2005, using linear and two-stage least squares regression. They find that (1) nationally, process quality generally falls across this period while outcome quality generally increases; (2) neither a prominent enforcement stringency index nor state culture, a relatively stable state characteristic, exerts much influence on state process and outcome quality scores over time, but (3) the relative costs and benefits for CMS compliance appear to contribute to explaining change in states' quality of resident outcomes over time; and (4) states' process quality is much less stable than outcome quality, and outcome indices distinct from OSCAR deficiency data provide more reliable and possibly more valid measures of care quality. PMID:21985066

  11. Contingency management improves outcomes in cocaine-dependent outpatients with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Gloria; Secades-Villa, Roberto; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Peña-Suárez, Elsa; Sánchez-Hervás, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    Despite depressive symptoms being very common among patients seeking treatment for cocaine dependence, few studies have examined the effects of depressive symptoms on cocaine outpatient treatment outcomes, and there is even less research in the context of Contingency Management (CM). The purpose of this study was to assess the main and interactive effects of co-occurring depressive symptoms on CM outcomes. Cocaine-dependent individuals (N = 108) were randomized to Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) or CRA plus CM in two outpatient community clinical settings. Participants were categorized according to depression symptoms, self-reported by means of the BDI at treatment entry. Outcome measures included treatment retention and documented cocaine abstinence over a 6-month treatment period. Depressive symptoms were more commonly found in females and in unemployed participants, and were associated with more drug-related, social, and psychiatric problems at treatment entry. Individuals with baseline depressive symptoms had poorer treatment outcomes than patients without depressive symptoms. The addition of CM to CRA made the program more effective than with CRA alone, regardless of depressive symptoms. CM was associated with better abstinence treatment outcomes, while the interaction between unemployment and depressive symptoms was associated with negative retention treatment outcomes. This study supports the efficacy of CM for cocaine-dependent outpatients with and without depressive symptoms, and highlights its importance for improving treatment for unemployed and depressed cocaine-dependent individuals. PMID:24080020

  12. Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Carey, ML; Clinton-McHarg, T; Sanson-Fisher, RW; Campbell, S; Douglas, HE

    2011-01-01

    The psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients may be influenced by individual-level, social and treatment centre predictors. This paper aimed to examine the extent to which individual, social and treatment centre variables have been examined as predictors or targets of intervention for psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients. Medline was searched to find studies in which the psychological outcomes of cancer patient were primary variables. Papers published in English between 1999 and 2009 that reported primary data relevant to psychosocial outcomes for cancer patients were included, with 20% randomly selected for further coding. Descriptive studies were coded for inclusion of individual, social or treatment centre variables. Intervention studies were coded to determine if the unit of intervention was the individual patient, social unit or treatment centre. After random sampling, 412 publications meeting the inclusion criteria were identified, 169 were descriptive and 243 interventions. Of the descriptive papers 95.0% included individual predictors, and 5.0% social predictors. None of the descriptive papers examined treatment centre variables as predictors of psychosocial outcomes. Similarly, none of the interventions evaluated the effectiveness of treatment centre interventions for improving psychosocial outcomes. Potential reasons for the overwhelming dominance of individual predictors and individual-focused interventions in psychosocial literature are discussed. PMID:20646035

  13. Outcome of arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: Are the results improving with improved techniques and equipment?: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Arun, G R; Kumar, Pradeep; Patnaik, Sarthak; Selvaraj, Karthik; Rajan, David; Singh, Anant; Kumaraswamy, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the subscapularis tears. There are multiple articles in the literature showing the short term results of isolated subscapularis tendon repair. However, the midterm and long term outcome studies for arthroscopic subscapularis repair are few. This study evaluates the functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Materials and Methods: The records of 35 patients who underwent an arthroscopic subscapularis repair between May 2008 and June 2012 were included in this retrospective study. The records of all patients were reviewed. There were 22 males and 13 female patients with mean age of 58.2 years (range 41-72 years). All patients had a complete history, physical examination, and radiographs of their shoulders. Visual analogue scale (VAS), range of movements, power of cuff muscles, and modified University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score were assessed. Results: The mean followup was 2.8 years (range 2-4 year). Functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair has an excellent outcome as analysed by clinical outcome, VAS score and UCLA score. Results were analyzed and had statistically significant values. The VAS for pain improved significantly (P < 0.001), and the mean modified UCLA score improved significantly (P < 0.001) from 14.24 ± 4.72 preoperatively to 33.15 ± 2.29 at 2 years postoperative. According to the UCLA system, there were 22 excellent, 11 good, and 2 fair results. Around 95% of patients returned to their usual work after surgery. Conclusion: At a median followup of 2 years, 95% of patients had a good to excellent result after an arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. We conclude that the midterm results show that arthroscopic subscapularis repair remains a good option for the treatment of patients with subscapularis tendon repair. PMID:27293291

  14. Individual prediction of treatment outcome in patients with temporomandibular disorders. A quality improvement model.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Bertil

    2007-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to create and evaluate a quality improvement model for prediction of treatment outcome in patients diagnosed with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) of either Muscle or Mainly TMJ (Temporomandibular Joint) origin, treated with interocclusal appliances and/or occlusal adjustment. The model was assumed to generate negative predictors of treatment outcome through evaluating all patients predicted Good reaching an objective treatment goal but not having an improvement of 50% or more. The model was created and evaluated by one TMD specialist. The questions were: (I) Was it possible for the TMD specialist to predict treatment outcome individually in patients diagnosed with TMD and, from the results, create a quality improvement model? (II) Was it possible for eight TMD-trained general dental practitioners, under the supervision of the TMD specialist, to treat TMD patients with similar results to the TMD specialist if the TMD specialist had examined, treatment planned, and individually predicted the treatment outcome? (III) Was it possible for the TMD specialist to improve the possibility to predict individual treatment outcome overtime? (IV) Was it possible for one TMD-trained general dental practitioner to copy the clinical part of the model and achieve the same results as the TMD specialist, in patients selected by the TMD specialist? Out of 5165 patients subjected to a functional examination of the masticatory system, 3602 were diagnosed with TMD and subgrouped as either Muscle or Mainly TMJ symptoms. The patients were predicted to have a Good, Dubious, or Poor possibility to have an improvement of 50% or more after treatment. Patients predicted Poor were not offered any treatment. A correct prediction of actual treatment outcome Good was defined as an improvement of 50% or more for muscle and/or TMJ symptoms. A total of 2625 patients began treatment at the specialist clinic for TMD and 2128 completed the full course of treatment. The

  15. Trans-sodium crocetinate improves outcomes in rodent models of occlusive and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yoshimura, Ryo; Manabe, Hiroaki; Schretter, Catherine; Clarke, Ryon; Cai, Yu; Fitzgerald, Mark; Lee, Kevin S

    2014-10-01

    Trans-sodium crocetinate (TSC) is a novel carotenoid compound capable of enhancing the diffusion of small molecules in aqueous solutions. TSC improves the diffusion of oxygen and glucose, and increases oxygenation in ischemic brain tissue. TSC also dampens the intensity of an ischemic challenge during an ongoing ischemic event. The current study examined the impact of TSC in rat models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Rat three vessel occlusion (3VO), and combined 3VO and one vessel occlusion (3VO/1VO) models of ischemic stroke were evaluated for structural and behavioral outcomes. The effects of TSC were also tested in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Delayed treatment with TSC reduced infarct volume in a rodent model of transient focal ischemia involving either 2 or 6h of ischemia. Neurological outcomes, based on a multi-scale assessment and automated gait analysis, also were improved by TSC treatment. Additionally, TSC reduced edema and hemorrhagic volume in a rat model of ICH. An optimal therapeutic candidate for early intervention in ischemic stroke should be effective when administered on a delayed basis and should not aggravate outcomes associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The current findings demonstrate that delayed TSC treatment improves outcomes in experimental models of both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Together, these findings suggest that TSC may be a safe and beneficial therapeutic modality for early stroke intervention, irrespective of the type of stroke involved. PMID:25128603

  16. Presurgical navigated TMS motor cortex mapping improves outcome in glioblastoma surgery: a controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Picht, Thomas; Frey, Dietmar; Thieme, Stefan; Kliesch, Stefan; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The authors report on an observational study designed to isolate the impact of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) on surgical outcome in glioblastoma treatment. We undertook a controlled observational study to identify the additive impact of presurgical nTMS in patients scheduled for surgical treatment of glioblastoma in or near motor eloquent locations. The trial data is derived from a large university hospital with a differential availability of its nTMS mapping service at its two campuses, both equally served by a single neurosurgical department. When available, the nTMS cortical mapping data and nTMS-based fiber tractography are used for surgical planning and patient counseling as well as intraoperative identification of the primary motor cortex and guidance in subcortical motor mapping. The addition of preoperative nTMS mapping data to a clinical routine already incorporating preoperative fiber tractography and intraoperative neuronavigation and electrophysiology was shown to improve surgical outcomes by increasing the extent of resection, without compromising patient safety or long-term functional outcomes in comparison to the concurrent non-TMS control group. This study is the first to prove that the improved surgical outcomes observed in previous studies after the implementation of nTMS to presurgical work-up are not caused by any overall improvement in patient care or a paradigm shift toward more aggressive resection but by the additional functional data provided by nTMS. PMID:26566653

  17. Improving the estimation of flavonoid intake for study of health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Johanna T.; Jacques, Paul F.; McCullough, Marjorie L.

    2015-01-01

    Imprecision in estimating intakes of non-nutrient bioactive compounds such as flavonoids is a challenge in epidemiologic studies of health outcomes. The sources of this imprecision, using flavonoids as an example, include the variability of bioactive compounds in foods due to differences in growing conditions and processing, the challenges in laboratory quantification of flavonoids in foods, the incompleteness of flavonoid food composition tables, and the lack of adequate dietary assessment instruments. Steps to improve databases of bioactive compounds and to increase the accuracy and precision of the estimation of bioactive compound intakes in studies of health benefits and outcomes are suggested. PMID:26084477

  18. Major liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in the morbidly obese: A proposed strategy to improve outcome

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Omar; Skolkin, Mark D; Toombs, Barry D; Fischer, John H; Ozaki, Claire F; Wood, R Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Background Morbid obesity strongly predicts morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. However, obesity's impact on outcome after major liver resection is unknown. Case presentation We describe the management of a large hepatocellular carcinoma in a morbidly obese patient (body mass index >50 kg/m2). Additionally, we propose a strategy for reducing postoperative complications and improving outcome after major liver resection. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of major liver resection in a morbidly obese patient with hepatocellular carcinoma. The approach we used could make this operation nearly as safe in obese patients as it is in their normal-weight counterparts. PMID:18783621

  19. Time-motion, tactical and technical analysis in top-level karatekas according to gender, match outcome and weight categories.

    PubMed

    Tabben, Montassar; Coquart, Jeremy; Chaabène, Helmi; Franchini, Emerson; Ghoul, Nihel; Tourny, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the time-motion (i.e., fighting, preparatory and breaking activity), technical (i.e., attack, timed-attack, counterattack, blocking and grasps) and tactical (i.e., upper limb, lower-limb, combination and throwing) profiles of the senior top-level karate competition played under the most recent rules of the International Karate Federation in relation to gender, match outcome and weight categories. Time-motion, tactical actions and technical executions were investigated of senior karatekas (n = 60) during the Karate World Championship. The referee's decisions caused an overall activity-to-break ratio of ~1:1.5 with a significant difference (P = 0.025) between karateka's weight categories (light = 1:1.5; middle = 1:2 and heavy = 1:1). High-intensity actions (i.e., attack and defensive actions performed quickly and powerfully) were higher in male compared to female athletes. Top-level karatekas used upper limb techniques more than lower limb ones, with both applied in the head more than in the body. For the high-intensity-actions to pause ratio and the percentage of combined techniques, light weight category was significantly higher than middle weight category. These findings suggest that training programs may need to be specific to the requirements of the gender and weight categories. PMID:25358098

  20. Improving Technical Information Use: What Can Be Learnt from a Manager's Perspective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, C.; Lisle, A.; Carter, R. W.; Hockings, M. T.

    2013-07-01

    Conservation practice reportedly suffers from low use of technical information. Understanding of factors that affect the influence of technical information on management decision-making is limited. We sought to identify leverage points for improved technical information dissemination in the New South Wales Parks and Wildlife Service, Australia, given the significant recent investments in monitoring and evaluation that had been made. We did so by exploring the inter-relationships between factors affecting the influence of different information types on management decisions. Results indicate that managers have a high inclination toward adaptive behavior, given they operate in an information poor environment. The most influential types of information were those that enabled interaction between information provider and recipient (e.g., staff experience and expertise). An analysis of the concordance in individuals' responses for different information types showed that neither accessibility nor organizational expectation of use was aligned with influence on decision-making. Alignment of responses also varied by work area. Raising expectations of information use or increasing access to particular types of information is therefore unlikely to result in an increase in influence on management decision-making. Rather than focussing on matching accessibility and expected use of particular information types, our results indicate that technical information uptake is best supported through existing peer networks tailored to specific work areas.

  1. The use of individually tailored environmental supports to improve medication adherence and outcomes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Velligan, Dawn I; Diamond, Pamela M; Mintz, Jim; Maples, Natalie; Li, Xueying; Zeber, John; Ereshefsky, Larry; Lam, Yui-Wing F; Castillo, Desiree; Miller, Alexander L

    2008-05-01

    Cognitive adaptation training (CAT) is a psychosocial treatment that uses environmental supports such as signs, checklists, alarms, and the organization of belongings to cue and sequence adaptive behaviors in the home. Ninety-five outpatients with schizophrenia (structured clinical interview for diagnosis, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) were randomly assigned to (1) Full-CAT (CAT focused on many aspects of community adaptation including grooming, care of living quarters, leisure skills, social and role performance, and medication adherence), (2) Pharm-CAT (CAT focused only on medication and appointment adherence), or (3) treatment as usual (TAU). Treatment lasted for 9 months, and patients were followed for 6 months after the withdrawal of home visits. Medication adherence (assessed during unannounced, in-home pill counts) and functional outcomes were assessed at 3-month intervals. Results of mixed-effects regression models indicated that both CAT and Pharm-CAT treatments were superior to TAU for improving adherence to prescribed medication (P < .0001). Effects on medication adherence remained significant when home visits were withdrawn. Full-CAT treatment improved functional outcome relative to Pharm-CAT and TAU (P < .0001). However, differences for functional outcome across groups decreased following the withdrawal of home visits and were no longer statistically significant at the 6-month follow-up. Survival time to relapse or significant exacerbation was significantly longer in both CAT and Pharm-CAT in comparison to TAU (.004). Findings indicate that supports targeting medication adherence can improve and maintain this behavior. Comprehensive supports targeting multiple domains of functioning are necessary to improve functional outcomes. Maintenance of gains in functional outcome may require some form of continued intervention. PMID:17932089

  2. The Improvement and Completion of Outcome index: A new assessment system for quality of orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mihee; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Kim, Myeng-Ki; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Hong-Gee

    2016-01-01

    Objective Given the considerable disagreement between the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index and the American Board of Orthodontics Cast-Radiograph Evaluation, we aimed to develop a novel assessment system―the Improvement and Completion of Outcome (ICO) index―to evaluate the outcome of orthodontic treatment. Methods Sixteen criteria from 4 major categories were established to represent the pretreatment malocclusion status, as well as the degree of improvement and level of completion of outcome during/after treatment: dental relationship (arch length discrepancy, irregularity, U1-SN, and IMPA); anteroposterior relationship (overjet, right and left molar position, ANB); vertical relationship (anterior overbite, anterior open-bite, lateral open-bite, SN-MP); and transverse relationship (dental midline discrepancy, chin point deviation, posterior cross-bite, occlusal plane cant). The score for each criterion was defined from 0 or −1 (worst) to 5 (ideal value or normal occlusion) in gradations of 1. The sum of the scores in each category indicates the area and extent of the problems. Improvement and completion percentages were estimated based on the pre- and post-treatment total scores and the maximum total score. If the completion percentage exceeded 80%, treatment outcome was considered successful. Results Two cases, Class I malocclusion and skeletal Class III malocclusion, are presented to represent the assessment procedure using the ICO index. The difference in the level of improvement and completion of treatment outcome can be clearly explained by using 2 percentage values. Conclusions Thus, the ICO index enables the evaluation of the quality of orthodontic treatment objectively and consecutively throughout the entire treatment process. PMID:27478797

  3. Elbow ulnar collateral ligament injuries in athletes: Can we improve our outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Lauren H; Degen, Ryan M; McDonald, Lucas S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) most commonly occurs in the overhead throwing athlete. Knowledge surrounding UCL injury pathomechanics continues to improve, leading to better preventative treatment strategies and rehabilitation programs. Conservative treatment strategies for partial injuries, improved operative techniques for reconstruction in complete tears, adjunctive treatments, as well as structured sport specific rehabilitation programs including resistive exercises for the entire upper extremity kinetic chain are all important factors in allowing for a return to throwing in competitive environments. In this review, we explore each of these factors and provide recommendations based on the available literature to improve outcomes in UCL injuries in athletes. PMID:27114930

  4. Elbow ulnar collateral ligament injuries in athletes: Can we improve our outcomes?

    PubMed

    Redler, Lauren H; Degen, Ryan M; McDonald, Lucas S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-04-18

    Injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) most commonly occurs in the overhead throwing athlete. Knowledge surrounding UCL injury pathomechanics continues to improve, leading to better preventative treatment strategies and rehabilitation programs. Conservative treatment strategies for partial injuries, improved operative techniques for reconstruction in complete tears, adjunctive treatments, as well as structured sport specific rehabilitation programs including resistive exercises for the entire upper extremity kinetic chain are all important factors in allowing for a return to throwing in competitive environments. In this review, we explore each of these factors and provide recommendations based on the available literature to improve outcomes in UCL injuries in athletes. PMID:27114930

  5. Provider and patient directed financial incentives to improve care and outcomes for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Ilona S; Lawson, Brittany C T; Long, Judith A

    2013-04-01

    Incentive programs directed at both providers and patients have become increasingly widespread. Pay-for-performance (P4P) where providers receive financial incentives to carry out specific care or improve clinical outcomes has been widely implemented. The existing literature indicates they probably spur initial gains which then level off or partially revert if incentives are withdrawn. The literature also indicates that process measures are easier to influence through P4P programs but that intermediate outcomes such as glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol control are harder to influence, and the long-term impact of P4P programs on health is largely unknown. Programs directed at patients show greater promise as a means to influence patient behavior and intermediate outcomes such as weight loss; however, the evidence for long-term effects are lacking. In combination, both patient and provider incentives are potentially powerful tools but whether they are cost-effective has yet to be determined. PMID:23225214

  6. Failed biliary cannulation: Clinical and technical outcomes after tertiary referral endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Michael P; Bourke, Michael J; Williams, Stephen J; Alexander, Sina; Moss, Alan; Hope, Rick; Ruppin, David

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Prospective evaluation of repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for failed Schutz grade 1 biliary cannulation in a high-volume center. METHODS: Prospective intention-to-treat analysis of patients referred for biliary cannulation following recent unsuccessful ERCP. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients (35 female; mean age: 62.5 years; age range: 40-87 years) with previous failed biliary cannulation were referred for repeat ERCP. The indication for ERCP was primarily choledocholithiasis (45%) or pancreatic malignancy (18%). Successful biliary cannulation was 100%. The precut needle knife sphincterotomy (NKS) rate was 27.4%. Complications occurred in 3.9% (post-ERCP pancreatitis). An identifiable reason for initial unsuccessful biliary cannulation was present in 55% of cases. Compared to a cohort of 940 naïve papilla patients (female 61%; mean age: 59.9 years; age range: 18-94 years) who required sphincterotomy over the same time period, there was no statistical difference in the cannulation success rate (100% vs 98%) or post-ERCP pancreatitis (3.1% vs 3.9%). Precut NKS use was more frequent (27.4% vs 12.7%) (P = 0.017). CONCLUSION: Referral to a high-volume center following unsuccessful ERCP is associated with high technical success, with a favorable complication rate, compared to routine ERCP procedures. PMID:22174549

  7. Wilms’ tumour in African children: Can an institutional approach improve outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Anyanwu, Lofty-John Chukwuemeka; Atanda, Akinfenwa Taoheed; Atanda, Jareenat Oladoyin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The poor outcome for patients with Wilms’ tumour (WT) in developing countries has been predicated on late presentation, poverty and low rate of chemotherapeutic access. This study aims to evaluate the effects of an institutionalised approach to improving outcome for patients managed in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Oncology records of children diagnosed with WT between 2009 and 2013 were analysed for therapy completion and other prognostic parameters. Ensuing data were then compared with those from other centres in Africa. Results: Compared with results from some local and African studies, the therapy completion rate was higher (60%) with a survival rate among this group being between 1 and 4 years. No patient was lost to follow-up because of unavailability or unaffordability of cytotoxic agents. Conclusion: This study shows that an institutionalised approach can help to improve access to anti-cancer drugs, reduce the rate of loss to follow-up and thus improve outcome. There is however need to improve on patient-doctor communication, form support groups and establish a WT registry. PMID:25659542

  8. Using public policy to improve outcomes for asthmatic children in schools.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Jewlya; Oppenheimer, Sophie; Zimmer, Lorena

    2014-12-01

    School-based services to improve asthma management need to be accompanied by public policies that can help sustain services, scale effective interventions, create greater equity across schools, and improve outcomes for children. Several national organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have recommended specific public policies the adoption of which in school settings can improve asthma outcomes for children. Although many states and school districts have adopted some of these policies, adoption is not universal, and implementation is not always successful, leaving inequities in children's access to asthma services and supports. These issues can be addressed by changing public policy. Policy change is a complex process, but it is one that will benefit from greater involvement by asthma experts, including the researchers who generate the knowledge base on what services, supports, and policies have the best outcomes for children. Asthma experts can participate in the policy process by helping to build awareness of the need for school-based asthma policy, estimating the costs associated with policy options and with inaction, advocating for the selection of specific policies, assisting in implementation (including providing feedback), conducting the research that can evaluate the effectiveness of implementation, and ultimately providing information back into the policy process to allow for improvements to the policies. PMID:25482868

  9. Manual Therapy and Exercise to Improve Outcomes in Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a common voice disorder that is not commonly referred for physical therapy intervention, is characterized by excessive muscle recruitment, resulting in incorrect vibratory patterns of vocal folds and an alteration in voice production. This case series was conducted to determine whether physical therapy including manual therapy, exercise, and stress management education would be beneficial to this population by reducing excess muscle tension. Case Description Nine patients with MTD completed a minimum of 9 sessions of the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes of pain, function, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and the conclusion of treatment. The outcome measures were the numeric rating scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Cervical and jaw range of motion also were assessed at baseline and postintervention using standard goniometric measurements. Outcomes Eight of the patients had no pain after treatment. All 9 of the patients demonstrated an improvement in PSFS score, with 7 patients exceeding a clinically meaningful improvement at the conclusion of the intervention. Three of the patients also had a clinically meaningful change in VHI scores. All 9 of the patients demonstrated improvement in cervical flexion and lateral flexion and jaw opening, whereas 8 patients improved in cervical extension and rotation postintervention. Discussion The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement an intervention to improve outcomes in patients with MTD. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the intervention. A clinical implication is the expansion of physical therapy to include referrals from voice centers for the treatment of MTD. PMID:25256740

  10. Optimizing healthcare at the population level: results of the improving cardiovascular outcomes in Nova Scotia partnership.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jafna; Johnstone, David; Nemis-White, Joanna; Montague, Terrence

    2008-01-01

    Disease management is increasingly considered a valid strategy in the chronic care of our aging patient populations with multiple diseases. The Improving Cardiovascular Outcomes in Nova Scotia (ICONS) project examined whether a community-oriented health management partnership would lead to enhanced care and improved outcomes across an entire healthcare system. ICONS was a prospective cohort study, with baseline and repeated measurements of care and outcomes fed back to all project partners, along with other interventions aimed at optimizing care; preceding interval cohorts served as controls to post-intervention cohorts. The setting was the province of Nova Scotia, whose population is approximately 950,000. All 34,060 consecutive adult patients hospitalized in Nova Scotia with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), unstable angina (UA) or congestive heart failure (CHF) October 1997-March 2002 were included. Interventions were a combination of serial audits and feedbacks of practices and outcomes, web-based publication of findings, newsletter-based education and reminders, physician small-group workshops, pharmacy monitoring and compliance programs, care maps, algorithms, discharge forms and patient information cards. Rates of use of evidence-based marker therapies were the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures included one-year, all-cause mortality and re-hospitalization. Evidence-based prescription practices, for all target diseases, continuously and markedly improved over time. At the population level, there were no changes in one-year mortality for any disease state, although use of proven therapies predicted survival at the individual level throughout the five-year period for all disease states. Rates of re-hospitalization decreased significantly for all disease states over the course of ICONS; but most traditional positive and negative predictors of this outcome, like advanced age and use of proven therapies, respectively, were not predictive. ICONS

  11. Deciding when to "cash in" when outcomes are continuously improving: an escalating interest task.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael E; Webb, Tara L; Jacobs, Eric A

    2011-10-01

    A first-person shooter video game was adapted for the study of choice between smaller sooner and larger later outcomes. Participants chose when to fire a weapon that increased in damage potential over a 10s interval, an escalating interest situation. Across two experiments, participants demonstrated sensitivity to the nature of the mathematical function that defined the relationship between waiting and damage potential. In Experiment 1, people tended to wait longer when doing so allowed them to eliminate targets more quickly. In Experiment 2, people tended to wait longer to increase the probability of a constant magnitude outcome than to increase the magnitude of a 100% certain outcome that was matched for the same expected value (i.e., probability times magnitude). The two experiments demonstrated sensitivity to the way in which an outcome improves when the outcome is continuously available. The results also demonstrate that this new video game task is useful for generating sensitivity to delay to reinforcement over time scales that are typically used in nonhuman animal studies. PMID:21871951

  12. Assessing Student Learning Outcomes in AQIP Accredited Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwass, Constance M.

    2010-01-01

    Accreditation in higher education institutions continues to be regarded as the seal of collegiate quality even while questions have been raised about its effectiveness and what the process accepts as evidence of improved student learning. As a result, many regional accrediting agencies are requiring higher education institutions to implement…

  13. Outcomes Improvement is Not Continuous Along the Learning Curve for Pancreaticoduodenectomy at the Hospital Level

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Taylor M.; Fong, Zhi Ven; Wilson, Samuel E.; Talamini, Mark A; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Chang, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most studies on learning curves for pancreaticoduodenectomy have been based on single-surgeon series at tertiary academic centers or are inferred indirectly from volume-outcome relationships. Our aim is to describe mortality rates associated with cumulative surgical experience among non-teaching hospitals. Study Design Observational study of a statewide in-patient database. Analysis included hospitals that began performing pancreaticoduodenectomy between 1996–2010, as captured by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database. Cases were numbered sequentially within each hospital. The same sequential series (e.g. first 10 cases, 11th through 20th cases) were identified across hospitals. The outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 1,210 cases from 143 non-teaching hospitals were analyzed. The average age was 63 years and the majority of patients were non-Hispanic white. The median overall mortality rate was 9.75%. The mortality rate for the first ten aggregated cases was 11.3%. This improved for subsequent cases, reaching 7.1% for the 21st-30th cases. However, the mortality rate then increased, reaching 16.7% by the 41st-50th cases before falling to 0.0% by the 61st-70th cases. Conclusions Initial improvement in surgical outcomes relative to cumulative surgical experience is not sustained. It is likely that factors other than surgical experience affect outcomes, such as less rigorous assessment of comorbidities or changes in support services. Vigilance regarding outcomes should be maintained even after initial improvements. PMID:26438484

  14. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  15. Economic Returns to Sub-Baccalaureate Technical Education: A Study of Labor Market Outcomes for Manufacturing Engineering Technologist and Technician Education (METTE) Programs in the Wisconsin Technical College System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheny, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the labor market outcomes of sub-baccalaureate education for individuals attending Manufacturing Engineering Technologist and Technician Education (METTE) programs in the Wisconsin Technical College System. Increasingly, public policy for postsecondary education and economic development, as well as decisions…

  16. A Survey of Vocational Administrators and Teachers in Career and Technical Education Centers regarding Their Perception of Vocational Program Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Richard Lynn, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this statewide study is to assess the perceived improvements made to programs that are offered at Career and Technical Education Centers from the perspective of vocational administrators and teachers following the Bureau of Career and Technical Education conduction of an Approved Program Evaluation. The Pennsylvania Bureau of Career…

  17. Improving maternal and infant health outcomes in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program.

    PubMed

    Applegate, Mary; Gee, Rebekah E; Martin, James N

    2014-07-01

    Maternal and infant health is critical to our nation's health. Disparities remain unacceptably high, particularly in the areas of prematurity and infant mortality. In 2012, traditionally distant partners such as federal and state governments, Medicaid and commercial payers, patients, public health and private clinicians, and multiple advocacy groups collaborated to focus on improving birth outcomes. To catalyze the alignment, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services convened an Expert Panel on Improving Maternal and Infant Health Outcomes in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. Over a year's time, the Expert Panel assimilated the best available evidence in clinical science and policy from content leaders and patients. These recommendations culminated in the present report, which challenges us as a nation to implement strategies to help all children have the best chance to survive and thrive comparable to that of other westernized nations. PMID:24901270

  18. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bond, Bryan M; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  19. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Bryan M.; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  20. Ultrasound combined with electrodiagnosis improves lesion localization and outcome in posterior interosseous neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wininger, Yevgeniya Dvorkin; Buckalew, Neilly A.; Kaufmann, Robert A.; Munin, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) syndrome is a rare compression neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic studies (EDX) combined with neuromuscular ultrasound (US) enable precise lesion localization and may improve patient outcome. METHODS In 4 patients with finger extension weakness, US was used to accurately localize concentric EMG needle placement in PIN muscles and to visualize the lesion site. RESULTS EMG with US guidance showed decreased recruitment with abnormal configuration in PIN muscles. Active denervation was not always observed. US scanning demonstrated larger PIN diameter in the affected arm. All patients had surgical intervention to confirm EDX and US findings with improved outcome on follow-up. CONCLUSION These cases demonstrate the benefits of augmenting EDX with US by guiding accurate electrode localization and providing diagnostic information about lesion location. PMID:26206065

  1. Liver transplantation at the Ochsner Clinic: programmatic expansion and outcomes improvement.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Ian C; Reichman, Trevor W; Bohorquez, Humberto; Cohen, Ari J; Bruce, David S; Therapondos, George; Girgrah, Nigel; Joshi, Shobha; Loss, George E

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the best and most durable treatment for both acute and chronic liver disease. Over 1400 liver transplants have been performed at the Ochsner Clinic since the first successful transplant in 1987. Since its inception, the program has gone through several changes and advancements and has become one of the largest liver transplant programs in the United States. We have helped evolve steroid sparing immunosuppression and the use of extended criteria, donor organs. Establishment of criteria for the selection of recipients for re-transplantation has resulted in better than expected short and long-term results. Our center has faced the challenge of Hurricane Katrina and overcome it. We have improved steadily in both outcomes and transplants performed. The Ochnser Clinic Liver Transplant program will continue to improve access and outcomes for all patients with liver disease. PMID:23721014

  2. Trial for Enhancing Technical Writing Skills to Improve Training Efficiencyin Writing Technical Papers and Its Effectiveness Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneda, Michio; Ishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    One of the important undertakings of student in laboratory education practiced in higher educational institutions, such as universities, is the development of technical communication skills based on training in technical writing for preparing not only theses but also papers to be submitted to society journals. However, technical writing is difficult for students who study at a technical university. Moreover, it might become a burden for the teaching staff, when a teaching staff trains many students. With the background of this situation, we have examined four effective methods described in this paper from year 2006. This paper describes the effects of practicing our four methods on the basis of the answers to questionnaires provided by students in years 2006 and 2007.

  3. Does supplementation of in-vitro culture medium with melatonin improve IVF outcome in PCOS?

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Park, Eun A; Kim, Hyung Joon; Choi, Won Yun; Cho, Jung Hyun; Lee, Woo Sik; Cha, Kwang Yul; Kim, You Shin; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2013-01-01

    Human pre-ovulatory follicular fluid (FF) contains a higher concentration of melatonin than serum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation of culture medium on the clinical outcomes of an in-vitro maturation (IVM) IVF-embryo transfer programme for patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Melatonin concentrations in the culture media of granulosa cells (GC) or cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) were measured and the clinical outcomes after using IVM media with or without melatonin were analysed. In the culture media of GC or COC, melatonin concentrations gradually increased. When human chorionic gonadotrophin priming protocols were used, implantation rates in the melatonin-supplemented group were higher than those of the non-supplemented control group (P<0.05). Pregnancy rates were also higher, although not significantly. The findings suggest that the addition of melatonin to IVM media may improve the cytoplasmic maturation of human immature oocytes and subsequent clinical outcomes. It is speculated that follicular melatonin may be released from luteinizing GC during late folliculogenesis and that melatonin supplementation may be used to improve the clinical outcomes of IVM IVF-embryo transfer. Melatonin is primarily produced by the pineal gland and regulates a variety of important central and peripheral actions related to circadian rhythms and reproduction. Interestingly, human pre-ovulatory follicular fluid contains a higher concentration of melatonin than serum. However, in contrast to animal studies, the direct role of melatonin on oocyte maturation in the human system has not yet been investigated. So, the aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation of culture medium on the clinical outcome of an in-vitro maturation (IVM) IVF-embryo transfer programme for PCOS patients. The melatonin concentrations in culture medium of granulosa cells (GC) or cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) were measured and

  4. Identifying Pathways for Improving Household Food Self-Sufficiency Outcomes in the Hills of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karki, Tika B; Sah, Shrawan K; Thapa, Resam B; McDonald, Andrew J; Davis, Adam S

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining and improving household food self-sufficiency (FSS) in mountain regions is an ongoing challenge. There are many facets to the issue, including comparatively high levels of land fragmentation, challenging terrain and transportation bottlenecks, declining labor availability due to out-migration, and low technical knowledge, among others. Using a nonparametric multivariate approach, we quantified primary associations underlying current levels of FSS in the mid-hills of Nepal. A needs assessment survey was administered to 77 households in Lungaun (Baglung District), Pang (Parbat District), and Pathlekhet (Myagdi District), with a total of 80 variables covering five performance areas; resulting data were analyzed using Classification and Regression Trees. The most parsimonious statistical model for household FSS highlighted associations with agronomic management, including yields of maize and fingermillet within a relay cropping system and adoption of improved crop cultivars. Secondary analyses of the variables retained in the first model again focused primarily on crop and livestock management. It thus appears that continued emphasis on technical agricultural improvements is warranted, independent of factors such as land holding size that, in any case, are very difficult to change through development interventions. Initiatives to increase household FSS in the mid-hills of Nepal will benefit from placing a primary focus on methods of agricultural intensification to improve crop yields and effective technology transfer to increase adoption of these methods. PMID:26047508

  5. Identifying Pathways for Improving Household Food Self-Sufficiency Outcomes in the Hills of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Tika B.; Sah, Shrawan K.; Thapa, Resam B.; McDonald, Andrew J.; Davis, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining and improving household food self-sufficiency (FSS) in mountain regions is an ongoing challenge. There are many facets to the issue, including comparatively high levels of land fragmentation, challenging terrain and transportation bottlenecks, declining labor availability due to out-migration, and low technical knowledge, among others. Using a nonparametric multivariate approach, we quantified primary associations underlying current levels of FSS in the mid-hills of Nepal. A needs assessment survey was administered to 77 households in Lungaun (Baglung District), Pang (Parbat District), and Pathlekhet (Myagdi District), with a total of 80 variables covering five performance areas; resulting data were analyzed using Classification and Regression Trees. The most parsimonious statistical model for household FSS highlighted associations with agronomic management, including yields of maize and fingermillet within a relay cropping system and adoption of improved crop cultivars. Secondary analyses of the variables retained in the first model again focused primarily on crop and livestock management. It thus appears that continued emphasis on technical agricultural improvements is warranted, independent of factors such as land holding size that, in any case, are very difficult to change through development interventions. Initiatives to increase household FSS in the mid-hills of Nepal will benefit from placing a primary focus on methods of agricultural intensification to improve crop yields and effective technology transfer to increase adoption of these methods. PMID:26047508

  6. Acid ceramidase improves the quality of oocytes and embryos and the outcome of in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Eliyahu, Efrat; Shtraizent, Nataly; Martinuzzi, Kurt; Barritt, Jason; He, Xingxuan; Wei, Hong; Chaubal, Sanjeev; Copperman, Alan B; Schuchman, Edward H

    2010-04-01

    A major challenge of assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) is to mimic the natural environment required to sustain oocyte and embryo survival. Herein, we show that the ceramide-metabolizing enzyme, acid ceramidase (AC), is expressed in human cumulus cells and follicular fluid, essential components of this environment, and that the levels of this enzyme are positively correlated with the quality of human embryos formed in vitro. These observations led us to develop a new approach for oocyte and embryo culture that markedly improved the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF). The addition of recombinant AC (rAC) to human and mouse oocyte culture medium maintained their healthy morphology in vitro. Following fertilization, the number of mouse embryos formed in the presence of rAC also was improved (from approximately 40 to 88%), leading to approximately 5-fold more healthy births. To confirm these observations, immature bovine oocytes were matured in vitro and subjected to IVF in the presence of rAC. Significantly more high-grade blastocysts were formed, and the number of morphologically intact, hatched embryos was increased from approximately 24 to 70%. Overall, these data identify AC as an important component of the in vivo oocyte and embryo environment, and provide a novel technology for enhancing the outcome of assisted fertilization. Eliyahu, E., Shtraizent, N., Martinuzzi, K., Barritt, J., He, X., Wei, H., Chaubal, S., Copperman, A. B., Schuchman, E. H. Acid ceramidase improves the quality of oocytes and embryos and the outcome of in vitro fertilization. PMID:20007509

  7. Comparing the Efficacy of Interventions that use environmental supports to Improve Outcomes in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Velligan, Dawn I.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Maples, Natalie J.; Mintz, James; Li, Xueying; Glahn, David C.; Miller, Alexander L.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of 2 treatments using environmental supports (e.g. signs, alarms, pill containers, checklists) to improve functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia. 120 participants were randomized into one of 3 treatment groups 1) Cognitive Adaptation Training (CAT; supports customized to individual cognitive impairments and behaviors and maintained on weekly home visits 2) Generic Environmental Supports (GES; a generic set of supports given to patients at a routine clinic visit and replaced on a monthly basis) and 3) treatment as usual (TAU). Functional outcomes, positive symptoms and motivation were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 18 and 24 months. After 9 months of intensive treatment with CAT, visits were decreased from weekly to monthly to examine whether treatment gains could be maintained. Results of a mixed effects regression model with repeated measures indicated a significant main effect of group (CAT>GES>TAU) with non-significant time and group by time interactions. Post-hoc analyses indicated that while individuals in CAT remained significantly better than those in TAU when treatment frequency was reduced, gains in CAT decreased to the level of those seen in GES. While group differences for positive symptoms were not significant, motivation improved in CAT and GES relative to TAU. The highest intensity treatment produced the best outcomes with respect to functioning. However, some improvements were seen with a relatively inexpensive, clinic-based treatment using a package of generic environmental supports. PMID:18374542

  8. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs. PMID:26422517

  9. Career and Technical Education Reforms and Comprehensive School Reforms in High Schools: Their Impact on Education Outcomes for At-Risk Youth. The Highlight Zone: Research @ Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Marisa; Stringfield, Samuel; Stone, James R., III

    The impact of career and technical education (CTE) reforms and comprehensive school reforms in high schools on education outcomes for at-risk youth was examined in a review of research on current reforms. The review identified a series of individual, family and home, school, and community factors that can place students at risk of failing to…

  10. Technical Highlight: NREL Evaluates the Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Walls to Improve the Accuracy of Building Energy Simulation Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, E.H.

    2012-01-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop models of uninsulated wall assemblies that help to improve the accuracy of building energy simulation tools when modeling potential energy savings in older homes.

  11. Technical improvements during 2005 at the La Plata Reflector TelescopeÂ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareilles, F. A.; Schwartz, M. A.; Garcia, R. E.; Solans, J. H.; Fernández Lajús, E.

    We present here the technical developments carried out at the 0.8-m Reflector telescope of the La Plata Observatory during 2005, namely: the development of a new software, running under GNU/Linux, for the control of the CCD Star I Camera; the design and construction of a infrared control for the telescope and dome movements; the calculation and building of the primary and secondary-mirror baffles. These are framed in a plan for improvement, updating and automatization of this historic telescope. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  12. Tenckhoff tunneled peritoneal catheter placement in the palliative treatment of malignant ascites: technical results and overall clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Indesteege, Inge; Laenen, Annouschka; Verslype, Chris; Vergote, Ignace; Prenen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background To assess the technical and clinical outcome of percutaneous insertion of tunneled peritoneal catheters in the palliative treatment of refractory malignant ascites and to determine the safety and feasibility of intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs through the tunneled catheter. Materials and methods Consecutive patients palliatively treated with a tunneled peritoneal catheter to drain the malignant ascites were identified. Patients’ medical history, procedural and clinical follow-up data, including complications and estimated survival, were reviewed. Additionally, a sub analysis of the patients with widespread ovarian cancer and refractory ascites treated with or without intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs was made. Results In all 94 patients it was technically feasible to insert the peritoneal drainage catheter and to drain a median of 3260 cc (range 100 cc – 8500 cc) of malignant ascitic fluid. Post procedural complications included catheter infection (n = 2; 2%), fluid leakage around the entry site (n = 4; 4%), catheter occlusion (n = 2; 2%), sleeve formation around the catheter tip (n = 1; 1%) and accidental loss of the catheter (n = 1; 1%). There was no increase in catheter infection rate in patients treated with or without intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs. Median overall survival after catheter insertion is 1.7 months. Conclusions Percutaneous insertion of a tunneled Tenckhoff catheter for the palliative drainage of malignant ascites and intraperitoneal infusion of cytotoxic drugs is feasible and associated with a very low complication rate, including catheter infection. These tunneled peritoneal lines are beneficial for symptomatic palliative treatment of refractory ascites and allow safe intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PMID:27247552

  13. Defining and Assessing Quality Improvement Outcomes: A Framework for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    McLees, Anita W.; Nawaz, Saira; Thomas, Craig; Young, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We describe an evidence-based framework to define and assess the impact of quality improvement (QI) in public health. Developed to address programmatic and research-identified needs for articulating the value of public health QI in aggregate, this framework proposes a standardized set of measures to monitor and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of public health programs and operations. We reviewed the scientific literature and analyzed QI initiatives implemented through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Public Health Improvement Initiative to inform the selection of 5 efficiency and 8 effectiveness measures. This framework provides a model for identifying the types of improvement outcomes targeted by public health QI efforts and a means to understand QI’s impact on the practice of public health. PMID:25689185

  14. Improving Heart Failure Outcomes: The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist.

    PubMed

    Coen, Jennifer; Curry, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies and explains barriers to optimal outcomes of heart failure and the role of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these obstacles, improving patient outcomes and quality of life. In recent years, advances in heart failure management have increased survival rates, and as a result, the number of patients requiring services to manage disease progression and the complex array of symptoms associated with end-stage heart disease. Management of the heart failure patient is dependent on the severity of the disease and wide range of available treatment regimens. Disease progression can be unpredictable and treatment regimens increasingly complex. The authors present a typical case of a patient with heart failure, identify the barriers to optimal outcomes in managing heart failure, as well as describe the roles of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these barriers within 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist influence: patient, health care provider, and health care systems. The clinical nurse specialist role is ideally suited to positively affect heart failure outcomes. These positive effects are drawn from the dynamic and unique nature of the clinical nurse specialist role and are perpetrated through the 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist practice: patient, health care provider, and heath care system. PMID:27575796

  15. Is diabetes management in primary care improving clinical outcomes? A study in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Mochtar, I; Al-Monjed, M F

    2015-04-01

    There has been little research into the effectiveness of primary-care diabetes clinics in the Middle East. This study in Qatar compared patient outcomes at a primary-care facility with a dedicated diabetes clinic and one without. Using a cross-sectional method, data on demographics, diabetes status and 6 clinical outcomes of diabetes care were collected from the records of patients who visited the clinics during 2012. Diabetes management in both facilities improved clinical outcomes over the 1-year observation period. The mean total cholesterol of patients attending the special clinic (n = 102) decreased significantly from 4.66 to 4.27 mmol/dL and LDL cholesterol from 3.42 to 3.22 mmol/dL. The LDL cholesterol of patients receiving standard care (n = 108) reduced significantly from 3.41 to 3.22 mmol/dL and HDL cholesterol increased from 0.83 to 0.87 mmol/dL. Inter-provider comparisons indicated that the outcomes in the facility with a diabetes clinic were not superior to those in the facility with standard care. PMID:26077518

  16. Improved outcomes for emergency department patients whose ambulance off-stretcher time is not delayed

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, Julia; Keijzers, Gerben; Tippett, Vivienne; O’Dwyer, John; Lind, James; Bost, Nerolie; O’Dwyer, Marilla; Shiels, Sue; Wallis, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare characteristics and outcomes of patients who arrive by ambulance to the ED. We aimed to (i) compare patients with a delayed ambulance offload time (AOT) >30 min with those who were not delayed; and (ii) identify predictors of an ED length of stay (LOS) of >4 h for ambulance-arriving patients. Methods A retrospective, multi-site cohort study was undertaken in Australia using 12 months of linked health data (September 2007–2008). Outcomes of AOT delayed and non-delayed presentations were compared. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to identify predictors of an ED LOS of >4 h. Results Of the 40 783 linked, analysable ambulance presentations, AOT delay of >30 min was experienced by 15%, and 63% had an ED LOS of >4 h. Patients with an AOT <30 min had better outcomes for: time to triage; ambulance time at hospital; time to see healthcare professional; proportion seen within recommended triage time frame; and ED LOS for both admitted and non-admitted patients. In-hospital mortality did not differ. Strong predictors of an ED LOS >4 h included: hospital admission, older age, triage category, and offload delay >30 min. Conclusion Patients arriving to the ED via ambulance and offloaded within 30 min experience better outcomes than those delayed. Given that offload delay is a modifiable predictor of an ED LOS of >4 h, targeted improvements in the ED arrival process for ambulance patients might be useful. PMID:25940975

  17. MEASURING AND IMPROVING RESPIRATORY OUTCOMES IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS LUNG DISEASE: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES TO THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.; Harris, J. Kirk; Conway, Steven; Konstan, Michael W.; Marshall, Bruce; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Saiman, Lisa; Accurso, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease with significant morbidity. Despite overall improvements in survival, patients with CF experience frequent pulmonary exacerbations and declining lung function, which often accelerates during adolescence. New treatments target steps in the pathogenesis of lung disease, such as the basic defect in CF (CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator [CFTR]), pulmonary infections, inflammation, and mucociliary clearance. These treatments offer hope but also present challenges to patients, clinicians, and researchers. Comprehensive assessment of efficacy is critical to identify potentially beneficial treatments. Lung function and pulmonary exacerbation are the most commonly used outcome measures in CF clinical research. Other outcome measures under investigation include measures of CFTR function; biomarkers of infection, inflammation, lung injury and repair; and patient-reported outcomes. Molecular diagnostics may help elucidate the complex CF airway microbiome. As new treatments are developed for patients with CF, efforts should be made to balance treatment burden with quality of life. This review highlights emerging treatments, obstacles to optimizing outcomes, and key future directions for research. PMID:19833563

  18. Erectile function post robotic radical prostatectomy: technical tips to improve outcomes?

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, S S; Persad, R; Gillatt, D

    2016-09-01

    Robotic surgery is becoming more and more commonplace. At the same time, so are complications, especially related to erectile function. The population being diagnosed with cancer is younger, with more aggressive cancers and higher expectations for good erectile function postoperatively. We conduct a retrospective analysis of literature over 20 years for Embase and Medline. Search terms used include (Robotic) AND (prostatectomy) AND (erectile function). There are a variety of multifactorial causes, resulting in worsening ED post-robotic radical prostatectomy; however, there are a number of treatments that can support this. There is much we can do to help prevent patients getting postoperative erectile dysfunction post-radical surgery. However, part of this is management of realistic patient expectations. PMID:27272758

  19. Individual and group based parenting programmes for improving psychosocial outcomes for teenage parents and their children

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jane; Smailagic, Nadja; Bennett, Cathy; Huband, Nick; Jones, Hannah; Coren, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenting programmes are a potentially important means of supporting teenage parents and improving outcomes for their children, and parenting support is a priority across most Western countries. This review updates the previous version published in 2001. Objectives To examine the effectiveness of parenting programmes in improving psychosocial outcomes for teenage parents and developmental outcomes in their children. Search methods We searched to find new studies for this updated review in January 2008 and May 2010 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ASSIA, CINAHL, DARE, ERIC, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts and Social Science Citation Index. The National Research Register (NRR) was last searched in May 2005 and UK Clinical Research Network Portfolio Database in May 2010. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials assessing short-term parenting interventions aimed specifically at teenage parents and a control group (no-treatment, waiting list or treatment-as-usual). Data collection and analysis We assessed the risk of bias in each study. We standardised the treatment effect for each outcome in each study by dividing the mean difference in post-intervention scores between the intervention and control groups by the pooled standard deviation. Main results We included eight studies with 513 participants, providing a total of 47 comparisons of outcome between intervention and control conditions. Nineteen comparisons were statistically significant, all favouring the intervention group. We conducted nine meta-analyses using data from four studies in total (each meta-analysis included data from two studies). Four meta-analyses showed statistically significant findings favouring the intervention group for the following outcomes: parent responsiveness to the child post-intervention (SMD −0.91, 95% CI −1.52 to −0.30, P = 0.04); infant responsiveness to mother at follow-up (SMD −0.65, 95% CI −1.25 to −0.06, P = 0.03); and an overall measure of parent

  20. The Development of Technical and Vocational Education for Vietnam--A Case Study in Quality Improvement. Case Studies on Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Duong

    This report provides a general overview of technical and vocational education in Vietnam, with information on the country's economy, climate, population, and culture. It summarizes the history and present practices of these types of education in the country, and suggests measures to improve the quality of teachers and instructors. Some of the…

  1. The Development of Technical and Vocational Education in Malaysia--A Case Study in Quality Improvement. Case Studies on Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hee, Tieng Fok

    The economic profile of Malaysia has changed from an economy mainly based on agriculture and the production of tin ore to a more balanced economy with continuing growth in the manufacturing and industrial sectors. Educational programs need to be upgraded and improved, particularly the direction and development of technical and vocational education…

  2. How postsecondary education improves adult outcomes for Supplemental Security Income children with severe hearing impairments.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Robert R; Walter, Gerard; Schley, Sara; Hennessey, John; Hemmeter, Jeffrey; Burkhauser, Richard V

    2007-01-01

    The rapid growth in the number of children participating in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program before the age of 18 has led policymakers to consider new methods of assisting children with disabilities in their transition from school to work. Postsecondary education represents one path that SSI children may take to acquire the skills necessary to enter employment and reduce dependency on the SSI disability program as adults. Yet little is known about SSI children's experience with postsecondary education, let alone their ability to increase their labor market earnings and reduce their time on SSI as adults in the long term. This lack of information on long-term outcomes is due in part to a lack of longitudinal data. This article uses a unique longitudinal data set to conduct a case study of SSI children who applied for postsecondary education at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) within the Rochester Institute of Technology. The data set was created by merging NTID administrative data on the characteristics and experiences of its applicants to Social Security Administration (SSA) longitudinal data on earnings and program participation. We used this data file to estimate the likelihood that an SSI child will graduate from NTID relative to other hearing-impaired NTID applicants, and we estimated the influence of graduation from NTID on participation in the SSI adult program and later success in the labor market. The results of our analysis show that the percentage of NTID applicants who were SSI children increased over time, from a low of 10 percent in 1982 to more than 41 percent in 2000. However, the differences in the probability of graduation from NTID between deaf SSI children and deaf applicants who were not SSI children did not change accordingly. The probability of graduation for SSI children who applied to NTID was 13.5 percentage points lower than for those who were not SSI children. The estimated disparity indicates that

  3. Improving Work Outcomes of Dysthymia (Persistent Depressive Disorder) in an Employed Population

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David A.; Lerner, Debra; Visco, Zachary L.; Greenhill, Annabel; Chang, Hong; Cymerman, Elina; Azocar, Francisca; Rogers, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of a work-focused intervention (WFI) on the work outcomes of employed adults with dysthymia. Method This subgroup analysis from a randomized controlled trial compares an initial sample of 167 employees (age ≥ 45 years), screened for dysthymia using the PC-SAD without current major depressive disorder randomized to WFI (n=85) or usual care (UC) (n=82). Study sites included 19 employers and five additional organizations. Telephone-based WFI counseling (eight, twice monthly 50-minute sessions) provided work coaching and modification, care coordination and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Adjusted mixed effects models compared the WFI versus UC group pre-intervention to four-month post-intervention change in at-work limitations measured by the Work Limitations Questionnaire. Secondary outcome analysis compared the change in self-reported absences and depression symptom severity (PHQ-9 scores). Results Work productivity loss scores improved 43.0% in the WFI group vs. 4.8% in UC (difference in change P < 0.001). Absence days declined by 58.3% in WFI vs. 0.0% in UC (difference in change P = .09). Mean PHQ-9 depression symptom severity declined 44.2% in WFI vs. 5.3% in UC (difference in change P < 0.001). Conclusion At four months, the WFI was more effective than UC on two of the three outcomes. It could be an important mental and functional health improvement resource for the employed dysthymic population. PMID:25892151

  4. Behavioral treatment of social phobia in youth: does parent education training improve the outcome?

    PubMed

    Öst, Lars-Göran; Cederlund, Rio; Reuterskiöld, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Social phobia is one of the most common anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, and it runs a fairly chronic course if left untreated. The goals of the present study were to evaluate if a parent education course would improve the outcome for children with a primary diagnosis of social phobia and if comorbidity at the start of treatment would impair the outcome of the social phobia. A total of 55 children, 8-14 years old, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1) Child is treated, 2) Child is treated and parent participates in the course, or 3) A wait-list for 12 weeks. The treatment consisted of individual exposure and group social skills training based on the Beidel, Turner, and Morris (2000) SET-C. Children and parents were assessed pre-, post-, and at one year follow-up with independent assessor ratings and self-report measures. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the two active treatments and both were better than the wait-list. The treatment effects were maintained or furthered at the follow-up. Comorbidity did not lead to worse outcome of social phobia. Comorbid disorders improved significantly from pre-to post-treatment and from post-to follow-up assessment without being targeted in therapy. PMID:25727679

  5. Spiritual Awakening Predicts Improved Drinking Outcomes in a Polish Treatment Sample

    PubMed Central

    Strobbe, Stephen; Cranford, James A.; Wojnar, Marcin; Brower, Kirk J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examined concurrent and longitudinal associations between two dimensions of affiliation in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)—attendance and spiritual awakening—and drinking outcomes among adult patients who were in treatment for alcohol dependence in Warsaw, Poland. In a study conducted at four addiction treatment centers, male and female patients (n = 118) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of alcohol dependence were assessed at baseline (Time 1 or T1), one month (T2), and 6 to 12 months post-baseline (T3) for AA meeting attendance, various aspects of AA affiliation, and alcohol use. AA meeting attendance and alcohol consumption were measured using the Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview. Self-report of having had a spiritual awakening was measured using a modified version of the Alcoholics Anonymous Involvement (AAI) scale. Results There were no cross-sectional or longitudinal associations between AA meeting attendance and improved drinking outcomes. In contrast, self-report of a spiritual awakening between T2 and T3 was significantly associated with abstinence (OR = 2.4, p < .05) and the absence of any heavy drinking (OR = 3.0, p < .05) at T3, even when demographic and clinical characteristics were statistically controlled. Conclusions Self-reports of spiritual awakening predicted improved drinking outcomes in a Polish treatment sample. PMID:24335767

  6. Discussing the Evidence for Upstream Palliative Care in Improving Outcomes in Advanced Cancer.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Thomas W; Nickolich, Myles S; El-Jawahri, Areej; Temel, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care has received increasing attention at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting since the publication of its provisional clinical opinion on the topic in 2012. Despite frequent discussion, palliative care remains a source of some controversy and confusion in clinical practice, especially concerning who should provide it, what it encompasses, and when and how it can help patients and their families. In this article, we provide a formal definition of palliative care and review the state of the science of palliative care in oncology. Several randomized controlled trials now show that palliative care improves important outcomes for patients with cancer. Related outcome improvements include a reduction in symptoms, improved quality of life, better prognostic understanding, less depressed mood, less aggressive end-of-life care, reduced resource utilization, and even prolonged survival. As such, ASCO recommends early integration of palliative care into comprehensive cancer care for all patients with advanced disease and/or significant symptom burden. Our aim is that this summary will facilitate greater understanding about palliative care and encourage further integration of palliative care services into cancer care. More research is needed to illuminate the mechanisms of action of palliative care and to improve the specificity of palliative care applications to unique scenarios and populations in oncology. PMID:27249764

  7. Patient-specific instrumentation does not improve radiographic alignment or clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Huijbregts, Henricus J T A M; Khan, Riaz J K; Sorensen, Emma; Fick, Daniel P; Haebich, Samantha

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been introduced to improve alignment and reduce outliers, increase efficiency, and reduce operation time. In order to improve our understanding of the outcomes of patient-specific instrumentation, we conducted a meta-analysis. Patients and methods - We identified randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patient-specific and conventional instrumentation in TKA. Weighted mean differences and risk ratios were determined for radiographic accuracy, operation time, hospital stay, blood loss, number of surgical trays required, and patient-reported outcome measures. Results - 21 RCTs involving 1,587 TKAs were included. Patient-specific instrumentation resulted in slightly more accurate hip-knee-ankle axis (0.3°), coronal femoral alignment (0.3°, femoral flexion (0.9°), tibial slope (0.7°), and femoral component rotation (0.5°). The risk ratio of a coronal plane outlier (> 3° deviation of chosen target) for the tibial component was statistically significantly increased in the PSI group (RR =1.64). No significance was found for other radiographic measures. Operation time, blood loss, and transfusion rate were similar. Hospital stay was significantly shortened, by approximately 8 h, and the number of surgical trays used decreased by 4 in the PSI group. Knee Society scores and Oxford knee scores were similar. Interpretation - Patient-specific instrumentation does not result in clinically meaningful improvement in alignment, fewer outliers, or better early patient-reported outcome measures. Efficiency is improved by reducing the number of trays used, but PSI does not reduce operation time. PMID:27249110

  8. Improving neurological outcome after cardiac arrest: Therapeutic hypothermia the best treatment

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Suchitra; Dhama, Satyavir S.; Kumar, Mohinder; Jain, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest, irrespective of its etiology, has a high mortality. This event is often associated with brain anoxia which frequently causes severe neurological damage and persistent vegetative state. Only one out of every six patients survives to discharge following in-hospital cardiac arrest, whereas only 2-9% of patients who experience out of hospital cardiac arrest survive to go home. Functional outcomes of survival are variable, but poor quality survival is common, with only 3-7% able to return to their previous level of functioning. Therapeutic hypothermia is an important tool for the treatment of post-anoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It has been shown to reduce mortality and has improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Nevertheless, hypothermia is underused in critical care units. This manuscript aims to review the mechanism of hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors and to propose a simple protocol, feasible to be implemented in any critical care unit. PMID:25885714

  9. Standardizing ICU management of pediatric traumatic brain injury is associated with improved outcomes at discharge.

    PubMed

    O'Lynnger, Thomas M; Shannon, Chevis N; Le, Truc M; Greeno, Amber; Chung, Dai; Lamb, Fred S; Wellons, John C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The goal of critical care in treating traumatic brain injury (TBI) is to reduce secondary brain injury by limiting cerebral ischemia and optimizing cerebral blood flow. The authors compared short-term outcomes as defined by discharge disposition and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores in children with TBI before and after the implementation of a protocol that standardized decision-making and interventions among neurosurgeons and pediatric intensivists. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective pre- and postprotocol study of 128 pediatric patients with severe TBI, as defined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores < 8, admitted to a tertiary care center pediatric critical care unit between April 1, 2008, and May 31, 2014. The preprotocol group included 99 patients, and the postprotocol group included 29 patients. The primary outcome of interest was discharge disposition before and after protocol implementation, which took place on April 1, 2013. Ordered logistic regression was used to assess outcomes while accounting for injury severity and clinical parameters. Favorable discharge disposition included discharge home. Unfavorable discharge disposition included discharge to an inpatient facility or death. RESULTS Demographics were similar between the treatment periods, as was injury severity as assessed by GCS score (mean 5.43 preprotocol, mean 5.28 postprotocol; p = 0.67). The ordered logistic regression model demonstrated an odds ratio of 4.0 of increasingly favorable outcome in the postprotocol cohort (p = 0.007). Prior to protocol implementation, 63 patients (64%) had unfavorable discharge disposition and 36 patients (36%) had favorable discharge disposition. After protocol implementation, 9 patients (31%) had unfavorable disposition, while 20 patients (69%) had favorable disposition (p = 0.002). In the preprotocol group, 31 patients (31%) died while 6 patients (21%) died after protocol implementation (p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Discharge disposition and mortality

  10. Improving the outcome of paediatric orthopaedic trauma: an audit of inpatient management in Southampton.

    PubMed

    Cox, P J; Clarke, N M

    1997-11-01

    The patterns, management and outcome of non-fatal orthopaedic injury in childhood was audited over a 1 year period in Southampton. A computer-based audit (1 September 1993 to 31 August 1994) was conducted of all children aged under 15 years who were admitted to the orthopaedic unit after accidental injury. Management was audited by studying the primary conservative and operative treatment methods employed. Treatment outcome was evaluated in terms of need for secondary operative treatment, salvage internal fixation, length of hospital stay and unplanned readmission. In all, 398 children, representing 50/10,000 of the local paediatric population, were admitted with a traumatic injury. There was a significant (P < 0.001, Kolmogorov-Smirnov) seasonal variation in admission rate. There were 87.3% admissions required for fractures, 8.5% after soft tissue injury and 2.2% after joint injury. The following areas were identified where management and outcome could be improved: 1 A 12.1% readmission rate (47/346) in children with fractures owing to a 16% incidence of loss of position after closed reduction of distal radial, forearm shaft and distal humeral fractures. 2 In all, 24% of internal fixation procedures were performed as 'salvage' after failure of conservative treatment, entailing either reoperation during the initial admission or a further unplanned readmission. 3 A prolonged inpatient stay for patients with femoral fractures owing to a wide variation in treatment method. The outcome of non-fatal orthopaedic injury can be improved through the selective use of primary internal fixation of distal radial and humeral fractures and the close adherence to a management algorithm in femoral fractures. There may be a role for more specialised supervision of primary treatment of these particular fractures. PMID:9422873

  11. Home Diuretic Protocol for Heart Failure: Partnering with Home Health to Improve Outcomes and Reduce Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, Richard P; Wight, Joseph N; Cannon, Ann; Whalen, Moira; Bachman, David

    2014-01-01

    Context: The management of heart failure (HF) is challenging, with high rates of readmission and no single solution. MaineHealth, a health care system serving southern Maine, has shown initial success with home health nurses partnering with physicians in the management of complex patients with HF using the MaineHealth Home Diuretic Protocol (HDP). Objective: To demonstrate that augmented diuretic therapy, both oral and intravenous, an evidence-based treatment for care of patients with HF experiencing fluid retention, can be delivered safely in the home setting using the HDP and can improve outcomes for recently hospitalized patients with HF. Design: In late 2011, the MaineHealth HDP was implemented in two hospitals and in the home health agency serving those hospitals. The patient population included recently hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of advanced HF, eligible for home health services and telemonitoring. Main Outcome Measures: Home health nurses reported data on the patients managed using the protocol, including interventions made, physical findings, lab values, and patient disposition after each episode of care. Questionnaires were used to determine patient and clinician satisfaction. Results: Sixty patients meeting the criteria above were enrolled between November 2011 and January 2014. The protocol was initiated 84 times for 30 of these patients. Sixteen patients had multiple activations. The readmission rate was 10% and no adverse outcomes were observed. Clinician and patient satisfaction was 97% or greater. Conclusion: The MaineHealth HDP can be delivered effectively and safely to improve outcomes, reducing readmissions and allowing patients to remain at home. PMID:25102518

  12. Improving Secondary Career and Technical Education through Professional Development: Alternative Certification and Use of Technical Assessment Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Research Center for Career and Technical Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Secondary career and technical education (CTE) is a field in transition. It is moving from a primary focus on preparing students for entry-level employment to preparing them for continuing education and training as well as employment. The rapid pace of change in technology and the global economy has created a demand for workers who are able to…

  13. Fluorescently Labeled Peptide Increases Identification of Degenerated Facial Nerve Branches during Surgery and Improves Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Mastrodimos, Melina B.; Raju, Sharat C.; Glasgow, Heather L.; Whitney, Michael; Friedman, Beth; Moore, Jeffrey D.; Kleinfeld, David; Steinbach, Paul; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Nerve degeneration after transection injury decreases intraoperative visibility under white light (WL), complicating surgical repair. We show here that the use of fluorescently labeled nerve binding probe (F-NP41) can improve intraoperative visualization of chronically (up to 9 months) denervated nerves. In a mouse model for the repair of chronically denervated facial nerves, the intraoperative use of fluorescent labeling decreased time to nerve identification by 40% compared to surgeries performed under WL alone. Cumulative functional post-operative recovery was also significantly improved in the fluorescence guided group as determined by quantitatively tracking of the recovery of whisker movement at time intervals for 6 weeks post-repair. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an injectable probe that increases visibility of chronically denervated nerves during surgical repair in live animals. Future translation of this probe may improve functional outcome for patients with chronic denervation undergoing surgical repair. PMID:25751149

  14. Money matters: exploiting the data from outcomes research for quality improvement initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Bizzini, Mario; Leunig, Michael; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Mannion, Anne F.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in studies that have sought to identify predictors of treatment outcome and to examine the efficacy of surgical and non-surgical treatments. In addition to the scientific advancement associated with these studies per se, the hospitals and clinics where the studies are conducted may gain indirect financial benefit from participating in such projects as a result of the prestige derived from corporate social responsibility, a reputational lever used to reward such institutions. It is known that there is a positive association between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance. However, in addition to this, the research findings and the research staff can constitute resources from which the provider can reap a more direct benefit, by means of their contribution to quality control and improvement. Poor quality is costly. Patient satisfaction increases the chances that the patient will be a promoter of the provider to friends and colleagues. As such, involvement of the research staff in the improvement of the quality of care can ultimately result in economic revenue for the provider. The most advanced methodologies for continuous quality improvement (e.g., six-sigma) are data-driven and use statistical tools similar to those utilized in the traditional research setting. Given that these methods rely on the application of the scientific process to quality improvement, researchers have the adequate skills and mind-set to embrace them and thereby contribute effectively to the quality team. The aim of this article is to demonstrate by means of real-life examples how to utilize the findings of outcome studies for quality management in a manner similar to that used in the business community. It also aims to stimulate research groups to better understand that, by adopting a different perspective, their studies can be an additional resource for the healthcare provider. The change in perspective should stimulate

  15. Money matters: exploiting the data from outcomes research for quality improvement initiatives.

    PubMed

    Impellizzeri, Franco M; Bizzini, Mario; Leunig, Michael; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Mannion, Anne F

    2009-08-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in studies that have sought to identify predictors of treatment outcome and to examine the efficacy of surgical and non-surgical treatments. In addition to the scientific advancement associated with these studies per se, the hospitals and clinics where the studies are conducted may gain indirect financial benefit from participating in such projects as a result of the prestige derived from corporate social responsibility, a reputational lever used to reward such institutions. It is known that there is a positive association between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance. However, in addition to this, the research findings and the research staff can constitute resources from which the provider can reap a more direct benefit, by means of their contribution to quality control and improvement. Poor quality is costly. Patient satisfaction increases the chances that the patient will be a promoter of the provider to friends and colleagues. As such, involvement of the research staff in the improvement of the quality of care can ultimately result in economic revenue for the provider. The most advanced methodologies for continuous quality improvement (e.g., six-sigma) are data-driven and use statistical tools similar to those utilized in the traditional research setting. Given that these methods rely on the application of the scientific process to quality improvement, researchers have the adequate skills and mind-set to embrace them and thereby contribute effectively to the quality team. The aim of this article is to demonstrate by means of real-life examples how to utilize the findings of outcome studies for quality management in a manner similar to that used in the business community. It also aims to stimulate research groups to better understand that, by adopting a different perspective, their studies can be an additional resource for the healthcare provider. The change in perspective should stimulate

  16. A Review of Web-Assisted Interventions for Diabetes Management: Maximizing the Potential for Improving Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Linda Lockett; Lustria, Mia Liza A.; Rankins, Jenice

    2007-01-01

    Current endeavors in diabetes care focus on helping patients and providers deal successfully with the complexities of the disease by improving the system of care, expanding the reach of interventions, and empowering patients to engage in self-care behaviors. Internet technologies that combine the broad reach of mass media with the interactive capabilities of interpersonal media provide a wide range of advantages over standard modes of delivery. The technical affordances of Web delivery enable individualization or tailoring, appropriately timed reinforcement of educational messages, social support, improved feedback, and increased engagement. In turn, these have been significantly correlated with improved health outcomes. This article is a narrative review of Web-based interventions for managing type 2 diabetes published from 2000 to 2007 that utilize Web sites, Web portals, electronic medical records, videoconference, interactive voice response, and short messaging systems. The most effective systems link medical management and self-management. Patient satisfaction is highest when the Web-based system gives them the ability to track blood glucose, receive electronic reminders, schedule physician visits, email their health care team, and interact with other diabetic patients. However, comprehensive medical and self-management programs have not been implemented widely outside of systems funded by government agencies. The cost of developing and maintaining comprehensive systems continues to be a challenge and is seldom measured in efficacy studies. Lack of reimbursement for Web-based treatments is also a major barrier to implementation. These barriers must be overcome for widespread adoption and realization of subsequent cost savings. PMID:19885163

  17. Transient lung-specific expression of the chemokine KC improves outcome in invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Mehrad, Borna; Wiekowski, Maria; Morrison, Brad E; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Coronel, Elizabeth C; Manfra, Denise J; Lira, Sergio A

    2002-11-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a common and devastating pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. Neutrophils are critical for defense against this infection, and ELR+ CXC chemokines are potent neutrophil chemoattractants. We hypothesized that transient lung-specific overexpression of one such ligand, KC, in mice with invasive aspergillosis improves the outcome of disease. We generated mice in which transgenic expression of KC was limited to the lungs and occurred only upon exposure to tetracycline analogues, and we exposed them to doxycycline after the onset of invasive aspergillosis. Transgenic mice had a threefold greater survival, a 74% lower lung fungal burden, a greater magnitude of lung KC induction, and an earlier and higher peak of lung neutrophil influx compared with wild-type mice. In addition to a higher number of neutrophils, we found a 1.8-fold higher number of monocytes-macrophages in the lungs of transgenic mice as compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, transgenic mice had greater lung expression of interferon-gamma and interleukin-12 in response to infection, suggesting that transgenic expression of KC indirectly regulated the expression of other cytokines associated with improved host defense against this pathogen. Taken together, these data suggest that overexpression of KC in the lung in the setting of established invasive aspergillosis results in improved host defense and outcome of disease. PMID:12403697

  18. Implementing chronic care for COPD: planned visits, care coordination, and patient empowerment for improved outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Current primary care patterns for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) focus on reactive care for acute exacerbations, often neglecting ongoing COPD management to the detriment of patient experience and outcomes. Proactive diagnosis and ongoing multifactorial COPD management, comprising smoking cessation, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, pulmonary rehabilitation, and symptomatic and maintenance pharmacotherapy according to severity, can significantly improve a patient’s health-related quality of life, reduce exacerbations and their consequences, and alleviate the functional, utilization, and financial burden of COPD. Redesign of primary care according to principles of the chronic care model, which is implemented in the patient-centered medical home, can shift COPD management from acute rescue to proactive maintenance. The chronic care model and patient-centered medical home combine delivery system redesign, clinical information systems, decision support, and self-management support within a practice, linked with health care organization and community resources beyond the practice. COPD care programs implementing two or more chronic care model components effectively reduce emergency room and inpatient utilization. This review guides primary care practices in improving COPD care workflows, highlighting the contributions of multidisciplinary collaborative team care, care coordination, and patient engagement. Each primary care practice can devise a COPD care workflow addressing risk awareness, spirometric diagnosis, guideline-based treatment and rehabilitation, and self-management support, to improve patient outcomes in COPD. PMID:22162647

  19. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice. PMID:20134280

  20. Does surgical sympathectomy improve clinical outcomes in patients with refractory angina pectoris?

    PubMed

    Holland, Luke C; Navaratnarajah, Manoraj; Taggart, David P

    2016-04-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: In patients with angina pectoris refractory to medical therapy, does surgical sympathectomy improve clinical outcomes? A total of 528 papers were identified using the search protocol described, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. There were 5 case series and 1 prospective cohort study. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. All 5 of the case series demonstrated an improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance or quality of life in patients undergoing surgical sympathectomy. An early case series investigating an open approach had a high morbidity and mortality rate, but the 4 other series used a minimally invasive technique and had low morbidity and zero perioperative mortality rates. The cohort study compared surgical sympathectomy with transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) and concluded TMR to be superior. However, this study looked only at unilateral sympathectomy, whereas all 5 case series focused on bilateral surgery. We conclude that the best currently available evidence does suggest that patients report an improvement in their symptoms and quality of life following surgical sympathectomy, but the low level of this evidence does not allow for a statistically proved recommendation. PMID:26787727

  1. Primary health care contribution to improve health outcomes in Bogota-Colombia: a longitudinal ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colombia has a highly segmented and fragmented national health system that contributes to inequitable health outcomes. In 2004 the district government of Bogota initiated a Primary Health Care (PHC) strategy to improve health care access and population health status. This study aims to analyse the contribution of the PHC strategy to the improvement of health outcomes controlling for socioeconomic variables. Methods A longitudinal ecological analysis using data from secondary sources was carried out. The analysis used data from 2003 and 2007 (one year before and 3 years after the PHC implementation). A Primary Health Care Index (PHCI) of coverage intensity was constructed. According to the PHCI, localities were classified into two groups: high and low coverage. A multivariate analysis using a Poisson regression model for each year separately and a Panel Poisson regression model to assess changes between the groups over the years was developed. Dependent variables were infant mortality rate, under-5 mortality rate, infant mortality rate due to acute diarrheal disease and pneumonia, prevalence of acute malnutrition, vaccination coverage for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus (DPT) and prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding. The independent variable was the PHCI. Control variables were sewerage coverage, health system insurance coverage and quality of life index. Results The high PHCI localities as compared with the low PHCI localities showed significant risk reductions of under-5 mortality (13.8%) and infant mortality due to pneumonia (37.5%) between 2003 and 2007. The probability of being vaccinated for DPT also showed a significant increase of 4.9%. The risk of infant mortality and of acute malnutrition in children under-5 years was lesser in the high coverage group than in the low one; however relative changes were not statistically significant. Conclusions Despite the adverse contextual conditions and the limitations imposed by the Colombian health

  2. The use of mobile apps to improve nutrition outcomes: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Kristen N; Huang, Wen-Hao; Andrade, Juan E; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen M

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review to determine if the use of nutrition apps resulted in improved outcomes, including knowledge and behavior, among healthy adults. Using app(s), cellular phone, iPads, mobile phone, mobile telephone, smart phone, mobile and mHealth as search terms with diet, food and nutrition as qualifiers we searched PubMed, CINAHL (January 2008-October 2013) and Web of Science (January 2008-January 2014). Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials, non-controlled trials, and cohort studies published in English that used apps to increase nutrition knowledge or improve behavior related to nutrition. Studies that were descriptive, did not include apps, focused on app development, app satisfaction app feasibility, text messaging, or digital photography were excluded. We evaluated article quality using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence Analysis Manual. Data was extracted for knowledge, behavior and weight change. Our initial search identified 12,010 titles from PubMed, 260 from CINAHL and 4762 from Web of Science; of these, only four articles met all search criteria. Positive quality ratings were given to three articles; only one reported knowledge outcomes (non-significant). All four articles evaluated weight loss and suggested an advantage to using nutrition apps. Behavioral changes in reviewed studies included increased adherence to diet monitoring (p < 0.001) and decreased effort to continue diet without app (p = 0.024). Few studies, however, have explored the use of nutrition apps as supportive educational interventions. Most apps focus on weight loss with inconsistent outcomes. We conclude that using apps for education needs additional research which includes behavior theory within the app and improved study design. PMID:25680388

  3. The unrecognized epidemic of blunt carotid arterial injuries: early diagnosis improves neurologic outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Ryu, R K; Offner, P J; Novak, Z; Coldwell, D M; Franciose, R J; Burch, J M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the benefit of screening for blunt carotid arterial injuries (BCI) in patients who are asymptomatic. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Blunt carotid arterial injuries have the potential for devastating complications. Published studies report 23% to 28% mortality rates, with 48% to 58% of survivors having permanent severe neurologic deficits. Most patients have neurologic deficits when the injury is diagnosed. The authors hypothesized that screening patients who are asymptomatic and instituting early therapy would improve neurologic outcome. METHODS: The Trauma Registry of the author's Level I Trauma Center identified patients with BCI from 1990 through 1997. Beginning in August 1996, the authors implemented a screening for BCI. Arteriography was used for diagnosis. Patients without specific contraindications were anticoagulated. Endovascular stents were deployed in the setting of pseudoaneurysms. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients with BCI were identified among 15,331 blunt-trauma victims (0.24%). During the screening period, 25 patients were diagnosed with BCI among 2902 admissions (0.86%); 13 (52%) were asymptomatic. Overall, eight patients died, and seven of the survivors had permanent severe neurologic deficits. Excluding those dying of massive brain injury and patients admitted with coma and brain injury, mortality associated with BCI was 15%, with severe neurologic morbidity in 16% of survivors. The patients who were asymptomatic at diagnosis had a better neurologic outcome than those who were symptomatic. Symptomatic patients who were anticoagulated showed a trend toward greater neurologic improvement at the time of discharge than those who were not anticoagulated. CONCLUSIONS: Screening allows the identification of asymptomatic BCI and thereby facilitates early systemic anticoagulation, which is associated with improved neurologic outcome. The role of endovascular stents in the treatment of blunt traumatic pseudoaneurysms remains to be defined

  4. The GPVI-Fc Fusion Protein Revacept Improves Cerebral Infarct Volume and Functional Outcome in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Silvia; Li, Zhongmin; Vogelmann, Jasmin; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Degen, Heidrun; Hermann, Dirk M.; Gawaz, Meinrad; Ungerer, Martin; Münch, Götz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined the effect of Revacept, an Fc fusion protein which is specifically linked to the extracellular domain of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), on thrombus formation after vessel wall injury and on experimental stroke in mice. Background Several antiplatelet drugs for the treatment of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke with potent anti-ischemic effects have been developed, but all incur a significant risk of bleeding. Methods Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation after endothelial injury was monitored in the carotid artery by intra-vital fluorescence microscopy. The morphological and clinical consequences of stroke were investigated in a mouse model with a one hour-occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Results Thrombus formation was significantly decreased after endothelial injury by 1 mg/kg Revacept IV, compared to Fc only. 1 mg/kg Revacept IV applied in mice with ischemic stroke immediately before reperfusion significantly improved functional outcome, cerebral infarct size and edema compared to Fc only. Also treatment with 10 mg/kg rtPA was effective, and functional outcome was similar in both treatment groups. The combination of Revacept with rtPA leads to increased reperfusion compared to treatment with either agent alone. In contrast to rtPA, however, there were no signs of increased intracranial bleeding with Revacept. Both rtPA and Revacept improved survival after stroke compared to placebo treatment. Revacept and vWF bind to collagen and Revacept competitively prevented the binding of vWF to collagen. Conclusions Revacept reduces arterial thrombus formation, reduces cerebral infarct size and edema after ischemic stroke, improves functional and prognostic outcome without intracranial bleeding. Revacept not only prevents GPVI-mediated, but probably also vWF-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregate formation. Therefore Revacept might be a potent and safe tool to treat ischemic complications of stroke. PMID:23935828

  5. Acute care of older patients in the emergency department: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, John J; Kennelly, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Older patients in the emergency department (ED) are a vulnerable population who are at a higher risk of functional decline and hospital reattendance subsequent to an ED visit, and have a high mortality rate in the months following an ED attendance. The delivery of acute care in a busy environment to this population presents its own unique challenge. The purpose of this review is to detail the common geriatric syndromes encountered in the ED as well as the appropriate strategies and instruments, which can be utilized to support the clinical decision matrix and improve outcomes. PMID:27147890

  6. Improving patient outcomes with better care transitions: the role for home health.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Michael O; Haney, Tara Trahan

    2013-01-01

    Patients, particularly the old and frail, are especially vulnerable at the time of hospital discharge. Fragmentation of care, characterized by miscommunications and lack of follow-up, can lead to oversights in diagnosis and management. The frequent result is avoidable rehospitalization. Amedisys, a home health and hospice organization, created and tested a care transitions initiative for its impact on patients' quality of life and avoidable rehospitalizations. The initiative was carried out in three academic institutions with 12 months of observation. The results suggested reduced hospital readmissions and a critical role for the home health industry in improving patient outcomes and reducing costs. PMID:23420797

  7. Anti-acrolein treatment improves behavioral outcome and alleviates myelin damage in EAE mouse

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Gary; Sun, Wenjing; Zheng, Lingxing; Brookes, Sarah; Tully, Melissa; Shi, Riyi

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major contributor in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde byproduct of lipid peroxidation, is thought to perpetuate oxidative stress. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of acrolein in an animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune enchephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. We have demonstrated a significant elevation of acrolein protein adduct levels in EAE mouse spinal cord. Hydralazine, a known acrolein scavenger, significantly improved behavioral outcomes and lessened myelin damage in spinal cord. We postulate that acrolein is an important pathological factor and likely a novel therapeutic target in MS. PMID:21081153

  8. Enhanced Recovery Pathway in Gynecologic Surgery: Improving Outcomes Through Evidence-Based Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kalogera, Eleftheria; Dowdy, Sean C

    2016-09-01

    A paucity of data exists regarding traditional perioperative practices (bowel preparation, NPO at midnight, liberal narcotics, PCA use, liberal fluids, prolonged bowel and bed rest). Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) is an evidence-based approach to peri-operative care associated with improved outcomes including earlier return of gastrointestinal function, reduced opioid use, shorter hospital stay, and substantial cost reductions with stable complication and readmission rates. Basic principles include patient education, minimizing preoperative fasting, avoiding bowel preparation, preemptive analgesia, nausea/vomiting prophylaxis, perioperative euvolemia, no routine use of drain and nasogastric tubes, early mobilization, oral intake, and catheter removal, non-opioid analgesics, and preemptive laxatives. PMID:27521884

  9. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby's health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal-fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  10. Using microfiber and steam technology to improve cleaning outcomes in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Elizabeth; Williams, Natalie; Sloane, Tracy; Wright, Louise; Kotsanas, Despina; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2015-02-01

    The use of microfiber and steam technology may be seen as a novel cleaning method that can improve the outcome of cleaning. We describe its use in an intensive care setting, its impact on vancomycin-resistant enterococci acquisition, and the importance of ensuring adequate education of cleaning staff. Such new methods can have a significant impact on the transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms, provided systems are in place to ensure that the methodology is adhered to and that cleaning hours are adequate. PMID:25637118

  11. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  12. Setting the vision: Applied patient reported outcomes and smart, connected digital healthcare systems to improve patient-centered outcomes prediction in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Wysham, Nicholas G.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Cox, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction models in critical illness are generally limited to short-term mortality and uncommonly include patient-centered outcomes. Current outcome prediction tools are also insensitive to individual context or evolution in healthcare practice, potentially limiting their value over time. Improved prognostication of patient-centered outcomes in critical illness could enhance decision making quality in the ICU. Recent Findings Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have emerged as precise methodological measures of patient-centered variables and have been successfully employed using diverse platforms and technologies, enhancing the value of research in critical illness survivorship and in direct patient care. The learning health system is an emerging ideal characterized by integration of multiple data sources into a smart and interconnected health information technology infrastructure with the goal of rapidly optimizing patient care. We propose a vision of a smart, interconnected learning health system with integrated electronic PROs (ePRO) to optimize patient-centered care including critical care outcome prediction. Summary A learning health system infrastructure integrating ePROs may aid in the management of critical illness associated conditions and yield tools to improve prognostication of patient-centered outcomes in critical illness. PMID:25159475

  13. A Lunar Broad Band Seismometer on SELENE-2 / LUNETTE missions: Focus on VBB technical improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebut, T.; Gagnepain-Beyneix, J.; Lognonne, P.; Kobayashi, N.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; de Raucourt, S.; Bierwirth, M.; Mimoun, D.; Zweifel, P.; Tillier, S.; Robert, O.; Escande, N.; Gabsi, T.; Lecomte, B.; Pot, O.; Mance, D.; Roll, R.; Shiraishi, H.; Garcia, R. F.; Yamada, R.; Mocquet, A.; Banerdt, B.; Tanaka, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Moon will be explored during the next decade by a series of missions, especially from Japan, China, India and USA. We present here the status of the development of space qualified Very Broad Band seismometer in Europe. This instrument, completed by Japanese Short Period Seismometers, is called Lunar Broad Band Seismometer (LBBS). It is considered for the Japanese project SELENE-2 and US project LUNETTE. The main scientific goals are to determine the internal structure of the whole Moon and more specifically the composition and size of the lunar core. The LBBS instrument is the result of an international consortium: A 3 axis short period (SP) seismometer (ISAS/JAXA) A 3 axis very broad band (VBB) seismometer (IPGP) A deployment system (DPL) (MPS) A data acquisition system (SEIS-AC) (ETHZ) Both SP and VBB development rely on technical heritage of cancelled space missions (LUNAR-A for the SP, Netlander & Humboldt/ExoMars for the VBB). This technical development lead VBB to reach a Technical Readiness Level (TRL) above 5 (ESA ExoMars PDR), and we aim at TRL 6 within the next few months. The adaptation of the VBB from Mars to Moon conditions and environment is challenging. The resolution has to be improved by a factor of ten and should be inferior to 2.10-11m/s^2/sqrt(Hz) @ 0.1 Hz while the Instrument are supporting very large temperature variations (several 10s of degrees) compared to those of typical VBB seismometers. Using Netlander & ExoMars heritage, It appeared that a trade-off between resolution and VBB thermal sensibility was possible. A passive thermal compensation device was designed and tested at IPGP reducing VBB thermal sensitivity by a factor of 12, and we aim at a factor of 20. It will be possible to improve the resolution consequently if thermal sensitivity is reduced. For Moon missions VBB developments, efforts have been made both on mechanical design and Displacement Capacitive Sensor (DCS). The mechanical part of VBB is an inverted pendulum; the

  14. A mnemonic for Parkinson disease patients considering DBS: a tool to improve perceived outcome of surgery.

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S; Foote, Kelly D

    2004-09-01

    Patients considering deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease (PD) may be exposed to videotapes, media coverage, or literature which show dramatic improvements in PD symptoms after surgical intervention. Based on this information, patients may seek a medical center with expertise in DBS for an evaluation and assessment of their candidacy for surgery. If patients receive a device, they may be disappointed or despondent following surgery because of a failure to achieve a preconceived and unrealistic outcome. In order to address the important issue of patient misconception of potential outcome, we have introduced a simple mnemonic device. The device may be taught and then reviewed with patients and families both before and after surgery. Use of this mnemonic device may allow the patient and family the time necessary to alter the perception of perceived benefit. This education can help to ensure that outcome meets or exceeds expectation, and as a result they become a more satisfied and easy-to-manage DBS patient. PMID:15335446

  15. Tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes improve clinical outcome of therapy-resistant neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Marco; Boldrini, Renata; Citti, Arianna; Romania, Paolo; D'Alicandro, Valerio; De Ioris, Maretta; Castellano, Aurora; Furlanello, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma grows within an intricate network of different cell types including epithelial, stromal and immune cells. The presence of tumor-infiltrating T cells is considered an important prognostic indicator in many cancers, but the role of these cells in neuroblastoma remains to be elucidated. Herein, we examined the relationship between the type, density and organization of infiltrating T cells and clinical outcome within a large collection of neuroblastoma samples by quantitative analysis of immunohistochemical staining. We found that infiltrating T cells have a prognostic value greater than, and independent of, the criteria currently used to stage neuroblastoma. A variable in situ structural organization and different concurrent infiltration of T-cell subsets were detected in tumors with various outcomes. Low-risk neuroblastomas were characterized by a higher number of proliferating T cells and a more structured T-cell organization, which was gradually lost in tumors with poor prognosis. We defined an immunoscore based on the presence of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ infiltrating T cells that associates with favorable clinical outcome in MYCN-amplified tumors, improving patient survival when combined with the v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene neuroblastoma derived homolog (MYCN) status. These findings support the hypothesis that infiltrating T cells influence the behavior of neuroblastoma and might be of clinical importance for the treatment of patients. PMID:26405592

  16. Patients with comorbidities: what shall we do to improve the outcome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Iemma, D

    2009-05-01

    The number of patients submitted to major surgery affected by one or more comorbidities is progressively increasing. Outcome is the final output measured as morbidity, mortality and quality of life, of diagnostic tests, procedures, therapy tools started in the preoperative period and fitted on single patients or groups of patients or typology of surgical acts. Strategies to improve outcome can be divided in some fundamental steps: preoperative evaluation; optimization and no discontinuation of preoperative drug treatments, mainly in cardiac patient; choice of adequate monitoring techniques, checking of patient metabolic state and oxidative balance; choice of the best anesthesia; postoperative care, particularly due to identify the best management of the critical patient between the different levels of assistance. In conclusion, a patient with comorbidities scheduled for major surgery needs a full anesthetist-intensivist involvement, which broadens the role of the anesthetist in the perioperative medicine. Outcome is the result of many interventions during patient course, including economic costs and the importance of an appropriate treatment. PMID:19412152

  17. Impact of Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Interventions on Improving Health Outcomes among School Children

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This review was done to explore the impact of water treatment, hygiene, and sanitary interventions on improving child health outcomes such as absenteeism, infections, knowledge, attitudes, and practices and adoption of point-of-use water treatment. Methods. A literature search was conducted using the databases PubMed and Google scholar for studies published between 2009 and 2012 and focusing on the effects of access to safe water, hand washing facilities, and hygiene education among school-age children. Studies included were those that documented the provision of water and sanitation in schools for children less than 18 years of age, interventions which assessed WASH practices, and English-language, full-text peer reviewed papers. Results. Fifteen studies were included in the final analysis. 73% (n = 11) of the studies were conducted in developing countries and were rural based (53%, n = 8). The child's age, gender, grade level, socioeconomic index, access to hygiene and sanitary facilities, and prior knowledge of hygiene practices were significantly associated with the outcomes. Nutrition practices which are key factors associated with the outcomes were rarely assessed. Conclusion. Further research is required to assess the long-term impact of such interventions in different settings. PMID:24454415

  18. Status and Opportunities for Improving the Consistency of Technical Reference Manuals

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, Tina; Velonis, Aquila; Haeri, Hossein; Goldman, Charles A.; Schiller, Steven R.

    2012-05-01

    Across the United States, energy-efficiency program administrators rely on Technical Reference Manuals (TRMs) as sources for calculations and deemed savings values for specific, well-defined efficiency measures. TRMs play an important part in energy efficiency program planning by providing a common and consistent source for calculation of ex ante and often ex post savings. They thus help reduce energy-efficiency resource acquisition costs by obviating the need for extensive measurement and verification and lower performance risk for program administrators and implementation contractors. This paper considers the benefits of establishing region-wide or national TRMs and considers the challenges of such undertaking due to the difficulties in comparing energy savings across jurisdictions. We argue that greater consistency across TRMs in the approaches used to determine deemed savings values, with more transparency about assumptions, would allow better comparisons in savings estimates across jurisdictions as well as improve confidence in reported efficiency measure savings. To support this thesis, we review approaches for the calculation of savings for select measures in TRMs currently in use in 17 jurisdictions. The review reveals differences in the saving methodologies, technical assumptions, and input variables used for estimating deemed savings values. These differences are described and their implications are summarized, using four, common energy-efficiency measures as examples. Recommendations are then offered for establishing a uniform approach for determining deemed savings values.

  19. Risk-based configuration control: Application of PSA in improving technical specifications and operational safety

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, P.K.; Kim, I.S.; Vesely, W.E.

    1992-11-01

    Risk-based configuration control is the management of component configurations using a risk perspective to control risk and assure safety. A configuration, as used here, is a set of component operability statuses that define the state of a nuclear power plant. If the component configurations that have high risk implications do not occur, then the risk from the operation of nuclear power plants would be minimal. The control of component configurations, i.e., the management of component statuses, to minimize the risk from components being unavailable, becomes difficult, because the status of a standby safety system component is often not apparent unless it is tested. Controlling plant configuration from a risk-perspective can provide more direct risk control and also more operational flexibility by allowing looser controls in areas unimportant to risk. Risk-based configuration control approaches can be used to replace parts of nuclear power plant Technical Specifications. With the advances in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) technology, such approaches to improve Technical Specifications and operational safety are feasible. In this paper, we present an analysis of configuration risks, and a framework for risk-based configuration control to achieve the desired control of risk-significant configurations during plant operation.

  20. Risk-based configuration control: Application of PSA in improving technical specifications and operational safety

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, P.K.; Kim, I.S. ); Vesely, W.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Risk-based configuration control is the management of component configurations using a risk perspective to control risk and assure safety. A configuration, as used here, is a set of component operability statuses that define the state of a nuclear power plant. If the component configurations that have high risk implications do not occur, then the risk from the operation of nuclear power plants would be minimal. The control of component configurations, i.e., the management of component statuses, to minimize the risk from components being unavailable, becomes difficult, because the status of a standby safety system component is often not apparent unless it is tested. Controlling plant configuration from a risk-perspective can provide more direct risk control and also more operational flexibility by allowing looser controls in areas unimportant to risk. Risk-based configuration control approaches can be used to replace parts of nuclear power plant Technical Specifications. With the advances in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) technology, such approaches to improve Technical Specifications and operational safety are feasible. In this paper, we present an analysis of configuration risks, and a framework for risk-based configuration control to achieve the desired control of risk-significant configurations during plant operation.

  1. Connecting the Disconnected: Improving Education and Employment Outcomes among Disadvantaged Youth. Discussion Paper No. 1412-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Peter B.; Holzer, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we will briefly review recent trends in employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth, focusing specifically on those who have become "disconnected" from school and the labor market, and why these trends have occurred. We then review a range of policy prescriptions that might improve those outcomes. These policies include: 1)…

  2. Improved outcomes in the non-operative management of liver injuries

    PubMed Central

    Saltzherr, Teun Peter; van der Vlies, Cees H; van Lienden, Krijn P; Beenen, Ludo F M; Ponsen, Kees Jan; van Gulik, Thomas M; Goslings, J Carel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Non-operative management has become the treatment of choice in the majority of liver injuries. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in primary treatment and outcomes in a single Dutch Level 1 trauma centre with wide experience in angio-embolisation (AE). Methods The prospective trauma registry was retrospectively analysed for 7-year periods before (Period 1) and after (Period 2) the introduction of AE. The primary outcome was the failure rate of primary treatment defined as liver injury-related death or re-bleeding requiring radiologic or operative (re)interventions. Secondary outcomes were liver injury-related intra-abdominal complications. Results Despite an increase in high-grade liver injuries, the incidence of primary non-operative management more than doubled over the two periods, from 33% (20 of 61 cases) in Period 1 to 72% (84 of 116 cases) in Period 2 (P < 0.001). The failure rate of primary treatment in Period 1 was 18% (11/61), compared with 11% (13/116) in Period 2 (P = 0.21). Complication rates were 23% (14/61) and 16% (18/116) in Periods 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.22). Liver-related mortality rates were 10% (6/61) and 3% (4/116) in Periods 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.095). The increase in the frequency of non-operative management was even higher in high-grade injuries, in which outcomes were improved. In high-grade injuries in Periods 1 and 2, failure rates decreased from 45% (9/20) to 20% (11/55) (P = 0.041), liver-related mortality decreased from 30% (6/20) to 7% (4/55) (P = 0.019) and complication rates fell from 60% (12/20) to 27% (15/55) (P = 0.014). Liver infarction or necrosis and abscess formation seemed to occur more frequently with AE. Conclusions Overall, liver-related mortality, treatment failure and complication rates remained constant despite an increase in non-operative management. However, in high-grade injuries outcomes improved after the introduction of AE. PMID:21492335

  3. Shared Treatment Decision Making Improves Adherence and Outcomes in Poorly Controlled Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra R.; Strub, Peg; Buist, A. Sonia; Knowles, Sarah B.; Lavori, Philip W.; Lapidus, Jodi; Vollmer, William M.

    2010-01-01

    significantly improves adherence to asthma pharmacotherapy and clinical outcomes. Clinical trials registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00217945 and NCT00149526). PMID:20019345

  4. Beyond Necrotizing Enterocolitis Prevention: Improving Outcomes with an Exclusive Human Milk–Based Diet

    PubMed Central

    Peluso, Allison M.; Hawthorne, Keli M.; Perez, Jose; Smith, Denise P.; Khan, Janine Y.; O'Donnell, Andrea; Powers, Richard J.; Lee, Martin L.; Abrams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to compare outcomes of infants pre and post initiation of a feeding protocol providing an exclusive human milk–based diet (HUM). Materials and Methods: In a multicenter retrospective cohort study, infants with a birth weight <1,250 g who received a bovine-based diet (BOV) of mother's own milk fortified with bovine fortifier and/or preterm formula were compared to infants who received a newly introduced HUM feeding protocol. Infants were excluded if they had major congenital anomalies or died in the first 12 hours of life. Data were collected 2–3 years prior to and after introduction of an exclusive HUM diet. Primary outcomes were necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and mortality. Secondary outcomes included late-onset sepsis, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Results: A total of 1,587 infants were included from four centers in Texas, Illinois, Florida, and California. There were no differences in baseline demographics or growth of infants. The HUM group had significantly lower incidence of proven NEC (16.7% versus 6.9%, p < 0.00001), mortality (17.2% versus 13.6%, p = 0.04), late-onset sepsis (30.3% versus 19.0%, p < 0.00001), ROP (9% versus 5.2%, p = 0.003), and BPD (56.3% versus 47.7%, p = 0.0015) compared with the BOV group. Conclusions: Extremely premature infants who received an exclusive HUM diet had a significantly lower incidence of NEC and mortality. The HUM group also had a reduction in late-onset sepsis, BPD, and ROP. This multicenter study further emphasizes the many benefits of an exclusive HUM diet, and demonstrates multiple improved outcomes after implementation of such a feeding protocol. PMID:26789484

  5. Improving access to psychological therapies (IAPT) and treatment outcomes: epistemological assumptions and controversies.

    PubMed

    Williams, C H J

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is recommended as a primary treatment choice in England, for anxiety and depression, by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). It has been argued that CBT has enjoyed political and cultural dominance and this has arguably led to maintained government investment in England for the cognitive and behavioural treatment of mental health problems. The government programme 'Improving Access to Psychological Therapies' (IAPT) aims to improve the availability of CBT. The criticism of the NICE evidence-based guidelines supporting the IAPT programme, has been the dominance of the gold standard randomized controlled trial methodology, with a focus on numerical outcome data, rather than a focus on a recovery narrative. RCT-based research is influenced by a philosophical paradigm called positivism. The IAPT culture is arguably influenced by one research paradigm and such an influence can skew services only towards numerical outcome data as the only truth of 'recovery'. An interpretative paradigm could assist in shaping service-based cultures, alter how services are evaluated and improve the richness of CBT research. This paper explores the theory of knowledge (epistemology) that underpins the evidence-based perspective of CBT and how this influences service delivery. The paper argues that the inclusion of service user narrative (qualitative data) can assist the evaluation of CBT from the user's perspective and can understand the context in which people live and how they access services. A qualitative perspective is discussed as a research strategy, capturing the lived experience of under-represented groups, such as sexual, gender and ethnic minorities. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has enjoyed political and cultural dominance within mental healthcare, with renewed government investment in England for the'Improving Access to Psychological Therapies' (IAPT) programme. The criticism of the evidence-based guidelines

  6. Improving patient outcomes following glaucoma surgery: state of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Van Bergen, Tine; Van de Velde, Sarah; Vandewalle, Evelien; Moons, Lieve; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Of all the treatments currently used to lower intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients, filtration surgery is known to be the most effective. However, in a significant percentage of cases, the constructed channel closes due to excessive scar formation, resulting in surgical failure. The process of postoperative wound healing is characterized by the coagulative and inflammatory phase, followed by the proliferative and repair phase, and finally the remodeling phase. Perioperative antimitotic agents, such as mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil, are known to modulate the process of wound healing and to improve surgical outcome, but they carry a risk of vision-threatening complications. New alternative strategies to prevent filtration failure, such as inhibition of transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, and placental growth factor, have shown promising results in the improvement of surgical success. However, it remains necessary to broaden the therapeutic approach by focusing on combined therapies and on extended drug delivery. PMID:24833892

  7. Potential approaches to improve the outcomes of donation after cardiac death liver grafts

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub, Paria; Bozorgzadeh, Adel; Martins, Paulo N

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing discrepancy between the supply and demand of livers for transplantation resulting in high mortality rates on the waiting list. One of the options to decrease the mortality on the waiting list is to optimize organs with inferior quality that otherwise would be discarded. Livers from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors are frequently discarded because they are exposed to additional warm ischemia time, and this might lead to primary-non-function, delayed graft function, or severe biliary complications. In order to maximize the usage of DCD livers several new preservation approaches have been proposed. Here, we will review 3 innovative organ preservation methods: (1) different ex vivo perfusion techniques; (2) persufflation with oxygen; and (3) addition of thrombolytic therapy. Improvement of the quality of DCD liver grafts could increase the pool of liver graft’s for transplantation, improve the outcomes, and decrease the mortality on the waiting list. PMID:27358776

  8. Neurocognitive, Neuroprotective, and Cardiometabolic Effects of Raloxifene: Potential for Improving Therapeutic Outcomes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad M

    2016-07-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that has been approved for treating osteoporosis and breast cancer in high-risk postmenopausal women. However, recent evidence suggests that raloxifene adjunct therapy improves cognition and reduces symptom severity in men and women with schizophrenia. In animal models, raloxifene increases forebrain neurogenesis and enhances working memory and synaptic plasticity. It may consequently repair the neuronal and synaptic connectivity that is disrupted in schizophrenia. It also reduces oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, which are potent etiological factors in the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Furthermore, in postmenopausal women, raloxifene reduces the risks for atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and weight gain, which are serious adverse effects associated with long-term antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia; therefore, it may improve the safety and efficacy of antipsychotic drugs. In this review, recent insights into the neurocognitive, neuroprotective, and cardiometabolic effects of raloxifene in relation to therapeutic outcomes in schizophrenia are discussed. PMID:27193386

  9. Improving Outcomes with Surgical Resection and Other Ablative Therapies in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rahul; O'Reilly, Derek; Sherlock, David

    2011-01-01

    With rising incidence and emergence of effective treatment options, the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex multidisciplinary process. There is still little consensus and uniformity about clinicopathological staging systems. Resection and liver transplantation have been the cornerstone of curative surgical treatments with recent emergence of ablative techniques. Improvements in diagnostics, surgical techniques, and postoperative care have lead to dramatically improved results over the years. The most appropriate treatment plan has to be individualised and depends on a variety of patient and tumour-related factors. Very small HCCs discovered on surveillance have the best outcomes. Patients with advanced cirrhosis and tumours within Milan criteria should be offered transplantation. Resection is best for small solitary tumours with preserved liver function. Ablative techniques are suitable for low volume tumours in patients unfit for either resection or transplantation. The role of downstaging and bridging therapy is not clearly established. PMID:21994867

  10. Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD?

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Janet; Stabile, Mark; Jones, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    We examine the effects of a policy change in the province of Quebec, Canada which greatly expanded insurance coverage for prescription medications. We show that the change was associated with a sharp increase in the use of stimulant medications commonly prescribed for ADHD in Quebec relative to the rest of Canada. We ask whether this increase in medication use was associated with improvements in emotional functioning or academic outcomes among children with ADHD. We find little evidence of improvement in either the medium or the long run. Our results are silent on the effects on optimal use of medication for ADHD, but suggest that expanding medication in a community setting had little positive benefit and may have had harmful effects given the average way these drugs are used in the community. PMID:24954077

  11. Potential approaches to improve the outcomes of donation after cardiac death liver grafts.

    PubMed

    Mahboub, Paria; Bozorgzadeh, Adel; Martins, Paulo N

    2016-06-24

    There is a growing discrepancy between the supply and demand of livers for transplantation resulting in high mortality rates on the waiting list. One of the options to decrease the mortality on the waiting list is to optimize organs with inferior quality that otherwise would be discarded. Livers from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors are frequently discarded because they are exposed to additional warm ischemia time, and this might lead to primary-non-function, delayed graft function, or severe biliary complications. In order to maximize the usage of DCD livers several new preservation approaches have been proposed. Here, we will review 3 innovative organ preservation methods: (1) different ex vivo perfusion techniques; (2) persufflation with oxygen; and (3) addition of thrombolytic therapy. Improvement of the quality of DCD liver grafts could increase the pool of liver graft's for transplantation, improve the outcomes, and decrease the mortality on the waiting list. PMID:27358776

  12. Early Warning/Track-and-Trigger Systems to Detect Deterioration and Improve Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Ariel L; Lominadze, George; Gong, Michelle N; Savel, Richard H

    2016-02-01

    As a global effort toward improving patient safety, a specific area of focus has been the early recognition and rapid intervention in deteriorating ward patients. This focus on "failure to rescue" has led to the construction of early warning/track-and-trigger systems. In this review article, we present a description of the data behind the creation and implementation of such systems, including multiple algorithms and strategies for deployment. Additionally, the strengths and weaknesses of the various systems and their evaluation in the literature are emphasized. Despite the limitations of the current literature, the potential benefit of these early warning/track-and-trigger systems to improve patient outcomes remains significant. PMID:26820276

  13. Transient antiangiogenic treatment improves delivery of cytotoxic compounds and therapeutic outcome in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sampurna; Wieczorek, Caroline; Schöttle, Jakob; Siobal, Maike; Hinze, Yvonne; Franz, Thomas; Florin, Alexandra; Adamczak, Joanna; Heukamp, Lukas C; Neumaier, Bernd; Ullrich, Roland T

    2014-05-15

    Extensive oncologic experience argues that the most efficacious applications of antiangiogenic agents rely upon a combination with cytotoxic drugs. Yet there remains a lack of clarity about how to optimize scheduling for such drug combinations. Prudent antiangiogenic therapy might transiently normalize blood vessels to improve tumor oxygenation and drug exposure. Using [(15)O]H2O positron emission tomography imaging in a preclinical mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer, we observed that short-term treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/platelet-derived growth factor receptor inhibitor PTK787 licensed a transient window of improved tumor blood flow. The improvement observed was associated with a reduced leakiness from tumor vessels, consistent with induction of a vascular normalization process. Initiation of a cytotoxic treatment in this window of tumor vessel normalization resulted in increased efficacy, as illustrated by improved outcomes of erlotinib administration after initial PTK787 treatment. Notably, intermittent PTK787 treatment also facilitated long-term tumor regression. In summary, our findings offer strong evidence that short-term antiangiogenic therapy can promote a transient vessel normalization process that improves the delivery and efficacy of a targeted cytotoxic drug. PMID:24675359

  14. Does a Quality Improvement Intervention for Anxiety Result in Differential Outcomes for Lower Income Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Chavira, Denise A.; Craske, Michelle G.; Gollineli, Daniela; Han, Xiaotong; Rose, Raphael D.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Stein, Murray B.; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effects of a collaborative care intervention for anxiety disorders in primary care on lower income participants relative to those with higher incomes. The authors hypothesized that lower income patients might show less improvement or improve at a lower rate given that they experience greater economic stress over the treatment course. Alternatively, lower income patients could improve at a higher rate because the intervention facilitates access to evidence-based treatment, which typically is less available to persons with lower incomes. Method The authors compared baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with lower (n=287) and higher (n=717) income using t-tests and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables respectively. For the longitudinal analysis of intervention effects by income group, the authors jointly modeled the outcomes at the four assessment times by study site; income; time; intervention; time and intervention; income and time; income and intervention; and time, intervention and income. Results Although lower-income participants were more ill and disabled at baseline than those in the higher income group, the two income groups were very similar in their clinical response. The lower income participants experienced a comparable degree of clinical improvement, despite receiving fewer treatment sessions, less relapse prevention, and less continuous care. Conclusions These findings contribute to the ongoing discussion as to whether or not, and to what extent, quality improvement interventions work equally well across income groups or require tailoring for specific vulnerable populations. PMID:23377641

  15. Technical and early outcomes of Ivor Lewis minimally invasive oesophagectomy for gastric tube construction in the thoracic cavity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weibing; Zhu, Quan; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jinyuan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Ivor Lewis minimally invasive oesophagectomy (ILMIE) is a complex surgery aiming to remove an oesophageal tumour and to create a new gastric tube in the abdomen. The objective was to assess the technical and early outcomes of ILMIE for gastric tube construction in the thoracic cavity. METHODS A retrospective analysis was conducted in 25 middle or lower oesophageal cancer patients treated with ILMIE between August and December 2012. A gastric tube was constructed in the thoracic cavity in all patients. The gastric tube and the oesophagus were anastomosed using a circular stapler. Clinical data (age, gender, pathological pattern and TNM stage), surgical data (operation time, intraoperative blood loss and intraoperative complications) and follow-up data (postoperative complications, length of stay, thoracic tube drainage time and time before eating) were assessed. RESULTS The mean age was 61 ± 8 years. Sixteen patients were male and 9 were female. Oesophageal cancer was located in the middle oesophagus in 5 cases and in the lower oesophagus in 20. No conversion to open surgery was performed. The mean operative time and intraoperative blood loss were 320 ± 63 min and 137 ± 95 ml, respectively. A mean of 2.4 ± 0.5 linear stapler cartridges was used per patient. A mean of 14.6 ± 5.4 lymph nodes was dissected per patient. Postoperative hospital stay was 13.2 ± 2.4 days. Intraoperative and postoperative complications occurred in 12% (3 of 25) and 20% (5 of 25) of patients, respectively, including 1 case of anastomotic fistula. The patients were followed up for a mean of 3.5 ± 1.2 months, and there was no relapse or death. CONCLUSIONS The construction of a gastric tube through the thoracic cavity using ILMIE is feasible and safe in patients with middle or lower oesophageal cancer. However, longer follow-up and larger sample sizes are needed to evaluate the oncological efficacy. PMID:24144805

  16. Maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcome in low-resource countries

    PubMed Central

    van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Background A maternity waiting home (MWH) is a facility within easy reach of a hospital or health centre which provides emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Women may stay in the MWH at the end of their pregnancy and await labour. Once labour starts, women move to the health facility so that labour and giving birth can be assisted by a skilled birth attendant. The aim of the MWH is to improve accessibility to skilled care and thus reduce morbidity and mortality for mother and neonate should complications arise. Some studies report a favourable effect on the outcomes for women and their newborns. Others show that utilisation is low and barriers exist. However, these data are limited in their reliability. Objectives To assess the effects of a maternity waiting facility on maternal and perinatal health. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (27 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2012), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), African Journals Online (AJOL) (January 2012), POPLINE (January 2012), Dissertation Abstracts (January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including quasi-randomised and cluster-randomised trials that compared perinatal and maternal outcome in women using a MWH and women who did not. Data collection and analysis There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Main results There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Authors’ conclusions There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:23076927

  17. Thrice-weekly nocturnal hemodialysis: the overlooked alternative to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chazot, Charles; Ok, Ercan; Lacson, Eduardo; Kerr, Peter G; Jean, Guillaume; Misra, Madhukar

    2013-10-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) therapy for patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been a major breakthrough in medicine during the twentieth century. Empirically, the conventional treatment is prescribed as 3-4.5 h of dialysis, three times a week. However, this prescription is being questioned because of poor patient outcomes including a persistently high death rate. Over the past 30 years, K(t)/V(urea) has been recognized as the predominant marker of dialysis adequacy. However, other important markers of 'adequate' dialysis are increasingly being recognized, including fluid and phosphate balance, and middle molecule removal. Conventional HD therapy, as it exists today, is limited in its scope to make a significant impact on these markers. Consequently, there is an active debate on novel HD strategies to improve patient outcomes. Recently, two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have highlighted potential benefits for patients with two such strategies, short or long nocturnal daily dialysis. These two trials did, however, highlight the difficulty in recruiting patients for such studies. A higher rate of blood access-related complications was also reported. Such novel strategies are also limited in their application by a higher economic burden and logistical difficulties. On the other hand, the thrice-weekly nocturnal HD prescription has been associated with excellent clinical results in observational reports published over recent years. Several non-randomized controlled studies support the clinical benefits of this approach. This prescription may overcome the limitations of daily dialysis and offer a potential for improving patient outcomes on HD. Even if the methodology of the latter studies may not be optimal, we underscore the point that this alternative dialysis prescription should be included in the current debate of novel dialysis strategies. PMID:23595292

  18. Improvement of debate competence: an outcome of an introductory course for medical humanities

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Academic debate is an effective method to enhance the competences of critical thinking, problem solving, communication skills and cooperation skills. The present study examined the improvement of debate competence which is an outcome of debate-based flipped learning. Methods: A questionnaire was administrated to second-year premedical school students at Yeungnam University. In total 45 students participated in the survey. The survey questionnaire was composed of 60 items of eight subfactors on debate competence. To investigate the homogeneous of low and high achievement groups, 18 items on empathy and 75 items on critical thinking scales were used. To compare the pretest with posttest scores, data was analyzed using paired sample t-test. Results: There were no significant differences between low and high achievement groups by average grade at the beginning of the semester. There was a significant improvement in high achievers on the logical argumentation (p<0.001), proficiency in inquiry (p<0.01), active participation (p<0.001), ability to investigate and analyze (p<0.001), observance of debate rules (p<0.05), and acceptability (p<0.05). Even in low achievers, active participation (p<0.05) and ability to investigate and analyze (p<0.01) were significantly improved. Conclusion: Results showed that students could improve their debate competence by the debate-based flipped learning. A prospective and comparative study on the communication and teamwork competences needs to be conducted in the future. It is suggested that in-depth discussion for the curriculum design and teaching will be needed in terms of the effectiveness and the outcomes of the medical humanities. PMID:26838572

  19. Reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes in overweight women: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julia; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Hure, Alexis; Smith, Roger; Collins, Clare E

    2015-03-01

    Overweight and obesity is prevalent among women of reproductive age (42% BMI > 25 kg/m2) and parity is associated with risk of weight gain. Weight gain greater than that recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM )is also associated with lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in women. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial is to examine the feasibility of recruiting and maintaining a cohort of pregnant women with the view of reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes. Women (BMI of 25-35 kg/m2 (n = 36)) were recruited from the John Hunter Hospital antenatal clinic in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were stratified by BMI and randomised to one of three groups with follow-up to six months postpartum. Women received a dietary intervention with or without breastfeeding support from a lactation consultant, or were assigned to a wait-list control group where the dietary intervention was issued at three months postpartum. Feasibility and acceptability was assessed by participation rates and questionnaire. Analysis of variance and covariance was conducted to determine any differences between groups. Sixty-nine per cent of the participants were still enrolled at six months postpartum. This pilot demonstrated some difficulties in recruiting women from antenatal clinics and retaining them in the trial. Although underpowered; the results on weight; biomarkers and breastfeeding outcomes indicated improved metabolic health. PMID:25723973

  20. Does fiscal decentralization improve health outcomes? Evidence from infant mortality in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Marina; Ferrante, Livio

    2016-09-01

    Despite financial and decision-making responsibilities having been increasingly devolved to lower levels of government worldwide, the potential impact of these reforms remains largely controversial. This paper investigates the hypothesis that a shift towards a higher degree of fiscal autonomy of sub-national governments could improve health outcomes, as measured by infant mortality rates. Italy is used as a case study since responsibilities for healthcare have been decentralized to regions, though the central government still retains a key role in ensuring all citizens uniform access to health services throughout the country. A linear fixed-effects regression model with robust standard errors is employed for a panel of 20 regions over the period 1996-2012 (340 observations in the full sample). Decentralization is proxied by two different indicators, capturing the degree of decision-making autonomy in the allocation of tax revenues and the extent to which regions rely on fiscal transfers from the central government. The results show that a higher proportion of tax revenues raised and/or controlled locally as well as a lower transfer dependency from the central government are consistently associated with lower infant mortality rates, ceteris paribus. The marginal benefit from fiscal decentralization, however, is not constant but depends on the level of regional wealth, favouring poorest regions. In terms of policy implications, this study outlines how the effectiveness of decentralization in improving health outcomes is contingent on the characteristics of the context in which the process takes place. PMID:27475054

  1. Interferon alpha 2b as maintenance therapy improves outcome in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith; Pérez, Felipe; Sotelo, León

    2004-11-01

    The role of interferon alpha as maintenance therapy in follicular lymphoma (FL) remains unsolved. We started a controlled clinical trial to assess if interferon alpha 2b could improve outcome, measured with event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with FL in complete remission after chemotherapy based anthracyclines and adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of initial bulky disease. Three hundred and eighty four patients in complete response after 6 cycles of CEOP-Bleo (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone and bleomycin, at standard doses), and adjuvant radiotherapy when necessary, were randomized to received Interferon alpha 2b, three times a week for 1 year or no treatment (control group). Median follow up was 9.8 years (range 7.0-15 years); actuarial curves showed that EFS was 64% (95% confidence interval (CI) 56-71%) in patients treated with interferon that was statistically significant to patients in the control group: 35% (95% CI: 28-43%) (p<.01). OS was also statistically significant: 81% in patients treated with interferon (95% CI: 74-93%) and 57% (95% CI: 50-63%) in the control group (p<.001). Toxicity was mild, all patients received the planned dose of interferon on time. The use of aggressive chemotherapy and maintenance therapy with interferon alpha 2b in follicular lymphoma improved outcome; more than 60% of patients remain alive free of disease at longer follow-up. PMID:15512813

  2. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including ‘communication’, ‘diagnosis’, and ‘referral’ to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff. PMID:27247676

  3. Can developing countries achieve adequate improvements in child health outcomes without engaging the private sector?

    PubMed Central

    Bustreo, Flavia; Harding, April; Axelsson, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The private sector exerts a significant and critical influence on child health outcomes in developing countries, including the health of poor children. This article reviews the available evidence on private sector utilization and quality of care. It provides a framework for analysing the private sector's influence on child health outcomes. This influence goes beyond service provision by private providers and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Pharmacies, drug sellers, private suppliers, and food producers also have an impact on the health of children. Many governments are experimenting with strategies to engage the private sector to improve child health. The article analyses some of the most promising strategies, and suggests that a number of constraints make it hard for policy-makers to emulate these approaches. Few experiences are clearly described, monitored, and evaluated. The article suggests that improving the impact of child health programmes in developing countries requires a more systematic analysis of how to engage the private sector most effectively. The starting point should include the evaluation of the presence and potential of the private sector, including actors such as professional associations, producer organizations, community groups, and patients' organizations. PMID:14997241

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  5. PEGylated liposomal vancomycin: a glimmer of hope for improving treatment outcomes in MRSA pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pumerantz, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) plays a significant role in the pandemic of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and is a major cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. MRSA pneumonia carries a high morbidity and mortality rate especially in elderly diabetics with chronic kidney disease. S. aureus is highly virulent and successful respiratory pathogen. Vancomycin and linezolid are the only two antimicrobial agents FDA-approved to treat MRSA pneumonia. Standard vancomycin dosing is associated with high clinical failure rates and higher dosages are associated with increased nephrotoxicity. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic limitations are major contributors to poor outcomes with vancomycin. New agents are needed to improve treatment outcomes with MRSA pneumonia. Recently released antimicrobials with in vitro activity are not FDA-approved for treating MRSA pneumonia. Other novel agents are being investigated though none are in late-stage development. Pharmaceutical industry perception of low returns on investment, a Sisyphean regulatory environment, and obstacles to patentability have contributed to declining interest in both the development of novel antibiotics and the improvement of existing generic formulations. Despite decades of investigation into liposomal encapsulation as a drug delivery system that would increase efficacy and decrease toxicity, only liposomal amphotericin B and doxorubicin are commercially available. In this article, the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a novel PEGylated liposomal vancomycin formulation along with passive targeting and the enhanced permeability and retention effect of liposomal drug delivery; the pathogenesis of MRSA pneumonia; and recent patents of novel anti-MRSA agents, including inhalational liposomal vancomycin, are reviewed. PMID:22742394

  6. Using Dynamic Risk to Enhance Conditional Release Decisions in Prisoners to Improve Their Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Serin, Ralph C; Gobeil, Renée; Lloyd, Caleb D; Chadwick, Nick; Wardrop, Kaitlyn; Hanby, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Advances in criminal risk assessment have increased sufficiently that inclusion of valid risk measures to anchor assessments is considered a best practice in release decision-making and community supervision by many paroling authorities and probation agencies. This article highlights how decision accuracy at several key stages of the offender's release and supervision process could be further enhanced by the inclusion of dynamic factors. In cases where the timing of release is discretionary and not legislated, the utilization of a validated decision framework can improve transparency and potentially reduce decision errors. In cases where release is by statute, there is still merit in using dynamic risk assessment and case analysis to inform the assignment of release conditions, thereby attending to re-entry and public safety considerations. Finally, preliminary results from a recent study are presented to highlight the fact that community supervision outcomes may be improved by incorporating changes in dynamic risk into case planning and risk management, although this work requires replication with larger populations reflecting diverse groups of offenders. Nonetheless, these decision strategies have implications for both resource allocation and client outcomes, as outlined here. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26992091

  7. Integrating Surgery Into Treatment Paradigms for Organ Preservation: Tailoring Treatment to Biology Improves Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Gregory T.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was introduced into treatment paradigms for curable head and neck cancer in the early 1970s in an effort to reduce the magnitude of mutilating surgery and to provide a rationale for adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in patients who responded to initial chemotherapy. The large number of trials that followed failed to demonstrate improved survival when neoadjuvant chemotherapy was added to conventional surgery or radiation. Importantly, a consistent observation in these neoadjuvant trials was the significant association of clinical tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and favorable prognosis. Results: The findings led to development of a new treatment paradigm that was based on the hypothesis that the biology of an individual cancer is more predictive of response to specific therapy and overall outcome than is anatomic tumor site or extent, and on the corollary that matching treatment modality to biology will improve overall survival rates. Conclusions: This report identifies key findings that are important in the design and analysis of organ preservation trials and biologic markers predictive of response and outcomes. Ongoing studies incorporating biomarkers such as p53, Bcl-xL, HPV, EGFR, COX-2, and tumor promoter gene methylation are underway and will identify new targets for molecular manipulation, response monitoring, and tumor imaging that could allow real-time changes in how we integrate the various components of multi-modal therapy.

  8. Adjunctive rifampicin may improve outcomes in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Russell, Clark D; Lawson McLean, Aaron; Saunders, Christopher; Laurenson, Ian F

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. By surviving within leukocytes, S. aureus can evade both immunological defences and antimicrobial drugs, thus facilitating haematogenous dissemination. We performed a systematic review to determine whether antimicrobials with intracellular activity improve outcomes in SAB when used as an adjunct to β-lactam or glycopeptide monotherapy. The Pubmed/MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane databases were systematically searched for eligible studies that reported on the use of first-line antimicrobials plus a single additional antimicrobial of interest in patients with SAB (any cause). Six relevant studies were identified, all reporting on rifampicin use. Four studies (three randomized controlled trials and one cohort) reported on adults with SAB, including 54 patients treated with adjunctive rifampicin and 44 standard-therapy controls. Estimated across all of these studies, adjunctive rifampicin was associated with trends towards reduced all-cause mortality and reduced clinical or bacteriological failure. The fifth study indicated that adjunctive rifampicin accelerates the resolution of persistent SAB in neonates. Data from the sixth study were considered flawed owing to differences in co-morbidities between groups. Limited data suggest that rifampicin-induced hepatitis is not clinically significant but that drug interactions are. In conclusion, adjunctive rifampicin may improve outcomes in SAB when used as an adjunct to β-lactam or glycopeptide monotherapy. PMID:24623637

  9. Technical improvements and performances of SpIOMM: an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Anne-Pier; Charlebois, Maxime; Drissen, Laurent; Grandmont, Frédéric

    2008-07-01

    We present the most recent technical improvements on SpIOMM, an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) attached to the 1.6 telescope of the Mont Megantic Observatory. The recent development of SpIOMM demonstrates that the concept of IFTS for ground telescopes is a promising astronomical 3D spectroscopy technique for multi-object spectroscopy and multi-band imaging. SpIOMM has been developed through a collaboration between Universite Laval and the industry (ABB Bomem). It is designed for optical observations from the near UV (350 nm) to the near IR (850 nm) with variable spectral resolution. The circular FOV of the instrument covers 12' in diameter. We have recently improved the servo system algorithm which now controls the mirror displacement and alignment at a rate of ~7kHz. Hardware improvements to the servo and the metrology system will be described along with their impacts on performance in the laboratory and in observing conditions. The instrument has successfully been operated at the 1.6 meter telescope this year using the revised control systems and acquired several datacubes. We will discuss some issues regarding the sensitivity to environmental conditions implied by the use of such an instrument. An overview of the datacube reduction procedure will show some solutions proposed for observational problems encountered that affect the quality of the data such as sky transmission variations, wind, changing gravity vector and temperature.

  10. Regional analgesia for improvement of long-term functional outcome after elective large joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Atchabahian, Arthur; Schwartz, Gary; Hall, Charles B; Lajam, Claudette M; Andreae, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional analgesia is more effective than conventional analgesia for controlling pain and may facilitate rehabilitation after large joint replacement in the short term. It remains unclear if regional anaesthesia improves functional outcomes after joint replacement beyond three months after surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of regional anaesthesia and analgesia on long-term functional outcomes 3, 6 and 12 months after elective major joint (knee, shoulder and hip) replacement surgery. Search methods We performed an electronic search of several databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL), and handsearched reference lists and conference abstracts. We updated our search in June 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing regional analgesia versus conventional analgesia in patients undergoing total shoulder, hip or knee replacement. We included studies that reported a functional outcome with a follow-up of at least three months after surgery. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We contacted study authors for additional information. Main results We included six studies with 350 participants followed for at least three months. All of these studies enrolled participants undergoing total knee replacement. Studies were at least partially blinded. Three studies had a high risk of performance bias and one a high risk of attrition bias, but the risk of bias was otherwise unclear or low. Only one study assessed joint function using a global score. Due to heterogeneity in outcome and reporting, we could only pool three out of six RCTs, with range of motion assessed at three months after surgery used as a surrogate for joint function. All studies had a high risk of detection bias. Using the random-effects model, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups (mean difference 3.99 degrees, 95% confidence interval (CI)

  11. Can Comprehensive Chromosome Screening Technology Improve IVF/ICSI Outcomes? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Song

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) for preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has an effect on improving in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) outcomes compared to traditional morphological methods. Methods A literature search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI and ClinicalTrials.gov up to May 2015. Two reviewers independently evaluated titles and abstracts, extracted data and assessed quality. We included studies that compared the IVF/ICSI outcomes of CCS-based embryo selection with those of the traditional morphological method. Relative risk (RR) values with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated in RevMan 5.3, and subgroup analysis and Begg’s test were used to assess heterogeneity and potential publication bias, respectively. Results Four RCTs and seven cohort studies were included. A meta-analysis of the outcomes showed that compared to morphological criteria, euploid embryos identified by CCS were more likely to be successfully implanted (RCT RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18–1.47; cohort study RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.35–2.24). CCS-based PGS was also related to an increased clinical pregnancy rate (RCT RR 1.26, 95% CI 0.83–1.93; cohort study RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.20–1.83), an increased ongoing pregnancy rate (RCT RR 1.31, 95% CI 0.64–2.66; cohort study RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.30–2.00), and an increased live birth rate (RCT RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.05–1.50; cohort study RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.85–2.13) as well as a decreased miscarriage rate (RCT RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.24–1.15; cohort study RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.21–0.46) and a decreased multiple pregnancy rate (RCT RR 0.02, 95% CI 0.00–0.26; cohort study RR 0.19, 95% CI 0.07–0.51). The results of the subgroup analysis also showed a significantly increased implantation rate in the CCS group. Conclusions The effectiveness of CCS-based PGS is comparable to that of traditional morphological methods, with better outcomes for women receiving IVF

  12. Improving HIV outcomes in resource-limited countries: the importance of quality indicators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Resource-limited countries increasingly depend on quality indicators to improve outcomes within HIV treatment programs, but indicators of program performance suitable for use at the local program level remain underdeveloped. Methods Using the existing literature as a guide, we applied standard quality improvement (QI) concepts to the continuum of HIV care from HIV diagnosis, to enrollment and retention in care, and highlighted critical service delivery process steps to identify opportunities for performance indicator development. We then identified existing indicators to measure program performance, citing examples used by pivotal donor agencies, and assessed their feasibility for use in surveying local program performance. Clinical delivery steps without existing performance measures were identified as opportunities for measure development. Using National Quality Forum (NQF) criteria as a guide, we developed measurement concepts suitable for use at the local program level that address existing gaps in program performance assessment. Results This analysis of the HIV continuum of care identified seven critical process steps providing numerous opportunities for performance measurement. Analysis of care delivery process steps and the application of NQF criteria identified 24 new measure concepts that are potentially useful for improving operational performance in HIV care at the local level. Conclusion An evidence-based set of program-level quality indicators is critical for the improvement of HIV care in resource-limited settings. These performance indicators should be utilized as treatment programs continue to grow. PMID:23176556

  13. Matching Information in National Data Collection Programs to a Model of Post-School Outcomes and Indicators. Technical Report 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Kevin S.; And Others

    This investigation mapped the correspondence between indicators at the post-school level included in the comprehensive system of educational outcomes and indicators developed by the National Center for Educational Outcomes (NCEO) and indicators included in select national data collection programs. The NCEO model articulates outcomes and indicators…

  14. Efficacy of e-technologies in improving breastfeeding outcomes among perinatal women: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ying; Htun, Tha P; Tam, Wai S W; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee

    2016-07-01

    A growing line of research has highlighted that e-technologies may play a promising role in improving breastfeeding outcomes. The objective of this review was to synthesise the best of available evidence by conducting a meta-analysis to evaluate whether e-technologies have had any effect in improving breastfeeding outcomes among perinatal women. The review was conducted using nine electronic databases to search for English-language research studies from 2007 to 2014. A 'risk of bias' table was used to assess methodological quality. Meta-analysis was performed with the RevMan software. The Q test and I(2) test was used to assess the heterogeneity. The test of overall effect was assessed using z-statistics at P < 0.05. Of 1842 studies identified through electronic searches and reference lists, 16 experimental studies were selected after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Half of the selected studies had a low risk of bias, from which a total of 5505 women in six countries in these studies were included. Meta-analyses revealed that e-technologies significantly improved exclusive breastfeeding initiation (z = 6.90, P < 0.00001), exclusive breastfeeding at 4 weeks (z = 2.12, P = 0.03) and 6 months (z = 3.2, P = 0.001), breastfeeding attitude (z = 3.01, P = 0.003) and breastfeeding knowledge (z = 4.54, P = < 0.00001) in subgroup analyses. This review provides support for the development of web-based, texting messaging, compact disc read-only memory, electronic prompts and interactive computer agent interventions for promoting and supporting breastfeeding. PMID:26194599

  15. Mealtime problems predict outcome in clinical trial to improve nutrition in children with CF.

    PubMed

    Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Powers, Scott W; Quittner, Alexandra L; Stark, Lori J

    2010-01-01

    Better growth and nutritional status is strongly associated with better pulmonary function and survival in children with CF. Behavioral intervention is an efficacious treatment approach for improving calorie intake and weight gain in children with CF; and recently has been shown to facilitate maintenance of daily energy intake at 120% of the healthy population over a 2-year period. However, no study to date has examined factors that predict outcome with behavior intervention to promote weight gain in CF. The objectives of this study were to examine the influence of nutritional status, mealtime behavior problems, and maternal depressive symptoms on calorie intake and weight gain following participation in a randomized trial to improve nutritional status in cystic fibrosis. Sixty-seven children, aged 4-12 years with cystic fibrosis participated in a clinical trial targeting calorie and weight increases. Participants completed baseline measures of mealtime behavior problems, maternal depression, and fat absorption, and baseline and post-treatment caloric intake and weight. Assignment to behavioral group (R(2) change = 0.17), lower frequency of mealtime behavior problems (R(2) change = 0.11), and higher maternal depression (R(2) change = 0.06) predicted greater calorie increase baseline to post-treatment. Assignment to behavioral group (R(2) change = 0.09), higher baseline weight (R(2) change = 0.10), fat absorption (R(2) change = 0.02), and lower frequency of mealtime behavior problems (R(2) change = 0.06) predicted greater weight gain baseline to post-treatment. Less frequent mealtime behavior problems led to better calorie intake and weight gain in a 9-week clinical trial of behavior intervention and nutrition education to improve nutritional status in cystic fibrosis. The key implication from these findings is that early referral to behavioral intervention as soon as growth deficits become a concern will likely yield the best nutritional outcomes. PMID:19953660

  16. Improving the outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse: a review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Stacy; Conner, Emma; Miller, Melodi; Messina, Nena

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major public health concern that impacts not just the user but also the user’s family. The effect that parental substance abuse has on children has been given substantial attention over the years. Findings from the literature suggest that children of substance-abusing parents have a high risk of developing physical and mental health and behavioral problems. A number of intervention programs have been developed for parents who have a substance abuse problem. There have also been a number of interventions that have been developed for children who have at least one parent with a substance abuse problem. However, it remains unclear how we can best mitigate the negative effects that parental substance abuse has on children due to the scarcity of evaluations that utilize rigorous methodologies such as experimental designs. The purpose of this study is to review randomized controlled trials of intervention programs targeting parents with substance abuse problems and/or children with at least one parent with a substance abuse problem in order to identify programs that show some promise in improving the behavioral and mental health outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse. Four randomized controlled trials that met our eligibility criteria were identified using major literature search engines. The findings from this review suggest that interventions that focus on improving parenting practices and family functioning may be effective in reducing problems in children affected by parental substance abuse. However, further research utilizing rigorous methodologies are needed in order to identify other successful interventions that can improve the outcomes of these children long after the intervention has ended. PMID:25670915

  17. Using Patient Reported Outcome Measures to Improve Service Effectiveness (UPROMISE): Training clinicians to Use Outcome Measures in Child Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Wolpert, Miranda; Deighton, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are prevalent in child mental health services. In this point of view, we discuss our experience of training clinicians to use PROMs and to interpret and discuss feedback from measures. Findings from pre-post observational data from clinicians who attended either a 1- or 3-day training course showed that clinicians in both courses had more positive attitudes and higher levels of self-efficacy regarding administering measures and using feedback after training. We hope that this special issue will lead the way for future research on training clinicians to use outcome measures so that PROMs may be a source of clinically useful practice based evidence. PMID:25331446

  18. A multi-centre phase IIa clinical study of predictive testing for preeclampsia: improved pregnancy outcomes via early detection (IMPROvED)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 5% of first time pregnancies are complicated by pre-eclampsia, the leading cause of maternal death in Europe. No clinically useful screening test exists; consequentially clinicians are unable to offer targeted surveillance or preventative strategies. IMPROvED Consortium members have pioneered a personalised medicine approach to identifying blood-borne biomarkers through recent technological advancements, involving mapping of the blood metabolome and proteome. The key objective is to develop a sensitive, specific, high-throughput and economically viable early pregnancy screening test for pre-eclampsia. Methods/Design We report the design of a multicentre, phase IIa clinical study aiming to recruit 5000 low risk primiparous women to assess and refine innovative prototype tests based on emerging metabolomic and proteomic technologies. Participation involves maternal phlebotomy at 15 and 20 weeks’ gestation, with optional testing and biobanking at 11 and 34 weeks. Blood samples will be analysed using two innovative, proprietary prototype platforms; one metabolomic based and one proteomic based, both of which outperform current biomarker based screening tests at comparable gestations. Analytical and clinical data will be collated and analysed via the Copenhagen Trials Unit. Discussion The IMPROvED study is expected to refine proteomic and metabolomic panels, combined with clinical parameters, and evaluate clinical applicability as an early pregnancy predictive test for pre-eclampsia. If ‘at risk’ patients can be identified, this will allow stratified care with personalised fetal and maternal surveillance, early diagnosis, timely intervention, and significant health economic savings. The IMPROvED biobank will be accessible to the European scientific community for high quality research into the cause and prevention of adverse pregnancy outcome. Trial registration Trial registration number NCT01891240 The IMPROvED project is funded by the seventh framework

  19. Sodium selenate reduces hyperphosphorylated tau and improves outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Stuchbery, Ryan; Liu, Shi-Jie; Sashindranath, Maithili; Medcalf, Robert L; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a common and serious neurodegenerative condition that lacks a pharmaceutical intervention to improve long-term outcome. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in some of the consequences of traumatic brain injury and is a potential pharmacological target. Protein phosphatase 2A is a heterotrimeric protein that regulates key signalling pathways, and protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimers consisting of the PR55 B-subunit represent the major tau phosphatase in the brain. Here we investigated whether traumatic brain injury in rats and humans would induce changes in protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated tau, and whether treatment with sodium selenate-a potent PR55 activator-would reduce phosphorylated tau and improve traumatic brain injury outcomes in rats. Ninety young adult male Long-Evans rats were administered either a fluid percussion injury or sham-injury. A proportion of rats were killed at 2, 24, and 72 h post-injury to assess acute changes in protein phosphatase 2A and tau. Other rats were given either sodium selenate or saline-vehicle treatment that was continuously administered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 12 weeks. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was acquired prior to, and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury to assess evolving structural brain damage and axonal injury. Behavioural impairments were assessed at 12 weeks post-injury. The results showed that traumatic brain injury in rats acutely reduced PR55 expression and protein phosphatase 2A activity, and increased the expression of phosphorylated tau and the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau. Similar findings were seen in post-mortem brain samples from acute human traumatic brain injury patients, although many did not reach statistical significance. Continuous sodium selenate treatment for 12 weeks after sham or fluid percussion injury in rats increased protein phosphatase 2A activity and PR55 expression, and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau

  20. Fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus Fails to Improve Outcomes Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Sherrefa R; Iniaghe, Loretta O; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most fatal stroke subtype, with no effective therapies. Hematoma expansion and inflammation play major roles in the pathophysiology of ICH, contributing to primary and secondary brain injury, respectively. Fucoidan, a polysaccharide from the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus, has been reported to activate a platelet receptor that may function in limiting bleeding, and to exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. As such, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of fucoidan on hemorrhaging and neurological outcomes after ICH. Male CD-1 mice were subjected to experimental ICH by infusion of bacterial collagenase. Animals were randomly divided into the following groups: sham, ICH + vehicle, ICH + 25 mg/kg fucoidan, ICH + 75 mg/kg fucoidan, and ICH + 100 mg/kg fucoidan. Brain water content, neurobehavioral outcomes, and hemoglobin content were evaluated at 24 h post ICH. Our findings show that fucoidan failed to attenuate the ICH-induced increase in BWC. The neurological deficits that result from ICH also did not differ in the treatment groups at all three doses. Finally, we found that fucoidan had no effect on the hemoglobin content after ICH. We postulate that fucoidan treatment did not improve the measured outcomes after ICH because we used crude fucoidan, which has a high molecular weight, in our study. High-molecular-weight fucoidans are reported to have less therapeutic potential than low molecular weight fucoidans. They have been shown to exhibit anti-coagulant and pro-apoptotic properties, which seem to outweigh their anti-inflammatory and potential procoagulant abilities. We propose that using a low-molecular-weight fucoidan, or fractionating the crude polysaccharide, may be effective in treating ICH. Future studies are needed to confirm this. PMID:26463947

  1. Improvement in the outcome of invasive fusariosis in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Nucci, M; Marr, K A; Vehreschild, M J G T; de Souza, C A; Velasco, E; Cappellano, P; Carlesse, F; Queiroz-Telles, F; Sheppard, D C; Kindo, A; Cesaro, S; Hamerschlak, N; Solza, C; Heinz, W J; Schaller, M; Atalla, A; Arikan-Akdagli, S; Bertz, H; Galvão Castro, C; Herbrecht, R; Hoenigl, M; Härter, G; Hermansen, N E U; Josting, A; Pagano, L; Salles, M J C; Mossad, S B; Ogunc, D; Pasqualotto, A C; Araujo, V; Troke, P F; Lortholary, O; Cornely, O A; Anaissie, E

    2014-06-01

    Invasive fusariosis (IF) has been associated with a poor prognosis. Although recent series have reported improved outcomes, the definition of optimal treatments remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in the outcome of IF. We retrospectively analysed 233 cases of IF from 11 countries, comparing demographics, clinical findings, treatment and outcome in two periods: 1985-2000 (period 1) and 2001-2011 (period 2). Most patients (92%) had haematological disease. Primary treatment with deoxycholate amphotericin B was more frequent in period 1 (63% vs. 30%, p <0.001), whereas voriconazole (32% vs. 2%, p <0.001) and combination therapies (18% vs. 1%, p <0.001) were more frequent in period 2. The 90-day probabilities of survival in periods 1 and 2 were 22% and 43%, respectively (p <0.001). In period 2, the 90-day probabilities of survival were 60% with voriconazole, 53% with a lipid formulation of amphotericin B, and 28% with deoxycholate amphotericin B (p 0.04). Variables associated with poor prognosis (death 90 days after the diagnosis of fusariosis) by multivariable analysis were: receipt of corticosteroids (hazard ratio (HR) 2.11, 95% CI 1.18-3.76, p 0.01), neutropenia at end of treatment (HR 2.70, 95% CI 1.57-4.65, p <0.001), and receipt of deoxycholate amphotericin B (HR 1.83, 95% CI 1.06-3.16, p 0.03). Treatment practices have changed over the last decade, with an increased use of voriconazole and combination therapies. There has been a 21% increase in survival rate in the last decade. PMID:24118322

  2. Concurrent erythropoietin and hypothermia treatment improve outcomes in a term nonhuman primate model of perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Traudt, Christopher M.; McPherson, Ronald J.; Bauer, Larry A.; Richards, Todd L.; Burbacher, Thomas M.; McAdams, Ryan M.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2013-01-01

    drug reactions were noted in animals receiving Epo, nor were there any hematology, liver, or kidney laboratory effects. Conclusions/Significance HT+Epo treatment improved outcomes in nonhuman primates exposed to UCO. Adjunctive use of Epo combined with HT may improve the outcomes of term human infants with HIE and clinical trials are warranted. PMID:24192275

  3. Recombinant T cell receptor ligands improve outcome after experimental cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Kozaburo; Dziennis, Suzan; Palmateer, Julie; Ren, Xuefang; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina; Herson, Paco S; Hurn, Patricia D

    2011-09-01

    A key target for novel stroke therapy is the regulation of post-ischemic inflammatory mechanisms. Recent evidence emphasizes the role of T lymphocytes of differing subtypes in the evolution is ischemic brain damage. We have recently demonstrated the benefit of myelin antigen-specific immunodulatory agents known as recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs) in a standard murine model of focal stroke. The aim of the current study was to extend this initial observation to RTL treatment in a therapeutically relevant timing after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and verify functional benefit to complement histological outcome measures. We observed that the administration of mouse-specific RTL551 reduced infarct size and improved sensorimotor outcome when administered within a 3 h post-ischemic therapeutic window. RTL551 treatment reduced cortical, caudate putamen, and total infarct volume as compared to vehicle-treated mice. Using a standard behavioral testing repertoire, we observed that RTL551 reduced sensorimotor impairment 3 days after MCAO. Humanized RTL1000 (HLA-DR2 moiety linked to hMOG-35-55 peptide) also reduced infarct size in HLA-DR2 transgenic mice. These data indicate that this neuroantigen-specific immunomodulatory agent reduces damage when administered in a therapeutically relevant reperfusion timeframe. PMID:21961027

  4. Improving the outcome for children with cancer: Development of targeted new agents.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    The outcome for children with cancer has improved significantly over the past 60 years, with greater than 80% of patients today becoming 5-year survivors. Despite this progress, cancer remains the leading cause of death from disease in children in the United States, and significant short-term and long-term treatment toxicities continue to impact the majority of children with cancer. The development of targeted new agents offers the prospect of potentially more effective and less toxic treatment for children. More than a decade since imatinib mesylate was introduced into the treatment of children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, transforming its outcome, a range of targeted agents has undergone study in pediatric cancer patients. Early lessons learned from these studies include a better understanding of the adverse event profile of these drugs in children, the challenge of developing pediatric-specific formulations, and the continued reliance on successful development for adult cancer indications on pediatric drug development. The collaborative research infrastructure for children with cancer in the United States is well positioned to advance novel treatments into clinical investigations for a spectrum of rare and ultra-rare childhood cancers. A greater investment of resources in target discovery and validation can help drive much needed development of new, more effective treatments for children with cancer. PMID:25754421

  5. Molecular targeted therapy to improve radiotherapeutic outcomes for non-small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Bhaskar; Bhardwaj, Himanshu; Balusu, Sree; Shwaiki, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatments for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) remain elusive. The use of concurrent chemotherapy with radiotherapy (RT) has improved outcomes, but a significant proportion of NSCLC patients are too frail to be able to tolerate an intense course of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The development of targeted therapies ignited new hope in enhancing radiotherapeutic outcomes. The use of targeted therapies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has offered slight but significant benefits in concurrent use with RT for certain patients in certain situations. However, despite theoretical promise, the use of anti-angiogenics, such as bevacizumab and endostatin, has not proven clinically safe or useful in combination with RT. However, many new targeted agents against new targets are being experimented for combined use with RT. It is hoped that these agents may provide a significant breakthrough in the radiotherapeutic management of NSCLC. The current review provides a brief discussion about the targets, the targeted therapies, the rationale for the use of targeted therapies in combination with RT, and a brief review of the existing data on the subject. PMID:26904572

  6. Enhancing Lay Counselor Capacity to Improve Patient Outcomes with Multimedia Technology

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Reuben N.; Mellins, Claude A.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Abrams, Elaine J.; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J.; Remien, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia technologies offer powerful tools to increase capacity of health workers to deliver standardized, effective, and engaging antiretroviral medication adherence counseling. Masivukeni is an innovative multimedia-based, computer-driven, lay counselor-delivered intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve optimal adherence. This pilot study examined medication adherence and key psychosocial outcomes among 55 non-adherent South African HIV+ patients, on ART for at least 6 months, who were randomized to receive either Masivukeni or standard of care (SOC) counseling for ART non-adherence. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the SOC and Masivukeni groups on any outcome variables. At post-intervention (approximately 5–6 weeks after baseline), clinic-based pill count adherence data available for 20 participants (10 per intervention arm) showed a 10% improvement for Masivukeni participants and a decrease of 8% for SOC participants. Masivukeni participants reported significantly more positive attitudes towards disclosure and medication social support, less social rejection, and better clinic-patient relationships than did SOC participants. Masivukeni shows promise to promote optimal adherence and provides preliminary evidence that multimedia, computer-based technology can help lay counselors offer better adherence counseling than standard approaches. PMID:25566763

  7. Decidual Cox2 inhibition improves fetal and maternal outcomes in a preeclampsia-like mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ashley K.; Bartos, Amanda; Heyward, Christa Y.; Lob, Heinrich E.; Isroff, Catherine E.; Butler, Scott D.; Shapiro, Stephanie E.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a disorder of pregnancy that manifests as late gestational maternal hypertension and proteinuria and can be life-threatening to both the mother and baby. It is believed that abnormal placentation is responsible for the cascade of events leading to the maternal syndrome. Embryo implantation is critical to establishing a healthy pregnancy. Defective implantation can cause adverse “ripple effects,” leading to abnormal decidualization and placentation, retarded fetal development, and poor pregnancy outcomes, such as PE and fetal growth restriction. The precise mechanism(s) of implantation defects that lead to PE remain elusive. BPH/5 mice, which spontaneously develop the cardinal features of PE, show peri-implantation defects including upregulation of Cox2 and IL-15 at the maternal-fetal interface. This was associated with decreased decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, which have important roles in establishing placental perfusion. Interestingly, a single administration of a Cox2 inhibitor (celecoxib) during decidualization restrained Cox2 and IL-15 expression, restored dNK cell numbers, improved fetal growth, and attenuated late gestational hypertension in BPH/5 female mice. This study provides evidence that decidual overexpression of Cox2 and IL-15 may trigger the adverse pregnancy outcomes reflected in the preeclamptic syndrome, underscoring the idea that Cox2 inhibitor treatment is an effective strategy for the prevention of PE-associated fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:27159542

  8. Team-Based Learning to Improve Learning Outcomes in a Therapeutics Course Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Remington, Tami L.; Wells, Trisha D.; Dorsch, Michael P.; Guthrie, Sally K.; Stumpf, Janice L.; Alaniz, Marissa C.; Ellingrod, Vicki L.; Tingen, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effectiveness of team-based learning (TBL) to that of traditional lectures on learning outcomes in a therapeutics course sequence. Design. A revised TBL curriculum was implemented in a therapeutic course sequence. Multiple choice and essay questions identical to those used to test third-year students (P3) taught using a traditional lecture format were administered to the second-year pharmacy students (P2) taught using the new TBL format. Assessment. One hundred thirty-one multiple-choice questions were evaluated; 79 tested recall of knowledge and 52 tested higher level, application of knowledge. For the recall questions, students taught through traditional lectures scored significantly higher compared to the TBL students (88%±12% vs 82%±16%, p=0.01). For the questions assessing application of knowledge, no differences were seen between teaching pedagogies (81%±16% vs 77%±20%, p=0.24). Scores on essay questions and the number of students who achieved 100% were also similar between groups. Conclusion. Transition to a TBL format from a traditional lecture-based pedagogy allowed P2 students to perform at a similar level as students with an additional year of pharmacy education on application of knowledge type questions. However, P3 students outperformed P2 students regarding recall type questions and overall. Further assessment of long-term learning outcomes is needed to determine if TBL produces more persistent learning and improved application in clinical settings. PMID:24558281

  9. Improving outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the role of the interprofessional approach.

    PubMed

    Amalakuhan, Bravein; Adams, Sandra G

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with significant morbidity, places substantial time and cost burden on the health care system, and is now the third leading cause of death in the US. Many interventions are available to appropriately manage patients with COPD; however, fully implementing these strategies to help improve outcomes may be difficult. Collaboration between an interprofessional team of health care professionals (which includes physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, dietitians, pharmacists, and many others) and COPD patients and caregivers is necessary to optimally manage these patients and to truly impact outcomes in this devastating disease. Prescribing evidence-based non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies is an important start, but a true team-based approach is critical to successfully implement comprehensive care in patients with COPD. The goal of this review is to employ a case-based approach to provide practical information regarding the roles of the interprofessional team in implementing strategies to optimally manage COPD patients. PMID:26170651

  10. Using checklists in a gross anatomy laboratory improves learning outcomes and dissection quality.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Ryan Engebretson; Nikolaus, O Brant; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Checklists have been widely used in the aviation industry ever since aircraft operations became more complex than any single pilot could reasonably remember. More recently, checklists have found their way into medicine, where cognitive function can be compromised by stress and fatigue. The use of checklists in medical education has rarely been reported, especially in the basic sciences. We explored whether the use of a checklist in the gross anatomy laboratory would improve learning outcomes, dissection quality, and students' satisfaction in the first-year Human Structure didactic block at Mayo Medical School. During the second half of a seven-week anatomy course, dissection teams were each day given a hardcopy checklist of the structures to be identified during that day's dissection. The first half of the course was considered the control, as students did not receive any checklists to utilize during dissection. The measured outcomes were scored on four practice practical examinations and four dissection quality assessments, two each from the first half (control) and second half of the course. A student satisfaction survey was distributed at the end of the course. Examination and dissection scores were analyzed for correlations between practice practical examination score and checklist use. Our data suggest that a daily hardcopy list of anatomical structures for active use in the gross anatomy laboratory increases practice practical examination scores and dissection quality. Students recommend the use of these checklists in future anatomy courses. PMID:21786427

  11. Improving the Outcome for Children With Cancer: Development of Targeted New Agents

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome for children with cancer has improved significantly over the past 60 years, with greater than 80% of patients today becoming 5-year survivors. Despite this progress, cancer remains the leading cause of death from disease in children in the United States, and significant short-term and long-term treatment toxicities continue to impact the majority of children with cancer. The development of targeted new agents offers the prospect of potentially more effective and less toxic treatment for children. More than a decade since imatinib mesylate was introduced into the treatment of children with Philadelphia chromosomepositive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, transforming its outcome, a range of targeted agents has undergone study in pediatric cancer patients. Early lessons learned from these studies include a better understanding of the adverse event profile of these drugs in children, the challenge of developing pediatric-specific formulations, and the continued reliance on successful development for adult cancer indications on pediatric drug development. The collaborative research infrastructure for children with cancer in the United States is well positioned to advance novel treatments into clinical investigations for a spectrum of rare and ultra-rare childhood cancers. A greater investment of resources in target discovery and validation can help drive much needed development of new, more effective treatments for children with cancer. PMID:25754421

  12. The scientific learning approach using multimedia-based maze game to improve learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Wawan; Hafitriani, Sarah; Prabawa, Harsa Wara

    2016-02-01

    The objective of curriculum 2013 is to improve the quality of education in Indonesia, which leads to improving the quality of learning. The scientific approach and supported empowerment media is one approach as massaged of curriculum 2013. This research aims to design a labyrinth game based multimedia and apply in the scientific learning approach. This study was conducted in one of the Vocational School in Subjects of Computer Network on 2 (two) classes of experimental and control. The method used Mix Method Research (MMR) which combines qualitative in multimedia design, and quantitative in the study of learning impact. The results of a survey showed that the general of vocational students like of network topology material (68%), like multimedia (74%), and in particular, like interactive multimedia games and flash (84%). Multimediabased maze game developed good eligibility based on media and material aspects of each value 840% and 82%. Student learning outcomes as a result of using a scientific approach to learning with a multimediabased labyrinth game increase with an average of gain index about (58%) and higher than conventional multimedia with index average gain of 0.41 (41%). Based on these results the scientific approach to learning by using multimediabased labyrinth game can improve the quality of learning and increase understanding of students. Multimedia of learning based labyrinth game, which developed, got a positive response from the students with a good qualification level (75%).

  13. Improving Outcomes in Resectable Gastric Cancer: A Review of Current and Future Strategies.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bryan A; Jang, Raymond W; Wong, Rebecca K S; Swallow, Carol J; Darling, Gail E; Elimova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is a highly fatal malignancy, and surgery alone often does not provide a cure, even for relatively early stages of disease. Various approaches have been adopted around the world to improve surgical outcomes; however, there currently is no global consensus with regard to the extent of surgery or the timing and choice of chemotherapy and radiation. Here we review the evidence supporting current approaches to resectable gastric cancer, including discussion of the optimal extent of surgery and lymphadenectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, postoperative chemotherapy with chemoradiation, and perioperative chemotherapy. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, including intensified chemotherapy (in neoadjuvant, perioperative, and adjuvant settings), pre- and postoperative chemoradiation in combination with chemotherapy, and the role of biologics and targeted therapy. Finally, we examine the promise of molecular subtyping and potential biomarkers for improved patient selection. Upcoming and future trials should help answer questions regarding the optimal sequencing and choice of treatments, in order to further improve survival and move us towards ultimately curing more patients with resectable gastric cancer. PMID:27422110

  14. Vitamin D improves inflammatory bowel disease outcomes: Basic science and clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Krista M; Fedorak, Richard N; Madsen, Karen; Kroeker, Karen I

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is commonly diagnosed among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are at risk of low bone density and increased fractures due to low vitamin D levels, long standing disease, and frequent steroid exposures; as a result, it is well established that vitamin D supplementation in this population is important. There is increasing support for the role of vitamin D in strengthening the innate immune system by acting as an immunomodulator and reducing inflammation in experimental and human IBD. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)D3, acts on T cells to promote T helper (Th)2/regulatory T responses over Th1/Th17 responses; suppresses dendritic cell inflammatory activity; induces antibacterial activity; and regulates cytokine production in favor of an anti-inflammatory response. Murine and human IBD studies support a therapeutic role of vitamin D in IBD. Risk factors for vitamin D deficiency in this population include decreased sunlight exposure, disease duration, smoking, and genetics. Vitamin D normalization is associated with reduced risk of relapse, reduced risk of IBD-related surgeries, and improvement in quality of life. Vitamin D is an inexpensive supplement which has been shown to improve IBD outcomes. However, further research is required to determine optimal serum vitamin D levels which will achieve beneficial immune effects, and stronger evidence is needed to support the role of vitamin D in inducing disease response and remission, as well as maintaining this improvement in patients’ disease states. PMID:24803805

  15. S-nitrosothiol signaling regulates hepatogenesis and improves outcome following toxic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Andrew G.; Saunders, Diane C.; Kelsey, Peter; Conway, Allie A.; Tesmenitsky, Yevgenia; Marchini, Julio F.; Brown, Kristin K.; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Colagiovanni, Dorothy B.; Rosenthal, Gary J.; Croce, Kevin J.; North, Trista E.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    Summary Toxic liver injury is a leading cause of liver failure and death, due to the organ’s inability to regenerate amidst massive cell death, and few therapeutic options exist. The mechanisms coordinating damage protection and repair are poorly understood. Here, we show that S-nitrosothiols regulate liver growth during development and after injury in vivo: in zebrafish, NO enhanced liver formation independent of cGMP-mediated vasoactive effects. Following acetaminophen (APAP) exposure, inhibition of the enzymatic regulator, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), minimized toxic liver damage, increased cell proliferation, and improved survival through sustained activation of the cytoprotective Nrf2 pathway. Preclinical studies of APAP injury in GSNOR-deficient mice confirmed conservation of hepatoprotective properties of S-nitrosothiol signaling across vertebrates; a GSNOR-specific inhibitor improved liver histology and acted together with the approved therapy N-acetylcysteine, to expand the therapeutic time window and improve outcome. These studies demonstrate that GSNOR inhibitors will be beneficial therapeutic candidates to treat liver injury. PMID:24388745

  16. The new health-care quality: value, outcomes, and continuous improvement.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, S J; Lanning, J A

    1991-01-01

    No longer convinced that their viewpoint on quality is the only one, different stakeholders in the health-care arena are sharing perspectives to piece together the quality picture. Although still preoccupied with the cost of health care, purchasers are concerned about value--efficiency, appropriateness, and effectiveness--as well as price. Faced with evidence of medically unnecessary procedures and unexamined medical theory, practitioners are searching for appropriateness guidelines, useful outcome measures, and methods to elicit informed patient preferences about elective surgeries. Underlying this search for reliable indicators of quality--now expanded to include patient satisfaction--is a new interest in the Japanese notion of "Kaizen" or continuous quality improvement. The end product of this ferment may determine whether good medicine drives out the bad--or vice versa. PMID:10118887

  17. Does physical therapy and rehabilitation improve outcomes for diabetic foot ulcers?

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Yasemin; Ertugrul, Bulent M; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Bayraktar, Kevser

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common and serious complications of diabetes mellitus is ulceration of the foot. Among persons with diabetes, 12%-25% will present to a healthcare institution for a foot disorder during their lifespan. Despite currently available medical and surgical treatments, these are still the most common diabetes-related cause of hospitalization and of lower extremity amputations. Thus, many adjunctive and complementary treatments have been developed in an attempt to improve outcomes. We herein review the available literature on the effectiveness of several treatments, including superficial and deep heaters, electro-therapy procedures, prophylactic methods, exercise and shoe modifications, on diabetic foot wounds. Overall, although physical therapy modalities seem to be useful in the treatment of diabetic foot wounds, further randomized clinical studies are required. PMID:25992328

  18. [Schematherapy in Eating Disorders - An Integrative Approach to Improve the Outcome].

    PubMed

    Archonti, Christina; de Zwaan, Martina

    2016-07-01

    Despite evidence-based psychotherapeutic treatment approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy eating disorders still pose a challenge to therapists and patients alike. Eating disorders are associated with a high comorbid prevalence of personality disorders and other psychological axis-I-disorders, show highdrop-out rates and relapse rates and anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate compared to all psychiatric disorders. Even self-motivated patients frequently fail to achieve the treatment goals like developing a normal eating behavior, gaining weight, and changing the underlying dysfunctional behavioral patterns and cognitions. We will present a schematherapeutic approach with experiential methods, integrated in evidence-based CBT, with the intention to improve motivation and therapeutic outcome. PMID:27388869

  19. Action plans for COPD: strategies to manage exacerbations and improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jalota, Leena; Jain, Vipul V

    2016-01-01

    COPD is the third-largest killer in the world, and certainly takes a toll on the health care system. Recurrent COPD exacerbations accelerate lung-function decline, worsen mortality, and consume over US$50 billion in health care spending annually. This has led to a tide of payment reforms eliciting interest in strategies reducing preventable COPD exacerbations. In this review, we analyze and discuss the evidence for COPD action plan-based self-management strategies. Although action plans may provide stabilization of acute symptomatology, there are several limitations. These include patient-centered attributes, such as comprehension and adherence, and nonadherence of health care providers to established guidelines. While no single intervention can be expected independently to translate into improved outcomes, structured together within a comprehensive integrated disease-management program, they may provide a robust paradigm. PMID:27330286

  20. Progesterone Reduces Secondary Damage, Preserves White Matter, and Improves Locomotor Outcome after Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; González, Susana; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Lima, Analía; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; De Nicola, Alejandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Progesterone is an anti-inflammatory and promyelinating agent after spinal cord injury, but its effectiveness on functional recovery is still controversial. In the current study, we tested the effects of chronic progesterone administration on tissue preservation and functional recovery in a clinically relevant model of spinal cord lesion (thoracic contusion). Using magnetic resonance imaging, we observed that progesterone reduced both volume and rostrocaudal extension of the lesion at 60 days post-injury. In addition, progesterone increased the number of total mature oligodendrocytes, myelin basic protein immunoreactivity, and the number of axonal profiles at the epicenter of the lesion. Further, progesterone treatment significantly improved motor outcome as assessed using the Basso-Bresnahan-Beattie scale for locomotion and CatWalk gait analysis. These data suggest that progesterone could be considered a promising therapeutical candidate for spinal cord injury. PMID:24460450

  1. The importance of survivors and partners in improving breast cancer outcomes in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Koon, Ksenia P; Lehman, Constance D; Gralow, Julie R

    2013-04-01

    In limited-resource countries, cancer kills more people annually than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. Programs targeting early detection and treatment of cancer are virtually non-existent due to insufficient funding and attention given to this emerging health challenge. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and is also the leading cause of cancer-related death in females. In developing countries such as Uganda, breast cancer incidence is increasing and typically presents at an advanced stage of disease, for which treatment options are limited. Inadequate knowledge and understanding of the disease, social stigma, and barriers to care all contribute to a poorer prognosis. There are many challenges to reducing breast cancer incidence and mortality globally; however, there is evidence to suggest that advocacy and education, in particular through the efforts of breast cancer survivors and their partners, can play a critical role in improving overall outcomes in limited-resource countries. PMID:23313061

  2. Cerebral Malaria; Mechanisms Of Brain Injury And Strategies For Improved Neuro-Cognitive Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Idro, Richard; Marsh, Kevin; John, Chandy C; Newton, Charles RJ

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most severe neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. With over 575,000 cases annually, children in sub-Saharan Africa are the most affected. Surviving patients have an increased risk of neurological and cognitive deficits, behavioral difficulties and epilepsy making cerebral malaria a leading cause of childhood neuro-disability in the region. The pathogenesis of neuro-cognitive sequelae is poorly understood: coma develops through multiple mechanisms and there may be several mechanisms of brain injury. It is unclear how an intravascular parasite causes such brain injury. Understanding these mechanisms is important to develop appropriate neuro-protective interventions. This paper examines possible mechanisms of brain injury in cerebral malaria, relating this to the pathogenesis of the disease and explores prospects for improved neuro-cognitive outcome. PMID:20606600

  3. Diabetic Kidney Disease– A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    PubMed Central

    Molitch, Mark E.; Adler, Amanda I.; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Nelson, Robert G.; So, Wing-Yee; Wanner, Christoph; Kasiske, Bertram L.; Wheeler, David C.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Mogensen, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) continue to grow dramatically throughout the world, due primarily to the increase in type 2 DM (T2DM). Although improvements in DM and hypertension management have reduced the proportion of diabetic individuals who develop chronic kidney disease (CKD) and progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the sheer increase in people developing DM will have a major impact on dialysis and transplant needs. This KDIGO conference addressed a number of controversial areas in the management of DM patients with CKD, including aspects of screening for CKD with measurements of albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); defining treatment outcomes; glycemic management in both those developing CKD and those with ESRD; hypertension goals and management, including blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; and lipid management. PMID:24786708

  4. Action plans for COPD: strategies to manage exacerbations and improve outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jalota, Leena; Jain, Vipul V

    2016-01-01

    COPD is the third-largest killer in the world, and certainly takes a toll on the health care system. Recurrent COPD exacerbations accelerate lung-function decline, worsen mortality, and consume over US$50 billion in health care spending annually. This has led to a tide of payment reforms eliciting interest in strategies reducing preventable COPD exacerbations. In this review, we analyze and discuss the evidence for COPD action plan-based self-management strategies. Although action plans may provide stabilization of acute symptomatology, there are several limitations. These include patient-centered attributes, such as comprehension and adherence, and nonadherence of health care providers to established guidelines. While no single intervention can be expected independently to translate into improved outcomes, structured together within a comprehensive integrated disease-management program, they may provide a robust paradigm. PMID:27330286

  5. Improving clinical outcomes and patient experience through the use of desloughing.

    PubMed

    Grothier, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    This article focuses on and aims to clarify the role of desloughing as a priority in modern-day wound care. Ambiguity around identification and slough removal has long been a clinical challenge. Effective removal of slough involves the elimination of dead and devitalised tissue as quickly and safely as possible, to enable the wound to return to a healthy state that supports healing. Desloughing is usually associated with typically conservative techniques compared with those used to debride necrotic tissue. More specific and timely targeted action to recognise and remove slough safely will significantly improve the clinical outcomes for patients as well as influence the effective use of scarce resources. The illustrative format of this article will facilitate how clinicians can become familiar with the different types of slough and the appropriate removal techniques. PMID:26322402

  6. The use of report cards and outcome measurements to improve the safety of surgical care: the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    PubMed Central

    Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative adverse events occur all too commonly and contribute greatly to our large and increasing healthcare costs. Surgeons, as well as hospitals, need to know their own outcomes in order to recognise areas that need improvement before they can work towards reducing complications. In the USA, the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (ACS NSQIP) collects clinical data that provide benchmarks for providers and hospitals. This review summarises the history of ACS NSQIP and its components, and describes the evidence that feeding outcomes back to providers, along with real-time comparisons with other hospital rates, leads to quality improvement, better patient outcomes, cost savings and overall improved patient safety. The potential harms and limitations of the program are discussed. PMID:24748371

  7. Improving patient and project outcomes using interorganisational innovation, collaboration and co-design.

    PubMed

    Evans, Liz; Green, Stuart; Howe, Cathy; Sharma, Kiran; Marinho, Fatima; Bell, Derek; Thomas, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Common mental disorders (CMDs) are a leading cause of disability. The Department of Health has launched a large-scale initiative to improve access to evidence-based psychological treatments, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), through the Improving Access to Psychological Therapy (IAPT) programme. Access to IAPT services by black and minority ethnic (BME) communities is lower than for other groups. Setting The London Borough of Ealing in west London; a diverse borough with areas of high BME population and relatively high deprivation. Aim To compare the outcomes of two linked quality improvement (QI) projects undertaken by Ealing Mental Health and Wellbeing Service (MHWBS), both with the same aim of increasing access to talking therapies for BME communities. Methods Application of QI methodologies supported by the NIHR CLAHRC for northwest London in two different settings in Ealing. One, the 'Southall project', was set within a wider initiative for collaborative improvements and shared learning (the Southall Initiative for Integrated Care) in an ethnically diverse area of Ealing; it was undertaken between April 2010 and September 2011. The second, 'the Ealing project', operated in the two other Ealing localities that did not have the advantage of a broader initiative for collaborative improvements; it was undertaken between April 2011 and September 2012. Results Comparison of the monthly referral rates of BME patients (standardised per 10 000 general practitioner (GP)-registered patients) show that the Southall project was more effective in increasing referrals from BME communities than the Ealing project. Conclusion Broad local participation and ownership in the project design of the Southall project may explain why it was more effective in achieving its aims than the Ealing project which lacked these ownership-creating mechanisms. PMID:25949710

  8. Randomized Trial of Exercise and an Online Recovery Tool to Improve Rehabilitation Outcomes of Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Anna L.; Biddle-Newberry, Mary; de Heer, Hendrik Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the effects of a cancer survivor exercise program and an online recovery awareness program (Restwise) on physical outcomes of aerobic capacity and muscle strength. Design Randomized controlled trial design. Setting: Treasure Valley Family YMCA, Boise, ID. Sample: Fifty cancer survivors. Methods Subjects were randomly assigned to the 12-week exercise program or the exercise program and Restwise. Restwise required users to complete daily objective and subjective ratings. Restwise compiles these data to provide individualized feedback recommending the exercise dose to maximize recovery and minimize fatigue. Main Research Variable Baseline and posttest measures of physical performance (6-minute walk, 1-repetition maximum of lower and upper body strength). Findings The exercise plus Restwise group demonstrated significant improvements (P < 0.001) that were found on all 3 physical measurements of strength and endurance. The exercise-only group demonstrated significant within-group improvement only on the 6-minute walk. The exercise plus Restwise group demonstrated an 18.5% greater improvement in the 6-minute walk, and a 35.2% and 45%, respectively, greater improvement on the leg and chest press than the exercise-only group. However, the between-group differences were not significant. Conclusion Cancer survivors who use the Restwise online recovery program in conjunction with an exercise program demonstrated minimal clinically important differences compared with other clinical populations on all 3 measures, whereas the exercise-only group had improvements only on the 6-minute walk. Patient adherence to the Restwise program was good, and patients provided positive feedback. PMID:25598168

  9. Career-Technical Education and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from California Community Colleges. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Ann; Kurlaender, Michal; Grosz, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This paper estimates the earnings returns to vocational, or career-technical, education programs in the nation's largest community college system. While career-technical education (CTE) programs have often been mentioned as an attractive alternative to four-year colleges for some students, very little systematic evidence exists on the returns to…

  10. Prior regular exercise improves clinical outcome and reduces demyelination and axonal injury in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Danielle; Brambilla, Roberta; Bracchi-Ricard, Valerie; Karmally, Shaffiat; Dellarole, Anna; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Bethea, John R

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that forced exercise modulates inflammation and is therapeutic acutely for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the long-term benefits have not been evaluated. In this study, we investigated the effects of preconditioning exercise on the clinical and pathological progression of EAE. Female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either an exercised (Ex) or unexercised (UEx) group and all of them were induced for EAE. Mice in the Ex group had an attenuated clinical score relative to UEx mice throughout the study. At 42 dpi, flow cytometry analysis showed a significant reduction in B cells, CD4(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells infiltrating into the spinal cord in the Ex group compared to UEx. Ex mice also had a significant reduction in myelin damage with a corresponding increase in proteolipid protein expression. Finally, Ex mice had a significant reduction in axonal damage. Collectively, our study demonstrates for the first time that a prolonged and forced preconditioning protocol of exercise improves clinical outcome and attenuates pathological hallmarks of EAE at chronic disease. In this study, we show that a program of 6 weeks of preconditioning exercise promoted a significant reduction of cells infiltrating into the spinal cord, a significant reduction in myelin damage and a significant reduction in axonal damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice at 42 dpi. Collectively, our study demonstrates for the first time that a preconditioning protocol of exercise improves clinical outcome and attenuates pathological hallmarks of EAE at chronic disease. PMID:26364732

  11. Improving outcomes in breast cancer for low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Yip, C H; Buccimazza, I; Hartman, M; Deo, S V S; Cheung, P S Y

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women world-wide. Incidence rates in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are lower than in high income countries; however, the rates are increasing very rapidly in LMICs due to social changes that increase the risk of breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality rates in LMICs remain high due to late presentation and inadequate access to optimal care. Breast Surgery International brought together a group of breast surgeons from different parts of the world to address strategies for improving outcomes in breast cancer for LMICs at a symposium during International Surgical Week in Helsinki, Finland in August 2013. A key strategy for early detection is public health education and breast awareness. Sociocultural barriers to early detection and treatment need to be addressed. Optimal management of breast cancer requires a multidisciplinary team. Surgical treatment is often the only modality of treatment available in low-resource settings where modified radical mastectomy is the most common operation performed. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy require more resources. Endocrine therapy is available but requires accurate assessment of estrogen receptors status. Targeted therapy with trastuzumab is generally unavailable due to cost. The Breast Health Global Initiative guidelines for the early detection and appropriate treatment of breast cancer in LMICs have been specifically designed to improve breast cancer outcomes in these regions. Closing the cancer divide between rich and poor countries is a moral imperative and there is an urgent need to prevent breast cancer deaths with early detection and optimal access to treatment. PMID:25398564

  12. Enduring improvement in Oswestry Disability Index outcomes following lumbar microscopic interlaminar decompression: An appraisal of prospectively collected patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Babar; Bashir, Muhammad Umair; Kumar, Rajesh; Enam, Syed Ather

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Our present study aims to assess the short and long-term postoperative outcome of microscopic interlaminar decompression from a neurosurgical center in a developing country and also aims to further determine any predictors of functional outcome. Materials and Methods: All patients with moderate to severe symptomatic stenosis undergoing elective posterior lumbar spinal decompression were prospectively enrolled in a database. Preoperative, 2 weeks and 2 years postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores were determined for all patients. These scores were retrospectively compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Further, linear regression modelling was applied to determine the effect of preoperative ODI, body mass index, age, prior physiotherapy, duration of symptoms, and single or multiple level decompression on the change in ODI at 2 weeks and 2 years follow-up respectively. Results: A total of 60 consecutive patients (40 males, 20 females) were included for statistical analysis. The percentage of patients with a minimum clinically important difference (MCID), using an ODI threshold value of 10, was 86.7% (n = 52) at the 2 weeks postoperative follow-up. At the 2 years follow-up assessment, 3.3% (n = 2) patients who had earlier not achieved MCID did so, 78.3% (n = 47) of patients were found to have a change in ODI score of <10 or no change, while 18.3% (n = 11) reported a deterioration in their ODI scores. The preoperative ODI score was an independent predictor of change in ODI score at 2 weeks and 2 years respectively (P < 0.0005). The duration of symptoms prior to surgery was found to predict the change in ODI at 2 years follow-up (P = 0.04). Conclusion: The evidence regarding the long-term and short-term efficacy of microscopic interlaminar decompression in symptomatic lumbar stenosis is overwhelming. Preoperative ODI scores and duration of symptoms prior to surgery can predict postoperative outcomes. PMID:26692698

  13. Inspiratory muscle strength training improves weaning outcome in failure to wean patients: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Most patients are readily liberated from mechanical ventilation (MV) support, however, 10% - 15% of patients experience failure to wean (FTW). FTW patients account for approximately 40% of all MV days and have significantly worse clinical outcomes. MV induced inspiratory muscle weakness has been implicated as a contributor to FTW and recent work has documented inspiratory muscle weakness in humans supported with MV. Methods We conducted a single center, single-blind, randomized controlled trial to test whether inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) would improve weaning outcome in FTW patients. Of 129 patients evaluated for participation, 69 were enrolled and studied. 35 subjects were randomly assigned to the IMST condition and 34 to the SHAM treatment. IMST was performed with a threshold inspiratory device, set at the highest pressure tolerated and progressed daily. SHAM training provided a constant, low inspiratory pressure load. Subjects completed 4 sets of 6-10 training breaths, 5 days per week. Subjects also performed progressively longer breathing trials daily per protocol. The weaning criterion was 72 consecutive hours without MV support. Subjects were blinded to group assignment, and were treated until weaned or 28 days. Results Groups were comparable on demographic and clinical variables at baseline. The IMST and SHAM groups respectively received 41.9 ± 25.5 vs. 47.3 ± 33.0 days of MV support prior to starting intervention, P = 0.36. The IMST and SHAM groups participated in 9.7 ± 4.0 and 11.0 ± 4.8 training sessions, respectively, P = 0.09. The SHAM group's pre to post-training maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) change was not significant (-43.5 ± 17.8 vs. -45.1 ± 19.5 cm H2O, P = 0.39), while the IMST group's MIP increased (-44.4 ± 18.4 vs. -54.1 ± 17.8 cm H2O, P < 0.0001). There were no adverse events observed during IMST or SHAM treatments. Twenty-five of 35 IMST subjects weaned (71%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 55% to 84

  14. Health system and community level interventions for improving antenatal care coverage and health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Medley, Nancy; Darzi, Andrea J; Richardson, Marty; Habiba Garga, Kesso; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least four antenatal care (ANC) visits for all pregnant women. Almost half of pregnant women worldwide, and especially in developing countries do not receive this amount of care. Poor attendance of ANC is associated with delivery of low birthweight babies and more neonatal deaths. ANC may include education on nutrition, potential problems with pregnancy or childbirth, child care and prevention or detection of disease during pregnancy. This review focused on community-based interventions and health systems-related interventions. Objectives To assess the effects of health system and community interventions for improving coverage of antenatal care and other perinatal health outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (7 June 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials and cluster-randomised trials. Trials of any interventions to improve ANC coverage were eligible for inclusion. Trials were also eligible if they targeted specific and related outcomes, such as maternal or perinatal death, but also reported ANC coverage. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Main results We included 34 trials involving approximately 400,000 women. Some trials tested community-based interventions to improve uptake of antenatal care (media campaigns, education or financial incentives for pregnant women), while other trials looked at health systems interventions (home visits for pregnant women or equipment for clinics). Most trials took place in low- and middle-income countries, and 29 of the 34 trials used a cluster-randomised design. We assessed 30 of the 34 trials as of low or unclear overall risk of bias. Comparison 1: One intervention versus no intervention We

  15. Randomized Trial of the Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity (ARC) Organizational Intervention for Improving Youth Outcomes in Community Mental Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glisson, Charles; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Green, Philip; Williams, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to assess whether the Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity (ARC) organizational intervention improved youth outcomes in community based mental health programs. The second objective was to assess whether programs with more improved organizational social contexts following the 18-month ARC…

  16. Improving Outcomes in Elective Colorectal Surgery: A Single-institution Retrospective Review.

    PubMed

    Rumberger, Lindsay K; Vittetoe, Debra; Cathey, Lorene; Bennett, Harriet; Heidel, Robert E; Daley, Brian J

    2016-04-01

    Our hospital, a Tennessee Surgical Quality Collaborative (TSQC) member, adopted a statewide colorectal care bundle intended to reduce surgical site infections (SSI) in elective colorectal cases. The bundle includes proper antibiotics/dosing, normoglycemia, normothermia, supplemental oxygen six hours postoperatively, and early enteral nutrition. A single-institution retrospective study of our National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database for the rates of SSI before and after the colorectal bundle. We compared our SSI rates to TSQC hospitals as well as NSQIP datasets. Because of low case numbers in the NSQIP data, National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) data collected at our institution was used to compare our colorectal SSI before and after our colorectal bundle. From January 2010 to December 2011, 188 patients underwent nonemergent colorectal surgery in the NSQIP data. Of these, 5.4 per cent (10/188) developed superficial SSIs. During this same time, the rate of the TSQC superficial SSI was 7.1 per cent and NSQIP was 7.8 per cent. From January 2013 to October 2014, after the colorectal bundle started, 76 patients in NSQIP underwent nonemergent colorectal surgery. Of these, 6.5 per cent (5/76) developed superficial SSI, compared with 5.5 per cent in TSQC and 5.5 per cent in NSQIP. NHSN data showed a prebundle rate of 11 per cent and a postbundle rate of 3.5 per cent (P < 00.1, χ(2)). After adopting a colorectal bundle aimed at reducing SSIs, we did not improve our SSI rates in NSQIP; however, our NHSN data demonstrated considerable improvement. Differences in data collection may affect SSI rates, and ultimately "quality" based reimbursement. Implementation of the bundle did improve outcomes in colorectal surgery. PMID:27097625

  17. Conservative surgical treatment of adenomyosis to improve fertility: Controversial values, indications, complications, and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Lee, Fa-Kung; Seow, Kok-Min; Chang, Wei-Chun; Wang, Jia-Wei; Chen, Shee-Uan; Chao, Hsiang-Tai; Yen, Min-Shyen; Wang, Peng-Hui

    2015-12-01

    treatment for adenomyosis to improve fertility, including controversial values, indications, complications, and pregnancy outcomes, might be very important, and might help physicians in managing these patients in the future. PMID:26700977

  18. Changing tides: improving outcomes through mentorship on all levels of nursing.

    PubMed

    Race, Tara Kay; Skees, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Critical care nursing is one of the most stressful specialties in the nursing profession. The demands of the specialty can lead to frustration and burnout at very high rates. High-quality, effective mentorship can be a valuable tool in recruiting and retaining nurses for these areas as well as improving their sense of job satisfaction. However, it must be understood that effective mentorship begins with the organizational culture and must have organizational buy-in to be successful. Also, because of the nursing shortage and high turnover in the critical care units, new graduates are frequently hired into these areas. Mentorship for these new nurses is crucial to their success and retention as a new employee. If we do not foster growth and development of young nurses, they may flounder, become extremely frustrated, and seek out new alternative employment settings. Mentoring new graduates may begin as early as their first exposure to critical care nursing in their undergraduate nursing program as it did for this author (T.K.R.). My critical care nurse faculty is the reason I entered critical care nursing and is now the reason that I have branched into education. The information in this article is not only pertinent to those working in critical care; it can be utilized and explored on all levels of nursing. Through effective mentorship, we can positively impact our healthcare organizations; improve job satisfaction; and promote professional development and empowerment in students, new graduates, staff nurses, educators, nurse leaders, and nurse faculty. Most importantly, mentoring can result in improved nursing care, high-quality healthcare, and improved patient outcomes. PMID:20234205

  19. Comprehensive psychological intervention to improve outcome in functional gastrointestinal disorder: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu Tien; Kwok, Kah Foo Victor; Tan, Shian Ming; Yek, Ming Hwei; Ong, Wai Choung; Barbier, Sylvaine; Ng, Beng Yeong

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) have a decreased quality of life (QoL). Psychological illnesses are strongly associated with FGIDs. This study examined the effect of a comprehensive psychological intervention programme designed for refractory FGID patients. METHODS Refractory FGID patients at a tertiary gastroenterology unit were encouraged to participate in a psychological intervention programme, which included screening for anxiety and depression in patients, educating patients and physicians on FGIDs, and providing early access to psychiatric consultation for patients with significant psychological illnesses. The duration of follow-up was six months. Outcomes were measured using the Irritable Bowel Syndrome-QoL (IBS-QoL) instrument and the EuroQol five dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 1,189 patients (68% female, 80% Chinese, mean age 48.6 years) participated in the programme. Among these participants, 51% had a significant psychological disorder (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS] anxiety or depression score > 7). These participants had a significantly poorer QoL (IBS-QoL and EQ-5D, both p < 0.0001), and were more likely to be single or English-speaking, as compared to the participants without psychological disorders. Participants who completed ≥ 3 months of follow-up (n = 906) showed significant and durable improvement. High baseline HADS anxiety score predicted improvement (p < 0.001), with participant IBS-QoL and EQ-5D scores decreasing over time. CONCLUSION The intervention programme was associated with a clinically meaningful improvement in the QoL of patients with refractory FGIDs. High baseline anxiety was predictive of improvement. PMID:26243975

  20. National Initiatives to Improve Healthcare Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Health Delivery Systems in Slovakia and the United States.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Robert; Caplanova, Anetta; Novak, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    While the United States and Slovakia offer different healthcare delivery systems, each country faces the same challenges of improving the health status of their populations. The authors explore the impact of their respective systems on the health of their populations and compare the health outcomes of both nations. They point out that socioeconomic factors play a far more important role in determining population health outcomes than do the structures of the systems surrounding the care delivery. The authors illustrate this finding through a comparison of the poverty and education levels of a selected minority group from each country in relation to the health outcomes for each population group. The comparison reveals that education is a more influential determinant in a population's health outcomes, than the improved access to care offered by a universal system. PMID:26684681

  1. Study on technical improvements for SOP of LINGAO 3 and 4 under construction in China

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, S.; Pechuzal, F.; Yan, L.; Yin, Z.; Wang, Z.; Zhou, H.

    2006-07-01

    This paper focuses on the emergency operating procedures planed to be design to manage the incidental and accidental situation of the NPPs on the LINGAO 3 and 4 nuclear plants project under construction in the South of China. Regarding the operation principles of the NPPs, the CNPEC Project management has launched two major improvements on the LAO 3 and 4 NPPs that are: Implementation of a Digital Control System (DCS) combined with a fully computerized MMI and backed-up with a conventional control mean (Back-up Panel) implementation of the state oriented procedures (SOP) for the incidental and accidental situations of the plant. Firstly, the domains covered with the SOP operating rules as well as the current technical development needed for the computerized-based SOP operating instructions design are detailed in this paper. Thus the structure of the SOP computerized operating instructions, the design of synthesis information and automatic diagnosis, the SOP operation in case of unavailability of the computerized MMI, are studied in the elaboration processing of the SOP. The availability of the NSSS functions and of the supply functions, as well as the fire action operating concerns are involved in this design activity. Finally, in the scope of these studies, the human factors considerations are considered in order to reduce the likelihood of human errors, to gain maximum benefit of the implemented technology and to increase the performance. (authors)

  2. AB051. Technical improvement of HoLEP and prevention strategies of postoperative incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mingxia; Wang, Jiansong; Zuo, Yigang; Chen, Jian; Wang, Haifeng; Li, Ning; Liu, Jingyu; Wang, Wei; Li, Haihao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To improve HoLEP surgical techniques of finding envelope, enucleation, hemostatic and comminution, and to treate the incontinence reason predictably, so as to reduce the complications of HoLEP surgery. Methods Technical improvements were performed in 272 patients who underwent HoLEP during January 2014 to December 2014. (I) The gland was enucleated in three lobes, not overall enucleation; (II) start with both sides of verumontanum to find envelope, the ‘three-lobe’ technique involves 5- and 7-o'clock position incisions with enucleation of the middle lobe and subsequent enucleation of one lateral lobe followed by the other lateral lobe; (III) we only lift the glands gently by lens body, using holmium laser blasting to peel glands, and abandon conventional mirror peeling method; (IV) if bleeding is encountered, the laser fibre can be defocused slightly from the bleeding point to achieve haemostasis; (V) we crushed glands vacantly with the status of bladder filling. The reason why postoperative urinary incontinence occurs may be thermal burns sphincter, mucosal retention inadequate, sphincter weiss at around 12:00, and sphincter injury caused by mirror body elevation, etc. Some precautions during the operation were as follows: (I) reducing laser ablation; (II) separation off the reserved side lobe mucosa before peeling; (III) avoid 12:00 distal mucosal tear; (IV) using blasting holmium laser energy not lens body to peel glands, which can avoid sphincter injury by mirror body elevation force. Results We identified 272 patients who underwent HoLEP. The median volume of enucleated adenomas was 92±24 g. The median IPSS before surgery was 23.3±6.1. Average (range) operation time was 86±21 minutes. Amount of bleeding was 56±14 mL. Postoperative patients of hospital stay was 32±5 h, average time of indwelling catheter time was 22±6 h. Patients were followed up for 6-28 months’ time, an average of 12.4 months. Postoperative patients with international

  3. Improving outcomes for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Christopher R; Sinha, Rajni; Vose, Julie M

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most commonly occurring form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the western world. Until the mid 1990s the incidence of DLBCL increased in both sexes, across racial categories, and across all age groups except the very young, the etiology of most cases remains unknown. DLBCL is associated with an aggressive natural history, but it can be cured with combination chemotherapy regimens like cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), which has been the mainstay of therapy for several decades. Remarkable progress has been made in understanding the biological heterogeneity of DLBCL and in improving survival for DLBCL patients with novel combinations of chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Gene expression profiling (GEP) has uncovered DLBCL subtypes that have distinct clinical behaviors and prognoses, and the addition of the monoclonal antibody, rituximab, to CHOP has markedly improved outcomes. Future approaches to DLBCL management will use molecular signatures identified through GEP to provide prognostic information and to isolate therapeutic targets that are being evaluated for DLBCL patients who relapse or those with high risk disease. PMID:21030533

  4. Diagnostics in a digital age: an opportunity to strengthen health systems and improve health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peeling, Rosanna W

    2015-11-01

    Diagnostics play a critical role in clinical decision making, and in disease control and prevention. Rapid point-of-care (POC) tests for infectious diseases can improve access to diagnosis and patient management, but the quality of these tests vary, quality of testing is often not assured and there are few mechanisms to capture test results for surveillance when the testing is so decentralised. A new generation of POC molecular tests that are highly sensitive and specific, robust and easy to use are now available for deployment in low resource settings. Decentralisation of testing outside of the laboratory can put tremendous stress on the healthcare system and presents challenges for training and quality assurance. A feature of many of these POC molecular devices is that they are equipped with data transmission capacities. In a digital age, it is possible to link data from diagnostic laboratories and POC test readers and devices to provide data on testing coverage, disease trends and timely information for early warning of infectious disease outbreaks to inform design or optimisation of disease control and elimination programmes. Data connectivity also allows control programmes to monitor the quality of tests and testing, and optimise supply chain management; thus, increasing the efficiency of healthcare systems and improving patient outcomes. PMID:26553825

  5. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S.; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as measured by exam scores, when the course is converted to a more active flipped format. The context is a physical chemistry course catering to life science majors in which approximately half of the lecture material is placed online and in-class problem-solving activities are increased, while total class time is reduced. We find that exam performance significantly improves by nearly 12% in the flipped-format course, due in part to students interacting with course material in a more timely and accurate manner. We also find that the positive effects of the flipped class are most pronounced for students with lower grade point averages and for female students. PMID:26396151

  6. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom.

    PubMed

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as measured by exam scores, when the course is converted to a more active flipped format. The context is a physical chemistry course catering to life science majors in which approximately half of the lecture material is placed online and in-class problem-solving activities are increased, while total class time is reduced. We find that exam performance significantly improves by nearly 12% in the flipped-format course, due in part to students interacting with course material in a more timely and accurate manner. We also find that the positive effects of the flipped class are most pronounced for students with lower grade point averages and for female students. PMID:26396151

  7. Using Primary Care Parenting Interventions to Improve Outcomes in Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tellegen, Cassandra L.; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Parenting is central to the health and well-being of children. Children with developmental disabilities have been shown to be at increased risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. Parent training programs are effective interventions for improving child behavior and family functioning. This paper describes the outcomes of a brief 4-session parenting intervention (Primary Care Stepping Stones Triple P) targeting compliance and cooperative play skills in an 8-year-old girl with Asperger's disorder and ADHD combined type. The intervention was associated with decreases in child behavior problems, increases in parenting confidence, and decreases in dysfunctional parenting styles. This paper demonstrates that low-intensity parenting interventions can lead to significant improvements in child behavior and family functioning. Such brief interventions are cost effective, can be widely disseminated, and have been designed to be delivered within primary health care settings. Pediatricians can play a key role in identifying parents in need of assistance and in helping them access evidence-based parenting interventions. PMID:22928141

  8. Improving outcome in severe trauma: trauma systems and initial management: intubation, ventilation and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tim; Davenport, Ross; Hurst, Tom; Jones, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Severe trauma is an increasing global problem mainly affecting fit and healthy younger adults. Improvements in the entire pathway of trauma care have led to improvements in outcome. Development of a regional trauma system based around a trauma centre is associated with a 15-50% reduction in mortality. Trauma teams led by senior doctors provide better care. Although intuitively advantageous, the involvement of doctors in the pre-hospital care of trauma patients currently lacks clear evidence of benefit. Poor airway management is consistently identified as a cause of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Rapid sequence induction/intubation is frequently indicated but the ideal drugs have yet to be identified. The benefits of cricoid pressure are not clear cut. Dogmas in the management of pneumothoraces have been challenged: chest x-ray has a role in the diagnosis of tension pneumothoraces, needle aspiration may be ineffective, and small pneumothoraces can be managed conservatively. Identification of significant haemorrhage can be difficult and specific early resuscitation goals are not easily definable. A hypotensive approach may limit further bleeding but could worsen significant brain injury. The ideal initial resuscitation fluid remains controversial. In appropriately selected patients early aggressive blood product resuscitation is beneficial. Hypothermia can exacerbate bleeding and the benefit in traumatic brain injury is not adequately studied for firm recommendations. PMID:23014941

  9. Diets and enteral supplements for improving outcomes in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Cano, Noël J.; Budde, Klemens; Chazot, Charles; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Mak, Robert H.; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Raj, Dominic S.; Sehgal, Ashwini R.; Stenvinkel, Peter; Ikizler, T. Alp

    2013-01-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), which is manifested by low serum levels of albumin or prealbumin, sarcopenia and weight loss, is one of the strongest predictors of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although PEW might be engendered by non-nutritional conditions, such as inflammation or other comorbidities, the question of causality does not refute the effectiveness of dietary interventions and nutritional support in improving outcomes in patients with CKD. The literature indicates that PEW can be mitigated or corrected with an appropriate diet and enteral nutritional support that targets dietary protein intake. In-center meals or oral supplements provided during dialysis therapy are feasible and inexpensive interventions that might improve survival and quality of life in patients with CKD. Dietary requirements and enteral nutritional support must also be considered in patients with CKD and diabetes mellitus, in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, renal transplant recipients, and in children with CKD. Adjunctive pharmacological therapies, such as appetite stimulants, anabolic hormones, and antioxidative or anti-inflammatory agents, might augment dietary interventions. Intraperitoneal or intradialytic parenteral nutrition should be considered for patients with PEW whenever enteral interventions are not possible or are ineffective. Controlled trials are needed to better assess the effectiveness of in-center meals and oral supplements. PMID:21629229

  10. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  11. Using primary care parenting interventions to improve outcomes in children with developmental disabilities: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tellegen, Cassandra L; Sanders, Matthew R

    2012-01-01

    Parenting is central to the health and well-being of children. Children with developmental disabilities have been shown to be at increased risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. Parent training programs are effective interventions for improving child behavior and family functioning. This paper describes the outcomes of a brief 4-session parenting intervention (Primary Care Stepping Stones Triple P) targeting compliance and cooperative play skills in an 8-year-old girl with Asperger's disorder and ADHD combined type. The intervention was associated with decreases in child behavior problems, increases in parenting confidence, and decreases in dysfunctional parenting styles. This paper demonstrates that low-intensity parenting interventions can lead to significant improvements in child behavior and family functioning. Such brief interventions are cost effective, can be widely disseminated, and have been designed to be delivered within primary health care settings. Pediatricians can play a key role in identifying parents in need of assistance and in helping them access evidence-based parenting interventions. PMID:22928141

  12. A complex intervention to improve pregnancy outcome in obese women; the UPBEAT randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread recognition that obesity in pregnant women is associated with adverse outcomes for mother and child, there is no intervention proven to reduce the risk of these complications. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial is to assess in obese pregnant women, whether a complex behavioural intervention, based on changing diet (to foods with a lower glycemic index) and physical activity, will reduce the risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) and delivery of a large for gestational age (LGA) infant. A secondary aim is to determine whether the intervention lowers the long term risk of obesity in the offspring. Methods/Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing a behavioural intervention designed to improve glycemic control with standard antenatal care in obese pregnant women. Inclusion criteria; women with a BMI ≥30 kg/m2 and a singleton pregnancy between 15+0 weeks and 18+6 weeks’ gestation. Exclusion criteria; pre-defined, pre-existing diseases and multiple pregnancy. Randomisation is on-line by a computer generated programme and is minimised by BMI category, maternal age, ethnicity, parity and centre. Intervention; this is delivered by a health trainer over 8 sessions. Based on control theory, with elements of social cognitive theory, the intervention is designed to improve maternal glycemic control. Women randomised to the control arm receive standard antenatal care until delivery according to local guidelines. All women have a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 27+0- 28+6 weeks’ gestation. Primary outcome; Maternal: diagnosis of GDM, according to the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) criteria. Neonatal; infant LGA defined as >90th customised birth weight centile. Sample size; 1546 women to provide 80% power to detect a 25% reduction in the incidence of GDM and a 30% reduction in infants large for gestational age. Discussion All aspects of this protocol have been

  13. An Outcome-Based Assessment and Improvement System for Measuring Student Performance and Course Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwar, M. A.; Ahmed, Naseer; Al Ameen, Abdurahem Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of students' expected performance and course effectiveness play a vital role in determining the course contribution toward meeting the program's learning objectives or outcomes. The success of any course not only requires a well-designed syllabus with clearly defined course learning outcomes and the use of appropriate outcome-based…

  14. Do home-based exercise interventions improve outcomes for frail older people? Findings from a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sally E; Young, John B; Forster, Anne; Iliffe, Steve J

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and long-term care admission. Objectives To evaluate whether home-based exercise interventions improve outcomes for frail older people. Data sources We searched systematically for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs, with literature searching to February 2010. Study selection All trials that evaluated home-based exercise interventions for frail older people were eligible. Primary outcomes were mobility, quality of life and daily living activities. Secondary outcomes included long-term care admission and hospitalisation. Results Six RCTs involving 987 participants met the inclusion criteria. Four trials were considered of high quality. One high quality trial reported improved disability in those with moderate but not severe frailty. Meta-analysis of long-term care admission rates identified a trend towards reduced risk. Inconsistent effects on other primary and secondary outcomes were reported in the other studies. Conclusions There is preliminary evidence that home-based exercise interventions may improve disability in older people with moderate, but not severe, frailty. There is considerable uncertainty regarding effects on important outcomes including quality of life and long-term care admission. Home-based exercises are a potentially simple, safe and widely applicable intervention to prevent dependency decline for frail older people.

  15. Focus Visits: A Process Improvement Model for Technical College Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Eric C.; Dillon, Brenda M.

    This document is designed to provide enough information for technical colleges and similar institutions to conduct their own focus visits. A focus visit is defined as a full-day activity that takes place on the campus during which a team of 10-25 individuals (program faculty, former and current students, technical college staff, advisory committee…

  16. Improving Technical Vocational Education and Training in the Kurdistan Region--Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constant, Louay; Culbertson, Shelly; Stasz, Cathleen; Vernez, Georges

    2014-01-01

    As Iraq's Kurdistan region develops rapidly, it is creating jobs that require a solid education and technical skills. The government has launched an ambitious reform of basic and secondary education to increase its quality and has expanded opportunities for tertiary technical and university education. But expansion of secondary vocational…

  17. Improving the Process of Informed Consent for PCI: Patient Outcomes from the ePRISM Study

    PubMed Central

    Spertus, John A.; Bach, Richard; Bethea, Charles; Chhatriwalla, Adnan; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Gialde, Elizabeth; Guerrero, Mayra; Gosch, Kensey; Jones, Philip; Kugelmass, Aaron; Leonard, Bradley M.; McNulty, Edward J.; Shelton, Marc; Ting, Henry H.; Decker, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Background While the process of informed consent is designed to transfer knowledge of the risks and benefits of treatment and to engage patients in shared medical decision-making, this is poorly done in routine clinical care. We assessed the impact of a novel informed consent form for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) that is more simply written, includes images of the procedure and embeds individualized estimates of outcomes on multiple domains of successful informed consent and shared decision-making. Methods We interviewed 590 PCI patients receiving traditional consent documents and 527 patients receiving novel ePRISM consents at 9 US centers and compared patients' perceptions, knowledge transfer and engagement in medical decision-making. Heterogeneity across sites was assessed and adjusted for using hierarchical models. Results Site-adjusted analyses revealed more frequent review (72% for ePRISM vs. 45% for original consents) and better understanding of the ePRISM consents (odds ratios (ORs)=1.8–3.0, depending upon the outcome) with marked heterogeneity across sites (median relative difference (MRD) in the ORs of ePRISM's effect = 2–3.2). Patients receiving ePRISM consents better understood the purposes and risks of the procedure (ORs=1.9–3.9, MRDs=1.1–6.2), engaged more in shared decision-making (proportional OR=2.1 [95%CI=1.02–4.4], MRD=2.2) and discussed stent options with their physicians (58% vs. 31%; site-adjusted odds ratio=2.7 [95% CI=1.2, 6.3], MRD=2.6) more often. Conclusions A personalized consent document improved the process of informed consent and shared decision-making. Marked heterogeneity across hospitals highlights that consent documents are but one aspect of engaging patients in understanding and participating in treatment. PMID:25641532

  18. Angiotensin AT2-receptor stimulation improves survival and neurological outcome after experimental stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Schwengel, Katja; Namsolleck, Pawel; Lucht, Kristin; Clausen, Bettina H; Lambertsen, Kate L; Valero-Esquitino, Veronica; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Müller, Susanne; Widdop, Robert E; Denton, Kate M; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Iwai, Masaru; Boato, Francesco; Dahlöf, Björn; Hallberg, Anders; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, U Muscha

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-stroke, direct AT2-receptor (AT2R) stimulation with the non-peptide AT2R-agonist compound 21 (C21) on infarct size, survival and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice and looked for potential underlying mechanisms. C57/BL6J or AT2R-knockout mice (AT2-KO) underwent MCAO for 30 min followed by reperfusion. Starting 45 min after MCAO, mice were treated once daily for 4 days with either vehicle or C21 (0.03 mg/kg ip). Neurological deficits were scored daily. Infarct volumes were measured 96 h post-stroke by MRI. C21 significantly improved survival after MCAO when compared to vehicle-treated mice. C21 treatment had no impact on infarct size, but significantly attenuated neurological deficits. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) (receptor for BDNF) and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) were significantly increased in the peri-infarct cortex of C21-treated mice when compared to vehicle-treated mice. Furthermore, the number of apoptotic neurons was significantly decreased in the peri-infarct cortex in mice treated with C21 compared to controls. There were no effects of C21 on neurological outcome, infarct size and expression of BDNF or GAP-43 in AT2-KO mice. From these data, it can be concluded that AT2R stimulation attenuates early mortality and neurological deficits after experimental stroke through neuroprotective mechanisms in an AT2R-specific way. Key message • AT2R stimulation after MCAO in mice reduces mortality and neurological deficits.• AT2R stimulation increases BDNF synthesis and protects neurons from apoptosis.• The AT2R-agonist C21 acts protectively when applied post-stroke and peripherally. PMID:26983606

  19. Optimal delivery of colorectal cancer follow-up care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Mikaela L; Young, Jane M; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. With population aging and increases in survival, the number of CRC survivors is projected to rise dramatically. The time following initial treatment is often described as a period of transition from intensive hospital-based care back into “regular life.” This review provides an overview of recommended follow-up care for people with CRC who have been treated with curative intent, as well as exploring the current state of the research that underpins these guidelines. For patients, key concerns following treatment include the development of recurrent and new cancers, late and long-term effects of cancer and treatment, and the interplay of these factors with daily function and general health. For physicians, survivorship care plans can be a tool for coordinating the surveillance, intervention, and prevention of these key patient concerns. Though much of the research in cancer survivorship to date has focused on surveillance for recurrent disease, many national guidelines differ in their conclusions about the frequency and timing of follow-up tests. Most CRC guidelines refer only briefly to the management of side effects, despite reports that many patients have a range of ongoing physiological, psychosocial, and functional needs. Guidance for surveillance and intervention is often limited by a small number of heterogeneous trials conducted in this patient group. However, recently released survivorship guidelines emphasize the potential for the effectiveness of secondary prevention strategies, such as physical activity, to improve patient outcomes. There is also emerging evidence for the role of primary care providers and nurse coordinated care to support the transition and increase the cost-effectiveness of follow-up. The shift in focus from recurrence alone to the assessment and management of a range of survivorship issues will be important for ensuring that this growing group of

  20. Does videothoracoscopy improve clinical outcomes when implemented as part of a pleural empyema treatment algorithm?

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; de Almeida, José Luiz Jesus; Devido, Marcela Santana; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate whether the inclusion of videothoracoscopy in a pleural empyema treatment algorithm would change the clinical outcome of such patients. METHODS: This study performed quality-improvement research. We conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent pleural decortication for pleural empyema at our institution from 2002 to 2008. With the old algorithm (January 2002 to September 2005), open decortication was the procedure of choice, and videothoracoscopy was only performed in certain sporadic mid-stage cases. With the new algorithm (October 2005 to December 2008), videothoracoscopy became the first-line treatment option, whereas open decortication was only performed in patients with a thick pleural peel (>2 cm) observed by chest scan. The patients were divided into an old algorithm (n = 93) and new algorithm (n = 113) group and compared. The main outcome variables assessed included treatment failure (pleural space reintervention or death up to 60 days after medical discharge) and the occurrence of complications. RESULTS: Videothoracoscopy and open decortication were performed in 13 and 80 patients from the old algorithm group and in 81 and 32 patients from the new algorithm group, respectively (p<0.01). The patients in the new algorithm group were older (41±1 vs. 46.3±16.7 years, p = 0.014) and had higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores [0(0-3) vs. 2(0-4), p = 0.032]. The occurrence of treatment failure was similar in both groups (19.35% vs. 24.77%, p = 0.35), although the complication rate was lower in the new algorithm group (48.3% vs. 33.6%, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The wider use of videothoracoscopy in pleural empyema treatment was associated with fewer complications and unaltered rates of mortality and reoperation even though more severely ill patients were subjected to videothoracoscopic surgery. PMID:22760892

  1. Transition to routine use of venoarterial extracorporeal oxygenation during lung transplantation could improve early outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Sik; Paik, Hyo Chae; Haam, Seok Jin; Lee, Chang Young; Nam, Kyung Sik; Jung, Hee Suk; Do, Young Woo; Shu, Jee Won

    2016-01-01

    Background The study objective was to compare the outcomes of intraoperative routine use of venoarterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) versus selective use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Between January 2010 and February 2013, 41 lung transplantations (LTx) were performed, and CPB was used as a primary cardiopulmonary support modality by selective basis (group A). Between March 2013 and December 2014, 41 LTx were performed, and ECMO was used routinely (group B). The two groups were compared retrospectively. Results The operative time was significantly longer in group A (group A, 458 min; group B, 420 min; P=0.041). Postoperatively, patients in group B had less fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion (P=0.030). Complications were not different between the two groups. The 30- and 90-day survival rates were better in group B (30-day survival: group A, 75.6%; group B, 95.1%, P=0.012; 90-day survival: group A, 68.3%; group B, 87.8%, P=0.033). The 1-year survival showed better trends in group B, but it was not significant. Forced vital capacity (FVC) at 1, 3, and 6 months after LTx was better in group B than in group A (1 month: group A, 43.8%; group B, 52.9%, P=0.043; 3 months: group A, 45.5%; group B, 59.0%, P=0.005; 6 months: group A, 51.5%; group B, 65.2%, P=0.020). Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) at 3 months after LTx was better in patients in group B than that in patient in group A (group A, 53.3%; group B, 67.5%, P=0.017). Conclusions Routine use of ECMO during LTx could improve early outcome and postoperative lung function without increased extracorporeal-related complication such as vascular and neurologic complications. PMID:27499961

  2. Early Viral Suppression Improves Neurocognitive Outcomes in HIV-infected Children

    PubMed Central

    CROWELL, Claudia S.; HUO, Yanling; TASSIOPOULOS, Katherine; MALEE, Kathleen M.; YOGEV, Ram; HAZRA, Rohan; RUTSTEIN, Richard M.; NICHOLS, Sharon L.; SMITH, Renee A.; WILLIAMS, Paige L.; OLESKE, James; MULLER, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association of age of viral suppression and central nervous system penetration effectiveness (CPE) score with neurocognitive functioning among school-age children with perinatally-acquired HIV infection (PHIV+). Design We analyzed data from two U.S.-based multisite prospective cohort studies. Methods Multivariable general linear regression models were used to evaluate associations of age at viral suppression and CPE scores [of initial ART regimen and weighted average] with WISC-III or WISC-IV neurocognitive assessments [full scale IQ (FSIQ); performance IQ/ perceptual reasoning index (PIQ/PRI); and verbal IQ/ verbal comprehension index (VIQ/VCI)], adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates. Sensitivity analyses were stratified by birth cohort (before vs after 1996). Results 396 PHIV+ children were included. Estimated differences in mean FSIQ (comparing virally suppressed vs. unsuppressed children) by each age cutoff were 3.7, 2.2, 3.2, 4.4, and 3.9 points at ages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. For PIQ/PRI, estimated mean differences were 3.7, 2.4, 2.2, 4.6, and 4.5 at ages 1 through 5 respectively. In both cases, these differences were significant only at the age 4 and 5 thresholds. After stratifying by birth cohort the association between age at suppression and cognitive function persisted only among those born after 1996. Age at viral suppression was not associated with VIQ/VCI; CPE score was not associated with FSIQ, verbal comprehension or perceptual reasoning indices. Conclusions Virologic suppression during infancy or early childhood is associated with improved neurocognitive outcomes in school-aged PHIV+ children. In contrast, CPE scores showed no association with neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686678

  3. Improving Outcomes in Patients Receiving Dialysis: The Peer Kidney Care Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, James B; Gilbertson, David T; Liu, Jiannong; Collins, Allan J

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has witnessed a marked reduction in mortality rates among patients receiving maintenance dialysis. However, the reasons for this welcome development are uncertain, and greater understanding is needed to translate advances in care into additional survival gains. To fill important knowledge gaps and to enable dialysis provider organizations to learn from one another, with the aim of advancing patient care, the Peer Kidney Care Initiative (Peer) was created in 2014 by the chief medical officers of 14 United States dialysis provider organizations and the Chronic Disease Research Group. Areas of particular clinical importance were targeted to help shape the public health agenda in CKD and ESRD. Peer focuses on the effect of geographic variation on outcomes, the implications of seasonality for morbidity and mortality, the clinical significance of understudied disorders affecting dialysis patients, and the debate about how best to monitor and evaluate progress in care. In the realm of geovariation, Peer has provided key observations on regional variation in the rates of ESRD incidence, hospitalization, and pre-ESRD care. Regarding seasonality, Peer has reported on variation in both infection-related and non-infection-related hospitalizations, suggesting that ambient environmental conditions may affect a range of health outcomes in dialysis patients. Specific medical conditions that Peer highlights include Clostridium difficile infection, which has become strikingly more common in patients in the year after dialysis initiation, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the treatments for which have the potential to contribute to sudden cardiac death. Finally, Peer challenges the nephrology community to consider alternatives to standardized mortality ratios in assessing progress in care, positing that close scrutiny of trends over time may be the most effective way to drive improvements in patient care. PMID:27006497

  4. Platelet-rich plasma treatment improves outcomes for chronic proximal hamstring injuries in an athletic population

    PubMed Central

    Fader, Ryan R.; Mitchell, Justin J.; Traub, Shaun; Nichols, Roger; Roper, Michelle; Mei Dan, Omer; McCarty, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathies is a disabling activity related condition. Currently, there is no well-accepted or extensively documented non-operative treatment option that provides consistently successful results. Purpose: to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound guided platelet-rich plasma injections in treating chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathies. Methods: a total of 18 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. All patients received a single injection of platelet rich plasma via ultra-sound guidance by a single radiologist. Outcome measures included a questionnaire evaluating previous treatments, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, subjective improvement, history of injury, and return to activity. Results: the patient population included 12 females and 6 males. The average age at the time of the injection was 42.6 years (19–60). Provocative activities included running, biking, swimming. The average body mass index of patients was 22.9 (17.2–30.2). The average time of chronic pain prior to receiving the first injection was 32.6 months (6–120). All patients had attempted other forms of non-surgical treatment prior to entering the study. The average VAS pre-injection was 4.6 (0–8). Six months after the injection, 10/18 patients had 80% or greater improvement in their VAS. Overall, the average improvement was 63% (5–100). The only documented side effect was post-injection discomfort that resolved within seventy-two hours. Conclusion: chronic hamstring tendinopathy is a debilitating condition secondary to the pain, which limits an athlete’s ability to perform. For refractory cases of chronic insertional proximal hamstring injuries, platelet-rich plasma injections are safe and show benefit in the majority of patients in our study, allowing return to pre-injury activities. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. PMID:25767784

  5. Blocking the P2X7 Receptor Improves Outcomes After Axonal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Feo, Charles L.; Sexton, Kevin W.; Boyer, Richard B.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Shack, R. Bruce; Mikesh, Michelle A; McGill, Christopher H; Driscoll, Christopher W; Bittner, George D.; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Activation of the P2X7 Receptor on nerve cells causes the formation of pannexin pores, which allows the influx of calcium across the cell membrane. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and methylene blue (MB) have previously been shown to delay Wallerian degeneration if applied during microsuture repair of the severed nerve. Our hypothesis is that by modulating calcium influx via the P2X7 receptor pathway, we could improve PEG based axonal repair. The P2X7 receptor can be stimulated or inhibited using bzATP or Brilliant Blue (FCF), respectively. Methods A single incision rat sciatic nerve injury model was used. The defect was repaired using a previously described PEG, MB fusion protocol. Experimental animals were treated with 100 µL of 100 µM FCF solution (n=8) or 100 µL of a 30 µM bzATP solution (n=6). Control animals received neither FCF, bzATP, nor PEG. Compound Action Potentials (CAPs) were recorded prior to transection (baseline), immediately after repair, and 21 days post operatively. Animals underwent behavioral testing 3,7, 14, and 21 days post operatively. After sacrifice, nerves were fixed, sectioned, and immunostained to allow for counting of total axons. Results Rats treated with FCF showed an improvement as compared to control at all time points (n=8) (p= .047, .044, .014, and .0059 respectively). A statistical difference was also shown between FCF and bzATP at Day 7 (p<.05), but not shown with days 3, 14, and 21. (p>.05). Conclusions Blocking the P2X7 receptor improves functional outcomes after PEG mediated axonal fusion. PMID:23731685

  6. Mesenchymal Stromal (Stem) Cell Therapy Fails to Improve Outcomes in Experimental Severe Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Ilyse; Banner, David; Mubareka, Samira; Kim, Hani; Besla, Rickvinder; Kelvin, David J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Liles, W. Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Severe influenza remains a major public health threat and is responsible for thousands of deaths annually. Increasing antiviral resistance and limited effectiveness of current therapies highlight the need for new approaches to influenza treatment. Extensive pre-clinical data have shown that mesenchymal stromal (stem) cell (MSC) therapy can induce anti-inflammatory effects and enhance repair of the injured lung. We hypothesized that MSC therapy would improve survival, dampen lung inflammation and decrease acute lung injury (ALI) in a murine model of severe influenza. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were infected with influenza A/PuertoRico/8/34 (mouse-adapted H1N1) or influenza A/Mexico/4108/2009 (swine-origin pandemic H1N1) and administered human or mouse MSCs via the tail vein, either pre- or post- infection. MSC efficacy was evaluated as both an independent and adjunctive treatment strategy in combination with the antiviral agent, oseltamivir. Weight loss and survival were monitored. Inflammatory cells, cytokine/chemokines (IFN-γ, CXCL10, CCL2 and CCL5) and markers of ALI (total protein and IgM), were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung parenchyma. Results Administration of murine MSCs or human MSCs in a prophylactic or therapeutic regimen failed to improve survival, decrease pulmonary inflammation/inflammatory cell counts or prevent ALI in influenza virus-infected mice. MSCs administered in combination with oseltamivir also failed to improve outcomes. Conclusions Despite similarities in the clinical presentation and pathobiology of ALI and severe influenza, our findings suggest that MSC therapy may not be effective for prevention and/or treatment of acute severe influenza. PMID:23967240

  7. Nationwide outcome registrations to improve quality of care in rectal surgery. An initiative of the European Society of Surgical Oncology.

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Willem; Wouters, Michel W J M; Peeters, Koen C M J; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2009-06-15

    In recent years there have been significant improvements in rectal cancer treatment. New surgical techniques as well as effective neoadjuvant treatment regimens have contributed to these improvements. Key is to spread these advances towards every rectal cancer patient and to ensure that not only patients who are treated within the framework of clinical trials may benefit from these advancements. Throughout Europe there have been interesting quality programmes that have proved to facilitate the spread of up to date knowledge and skills among medical professionals resulting in improved treatment outcome. Despite these laudable efforts there is still a wide variation in treatment outcome between countries, regions and institutions, which calls for a European audit on cancer treatment outcome. PMID:19031492

  8. The Pediatrix BabySteps® Data Warehouse--a unique national resource for improving outcomes for neonates.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Alan R; Ellsbury, Dan; Clark, Reese H

    2015-01-01

    The Pediatrix Medical Group Clinical Data Warehouse represents a unique electronic data capture system for the assessment of outcomes, the management of quality improvement (CQI) initiatives, and the resolution of important research questions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This system is described in detail and the manner in which the Data Warehouse has been used to measure and improve patient outcomes through CQI projects and research is outlined. The Pediatrix Data Warehouse now contains more than 1 million patients, serving as an exceptional tool for evaluating NICU care. Examples are provided of how significant outcome improvement has been achieved and several papers are cited that have used the "Big Data" contained in the Data Warehouse for novel observations that could not be made otherwise. PMID:25319813

  9. Manipulation of exercise to rest ratio within set duration on physical and technical outcomes during small-sided games in elite youth soccer players.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Jack; Beato, Marco; Hulton, Andrew T

    2016-08-01

    Training practices for elite soccer players should take into account specific technical, tactical and physical components. As a consequence of these demands small-sided games (SSGs) have become a popular conditioning tool that replicate the demands encountered during match play. The aim of this investigation was to examine how the manipulation of exercise to rest ratio, within the same overall duration, affected both physical and technical outcomes during SSGs in elite youth soccer. Twelve elite youth soccer players participated in three variations of eight minute 6v6 SSGs. The three variations included eight minutes continuous, 2×4min and 4×2min. Players perceived the continuous 8min block as the hardest (4.5±1.5AU), followed by the 2×4min (3.9±1.4AU) and the 4×2min (3.3±1.4AU), although no difference in mean HR or physical measures via GPS analysis between SSGs was evident. From the technical perspective, only goals scored reached significance, with post hoc analysis identifying the number of goals scored were significantly higher during the 4×2min and 2×4min SSGs compared to 8min continuous block. These results show that subjective ratings of exertion differed between conditions, but only minor technical manipulations were observed by adjusting work to rest ratios, with no significant effect on physical performance. PMID:27082027

  10. Community Mobilization in Mumbai Slums to Improve Perinatal Care and Outcomes: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    More, Neena Shah; Bapat, Ujwala; Das, Sushmita; Alcock, Glyn; Patil, Sarita; Porel, Maya; Vaidya, Leena; Fernandez, Armida; Joshi, Wasundhara; Osrin, David

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Improving maternal and newborn health in low-income settings requires both health service and community action. Previous community initiatives have been predominantly rural, but India is urbanizing. While working to improve health service quality, we tested an intervention in which urban slum-dweller women's groups worked to improve local perinatal health. Methods and Findings A cluster randomized controlled trial in 24 intervention and 24 control settlements covered a population of 283,000. In each intervention cluster, a facilitator supported women's groups through an action learning cycle in which they discussed perinatal experiences, improved their knowledge, and took local action. We monitored births, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths, and interviewed mothers at 6 weeks postpartum. The primary outcomes described perinatal care, maternal morbidity, and extended perinatal mortality. The analysis included 18,197 births over 3 years from 2006 to 2009. We found no differences between trial arms in uptake of antenatal care, reported work, rest, and diet in later pregnancy, institutional delivery, early and exclusive breastfeeding, or care-seeking. The stillbirth rate was non-significantly lower in the intervention arm (odds ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.60–1.22), and the neonatal mortality rate higher (1.48, 1.06–2.08). The extended perinatal mortality rate did not differ between arms (1.19, 0.90–1.57). We have no evidence that these differences could be explained by the intervention. Conclusions Facilitating urban community groups was feasible, and there was evidence of behaviour change, but we did not see population-level effects on health care or mortality. In cities with multiple sources of health care, but inequitable access to services, community mobilization should be integrated with attempts to deliver services for the poorest and most vulnerable, and with initiatives to improve quality of care in both public and private sectors. Trial registration

  11. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lee-Fay; Fletcher, Jennifer; Goodenough, Belinda; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; MacAndrew, Margaret; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes. Methods Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure. Results Sixty-three unique studies were broadly grouped according to clinical domain—oral health (3 studies), hygiene and infection control (3 studies), nutrition (2 studies), nursing home acquired pneumonia (2 studies), depression (2 studies) appropriate prescribing (7 studies), reduction of physical restraints (3 studies), management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6 studies), falls reduction and prevention (11 studies), quality improvement (9 studies), philosophy of care (10 studies) and other (5 studies). No single intervention component, combination of, or increased number of components was associated with greater likelihood of positive outcomes. Studies with positive outcomes for residents also tended to change staff behavior, however changing staff behavior did not necessarily improve resident outcomes. Studies targeting specific care tasks (e.g. oral care, physical restraints) were more likely to produce positive outcomes than those requiring global practice changes (e.g. care philosophy). Studies using intervention theories were more likely to be successful. Program logic was rarely articulated, so it was often unclear whether there was a coherent connection between the intervention components and measured outcomes. Many studies reported barriers relating to staff (e.g. turnover, high workload, attitudes) or organizational factors (e.g. funding, resources, logistics). Conclusion Changing staff practice in nursing homes is possible but complex

  12. Higher Chest Wall Dose Results in Improved Locoregional Outcome in Patients Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panoff, Joseph E.; Takita, Cristiane; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha M.; Zhao, Wei; Rodgers, Steven E.; Gunaseelan, Vijayalakshmi; Wright, Jean L.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Randomized trials demonstrating decreased locoregional recurrence (LRR) and improved overall survival (OS) in women receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) used up to 50 Gy to the chest wall (CW), but in practice, many centers boost the CW dose to {>=}60 Gy, despite lack of data supporting this approach. We evaluated the relationship between CW dose and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients who received PMRT between January 1999 and December 2009. We collected data on patient, disease, treatment characteristics, and outcomes of LRR, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. Results: Median follow-up from the date of diagnosis was 44.7 months. The cumulative 5-year incidence of LRR as first site of failure was 6.2%. CW dose for 7% (43 patients) was {<=}50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-50.4 Gy) and 93% received >50.4 Gy (range, 52.4-74.4 Gy). A CW dose of >50.4 Gy vs. {<=}50.4 Gy was associated with lower incidence of LRR, a 60-month rate of 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-8.2) vs. 12.7% (95% CI, 4.5-25.3; p = 0.054). Multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for LRR controlling for race, receptor status, and stage was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.02-7.13; p = 0.042). All LRR in the low-dose group occurred in patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy. Lower CW dose was associated with worse PFS (multivariate HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.64-4.56; p < 0.001) and OS (multivariate HR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.16-6.99; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of a CW boost above 50.4 Gy resulted in improved locoregional control and survival in this cohort patients treated with PMRT for stage II-III breast cancer. The addition of a CW boost to standard-dose PMRT is likely to benefit selected high-risk patients. The optimal technique, target volume, and patient selection criteria are unknown. The use of a CW boost should be studied prospectively, as has been done in the setting of breast conservation.

  13. Prospective monitoring improves outcomes of primary total hip replacement: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N; Pachón, Marcela; Kerguelén, Carlos A; Navas, José; Portocarrero, Julio; Pesantez, Rodrigo F; Zayed, Gamal; Carrillo, Germán; Llinás, Adolfo M

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the past decade several studies have questioned current standards of patient safety in health care delivery. In response, our institution started a clinical pathway for total hip replacement in 1996. Prospective monitoring with regular feedback sessions to the individuals involved in patient care did however not start until 2003. The present study evaluates the effect of prospective monitoring on outcomes of total hip replacement. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing primary elective total hip replacement between 1997 and 2004 were reviewed. Data on adverse events as well as adherence to protocols for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis were extracted retrospectively for the period 1997 to 2001 and prospectively from 2003 to 2004. Results were compared and analyzed in order to establish possible improvement in outcomes. Data was analyzed with Chi-square or Fisher's Exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Alpha was set as less than 5% and analysis was performed with Stata 9.0 for Macintosh. Results Two-hundred and eighty-three patients were included from 1997 to 2001, and 62 from 2003 to 2004. Mean age, male to female ratio and initial diagnosis were similar in both groups. At least one adverse event occurred in 45% of patients in 1997–2001 and in 21% in 2003–2004 (p < 0.001). In-hospital hip dislocations occurred in 6% and 0% (p = 0.05), oliguria in 19% and 5% (p = 0.007), SSI and VTE in 3% and 0% (p = 0.37), adverse drug reactions in 11% and 13% (p = 0.66) and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols in 15% and 2% of cases respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusion Overall rate of adverse events as well as in-hospital hip dislocations, oliguria and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols were significantly reduced during the second period. We conclude that clinical pathways alone are insufficient to improve patient safety and require prospective monitoring and continuous feedback to health

  14. Improved outcomes for elderly patients who received care on a transitional care unit

    PubMed Central

    Manville, Margaret; Klein, Michael C.; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether providing elderly alternate level of care (ALC) patients with interdisciplinary care on a transitional care unit (TCU) achieves better clinical outcomes and lowers costs compared with providing them with standard hospital care. Design Before-and-after structured retrospective chart audit. Setting St Joseph’s Hospital in Comox, BC. Participants One hundred thirty-five consecutively admitted patients aged 70 years and older with ALC designation during 5-month periods before (n = 49) and after (n = 86) the opening of an on-site TCU. Main outcome measures Length of stay, discharge disposition, complications of the acute and ALC portions of the patients’ hospital stays, activities of daily living (mobility, transfers, and urinary continence), psychotropic medications and vitamin D prescriptions, and ALC patient care costs, as well as annual hospital savings, were examined. Results Among the 86 ALC patients receiving care during the postintervention period, 57 (66%) were admitted to the TCU; 29 of the 86 (34%) patients in the postintervention group received standard care (SC). All 86 ALC patients in the postintervention group were compared with the 49 preintervention ALC patients who received SC. Length of stay reduction occurred among the postintervention group during the acute portion of the hospital stay (14.0 days postintervention group vs 22.5 days preintervention group; P < .01). Discharge home or to an assisted-living facility increased among the postintervention group (30% postintervention group vs 12% preintervention group; P < .01). Patients’ ability to transfer improved among the postintervention group (55% postintervention group vs 14% preintervention group; P < .01). At discharge, 48% of ALC patients in the postintervention group were able to transfer independently compared with 17% of ALC patients in the preintervention group. Hospital-acquired infections among the postintervention group decreased during the

  15. The microvascular anastomotic coupler for venous anastomoses in free flap breast reconstruction improves outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, Warren Matthew; Chowdhry, Muhammad; Patel, Nakul Gamanlal; Chow, Whitney T.H.; Griffiths, Matthew; Ramakrishnan, Venkat V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Venous couplers are ubiquitous around the world and are a useful tool for the reconstructive microsurgeon. A systematic review of coupler performance studies demonstrated a thrombosis rate range of 0% to 3%, whilst the average time of using the device is 5 minutes. There is sparse published data on cost analysis and the impact of operator experience on the anastomotic coupler device success. Improvements in outcomes other than time benefits have also not been shown. This study aims to address these deficiencies in the literature. Methods A retrospective clinical study was undertaken, aiming to compare equivalent groups of patients that had free flap surgery with venous micro-anastomoses with those that had sutured anastomoses. The cohort comprised all patients undergoing microsurgical breast reconstruction at the St Andrew’s Centre for Plastic Surgery & Burns from January 2009 to December 2014. Results Between January 2010 to December 2014, 1,064 patients underwent 1,206 free flap breast reconstructions. The average age of patients was 50 years. Seventy percent of patients underwent mastectomy and immediate reconstruction during this period with the remaining 30% having a delayed reconstruction. The 1,206 free flaps comprised of 83 transverse myocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flaps, and 1,123 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps. In total the coupler was used in 319 flaps, 26% of the cohort. There was a statistically significant clinical benefit in using the anastomotic coupler for venous anastomosis. Overall, the return to theatre rate was 12.69% whilst the overall flap loss rate was 0.75%. The overall coupler failure rate was significantly less at 1.4% whilst sutured vein failure rate was 3.57% (P=0.001). Conclusions The anastomotic coupler for venous anastomosis in free flap surgery is associated with reduced operating times, reduced take-backs to theatre and cost benefits. This is the first study to demonstrate clear clinical benefits

  16. Late outcomes after grafting of the severely burned face: a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Philp, Lauren; Umraw, Nisha; Cartotto, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Many approaches to surgical management of the severely burned face are described, but there are few objective outcome studies. The purpose of this study was to perform a detailed evaluation of the late outcomes in adult patients who have undergone grafting using a standardized surgical and rehabilitation approach for full-thickness (FT) facial burns to identify areas for improvement in the treatment strategy of authors. This was a prospective observational study in which patients who had undergone grafting for FT facial burns by the senior investigator at a regional burn centre between 1999 and 2010 were examined by a single evaluator. The surgical approach included tangential excision based on the facial aesthetic units, temporary cover with allograft then autografting with scalp skin preferentially, split grafts for the upper eyelid, and FT grafts for the lower eyelid. Rehabilitation included compression (uvex and or soft cloth), scar massage, and silicone gel sheeting. Of 35 patients with facial grafts, 14 subjects (age 43 ± 16 years with 22 ± 21% TBSA burns) returned for late follow-up at 40 ± 33 months (range, 5-91 months). A mean of four facial aesthetic units per patient were grafted (range, 1-9 units), with six full facial grafts performed. Scalp was used as donor in 10 of 14 cases. Scalp donor sites were well tolerated with minor alopecia visible in only one case although the donor site visibly extended slightly past the hairline in two cases. Color match with native skin was rated at 8.8 ± 0.8 of 10 when scalp skin was used compared with 7.5 ± 1.6 with other donor sites (P = .06). On the lip and chin, hypertrophic scars were significantly worse compared with the rest of the facial grafts (Vancouver scar scale 8 ± 2 vs 3 ± 1, P < .01). Sensory recovery was poor with overall moving two-point discrimination at 11 ± 3 mm (range, 4-15 mm), and monofilament light touch was 3.8 ± 0.6. Graft borders were significantly more elevated than graft seams. On

  17. Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy Improves Early Postoperative Results: A Retrospective Comparison of Outcomes After Endoscopic Versus Open Plantar Fasciotomy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andrew Chia Chen; Ng, Sean Yung Chuan; Koo, Kevin Oon Thien

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciotomy is offered to patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Few studies have characterized the functional outcomes over time for the endoscopic approach compared with the open approach. We hypothesized that patients undergoing endoscopic surgery will have better postoperative functional outcomes early in the postoperative period but equivalent long-term outcomes compared with patients undergoing open surgery. We analyzed the prospectively collected data of all patients undergoing plantar fasciotomy at our institution from December 2007 to August 2014. A total of 42 feet of 38 patients were included in the analysis. The clinical data were collected preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months and 1 year. The functional outcomes analyzed included the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot scale, the Medical Outcomes Study, Short-Form, 36-item Health Survey, and patient satisfaction and expectations. Patients undergoing endoscopic surgery had significantly greater American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot and SF-36 Health Survey scores and lower pain scores at the 3-month period. They were also significantly more likely to be satisfied with and have had their expectations met by surgery. Compared with the open approach, the patients who had undergone endoscopic plantar fasciotomy experienced significantly greater improvements in the subjective and objective functional outcomes, with less pain and greater satisfaction, and had had their expectations met earlier in the recovery period, with equivalent long-term outcomes, compared with the patients who had undergone open plantar fasciotomy. PMID:26007627

  18. An In-Situ Forming Skin Substitute Improves Healing Outcome in a Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Hartwell, Ryan; Poormasjedi-Meibod, Malihe-Sadat; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Jalili, Reza B.; Hossenini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Wound repair requires a sequential series of biological events that begins with the deposition of a temporary scaffold within which cells can repair the skin. Without a scaffold, repair is essentially impossible. Aberrant wound healing, such as hypertrophic scarring or nonhealing, has a tremendous burden on healthcare and quality of life. Timely wound closure dramatically reduces the risk of infection and scarring. Cellular skin substitutes are opportune to meet this need. Our goal was to create an in-situ forming scaffold that can be easily combined with cells to rapidly form a dermal substitute within the wound bed. In this study, we evaluated the application of a polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-glycosaminoglycan-based biohybrid scaffold system in full-thickness wounds on a rabbit fibrotic ear model. Punch wounds (6 mm) were either untreated or filled with an acellular scaffold, a scaffold containing xenofibroblasts, or a scaffold containing xenofibroblasts expressing indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Results demonstrated that (1) both acellular and IDO-expressing fibroblast in-situ forming scaffolds significantly reduced scar elevation index (1.24±0.05 and 1.25±0.03; p<0.05) and improved overall healing quality compared with xenofibroblast scaffolds and untreated wounds; (2) IDO-expressing fibroblast scaffolds significantly reduced T-cell infiltration into the scaffold-engrafted area (p<0.05); and (3) both IDO-expressing and acellular in-situ forming scaffolds demonstrated increased vessel-like and nerve-like structures (p<0.05). The results demonstrated that the use of the in-situ forming scaffold, and even more so when delivering IDO-expressing cells, improved healing outcome in full-thickness hypertrophic rabbit ear wounds. PMID:25412924

  19. Progesterone improves long-term functional and histological outcomes after permanent stroke in older rats.

    PubMed

    Wali, Bushra; Ishrat, Tauheed; Stein, Donald G; Sayeed, Iqbal

    2016-05-15

    Previous studies have shown progesterone to be beneficial in animal models of central nervous system injury, but less is known about its longer-term sustained effects on recovery of function following stroke. We evaluated progesterone's effects on a panel of behavioral tests up to 8 weeks after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). Male Sprague-Dawley rats 12m.o. were subjected to pMCAO and, beginning 3h post-pMCAO, given intraperitoneal injections of progesterone (8mg/kg) or vehicle, followed by subcutaneous injections at 8h and then every 24h for 7 days, with tapering of the last 2 treatments. The rats were then tested on functional recovery at 3, 6 and 8 weeks post-stroke. We observed that progesterone-treated animals showed attenuation of infarct volume and improved functional outcomes at 8 weeks after stroke on grip strength, sensory neglect, motor coordination and spatial navigation tests. Progesterone treatments significantly improved motor deficits in the affected limb on a number of gait parameters. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression was increased in the vehicle group and considerably lowered in the progesterone group at 8 weeks post-stroke. With repeated post-stroke testing, sensory neglect and some aspects of spatial learning performance showed spontaneous recovery, but on gait and grip-strength measres progesterone given only in the acute stage of stroke (first 7 days) showed sustained beneficial effects on all other measures of functional recovery up to 8 weeks post-stroke. PMID:26921692

  20. Child abuse treatment and follow-up: can the pediatrician help improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Fischler, R S

    1984-01-01

    The pediatric role in the management of child abuse and neglect has been largely limited to detecting and reporting cases, with little involvement in long-term treatment and follow-up. A review of published clinical experience indicates that customary protective services' "treatment" strategies are all too often ineffective at preventing reabuse, improving child health and developmental status, and improving family functioning. When foster care is used as a treatment modality, children run the added risk of never returning home, nor being freed for adoption, and they may suffer the emotional harm of repeated foster placements. This situation is likely to worsen, in the light of recent cutbacks in social service programs, at a time of rising reports of maltreatment. The pediatrician is widely recognized as an expert in children's health and development, and he can effectively use his position to influence the management of cases and thereby the outcome, by actively participating in treatment decision making and providing close follow-up in a limited but important way. In order to do this, he must first become acquainted with the effects of maltreatment upon children's health and development and with the general principles and available modalities of treatment. He must be sympathetic and supportive of the difficult role of the protective service worker who must make treatment decisions. His role is to assist the worker by making medical resources available in order to adequately define the child's needs and the capacity of the family to meet those needs. Essential to answering these questions is the availability of a child development clinic and mental health resources.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6541088

  1. AMOR: a proposed cooperative effort to improve outcomes of childhood cancer in Central America.

    PubMed

    Antillon, Federico; Baez, Fulgencio L; Barr, Ronald; Barrantes Zamorra, Jose C; Carrasco, Ligia Fu; Moreno, Belgica; Bonilla, Miguel M; Tognoni, Gianni; Valsecch, Maria G; Howard, Scott; Ribeiro, Raul C; Masera, Giuseppe

    2005-08-01

    The dramatic reduction of pediatric cancer mortality rates has been one of the greatest accomplishments of contemporary medicine. About 80% of children with cancer are now expected to be cured by current therapies. However, most of the world's children have no access to cancer treatment. The translation of effective pediatric cancer therapies to impoverished regions of the world presents an enormous challenge to the health care profession. Over the past 20 years, efforts have been under way to extend adequate cancer treatment to an increasing number of children in developing countries. These initiatives, collectively designated "twinning programs," consist essentially of a partnership between a pediatric cancer unit in a developing country and a group of health care providers in the developed world. Here we review the twinning programs that have been implemented in Central America, discuss their impact on the development of local resources and the outcome of childhood cancer, and propose a collaborative research initiative aimed at improving the international dissemination of progress in pediatric hematology-oncology. PMID:15806545

  2. N-acetylcysteineamide confers neuroprotection, improves bioenergetics and behavioral outcome following TBI

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Jignesh D.; Readnower, Ryan D.; Patel, Samir P.; Yonutas, Heather M.; Pauly, James R.; Goldstein, Glenn A.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.; Sullivan, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a growing epidemic but no approved pharmacological treatment has been identified. Our previous work indicates that mitochondrial oxidative stress/damage and loss of bioenergetics play a pivotal role in neuronal cell death and behavioral outcome following experimental TBI. One tactic that has had some experimental success is to target glutathione using its precursor N-acetylcysteine (NAC). However, this approach has been hindered by the low CNS bioavailability of NAC. The current study evaluated a novel, cell permeant amide form of N-acetylcysteine (NACA), which has high permeability through cellular and mitochondrial membranes resulting in increased CNS bioavailability. Cortical tissue sparing, cognitive function and oxidative stress markers were assessed in rats treated with NACA, NAC, or vehicle following a TBI. At 15 days post-injury, animals treated with NACA demonstrated significant improvements in cognitive function and cortical tissue sparing compared to NAC or vehicle treated animals. NACA treatment also was shown to reduce oxidative damage (HNE levels) at 7 days post-injury. Mechanistically, post-injury NACA administration was demonstrated to maintain levels of mitochondrial glutathione and mitochondrial bioenergetics comparable to sham animals. Collectively these data provide a basic platform to consider NACA as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of TBI. PMID:24792639

  3. Coordinating ecological restoration options analysis and risk assessment to improve environmental outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kapustka, Lawrence A; Bowers, Keith; Isanhart, John; Martinez-Garza, Cristina; Finger, Susan; Stahl, Ralph G; Stauber, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Ecological risk assessment as currently practiced has hindered consideration of ecosystem services endpoints and restoration goals in the environmental management process. Practitioners have created barriers between procedures to clean up contaminated areas and efforts to restore ecosystem functions. In this article, we examine linkages between contaminant risk assessment approaches and restoration efforts with the aim of identifying ways to improve environmental outcomes. We advocate that project managers and other stakeholders use an ecological planning framework, with restoration options included upfront in the risk assessment. We also considered the opportunities to incorporate ecosystem services as potential assessment endpoints in the Problem Formulation stages of a risk assessment. Indeed, diverse perspectives of stakeholders are central to understand the relevance of social, cultural, economic, and regional ecology as influences on future use options for the landscape being restored. The measurement endpoints used to characterize the existing ecological conditions for selected ecosystem services can also be used to evaluate restoration success. A regional, landscape, or seascape focus is needed throughout the risk assessment process, so that restoration efforts play a more prominent role in enhancing ecosystem services. In short, we suggest that practitioners begin with the question of "how can the ecological risk assessment inform the decision on how best to restore the ecosystem?" PMID:26077395

  4. Could training executive function improve treatment outcomes for eating disorders?☆

    PubMed Central

    Juarascio, Adrienne S.; Manasse, Stephanie M.; Espel, Hallie M.; Kerrigan, Stephanie G.; Forman, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    Current gold standard treatments for eating disorders (EDs) lack satisfactory efficacy, and traditional psychological treatments do not directly address executive functioning deficits underpinning ED pathology. The goal of this paper is to explore the potential for enhancing ED treatment outcomes by improving executive functioning deficits that have been demonstrated to underlie eating pathology. To achieve our objective, we (1) review existing evidence for executive functioning deficits that underpin EDs and consider the extent to which these deficits could be targeted in neurocognitive training programs, (2) present the evidence for the one ED neurocognitive training program well-studied to date (Cognitive Remediation Therapy), (3) discuss the utility of neurocognitive training programs that have been developed for other psychiatric disorders with similar deficits, and (4) provide suggestions for the future development and research of neurocognitive training programs for EDs. Despite the fact that the body of empirical work on neurocognitive training programs for eating disorders is very small, we conclude that their potential is high given the combined evidence for the role of deficits in executive functioning in EDs, the initial promise of Cognitive Remediation Training, and the success in treating related conditions with neurocognitive training. Based on the evidence to date, it appears that the development and empirical evaluation of neurocognitive training programs for EDs is warranted. PMID:25777264

  5. Mobile stroke units bring treatment to patients, potentially improving long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    At least three U.S. medical centers are evaluating the benefits of deploying specially equipped mobile stroke units to respond to emergency calls for patients with suspected strokes. Most of these units contain CT scanners, lab facilities, and other functionality capable of determining whether a patient would benefit from clot-busting therapy. Such drugs can then be administered to appropriate patients before a patient even arrives in the ED. Early findings from the approach show that care can be accelerated, potentially improving stroke outcomes and reducing longer-term costs. In Houston, a mobile stroke unit dispatches along with EMS when a call involves a potential stroke victim. If the mobile stroke unit team determines that a patient is a candidate for clot-busting therapy, clinicians can administer the therapy, accelerating potentially brain-saving care. In a nine-week period, researchers reported that they treated about two patients per week with clot-busting drugs, 40% of whom received treatment within the first hour of onset. Further, none of the patients who received the drugs experienced intracerebral hemorrhage, and half of them recovered fully from their strokes within 90 days. PMID:26731930

  6. Can Decision Biases Improve Insurance Outcomes? An Experiment on Status Quo Bias in Health Insurance Choice

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure. PMID:23783222

  7. N-acetylcysteine amide confers neuroprotection, improves bioenergetics and behavioral outcome following TBI.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Jignesh D; Readnower, Ryan D; Patel, Samir P; Yonutas, Heather M; Pauly, James R; Goldstein, Glenn A; Rabchevsky, Alexander G; Sullivan, Patrick G

    2014-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a growing epidemic but no approved pharmacological treatment has been identified. Our previous work indicates that mitochondrial oxidative stress/damage and loss of bioenergetics play a pivotal role in neuronal cell death and behavioral outcome following experimental TBI. One tactic that has had some experimental success is to target glutathione using its precursor N-acetylcysteine (NAC). However, this approach has been hindered by the low CNS bioavailability of NAC. The current study evaluated a novel, cell permeant amide form of N-acetylcysteine (NACA), which has high permeability through cellular and mitochondrial membranes resulting in increased CNS bioavailability. Cortical tissue sparing, cognitive function and oxidative stress markers were assessed in rats treated with NACA, NAC, or vehicle following a TBI. At 15days post-injury, animals treated with NACA demonstrated significant improvements in cognitive function and cortical tissue sparing compared to NAC or vehicle treated animals. NACA treatment also was shown to reduce oxidative damage (HNE levels) at 7days post-injury. Mechanistically, post-injury NACA administration was demonstrated to maintain levels of mitochondrial glutathione and mitochondrial bioenergetics comparable to sham animals. Collectively these data provide a basic platform to consider NACA as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of TBI. PMID:24792639

  8. Patient-centered medicine and patient-oriented research: improving health outcomes for individual patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient-centered medicine is developing alongside the concepts of personalized medicine and tailored therapeutics. The main objective of patient-centered medicine is to improve health outcomes of individual patients in everyday clinical practice, taking into account the patient’s objectives, preferences, values as well as the available economic resources. Discussion Patient-centered medicine implies a paradigm shift in the relationship between doctors and patients, but also requires the development of patient-oriented research. Patient-oriented research should not be based on the evaluation of medical interventions in the average patient, but on the identification of the best intervention for every individual patient, the study of heterogeneity and the assignment of greater value to observations and exceptions. The development of information-based technologies can help to close the gap between clinical research and clinical practice, a fundamental step for any advance in this field. Summary Evidence-based medicine and patient centered medicine are not contradictory but complementary movements. It is not possible to practice patient-centered medicine that is not based on evidence, nor is it possible to practice evidence-based medicine at a distance from the individual patient. PMID:23294526

  9. Improving Health Outcomes of Children through Effective Parenting: Model and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Martha; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Ferguson, Aneeqah; Satcher, David

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the design, development, testing and presentation of preliminary evidence of a translational, culturally relevant parenting education model, titled Smart and Secured Children (SSC). SSC, a quality parenting curriculum, prepares disparate African American parents as leaders for transforming their parenting behaviors and leading their peers and community in changing existing parenting culture. The article recommends expanded utility of identified promising processes, approaches and practices to engage African American parents to lead in addressing health inequity conditions in their families and communities. It adds to the growing scientific literature on the association between parent–child relationship quality and a wide variety of children physical, emotional and social outcomes. SSC applied principles of developmental theories; community based participatory research (CBPR), and iterative Delphi method between the community stakeholders, parents and researchers. The delivery approach of SSC was revamped from professional-led to parent-led content presentation and delivery methods using a conversational learning approach, referred to as ‘conversepedia’. Parents’ leadership development training and delivery of this curriculum in social supportive groups improved their mental wellbeing, parenting capacity and leadership skills. Parents do matter and can choose positive influence in their lives and are capable of reversing negative peer influence. PMID:24366048

  10. Improving health outcomes of children through effective parenting: model and methods.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Martha; Sarpong, Daniel F; Ferguson, Aneeqah; Satcher, David

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the design, development, testing and presentation of preliminary evidence of a translational, culturally relevant parenting education model, titled Smart and Secured Children (SSC). SSC, a quality parenting curriculum, prepares disparate African American parents as leaders for transforming their parenting behaviors and leading their peers and community in changing existing parenting culture. The article recommends expanded utility of identified promising processes, approaches and practices to engage African American parents to lead in addressing health inequity conditions in their families and communities. It adds to the growing scientific literature on the association between parent-child relationship quality and a wide variety of children physical, emotional and social outcomes. SSC applied principles of developmental theories; community based participatory research (CBPR), and iterative Delphi method between the community stakeholders, parents and researchers. The delivery approach of SSC was revamped from professional-led to parent-led content presentation and delivery methods using a conversational learning approach, referred to as 'conversepedia'. Parents' leadership development training and delivery of this curriculum in social supportive groups improved their mental wellbeing, parenting capacity and leadership skills. Parents do matter and can choose positive influence in their lives and are capable of reversing negative peer influence. PMID:24366048

  11. Delivering On Accountable Care: Lessons From A Behavioral Health Program To Improve Access And Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Robin M A; Jeffrey, Jessica; Grossman, Mark; Strouse, Thomas; Gitlin, Michael; Skootsky, Samuel A

    2016-08-01

    Patients with behavioral health disorders often have worse health outcomes and have higher health care utilization than patients with medical diseases alone. As such, people with behavioral health conditions are important populations for accountable care organizations (ACOs) seeking to improve the efficiency of their delivery systems. However, ACOs have historically faced numerous barriers in implementing behavioral health population-based programs, including acquiring reimbursement, recruiting providers, and integrating new services. We developed an evidence-based, all-payer collaborative care program called Behavioral Health Associates (BHA), operated as part of UCLA Health, an integrated academic medical center. Building BHA required several innovations, which included using our enterprise electronic medical record for behavioral health referrals and documentation; registering BHA providers with insurance plans' mental health carve-out products; and embedding BHA providers in primary care practices throughout the UCLA Health system. Since 2012 BHA has more than tripled the number of patients receiving behavioral health services through UCLA Health. After receiving BHA treatment, patients had a 13 percent reduction in emergency department use. Our efforts can serve as a model for other ACOs seeking to integrate behavioral health care into routine practice. PMID:27503975

  12. Improving long term outcomes in urea cycle disorders-report from the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, Susan E; Gropman, Andrea L; Batshaw, Mark L

    2016-07-01

    The Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium (UCDC) has conducted, beginning in 2006, a longitudinal study (LS) of eight enzyme deficiencies/transporter defects associated with the urea cycle. These include N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency (NAGSD); Carbamyl phosphate synthetase 1 deficiency (CPS1D); Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD); Argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency (ASSD) (Citrullinemia); Argininosuccinate lyase deficiency (ASLD) (Argininosuccinic aciduria); Arginase deficiency (ARGD, Argininemia); Hyperornithinemia, hyperammonemia, homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome (or mitochondrial ornithine transporter 1 deficiency [ORNT1D]); and Citrullinemia type II (mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier deficiency [CITRIN]). There were 678 UCD patients enrolled in 14 sites in the U.S., Canada, and Europe at the writing of this paper. This review summarizes findings of the consortium related to outcome, focusing primarily on neuroimaging findings and neurocognitive function. Neuroimaging studies in late onset OTCD offered evidence that brain injury caused by biochemical dysregulation may impact functional neuroanatomy serving working memory processes, an important component of executive function and regulation. Additionally, there were alteration in white mater microstructure and functional connectivity at rest. Intellectual deficits in OTCD and other urea cycle disorders (UCD) vary. However, when neuropsychological deficits occur, they tend to be more prominent in motor/performance areas on both intelligence tests and other measures. In some disorders, adults performed significantly less well than younger patients. Further longitudinal follow-up will reveal whether this is due to declines throughout life or to improvements in diagnostics (especially newborn screening) and treatments in the younger generation of patients. PMID:27215558

  13. Daily Automated Telephone Assessment and Intervention Improved 1-Month Outcome in Paroled Offenders.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Claes; Vasiljevic, Zoran; Höglund, Peter; Ojehagen, Agneta; Berglund, Mats

    2014-03-13

    This randomized trial evaluates whether automated telephony could be used to perform daily assessments in paroled offenders (N = 108) during their first 30 days after leaving prison. All subjects were called daily and answered assessment questions. Based on the content of their daily assessments, subjects in the intervention group received immediate feedback and a recommendation by automated telephony, and their probation officers also received a daily report by email. The outcome variables were analyzed using linear mixed models. The intervention group showed greater improvement than the control group in the summary scores (M = 9.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.5, 18.7], p = .038), in mental symptoms (M = 4.6, CI = [0.2, 9.0], p = .042), in alcohol drinking (M = 0.8, CI = [0.1, 1.4], p = .031), in drug use (M = 1.0, CI = [0.5, 1.6], p = .000), and in most stressful daily event (M = 1.9, CI = [1.1, 2.7], p = .000). In conclusion, automated telephony may be used to follow up and to give interventions, resulting in reduced stress and drug use, in paroled offenders. PMID:24626145

  14. Can decision biases improve insurance outcomes? An experiment on status quo bias in health insurance choice.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure. PMID:23783222

  15. Use of an electronic patient-reported outcome measurement system to improve distress management in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sophia K.; Rowe, Krista; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Management of patient distress is a critical task in cancer nursing and cancer practice. Here we describe two examples of how an electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) measurement system implemented into routine oncology care can practically aid clinical and research tasks related to distress management. Methods Tablet personal computers were used to routinely complete a standardized ePRO review of systems surveys at point of care during every encounter in the Duke Oncology outpatient clinics. Two cases of use implementation are explored: (1) triaging distressed patients for optimal care, and (2) psychosocial program evaluation research. Results Between 2009 and 2011, the ePRO system was used to collect information during 17,338 Duke Oncology patient encounters. The system was used to monitor patients for psychosocial distress employing an electronic clinical decision support algorithm, with 1,952 (11.3%) referrals generated for supportive services. The system was utilized to examine the efficacy of a psychosocial care intervention documenting statistically significant improvements in distress, despair, fatigue, and quality of life (QOL) in 50 breast cancer patients. Significance of results ePRO solutions can guide best practice management of cancer patient distress. Nurses play a key role in implementation and utilization. PMID:24128592

  16. Designing Paclitaxel Drug Delivery Systems Aimed at Improved Patient Outcomes: Current Status and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Surapaneni, Madhu S.; Das, Sudip K.; Das, Nandita G.

    2012-01-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the most widely used and effective antineoplastic agents derived from natural sources. It has a wide spectrum of antitumor activity, particularly against ovarian cancer, breast cancer, nonsmall cell lung cancer, head and neck tumors, Kaposi's sarcoma, and urologic malignancies. It is a highly lipophilic compound with a log P value of 3.96 and very poor aqueous solubility of less than 0.01 mg/mL. In addition, the compound lacks functional groups that are ionizable which could potentially lead to an increase in its solubility with the alteration in pH. Therefore, the delivery of paclitaxel is associated with substantial challenges. Until the introduction of Abraxane, only commercial formulation was solution of paclitaxel in cremophor, which caused severe side effects. However, in recent years, a number of approaches have been reported to solubilize paclitaxel using cosolvents and inclusion complexes. In addition, innovative approaches have been reported for passive targeting of tumors using nanoparticles, nanosuspensions, liposomes, emulsions, micelles, implants, pastes and gels. All approaches for delivery of improved therapeutic outcome have been discussed in this paper. PMID:22934190

  17. A Multidisciplinary Approach with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Improve Outcome in Snake Bite Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Korambayil, Pradeoth Mukundan; Ambookan, Prashanth Varkey; Abraham, Siju Varghese; Ambalakat, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Snakebite injuries are common in tropical India among those who are involved in outdoor activities. These injuries results in cellulitis, gangrene at the bite area, bleeding manifestations, compartment syndrome, regional lymphadenopathy, septicemia, hypotension, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to share our experience of multidisciplinary approach in the management of snakebite injuries of the extremities with various treatment modalities including hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, surgical debridement, and soft tissue reconstruction to provide an effective treatment for snake bite injuries. Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Plastic Surgery, during the period October 2012–December 2014, wherein all the patients who were admitted with snakebite injuries were enrolled and the patients treated in plastic surgery department were included into the study. Out of total 766 patients, there were 323 patients treated with anti snake venom (ASV) and 29 died among the treated patients; 205 patients belonged to pediatric age group. Results: Out of 112 patients referred to Department of Plastic Surgery, 50 cases presented with cellulitis, 24 patients with compartment syndrome, and 38 patients were referred for the management of soft tissue cover over the extremities. Among 112 patients, 77 involved the lower extremity and 35 the upper extremity. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary approach including hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy improves outcome in the management of snakebite injuries of the extremities. PMID:26862269

  18. Multidisciplinary strategies to improve treatment outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Massimo; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Lencioni, Riccardo; Galle, Peter R; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Bañares, Rafael; Seehofer, Daniel; Neuhaus, Peter; Johnson, Philip

    2013-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease with a poor prognosis. Incidence and mortality rates are increasing in many geographical regions, indicating a need for better management strategies. Among several risk factors for HCC, the most common are cirrhosis because of chronic hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus infection and alcohol consumption, obesity, and diabetes. In some patients, combined risk factors present additional challenges to the prevention and treatment of HCC. Screening and surveillance of high-risk populations varies widely by geographic regions, and access to optimal surveillance is critical for early diagnosis. The treatment choice for HCC depends on the cancer stage, patient performance status, and liver function and requires a multidisciplinary approach and close cooperation among specialists for the best patient outcomes. Despite advances in surgical treatments and locoregional therapies, recurrence and liver failure remain significant challenges. The pathogenesis of HCC is a multistep and complex process, wherein angiogenesis plays an important role. The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is the only approved targeted agent for advanced HCC, although promising results have been obtained with other targeted agents and combinations, and the results of ongoing trials are eagerly awaited. Clinical trials with rigorous study designs, including molecular classification and validation of new molecular biomarkers, are required to improve the personalized treatment of HCC. This article provides an overview of HCC and was developed through a review of relevant literature, clinical trial data, and updated clinical guidelines. PMID:23628963

  19. Technical Highlight: NREL Improves Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Polly, B.

    2012-01-09

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market.

  20. Can primary care team-based transition to insulin improve outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes: the stepping up to insulin cluster randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) brings significant human and healthcare costs. Its progressive nature means achieving normoglycaemia is increasingly difficult, yet critical to avoiding long term vascular complications. Nearly one-half of people with T2D have glycaemic levels out of target. Insulin is effective in achieving glycaemic targets, yet initiation of insulin is often delayed, particularly in primary care. Given limited access to specialist resources and the size of the diabetes epidemic, primary care is where insulin initiation must become part of routine practice. This would also support integrated holistic care for people with diabetes. Our Stepping Up Program is based on a general practitioner (GP) and practice nurse (PN) model of care supported appropriately by endocrinologists and credentialed diabetes educator-registered nurses. Pilot work suggests the model facilitates integration of the technical work of insulin initiation within ongoing generalist care. Methods This protocol is for a cluster randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of the Stepping Up Program to enhance the role of the GP-PN team in initiating insulin and improving glycaemic outcomes for people with T2D. 224 patients between the ages of 18 and 80 years with T2D, on two or more oral hypoglycaemic agents and with an HbA1c ≥7.5% in the last six months will be recruited from 74 general practices. The unit of randomization is the practice. Primary outcome is change in glycated haemoglobin HbA1c (measured as a continuous variable). We hypothesize that the intervention arm will achieve an absolute HbA1c mean difference of 0.5% lower than control group at 12 months follow up. Secondary outcomes include the number of participants who successfully transfer to insulin and the proportion who achieve HbA1c measurement of <7.0%. We will also collect data on patient psychosocial outcomes and healthcare utilization and costs. Discussion The study is a pragmatic translational

  1. Traditional birth attendant training for improving health behaviours and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Lynn M; Sipe, Theresa Ann; Barry, Danika

    2014-01-01

    rate was lower but not significant (adjusted OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.22). Additionally trained TBAs versus trained TBAs: three large cluster-randomised trials compared TBAs who received additional training in initial steps of resuscitation, including bag-valve-mask ventilation, with TBAs who had received basic training in safe, clean delivery and immediate newborn care. Basic training included mouth-to-mouth resuscitation (two studies) or bag-valve-mask resuscitation (one study). There was no significant difference in the perinatal death rate between the intervention and control clusters (one study, adjusted OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.02) and no significant difference in late neonatal death rate between intervention and control clusters (one study, adjusted risk ratio (RR) 0.47, 95% CI 0.20 to 1.11). The neonatal death rate, however, was 45% lower in intervention compared with the control clusters (one study, 22.8% versus 40.2%, adjusted RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.92). We conducted a meta-analysis on two outcomes: stillbirths and early neonatal death. There was no significant difference between the additionally trained TBAs versus trained TBAs for stillbirths (two studies, mean weighted adjusted RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.28) or early neonatal death rate (three studies, mean weighted adjusted RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.01). Authors’ conclusions The results are promising for some outcomes (perinatal death, stillbirth and neonatal death). However, most outcomes are reported in only one study. A lack of contrast in training in the intervention and control clusters may have contributed to the null result for stillbirths and an insufficient number of studies may have contributed to the failure to achieve significance for early neonatal deaths. Despite the additional studies included in this updated systematic review, there remains insufficient evidence to establish the potential of TBA training to improve peri-neonatal mortality. PMID:22895949

  2. Improvement in patient outcomes following endovascular treatment of WFNS grade V subarachnoid haemorrhage from 2000 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Sadato, Akiyo; Oheda, Motoki; Hayakawa, Motoharu; Nakae, Shunsuke; Ohmi, Tatsuo; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nakahara, Ichiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    Patient outcomes following grade V subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been dismal, although they may have improved following recent technological advances in endovascular treatment (EVT). A single-centre, retrospective study was conducted to evaluate whether outcomes have improved from 2000 to 2014 for patients with World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade V SAH. Coiling has been the preferred first-line treatment for grade V SAH patients in our institution since 2000. Patients who underwent EVT (n=115) were grouped on the basis of their hospital admission year: 2000-2004 (n=44), 2005-2009 (n=37) and 2010-2014 (n=34). Patient demographics, outcomes and in-hospital mortality rates were compared between the groups. Patient outcomes at discharge were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), with GOS scores of 4-5 defined as favourable outcomes. There were no significant intergroup differences in patient demographics. In addition, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of favourable outcomes (14% in 2000-2004, 16% in 2005-2009 and 26% in 2010-2014). Mortality rates were 52% in 2000-2004, 43% in 2005-2009 and 24% in 2010-2014, with a significantly lower mortality rate in 2010-2014 than in 2000-2004 (p=0.01). Both perioperative rebleeding and delayed cerebral ischaemia decreased over time; however, multivariate regression analysis showed that the former contributed more to the decrease in mortality. Age was the only variable associated with favourable outcomes. The results of this study indicate that EVT is an appropriate therapeutic option for grade V SAH patients. However, multi-centre, prospective trials are required to provide evidence-based verification of the efficacy of EVT. PMID:26778358

  3. Supplemental Cardioplegia Immediately before Graft Implantation may Improve Early Post-Transplantation Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Tevaearai Stahel, Hendrik T.; Unger, Darja; Schmidli, Juerg; Gahl, Brigitta; Englberger, Lars; Kadner, Alexander; Eberle, Balthasar; Mohacsi, Paul; Carrel, Thierry P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preservation of cardiac grafts for transplantation is not standardized and most centers use a single administration of crystalloid solution at the time of harvesting. We investigated possible benefits of an additional dose of cardioplegia dispensed immediately before implantation. Methods: Consecutive adult cardiac transplantations (2005–2012) were reviewed. Hearts were harvested following a standard protocol (Celsior 2L, 4–8°C). In 2008, 100 ml crystalloid cardioplegic solution was added and administered immediately before implantation. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate risk factors for post-operative graft failure and mid-term outcome. Results: A total of 81 patients, 44 standard (“Cardio−”) vs. 37 with additional cardioplegia (“Cardio+”) were analyzed. Recipients and donors were comparable in both groups. Cardio+ patients demonstrated a reduced need for defibrillation (24 vs. 48%, p = 0.03), post-operative ratio of CK-MB/CK (10.1 ± 3.9 vs. 13.3 ± 4.2%, p = 0.001), intubation time (2.0 ± 1.6 vs. 7.2 ± 11.5 days, p = 0.05), and ICU stay (3.9 ± 2.1 vs. 8.5 ± 7.8 days, p = 0.001). Actuarial survival was reduced when graft ischemic time was >180 min in Cardio− but not in Cardio+ patients (p = 0.033). Organ ischemic time >180 min (OR: 5.48, CI: 1.08–27.75), donor female gender (OR: 5.84, CI: 1.13–33.01), and recipient/donor age >60 (OR: 6.33, CI: 0.86–46.75), but not the additional cardioplegia or the observation period appeared independent predictors of post-operative acute graft failure. Conclusion: An additional dose of cardioplegia administered immediately before implantation may be a simple way to improve early and late outcome of cardiac transplantation, especially in situations of prolonged graft ischemia. A large, ideally multicentric, randomized study is desirable to verify this preliminary observation. PMID:25593970

  4. Aggressive Locoregional Treatment Improves the Outcome of Liver Metastases from Grade 3 Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Du, Shunda; Ni, Jianjiao; Weng, Linqian; Ma, Fei; Li, Shaohua; Wang, Wenze; Sang, Xinting; Lu, Xin; Zhong, Shouxian; Mao, Yilei

    2015-08-01

    metastases, aggressive LTs may improve clinical outcomes. Larger studies with prospective design are warranted to consolidate these results, and to discover the most appropriate seletion criteria for patients to undergo different kinds of aggressive LTs and to find the most effective combinations, with or without ST. PMID:26313798

  5. Improved outcome of pediatric patients with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in the AML-BFM 04 trial.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Jana; Zimmermann, Martin; Rasche, Mareike; von Neuhoff, Christine; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of children with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) using intensified treatment protocols, clear prognostic indicators, and treatment recommendations for this acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroup are yet to be defined. Here, we report the outcome of 97 pediatric patients with de novo AMKL (excluding Down syndrome [DS]) enrolled in the prospective multicenter studies AML-BFM 98 and AML-BFM 04 (1998-2014). AMKL occurred in 7.4 % of pediatric AML cases, at younger age (median 1.44 years) and with lower white blood cell count (mean 16.5 × 10(9)/L) as compared to other AML subgroups. With 60 ± 5 %, children with AMKL had a lower 5-year overall survival (5-year OS; vs. 68 ± 1 %, P log rank = 0.038). Yet, we achieved an improved 5-year OS in AML-BFM 04 compared to AML-BFM 98 (70 ± 6 % vs. 45 ± 8 %, P log rank = 0.041). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission did not provide a significant survival benefit (5-year OS 70 ± 11 % vs. 63 ± 6 %; P Mantel-Byar = 0.85). Cytogenetic data were available for n = 78 patients. AMKL patients with gain of chromosome 21 had a superior 5-year OS (80 ± 9 %, P log rank = 0.034), whereas translocation t(1;22)(p13;q13) was associated with an inferior 5-year event-free survival (38 ± 17 %, P log rank = 0.04). However, multivariate analysis showed that treatment response (bone marrow morphology on day 15 and 28) was the only independent prognostic marker (RR = 4.39; 95 % CI, 1.97-9.78). Interestingly, GATA1-mutations were detected in six patients (11 %) without previously known trisomy 21. Thus, AMKL (excluding DS) remains an AML subgroup with inferior outcome. Nevertheless, with intensive therapy regimens, a steep increase in the survival rates was achieved. PMID:25913479

  6. Can the ubiquitous power of mobile phones be used to improve health outcomes in developing countries?

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Warren A

    2006-01-01

    Background The ongoing policy debate about the value of communications technology in promoting development objectives is diverse. Some view computer/web/phone communications technology as insufficient to solve development problems while others view communications technology as assisting all sections of the population. This paper looks at evidence to support or refute the idea that fixed and mobile telephones is, or could be, an effective healthcare intervention in developing countries. Methods A Web-based and library database search was undertaken including the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, (nursing & allied health), Evidence Based Medicine (EBM), POPLINE, BIOSIS, and Web of Science, AIDSearch (MEDLINE AIDS/HIV Subset, AIDSTRIALS & AIDSDRUGS) databases. Results Evidence can be found to both support and refute the proposition that fixed and mobile telephones is, or could be, an effective healthcare intervention in developing countries. It is difficult to generalize because of the different outcome measurements and the small number of controlled studies. There is almost no literature on using mobile telephones as a healthcare intervention for HIV, TB, malaria, and chronic conditions in developing countries. Clinical outcomes are rarely measured. Convincing evidence regarding the overall cost-effectiveness of mobile phone " telemedicine" is still limited and good-quality studies are rare. Evidence of the cost effectiveness of such interventions to improve adherence to medicines is also quite weak. Conclusion The developed world model of personal ownership of a phone may not be appropriate to the developing world in which shared mobile telephone use is important. Sharing may be a serious drawback to use of mobile telephones as a healthcare intervention in terms of stigma and privacy, but its magnitude is unknown. One advantage, however, of telephones with respect to adherence to medicine in chronic care models is its ability to create a multi-way interaction

  7. Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Frequency Modulation Devices in Improving Academic Outcomes in Children With Auditory Processing Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Stacey; Miller Kuhaneck, Heather; Pfeiffer, Beth

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review describes the published evidence related to the effectiveness of frequency modulation (FM) devices in improving academic outcomes in children with auditory processing difficulties. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses standards were used to identify articles published between January 2003 and March 2014. The Cochrane Population, Intervention, Control, Outcome, Study Design approach and the American Occupational Therapy Association process forms were used to guide the article selection and evaluation process. Of the 83 articles screened, 7 matched the systematic review inclusion criteria. Findings were consistently positive, although limitations were identified. Results of this review indicate moderate support for the use of FM devices to improve children's ability to listen and attend in the classroom and mixed evidence to improve specific academic performance areas. FM technology should be considered for school-age children with auditory processing impairments who are receiving occupational therapy services to improve functioning in the school setting. PMID:26709423

  8. Ready for Fall? Near-Term Effects of Voluntary Summer Learning Programs on Low-Income Students' Learning Opportunities and Outcomes. Technical Appendixes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Pane, John F.; Augustine, Catherine H.; Schwartz, Heather L.; Martorell, Paco; Zakaras, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Prior research has determined that low-income students lose more ground over the summer than their higher-income peers. Prior research has also shown that some summer learning programs can stem this loss, but we do not know whether large, district-run, voluntary programs can improve students' outcomes. To fill this gap, The Wallace Foundation…

  9. Xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces secondary injury following trauma in an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Luh, Clara; Gruss, Marco; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Hirnet, Tobias; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Franks, Nicholas P; Thal, Serge C; Dickinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the neuroprotective efficacy of the inert gas xenon following traumatic brain injury, and to determine whether application of xenon has a clinically relevant therapeutic time window. Design Controlled animal study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Male C57BL/6N mice (n=196) Interventions 75% xenon, 50% xenon or 30% xenon, with 25% oxygen (balance nitrogen) treatment following mechanical brain lesion by controlled cortical impact. Measurements & Main Results Outcome following trauma was measured using: 1) functional neurological outcome score, 2) histological measurement of contusion volume, 3) analysis of locomotor function and gait. Our study shows that xenon-treatment improves outcome following traumatic brain injury. Neurological outcome scores were significantly (p<0.05) better in xenon-treated groups in the early phase (24 hours) and up to 4 days after injury. Contusion volume was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in the xenon-treated groups. Xenon treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced contusion volume when xenon was given 15 minutes after injury or when treatment was delayed 1 hour or 3 hours after injury. Neurological outcome was significantly (p<0.05) improved when xenon treatment was given 15 minutes or 1 hour after injury. Improvements in locomotor function (p<0.05) were observed in the xenon-treated group, 1 month after trauma. Conclusions These results show for the first time that xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces contusion volume following traumatic brain injury in mice. In this model, xenon application has a therapeutic time window of up to at least 3 hours. These findings support the idea that xenon may be of benefit as a neuroprotective treatment in brain trauma patients. PMID:25188549

  10. Community College Teacher Development: Focusing upon New Teachers to Improve Student Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Robert Gerald

    This dissertation examines the following questions: (1) What are the characteristics and teaching practices of faculty that lead to higher student outcomes? (2) How do community colleges effectively support the efforts of faculty, who are successful in producing high student outcomes? (3) How can this knowledge be incorporated into an effective…

  11. Achievement for All: Improving Psychosocial Outcomes for Students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Barlow, Alexandra; Wigelsworth, Michael; Squires, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are at a greatly increased risk of experiencing poor psychosocial outcomes. Developing effective interventions that address the cause of these outcomes has therefore become a major policy priority in recent years. We report on a national evaluation of the Achievement for All (AfA)…

  12. The challenges in improving outcome of cataract surgery in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Lindfield, Robert; Vishwanath, Kalluru; Ngounou, Faustin; Khanna, Rohit C

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness globally and surgery is the only known measure to deal with it effectively. Providing high quality cataract surgical services is critical if patients with cataract are to have their sight restored. A key focus of surgery is the outcome of the procedure. In cataract surgery this is measured predominantly, using visual acuity. Population- and hospital-based studies have revealed that the visual outcome of cataract surgery in many low and middle income settings is frequently sub-optimal, often failing to reach the recommended standards set by the World Health Organization (WHO). Another way of measuring outcome of cataract surgery is to ask patients for their views on whether surgery has changed the functioning of their eyes and their quality of life. There are different tools available to capture patient views and now, these patient-reported outcomes are becoming more widely used. This paper discusses the visual outcome of cataract surgery and frames the outcome of surgery within the context of the surgical service, suggesting that the process and outcome of care cannot be separated. It also discusses the components of patient-reported outcome tools and describes some available tools in more detail. Finally, it describes a hierarchy of challenges that need to be addressed before a high quality cataract surgical service can be achieved. PMID:22944761

  13. The Differential Outcomes Effect: A Useful Tool to Improve Discriminative Learning in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estévez, Angeles F.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most robust and reliable learning phenomena documented in the animal learning literature is the enhancement of discriminative performance by differential outcomes. To date, very few studies have focused on this effect in humans. The results obtained in these studies support the potential use of the differential outcomes procedure in…

  14. Application of Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Model to Improve Diabetes Health Outcomes: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Faison, Yulanda; Burns, Djuana; Weed, Diane

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Model as a guide to improve diabetes health outcomes. The success of the holistic and patient-centered diabetes pilot program indicates that nontraditional approaches to managing diabetes are effective. PMID:27078807

  15. Improving Educational Outcomes for Latinos: A Study of the Interactive Policy Effects of Representative Bureaucracy and Personnel Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Tabitha S. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to determine whether 2 common management strategies, representative bureaucracy and personnel stability, can be used in combination with each other in order to improve educational policy outcomes for Latinos. Using data from Texas school districts from 1994 to 2010 and a cross-sectional longitudinal research design, I find that…

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Curriculum to Improve Educational and Career Outcomes for High School Girls with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doren, Bonnie; Lombardi, Allison; Lindstrom, Lauren; Gau, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Despite the national focus on improving transition services and post-school outcomes, many young women with disabilities still face significant barriers in obtaining meaningful employment and pursuing postsecondary education or training. Although recent reports indicate that the gender gap in employment rates may be diminishing, in this same…

  17. Improving Outcomes for Teen Parents and Their Young Children by Strengthening School-Based Programs. Challenges, Solutions, and Policy Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, S. A.; Wolf, Wendy C.; Batten, Susan T.

    This policy paper addresses how to strengthen school-based efforts for adolescent parents and their children so that they can be more effective in meeting the needs and improving the outcomes of these young families. Based on the experience and lessons of a 6-year effort, the Initiative to Strengthen School-Based Programs for Adolescent Parents…

  18. The Leadership of the Improvement of Teaching and Learning: Lessons from Initiatives with Positive Outcomes for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Viviane M. J.; Timperley, Helen S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how leaders foster school renewal by facilitating and participating in the types of teacher professional learning and development that improve student academic and non-academic outcomes. The methodology involved a backward mapping strategy that takes as its starting point, not theories of leadership, but…

  19. How to Improve Schooling Outcomes in Low-Income Countries? the Challenges and Hopes of Cognitive Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abadzi, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The international Education for All initiative to bring about universal primary education has resulted in large enrollment increases in lower income countries but with limited outcomes. Due to scarcity in material and human resources, all but the better off often fail to learn basic skills. To improve performance within the very limited capacities…

  20. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 July--30 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, H.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rosynek, M.P.

    1988-12-31

    The objective of this contract is to develop a consistent technical data base on the use of iron-based catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis reactions. This data base will be developed to allow the unambiguous comparison of the performance of these catalysts with each other and with state-of-the-art iron catalyst compositions. Particular attention will be devoted to generating reproducible kinetic and selectivity data and to developing reproducible improved catalyst compositions.