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Sample records for improving graph partitions

  1. Graph Partitioning and Sequencing Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-09-19

    Graph partitioning is a fundemental problem in many scientific contexts. CHACO2.0 is a software package designed to partition and sequence graphs. CHACO2.0 allows for recursive application of several methods for finding small edge separators in weighted graphs. These methods include inertial, spectral, Kernighan Lin and multilevel methods in addition to several simpler strategies. Each of these approaches can be used to partition the graph into two, four, or eight pieces at each level of recursion.more » In addition, the Kernighan Lin method can be used to improve partitions generated by any of the other algorithms. CHACO2.0 can also be used to address various graph sequencing problems, with applications to scientific computing, database design, gene sequencing and other problems.« less

  2. Multi-A Graph Patrolling and Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elor, Y.; Bruckstein, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a novel multi agent patrolling algorithm inspired by the behavior of gas filled balloons. Very low capability ant-like agents are considered with the task of patrolling an unknown area modeled as a graph. While executing the proposed algorithm, the agents dynamically partition the graph between them using simple local interactions, every agent assuming the responsibility for patrolling his subgraph. Balanced graph partition is an emergent behavior due to the local interactions between the agents in the swarm. Extensive simulations on various graphs (environments) showed that the average time to reach a balanced partition is linear with the graph size. The simulations yielded a convincing argument for conjecturing that if the graph being patrolled contains a balanced partition, the agents will find it. However, we could not prove this. Nevertheless, we have proved that if a balanced partition is reached, the maximum time lag between two successive visits to any vertex using the proposed strategy is at most twice the optimal so the patrol quality is at least half the optimal. In case of weighted graphs the patrol quality is at least (1)/(2){lmin}/{lmax} of the optimal where lmax (lmin) is the longest (shortest) edge in the graph.

  3. Bipartite graph partitioning and data clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Hongyuan; He, Xiaofeng; Ding, Chris; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst D.

    2001-05-07

    Many data types arising from data mining applications can be modeled as bipartite graphs, examples include terms and documents in a text corpus, customers and purchasing items in market basket analysis and reviewers and movies in a movie recommender system. In this paper, the authors propose a new data clustering method based on partitioning the underlying biopartite graph. The partition is constructed by minimizing a normalized sum of edge weights between unmatched pairs of vertices of the bipartite graph. They show that an approximate solution to the minimization problem can be obtained by computing a partial singular value decomposition (SVD) of the associated edge weight matrix of the bipartite graph. They point out the connection of their clustering algorithm to correspondence analysis used in multivariate analysis. They also briefly discuss the issue of assigning data objects to multiple clusters. In the experimental results, they apply their clustering algorithm to the problem of document clustering to illustrate its effectiveness and efficiency.

  4. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  5. Partitioning sparse matrices with eigenvectors of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pothen, Alex; Simon, Horst D.; Liou, Kang-Pu

    1990-01-01

    The problem of computing a small vertex separator in a graph arises in the context of computing a good ordering for the parallel factorization of sparse, symmetric matrices. An algebraic approach for computing vertex separators is considered in this paper. It is shown that lower bounds on separator sizes can be obtained in terms of the eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix associated with a graph. The Laplacian eigenvectors of grid graphs can be computed from Kronecker products involving the eigenvectors of path graphs, and these eigenvectors can be used to compute good separators in grid graphs. A heuristic algorithm is designed to compute a vertex separator in a general graph by first computing an edge separator in the graph from an eigenvector of the Laplacian matrix, and then using a maximum matching in a subgraph to compute the vertex separator. Results on the quality of the separators computed by the spectral algorithm are presented, and these are compared with separators obtained from other algorithms for computing separators. Finally, the time required to compute the Laplacian eigenvector is reported, and the accuracy with which the eigenvector must be computed to obtain good separators is considered. The spectral algorithm has the advantage that it can be implemented on a medium-size multiprocessor in a straightforward manner.

  6. Graph Partitioning for Parallel Applications in Heterogeneous Grid Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisws, Rupak; Kumar, Shailendra; Das, Sajal K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The problem of partitioning irregular graphs and meshes for parallel computations on homogeneous systems has been extensively studied. However, these partitioning schemes fail when the target system architecture exhibits heterogeneity in resource characteristics. With the emergence of technologies such as the Grid, it is imperative to study the partitioning problem taking into consideration the differing capabilities of such distributed heterogeneous systems. In our model, the heterogeneous system consists of processors with varying processing power and an underlying non-uniform communication network. We present in this paper a novel multilevel partitioning scheme for irregular graphs and meshes, that takes into account issues pertinent to Grid computing environments. Our partitioning algorithm, called MiniMax, generates and maps partitions onto a heterogeneous system with the objective of minimizing the maximum execution time of the parallel distributed application. For experimental performance study, we have considered both a realistic mesh problem from NASA as well as synthetic workloads. Simulation results demonstrate that MiniMax generates high quality partitions for various classes of applications targeted for parallel execution in a distributed heterogeneous environment.

  7. Exact Potts model partition functions on ladder graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrock, Robert

    2000-08-01

    We present exact calculations of the partition function Z of the q-state Potts model and its generalization to real q, for arbitrary temperature on n-vertex ladder graphs, i.e., strips of the square lattice with width Ly=2 and arbitrary length Lx, with free, cyclic, and Möbius longitudinal boundary conditions. These partition functions are equivalent to Tutte/Whitney polynomials for these graphs. The free energy is calculated exactly for the infinite-length limit of these ladder graphs and the thermodynamics is discussed. By comparison with strip graphs of other widths, we analyze how the singularities at the zero-temperature critical point of the ferromagnet on infinite-length, finite-width strips depend on the width. We point out and study the following noncommutativity at certain special values q s: lim n→∞ limq→q s Z 1/n≠ limq→q s limn→∞ Z 1/n. It is shown that the Potts antiferromagnet on both the infinite-length line and ladder graphs with cyclic or Möbius boundary conditions exhibits a phase transition at finite temperature if 0< q<2, but with unphysical properties, including negative specific heat and non-existence, in the low-temperature phase, of an n→∞ limit for thermodynamic functions that is independent of boundary conditions. Considering the full generalization to arbitrary complex q and temperature, we determine the singular locus B in the corresponding C2 space, arising as the accumulation set of partition function zeros as n→∞. In particular, we study the connection with the T=0 limit of the Potts antiferromagnet where B reduces to the accumulation set of chromatic zeros. Certain properties of the complex-temperature phase diagrams are shown to exhibit close connections with those of the model on the square lattice, showing that exact solutions on infinite-length strips provide a way of gaining insight into these complex-temperature phase diagrams.

  8. A Weakly Robust PTAS for Minimum Clique Partition in Unit Disk Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirwani, Imran A.; Salavatipour, Mohammad R.

    We consider the problem of partitioning the set of vertices of a given unit disk graph (UDG) into a minimum number of cliques. The problem is NP-hard and various constant factor approximations are known, with the best known ratio of 3. Our main result is a weakly robust polynomial time approximation scheme (PTAS) for UDGs expressed with edge-lengths and ɛ> 0 that either (i) computes a clique partition, or (ii) produces a certificate proving that the graph is not a UDG; if the graph is a UDG, then our partition is guaranteed to be within (1 + ɛ) ratio of the optimum; however, if the graph is not a UDG, it either computes a clique partition, or detects that the graph is not a UDG. Noting that recognition of UDG's is NP-hard even with edge lengths, this is a significant weakening of the input model.

  9. Semiclassical limits of quantum partition functions on infinite graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Güneysu, Batu

    2015-02-15

    We prove that if H denotes the operator corresponding to the canonical Dirichlet form on a possibly locally infinite weighted graph (X, b, m), and if v : X → ℝ is such that H + v/ħ is well-defined as a form sum for all ħ > 0, then the quantum partition function tr(e{sup −βħ(H+v/ħ)}) converges to ∑{sub x∈X}e{sup −βv(x)} as ħ → 0 +, for all β > 0, regardless of the fact whether e{sup −βv} is a priori summable or not. This fact can be interpreted as a semiclassical limit, and it allows geometric Weyl-type convergence results. We also prove natural generalizations of this semiclassical limit to a large class of covariant Schrödinger operators that act on sections in Hermitian vector bundle over (X, m, b), a result that particularly applies to magnetic Schrödinger operators that are defined on (X, m, b)

  10. A Multi-Teacher Learning Automata Computing Model for Graph Partitioning Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikebo, Shigeya; Qian, Fei; Hirata, Hironori

    Graph partitioning is an important problem that has extensive applications in many areas, including VLSI design, scientific computing, data mining, geographical information systems and job scheduling. The graph partitioning problem (GPP) is NP-complete. There are several heuristic algorithms developed finding a reasonably good resolution. The most famous partitioning methods are simulated annealing (SA) and mean field algorithm (MFA) known to produce good partition for a wide class of problems, and they are used quite extensively. However these methods are very expensive in time and very sensitive in parameters tuning methods. In this paper, a new parameter-free algorithm for GPP has been proposed. The algorithm has been constructed using the S-model learning automata with multi-teacher random environments. As shown in our experiments, the proposed algorithm has some advantages superior to SA, MFA and ParMeTiS.

  11. Integrating graph partitioning and matching for trajectory analysis in video surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Lu, Yongyi; Pan, Yan; Chen, Xiaowu

    2012-12-01

    In order to track moving objects in long range against occlusion, interruption, and background clutter, this paper proposes a unified approach for global trajectory analysis. Instead of the traditional frame-by-frame tracking, our method recovers target trajectories based on a short sequence of video frames, e.g., 15 frames. We initially calculate a foreground map at each frame obtained from a state-of-the-art background model. An attribute graph is then extracted from the foreground map, where the graph vertices are image primitives represented by the composite features. With this graph representation, we pose trajectory analysis as a joint task of spatial graph partitioning and temporal graph matching. The task can be formulated by maximizing a posteriori under the Bayesian framework, in which we integrate the spatio-temporal contexts and the appearance models. The probabilistic inference is achieved by a data-driven Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Given a period of observed frames, the algorithm simulates an ergodic and aperiodic Markov chain, and it visits a sequence of solution states in the joint space of spatial graph partitioning and temporal graph matching. In the experiments, our method is tested on several challenging videos from the public datasets of visual surveillance, and it outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:22875250

  12. Partitioning a chordal graph into transitive subgraphs for parallel sparse triangular solution

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W.; Pothen, A.; Yuan, Xiaoqing

    1992-12-01

    A recent approach for solving sparse triangular systems of equations on massively parallel computers employs a factorization of the triangular coefficient matrix to obtain a representation of its inverse in product form. The number of general communication steps required by this approach is proportional to the number of factors in the factorization. The triangular matrix can be symmetrically permuted to minimize the number of factors over suitable classes of permutations, and thereby the complexity of the parallel algorithm can be minimized. Algorithms for minimizing the number of factors over several classes of permutations have been considered in earlier work. Let F = L+L{sup T} denote the symmetric filled matrix corresponding to a Cholesky factor L, and let G{sub F} denote the adjacency graph of F. In this paper we consider the problem of minirriizing the number of factors over all permutations which preserve the structure of G{sub F}. The graph model of this problem is to partition the vertices G{sub F} into the fewest transitively closed subgraphs over all perfect elimination orderings while satisfying a certain precedence relationship. The solution to this chordal graph partitioning problem can be described by a greedy scheme which eliminates a largest permissible subgraph at each step. Further, the subgraph eliminated at each step can be characterized in terms of lengths of chordless paths in the current elimination graph. This solution relies on several results concerning transitive perfect elimination orderings introduced in this paper. We describe a partitioning algorithm with {Omicron}({vert_bar}V{vert_bar} + {vert_bar}E{vert_bar}) time and space complexity.

  13. Partitioning a chordal graph into transitive subgraphs for parallel sparse triangular solution

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W. ); Pothen, A. . Dept. of Computer Science); Yuan, Xiaoqing )

    1992-12-01

    A recent approach for solving sparse triangular systems of equations on massively parallel computers employs a factorization of the triangular coefficient matrix to obtain a representation of its inverse in product form. The number of general communication steps required by this approach is proportional to the number of factors in the factorization. The triangular matrix can be symmetrically permuted to minimize the number of factors over suitable classes of permutations, and thereby the complexity of the parallel algorithm can be minimized. Algorithms for minimizing the number of factors over several classes of permutations have been considered in earlier work. Let F = L+L[sup T] denote the symmetric filled matrix corresponding to a Cholesky factor L, and let G[sub F] denote the adjacency graph of F. In this paper we consider the problem of minirriizing the number of factors over all permutations which preserve the structure of G[sub F]. The graph model of this problem is to partition the vertices G[sub F] into the fewest transitively closed subgraphs over all perfect elimination orderings while satisfying a certain precedence relationship. The solution to this chordal graph partitioning problem can be described by a greedy scheme which eliminates a largest permissible subgraph at each step. Further, the subgraph eliminated at each step can be characterized in terms of lengths of chordless paths in the current elimination graph. This solution relies on several results concerning transitive perfect elimination orderings introduced in this paper. We describe a partitioning algorithm with [Omicron]([vert bar]V[vert bar] + [vert bar]E[vert bar]) time and space complexity.

  14. Automated Extraction of Buildings and Roads in a Graph Partitioning Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, A. O.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an original unsupervised framework to identify regions belonging to buildings and roads from monocular very high resolution (VHR) satellite images. The proposed framework consists of three main stages. In the first stage, we extract information only related to building regions using shadow evidence and probabilistic fuzzy landscapes. Firstly, the shadow areas cast by building objects are detected and the directional spatial relationship between buildings and their shadows is modelled with the knowledge of illumination direction. Thereafter, each shadow region is handled separately and initial building regions are identified by iterative graph-cuts designed in a two-label partitioning. The second stage of the framework automatically classifies the image into four classes: building, shadow, vegetation, and others. In this step, the previously labelled building regions as well as the shadow and vegetation areas are involved in a four-label graph optimization performed in the entire image domain to achieve the unsupervised classification result. The final stage aims to extend this classification to five classes in which the class road is involved. For that purpose, we extract the regions that might belong to road segments and utilize that information in a final graph optimization. This final stage eventually characterizes the regions belonging to buildings and roads. Experiments performed on seven test images selected from GeoEye-1 VHR datasets show that the presented approach has ability to extract the regions belonging to buildings and roads in a single graph theory framework.

  15. Segmentation and classification of PolSAR data using spectral graph partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Erxue

    2013-10-01

    Polar metric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) image classification is an important technique in the remote sensing area, has been deeply studied for a couple of decades. This paper proposes a new approach for segmentation and classification of PolSAR datain two steps. First, segmentation is performed based on spectral graph partitioning using edge information. Graph partitioning process is completed using the normalized cut criterion. Then, classification is performed based on the object level. We use Cloude and Pottier‟s method to initially classify the PolSAR image. The initial classification map defines training sets for classification based on the Wishart distribution. The advantages of this method are the automated classification, and the interpretation of each class based on the region‟s scattering mechanism. We tested this object-based analysis on our study area. It showed that this result well overcome the pepper-sault phenomenon appearing in the one using traditional pixel-based method, providing robust performance and the results more understandable and easier for further analyses

  16. Fast parallel algorithms for graph-theoretic problems: matching, coloring, and partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Karloff, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    New parallel algorithms are presented to solve graph-theoretic problems of three kinds: matching, coloring, and partitioning. Throughout, superfast algorithms, are sought, those running on a parallel random access machine in time polynomial in the log of the input size (polylog time) and using a polynomial number of processors. Problems solvable with such algorithms are said to be in NC. Those solvable by randomized algorithms obeying the same time and processor bounds are said to be in RNC or LVNC; those in RNC (or Monte Carlo RNC) are solvable by algorithms which, on instances of size n, return a correct answer with probability at least 1-2/sup -n/, and those in LVNC (or Las Vegas RNC), by algorithms that always return either a correct answer or failure, failure being returned at most half the time. Often the algorithms themselves will be said to be in NC, TNC, or LVNC.

  17. Breast histopathology image segmentation using spatio-colour-texture based graph partition method.

    PubMed

    Belsare, A D; Mushrif, M M; Pangarkar, M A; Meshram, N

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel integrated spatio-colour-texture based graph partitioning method for segmentation of nuclear arrangement in tubules with a lumen or in solid islands without a lumen from digitized Hematoxylin-Eosin stained breast histology images, in order to automate the process of histology breast image analysis to assist the pathologists. We propose a new similarity based super pixel generation method and integrate it with texton representation to form spatio-colour-texture map of Breast Histology Image. Then a new weighted distance based similarity measure is used for generation of graph and final segmentation using normalized cuts method is obtained. The extensive experiments carried shows that the proposed algorithm can segment nuclear arrangement in normal as well as malignant duct in breast histology tissue image. For evaluation of the proposed method the ground-truth image database of 100 malignant and nonmalignant breast histology images is created with the help of two expert pathologists and the quantitative evaluation of proposed breast histology image segmentation has been performed. It shows that the proposed method outperforms over other methods. PMID:26708167

  18. Partition function zeros for the Ising model on complete graphs and on annealed scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnytska, M.; Berche, B.; Holovatch, Yu; Kenna, R.

    2016-04-01

    We analyse the partition function of the Ising model on graphs of two different types: complete graphs, wherein all nodes are mutually linked and annealed scale-free networks for which the degree distribution decays as P(k) ˜ k -λ . We are interested in zeros of the partition function in the cases of complex temperature or complex external field (Fisher and Lee-Yang zeros respectively). For the model on an annealed scale-free network, we find an integral representation for the partition function which, in the case λ > 5, reproduces the zeros for the Ising model on a complete graph. For 3 < λ < 5 we derive the λ-dependent angle at which the Fisher zeros impact onto the real temperature axis. This, in turn, gives access to the λ-dependent universal values of the critical exponents and critical amplitudes ratios. Our analysis of the Lee-Yang zeros reveals a difference in their behaviour for the Ising model on a complete graph and on an annealed scale-free network when 3 < λ < 5. Whereas in the former case the zeros are purely imaginary, they have a non zero real part in latter case, so that the celebrated Lee-Yang circle theorem is violated.

  19. Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping

    SciTech Connect

    John Homer; Ashok Varikuti; Xinming Ou; Miles A. McQueen

    2008-09-01

    Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often complex and difficult to comprehend fully, and a human user may find it problematic to reach appropriate configuration decisions. This paper presents methodologies that can 1) automatically identify portions of an attack graph that do not help a user to understand the core security problems and so can be trimmed, and 2) automatically group similar attack steps as virtual nodes in a model of the network topology, to immediately increase the understandability of the data. We believe both methods are important steps toward improving visualization of attack graphs to make them more useful in configuration management for large enterprise networks. We implemented our methods using one of the existing attack-graph toolkits. Initial experimentation shows that the proposed approaches can 1) significantly reduce the complexity of attack graphs by trimming a large portion of the graph that is not needed for a user to understand the security problem, and 2) significantly increase the accessibility and understandability of the data presented in the attack graph by clearly showing, within a generated visualization of the network topology, the number and type of potential attacks to which each host is exposed.

  20. Potts model partition functions for self-dual families of strip graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shu-Chiuan; Shrock, Robert

    2001-12-01

    We consider the q-state Potts model on families of self-dual strip graphs GD of the square lattice of width Ly and arbitrarily great length Lx, with periodic longitudinal boundary conditions. The general partition function Z and the T=0 antiferromagnetic special case P (chromatic polynomial) have the respective forms ∑ j=1 NF, Ly, λcF, Ly, j( λF, Ly, j) Lx, with F= Z, P. For arbitrary Ly, we determine (i) the general coefficient cF, Ly, j in terms of Chebyshev polynomials, (ii) the number nF( Ly, d) of terms with each type of coefficient, and (iii) the total number of terms NF, Ly, λ. We point out interesting connections between the nZ( Ly, d) and Temperley-Lieb algebras, and between the NF, Ly, λ and enumerations of directed lattice animals. Exact calculations of P are presented for 2⩽ Ly⩽4. In the limit of infinite length, we calculate the ground state degeneracy per site (exponent of the ground state entropy), W( q). Generalizing q from Z+ to C, we determine the continuous locus B in the complex q plane where W( q) is singular. We find the interesting result that for all Ly values considered, the maximal point at which B crosses the real q-axis, denoted qc, is the same, and is equal to the value for the infinite square lattice, qc=3. This is the first family of strip graphs of which we are aware that exhibits this type of universality of qc.

  1. Co-Clustering by Bipartite Spectral Graph Partitioning for Out-of-Tutor Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivedi, Shubhendu; Pardos, Zachary A.; Sarkozy, Gabor N.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    Learning a more distributed representation of the input feature space is a powerful method to boost the performance of a given predictor. Often this is accomplished by partitioning the data into homogeneous groups by clustering so that separate models could be trained on each cluster. Intuitively each such predictor is a better representative of…

  2. Cascading failures in bi-partite graphs: model for systemic risk propagation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    As economic entities become increasingly interconnected, a shock in a financial network can provoke significant cascading failures throughout the system. To study the systemic risk of financial systems, we create a bi-partite banking network model composed of banks and bank assets and propose a cascading failure model to describe the risk propagation process during crises. We empirically test the model with 2007 US commercial banks balance sheet data and compare the model prediction of the failed banks with the real failed banks after 2007. We find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The results suggest that this model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the failure of over 350 US commercial banks during 2008-2011. PMID:23386974

  3. Cascading Failures in Bi-partite Graphs: Model for Systemic Risk Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    As economic entities become increasingly interconnected, a shock in a financial network can provoke significant cascading failures throughout the system. To study the systemic risk of financial systems, we create a bi-partite banking network model composed of banks and bank assets and propose a cascading failure model to describe the risk propagation process during crises. We empirically test the model with 2007 US commercial banks balance sheet data and compare the model prediction of the failed banks with the real failed banks after 2007. We find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The results suggest that this model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the failure of over 350 US commercial banks during 2008–2011. PMID:23386974

  4. Improving Graphing Interpretation Skills and Understanding of Motion Using Microcomputer Based Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svec, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Examines the relative effectiveness of the traditional lab method and the microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) for improving student understanding. Examines three areas of achievement: graphing interpretation skills, and interpreting motion graphs and understanding of motion. Results indicate that MBL laboratories are more effective than…

  5. Improving Student Knowledge of the Graphing Calculator's Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Donna

    This paper describes an intervention in two Algebra II classes in which the graphing calculator was incorporated into the curriculum as often as possible. The targeted population consisted of high school students in a growing middle to upper class community located in a suburb of a large city. The problem of a lack of understanding of the…

  6. Improved visibility graph fractality with application for the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlou, Mehran; Adeli, Hojjat; Adeli, Amir

    2012-10-01

    Recently, the visibility graph (VG) algorithm was proposed for mapping a time series to a graph to study complexity and fractality of the time series through investigation of the complexity of its graph. The visibility graph algorithm converts a fractal time series to a scale-free graph. VG has been used for the investigation of fractality in the dynamic behavior of both artificial and natural complex systems. However, robustness and performance of the power of scale-freeness of VG (PSVG) as an effective method for measuring fractality has not been investigated. Since noise is unavoidable in real life time series, the robustness of a fractality measure is of paramount importance. To improve the accuracy and robustness of PSVG to noise for measurement of fractality of time series in biological time-series, an improved PSVG is presented in this paper. The proposed method is evaluated using two examples: a synthetic benchmark time series and a complicated real life Electroencephalograms (EEG)-based diagnostic problem, that is distinguishing autistic children from non-autistic children. It is shown that the proposed improved PSVG is less sensitive to noise and therefore more robust compared with PSVG. Further, it is shown that using improved PSVG in the wavelet-chaos neural network model of Adeli and c-workers in place of the Katz fractality dimension results in a more accurate diagnosis of autism, a complicated neurological and psychiatric disorder.

  7. Application and improvement of Raupach's shear stress partitioning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Lehning, M.; Gromke, C.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian processes such as the entrainment, transport and redeposition of sand, soil or snow are able to significantly reshape the earth's surface. In times of increasing desertification and land degradation, often driven by wind erosion, investigations of aeolian processes become more and more important in environmental sciences. The reliable prediction of the sheltering effect of vegetation canopies against sediment erosion, for instance, is a clear practical application of such investigations to identify suitable and sustainable counteractive measures against wind erosion. This study presents an application and improvement of a theoretical model presented by Raupach (Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1992, Vol.60, 375-395 and Journal of Geophysical Research, 1993, Vol.98, 3023-3029) which allows for quantifying the sheltering effect of vegetation against sediment erosion. The model predicts the shear stress ratios τS'/τ and τS''/τ. Here, τS is the part of the total shear stress τ that acts on the ground beneath the plants. The spatial peak τS'' of the surface shear stress is responsible for the onset of particle entrainment whereas the spatial mean τS' can be used to quantify particle mass fluxes. The precise and accurate prediction of these quantities is essential when modeling wind erosion. Measurements of the surface shear stress distributions τS(x,y) on the ground beneath live vegetation canopies (plant species: lolium perenne) were performed in a controlled wind tunnel environment to determine the model parameters and to evaluate the model performance. Rigid, non-porous wooden blocks instead of the plants were additionally tested for the purpose of comparison, since previous wind tunnel studies used exclusively artificial plant imitations for their experiments on shear stress partitioning. The model constant c, which is needed to determine the total stress τ for a canopy of interest and which remained rather unspecified to date, was found to be c ≈ 0

  8. Loop analysis for pathogens: niche partitioning in the transmission graph for pathogens of the North American tick Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stephen; Bent, Stephen J

    2011-01-21

    In population biology, loop analysis is a method of decomposing a life cycle graph into life history pathways so as to compare the relative contributions of pathways to the population growth rate across species and populations. We apply loop analysis to the transmission graph of five pathogens known to infect the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis. In this context loops represent repeating chains of transmission that could maintain the pathogen. They hence represent completions of the life cycle, in much the same way as loops in a life cycle graph do for plants and animals. The loop analysis suggests the five pathogens fall into two distinct groups. Borellia burgdorferi, Babesia microti and Anaplasma phagocytophilum rely almost exclusively on a single loop representing transmission to susceptible larvae feeding on vertebrate hosts that were infected by nymphs. Borellia miyamotoi, in contrast, circulates among a separate set of host types and utilizes loops that are a mix of vertical transmission and horizontal transmission. For B. miyamotoi the main loop is from vertebrate hosts to susceptible nymphs, where the vertebrate hosts were infected by larvae that were infected from birth. The results for Powassan virus are similar to B. miyamotoi. The predicted impacts of the known variation in tick phenology between populations of I. scapularis in the Midwest and Northeast of the United States are hence markedly different for the two groups. All of these pathogens benefit, though, from synchronous activity of larvae and nymphs. PMID:20950628

  9. Physics Students' Performance Using Computational Modelling Activities to Improve Kinematics Graphs Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Ives Solano; Veit, Eliane Angela; Moreira, Marco Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate students' performance while exposed to complementary computational modelling activities to improve physics learning, using the software "Modellus." Interpretation of kinematics graphs was the physics topic chosen for investigation. The theoretical framework adopted was based on Halloun's…

  10. A graph-based method for improving GSAT

    SciTech Connect

    Kask, K.; Dechter, R.

    1996-12-31

    GSAT is a randomized greedy local repair procedure that was introduced for solving propositional satisfiability and constraint satisfaction problems. We present an improvement to GSAT that is sensitive to the problem`s structure. When the problem has a tree structure the algorithm is guaranteed to find a solution in linear time. For non-tree networks, the algorithm designates a subset of nodes, called cutset, and executes a regular GSAT algorithm on this set of variables. On all the rest of the variables it executes a specialized local search algorithm for trees. This algorithm finds an assignment that, like GSAT, locally minimizes the sum of unsatisfied constraints and also globally minimizes the number of conflicts in every tree-like sub-network. We will present results of experiments showing that this new algorithm outperforms regular GSAT on sparse networks whose cycle-cutset size is bounded by 30% of the nodes.

  11. Improved segmentation of abnormal cervical nuclei using a graph-search based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Liu, Shaoxiong; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping; Sonka, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Reliable segmentation of abnormal nuclei in cervical cytology is of paramount importance in automation-assisted screening techniques. This paper presents a general method for improving the segmentation of abnormal nuclei using a graph-search based approach. More specifically, the proposed method focuses on the improvement of coarse (initial) segmentation. The improvement relies on a transform that maps round-like border in the Cartesian coordinate system into lines in the polar coordinate system. The costs consisting of nucleus-specific edge and region information are assigned to the nodes. The globally optimal path in the constructed graph is then identified by dynamic programming. We have tested the proposed method on abnormal nuclei from two cervical cell image datasets, Herlev and H and E stained liquid-based cytology (HELBC), and the comparative experiments with recent state-of-the-art approaches demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method.

  12. Partition dataset according to amino acid type improves the prediction of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yi-Xue; Ye, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper dataset partition can improve the prediction of deleterious nsSNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition according to original residue type at nsSNP is a good criterion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar strategy is supposed promising in other machine learning problems. -- Abstract: Many non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) are associated with diseases, and numerous machine learning methods have been applied to train classifiers for sorting disease-associated nsSNPs from neutral ones. The continuously accumulated nsSNP data allows us to further explore better prediction approaches. In this work, we partitioned the training data into 20 subsets according to either original or substituted amino acid type at the nsSNP site. Using support vector machine (SVM), training classification models on each subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 76.3% or 74.9% depending on the two different partition criteria, while training on the whole dataset obtained an accuracy of only 72.6%. Moreover, the dataset was also randomly divided into 20 subsets, but the corresponding accuracy was only 73.2%. Our results demonstrated that partitioning the whole training dataset into subsets properly, i.e., according to the residue type at the nsSNP site, will improve the performance of the trained classifiers significantly, which should be valuable in developing better tools for predicting the disease-association of nsSNPs.

  13. Rigidity-Preserving Team Partitions in Multiagent Networks.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Daniela; Williams, Ryan K; Gasparri, Andrea; Ulivi, Giovanni; Sukhatme, Gaurav S

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the strong influence network rigidity has on collaborative systems, in this paper, we consider the problem of partitioning a multiagent network into two sub-teams, a bipartition, such that the resulting sub-teams are topologically rigid. In this direction, we determine the existence conditions for rigidity-preserving bipartitions, and provide an iterative algorithm that identifies such partitions in polynomial time. In particular, the relationship between rigid graph partitions and the previously identified Z-link edge structure is given, yielding a feasible direction for graph search. Adapting a supergraph search mechanism, we then detail a methodology for discerning graphs cuts that represent valid rigid bipartitions. Next, we extend our methods to a decentralized context by exploiting leader election and an improved graph search to evaluate feasible cuts using only local agent-to-agent communication. Finally, full algorithm details and pseudocode are provided, together with simulation results that verify correctness and demonstrate complexity. PMID:25561600

  14. High dimensional data clustering by partitioning the hypergraphs using dense subgraph partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xili; Tian, Shoucai; Lu, Yonggang

    2015-12-01

    Due to the curse of dimensionality, traditional clustering methods usually fail to produce meaningful results for the high dimensional data. Hypergraph partition is believed to be a promising method for dealing with this challenge. In this paper, we first construct a graph G from the data by defining an adjacency relationship between the data points using Shared Reverse k Nearest Neighbors (SRNN). Then a hypergraph is created from the graph G by defining the hyperedges to be all the maximal cliques in the graph G. After the hypergraph is produced, a powerful hypergraph partitioning method called dense subgraph partition (DSP) combined with the k-medoids method is used to produce the final clustering results. The proposed method is evaluated on several real high-dimensional datasets, and the experimental results show that the proposed method can improve the clustering results of the high dimensional data compared with applying k-medoids method directly on the original data.

  15. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  16. Improved genome inference in the MHC using a population reference graph

    PubMed Central

    Dilthey, Alexander; Cox, Charles; Iqbal, Zamin; Nelson, Matthew R.; McVean, Gil

    2015-01-01

    While much is known about human genetic variation, such information is typically ignored in assembling novel genomes. Instead, reads are mapped to a single reference, which can lead to poor characterization of regions of high sequence or structural diversity. We introduce a population reference graph, which combines multiple reference sequences and catalogues of variation. The genomes of novel samples are reconstructed as paths through the graph using an efficient hidden Markov model, allowing for recombination between different haplotypes and additional variants. By applying the method to the 4.5Mb extended MHC region on human chromosome 6, combining eight assembled haplotypes, sequences of known classical HLA alleles and 87,640 SNP variants from the 1000 Genomes Project, we demonstrate, using simulations, SNP genotyping, short-read and long-read data, how the method improves the accuracy of genome inference and reveals regions where the current set of reference sequences is substantially incomplete. PMID:25915597

  17. Multi-focus image fusion based on improved spectral graph wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiang; Qin, Hanlin; Chen, Zhimin; Zhou, Huixin; Li, Jia; Zong, Jingguo

    2015-10-01

    Due to the limited depth-of-focus of optical lenses in imaging camera, it is impossible to acquire an image with all parts of the scene in focus. To make up for this defect, fusing the images at different focus settings into one image is a potential approach and many fusion methods have been developed. However, the existing methods can hardly deal with the problem of image detail blur. In this paper, a novel multiscale geometrical analysis called the directional spectral graph wavelet transform (DSGWT) is proposed, which integrates the nonsubsampled directional filter bank with the traditional spectral graph wavelet transform. Through combines the feature of efficiently representing the image containing regular or irregular areas of the spectral graph wavelet transform with the ability of capturing the directional information of the directional filter bank, the DSGWT can better represent the structure of images. Given the feature of the DSGWT, it is introduced to multi-focus image fusion to overcome the above disadvantage. On the one hand, using the high frequency subbands of the source images are obtained by the DSGWT, the proposed method efficiently represents the source images. On the other hand, using morphological filter to process the sparse feature matrix obtained by sum-modified-Laplacian focus measure criterion, the proposed method generates the fused subbands by morphological filtering. Comparison experiments have been performed on different image sets, and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method does significantly improve the fusion performance compared to the existing fusion methods.

  18. An improved bi-level algorithm for partitioning dynamic grid hierarchies.

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA); Johansson, Henrik (Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden); Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

    2006-05-01

    Structured adaptive mesh refinement methods are being widely used for computer simulations of various physical phenomena. Parallel implementations potentially offer realistic simulations of complex three-dimensional applications. But achieving good scalability for large-scale applications is non-trivial. Performance is limited by the partitioner's ability to efficiently use the underlying parallel computer's resources. Designed on sound SAMR principles, Nature+Fable is a hybrid, dedicated SAMR partitioning tool that brings together the advantages of both domain-based and patch-based techniques while avoiding their drawbacks. But the original bi-level partitioning approach in Nature+Fable is insufficient as it for realistic applications regards frequently occurring bi-levels as ''impossible'' and fails. This document describes an improved bi-level partitioning algorithm that successfully copes with all possible bi-levels. The improved algorithm uses the original approach side-by-side with a new, complementing approach. By using a new, customized classification method, the improved algorithm switches automatically between the two approaches. This document describes the algorithms, discusses implementation issues, and presents experimental results. The improved version of Nature+Fable was found to be able to handle realistic applications and also to generate less imbalances, similar box count, but more communication as compared to the native, domain-based partitioner in the SAMR framework AMROC.

  19. An improved bi-level algorithm for partitioning dynamic structured grid hierarchies.

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

    2006-02-01

    Structured adaptive mesh refinement methods are being widely used for computer simulations of various physical phenomena. Parallel implementations potentially offer realistic simulations of complex three-dimensional applications. But achieving good scalability for large-scale applications is non-trivial. Performance is limited by the partitioner's ability to efficiently use the underlying parallel computer's resources. Designed on sound SAMR principles, Nature+Fable is a hybrid, dedicated SAMR partitioning tool that brings together the advantages of both domain-based and patch-based techniques while avoiding their drawbacks. But the original bi-level partitioning approach in Nature+Fable is insufficient as it for realistic applications regards frequently occurring bi-levels as 'impossible' and fails. This document describes an improved bi-level partitioning algorithm that successfully copes with all possible hi-levels. The improved algorithm uses the original approach side-by-side with a new, complementing approach. By using a new, customized classification method, the improved algorithm switches automatically between the two approaches. This document describes the algorithms, discusses implementation issues, and presents experimental results. The improved version of Nature+Fable was found to be able to handle realistic applications and also to generate less imbalances, similar box count, but more communication as compared to the native, domain-based partitioner in the SAMR framework AMROC.

  20. A Novel Space Partitioning Algorithm to Improve Current Practices in Facility Placement

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Tamara; Mikler, Armin R; Tiwari, Chetan

    2012-01-01

    In the presence of naturally occurring and man-made public health threats, the feasibility of regional bio-emergency contingency plans plays a crucial role in the mitigation of such emergencies. While the analysis of in-place response scenarios provides a measure of quality for a given plan, it involves human judgment to identify improvements in plans that are otherwise likely to fail. Since resource constraints and government mandates limit the availability of service provided in case of an emergency, computational techniques can determine optimal locations for providing emergency response assuming that the uniform distribution of demand across homogeneous resources will yield and optimal service outcome. This paper presents an algorithm that recursively partitions the geographic space into sub-regions while equally distributing the population across the partitions. For this method, we have proven the existence of an upper bound on the deviation from the optimal population size for sub-regions. PMID:23853502

  1. Partition search

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    We introduce a new form of game search called partition search that incorporates dependency analysis, allowing substantial reductions in the portion of the tree that needs to be expanded. Both theoretical results and experimental data are presented. For the game of bridge, partition search provides approximately as much of an improvement over existing methods as {alpha}-{beta} pruning provides over minimax.

  2. Improving Students' Understanding of Waves by Plotting a Displacement-Time Graph in Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yajun

    2012-04-01

    The topic of waves is one that many high school physics students find difficult to understand. This is especially true when using some A-level textbooks1,2used in the U.K., where the concept of waves is introduced prior to the concept of simple harmonic oscillations. One of the challenges my students encounter is understanding the difference between displacement-time graphs and displacement-position graphs. Many students wonder why these two graphs have the same sinusoidal shape. Having the students use multimedia simulations allows them to see, in a hands-on fashion, the relationship between the two graphs.

  3. Improved Approximability and Non-approximability Results for Graph Diameter Decreasing Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilò, Davide; Gualà, Luciano; Proietti, Guido

    In this paper we study two variants of the problem of adding edges to a graph so as to reduce the resulting diameter. More precisely, given a graph G = (V,E), and two positive integers D and B, the Minimum-Cardinality Bounded-Diameter Edge Addition (MCBD) problem is to find a minimum cardinality set F of edges to be added to G in such a way that the diameter of G + F is less than or equal to D, while the Bounded-Cardinality Minimum-Diameter Edge Addition (BCMD) problem is to find a set F of B edges to be added to G in such a way that the diameter of G + F is minimized. Both problems are well known to be NP-hard, as well as approximable within O(logn logD) and 4 (up to an additive term of 2), respectively. In this paper, we improve these long-standing approximation ratios to O(logn) and to 2 (up to an additive term of 2), respectively. As a consequence, we close, in an asymptotic sense, the gap on the approximability of the MCBD problem, which was known to be not approximable within c logn, for some constant c > 0, unless P=NP. Remarkably, as we further show in the paper, our approximation ratio remains asymptotically tight even if we allow for a solution whose diameter is optimal up to a multiplicative factor approaching 5/3. On the other hand, on the positive side, we show that at most twice of the minimal number of additional edges suffices to get at most twice of the required diameter.

  4. Improving Graduate Students' Graphing Skills of Multiple Baseline Designs with Microsoft[R] Excel 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Ya-yu; Starling, A. Leyf Peirce

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a graphing task analysis using the Microsoft[R] Office Excel 2007 program on the single-subject multiple baseline graphing skills of three university graduate students. Using a multiple probe across participants design, the study demonstrated a functional relationship between the number of correct graphing…

  5. An improved bundle adjustment model and algorithm with novel block matrix partition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zemin; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Sparse bundle adjustment is widely applied in computer vision and photogrammetry. However, existing implementation is based on the model of n 3D points projecting onto m different camera imaging planes at m positions, which can't be applied to commonly monocular, binocular or trinocular imaging systems. A novel design and implementation of bundle adjustment algorithm is proposed in this paper, which is based on n 3D points projecting onto the same camera imaging plane at m positions .To improve the performance of the algorithm, a novel sparse block matrix partition method is proposed. Experiments show that the improved bundle adjustment is effective, robust and has a better tolerance to pixel coordinates error.

  6. "What Does This Graph Mean?" Formative Assessment With Science Inquiry to Improve Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leech, Andrea Dawn

    This study investigated the use of formative assessment to improve three specific data analysis skills within the context of a high school chemistry class: graph interpretation, pattern recognition, and making conclusions based on data. Students need to be able to collect data, analyze that data, and produce accurate scientific explanations (NRC, 2011) if they want to be ready for college and careers after high school. This mixed methods study, performed in a high school chemistry classroom, investigated the impact of the formative assessment process on data analysis skills that require higher order thinking. We hypothesized that the use of evaluative feedback within the formative assessment process would improve specific data analysis skills. The evaluative feedback was given to the one group and withheld from the other for the first part of the study. The treatment group had statistically better data analysis skills after evaluative feedback over the control. While these results are promising, they must be considered preliminary due to a number of limitations involved in this study.

  7. Clustering gene expression data using graph separators.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Bangaly; Pinet, Nicolas; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Sigayret, Alain; Berry, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has used graphs to modelize expression data from microarray experiments, in view of partitioning the genes into clusters. In this paper, we introduce the use of a decomposition by clique separators. Our aim is to improve the classical clustering methods in two ways: first we want to allow an overlap between clusters, as this seems biologically sound, and second we want to be guided by the structure of the graph to define the number of clusters. We test this approach with a well-known yeast database (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our results are good, as the expression profiles of the clusters we find are very coherent. Moreover, we are able to organize into another graph the clusters we find, and order them in a fashion which turns out to respect the chronological order defined by the the sporulation process. PMID:18391236

  8. Impossible Graphs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Tracy; And Others

    Graphs without a time axis, such as velocity-versus-position graphs, offer interesting possibilities for exploring graphing and motion. Relations depicted by these graphs are not limited to functions. Interviews with a high school student named Olivia, who uses a motion detector to create such graphs, indicate that she uses thought experiments as…

  9. On some trees having partition dimension four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida Bagus Kade Puja Arimbawa, K.; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    In 1998, G. Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang introduced the notion of partition dimension of a graph. Since then, the study of this graph parameter has received much attention. A number of results have been obtained to know the values of partition dimensions of various classes of graphs. However, for some particular classes of graphs, finding of their partition dimensions is still not completely solved, for instances a class of general tree. In this paper, we study the properties of trees having partition dimension 4. In particular, we show that, for olive trees O(n), its partition dimension is equal to 4 if and only if 8 ≤ n ≤ 17. We also characterize all centipede trees having partition dimension 4.

  10. Anatomically-adapted graph wavelets for improved group-level fMRI activation mapping.

    PubMed

    Behjat, Hamid; Leonardi, Nora; Sörnmo, Leif; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2015-12-01

    A graph based framework for fMRI brain activation mapping is presented. The approach exploits the spectral graph wavelet transform (SGWT) for the purpose of defining an advanced multi-resolutional spatial transformation for fMRI data. The framework extends wavelet based SPM (WSPM), which is an alternative to the conventional approach of statistical parametric mapping (SPM), and is developed specifically for group-level analysis. We present a novel procedure for constructing brain graphs, with subgraphs that separately encode the structural connectivity of the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter (GM), and address the inter-subject GM variability by the use of template GM representations. Graph wavelets tailored to the convoluted boundaries of GM are then constructed as a means to implement a GM-based spatial transformation on fMRI data. The proposed approach is evaluated using real as well as semi-synthetic multi-subject data. Compared to SPM and WSPM using classical wavelets, the proposed approach shows superior type-I error control. The results on real data suggest a higher detection sensitivity as well as the capability to capture subtle, connected patterns of brain activity. PMID:26057594

  11. Application of annular centrifugal contactors in the hot test of the improved total partitioning process for high level liquid waste.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wuhua; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jianchen; Wang, Shuwei; Feng, Xiaogui; Wang, Xinghai; Li, Shaowei; Xu, Chao

    2014-08-15

    High level liquid waste (HLLW) produced from the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel still contains moderate amounts of uranium, transuranium (TRU) actinides, (90)Sr, (137)Cs, etc., and thus constitutes a permanent hazard to the environment. The partitioning and transmutation (P&T) strategy has increasingly attracted interest for the safe treatment and disposal of HLLW, in which the partitioning of HLLW is one of the critical technical issues. An improved total partitioning process, including a TRPO (tri-alkylphosphine oxide) process for the removal of actinides, a CESE (crown ether strontium extraction) process for the removal of Sr, and a CECE (calixcrown ether cesium extraction) process for the removal of Cs, has been developed to treat Chinese HLLW. A 160-hour hot test of the improved total partitioning process was carried out using 72-stage 10-mm-dia annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) and genuine HLLW. The hot test results showed that the average DFs of total α activity, Sr and Cs were 3.57 × 10(3), 2.25 × 10(4) and 1.68 × 10(4) after the hot test reached equilibrium, respectively. During the hot test, 72-stage 10-mm-dia ACCs worked stable, continuously with no stage failing or interruption of the operation. PMID:25016455

  12. "Improved Geometric Network Model" (IGNM): a novel approach for deriving Connectivity Graphs for Indoor Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortari, F.; Zlatanova, S.; Liu, L.; Clementini, E.

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few years Personal Navigation Systems have become an established tool for route planning, but they are mainly designed for outdoor environments. Indoor navigation is still a challenging research area for several reasons: positioning is not very accurate, users can freely move between the interior boundaries of buildings, path network construction process may not be easy and straightforward due to complexity of indoor space configurations. Therefore the creation of a good network is essential for deriving overall connectivity of a building and for representing position of objects within the environment. This paper reviews current approaches to automatic derivation of route graphs for indoor navigation and discusses some of their limitations. Then, it introduces a novel algorithmic strategy for extracting a 3D connectivity graph for indoor navigation based on 2D floor plans.

  13. Subgraph-Based Filterbanks for Graph Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Nicolas; Borgnat, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We design a critically-sampled compact-support biorthogonal transform for graph signals, via graph filterbanks. Instead of partitioning the nodes in two sets so as to remove one every two nodes in the filterbank downsampling operations, the design is based on a partition of the graph in connected subgraphs. Coarsening is achieved by defining one "supernode" for each subgraph and the edges for this coarsened graph derives from the connectivity between the subgraphs. Unlike the "one every two nodes" downsampling on bipartite graphs, this coarsening operation does not have an exact formulation in the graph Fourier domain. Instead, we rely on the local Fourier bases of each subgraph to define filtering operations. We apply successfully this method to decompose graph signals, and show promising performance on compression and denoising.

  14. Partitioning technique for discrete quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2011-06-15

    We develop the partitioning technique for quantum discrete systems. The graph consists of several subgraphs: a central graph and several branch graphs, with each branch graph being rooted by an individual node on the central one. We show that the effective Hamiltonian on the central graph can be constructed by adding additional potentials on the branch-root nodes, which generates the same result as does the the original Hamiltonian on the entire graph. Exactly solvable models are presented to demonstrate the main points of this paper.

  15. Some trees with partition dimension three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredlina, Ketut Queena; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    The concept of partition dimension of a graph was introduced by Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang (1998) [2]. Let G(V, E) be a connected graph. For S ⊆ V (G) and v ∈ V (G), define the distance d(v, S) from v to S is min{d(v, x)|x ∈ S}. Let Π be an ordered partition of V (G) and Π = {S1, S2, ..., Sk }. The representation r(v|Π) of vertex v with respect to Π is (d(v, S1), d(v, S2), ..., d(v, Sk)). If the representations of all vertices are distinct, then the partition Π is called a resolving partition of G. The partition dimension of G is the minimum k such that G has a resolving partition with k partition classes. In this paper, we characterize some classes of trees with partition dimension three, namely olive trees, weeds, and centipedes.

  16. Graph based model to support nurses' work.

    PubMed

    Benedik, Peter; Rajkovič, Uroš; Sušteršič, Olga; Prijatelj, Vesna; Rajkovič, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Health care is a knowledge-based community that critically depends on knowledge management activities in order to ensure quality. Nurses are primary stakeholders and need to ensure that their information and knowledge needs are being met in such ways that enable them, to improve the quality and efficiency of health care service delivery for all subjects of health care. This paper describes a system to help nurses to create nursing care plan. It supports focusing nurse's attention on those resources/solutions that are likely to be most relevant to their particular situation/problem in nursing domain. System is based on multi-relational property graph representing a flexible modeling construct. Graph allows modeling a nursing domain (ontology) and the indices that partition domain into an efficient, searchable space where the solution to a problem is seen as abstractly defined traversals through its vertices and edges. PMID:24943559

  17. Subdominant pseudoultrametric on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Dovgoshei, A A; Petrov, E A

    2013-08-31

    Let (G,w) be a weighted graph. We find necessary and sufficient conditions under which the weight w:E(G)→R{sup +} can be extended to a pseudoultrametric on V(G), and establish a criterion for the uniqueness of such an extension. We demonstrate that (G,w) is a complete k-partite graph, for k≥2, if and only if for any weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric, among all such extensions one can find the least pseudoultrametric consistent with w. We give a structural characterization of graphs for which the subdominant pseudoultrametric is an ultrametric for any strictly positive weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  18. Higher-order graph wavelets and sparsity on circulant graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzagiannidis, Madeleine S.; Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    2015-08-01

    The notion of a graph wavelet gives rise to more advanced processing of data on graphs due to its ability to operate in a localized manner, across newly arising data-dependency structures, with respect to the graph signal and underlying graph structure, thereby taking into consideration the inherent geometry of the data. In this work, we tackle the problem of creating graph wavelet filterbanks on circulant graphs for a sparse representation of certain classes of graph signals. The underlying graph can hereby be data-driven as well as fixed, for applications including image processing and social network theory, whereby clusters can be modelled as circulant graphs, respectively. We present a set of novel graph wavelet filter-bank constructions, which annihilate higher-order polynomial graph signals (up to a border effect) defined on the vertices of undirected, circulant graphs, and are localised in the vertex domain. We give preliminary results on their performance for non-linear graph signal approximation and denoising. Furthermore, we provide extensions to our previously developed segmentation-inspired graph wavelet framework for non-linear image approximation, by incorporating notions of smoothness and vanishing moments, which further improve performance compared to traditional methods.

  19. Partitioning Breaks Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    Considering a clique as a conservative definition of community structure, we examine how graph partitioning algorithms interact with cliques. Many popular community-finding algorithms partition the entire graph into non-overlapping communities. We show that on a wide range of empirical networks, from different domains, significant numbers of cliques are split across the separate partitions produced by these algorithms. We then examine the largest connected component of the subgraph formed by retaining only edges in cliques, and apply partitioning strategies that explicitly minimise the number of cliques split. We further examine several modern overlapping community finding algorithms, in terms of the interaction between cliques and the communities they find, and in terms of the global overlap of the sets of communities they find. We conclude that, due to the connectedness of many networks, any community finding algorithm that produces partitions must fail to find at least some significant structures. Moreover, contrary to traditional intuition, in some empirical networks, strong ties and cliques frequently do cross community boundaries; much community structure is fundamentally overlapping and unpartitionable in nature.

  20. Light Competition and Carbon Partitioning-Allocation in an improved Forest Ecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collalti, Alessio; Santini, Monia; Valentini Valentini, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    In Italy about 100.000 km2 are covered by forests. This surface is the 30% of the whole national land and this shows how the forests are important both for socio-economic and for environmental aspects. Forests changes affect a delicate balance that involve not only vegetation components but also bio-geochemical cycles and global climate. The knowledge of the amount of Carbon sequestered by forests represents a precious information for their sustainable management in the framework of climate changes. Primary studies in terms of model about this important issue, has been done through Forest Ecosystem Model (FEM), well known and validated as 3PG (Landsberg et Waring, 1997; Sands 2004). It is based on light use efficiency approach at the canopy level. The present study started from the original model 3PG, producing an improved version that uses many of explicit formulations of all relevant ecophysiological processes but makes it able to be applied for natural forests. The mutual interaction of forest growth and light conditions causes vertical and horizontal differentiation in the natural forest mosaic. Only ecophysiological parameters which can be either directly measured or estimates with reasonable certainty are used. The model has been written in C language and has been created considering a tri-dimensional cell structure with different vertical layers depending on the forest type that has to be simulated. This 3PG 'improved' version enable to work on multi-layer and multi-species forests type with cell resolution of one hectare for the typical Italian forest species. The multi-layer version is the result of the implementation and development of Lambert-Beer law for the estimation of intercepted, absorbed and transmitted light through different storeys of the forest. It is possible estimates, for each storey, a Par value (Photosynthetic Active Radiation) through Leaf Area Index (LAI), Light Extinction Coefficient and cell Canopy Cover using a "Big Leaf" approach

  1. Detecting alternative graph clusterings.

    PubMed

    Mandala, Supreet; Kumara, Soundar; Yao, Tao

    2012-07-01

    The problem of graph clustering or community detection has enjoyed a lot of attention in complex networks literature. A quality function, modularity, quantifies the strength of clustering and on maximization yields sensible partitions. However, in most real world networks, there are an exponentially large number of near-optimal partitions with some being very different from each other. Therefore, picking an optimal clustering among the alternatives does not provide complete information about network topology. To tackle this problem, we propose a graph perturbation scheme which can be used to identify an ensemble of near-optimal and diverse clusterings. We establish analytical properties of modularity function under the perturbation which ensures diversity. Our approach is algorithm independent and therefore can leverage any of the existing modularity maximizing algorithms. We numerically show that our methodology can systematically identify very different partitions on several existing data sets. The knowledge of diverse partitions sheds more light into the topological organization and helps gain a more complete understanding of the underlying complex network. PMID:23005495

  2. Detecting alternative graph clusterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandala, Supreet; Kumara, Soundar; Yao, Tao

    2012-07-01

    The problem of graph clustering or community detection has enjoyed a lot of attention in complex networks literature. A quality function, modularity, quantifies the strength of clustering and on maximization yields sensible partitions. However, in most real world networks, there are an exponentially large number of near-optimal partitions with some being very different from each other. Therefore, picking an optimal clustering among the alternatives does not provide complete information about network topology. To tackle this problem, we propose a graph perturbation scheme which can be used to identify an ensemble of near-optimal and diverse clusterings. We establish analytical properties of modularity function under the perturbation which ensures diversity. Our approach is algorithm independent and therefore can leverage any of the existing modularity maximizing algorithms. We numerically show that our methodology can systematically identify very different partitions on several existing data sets. The knowledge of diverse partitions sheds more light into the topological organization and helps gain a more complete understanding of the underlying complex network.

  3. Dense Subgraph Partition of Positive Hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hairong; Latecki, Longin Jan; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel partition framework, called dense subgraph partition (DSP), to automatically, precisely and efficiently decompose a positive hypergraph into dense subgraphs. A positive hypergraph is a graph or hypergraph whose edges, except self-loops, have positive weights. We first define the concepts of core subgraph, conditional core subgraph, and disjoint partition of a conditional core subgraph, then define DSP based on them. The result of DSP is an ordered list of dense subgraphs with decreasing densities, which uncovers all underlying clusters, as well as outliers. A divide-and-conquer algorithm, called min-partition evolution, is proposed to efficiently compute the partition. DSP has many appealing properties. First, it is a nonparametric partition and it reveals all meaningful clusters in a bottom-up way. Second, it has an exact and efficient solution, called min-partition evolution algorithm. The min-partition evolution algorithm is a divide-and-conquer algorithm, thus time-efficient and memory-friendly, and suitable for parallel processing. Third, it is a unified partition framework for a broad range of graphs and hypergraphs. We also establish its relationship with the densest k-subgraph problem (DkS), an NP-hard but fundamental problem in graph theory, and prove that DSP gives precise solutions to DkS for all kin a graph-dependent set, called critical k-set. To our best knowledge, this is a strong result which has not been reported before. Moreover, as our experimental results show, for sparse graphs, especially web graphs, the size of critical k-set is close to the number of vertices in the graph. We test the proposed partition framework on various tasks, and the experimental results clearly illustrate its advantages. PMID:26353260

  4. The peculiar phase structure of random graph bisection

    SciTech Connect

    Percus, Allon G; Istrate, Gabriel; Goncalves, Bruno T; Sumi, Robert Z

    2008-01-01

    The mincut graph bisection problem involves partitioning the n vertices of a graph into disjoint subsets, each containing exactly n/2 vertices, while minimizing the number of 'cut' edges with an endpoint in each subset. When considered over sparse random graphs, the phase structure of the graph bisection problem displays certain familiar properties, but also some surprises. It is known that when the mean degree is below the critical value of 2 log 2, the cutsize is zero with high probability. We study how the minimum cutsize increases with mean degree above this critical threshold, finding a new analytical upper bound that improves considerably upon previous bounds. Combined with recent results on expander graphs, our bound suggests the unusual scenario that random graph bisection is replica symmetric up to and beyond the critical threshold, with a replica symmetry breaking transition possibly taking place above the threshold. An intriguing algorithmic consequence is that although the problem is NP-hard, we can find near-optimal cutsizes (whose ratio to the optimal value approaches 1 asymptotically) in polynomial time for typical instances near the phase transition.

  5. Development of a floating photobioreactor with internal partitions for efficient utilization of ocean wave into improved mass transfer and algal culture mixing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Z-Hun; Park, Hanwool; Hong, Seong-Joo; Lim, Sang-Min; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2016-05-01

    Culturing microalgae in the ocean has potentials that may reduce the production cost and provide an option for an economic biofuel production from microalgae. The ocean holds great potentials for mass microalgal cultivation with its high specific heat, mixing energy from waves, and large cultivable area. Suitable photobioreactors (PBRs) that are capable of integrating marine energy into the culture systems need to be developed for the successful ocean cultivation. In this study, prototype floating PBRs were designed and constructed using transparent low-density polyethylene film for microalgal culture in the ocean. To improve the mixing efficiency, various types of internal partitions were introduced within PBRs. Three different types of internal partitions were evaluated for their effects on the mixing efficiency in terms of mass transfer (k(L)a) and mixing time in the PBRs. The partition type with the best mixing efficiency was selected, and the number of partitions was varied from one to three for investigation of its effect on mixing efficiency. When the number of partitions is increased, mass transfer increased in proportion to the number of partitions. However, mixing time was not directly related to the number of partitions. When a green microalga, Tetraselmis sp. was cultivated using PBRs with the selected partition under semi-continuous mode in the ocean, biomass and fatty acid productivities in the PBRs were increased by up to 50 % and 44% at high initial cell density, respectively, compared to non-partitioned ones. The results of internally partitioned PBRs demonstrated potentials for culturing microalgae by efficiently utilizing ocean wave energy into culture mixing in the ocean. PMID:26857371

  6. Isorropia Partitioning and Load Balancing Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-09-01

    Isorropia is a partitioning and load balancing package which interfaces with the Zoltan library. Isorropia can accept input objects such as matrices and matrix-graphs, and repartition/redistribute them into a better data distribution on parallel computers. Isorropia is primarily an interface package, utilizing graph and hypergraph partitioning algorithms that are in the Zoltan library which is a third-party library to Tilinos.

  7. Improved estimation of solubility and partitioning through correction of UNIFAC-derived activity coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Howard, P.H.

    1988-07-01

    Octanol-water partition coefficients (K/sub ow/) of 75 compounds ranging over 9 orders of magnitude are correlated by log K/sub ow/ = -0.40 + 0.73 log (..gamma../sub W/)/sub U/ -0.39 log (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/ (r = 0.98), where (..gamma..//sub W/)/sub U/ and (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/ are UNIFAC-derived activity coefficients in water and octanol, respectively. The constants 0.73 and -0.39 are obtained empirically and are intended to compensate for group nonadditivity. Correction factors of similar magnitude are obtained in independent correlations of water solubility with (..gamma../sub W/)/sub U/ and of octanol solubility with (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/, thereby confirming the validity of the approach.

  8. Quantum field theory of partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C.M.; Brody, D.C.; Meister, B.K.

    1999-07-01

    Given a sequence of numbers {l_brace}a{sub n}{r_brace}, it is always possible to find a set of Feynman rules that reproduce that sequence. For the special case of the partitions of the integers, the appropriate Feynman rules give rise to graphs that represent the partitions in a clear pictorial fashion. These Feynman rules can be used to generate the Bell numbers B(n) and the Stirling numbers S(n,k) that are associated with the partitions of the integers. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs. PMID:25616091

  10. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  11. On bottleneck partitioning k-ary n-cubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Mao, Weizhen

    1994-01-01

    Graph partitioning is a topic of extensive interest, with applications to parallel processing. In this context graph nodes typically represent computation, and edges represent communication. One seeks to distribute the workload by partitioning the graph so that every processor has approximately the same workload, and the communication cost (measured as a function of edges exposed by the partition) is minimized. Measures of partition quality vary; in this paper we consider a processor's cost to be the sum of its computation and communication costs, and consider the cost of a partition to be the bottleneck, or maximal processor cost induced by the partition. For a general graph the problem of finding an optimal partitioning is intractable. In this paper we restrict our attention to the class of k-art n-cube graphs with uniformly weighted nodes. Given mild restrictions on the node weight and number of processors, we identify partitions yielding the smallest bottleneck. We also demonstrate by example that some restrictions are necessary for the partitions we identify to be optimal. In particular, there exist cases where partitions that evenly partition nodes need not be optimal.

  12. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Umesh P; Ayre, Brian G; Bush, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models. PMID:25954297

  13. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.

  14. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in themore » earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.« less

  15. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models. PMID:25954297

  16. Graph Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2005-12-27

    Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.

  17. Partitioning in trees and soil (PiTS) - a experimental approach to improve knowledge of forest carbon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Garten Jr, Charles T; Iversen, Colleen M; Norby, Richard J; Thornton, Peter E; Weston, David; Gu, Lianhong; Brice, Deanne Jane; Childs, Joanne; Evans, R

    2012-01-01

    Summary The dynamics of rapid changes in carbon (C) partitioning within forest ecosystems are not well understood, which limits improvement of mechanistic models of C cycling. Our objective was to inform model processes by describing relationships between C partitioning and accessible environmental or physiological measurements, with a special emphasis on belowground C flux. We exposed eight 7-year-old loblolly pine trees to air enriched with 13CO2 and then implemented adjacent light shade (LS) and heavy shade (HS) treatments in order to manipulate C uptake and flux. A soil pit was dug adjacent to the trees to provide greater access belowground. The impacts of shading on photosynthesis, plant water potential, sap flow, basal area growth, root growth, and soil C exchange rate (CER) were assessed for each tree over a three-week period. The progression of the 13C label was concurrently tracked from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots, and soil CO2 efflux. The HS treatment significantly reduced C uptake, sap flow, stem growth and root standing crop, and resulted in greater residual soil water content to 1 m depth. Sap flow was strongly correlated with CER on the previous day, but not the current day, with no apparent treatment effect on the relationship. The 13C label was immediately detected in foliage on label day (half-life = 0.5 d), progressed through phloem by day 2 (half-life = 4.7 d), roots by day 2-4, and subsequently was evident as respiratory release from soil which peaked between days 3-6. The 13C of soil CO2 efflux was strongly correlated with phloem 13C on the previous day, or two days earlier. These data detail the timing and relative magnitude of C flux through a young pine stand in relation to environmental conditions. Refinement of belowground sampling will be necessary to adequately separate and quantify the flux of recently fixed C into roots, and fate of that new C as respiratory, mycorrhizal or exudative release, storage or partitioning

  18. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE PHOTOMETRY IN CONFUSED IMAGES USING GRAPHS AND BAYESIAN PRIORS

    SciTech Connect

    Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; Ferguson, Henry C.; Lu, Yu; Inami, Hanae; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2015-01-10

    We present a new technique for overcoming confusion noise in deep far-infrared Herschel space telescope images making use of prior information from shorter λ < 2 μm wavelengths. For the deepest images obtained by Herschel, the flux limit due to source confusion is about a factor of three brighter than the flux limit due to instrumental noise and (smooth) sky background. We have investigated the possibility of de-confusing simulated Herschel PACS 160 μm images by using strong Bayesian priors on the positions and weak priors on the flux of sources. We find the blended sources and group them together and simultaneously fit their fluxes. We derive the posterior probability distribution function of fluxes subject to these priors through Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling by fitting the image. Assuming we can predict the FIR flux of sources based on the ultraviolet-optical part of their SEDs to within an order of magnitude, the simulations show that we can obtain reliable fluxes and uncertainties at least a factor of three fainter than the confusion noise limit of 3σ {sub c} = 2.7 mJy in our simulated PACS-160 image. This technique could in principle be used to mitigate the effects of source confusion in any situation where one has prior information of positions and plausible fluxes of blended sources. For Herschel, application of this technique will improve our ability to constrain the dust content in normal galaxies at high redshift.

  19. Effects of Constituent Properties on Performance Improvement of a Quenching and Partitioning Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Taylor, Mark D.; De Moor, Emmanuel; Speer, John; Matlock, David K.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of material parameters of the constituent phases on the macroscopic tensile behavior of Q&P steel and then to do a computational materials design approach for its performance improvement. For this purpose, a model Q&P steel is first produced and various experiments are then performed to characterize the steel. Actual microstructure-based model is generated based on the information from EBSD, SEM and nano-indentation test, and the material properties for the constituent phases are determined based on the initial constituents’ properties from HEXRD test and the subsequent calibration of model prediction to tensile test results. Influence of various material parameters of the constituents on the macroscopic behaviors is then investigated by separately adjusting them by small amount. Based on the observation on the respective influence of constituents’ material parameters, a new set of material parameters are devised, which results in better performance in ductility. The results indicate that various material parameters may need to be concurrently adjusted in a cohesive way in order to improve the performance of Q&P steel. In summary, higher austenite stability, less strength difference between the phases, higher hardening exponents of the phases are generally beneficial for the performance improvement. The information from this study can be used to devise new Q&P heat-treating parameters to produce the Q&P steels with better performance.

  20. GRACE-assisted Budyko Hypothesis for Improved Estimates of Long-term Water Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, K.; Shen, C.; Fisher, J. B.; Niu, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Budyko hypothesis provides a reference condition of water balance and describes an empirical relationship between precipitation (P), evapotranspiration (E) and potential evapotranspiration (Ep). However, real-world catchments often deviate significantly from the theoretical Budyko curve. Recent advances of understanding in the impacts of seasonal water balances on long-term averaged water balance showed that phase difference between P and Ep is a major cause of downward departure from the Budyko curve. The phase difference and its processing by the catchments are in fact recorded over the globe in the form of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite (GRACE) terrestrial water storage anomalies (TWSA). Here we present a GRACE-assisted Budyko-type formula that has improved predictive accuracy for long term E/P using the aridity index and storage patterns. We established an error model for the residual between Turk-Pike form of the Budyko curve and the observed E, based on a seamless United States basin water balance dataset. We found that the error model could improve the prediction efficiency by more than 60% comparing to Budyko model. The form of the error model was supported by Monte Carlo analysis. We compared the results with NLDAS predict E and found that the GRACE-corrected formula are in closer agreement with NLDAS than that without GRACE correction. In addition, we apply this error model to the whole world and global E was predicted. By comparing with other E products we found this error model can correct Budyko curve effectively.

  1. An Efficient Data Partitioning to Improve Classification Performance While Keeping Parameters Interpretable.

    PubMed

    Korjus, Kristjan; Hebart, Martin N; Vicente, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Supervised machine learning methods typically require splitting data into multiple chunks for training, validating, and finally testing classifiers. For finding the best parameters of a classifier, training and validation are usually carried out with cross-validation. This is followed by application of the classifier with optimized parameters to a separate test set for estimating the classifier's generalization performance. With limited data, this separation of test data creates a difficult trade-off between having more statistical power in estimating generalization performance versus choosing better parameters and fitting a better model. We propose a novel approach that we term "Cross-validation and cross-testing" improving this trade-off by re-using test data without biasing classifier performance. The novel approach is validated using simulated data and electrophysiological recordings in humans and rodents. The results demonstrate that the approach has a higher probability of discovering significant results than the standard approach of cross-validation and testing, while maintaining the nominal alpha level. In contrast to nested cross-validation, which is maximally efficient in re-using data, the proposed approach additionally maintains the interpretability of individual parameters. Taken together, we suggest an addition to currently used machine learning approaches which may be particularly useful in cases where model weights do not require interpretation, but parameters do. PMID:27564393

  2. An Efficient Data Partitioning to Improve Classification Performance While Keeping Parameters Interpretable

    PubMed Central

    Korjus, Kristjan; Hebart, Martin N.; Vicente, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Supervised machine learning methods typically require splitting data into multiple chunks for training, validating, and finally testing classifiers. For finding the best parameters of a classifier, training and validation are usually carried out with cross-validation. This is followed by application of the classifier with optimized parameters to a separate test set for estimating the classifier’s generalization performance. With limited data, this separation of test data creates a difficult trade-off between having more statistical power in estimating generalization performance versus choosing better parameters and fitting a better model. We propose a novel approach that we term “Cross-validation and cross-testing” improving this trade-off by re-using test data without biasing classifier performance. The novel approach is validated using simulated data and electrophysiological recordings in humans and rodents. The results demonstrate that the approach has a higher probability of discovering significant results than the standard approach of cross-validation and testing, while maintaining the nominal alpha level. In contrast to nested cross-validation, which is maximally efficient in re-using data, the proposed approach additionally maintains the interpretability of individual parameters. Taken together, we suggest an addition to currently used machine learning approaches which may be particularly useful in cases where model weights do not require interpretation, but parameters do. PMID:27564393

  3. Capacitated max -Batching with Interval Graph Compatibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonner, Tim

    We consider the problem of partitioning interval graphs into cliques of bounded size. Each interval has a weight, and the weight of a clique is the maximum weight of any interval in the clique. This natural graph problem can be interpreted as a batch scheduling problem. Solving a long-standing open problem, we show NP-hardness, even if the bound on the clique sizes is constant. Moreover, we give a PTAS based on a novel dynamic programming technique for this case.

  4. Accelerating semantic graph databases on commodity clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Morari, Alessandro; Castellana, Vito G.; Haglin, David J.; Feo, John T.; Weaver, Jesse R.; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

    2013-10-06

    We are developing a full software system for accelerating semantic graph databases on commodity cluster that scales to hundreds of nodes while maintaining constant query throughput. Our framework comprises a SPARQL to C++ compiler, a library of parallel graph methods and a custom multithreaded runtime layer, which provides a Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model with fork/join parallelism and automatic load balancing over a commodity clusters. We present preliminary results for the compiler and for the runtime.

  5. Extended sorption partitioning models for pesticide leaching risk assessments: Can we improve upon the koc concept?

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Models used to assess leaching of pesticides to groundwater still rely on the sorption koc value, even though its limitations have been known for several decades, especially for soils of low organic carbon content (i.e. subsoils). This is mainly because the general applicability of any improved model approach that is also simple enough to use for regulatory purposes has not been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to test and compare alternative models of sorption that could be useful in pesticide risk assessment and management. To this end, a database containing the results of batch sorption experiments for pesticides was compiled from published studies in the literature, which placed at least as much emphasis on measurements in subsoil horizons as in topsoil. The database includes 785 data entries from 34 different published studies and for 21 different active substances. Overall, the apparent koc value, koc(app), roughly doubled as the soil organic carbon content decreased by a factor of ten. Nevertheless, in nearly half of the individual datasets, a constant koc value proved to be an adequate model. Further analysis showed that significant increases in koc(app) in subsoil were found primarily for the more weakly adsorbing compounds (koc values

  6. Graphing Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science.1 Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations.2 Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary school instruction, the job of graphing skills falls heavily on physics teachers. By virtue of the nature of the topics we cover, it is our mission to develop this skill to the fine art that it is.

  7. Towards information inequalities for generalized graph entropies.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Lavanya; Dehmer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the problem of establishing relations between information measures for network structures. Two types of entropy based measures namely, the Shannon entropy and its generalization, the Rényi entropy have been considered for this study. Our main results involve establishing formal relationships, by means of inequalities, between these two kinds of measures. Further, we also state and prove inequalities connecting the classical partition-based graph entropies and partition-independent entropy measures. In addition, several explicit inequalities are derived for special classes of graphs. PMID:22715375

  8. Graphing Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science. Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations. Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary…

  9. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  10. Optimal Clustering in Graphs with Weighted Edges: A Unified Approach to the Threshold Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetschel, Roy; Voxman, William

    1987-01-01

    Relations on a finite set V are viewed as weighted graphs. Using the language of graph theory, two methods of partitioning V are examined: selecting threshold values and applying them to a maximal weighted spanning forest, and using a parametric linear program to obtain a most adhesive partition. (Author/EM)

  11. A parallel graph coloring heuristic

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.T.; Plassmann, P.E. )

    1993-05-01

    The problem of computing good graph colorings arises in many diverse applications, such as in the estimation of sparse Jacobians and in the development of efficient, parallel iterative methods for solving sparse linear systems. This paper presents an asynchronous graph coloring heuristic well suited to distributed memory parallel computers. Experimental results obtained on an Intel iPSC/860 are presented, which demonstrate that, for graphs arising from finite element applications, the heuristic exhibits scalable performance and generates colorings usually within three or four colors of the best-known linear time sequential heuristics. For bounded degree graphs, it is shown that the expected running time of the heuristic under the P-Ram computation model is bounded by EO(log(n)/log log(n)). This bound is an improvement over the previously known best upper bound for the expected running time of a random heuristic for the graph coloring problem.

  12. A Hybrid Parallel Strategy Based on String Graph Theory to Improve De Novo DNA Assembly on the TianHe-2 Supercomputer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Liao, Xiangke; Peng, Shaoliang; Cui, Yingbo; Wang, Bingqiang; Zhu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    ' The de novo assembly of DNA sequences is increasingly important for biological researches in the genomic era. After more than one decade since the Human Genome Project, some challenges still exist and new solutions are being explored to improve de novo assembly of genomes. String graph assembler (SGA), based on the string graph theory, is a new method/tool developed to address the challenges. In this paper, based on an in-depth analysis of SGA we prove that the SGA-based sequence de novo assembly is an NP-complete problem. According to our analysis, SGA outperforms other similar methods/tools in memory consumption, but costs much more time, of which 60-70 % is spent on the index construction. Upon this analysis, we introduce a hybrid parallel optimization algorithm and implement this algorithm in the TianHe-2's parallel framework. Simulations are performed with different datasets. For data of small size the optimized solution is 3.06 times faster than before, and for data of middle size it's 1.60 times. The results demonstrate an evident performance improvement, with the linear scalability for parallel FM-index construction. This results thus contribute significantly to improving the efficiency of de novo assembly of DNA sequences. PMID:26403255

  13. Partitioning evapotranspiration using an eddy covariance-based technique: Improved assessment of soil moisture and land-atmosphere exchange dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The capability to partition evapotranspiration (ET) measurements into two components, namely direct evaporation (E) from soil, leaf, and litter surfaces and transpiration (T) via plants is critical toward better defining hydrological processes along the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Such informat...

  14. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  15. Further improved stability criteria for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delay by delay-partitioning approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Luo, Wenpin; Cheng, Jun; Wang, Yonghu

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on further improved stability criteria for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with interval time-varying delay by a delay-partitioning approach. A modified augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is established by partitioning the delay in all integral terms. Then some tighter bounding inequalities, i.e., Peng-Park׳s integral inequality (reciprocally convex approach) and the Free-Matrix-Based integral inequality (which yields less conservative stability criteria than the use of Wirtinger-based inequality does) are introduced to reduce the enlargement in bounding the derivative of LKF as much as possible, therefore, less conservative results can be expected in terms of es and LMIs. Finally, a numerical example is included to show that the proposed methods are less conservative than existing ones. PMID:26073644

  16. A Partitioning Algorithm for Block-Diagonal Matrices With Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Guy Antoine Atenekeng Kahou; Laura Grigori; Masha Sosonkina

    2008-02-02

    We present a graph partitioning algorithm that aims at partitioning a sparse matrix into a block-diagonal form, such that any two consecutive blocks overlap. We denote this form of the matrix as the overlapped block-diagonal matrix. The partitioned matrix is suitable for applying the explicit formulation of Multiplicative Schwarz preconditioner (EFMS) described in [3]. The graph partitioning algorithm partitions the graph of the input matrix into K partitions, such that every partition {Omega}{sub i} has at most two neighbors {Omega}{sub i-1} and {Omega}{sub i+1}. First, an ordering algorithm, such as the reverse Cuthill-McKee algorithm, that reduces the matrix profile is performed. An initial overlapped block-diagonal partition is obtained from the profile of the matrix. An iterative strategy is then used to further refine the partitioning by allowing nodes to be transferred between neighboring partitions. Experiments are performed on matrices arising from real-world applications to show the feasibility and usefulness of this approach.

  17. Bipartite Graphs for Visualization Analysis of Microbiome Data.

    PubMed

    Sedlar, Karel; Videnska, Petra; Skutkova, Helena; Rychlik, Ivan; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Visualization analysis plays an important role in metagenomics research. Proper and clear visualization can help researchers get their first insights into data and by selecting different features, also revealing and highlighting hidden relationships and drawing conclusions. To prevent the resulting presentations from becoming chaotic, visualization techniques have to properly tackle the high dimensionality of microbiome data. Although a number of different methods based on dimensionality reduction, correlations, Venn diagrams, and network representations have already been published, there is still room for further improvement, especially in the techniques that allow visual comparison of several environments or developmental stages in one environment. In this article, we represent microbiome data by bipartite graphs, where one partition stands for taxa and the other stands for samples. We demonstrated that community detection is independent of taxonomical level. Moreover, focusing on higher taxonomical levels and the appropriate merging of samples greatly helps improving graph organization and makes our presentations clearer than other graph and network visualizations. Capturing labels in the vertices also brings the possibility of clearly comparing two or more microbial communities by showing their common and unique parts. PMID:27279729

  18. Bipartite Graphs for Visualization Analysis of Microbiome Data

    PubMed Central

    Sedlar, Karel; Videnska, Petra; Skutkova, Helena; Rychlik, Ivan; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Visualization analysis plays an important role in metagenomics research. Proper and clear visualization can help researchers get their first insights into data and by selecting different features, also revealing and highlighting hidden relationships and drawing conclusions. To prevent the resulting presentations from becoming chaotic, visualization techniques have to properly tackle the high dimensionality of microbiome data. Although a number of different methods based on dimensionality reduction, correlations, Venn diagrams, and network representations have already been published, there is still room for further improvement, especially in the techniques that allow visual comparison of several environments or developmental stages in one environment. In this article, we represent microbiome data by bipartite graphs, where one partition stands for taxa and the other stands for samples. We demonstrated that community detection is independent of taxonomical level. Moreover, focusing on higher taxonomical levels and the appropriate merging of samples greatly helps improving graph organization and makes our presentations clearer than other graph and network visualizations. Capturing labels in the vertices also brings the possibility of clearly comparing two or more microbial communities by showing their common and unique parts. PMID:27279729

  19. Improved prediction of octanol-water partition coefficients from liquid-solute water solubilities and molar volumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Schmedding, D.W.; Manes, M.

    2005-01-01

    A volume-fraction-based solvent-water partition model for dilute solutes, in which the partition coefficient shows a dependence on solute molar volume (V??), is adapted to predict the octanol-water partition coefficient (K ow) from the liquid or supercooled-liquid solute water solubility (Sw), or vice versa. The established correlation is tested for a wide range of industrial compounds and pesticides (e.g., halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, halogenated benzenes, ethers, esters, PAHs, PCBs, organochlorines, organophosphates, carbamates, and amidesureas-triazines), which comprise a total of 215 test compounds spanning about 10 orders of magnitude in Sw and 8.5 orders of magnitude in Kow. Except for phenols and alcohols, which require special considerations of the Kow data, the correlation predicts the Kow within 0.1 log units for most compounds, much independent of the compound type or the magnitude in K ow. With reliable Sw and V data for compounds of interest, the correlation provides an effective means for either predicting the unavailable log Kow values or verifying the reliability of the reported log Kow data. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  20. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations and their application to calculate converged vibrational–rotational partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities for methane

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Steven L. E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu; Truhlar, Donald G. E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu

    2015-01-28

    We present an improved version of our “path-by-path” enhanced same path extrapolation scheme for Feynman path integral (FPI) calculations that permits rapid convergence with discretization errors ranging from O(P{sup −6}) to O(P{sup −12}), where P is the number of path discretization points. We also present two extensions of our importance sampling and stratified sampling schemes for calculating vibrational–rotational partition functions by the FPI method. The first is the use of importance functions for dihedral angles between sets of generalized Jacobi coordinate vectors. The second is an extension of our stratification scheme to allow some strata to be defined based only on coordinate information while other strata are defined based on both the geometry and the energy of the centroid of the Feynman path. These enhanced methods are applied to calculate converged partition functions by FPI methods, and these results are compared to ones obtained earlier by vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations, both calculations being for the Jordan–Gilbert potential energy surface. The earlier VCI calculations are found to agree well (within ∼1.5%) with the new benchmarks. The FPI partition functions presented here are estimated to be converged to within a 2σ statistical uncertainty of between 0.04% and 0.07% for the given potential energy surface for temperatures in the range 300–3000 K and are the most accurately converged partition functions for a given potential energy surface for any molecule with five or more atoms. We also tabulate free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities.

  1. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations and their application to calculate converged vibrational-rotational partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities for methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    We present an improved version of our "path-by-path" enhanced same path extrapolation scheme for Feynman path integral (FPI) calculations that permits rapid convergence with discretization errors ranging from O(P-6) to O(P-12), where P is the number of path discretization points. We also present two extensions of our importance sampling and stratified sampling schemes for calculating vibrational-rotational partition functions by the FPI method. The first is the use of importance functions for dihedral angles between sets of generalized Jacobi coordinate vectors. The second is an extension of our stratification scheme to allow some strata to be defined based only on coordinate information while other strata are defined based on both the geometry and the energy of the centroid of the Feynman path. These enhanced methods are applied to calculate converged partition functions by FPI methods, and these results are compared to ones obtained earlier by vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations, both calculations being for the Jordan-Gilbert potential energy surface. The earlier VCI calculations are found to agree well (within ˜1.5%) with the new benchmarks. The FPI partition functions presented here are estimated to be converged to within a 2σ statistical uncertainty of between 0.04% and 0.07% for the given potential energy surface for temperatures in the range 300-3000 K and are the most accurately converged partition functions for a given potential energy surface for any molecule with five or more atoms. We also tabulate free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities.

  2. Ising-like models on arbitrary graphs: The Hadamard way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosseri, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    We propose a generic framework to describe classical Ising-like models defined on arbitrary graphs. The energy spectrum is shown to be the Hadamard transform of a suitably defined sparse "coding" vector associated with the graph. We expect that the existence of a fast Hadamard transform algorithm (used, for instance, in image compression processes), together with the sparseness of the coding vector, may provide ways to fasten the spectrum computation. Applying this formalism to regular graphs, such as hypercubic graphs, we obtain a simple recurrence relation for the spectrum, which significantly speeds up its determination. First attempts to analyze partition functions and transfer matrices are also presented.

  3. Rectilinear partitioning of irregular data parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1991-01-01

    New mapping algorithms for domain oriented data-parallel computations, where the workload is distributed irregularly throughout the domain, but exhibits localized communication patterns are described. Researchers consider the problem of partitioning the domain for parallel processing in such a way that the workload on the most heavily loaded processor is minimized, subject to the constraint that the partition be perfectly rectilinear. Rectilinear partitions are useful on architectures that have a fast local mesh network. Discussed here is an improved algorithm for finding the optimal partitioning in one dimension, new algorithms for partitioning in two dimensions, and optimal partitioning in three dimensions. The application of these algorithms to real problems are discussed.

  4. Effective Use of Water and Increased Dry Matter Partitioned to Grain Contribute to Yield of Common Bean Improved for Drought Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Polania, Jose A.; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Beebe, Stephen; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume in the diet of poor people in the tropics. Drought causes severe yield loss in this crop. Identification of traits associated with drought resistance contributes to improving the process of generating bean genotypes adapted to these conditions. Field studies were conducted at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Palmira, Colombia, to determine the relationship between grain yield and different parameters such as effective use of water (EUW), canopy biomass, and dry partitioning indices (pod partitioning index, harvest index, and pod harvest index) in elite lines selected for drought resistance over the past decade. Carbon isotope discrimination (CID) was used for estimation of water use efficiency (WUE). The main objectives were: (i) to identify specific morpho-physiological traits that contribute to improved resistance to drought in lines developed over several cycles of breeding and that could be useful as selection criteria in breeding; and (ii) to identify genotypes with desirable traits that could serve as parents in the corresponding breeding programs. A set of 36 bean genotypes belonging to the Middle American gene pool were evaluated under field conditions with two levels of water supply (irrigated and drought) over two seasons. Eight bean lines (NCB 280, NCB 226, SEN 56, SCR 2, SCR 16, SMC 141, RCB 593, and BFS 67) were identified as resistant to drought stress. Resistance to terminal drought stress was positively associated with EUW combined with increased dry matter partitioned to pod and seed production and negatively associated with days to flowering and days to physiological maturity. Differences in genotypic response were observed between grain CID and grain yield under irrigated and drought stress. Based on phenotypic differences in CID, leaf stomatal conductance, canopy biomass, and grain yield under drought stress, the lines tested were classified into two

  5. Effective Use of Water and Increased Dry Matter Partitioned to Grain Contribute to Yield of Common Bean Improved for Drought Resistance.

    PubMed

    Polania, Jose A; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Beebe, Stephen; Rao, Idupulapati M

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume in the diet of poor people in the tropics. Drought causes severe yield loss in this crop. Identification of traits associated with drought resistance contributes to improving the process of generating bean genotypes adapted to these conditions. Field studies were conducted at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Palmira, Colombia, to determine the relationship between grain yield and different parameters such as effective use of water (EUW), canopy biomass, and dry partitioning indices (pod partitioning index, harvest index, and pod harvest index) in elite lines selected for drought resistance over the past decade. Carbon isotope discrimination (CID) was used for estimation of water use efficiency (WUE). The main objectives were: (i) to identify specific morpho-physiological traits that contribute to improved resistance to drought in lines developed over several cycles of breeding and that could be useful as selection criteria in breeding; and (ii) to identify genotypes with desirable traits that could serve as parents in the corresponding breeding programs. A set of 36 bean genotypes belonging to the Middle American gene pool were evaluated under field conditions with two levels of water supply (irrigated and drought) over two seasons. Eight bean lines (NCB 280, NCB 226, SEN 56, SCR 2, SCR 16, SMC 141, RCB 593, and BFS 67) were identified as resistant to drought stress. Resistance to terminal drought stress was positively associated with EUW combined with increased dry matter partitioned to pod and seed production and negatively associated with days to flowering and days to physiological maturity. Differences in genotypic response were observed between grain CID and grain yield under irrigated and drought stress. Based on phenotypic differences in CID, leaf stomatal conductance, canopy biomass, and grain yield under drought stress, the lines tested were classified into two

  6. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  7. Graphing for Any Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nibbelink, William

    1982-01-01

    An instructional sequence for teaching graphing that has been extensively field tested in kindergarten through grade six is detailed. The material begins with point graphs, employs a movable y-axis to begin with minimal clutter, and has graphs constructed before reading graphs is required. (MP)

  8. Path Separability of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, Emilie; Gavoille, Cyril

    In this paper we investigate the structural properties of k-path separable graphs, that are the graphs that can be separated by a set of k shortest paths. We identify several graph families having such path separability, and we show that this property is closed under minor taking. In particular we establish a list of forbidden minors for 1-path separable graphs.

  9. TrajGraph: A Graph-Based Visual Analytics Approach to Studying Urban Network Centralities Using Taxi Trajectory Data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoke; Zhao, Ye; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Chong; Ma, Chao; Ye, Xinyue

    2016-01-01

    We propose TrajGraph, a new visual analytics method, for studying urban mobility patterns by integrating graph modeling and visual analysis with taxi trajectory data. A special graph is created to store and manifest real traffic information recorded by taxi trajectories over city streets. It conveys urban transportation dynamics which can be discovered by applying graph analysis algorithms. To support interactive, multiscale visual analytics, a graph partitioning algorithm is applied to create region-level graphs which have smaller size than the original street-level graph. Graph centralities, including Pagerank and betweenness, are computed to characterize the time-varying importance of different urban regions. The centralities are visualized by three coordinated views including a node-link graph view, a map view and a temporal information view. Users can interactively examine the importance of streets to discover and assess city traffic patterns. We have implemented a fully working prototype of this approach and evaluated it using massive taxi trajectories of Shenzhen, China. TrajGraph's capability in revealing the importance of city streets was evaluated by comparing the calculated centralities with the subjective evaluations from a group of drivers in Shenzhen. Feedback from a domain expert was collected. The effectiveness of the visual interface was evaluated through a formal user study. We also present several examples and a case study to demonstrate the usefulness of TrajGraph in urban transportation analysis. PMID:26529696

  10. New Aperture Partitioning Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, S.; Calef, B.; Williams, S.

    Postprocessing in an optical system can be aided by adding an optical element to partition the pupil into a number of segments. When imaging through the atmosphere, the recorded data are blurred by temperature-induced variations in the index of refraction along the line of sight. Using speckle imaging techniques developed in the astronomy community, this blurring can be corrected to some degree. The effectiveness of these techniques is diminished by redundant baselines in the pupil. Partitioning the pupil reduces the degree of baseline redundancy, and therefore improves the quality of images that can be obtained from the system. It is possible to implement the described approach on an optical system with a segmented primary mirror, but not very practical. This is because most optical systems do not have segmented primary mirrors, and those that do have relatively low bandwidth positioning of segments due to their large mass and inertia. It is much more practical to position an active aperture partitioning element at an aft optics pupil of the optical system. This paper describes the design, implementation and testing of a new aperture partitioning element that is completely reflective and reconfigurable. The device uses four independent, annular segments that can be positioned with a high degree of accuracy without impacting optical wavefront of each segment. This mirror has been produced and is currently deployed and working on the 3.6 m telescope.

  11. Genetic Algorithm and Graph Theory Based Matrix Factorization Method for Online Friend Recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qu; Yang, Jianhua; Xu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Online friend recommendation is a fast developing topic in web mining. In this paper, we used SVD matrix factorization to model user and item feature vector and used stochastic gradient descent to amend parameter and improve accuracy. To tackle cold start problem and data sparsity, we used KNN model to influence user feature vector. At the same time, we used graph theory to partition communities with fairly low time and space complexity. What is more, matrix factorization can combine online and offline recommendation. Experiments showed that the hybrid recommendation algorithm is able to recommend online friends with good accuracy. PMID:24757410

  12. Cognitive Aids for Guiding Graph Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mautone, Patricia D.; Mayer, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to improve students' comprehension of scientific graphs by adapting scaffolding techniques used to aid text comprehension. In 3 experiments involving 121 female and 88 male college students, some students were shown cognitive aids prior to viewing 4 geography graphs whereas others were not; all students were then asked to write a…

  13. Using Flashcard Drill Methods and Self-Graphing Procedures to Improve the Reading Performance of English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Craig A.; Hoffman, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The increasing numbers of English language learners who are enrolled in schools across the nation, combined with the escalating academic demands placed on all students, warrant the evaluation of instructional strategies designed to improve English language learners' reading performance. In this study, the authors used a multiple baseline design…

  14. Partitioning of heat production in growing pigs as a tool to improve the determination of efficiency of energy utilization

    PubMed Central

    Labussière, Etienne; Dubois, Serge; van Milgen, Jaap; Noblet, Jean

    2013-01-01

    In growing pigs, the feed cost accounts for more than 60% of total production costs. The determination of efficiency of energy utilization through calorimetry measurements is of importance to sustain suitable feeding practice. The objective of this paper is to describe a methodology to correct daily heat production (HP) obtained from measurements in respiration chamber for the difference in energy expenditure related to physical activity between animals. The calculation is based on a preliminary published approach for partitioning HP between HP due to physical activity (AHP), thermic effect of feeding (TEF) and basal metabolic rate (fasting HP; FHP). Measurements with male growing pigs [mean body weight (BW): 115 kg] which were surgically castrated (SC), castrated through immunization against GnRH (IC), or kept as entire male (EM) were used as an example. Animals were fed the same diet ad-libitum and were housed individually in two 12-m3 open-circuit respiration chambers during 6 days when fed ad-libitum and one supplementary day when fasted. Physical activity was recorded through interruption of an infrared beam to detect standing and lying positions and with force transducers that recorded the mechanical force the animal exerted on the floor of the cage. Corrected AHP (AHPc), TEF (TEFc), and HP (HPc) were calculated to standardize the level of AHP between animals, assuming that the ratio between AHPc and ME intake should be constant. Inefficiency of energy utilization (sum of AHPc and TEFc) was lower than the inefficiency estimated from the slope of the classical relationship between HPc and ME intake but was associated with higher requirements for maintenance. Results indicate that EM pigs had higher FHP but lower TEFc than IC and SC pigs. These results agree with the higher contents in viscera of EM pigs that stimulate their basal metabolic rate and with the reduced utilization of dietary protein to provide energy for maintenance energy requirements and fat

  15. Subvoxel accurate graph search using non-Euclidean graph space.

    PubMed

    Abràmoff, Michael D; Wu, Xiaodong; Lee, Kyungmoo; Tang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Graph search is attractive for the quantitative analysis of volumetric medical images, and especially for layered tissues, because it allows globally optimal solutions in low-order polynomial time. However, because nodes of graphs typically encode evenly distributed voxels of the volume with arcs connecting orthogonally sampled voxels in Euclidean space, segmentation cannot achieve greater precision than a single unit, i.e. the distance between two adjoining nodes, and partial volume effects are ignored. We generalize the graph to non-Euclidean space by allowing non-equidistant spacing between nodes, so that subvoxel accurate segmentation is achievable. Because the number of nodes and edges in the graph remains the same, running time and memory use are similar, while all the advantages of graph search, including global optimality and computational efficiency, are retained. A deformation field calculated from the volume data adaptively changes regional node density so that node density varies with the inverse of the expected cost. We validated our approach using optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the retina and 3-D MR of the arterial wall, and achieved statistically significant increased accuracy. Our approach allows improved accuracy in volume data acquired with the same hardware, and also, preserved accuracy with lower resolution, more cost-effective, image acquisition equipment. The method is not limited to any specific imaging modality and readily extensible to higher dimensions. PMID:25314272

  16. Are Graphs Finally Surfacing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beineke, Lowell W.

    1989-01-01

    Explored are various aspects of drawing graphs on surfaces. The Euler's formula, Kuratowski's theorem and the drawing of graphs in the plane with as few crossings as possible are discussed. Some applications including embedding of graphs and coloring of maps are included. (YP)

  17. Graphing Important People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Toolbox" column features content adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans and provides practical tools for classroom teachers. This issue's column features a lesson plan adapted from "Graphing Plot and Character in a Novel" by Lisa Storm Fink and "Bio-graph: Graphing Life Events" by Susan Spangler. Students retell biographic events…

  18. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  19. Graph-Plotting Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    Plotter routine for IBM PC (AKPLOT) designed for engineers and scientists who use graphs as integral parts of their documentation. Allows user to generate graph and edit its appearance on cathode-ray tube. Graph may undergo many interactive alterations before finally dumped from screen to be plotted by printer. Written in BASIC.

  20. An analysis of spectral transformation techniques on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurović, Igor; Sejdić, Ervin; Bulatović, Nikola; Simeunović, Marko

    2015-05-01

    Emerging methods for the spectral analysis of graphs are analyzed in this paper, as graphs are currently used to study interactions in many fields from neuroscience to social networks. There are two main approaches related to the spectral transformation of graphs. The first approach is based on the Laplacian matrix. The graph Fourier transform is defined as an expansion of a graph signal in terms of eigenfunctions of the graph Laplacian. The calculated eigenvalues carry the notion of frequency of graph signals. The second approach is based on the graph weighted adjacency matrix, as it expands the graph signal into a basis of eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix instead of the graph Laplacian. Here, the notion of frequency is then obtained from the eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix or its Jordan decomposition. In this paper, advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are examined. Potential challenges and improvements to graph spectral processing methods are considered as well as the generalization of graph processing techniques in the spectral domain. Its generalization to the time-frequency domain and other potential extensions of classical signal processing concepts to graph datasets are also considered. Lastly, it is given an overview of the compressive sensing on graphs concepts.

  1. Parallel algorithms for finding cliques in a graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, S.

    2011-01-01

    A clique is a subgraph in a graph that is complete in the sense that each two of its nodes are connected by an edge. Finding cliques in a given graph is an important procedure in discrete mathematical modeling. The paper will show how concepts such as splitting partitions, quasi coloring, node and edge dominance are related to clique search problems. In particular we will discuss the connection with parallel clique search algorithms. These concepts also suggest practical guide lines to inspect a given graph before starting a large scale search.

  2. Can Comparison of Contrastive Examples Facilitate Graph Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linsey A.; Gentner, Dedre

    2011-01-01

    The authors explore the role of comparison in improving graph fluency. The ability to use graphs fluently is crucial for STEM achievement, but graphs are challenging to interpret and produce because they often involve integration of multiple variables, continuous change in variables over time, and omission of certain details in order to highlight…

  3. Graph hierarchies for phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Cybis, Gabriela B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A

    2013-03-19

    Bayesian phylogeographic methods simultaneously integrate geographical and evolutionary modelling, and have demonstrated value in assessing spatial spread patterns of measurably evolving organisms. We improve on existing phylogeographic methods by combining information from multiple phylogeographic datasets in a hierarchical setting. Consider N exchangeable datasets or strata consisting of viral sequences and locations, each evolving along its own phylogenetic tree and according to a conditionally independent geographical process. At the hierarchical level, a random graph summarizes the overall dispersion process by informing which migration rates between sampling locations are likely to be relevant in the strata. This approach provides an efficient and improved framework for analysing inherently hierarchical datasets. We first examine the evolutionary history of multiple serotypes of dengue virus in the Americas to showcase our method. Additionally, we explore an application to intrahost HIV evolution across multiple patients. PMID:23382428

  4. Inter-annual and inter-catchment variability of hydrologic partitioning: The importance of the Horton index to improve hydrologic predictions in a changing environment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, P. A.; Sivapalan, M.; Ruddell, B. L.; Brooks, P. D.; Durcik, M.; McGrath, G.

    2009-12-01

    In 1933, Horton analyzed the inter-annual variability of growing-season water balance components of the West Branch of the Delaware River at Hancock, NY, and discovered that the ratio of catchment vaporization to catchment wetting (the Horton index) remains almost constant despite large variability in precipitation. Eighty-six years later, Horton’s observation was confirmed using data from 431 MOPEX catchment in the US, but it was noted that the inter-annual variability of the Horton index depends strongly on the annual humidity index. It was also found that catchment vegetation use water more efficiently during drought years (lowest precipitation amount in 30 year record), suggesting that the convergence of biomes toward a common rain-use efficiency leaves a trace in the catchment water balance across climates. Recent work at the Hydrologic Synthesis Summer Institute at UBC, Vancouver, explored different simple top-down modeling approaches to investigate the observations related to the Horton index. All models were capable of predicting the mean Horton index with great accuracy, but were not able to fully explain the inter-annual variability. None of the models explicitly account for vegetation dynamics. It was also explored how knowledge of the Horton index in any given year can predict vegetation response (here measured by MODIS derived maximum NDVI), with surprisingly good results. Therefore, knowledge as to how precipitation is partitioned allows for improved predictions of vegetation response. This leads to an apparent paradox: how can it be that we predict the Horton index accurately with simple models that do not account for vegetation response, while knowledge of the Horton index predicts vegetation response? To resolve this paradox we used flux tower data from several Fluxnet stations across the country. The classic approach to model evapotranspiration (ET), which is based on the computation of a maximum ET rate and a soil moisture dependent reduction

  5. A Pfaffian Formula for Monomer-Dimer Partition Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Jauslin, Ian; Lieb, Elliott H.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the monomer-dimer partition function on arbitrary finite planar graphs and arbitrary monomer and dimer weights, with the restriction that the only non-zero monomer weights are those on the boundary. We prove a Pfaffian formula for the corresponding partition function. As a consequence of this result, multipoint boundary monomer correlation functions at close packing are shown to satisfy fermionic statistics. Our proof is based on the celebrated Kasteleyn theorem, combined with a theorem on Pfaffians proved by one of the authors, and a careful labeling and directing procedure of the vertices and edges of the graph.

  6. Methods of visualizing graphs

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, James J.

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  7. Hyperbolic graph generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Orsini, Chiara; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    Networks representing many complex systems in nature and society share some common structural properties like heterogeneous degree distributions and strong clustering. Recent research on network geometry has shown that those real networks can be adequately modeled as random geometric graphs in hyperbolic spaces. In this paper, we present a computer program to generate such graphs. Besides real-world-like networks, the program can generate random graphs from other well-known graph ensembles, such as the soft configuration model, random geometric graphs on a circle, or Erdős-Rényi random graphs. The simulations show a good match between the expected values of different network structural properties and the corresponding empirical values measured in generated graphs, confirming the accurate behavior of the program.

  8. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Coen, Paul M; Menshikova, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J; Standley, Robert A; Helbling, Nicole L; Dubis, Gabriel S; Ritov, Vladimir B; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E; Smith, Steven R; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G S; Houmard, Joseph A; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2015-11-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Mitochondrial respiration and intramyocellular triglyceride, sphingolipid, and diacylglycerol content were measured in vastus lateralis biopsy specimens. We found that EX provided additional improvements in SI and that only EX improved cardiorespiratory fitness, mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities, and cardiolipin profile with no change in mitochondrial content. Muscle triglycerides were reduced in type I fibers in CON, and sphingolipids decreased in both groups, with EX showing a further reduction in a number of ceramide species. In conclusion, exercise superimposed on bariatric surgery-induced weight loss enhances mitochondrial respiration, induces cardiolipin remodeling, reduces specific sphingolipids, and provides additional improvements in insulin sensitivity. PMID:26293505

  9. NEIGHBORHOOD COMPLEXITIES AND SYMMETRY OF CHEMICAL GRAPHS AND THEIR BIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative measures of molecular complexity are calculated through the application of information-theoretic formalism on chemical graphs. The vertex set of a chemical graph is partitioned into disjoint subsets on the basis of the equivalence of various orders of closed neighbor...

  10. Partitioning Rectangular and Structurally Nonsymmetric Sparse Matrices for Parallel Processing

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hendrickson; T.G. Kolda

    1998-09-01

    A common operation in scientific computing is the multiplication of a sparse, rectangular or structurally nonsymmetric matrix and a vector. In many applications the matrix- transpose-vector product is also required. This paper addresses the efficient parallelization of these operations. We show that the problem can be expressed in terms of partitioning bipartite graphs. We then introduce several algorithms for this partitioning problem and compare their performance on a set of test matrices.

  11. Improved reactor performance and operability in the biotransformation of carveol to carvone using a solid-liquid two-phase partitioning bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Morrish, Jenna L E; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to improve reactor performance and process operability, the microbial biotransformation of (-)-trans-carveol to (R)-(-)-carvone by hydrophobic Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 was carried out in a two phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) with solid polymer beads acting as the partitioning phase. Previous work had demonstrated that the substrate and product become inhibitory to the organism at elevated aqueous concentrations and the use of an immiscible second phase in the bioreactor was intended to provide a reservoir for substrates to be delivered to the aqueous phase based on the metabolic rate of the cells, while also acting as a sink to uptake the product as it is produced. The biotransformation was previously undertaken in a two liquid phase TPPB with 1-dodecene and with silicone oil as the immiscible second phase and, although improvement in the reactor performance was obtained relative to a single phase system, the hydrophobic nature of the organism caused the formation of severe emulsions leading to significant operational challenges. In the present work, eight types of polymer beads were screened for their suitability for use in a solid-liquid TPPB for this biotransformation. The use of selected solid polymer beads as the second phase completely prevented emulsion formation and therefore improved overall operability of the reactor. Three modes of solid-liquid TPPB operation were considered: the use of a single polymer bead type (styrene/butadiene copolymer) in the reactor, the use of a mixture of polymer beads in the reactor (styrene/butadiene copolymer plus Hytrel(R) 8206), and the use of one type of polymer beads in the reactor (styrene/butadiene copolymer), and another bead type (Hytrel(R) 8206) in an external column through which fermentation medium was recirculated. This last configuration achieved the best reactor performance with 7 times more substrate being added throughout the biotransformation relative to a single aqueous phase

  12. Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with…

  13. Topologies on directed graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Given a directed graph, a natural topology is defined and relationships between standard topological properties and graph theoretical concepts are studied. In particular, the properties of connectivity and separatedness are investigated. A metric is introduced which is shown to be related to separatedness. The topological notions of continuity and homeomorphism. A class of maps is studied which preserve both graph and topological properties. Applications involving strong maps and contractions are also presented.

  14. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  15. mpiGraph

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-05-22

    MpiGraph consists of an MPI application called mpiGraph written in C to measure message bandwidth and an associated crunch_mpiGraph script written in Perl to process the application output into an HTMO report. The mpiGraph application is designed to inspect the health and scalability of a high-performance interconnect while under heavy load. This is useful to detect hardware and software problems in a system, such as slow nodes, links, switches, or contention in switch routing. Itmore » is also useful to characterize how interconnect performance changes with different settings or how one interconnect type compares to another.« less

  16. Coloring random graphs.

    PubMed

    Mulet, R; Pagnani, A; Weigt, M; Zecchina, R

    2002-12-23

    We study the graph coloring problem over random graphs of finite average connectivity c. Given a number q of available colors, we find that graphs with low connectivity admit almost always a proper coloring, whereas graphs with high connectivity are uncolorable. Depending on q, we find the precise value of the critical average connectivity c(q). Moreover, we show that below c(q) there exists a clustering phase c in [c(d),c(q)] in which ground states spontaneously divide into an exponential number of clusters and where the proliferation of metastable states is responsible for the onset of complexity in local search algorithms. PMID:12484862

  17. mpiGraph

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Adam

    2007-05-22

    MpiGraph consists of an MPI application called mpiGraph written in C to measure message bandwidth and an associated crunch_mpiGraph script written in Perl to process the application output into an HTMO report. The mpiGraph application is designed to inspect the health and scalability of a high-performance interconnect while under heavy load. This is useful to detect hardware and software problems in a system, such as slow nodes, links, switches, or contention in switch routing. It is also useful to characterize how interconnect performance changes with different settings or how one interconnect type compares to another.

  18. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Aydın; Gilbert, John; Mattson, Timothy; Meyerhenke, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.

  19. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Aydın; Gilbert, John; Mattson, Timothy; Meyerhenke, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implementmore » a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.« less

  20. Graphing Electric Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Marvin L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the powerful graphing ability of computer algebra systems (CAS) to create three-dimensional graphs or surface graphics of electric potentials. Provides equations along with examples of the printouts. Lists the programs Mathematica, Maple, Derive, Theorist, MathCad, and MATLAB as promising CAS systems. (MVL)

  1. Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Millie

    1997-01-01

    Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

  2. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  3. Reflections on "The Graph"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article responds to arguments by Skidmore and Thompson (this issue of "Educational Researcher") that a graph published more than 10 years ago was erroneously reproduced and "gratuitously damaged" perceptions of the quality of education research. After describing the purpose of the original graph, the author counters assertions that the graph…

  4. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  5. Walking Out Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that students have to understand the consistency among these representations and form the habit of…

  6. ACTIVITIES: Graphs and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1975-01-01

    Using a set of worksheets, students will discover and apply Euler's formula regarding connected planar graphs and play and analyze the game of Sprouts. One sheet leads to the discovery of Euler's formula; another concerns traversability of a graph; another gives an example and a game involving these ideas. (Author/KM)

  7. Let's Do It: Making Graphs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jean M.

    1984-01-01

    Reasons for having students make graphs are noted. Then specific graphing topics and materials appropriate for young learners are presented, including life-sized, floor, clothespin, felt-face, block, and magnetic graphs, and polls of pupils. (MNS)

  8. An iterated tabu search approach for the clique partitioning problem.

    PubMed

    Palubeckis, Gintaras; Ostreika, Armantas; Tomkevičius, Arūnas

    2014-01-01

    Given an edge-weighted undirected graph with weights specifying dissimilarities between pairs of objects, represented by the vertices of the graph, the clique partitioning problem (CPP) is to partition the vertex set of the graph into mutually disjoint subsets such that the sum of the edge weights over all cliques induced by the subsets is as small as possible. We develop an iterated tabu search (ITS) algorithm for solving this problem. The proposed algorithm incorporates tabu search, local search, and solution perturbation procedures. We report computational results on CPP instances of size up to 2000 vertices. Performance comparisons of ITS against state-of-the-art methods from the literature demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach. PMID:24737968

  9. An Iterated Tabu Search Approach for the Clique Partitioning Problem

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Given an edge-weighted undirected graph with weights specifying dissimilarities between pairs of objects, represented by the vertices of the graph, the clique partitioning problem (CPP) is to partition the vertex set of the graph into mutually disjoint subsets such that the sum of the edge weights over all cliques induced by the subsets is as small as possible. We develop an iterated tabu search (ITS) algorithm for solving this problem. The proposed algorithm incorporates tabu search, local search, and solution perturbation procedures. We report computational results on CPP instances of size up to 2000 vertices. Performance comparisons of ITS against state-of-the-art methods from the literature demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach. PMID:24737968

  10. Evolutionary stability on graphs

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary stability is a fundamental concept in evolutionary game theory. A strategy is called an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS), if its monomorphic population rejects the invasion of any other mutant strategy. Recent studies have revealed that population structure can considerably affect evolutionary dynamics. Here we derive the conditions of evolutionary stability for games on graphs. We obtain analytical conditions for regular graphs of degree k > 2. Those theoretical predictions are compared with computer simulations for random regular graphs and for lattices. We study three different update rules: birth-death (BD), death-birth (DB), and imitation (IM) updating. Evolutionary stability on sparse graphs does not imply evolutionary stability in a well-mixed population, nor vice versa. We provide a geometrical interpretation of the ESS condition on graphs. PMID:18295801

  11. Improving energy partitioning and the nighttime energy balance by implementation of a multi-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiying; Ryder, James; Naudts, Kim; McGrath, Matthew J.; Otto, Juliane; Bastriko, Vladislav; Valade, Aude; Launiainen, Samuli; Ogée, Jérôme; Elbers, Jan A.; Foken, Thomas; Tiedemann, Frank; Heinesch, Bernard; Black, Andrew; Haverd, Vanessa; Loustau, Denis; Ottlé, Catherine; Peylin, Philippe; Polcher, Jan; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2015-04-01

    Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between land surface and overlay air mass. In this study we evaluated the performance of a newly developed multi-layer energy budget (Ryder et al., 2014) in a land surface model, ORCHIDEE-CAN (Naudts et al., 2014), which simulates canopy structure and can be coupled to an atmospheric model using an implicit procedure. Furthermore, a vertical discrete drag parametrization scheme was also incorporated into this model, in order to obtain a better description of the sub-canopy wind profile simulation. Site level datasets, including the top-of-the-canopy and sub-canopy observations made available from eight flux observation sites, were collected in order to conduct this evaluation. The geo-location of the collected observation sites crossed climate zones from temperate to boreal and the vegetation types included deciduous, evergreen broad leaved and evergreen needle leaved forest with maximum LAI ranging from 2.1 to 7.0. First, we used long-term top-of-the-canopy measurements to analyze the performance of the current one-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN. Three major processes were identified for improvement through the implementation of a multi-layer energy budget: 1) night time radiation balance, 2) energy partitioning during winter and 3) prediction of the ground heat flux. Short-term sub-canopy observations were used to calibrate the parameters in sub-canopy radiation, turbulence and resistances modules with an automatic tuning process following the maximum gradient of the user-defined objective function. The multi-layer model is able to capture the dynamic of sub-canopy turbulence, temperature and energy fluxes with imposed LAI profile and optimized parameter set at a site level calibration. The simulation result shows the improvement both on the nighttime energy balance and energy partitioning during winter

  12. Implementing Graph Pattern Queries on a Relational Database

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I L; Abdulla, G M; Brugger, S T; Kohn, S R

    2007-12-26

    When a graph database is implemented on top of a relational database, queries in the graph query language are translated into relational SQL queries. Graph pattern queries are an important feature of a graph query language. Translating graph pattern queries into single SQL statements results in very poor query performance. By taking into account the pattern query structure and generating multiple SQL statements, pattern query performance can be dramatically improved. The performance problems encountered with the single SQL statements generated for pattern queries reflects a problem in the SQL query planner and optimizer. Addressing this problem would allow relational databases to better support semantic graph databases. Relational database systems that provide good support for graph databases may also be more flexible platforms for data warehouses.

  13. Understanding graphs with two independent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Jennifer L.

    Adults are not necessarily competent users of graphs with two independent variables, despite the frequency of this representational format. The three tasks in this thesis address the impact of interpretation statements and graph patterns. Interpretation statements were based on the statistical effects -- simple effects, main effects, and interactions. Graph patterns were systematically varied based on a novel classification scheme of graphs with two IVs. I suggest that the complexity of a graph's data pattern depends on the consistency of the simple effects' directions and magnitudes. In the first study, undergraduates constructed graphs based on statements about data patterns. Errors reflected a misunderstanding of how two IVs could be combined and represented graphically. When the experimental group had graph-relevant information added (variable labels spatially located on axes), the ability to represent the relationships among the IVs significantly increased. The ability to satisfy the constraints imposed by the statements was not affected. Adding labels specifically targeted skills relevant to graphical literacy. Transfer to a third trial was stronger for those of higher math abilities. The second study focused on the effect of an introductory statistics course. Overall, undergraduates performed well on statements describing the simple effects of the IVs. However, even though they improved from Time 1 to Time 2 for interaction statements, performance on statements about main effects and interactions still showed considerable room for improvement. In the third study, repeated trials of the 20 patterns proposed by the simple effects consistency model established that the proposed classification scheme addresses additional sources of variability in reasoning with graphs (i.e., sources not captured by traditional classification schemes). As the complexity level of the data pattern increased, performance (based on accuracy and RT) decreased, with parallel impacts on

  14. Scaling metagenome sequence assembly with probabilistic de Bruijn graphs

    PubMed Central

    Pell, Jason; Hintze, Arend; Canino-Koning, Rosangela; Howe, Adina; Tiedje, James M.; Brown, C. Titus

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing has enabled the investigation of a wide range of environmental microbial ecosystems, but the high memory requirements for de novo assembly of short-read shotgun sequencing data from these complex populations are an increasingly large practical barrier. Here we introduce a memory-efficient graph representation with which we can analyze the k-mer connectivity of metagenomic samples. The graph representation is based on a probabilistic data structure, a Bloom filter, that allows us to efficiently store assembly graphs in as little as 4 bits per k-mer, albeit inexactly. We show that this data structure accurately represents DNA assembly graphs in low memory. We apply this data structure to the problem of partitioning assembly graphs into components as a prelude to assembly, and show that this reduces the overall memory requirements for de novo assembly of metagenomes. On one soil metagenome assembly, this approach achieves a nearly 40-fold decrease in the maximum memory requirements for assembly. This probabilistic graph representation is a significant theoretical advance in storing assembly graphs and also yields immediate leverage on metagenomic assembly. PMID:22847406

  15. The Effect of Using Graphing Calculators in Complex Function Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocak, Mehmet Akif

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the role of graphing calculators in multiple representations for knowledge transfer and the omission of oversimplification in complex function graphs. The main aim is to examine whether graphing calculators were used efficiently to see different cases and multiple perspectives among complex function graphs, or whether…

  16. Further improved stability criteria for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with time-varying delay by (m,N)-delay-partitioning approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Luo, Wen-Pin; Wang, Yong-Hu; Cheng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the robust stability criteria for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with time-varying delay by (m,N)-delay-partitioning approach. A modified augmented LKF is established by partitioning the delay in all integral terms. Via taking into account of (i) the relationship between each subinterval and time-varying delay and (ii) the independent upper bounds of the delay derivative in the various delay intervals, some new results on tighter bounding inequalities such as Peng-Park׳s integral inequality and Free-Matrix-based integral inequality are introduced to effectively reduce the enlargement in bounding the derivative of LKF as much as possible, therefore, significant less conservative results can be expected in terms of es and LMIs, which can be solved efficiently with the Matlab LMI toolbox. Furthermore, it is worth mentioning that, when the delay-partitioning number m is fixed, the conservatism is gradually reduced with the increase of another delay-partitioning number N, but without increasing any computing burden. Finally, two numerical examples are included to show that the proposed method is less conservative than existing ones. PMID:26365365

  17. A study on vague graphs.

    PubMed

    Rashmanlou, Hossein; Samanta, Sovan; Pal, Madhumangal; Borzooei, R A

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the notion of vague h-morphism on vague graphs and regular vague graphs. The action of vague h-morphism on vague strong regular graphs are studied. Some elegant results on weak and co weak isomorphism are derived. Also, [Formula: see text]-complement of highly irregular vague graphs are defined. PMID:27536517

  18. A Semantic Graph Query Language

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I L

    2006-10-16

    Semantic graphs can be used to organize large amounts of information from a number of sources into one unified structure. A semantic query language provides a foundation for extracting information from the semantic graph. The graph query language described here provides a simple, powerful method for querying semantic graphs.

  19. A Negative Partition Relation

    PubMed Central

    Hajnal, A.

    1971-01-01

    If the continuum hypothesis is assumed, there is a graph G whose vertices form an ordered set of type ω12; G does not contain triangles or complete even graphs of form [[unk]0,[unk]0], and there is no independent subset of vertices of type ω12. PMID:16591893

  20. Direct reciprocity on graphs

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    Direct reciprocity is a mechanism for the evolution of cooperation based on the idea of repeated encounters between the same two individuals. Here we examine direct reciprocity in structured populations, where individuals occupy the vertices of a graph. The edges denote who interacts with whom. The graph represents spatial structure or a social network. For birth-death or pairwise comparison updating, we find that evolutionary stability of direct reciprocity is more restrictive on a graph than in a well-mixed population, but the condition for reciprocators to be advantageous is less restrictive on a graph. For death-birth and imitation updating, in contrast, both conditions are easier to fulfill on a graph. Moreover, for all four update mechanisms, reciprocators can dominate defectors on a graph, which is never possible in a well-mixed population. We also study the effect of an error rate, which increases with the number of links per individual; interacting with more people simultaneously enhances the probability of making mistakes. We provide analytic derivations for all results. PMID:17466339

  1. Commuting projections on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Zikatanov, Ludmil T.

    2013-02-19

    For a given (connected) graph, we consider vector spaces of (discrete) functions defined on its vertices and its edges. These two spaces are related by a discrete gradient operator, Grad and its adjoint, ₋Div, referred to as (negative) discrete divergence. We also consider a coarse graph obtained by aggregation of vertices of the original one. Then a coarse vertex space is identified with the subspace of piecewise constant functions over the aggregates. We consider the ℓ2-projection QH onto the space of these piecewise constants. In the present paper, our main result is the construction of a projection π H from the original edge-space onto a properly constructed coarse edge-space associated with the edges of the coarse graph. The projections π H and QH commute with the discrete divergence operator, i.e., we have div π H = QH div. The respective pair of coarse edge-space and coarse vertexspace offer the potential to construct two-level, and by recursion, multilevel methods for the mixed formulation of the graph Laplacian which utilizes the discrete divergence operator. The performance of one two-level method with overlapping Schwarz smoothing and correction based on the constructed coarse spaces for solving such mixed graph Laplacian systems is illustrated on a number of graph examples.

  2. Integration of Building Knowledge Into Binary Space Partitioning for the Reconstruction of Regularized Building Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, A.; Jung, J.; Sohn, G.; Kada, M.; Ehlers, M.

    2015-09-01

    Recent approaches for the automatic reconstruction of 3D building models from airborne point cloud data integrate prior knowledge of roof shapes with the intention to improve the regularization of the resulting models without lessening the flexibility to generate all real-world occurring roof shapes. In this paper, we present a method to integrate building knowledge into the data-driven approach that uses binary space partitioning (BSP) for modeling the 3D building geometry. A retrospective regularization of polygons that emerge from the BSP tree is not without difficulty because it has to deal with the 2D BSP subdivision itself and the plane definitions of the resulting partition regions to ensure topological correctness. This is aggravated by the use of hyperplanes during the binary subdivision that often splits planar roof regions into several parts that are stored in different subtrees of the BSP tree. We therefore introduce the use of hyperpolylines in the generation of the BSP tree to avoid unnecessary spatial subdivisions, so that the spatial integrity of planar roof regions is better maintained. The hyperpolylines are shown to result from basic building roof knowledge that is extracted based on roof topology graphs. An adjustment of the underlying point segments ensures that the positions of the extracted hyperpolylines result in regularized 2D partitions as well as topologically correct 3D building models. The validity and limitations of the approach are demonstrated on real-world examples.

  3. Selecting optimal partitioning schemes for phylogenomic datasets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Partitioning involves estimating independent models of molecular evolution for different subsets of sites in a sequence alignment, and has been shown to improve phylogenetic inference. Current methods for estimating best-fit partitioning schemes, however, are only computationally feasible with datasets of fewer than 100 loci. This is a problem because datasets with thousands of loci are increasingly common in phylogenetics. Methods We develop two novel methods for estimating best-fit partitioning schemes on large phylogenomic datasets: strict and relaxed hierarchical clustering. These methods use information from the underlying data to cluster together similar subsets of sites in an alignment, and build on clustering approaches that have been proposed elsewhere. Results We compare the performance of our methods to each other, and to existing methods for selecting partitioning schemes. We demonstrate that while strict hierarchical clustering has the best computational efficiency on very large datasets, relaxed hierarchical clustering provides scalable efficiency and returns dramatically better partitioning schemes as assessed by common criteria such as AICc and BIC scores. Conclusions These two methods provide the best current approaches to inferring partitioning schemes for very large datasets. We provide free open-source implementations of the methods in the PartitionFinder software. We hope that the use of these methods will help to improve the inferences made from large phylogenomic datasets. PMID:24742000

  4. ASK-GraphView: A large scale graph visualization system.

    PubMed

    Abello, James; van Ham, Frank; Krishnan, Neeraj

    2006-01-01

    We describe ASK-GraphView, a node-link-based graph visualization system that allows clustering and interactive navigation of large graphs, ranging in size up to 16 million edges. The system uses a scalable architecture and a series of increasingly sophisticated clustering algorithms to construct a hierarchy on an arbitrary, weighted undirected input graph. By lowering the interactivity requirements we can scale to substantially bigger graphs. The user is allowed to navigate this hierarchy in a top down manner by interactively expanding individual clusters. ASK-GraphView also provides facilities for filtering and coloring, annotation and cluster labeling. PMID:17080786

  5. New Graph Calculi for Planar Non-3-Colorable Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanatani, Yoichi; Horiyama, Takashi; Iwama, Kazuo; Tamaki, Suguru

    The Hajós calculus is a nondeterministic procedure which generates the class of non-3-colorable graphs. If all non-3-colorable graphs can be constructed in polynomial steps by the calculus, then NP=co-NP holds. Up to date, however, it remains open whether there exists a family of graphs that cannot be generated in polynomial steps. To attack this problem, we propose two graph calculi PHC and PHC* that generate non-3-colorable planar graphs, where intermediate graphs in the calculi are also restricted to be planar. Then we prove that PHC and PHC* are sound and complete. We also show that PHC* can polynomially simulate PHC.

  6. Graphing. USMES Beginning "How To" Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agro, Sally; And Others

    In this set of eight booklets on graphing, primary grade students learn how to choose which graph to make and how to make a bar graph, bar graph histogram, conversion graph, line chart, line graph, scatter graph, and slope diagram. The major emphasis in all Unified Sciences and Mathematics for Elementary Schools (USMES) units is on open-ended,…

  7. Analyzing locomotion synthesis with feature-based motion graphs.

    PubMed

    Mahmudi, Mentar; Kallmann, Marcelo

    2013-05-01

    We propose feature-based motion graphs for realistic locomotion synthesis among obstacles. Among several advantages, feature-based motion graphs achieve improved results in search queries, eliminate the need of postprocessing for foot skating removal, and reduce the computational requirements in comparison to traditional motion graphs. Our contributions are threefold. First, we show that choosing transitions based on relevant features significantly reduces graph construction time and leads to improved search performances. Second, we employ a fast channel search method that confines the motion graph search to a free channel with guaranteed clearance among obstacles, achieving faster and improved results that avoid expensive collision checking. Lastly, we present a motion deformation model based on Inverse Kinematics applied over the transitions of a solution branch. Each transition is assigned a continuous deformation range that does not exceed the original transition cost threshold specified by the user for the graph construction. The obtained deformation improves the reachability of the feature-based motion graph and in turn also reduces the time spent during search. The results obtained by the proposed methods are evaluated and quantified, and they demonstrate significant improvements in comparison to traditional motion graph techniques. PMID:22752722

  8. Improving Design Efficiency for Large-Scale Heterogeneous Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregerson, Anthony

    Despite increases in logic density, many Big Data applications must still be partitioned across multiple computing devices in order to meet their strict performance requirements. Among the most demanding of these applications is high-energy physics (HEP), which uses complex computing systems consisting of thousands of FPGAs and ASICs to process the sensor data created by experiments at particles accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Designing such computing systems is challenging due to the scale of the systems, the exceptionally high-throughput and low-latency performance constraints that necessitate application-specific hardware implementations, the requirement that algorithms are efficiently partitioned across many devices, and the possible need to update the implemented algorithms during the lifetime of the system. In this work, we describe our research to develop flexible architectures for implementing such large-scale circuits on FPGAs. In particular, this work is motivated by (but not limited in scope to) high-energy physics algorithms for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC. To make efficient use of logic resources in multi-FPGA systems, we introduce Multi-Personality Partitioning, a novel form of the graph partitioning problem, and present partitioning algorithms that can significantly improve resource utilization on heterogeneous devices while also reducing inter-chip connections. To reduce the high communication costs of Big Data applications, we also introduce Information-Aware Partitioning, a partitioning method that analyzes the data content of application-specific circuits, characterizes their entropy, and selects circuit partitions that enable efficient compression of data between chips. We employ our information-aware partitioning method to improve the performance of the hardware validation platform for evaluating new algorithms for the CMS experiment. Together, these research efforts help to improve the efficiency

  9. "K"-Balance Partitioning: An Exact Method with Applications to Generalized Structural Balance and Other Psychological Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael; Steinley, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Structural balance theory (SBT) has maintained a venerable status in the psychological literature for more than 5 decades. One important problem pertaining to SBT is the approximation of structural or generalized balance via the partitioning of the vertices of a signed graph into "K" clusters. This "K"-balance partitioning problem also has more…

  10. Continuous partition lattice

    PubMed Central

    Björner, Anders

    1987-01-01

    A continuous analogue to the partition lattices is presented. This is the metric completion of the direct limit of a system of embeddings of the finite partition lattices. The construction is analogous to von Neumann's construction of a continuous geometry over a field F from the finite-dimensional projective geometries over F. PMID:16593874

  11. A Graph Search Heuristic for Shortest Distance Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, E

    2005-03-24

    This paper presents a heuristic for guiding A* search for finding the shortest distance path between two vertices in a connected, undirected, and explicitly stored graph. The heuristic requires a small amount of data to be stored at each vertex. The heuristic has application to quickly detecting relationships between two vertices in a large information or knowledge network. We compare the performance of this heuristic with breadth-first search on graphs with various topological properties. The results show that one or more orders of magnitude improvement in the number of vertices expanded is possible for large graphs, including Poisson random graphs.

  12. Robust Spectral Clustering Using Statistical Sub-Graph Affinity Model

    PubMed Central

    Eichel, Justin A.; Wong, Alexander; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods. PMID:24386111

  13. Application of graph colouring to biological networks.

    PubMed

    Khor, S

    2010-05-01

    The author explores the application of graph colouring to biological networks, specifically protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. First, the author finds that given similar conditions (i.e. graph size, degree distribution and clustering), fewer colours are needed to colour disassortative than assortative networks. Fewer colours create fewer independent sets which in turn imply higher concurrency potential for a network. Since PPI networks tend to be disassortative, the author suggests that in addition to functional specificity and stability proposed previously by Maslov and Sneppen (Science, 296, 2002), the disassortative nature of PPI networks may promote the ability of cells to perform multiple, crucial and functionally diverse tasks concurrently. Second, because graph colouring is closely related to the presence of cliques in a graph, the significance of node colouring information to the problem of identifying protein complexes (dense subgraphs in PPI networks), is investigated. The author finds that for PPI networks where 1-11% of nodes participate in at least one identified protein complex, such as H. sapien, DSATUR (a well-known complete graph colouring algorithm) node colouring information can improve the quality (homogeneity and separation) of initial candidate complexes. This finding may help improve existing protein complex detection methods, and/or suggest new methods. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:20499999

  14. Exploiting graph properties of game trees

    SciTech Connect

    Plaat, A.; Pijls, W.; Bruin, A. de; Schaeffer, J.

    1996-12-31

    The state space of most adversary games is a directed graph. However, due to the success of simple recursive algorithms based on alpha-beta, theoreticians and practitioners have concentrated on the traversal of trees, giving the field the name {open_quotes}game-tree search,{close_quotes} This paper shows that the focus on trees has obscured some important properties of the underlying graphs. One of the hallmarks of the field of game-tree search has been the notion of the minimal tree, the smallest tree that has to be searched by any algorithm to find the minimax value. In fact, for most games it is a directed graph. As demonstrated in chess and checkers, we show that the minimal graph is significantly smaller than previously thought, proving that there is more room for improvement of current algorithms. We exploit the graph properties of the search space to reduce the size of trees built in practice by at least 25%. For over a decade, fixed-depth alpha-beta searching has been considered a closed subject, with research moving on to more application-dependent techniques. This work opens up new avenues of research for further application-independent improvements.

  15. Quantum Ergodicity on Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnutzmann, S.; Keating, J. P.; Piotet, F.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the equidistribution of the eigenfunctions on quantum graphs in the high-energy limit. Our main result is an estimate of the deviations from equidistribution for large well-connected graphs. We use an exact field-theoretic expression in terms of a variant of the supersymmetric nonlinear σ model. Our estimate is based on a saddle-point analysis of this expression and leads to a criterion for when equidistribution emerges asymptotically in the limit of large graphs. Our theory predicts a rate of convergence that is a significant refinement of previous estimates, long assumed to be valid for quantum chaotic systems, agreeing with them in some situations but not all. We discuss specific examples for which the theory is tested numerically.

  16. Algebraic distance on graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Safro, I.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the connection strength between a pair of vertices in a graph is one of the most important concerns in many graph applications. Simple measures such as edge weights may not be sufficient for capturing the effects associated with short paths of lengths greater than one. In this paper, we consider an iterative process that smooths an associated value for nearby vertices, and we present a measure of the local connection strength (called the algebraic distance; see [D. Ron, I. Safro, and A. Brandt, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 407-423]) based on this process. The proposed measure is attractive in that the process is simple, linear, and easily parallelized. An analysis of the convergence property of the process reveals that the local neighborhoods play an important role in determining the connectivity between vertices. We demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the proposed measure through several combinatorial optimization problems on graphs and hypergraphs.

  17. Discrete geometric analysis of message passing algorithm on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yusuke

    2010-04-01

    We often encounter probability distributions given as unnormalized products of non-negative functions. The factorization structures are represented by hypergraphs called factor graphs. Such distributions appear in various fields, including statistics, artificial intelligence, statistical physics, error correcting codes, etc. Given such a distribution, computations of marginal distributions and the normalization constant are often required. However, they are computationally intractable because of their computational costs. One successful approximation method is Loopy Belief Propagation (LBP) algorithm. The focus of this thesis is an analysis of the LBP algorithm. If the factor graph is a tree, i.e. having no cycle, the algorithm gives the exact quantities. If the factor graph has cycles, however, the LBP algorithm does not give exact results and possibly exhibits oscillatory and non-convergent behaviors. The thematic question of this thesis is "How the behaviors of the LBP algorithm are affected by the discrete geometry of the factor graph?" The primary contribution of this thesis is the discovery of a formula that establishes the relation between the LBP, the Bethe free energy and the graph zeta function. This formula provides new techniques for analysis of the LBP algorithm, connecting properties of the graph and of the LBP and the Bethe free energy. We demonstrate applications of the techniques to several problems including (non) convexity of the Bethe free energy, the uniqueness and stability of the LBP fixed point. We also discuss the loop series initiated by Chertkov and Chernyak. The loop series is a subgraph expansion of the normalization constant, or partition function, and reflects the graph geometry. We investigate theoretical natures of the series. Moreover, we show a partial connection between the loop series and the graph zeta function.

  18. Graph for locked rotor current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Graph determines effect of stalled motor on a distribution system and eliminates hand calculation of amperage in emergencies. Graph is useful to any manufacturer, contractor, or maintenance department involved in electrical technology.

  19. A graph based algorithm for adaptable dynamic airspace configuration for NextGen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savai, Mehernaz P.

    The National Airspace System (NAS) is a complicated large-scale aviation network, consisting of many static sectors wherein each sector is controlled by one or more controllers. The main purpose of the NAS is to enable safe and prompt air travel in the U.S. However, such static configuration of sectors will not be able to handle the continued growth of air travel which is projected to be more than double the current traffic by 2025. Under the initiative of the Next Generation of Air Transportation system (NextGen), the main objective of Adaptable Dynamic Airspace Configuration (ADAC) is that the sectors should change to the changing traffic so as to reduce the controller workload variance with time while increasing the throughput. Change in the resectorization should be such that there is a minimal increase in exchange of air traffic among controllers. The benefit of a new design (improvement in workload balance, etc.) should sufficiently exceed the transition cost, in order to deserve a change. This leads to the analysis of the concept of transition workload which is the cost associated with a transition from one sectorization to another. Given two airspace configurations, a transition workload metric which considers the air traffic as well as the geometry of the airspace is proposed. A solution to reduce this transition workload is also discussed. The algorithm is specifically designed to be implemented for the Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) Algorithm. A graph model which accurately represents the air route structure and air traffic in the NAS is used to formulate the airspace configuration problem. In addition, a multilevel graph partitioning algorithm is developed for Dynamic Airspace Configuration which partitions the graph model of airspace with given user defined constraints and hence provides the user more flexibility and control over various partitions. In terms of air traffic management, vertices represent airports and waypoints. Some of the major

  20. Cookies and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Carol

    1975-01-01

    Teachers of an integrated elementary classroom used cookie-sharing time as a learning experience for students. Responsible for dividing varying amounts of cookies daily, the students learned to translate their experiences to graphs of differing sophistication and analyses. Further interpretation and application were done by individual students…

  1. GraphLib

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-02-19

    This library is used in several LLNL projects, including STAT (the Stack Trace Analysis Tool for scalable debugging) and some modules in P^nMPI (a tool MPI tool infrastructure). It can also be used standalone for creating and manipulationg graphs, but its API is primarily tuned to support these other projects

  2. Graph-theoretical exorcism

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Given a graph G and an ordering phi of the vertices, V(G), we define a parsimonious proper coloring (PPC) of V(G) under phi to be a proper coloring of V(G) in the order phi, where a new color is introduced only when a vertex cannot be properly colored in its order with any of the colors already used.

  3. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  4. Body Motion and Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  5. Graphs in Real Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Charlene E.; Rozanski, Kara

    1999-01-01

    Presents a lesson that uses a motion detector in order for students to experience the interplay between motion and its graphical representation of the slope. Focuses on the change in the appearance of the graph with regard to changing speed. (ASK)

  6. Line Graph Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  7. Straight Line Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares one effective lesson idea on straight line graphs that he applied in his lower ability Y9 class. The author wanted something interesting for his class to do, something that was fun and engaging with direct feedback, and something that worked because someone else had tried it before. In a word, the author admits…

  8. Physics on Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Robert

    This is an extended version of the talk given at the Nato Advanced Research Workshop: New Challenges in Complex System Physics, May 20-24, 2013 in Samarkand (Uzbekistan). We report on results on three topics in joint work with V. Kostrykin (Mainz, Germany) and J. Potthoff (Mannheim, Germany): Propagation of waves on graphs,

  9. Quantum walks on quotient graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-06-15

    A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

  10. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  11. Graph-state basis for Pauli channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiaoyu; Jiang Lizhen

    2011-05-15

    Quantum capacities of Pauli channels are not additive, a degenerate quantum code may improve the hashing bound of the capacity. The difficulty in approaching the capacity is how to calculate the coherent information of a generic degenerate quantum code. Using graph state basis, we greatly reduce the problem for the input of quantum error-correcting code. We show that for a graph diagonal state passing through a Pauli channel the output state is diagonalizable and the joint output state of the system and ancilla is block diagonalizable. When the input state is an equal probable mixture of codewords of a stabilizer code, the coherent information can be analytically obtained.

  12. A Visual Analytics Paradigm Enabling Trillion-Edge Graph Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Haglin, David J.; Gillen, David S.; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Castellana, Vito G.; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Chappell, Alan R.; Zhang, Song

    2015-07-06

    We present a visual analytics paradigm and a system prototype for exploring web-scale graphs. A web-scale graph is described as a graph with ~one trillion edges and ~50 billion vertices. While there is an aggressive R&D effort in processing and exploring web-scale graphs among internet vendors such as Facebook and Google, visualizing a graph of that scale still remains an underexplored R&D area. The paper describes a nontraditional peek-and-filter strategy that facilitates the exploration of a graph database of unprecedented size for visualization and analytics. We demonstrate that our system prototype can 1) preprocess a graph with ~25 billion edges in less than two hours and 2) support database query and visualization on the processed graph database afterward. Based on our computational performance results, we argue that we most likely will achieve the one trillion edge mark (a computational performance improvement of 40 times) for graph visual analytics in the near future.

  13. A Clustering Graph Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Winlaw, Manda; De Sterck, Hans; Sanders, Geoffrey

    2015-10-26

    In very simple terms a network can be de ned as a collection of points joined together by lines. Thus, networks can be used to represent connections between entities in a wide variety of elds including engi- neering, science, medicine, and sociology. Many large real-world networks share a surprising number of properties, leading to a strong interest in model development research and techniques for building synthetic networks have been developed, that capture these similarities and replicate real-world graphs. Modeling these real-world networks serves two purposes. First, building models that mimic the patterns and prop- erties of real networks helps to understand the implications of these patterns and helps determine which patterns are important. If we develop a generative process to synthesize real networks we can also examine which growth processes are plausible and which are not. Secondly, high-quality, large-scale network data is often not available, because of economic, legal, technological, or other obstacles [7]. Thus, there are many instances where the systems of interest cannot be represented by a single exemplar network. As one example, consider the eld of cybersecurity, where systems require testing across diverse threat scenarios and validation across diverse network structures. In these cases, where there is no single exemplar network, the systems must instead be modeled as a collection of networks in which the variation among them may be just as important as their common features. By developing processes to build synthetic models, so-called graph generators, we can build synthetic networks that capture both the essential features of a system and realistic variability. Then we can use such synthetic graphs to perform tasks such as simulations, analysis, and decision making. We can also use synthetic graphs to performance test graph analysis algorithms, including clustering algorithms and anomaly detection algorithms.

  14. Towards Scalable Graph Computation on Mobile Devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Pienta, Robert; Kahng, Minsuk; Chau, Duen Horng

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices have become increasingly central to our everyday activities, due to their portability, multi-touch capabilities, and ever-improving computational power. Such attractive features have spurred research interest in leveraging mobile devices for computation. We explore a novel approach that aims to use a single mobile device to perform scalable graph computation on large graphs that do not fit in the device's limited main memory, opening up the possibility of performing on-device analysis of large datasets, without relying on the cloud. Based on the familiar memory mapping capability provided by today's mobile operating systems, our approach to scale up computation is powerful and intentionally kept simple to maximize its applicability across the iOS and Android platforms. Our experiments demonstrate that an iPad mini can perform fast computation on large real graphs with as many as 272 million edges (Google+ social graph), at a speed that is only a few times slower than a 13″ Macbook Pro. Through creating a real world iOS app with this technique, we demonstrate the strong potential application for scalable graph computation on a single mobile device using our approach. PMID:25859564

  15. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  16. Random Walks on Random Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Colin; Frieze, Alan

    The aim of this article is to discuss some of the notions and applications of random walks on finite graphs, especially as they apply to random graphs. In this section we give some basic definitions, in Section 2 we review applications of random walks in computer science, and in Section 3 we focus on walks in random graphs.

  17. Editing graphs for maximum effect

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.W.; Rhiner, R.W.

    1991-01-08

    The paper contains over eighty rules for editing graphs, arranged under nine major headings in a logical sequence for editing all the graphs in a manuscript. It is excerpted from a monograph used at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to train beginning technical editors in editing graphs; a corresponding Hypercard stack is also used in this training. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  19. Kevin Bacon and Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The interconnected world of actors and movies is a familiar, rich example for graph theory. This paper gives the history of the "Kevin Bacon Game" and makes extensive use of a Web site to analyze the underlying graph. The main content is the classroom development of the weighted average to determine the best choice of "center" for the graph. The…

  20. Recursive Feature Extraction in Graphs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-08-14

    ReFeX extracts recursive topological features from graph data. The input is a graph as a csv file and the output is a csv file containing feature values for each node in the graph. The features are based on topological counts in the neighborhoods of each nodes, as well as recursive summaries of neighbors' features.

  1. Fuzzy Partition Models for Fitting a Set of Partitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, A. D.; Vichi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes methods for fitting a fuzzy consensus partition to a set of partitions of the same set of objects. Describes and illustrates three models defining median partitions and compares these methods to an alternative approach to obtaining a consensus fuzzy partition. Discusses interesting differences in the results. (SLD)

  2. Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.

    2010-08-11

    The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

  3. Partitioning and parallel radiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzouk, S.; Winkler, C.; Paul, J. C.

    1996-03-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework, based on domain subdivision for parallel radiosity. Moreover, three various implementation approaches, taking advantage of partitioning algorithms and global shared memory architecture, are presented.

  4. A brief history of partitions of numbers, partition functions and their modern applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2016-04-01

    'Number rules the universe.' The Pythagoras 'If you wish to forsee the future of mathematics our course is to study the history and present conditions of the science.' Henri Poincaré 'The primary source (Urqell) of all mathematics are integers.' Hermann Minkowski This paper is written to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the Mathematical Association of America. It deals with a short history of different kinds of natural numbers including triangular, square, pentagonal, hexagonal and k-gonal numbers, and their simple properties and their geometrical representations. Included are Euclid's and Pythagorean's main contributions to elementary number theory with the main contents of the Euclid Elements of the 13-volume masterpiece of mathematical work. This is followed by Euler's new discovery of the additive number theory based on partitions of numbers. Special attention is given to many examples, Euler's theorems on partitions of numbers with geometrical representations of Ferrers' graphs, Young's diagrams, Lagrange's four-square theorem and the celebrated Waring problem. Included are Euler's generating functions for the partitions of numbers, Euler's pentagonal number theorem, Gauss' triangular and square number theorems and the Jacobi triple product identity. Applications of the theory of partitions of numbers to different statistics such as the Bose- Einstein, Fermi- Dirac, Gentile, and Maxwell- Boltzmann statistics are briefly discussed. Special attention is given to pedagogical information through historical approach to number theory so that students and teachers at the school, college and university levels can become familiar with the basic concepts of partitions of numbers, partition functions and their modern applications, and can pursue advanced study and research in analytical and computational number theory.

  5. What is a complex graph?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongkwang; Wilhelm, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Many papers published in recent years show that real-world graphs G(n,m) ( n nodes, m edges) are more or less “complex” in the sense that different topological features deviate from random graphs. Here we narrow the definition of graph complexity and argue that a complex graph contains many different subgraphs. We present different measures that quantify this complexity, for instance C1e, the relative number of non-isomorphic one-edge-deleted subgraphs (i.e. DECK size). However, because these different subgraph measures are computationally demanding, we also study simpler complexity measures focussing on slightly different aspects of graph complexity. We consider heuristically defined “product measures”, the products of two quantities which are zero in the extreme cases of a path and clique, and “entropy measures” quantifying the diversity of different topological features. The previously defined network/graph complexity measures Medium Articulation and Offdiagonal complexity ( OdC) belong to these two classes. We study OdC measures in some detail and compare it with our new measures. For all measures, the most complex graph G has a medium number of edges, between the edge numbers of the minimum and the maximum connected graph n-1graph complexity measures are characterized with the help of different example graphs. For all measures the corresponding time complexity is given. Finally, we discuss the complexity of 33 real-world graphs of different biological, social and economic systems with the six computationally most simple measures (including OdC). The complexities of the real graphs are compared with average complexities of two different random graph versions: complete random graphs (just fixed n,m) and rewired graphs with fixed node degrees.

  6. Graphing. USMES Intermediate "How To" Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agro, Sally; And Others

    In this set of six booklets on graphing, intermediate grade students learn how to choose which kind of graph to make; make bar graphs, histograms, line graphs, and conversion graphs; and use graphs to compare two sets of data. The major emphasis in all Unified Sciences and Mathematics for Elementary Schools (USMES) units is on open-ended,…

  7. Tracing retinal blood vessels by matrix-forest theorem of directed graphs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; De, Jaydeep; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Feng; Li, Huiqi

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to trace retinal blood vessel trees in fundus images. This task is far from being trivial as the crossover of vessels are commonly encountered in image-based vessel networks. Meanwhile it is often crucial to separate the vessel tree structures in applications such as diabetic retinopathy analysis. In this work, a novel directed graph based approach is proposed to cast the task as label propagation over directed graphs, such that the graph is to be partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the vessel trees is traced and separated from the rest of the vessel network. Then the tracing problem is addressed by making novel usage of the matrix-forest theorem in algebraic graph theory. Empirical experiments on synthetic as well as publicly available fundus image datasets demonstrate the applicability of our approach. PMID:25333171

  8. Random graphs with hidden color.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Bo

    2003-07-01

    We propose and investigate a unifying class of sparse random graph models, based on a hidden coloring of edge-vertex incidences, extending an existing approach, random graphs with a given degree distribution, in a way that admits a nontrivial correlation structure in the resulting graphs. The approach unifies a number of existing random graph ensembles within a common general formalism, and allows for the analytic calculation of observable graph characteristics. In particular, generating function techniques are used to derive the size distribution of connected components (clusters) as well as the location of the percolation threshold where a giant component appears. PMID:12935185

  9. Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhař, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-10-15

    We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

  10. Fuel for the Fire: Improved Understanding of Fire Behavior in Africa Based on Partitioned Herbaceous and Woody LAI from MODIS Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahiu, M. N.; Hanan, N. P.

    2014-12-01

    Fire is an important recurrent phenomenon that determines the distribution of global savanna biomes and tree cover in savanna ecosystems. Tropical savanna fires are almost exclusively ground fires, fueled by senescent herbaceous material, with crown fires being rare. Analyses of satellite-based fire activity and burned area (active fires and burn-scars) in tropical savannas reveal a close correlation with satellite-based estimates of total net primary productivity (NPP) in drier savannas, and apparent limitation by rainfall (fuel moisture) in wetter systems. However, these analyses of fire frequency and extent at continental scales ignore the different roles played by the herbaceous and woody vegetation components in promoting and/or suppressing fire ignition and spread. In this research we hypothesized that, since herbaceous vegetation provides the primary fuel, fire frequency and burn areas in African savannas and seasonal woodlands should correlate more closely with measurements of herbaceous NPP or end of season leaf area index (LAI), than with the NPP or LAI of the tree layer. Similarly, while fire patterns may correlate with patterns of total LAI and total NPP across Africa, the relationship will be confounded by variations in tree cover. Our objective is to understand how fire frequency and intensity vary with changes in herbaceous cover. To test our hypotheses we will use estimates of herbaceous and woody LAI that we have developed recently by partitioning MODIS LAI. We will explore how seasonal maximum herbaceous LAI and leaf area duration (LAD) (both potential proxies for accumulated fuel load) correlate with fire frequency in African savannas. We will demonstrate the MODIS LAI partitioning methodology, and present results on the divergent relationships between African savanna fires and total LAI, herbaceous LAI and herbaceous LAD.

  11. Locating-chromatic number for a graph of two components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welyyanti, Des; Simanjuntak, Rinovia; Uttunggadewa, Saladin; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    The study of locating-chromatic number of a graph initiated by Chartrand et al. [5] is only limited for connected graphs. In 2014, Welyyanti et al. extended this notion so that the locating-chromatic number can also be applied to disconnected graphs. Let c be a k-coloring of a disconnected graph H(V, E) and ∏ = {C1,C2, …, Ck} be the partition of V (H) induced by c, where Ci is the set of all vertices receiving color i. The color code c∏(v) of a vertex v ∈ H is the ordered k-tuple (d(v,C1), d(v,C2), …, d(v,Ck)), where d(v,Ci) = min{d(v, x)|x ∈ Ci} and d(v,Ci) < ∞ for all i ∈ [1, k]. If all vertices of H have distinct color codes, then c is called a locating-coloring of H. The locating-chromatic number of H, denoted by χ'L(H ) , is the smallest k such that H admits a locating-coloring with k colors, otherwise we say that χ'L(H )=∞ . In this paper, we determine locating-chromatic number of a graph with two components where each component has the locating-chromatic number 3.

  12. A New Graph Drawing Scheme for Social Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric Ke; Zou, Futai

    2014-01-01

    With the development of social networks, people have started to use social network tools to record their life and work more and more frequently. How to analyze social networks to explore potential characteristics and trend of social events has been a hot research topic. In order to analyze it effectively, a kind of techniques called information visualization is employed to extract the potential information from the large scale of social network data and present the information briefly as visualized graphs. In the process of information visualization, graph drawing is a crucial part. In this paper, we study the graph layout algorithms and propose a new graph drawing scheme combining multilevel and single-level drawing approaches, including the graph division method based on communities and refining approach based on partitioning strategy. Besides, we compare the effectiveness of our scheme and FM3 in experiments. The experiment results show that our scheme can achieve a clearer diagram and effectively extract the community structure of the social network to be applied to drawing schemes. PMID:25157378

  13. Graph - Based High Resolution Satellite Image Segmentation for Object Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravali, K.; Kumar, M. V. Ravi; Venugopala Rao, K.

    2014-11-01

    Object based image processing and analysis is challenging research in very high resolution satellite utilisation. Commonly ei ther pixel based classification or visual interpretation is used to recognize and delineate land cover categories. The pixel based classification techniques use rich spectral content of satellite images and fail to utilise spatial relations. To overcome th is drawback, traditional time consuming visual interpretation methods are being used operational ly for preparation of thematic maps. This paper addresses computational vision principles to object level image segmentation. In this study, computer vision algorithms are developed to define the boundary between two object regions and segmentation by representing image as graph. Image is represented as a graph G (V, E), where nodes belong to pixels and, edges (E) connect nodes belonging to neighbouring pixels. The transformed Mahalanobis distance has been used to define a weight function for partition of graph into components such that each component represents the region of land category. This implies that edges between two vertices in the same component have relatively low weights and edges between vertices in different components should have higher weights. The derived segments are categorised to different land cover using supervised classification. The paper presents the experimental results on real world multi-spectral remote sensing images of different landscapes such as Urban, agriculture and mixed land cover. Graph construction done in C program and list the run time for both graph construction and segmentation calculation on dual core Intel i7 system with 16 GB RAM, running 64bit window 7.

  14. Graphs in molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Carey, Vincent J; Long, Li; Falcon, Seth; Gentleman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Graph theoretical concepts are useful for the description and analysis of interactions and relationships in biological systems. We give a brief introduction into some of the concepts and their areas of application in molecular biology. We discuss software that is available through the Bioconductor project and present a simple example application to the integration of a protein-protein interaction and a co-expression network. PMID:17903289

  15. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

  16. Program partitioning for NUMA multiprocessor computer systems. [Nonuniform memory access

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, R.M.; Feo, J.T. )

    1993-11-01

    Program partitioning and scheduling are essential steps in programming non-shared-memory computer systems. Partitioning is the separation of program operations into sequential tasks, and scheduling is the assignment of tasks to processors. To be effective, automatic methods require an accurate representation of the model of computation and the target architecture. Current partitioning methods assume today's most prevalent models -- macro dataflow and a homogeneous/two-level multicomputer system. Based on communication channels, neither model represents well the emerging class of NUMA multiprocessor computer systems consisting of hierarchical read/write memories. Consequently, the partitions generated by extant methods do not execute well on these systems. In this paper, the authors extend the conventional graph representation of the macro-dataflow model to enable mapping heuristics to consider the complex communication options supported by NUMA architectures. They describe two such heuristics. Simulated execution times of program graphs show that the model and heuristics generate higher quality program mappings than current methods for NUMA architectures.

  17. Community detection in graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, Santo

    2010-02-01

    The modern science of networks has brought significant advances to our understanding of complex systems. One of the most relevant features of graphs representing real systems is community structure, or clustering, i.e. the organization of vertices in clusters, with many edges joining vertices of the same cluster and comparatively few edges joining vertices of different clusters. Such clusters, or communities, can be considered as fairly independent compartments of a graph, playing a similar role like, e.g., the tissues or the organs in the human body. Detecting communities is of great importance in sociology, biology and computer science, disciplines where systems are often represented as graphs. This problem is very hard and not yet satisfactorily solved, despite the huge effort of a large interdisciplinary community of scientists working on it over the past few years. We will attempt a thorough exposition of the topic, from the definition of the main elements of the problem, to the presentation of most methods developed, with a special focus on techniques designed by statistical physicists, from the discussion of crucial issues like the significance of clustering and how methods should be tested and compared against each other, to the description of applications to real networks.

  18. A Gestalt rules and graph-cut-based simplification framework for urban building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuebin; Zhang, Liqiang; Mathiopoulos, P. Takis; Deng, Hao

    2015-03-01

    To visualize large urban models efficiently, this paper presents a framework for generalizing urban building footprints and facade textures by using multiple Gestalt rules and a graph-cut-based energy function. First, an urban scene is divided into different blocks by main road networks. In each block, the building footprints are partitioned into potential Gestalt groups. A footprint may satisfy several Gestalt principles. We employ the graph-cut-based optimization function to obtain a consistent segmentation of the buildings into optimal Gestalt groups with minimal energy. The building footprints in each Gestalt group are aggregated into different levels of detail (LODs). Building facade textures are also abstracted and simplified into multiple LODs using the same approach as the building footprint simplification. An effective data structure termed SceneTree is introduced to manage these aggregated building footprints and facade textures. Combined with the parallelization scheme, the rendering efficiency of large-scale urban buildings is improved. Compared with other methods, our presented method can efficiently visualize large urban models and maintain the city's image.

  19. Fast clique minor generation in Chimera qubit connectivity graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothby, Tomas; King, Andrew D.; Roy, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    The current generation of D-Wave quantum annealing processor is designed to minimize the energy of an Ising spin configuration whose pairwise interactions lie on the edges of a Chimera graph C_{M,N,L}. In order to solve an Ising spin problem with arbitrary pairwise interaction structure, the corresponding graph must be minor-embedded into a Chimera graph. We define a combinatorial class of native clique minors in Chimera graphs with vertex images of uniform, near minimal size and provide a polynomial-time algorithm that finds a maximum native clique minor in a given induced subgraph of a Chimera graph. These minors allow improvement over recent work and have immediate practical applications in the field of quantum annealing.

  20. Eigenvector synchronization, graph rigidity and the molecule problem.

    PubMed

    Cucuringu, Mihai; Singer, Amit; Cowburn, David

    2012-12-01

    The graph realization problem has received a great deal of attention in recent years, due to its importance in applications such as wireless sensor networks and structural biology. In this paper, we extend the previous work and propose the 3D-As-Synchronized-As-Possible (3D-ASAP) algorithm, for the graph realization problem in ℝ(3), given a sparse and noisy set of distance measurements. 3D-ASAP is a divide and conquer, non-incremental and non-iterative algorithm, which integrates local distance information into a global structure determination. Our approach starts with identifying, for every node, a subgraph of its 1-hop neighborhood graph, which can be accurately embedded in its own coordinate system. In the noise-free case, the computed coordinates of the sensors in each patch must agree with their global positioning up to some unknown rigid motion, that is, up to translation, rotation and possibly reflection. In other words, to every patch, there corresponds an element of the Euclidean group, Euc(3), of rigid transformations in ℝ(3), and the goal was to estimate the group elements that will properly align all the patches in a globally consistent way. Furthermore, 3D-ASAP successfully incorporates information specific to the molecule problem in structural biology, in particular information on known substructures and their orientation. In addition, we also propose 3D-spectral-partitioning (SP)-ASAP, a faster version of 3D-ASAP, which uses a spectral partitioning algorithm as a pre-processing step for dividing the initial graph into smaller subgraphs. Our extensive numerical simulations show that 3D-ASAP and 3D-SP-ASAP are very robust to high levels of noise in the measured distances and to sparse connectivity in the measurement graph, and compare favorably with similar state-of-the-art localization algorithms. PMID:24432187

  1. Thermodynamic characterization of networks using graph polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Cheng; Comin, César H.; Peron, Thomas K. DM.; Silva, Filipi N.; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Costa, Luciano da F.; Torsello, Andrea; Hancock, Edwin R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method for characterizing the evolution of time-varying complex networks by adopting a thermodynamic representation of network structure computed from a polynomial (or algebraic) characterization of graph structure. Commencing from a representation of graph structure based on a characteristic polynomial computed from the normalized Laplacian matrix, we show how the polynomial is linked to the Boltzmann partition function of a network. This allows us to compute a number of thermodynamic quantities for the network, including the average energy and entropy. Assuming that the system does not change volume, we can also compute the temperature, defined as the rate of change of entropy with energy. All three thermodynamic variables can be approximated using low-order Taylor series that can be computed using the traces of powers of the Laplacian matrix, avoiding explicit computation of the normalized Laplacian spectrum. These polynomial approximations allow a smoothed representation of the evolution of networks to be constructed in the thermodynamic space spanned by entropy, energy, and temperature. We show how these thermodynamic variables can be computed in terms of simple network characteristics, e.g., the total number of nodes and node degree statistics for nodes connected by edges. We apply the resulting thermodynamic characterization to real-world time-varying networks representing complex systems in the financial and biological domains. The study demonstrates that the method provides an efficient tool for detecting abrupt changes and characterizing different stages in network evolution.

  2. Clustering Analysis for Graphs with Multiweighted Edges: A Unified Approach to the Threshold Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetschel, Roy, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Multivalent relations, inferred as relationships with an added dimension of discernment, are realized as weighted graphs with multivalued edges. A unified treatment of the threshold problem is discussed and a reliability measure is produced to judge various partitions. (Author/EM)

  3. A significance test for graph-constrained estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sen; Shojaie, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Graph-constrained estimation methods encourage similarities among neighboring covariates presented as nodes of a graph, and can result in more accurate estimates, especially in high-dimensional settings. Variable selection approaches can then be utilized to select a subset of variables that are associated with the response. However, existing procedures do not provide measures of uncertainty of estimates. Further, the vast majority of existing approaches assume that available graph accurately captures the association among covariates; violations to this assumption could severely hurt the reliability of the resulting estimates. In this article, we present a new inference framework, called the Grace test, which produces coefficient estimates and corresponding p-values by incorporating the external graph information. We show, both theoretically and via numerical studies, that the proposed method asymptotically controls the type-I error rate regardless of the choice of the graph. We also show that when the underlying graph is informative, the Grace test is asymptotically more powerful than similar tests that ignore the external information. We study the power properties of the proposed test when the graph is not fully informative and develop a more powerful Grace-ridge test for such settings. Our numerical studies show that as long as the graph is reasonably informative, the proposed inference procedures deliver improved statistical power over existing methods that ignore external information. PMID:26393533

  4. Evaluation of Graph Pattern Matching Workloads in Graph Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokyong; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan; Vatsavai, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Graph analysis has emerged as a powerful method for data scientists to represent, integrate, query, and explore heterogeneous data sources. As a result, graph data management and mining became a popular area of research, and led to the development of plethora of systems in recent years. Unfortunately, the number of emerging graph analysis systems and the wide range of applications, coupled with a lack of apples-to-apples comparisons, make it difficult to understand the trade-offs between different systems and the graph operations for which they are designed. A fair comparison of these systems is a challenging task for the following reasons: multiple data models, non-standardized serialization formats, various query interfaces to users, and diverse environments they operate in. To address these key challenges, in this paper we present a new benchmark suite by extending the Lehigh University Benchmark (LUBM) to cover the most common capabilities of various graph analysis systems. We provide the design process of the benchmark, which generalizes the workflow for data scientists to conduct the desired graph analysis on different graph analysis systems. Equipped with this extended benchmark suite, we present performance comparison for nine subgraph pattern retrieval operations over six graph analysis systems, namely NetworkX, Neo4j, Jena, Titan, GraphX, and uRiKA. Through the proposed benchmark suite, this study reveals both quantitative and qualitative findings in (1) implications in loading data into each system; (2) challenges in describing graph patterns for each query interface; and (3) different sensitivity of each system to query selectivity. We envision that this study will pave the road for: (i) data scientists to select the suitable graph analysis systems, and (ii) data management system designers to advance graph analysis systems.

  5. Partition density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, Jonathan

    Partition density functional theory (PDFT) is a method for dividing a molecular electronic structure calculation into fragment calculations. The molecular density and energy corresponding to Kohn Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) may be exactly recovered from these fragments. Each fragment acts as an isolated system except for the influence of a global one-body 'partition' potential which deforms the fragment densities. In this work, the developments of PDFT are put into the context of other fragment-based density functional methods. We developed three numerical implementations of PDFT: One within the NWChem computational chemistry package using basis sets, and the other two developed from scratch using real-space grids. It is shown that all three of these programs can exactly reproduce a KS-DFT calculation via fragment calculations. The first of our in-house codes handles non-interacting electrons in arbitrary one-dimensional potentials with any number of fragments. This code is used to explore how the exact partition potential changes for different partitionings of the same system and also to study features which determine which systems yield non-integer PDFT occupations and which systems are locked into integer PDFT occupations. The second in-house code, CADMium, performs real-space calculations of diatomic molecules. Features of the exact partition potential are studied for a variety of cases and an analytical formula determining singularities in the partition potential is derived. We introduce an approximation for the non-additive kinetic energy and show how this quantity can be computed exactly. Finally a PDFT functional is developed to address the issues of static correlation and delocalization errors in approximations within DFT. The functional is applied to the dissociation of H2 + and H2.

  6. Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-01-01

    n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

  7. New methods for analyzing semantic graph based assessments in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikaros, Lance Steven

    This research investigated how the scoring of semantic graphs (known by many as concept maps) could be improved and automated in order to address issues of inter-rater reliability and scalability. As part of the NSF funded SENSE-IT project to introduce secondary school science students to sensor networks (NSF Grant No. 0833440), semantic graphs illustrating how temperature change affects water ecology were collected from 221 students across 16 schools. The graphing task did not constrain students' use of terms, as is often done with semantic graph based assessment due to coding and scoring concerns. The graphing software used provided real-time feedback to help students learn how to construct graphs, stay on topic and effectively communicate ideas. The collected graphs were scored by human raters using assessment methods expected to boost reliability, which included adaptations of traditional holistic and propositional scoring methods, use of expert raters, topical rubrics, and criterion graphs. High levels of inter-rater reliability were achieved, demonstrating that vocabulary constraints may not be necessary after all. To investigate a new approach to automating the scoring of graphs, thirty-two different graph features characterizing graphs' structure, semantics, configuration and process of construction were then used to predict human raters' scoring of graphs in order to identify feature patterns correlated to raters' evaluations of graphs' topical accuracy and complexity. Results led to the development of a regression model able to predict raters' scoring with 77% accuracy, with 46% accuracy expected when used to score new sets of graphs, as estimated via cross-validation tests. Although such performance is comparable to other graph and essay based scoring systems, cross-context testing of the model and methods used to develop it would be needed before it could be recommended for widespread use. Still, the findings suggest techniques for improving the

  8. Cumulants of partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Christoph; Block, Martin; Holthaus, Martin; Schmieder, Gerald

    2003-02-01

    We utilize the formal equivalence between the number-partitioning problem and a harmonically trapped ideal Bose gas within the microcanonical ensemble for characterizing the probability distribution which governs the number of addends occurring in an unrestricted partition of a natural number n. By deriving accurate asymptotic formulae for its coefficients of skewness and excess, it is shown that this distribution remains non-Gaussian even when n is made arbitrarily large. Both skewness and excess vary substantially before settling to their constant-limiting values for n > 1010.

  9. FNAS phase partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Project NAS8-36955 D.O. #100 initially involved the following tasks: (1) evaluation of various coatings' ability to control wall wetting and surface zeta potential expression; (2) testing various methods to mix and control the demixing of phase systems; and (3) videomicroscopic investigation of cell partition. Three complementary areas were identified for modification and extension of the original contract. They were: (1) identification of new supports for column cell partition; (2) electrokinetic detection of protein adsorption; and (3) emulsion studies related to bioseparations.

  10. Cactus Graphs for Genome Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paten, Benedict; Diekhans, Mark; Earl, Dent; St. John, John; Ma, Jian; Suh, Bernard; Haussler, David

    We introduce a data structure, analysis and visualization scheme called a cactus graph for comparing sets of related genomes. Cactus graphs capture some of the advantages of de Bruijn and breakpoint graphs in one unified framework. They naturally decompose the common substructures in a set of related genomes into a hierarchy of chains that can be visualized as multiple alignments and nets that can be visualized in circular genome plots.

  11. Contact Graph Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic

  12. Graph pyramids for protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Uncovering the hidden organizational characteristics and regularities among biological sequences is the key issue for detailed understanding of an underlying biological phenomenon. Thus pattern recognition from nucleic acid sequences is an important affair for protein function prediction. As proteins from the same family exhibit similar characteristics, homology based approaches predict protein functions via protein classification. But conventional classification approaches mostly rely on the global features by considering only strong protein similarity matches. This leads to significant loss of prediction accuracy. Methods Here we construct the Protein-Protein Similarity (PPS) network, which captures the subtle properties of protein families. The proposed method considers the local as well as the global features, by examining the interactions among 'weakly interacting proteins' in the PPS network and by using hierarchical graph analysis via the graph pyramid. Different underlying properties of the protein families are uncovered by operating the proposed graph based features at various pyramid levels. Results Experimental results on benchmark data sets show that the proposed hierarchical voting algorithm using graph pyramid helps to improve computational efficiency as well the protein classification accuracy. Quantitatively, among 14,086 test sequences, on an average the proposed method misclassified only 21.1 sequences whereas baseline BLAST score based global feature matching method misclassified 362.9 sequences. With each correctly classified test sequence, the fast incremental learning ability of the proposed method further enhances the training model. Thus it has achieved more than 96% protein classification accuracy using only 20% per class training data. PMID:26044522

  13. Clustering Qualitative Data Based on Binary Equivalence Relations: Neighborhood Search Heuristics for the Clique Partitioning Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Kohn, Hans-Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    The clique partitioning problem (CPP) requires the establishment of an equivalence relation for the vertices of a graph such that the sum of the edge costs associated with the relation is minimized. The CPP has important applications for the social sciences because it provides a framework for clustering objects measured on a collection of nominal…

  14. An Efficient Algorithm for Partitioning and Authenticating Problem-Solutions of eLeaming Contents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewan, Jahangir; Chowdhury, Morshed; Batten, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Content authenticity and correctness is one of the important challenges in eLearning as there can be many solutions to one specific problem in cyber space. Therefore, the authors feel it is necessary to map problems to solutions using graph partition and weighted bipartite matching. This article proposes an efficient algorithm to partition…

  15. Graph Visualization for RDF Graphs with SPARQL-EndPoints

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-07-11

    RDF graphs are hard to visualize as triples. This software module is a web interface that connects to a SPARQL endpoint and retrieves graph data that the user can explore interactively and seamlessly. The software written in python and JavaScript has been tested to work on screens as little as the smart phones to large screens such as EVEREST.

  16. Explicit and probabilistic constructions of distance graphs with small clique numbers and large chromatic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupavskii, A. B.

    2014-02-01

    We study distance graphs with exponentially large chromatic numbers and without k-cliques, that is, complete subgraphs of size k. Explicit constructions of such graphs use vectors in the integer lattice. For a large class of graphs we find a sharp threshold for containing a k-clique. This enables us to improve the lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers of such graphs. We give a new probabilistic approach to the construction of distance graphs without k-cliques, and this yields better lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers for large k.

  17. Quantum Graph Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Sterk, Jonathan David; Lobser, Daniel; Parekh, Ojas D.; Ryan-Anderson, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, advanced network analytics have become increasingly important to na- tional security with applications ranging from cyber security to detection and disruption of ter- rorist networks. While classical computing solutions have received considerable investment, the development of quantum algorithms to address problems, such as data mining of attributed relational graphs, is a largely unexplored space. Recent theoretical work has shown that quan- tum algorithms for graph analysis can be more efficient than their classical counterparts. Here, we have implemented a trapped-ion-based two-qubit quantum information proces- sor to address these goals. Building on Sandia's microfabricated silicon surface ion traps, we have designed, realized and characterized a quantum information processor using the hyperfine qubits encoded in two 171 Yb + ions. We have implemented single qubit gates using resonant microwave radiation and have employed Gate set tomography (GST) to characterize the quan- tum process. For the first time, we were able to prove that the quantum process surpasses the fault tolerance thresholds of some quantum codes by demonstrating a diamond norm distance of less than 1 . 9 x 10 [?] 4 . We used Raman transitions in order to manipulate the trapped ions' motion and realize two-qubit gates. We characterized the implemented motion sensitive and insensitive single qubit processes and achieved a maximal process infidelity of 6 . 5 x 10 [?] 5 . We implemented the two-qubit gate proposed by Molmer and Sorensen and achieved a fidelity of more than 97 . 7%.

  18. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk; Sars, Matthias; Suijlekom, Walter D. van

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  19. Identifying Cognitive States Using Regularity Partitions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) data can be used to depict functional connectivity of the brain. Standard techniques have been developed to construct brain networks from this data; typically nodes are considered as voxels or sets of voxels with weighted edges between them representing measures of correlation. Identifying cognitive states based on fMRI data is connected with recording voxel activity over a certain time interval. Using this information, network and machine learning techniques can be applied to discriminate the cognitive states of the subjects by exploring different features of data. In this work we wish to describe and understand the organization of brain connectivity networks under cognitive tasks. In particular, we use a regularity partitioning algorithm that finds clusters of vertices such that they all behave with each other almost like random bipartite graphs. Based on the random approximation of the graph, we calculate a lower bound on the number of triangles as well as the expectation of the distribution of the edges in each subject and state. We investigate the results by comparing them to the state of the art algorithms for exploring connectivity and we argue that during epochs that the subject is exposed to stimulus, the inspected part of the brain is organized in an efficient way that enables enhanced functionality. PMID:26317983

  20. CANCER MORTALITY MAPS AND GRAPHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cancer Mortality Maps & Graph Web Site provides interactive maps, graphs (which are accessible to the blind and visually-impaired), text, tables and figures showing geographic patterns and time trends of cancer death rates for the time period 1950-1994 for more than 40 cancer...

  1. Graphs as Statements of Belief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, David

    2002-01-01

    Identifies points where beliefs are important when making decisions about how graphs are drawn. Describes a simple case of the reaction between 'bicarb soda' and orange or lemon juice and discusses how drawing a graph becomes a statement of belief. (KHR)

  2. Graph models of habitat mosaics.

    PubMed

    Urban, Dean L; Minor, Emily S; Treml, Eric A; Schick, Robert S

    2009-03-01

    Graph theory is a body of mathematics dealing with problems of connectivity, flow, and routing in networks ranging from social groups to computer networks. Recently, network applications have erupted in many fields, and graph models are now being applied in landscape ecology and conservation biology, particularly for applications couched in metapopulation theory. In these applications, graph nodes represent habitat patches or local populations and links indicate functional connections among populations (i.e. via dispersal). Graphs are models of more complicated real systems, and so it is appropriate to review these applications from the perspective of modelling in general. Here we review recent applications of network theory to habitat patches in landscape mosaics. We consider (1) the conceptual model underlying these applications; (2) formalization and implementation of the graph model; (3) model parameterization; (4) model testing, insights, and predictions available through graph analyses; and (5) potential implications for conservation biology and related applications. In general, and for a variety of ecological systems, we find the graph model a remarkably robust framework for applications concerned with habitat connectivity. We close with suggestions for further work on the parameterization and validation of graph models, and point to some promising analytic insights. PMID:19161432

  3. A PVS Graph Theory Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Sjogren, Jon A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper documents the NASA Langley PVS graph theory library. The library provides fundamental definitions for graphs, subgraphs, walks, paths, subgraphs generated by walks, trees, cycles, degree, separating sets, and four notions of connectedness. Theorems provided include Ramsey's and Menger's and the equivalence of all four notions of connectedness.

  4. Graphs and Zero-Divisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axtell, M.; Stickles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The last ten years have seen an explosion of research in the zero-divisor graphs of commutative rings--by professional mathematicians "and" undergraduates. The objective is to find algebraic information within the geometry of these graphs. This topic is approachable by anyone with one or two semesters of abstract algebra. This article gives the…

  5. Experimental quantum annealing: case study involving the graph isomorphism problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zick, Kenneth M.; Shehab, Omar; French, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Quantum annealing is a proposed combinatorial optimization technique meant to exploit quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling and entanglement. Real-world quantum annealing-based solvers require a combination of annealing and classical pre- and post-processing; at this early stage, little is known about how to partition and optimize the processing. This article presents an experimental case study of quantum annealing and some of the factors involved in real-world solvers, using a 504-qubit D-Wave Two machine and the graph isomorphism problem. To illustrate the role of classical pre-processing, a compact Hamiltonian is presented that enables a reduced Ising model for each problem instance. On random N-vertex graphs, the median number of variables is reduced from N2 to fewer than N log2 N and solvable graph sizes increase from N = 5 to N = 13. Additionally, error correction via classical post-processing majority voting is evaluated. While the solution times are not competitive with classical approaches to graph isomorphism, the enhanced solver ultimately classified correctly every problem that was mapped to the processor and demonstrated clear advantages over the baseline approach. The results shed some light on the nature of real-world quantum annealing and the associated hybrid classical-quantum solvers.

  6. In-Memory Graph Databases for Web-Scale Data

    SciTech Connect

    Castellana, Vito G.; Morari, Alessandro; Weaver, Jesse R.; Tumeo, Antonino; Haglin, David J.; Villa, Oreste; Feo, John

    2015-03-01

    RDF databases have emerged as one of the most relevant way for organizing, integrating, and managing expo- nentially growing, often heterogeneous, and not rigidly structured data for a variety of scientific and commercial fields. In this paper we discuss the solutions integrated in GEMS (Graph database Engine for Multithreaded Systems), a software framework for implementing RDF databases on commodity, distributed-memory high-performance clusters. Unlike the majority of current RDF databases, GEMS has been designed from the ground up to primarily employ graph-based methods. This is reflected in all the layers of its stack. The GEMS framework is composed of: a SPARQL-to-C++ compiler, a library of data structures and related methods to access and modify them, and a custom runtime providing lightweight software multithreading, network messages aggregation and a partitioned global address space. We provide an overview of the framework, detailing its component and how they have been closely designed and customized to address issues of graph methods applied to large-scale datasets on clusters. We discuss in details the principles that enable automatic translation of the queries (expressed in SPARQL, the query language of choice for RDF databases) to graph methods, and identify differences with respect to other RDF databases.

  7. Experimental quantum annealing: case study involving the graph isomorphism problem

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Kenneth M.; Shehab, Omar; French, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Quantum annealing is a proposed combinatorial optimization technique meant to exploit quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling and entanglement. Real-world quantum annealing-based solvers require a combination of annealing and classical pre- and post-processing; at this early stage, little is known about how to partition and optimize the processing. This article presents an experimental case study of quantum annealing and some of the factors involved in real-world solvers, using a 504-qubit D-Wave Two machine and the graph isomorphism problem. To illustrate the role of classical pre-processing, a compact Hamiltonian is presented that enables a reduced Ising model for each problem instance. On random N-vertex graphs, the median number of variables is reduced from N2 to fewer than N log2 N and solvable graph sizes increase from N = 5 to N = 13. Additionally, error correction via classical post-processing majority voting is evaluated. While the solution times are not competitive with classical approaches to graph isomorphism, the enhanced solver ultimately classified correctly every problem that was mapped to the processor and demonstrated clear advantages over the baseline approach. The results shed some light on the nature of real-world quantum annealing and the associated hybrid classical-quantum solvers. PMID:26053973

  8. Inexact Matching of Ontology Graphs Using Expectation-Maximization

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Prashant; Kolli, Ravikanth; Thomas, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method for mapping ontology schemas that address similar domains. The problem of ontology matching is crucial since we are witnessing a decentralized development and publication of ontological data. We formulate the problem of inferring a match between two ontologies as a maximum likelihood problem, and solve it using the technique of expectation-maximization (EM). Specifically, we adopt directed graphs as our model for ontology schemas and use a generalized version of EM to arrive at a map between the nodes of the graphs. We exploit the structural, lexical and instance similarity between the graphs, and differ from the previous approaches in the way we utilize them to arrive at, a possibly inexact, match. Inexact matching is the process of finding a best possible match between the two graphs when exact matching is not possible or is computationally difficult. In order to scale the method to large ontologies, we identify the computational bottlenecks and adapt the generalized EM by using a memory bounded partitioning scheme. We provide comparative experimental results in support of our method on two well-known ontology alignment benchmarks and discuss their implications. PMID:20160892

  9. A Collection of Features for Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassi-Rad, T; Fodor, I K; Gallagher, B

    2007-05-02

    Semantic graphs are commonly used to represent data from one or more data sources. Such graphs extend traditional graphs by imposing types on both nodes and links. This type information defines permissible links among specified nodes and can be represented as a graph commonly referred to as an ontology or schema graph. Figure 1 depicts an ontology graph for data from National Association of Securities Dealers. Each node type and link type may also have a list of attributes. To capture the increased complexity of semantic graphs, concepts derived for standard graphs have to be extended. This document explains briefly features commonly used to characterize graphs, and their extensions to semantic graphs. This document is divided into two sections. Section 2 contains the feature descriptions for static graphs. Section 3 extends the features for semantic graphs that vary over time.

  10. TIFF Image Writer patch for OpenSceneGraph

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-05

    This software consists of code modifications to the open-source OpenSceneGraph software package to enable the creation of TlFF images containing 16 bit unsigned data. They also allow the user to disable compression and set the DPI tags in the resulting TIFF Images. Some image analysis programs require uncompressed, 16 bit unsigned input data. These code modifications allow programs based on OpenSceneGraph to write out such images, improving connectivity between applications.