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Sample records for in-home community health

  1. Effect of Weatherization Combined With Community Health Worker In-Home Education on Asthma Control

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Sherry; Gregory, Joel; Philby, Miriam; Jacobs, David E.; Krieger, James

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the benefits of adding weatherization-plus-health interventions to an in-home, community health worker (CHW) education program on asthma control. Methods. We used a quasi-experimental design to compare study group homes (n = 34) receiving CHW education and weatherization-plus-health structural interventions with historical comparison group homes (n = 68) receiving only education. Data were collected in King County, Washington, from October 2009 to September 2010. Results. Over the 1-year study period, the percentage of study group children with not-well-controlled or very poorly controlled asthma decreased more than the comparison group percentage (100% to 28.8% vs 100% to 51.6%; P = .04). Study group caregiver quality-of-life improvements exceeded comparison group improvements (P = .002) by 0.7 units, a clinically important difference. The decrease in study home asthma triggers (evidence of mold, water damage, pests, smoking) was marginally greater than the comparison group decrease (P = .089). Except for mouse allergen, the percentage of study group allergen floor dust samples at or above the detection limit decreased, although most reductions were not statistically significant. Conclusions. Combining weatherization and healthy home interventions (e.g., improved ventilation, moisture and mold reduction, carpet replacement, and plumbing repairs) with CHW asthma education significantly improves childhood asthma control. PMID:24228661

  2. Community health nursing: can being self-employed work for you in home care?

    PubMed

    Seri, S F

    1997-09-01

    There is a fine distinction between being an independent contractor and being an employee. The advantages of being self-employed as a community health nurse are many. Self-employment suits new parents, graduate students, people in transition, with more than one profession, and who don't want a fixed schedule. However, this type of nursing is not for everyone. A broker such as CHN can help nurses become successfully self-employed. At a time when hospitals are downsizing and home care is becoming more in demand, brokers such as CHN provide a framework in which busy, experienced, community health nurses can work when and where they want. Good clinical and communication skills and a wish to be autonomous are necessities. A willingness to travel to different agencies and a reliable car are also important. A love for variety, flexibility, and independence make self-employment as a home health nurse a clinician's dream. PMID:9335699

  3. Psychosocial risk factors in home and community settings and their associations with population health and health inequalities: A systematic meta-review

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Matt; Tannahill, Carol; Petticrew, Mark; Thomas, Sian

    2008-01-01

    Background The effects of psychosocial risk factors on population health and health inequalities has featured prominently in epidemiological research literature as well as public health policy strategies. We have conducted a meta-review (a review of reviews) exploring how psychosocial factors may relate to population health in home and community settings. Methods Systematic review (QUORUM) of literature reviews (published in any language or country) on the health associations of psychosocial risk factors in community settings. The literature search included electronic and manual searches. Two reviewers appraised included reviews using criteria for assessing systematic reviews. Data from the more robust reviews were extracted, tabulated and synthesised. Results Thirty-one reviews met our inclusion criteria. These explored a variety of psychosocial factors including social support and networks, social capital, social cohesion, collective efficacy, participation in local organisations – and less favourable psychosocial risk factors such as demands, exposure to community violence or anti-social behaviour, exposure to discrimination, and stress related to acculturation to western society. Most of the reviews focused on associations between social networks/support and physical or mental health. We identified some evidence of favourable psychosocial environments associated with better health. Reviews also found evidence of unfavourable psychosocial risk factors linked to poorer health, particularly among socially disadvantaged groups. However, the more robust reviews each identified studies with inconclusive findings, as well as studies finding evidence of associations. We also identified some evidence of apparently favourable psychosocial risk factors associated with poorer health. Conclusion From the review literature we have synthesised, where associations have been identified, they generally support the view that favourable psychosocial environments go hand in hand

  4. Controversial issues in home health care: a roundtable discussion.

    PubMed

    McAllister, J C; Black, B L; Griffin, R E; Smith, J E

    1986-04-01

    Controversial issues in home health care (HHC) were discussed by a panel of four individuals involved in or knowledgeable about HHC. The panel addressed the following issues: reluctance of health professionals to participate in home care, challenges in providing HHC services, assigning responsibility for HHC services, reimbursement considerations in joint-venture arrangements, assuming fiscal responsibility for unreimbursed care, selecting HHC providers, defining patient rights, selecting drug products for home-care patients, competing with community pharmacists, circumvention of pharmacist input in preparation of solutions for home infusion, and the future of HHC. Hospital pharmacists who plan to become involved or are already involved in providing HHC services should become familiar with these controversial issues. PMID:3706341

  5. In-home mental health treatment for individuals with HIV.

    PubMed

    Reif, Susan S; Pence, Brian W; LeGrand, Sara; Wilson, Elena S; Swartz, Marvin; Ellington, Terry; Whetten, Kathryn

    2012-11-01

    Mental health problems are highly prevalent among individuals with HIV and are consistently associated with negative health outcomes. However, mental illness often remains untreated due to significant psychosocial and physical barriers to treatment participation. The Collaborative HIV/AIDS Mental Health Program (CHAMP) assessed the outcomes associated with providing 9 months of in-home mental health counseling for 40 individuals with HIV and a Major Axis I mental disorder. The evidence-based Illness Management and Recovery Model was adapted for use with HIV-positive individuals for the study using a community-based participatory research approach. Study participants were surveyed at baseline, 5 and 9 months to assess for changes in health outcomes. Thirty-five percent of study participants were female, 80% African American, 33% self-identified as MSM and the average participant age was 43. Forty percent of participants were on psychotropic medication at baseline. Participants had an average of 8 counseling visits (median 9). Statistically significant decreases in the global Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) score and a number of BSI symptoms dimensions including anxiety, depression, obsessive compulsive, phobic anxiety and hostility were detected, indicating a reduction of psychiatric symptoms. Statistically significant improvement was also identified for the SF-12 mental health scale, adaptive coping, overall social support and emotional support. No differences in psychiatric outcomes were identified by gender, race/ethnicity, or sexual preference. Findings from the CHAMP Study suggest that the use of in-home mental health treatment may be beneficial in engaging and treating HIV-positive individuals with comorbid mental health disorders. PMID:23050767

  6. [Role of the community pharmacist in the management of drug related problems in home care patients].

    PubMed

    Van de Putte, M; Appels, S; Boone, T; Collienne, S; Daems, T; De Lepeleire, J; Foulon, V

    2012-09-01

    Medication management in home care is an error prone process. In a small pilot project in Flanders, community pharmacists collaborated with physicians and home care nurses through a shared electronic care plan, to optimize the medication management of their home care patients. The pilot project shows that GPs and nurses are positive about the possible contribution of the pharmacist in medication management of home care patients. A larger follow up study is necessary to further identify possible roles of pharmacists in home care and to show related health benefits. PMID:23697093

  7. Promoting spiritual health in home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2008-06-01

    This article explores how clinicians can promote patient and family caregiver spiritual health. After a review of pertinent theory and research, clinical implications are identified, including appropriate goals for clinicians with regard to spiritual health promotion. PMID:18562823

  8. [Supply and demand in home health care].

    PubMed

    Braga, Patrícia Pinto; de Sena, Roseni Rosângela; Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; de Castro, Edna Aparecida Barbosa; Andrade, Angélica Mônica; Silva, Yara Cardoso

    2016-03-01

    The changes in the demographic and epidemiologic profiles of the Brazilian population and the need to rethink the health care model have led many countries like Brazil to consider Home Care (HC) as a care strategy. However, there is a gap between the supply of HC services, the demand for care and the health needs manifested by the population. Thus, this article analyzes scientific output regarding the status of the relation between supply, demand and the needs related to home health care. This work is based on an integrative review of the literature in the following databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Latin America and the Caribbean Literature on Health and Science (Lilacs), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline) and Web of Science. Despite the fact that few articles refer to the issue in question, there is evidence indicating that health demands and needs are seldom taken into account either in a quantitative or qualitative approach when developing the organization of HC services. The analysis would indicate that there is a national and international deficit in the supply of HC services considering the demand for health care and needs currently prevailing. PMID:26960102

  9. The Seattle–King County Healthy Homes II Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Asthma Self-management Support Comparing Clinic-Based Nurses and In-Home Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Takaro, Tim K.; Song, Lin; Beaudet, Nancy; Edwards, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the marginal benefit of in-home asthma self-management support provided by community health workers (CHWs) with standard asthma education from clinic-based nurses. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Community and public health clinics and homes. Participants Three hundred nine children aged 3 to 13 years with asthma living in low-income households. Interventions All participants received nurse-provided asthma education and referrals to community resources. Some participants also received CHW-provided home environmental assessments, asthma education, social support, and asthma-control resources. Outcome Measures Asthma symptom–free days, Pediatric Asthma Caretaker Quality of Life Scale score, and use of urgent health services. Results Both groups showed significant increases in caretaker quality of life (nurse-only group: 0.4 points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.6; nurse + CHW group: 0.6 points; 95% CI, 0.4–0.8) and number of symptom-free days (nurse only: 1.3 days; 95% CI, 0.5–2.1; nurse + CHW: 1.9 days; 95% CI, 1.1–2.8), and absolute decreases in the proportion of children who used urgent health services in the prior 3 months (nurse only: 17.6%; 95% CI, 8.1%–27.2%; nurse + CHW: 23.1%; 95% CI, 13.6%–32.6%). Quality of life improved by 0.22 more points in the nurse + CHW group (95% CI, 0.00–0.44; P=.049). The number of symptom-free days increased by 0.94 days per 2 weeks (95% CI, 0.02–1.86; P = .046), or 24.4 days per year, in the nurse + CHW group. While use of urgent health services decreased more in the nurse + CHW group, the difference between groups was not significant. Conclusion The addition of CHW home visits to clinic-based asthma education yielded a clinically important increase in symptom-free days and a modest improvement in caretaker quality of life. PMID:19188646

  10. In-Home Care for Optimizing Chronic Disease Management in the Community

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emerging attention on in-home care in Canada assumes that chronic disease management will be optimized if it takes place in the community as opposed to the health care setting. Both the patient and the health care system will benefit, the latter in terms of cost savings. Objectives To compare the effectiveness of care delivered in the home (i.e., in-home care) with no home care or with usual care/care received outside of the home (e.g., health care setting). Data Sources A literature search was performed on January 25, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 1, 2006, until January 25, 2012. Review Methods An evidence-based analysis examined whether there is a difference in mortality, hospital utilization, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), functional status, and disease-specific clinical measures for in-home care compared with no home care for heart failure, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, chronic wounds, and chronic disease / multimorbidity. Data was abstracted and analyzed in a pooled analysis using Review Manager. When needed, subgroup analysis was performed to address heterogeneity. The quality of evidence was assessed by GRADE. Results The systematic literature search identified 1,277 citations from which 12 randomized controlled trials met the study criteria. Based on these, a 12% reduced risk for in-home care was shown for the outcome measure of combined events including all-cause mortality and hospitalizations (relative risk [RR]: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80–0.97). Patients receiving in-home care had an average of 1 less unplanned hospitalization (mean difference [MD]: –1.03; 95% CI: –1.53 to –0.53) and an average of 1 less

  11. Understanding inequities in home health care outcomes: staff views on agency and system factors.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Bourjolly, Joretha; Frasso, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Results regarding staff perspectives on contributing factors to racial/ethnic disparities in home health care outcomes are discussed. Focus group interviews were conducted with home health care staff (N = 23) who represented various agencies from three Northeastern states. Participants identified agency and system factors that contribute to disparities, including: (a) administrative staff bias/discretion, (b) communication challenges, (c) patient/staff cultural discordance, (d) cost control, and (e) poor access to community resources. Participants reported that bias can influence staff at all levels and is expressed via poor coverage of predominantly minority service areas, resulting in reduced intensity and continuity of service for minority patients. PMID:25706958

  12. Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

  13. Integrating new graduate nurses in home health care.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Carl A

    2009-10-01

    In 2005, the home health nursing sector of a large Canadian health authority was on its way toward changing a hiring prerequisite of acute care (medical or surgical) experience for entry to practice into home care nursing. At that time, home healthcare services in Canada and the United States were generally requiring acute care experience as prerequisites for working in home health. However, much of the research beginning as early as early 2000 challenged this perspective and universities and colleges offering baccalaureate degrees in nursing began including home health content in their curricula. The findings from research add to the ongoing critique of this acute care requirement and support the concept that acute care and home care are different practice areas with distinct competencies. This article discusses the contextual background that influenced the undertaking of our research, the relevant research literature, our research findings, model for integration, and evaluation of our pilot and lessons learned. The successes seen as a result of New Graduate integration are now being utilized by other home care nursing offices as a result of this work. PMID:19820662

  14. Behavioral Parent Training in Home and Community Generalization Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Laurie E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three mothers of children (ages 4-9) who had disabilities and exhibited serious behavior management problems were taught child management techniques and planned activities techniques, using in-home coaching and written prompts for use in generalization settings. Results suggested that such training is effective but needs to be individualized.…

  15. Influence of housing characteristics on bacterial and fungal communities in homes of asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Dannemiller, K C; Gent, J F; Leaderer, B P; Peccia, J

    2016-04-01

    Variations in home characteristics, such as moisture and occupancy, affect indoor microbial ecology as well as human exposure to microorganisms. Our objective was to determine how indoor bacterial and fungal community structure and diversity are associated with the broader home environment and its occupants. Next-generation DNA sequencing was used to describe fungal and bacterial communities in house dust sampled from 198 homes of asthmatic children in southern New England. Housing characteristics included number of people/children, level of urbanization, single/multifamily home, reported mold, reported water leaks, air conditioning (AC) use, and presence of pets. Both fungal and bacterial community structures were non-random and demonstrated species segregation (C-score, P < 0.00001). Increased microbial richness was associated with the presence of pets, water leaks, longer AC use, suburban (vs. urban) homes, and dust composition measures (P < 0.05). The most significant differences in community composition were observed for AC use and occupancy (people, children, and pets) characteristics. Occupant density measures were associated with beneficial bacterial taxa, including Lactobacillus johnsonii as measured by qPCR. A more complete knowledge of indoor microbial communities is useful for linking housing characteristics to human health outcomes. Microbial assemblies in house dust result, in part, from the building's physical and occupant characteristics. PMID:25833176

  16. Considering place in community health nursing.

    PubMed

    Bender, Amy; Clune, Laurie; Guruge, Sepali

    2007-09-01

    When a geographic location is assigned meaning, it becomes a place. The authors argue that place matters as both geographical location and lived experience. They extend the current conceptualization of nursing geography to encompass community health nursing and address intricacies of community nursing practice and research that often go unnoticed. They do so by exploring the notion of place in home and community, including the structural/spatial dimensions of the nurse-client relationship. The authors review the health geography literatures, then discuss the implications for practice and research in community health. They invite community health nurses to critically examine their practice and research with reference to such issues as the power of the nurse, marginalized places as determinants of health, and how best to care for clients living in diverse community settings. PMID:17970458

  17. Considering place in community health nursing.

    PubMed

    Bender, Amy; Clune, Laurie; Guruge, Sepali

    2009-03-01

    When a geographic location is assigned meaning, it becomes a place. The authors argue that place matters as both geographical location and lived experience.They extend the current conceptualization of nursing geography to encompass community health nursing and address intricacies of community nursing practice and research that often go unnoticed. They do so by exploring the notion of place in home and community, including the structural/spatial dimensions of the nurse-client relationship. The authors review the health geography literatures, then discuss the implications for practice and research in community health. They invite community health nurses to critically examine their practice and research with reference to such issues as the power of the nurse, marginalized places as determinants of health, and how best to care for clients living in diverse community settings. PMID:19485049

  18. Automated Health Alerts Using In-Home Sensor Data for Embedded Health Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rainer Dane; Rantz, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    We present an example of unobtrusive, continuous monitoring in the home for the purpose of assessing early health changes. Sensors embedded in the environment capture behavior and activity patterns. Changes in patterns are detected as potential signs of changing health. We first present results of a preliminary study investigating 22 features extracted from in-home sensor data. A 1-D alert algorithm was then implemented to generate health alerts to clinicians in a senior housing facility. Clinicians analyze each alert and provide a rating on the clinical relevance. These ratings are then used as ground truth for training and testing classifiers. Here, we present the methodology for four classification approaches that fuse multisensor data. Results are shown using embedded sensor data and health alert ratings collected on 21 seniors over nine months. The best results show similar performance for two techniques, where one approach uses only domain knowledge and the second uses supervised learning for training. Finally, we propose a health change detection model based on these results and clinical expertise. The system of in-home sensors and algorithms for automated health alerts provides a method for detecting health problems very early so that early treatment is possible. This method of passive in-home sensing alleviates compliance issues. PMID:27170900

  19. Rural Older Adults' Access Barriers to In-Home and Community-Based Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong

    2006-01-01

    This study identified specific access barriers to seven commonly used in-home and community-based services (CBS) and examined factors that were related to barriers to these services. The data used in this study were extracted from the 1999 National Long Term Care Survey and included 283 dyads of rural older adults and their caregivers. The CBS to…

  20. Community health advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Loue, Sana

    2006-01-01

    Competing health needs of diverse populations and ever shrinking resources available to support these needs often serve as the impetus for the initiation of advocacy efforts to improve community health. However, perceptions of what constitutes a community differ, as do approaches to advocacy itself. This glossary addresses five key questions: (1) What is advocacy?; (2) What is meant by community?; (3) What are the different approaches to community health advocacy?; (4) How are priorities established in the face of competing health advocacy goals?; (5) How can community health advocacy efforts be evaluated?; and (6) What challenges may be encountered in advocating for community health? Each of these issues could serve as the basis for a text on that subject alone. Accordingly, this article is not meant to be comprehensive text on these issues but is, instead, intended to highlight key foundational issues. And, although advocacy efforts can be conducted by individuals, this article focuses specifically on advocacy efforts of communities, however they may be defined and characterised. PMID:16698972

  1. Air Pollution Affects Community Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shy, Carl M.; Finklea, John F.

    1973-01-01

    Community Health and Environmental Surveillance System (CHESS), a nationwide program relating community health to environmental quality, is designed to evaluate existing environmental standards, obtain health intelligence for new standards, and document health benefits of air pollution control. (BL)

  2. The Case of an In-Home Recreation Program for an Older Adult in a Naturally Occurring Retirement Community (NORC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Yvette

    2002-01-01

    Describes the implementation of an in-home therapeutic recreation (TR) program with an elderly woman living in a naturally occurring retirement community (NORC) by a fourth-year TR student. The program helped meet her physical, social, and cognitive needs and re-stimulate her interests. Results suggest that in-home TR can be beneficial, and TR…

  3. Community Bioethics: The Health Decisions Community Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallegos, Tom; Mrgudic, Kate

    1993-01-01

    Sees health care decision making posing variety of complex issues for individuals, families, and providers. Describes Health Decisions Community Council (HDCC), community-based bioethics committee established to offer noninstitutional forum for discussion of health care dilemmas. Notes that social work skills and values for autonomy and…

  4. Meaning creation and employee engagement in home health caregivers.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Mette Strange; Jørgensen, Frances

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to an understanding on how home health caregivers experience engagement in their work, and specifically, how aspects of home healthcare work create meaning associated with employee engagement. Although much research on engagement has been conducted, little has addressed how individual differences such as worker orientation influence engagement, or how engagement is experienced within a caregiving context. The study is based on a qualitative study in two home homecare organisations in Denmark using a think-aloud data technique, interviews and observations. The analysis suggests caregivers experience meaning in three relatively distinct ways, depending on their work orientation. Specifically, the nature of engagement varies across caregivers oriented towards being 'nurturers', 'professionals', or 'workers', and the sources of engagement differ for each of these types of caregivers. The article contributes by (i) advancing our theoretical understanding of employee engagement by emphasising meaning creation and (ii) identifying factors that influence meaning creation and engagement of home health caregivers, which should consequently affect the quality of services provided home healthcare patients. PMID:25982838

  5. Community health for Rwandan refugees.

    PubMed

    Plummer, M

    1995-12-01

    Health education and disease prevention programs are essential elements in every health care system. We normally envision community health programs in urban and rural settings across Canada. However, health education and disease prevention have also become a fundamental part of the health care system for refugee communities around the world. PMID:8713152

  6. Identification of Tasks in Home Economics Related Occupations: Family and Community Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Home Economics Education.

    The study of task identification in family and community services presents statistical correlations of task frequencies obtained by questionnaire for the occupations of visiting homemaker or homemaker home/health aide, family planning health aide, counselor on alcoholism, management aide in low-income housing projects, deputy juvenile probation…

  7. The Ramathibodi Community Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, Prem; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The Ramathibodi Faculty of Medicine in Bangkok, Thailand, has developed a teaching and research program in community health aimed at brining the institution into close association with the health needs of the country. (Editor)

  8. Curriculum for Community Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwick, Paula S.

    The Community Outreach Curriculum described in this paper is designed to prepare community health aides employed through the Outreach Department of Pima County (Arizona) Indian Health Inc., (PCIHI), which consists of two medical clinics on two separate reservations. The first sections of the paper describe PCIHI, provide a rationale for the…

  9. Many ways of community health.

    PubMed

    Joseph, T

    1988-03-01

    The community health approach to health care has been widely recognized as the right alternative for ensuring health to the poor millions in developing nations. In India too, governmental as well as voluntary efforts are made for the promotion of community health. In the evolution of a health care system, this approach has emerged through a process of dialogue between the medical and the social sciences in an effort to make the health care system relevant and and responsive to the socio-political-economic realities in the society. Different approaches have been identified in community health. These are: Medical, Health extension, and Comprehensive. The Medical Approach considers health as the absence of diseases. Health is achieved by medical interventions based on modern sciences and technology and medicine, and sees the role of the community (the people) as one of responding to the directions given by the medical professionals. The Health Extension Approach is based on a critique medical approach. It accepts the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of health as the total physical, mental, and social well being of the individual. Mere advancement of medical technology and the sophistication of services would not bring health to the majority of people--especially the poor. There should be a planned redistribution of health care facilities to reach the vastness of the society. The Comprehensive Approach views health as total well being in the context of the situational realities of the individual. Health--the state of well being--is also a human condition, which does not improve either by providing more services or by mobilizing the community for providing more health services. It improves only by having the community take control and responsibility for decisions about how to mobilize. PMID:12179470

  10. Community health assessment. The first step in community health planning.

    PubMed

    Rice, J A

    1993-01-01

    Hospitals face a paradigm shift: from planning service delivery to population-based community health planning. Comprehensive community health planning is a two-step process: assessment and action, in that order. Assessment identifies community problems and resources; action follows planning, which determines which of those problems should be addressed with which resources. This paper provides an overview of the community assessment process. The first challenge in launching a community health initiative is to identify and recruit partners drawn from the ranks of prominent community organizations, such as school boards, public health agencies, and elected officials. The best enlistment strategies are those that empower persons outside the hospital to take visible control. Defining the community is the first step in analyzing the community. It is important that everyone involved in the assessment process agree on the definition, which should take in those characteristics that make the community unique, including its social systems, environmental factors, and demographics. The next step in the process is developing a community health profile, a set of key community indicators or measures that will help you set priorities, document successes and failures, and monitor trends. There are a number of models available to consult in developing indicators, whether traditional, medically oriented determinants of health or broader parameters, such as housing and public safety. Criteria for selecting indicators include validity, stability and reliability, and responsiveness. Most indicators will be developed using secondary, or already existing, sources of data, such as census data, Medicare and Medicaid files, police records, and hospital admission and exit records. Conducting the community assessment involves putting together a list of problems to be solved and a list of available resources, both of which can be compiled using the same four-step process of gathering and

  11. Knowledge and Practices of In-Home Pesticide Use: A Community Survey in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nalwanga, Eva; Ssempebwa, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Many communities in low-income countries use in-home pesticides for the control of pests. Such use is often inadequately controlled. In this study, 100 households in Kireka ward, Wakiso district in Uganda were involved in a cross-sectional survey to assess pests, knowledge, and use patterns of pesticides. A structured pretested questionnaire was administered via personal interviews, and observational checklists were used. Mosquitoes were the most prevalent pests (83%), followed by cockroaches (69%) and rats (52%). Pesticides were the most preferred method for pest control (98%), with insecticide spray being the most common form of application (71.4%). Pesticide application was inappropriately done in many households mainly due to inadequate knowledge on use. Only 48% of the respondents read manufacturer's instructions for use. Information on what pesticide to use was obtained from friends (53.1%), points of sales (48%). Educational interventions particularly at points of sale would be a critical avenue for promoting safe use of pesticides in households. PMID:21776435

  12. Pakistan's community health workers.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, B; Amarsi, Y; Carpio, B

    1997-05-01

    Pakistan's health characteristics are worse than those of other Asian countries at similar stages of development. Its mortality rate for children under five is 139 per 1,000, and its maternal mortality is 60 per 10,000. Malnutrition in women and children is widespread; 50 per cent of children under five are stunted. Pakistan's population growth rate of 3.1 per cent per year is among the highest in Asia. The high population growth rate and poor health status of many people call for extensive health care services, but, unfortunately, health services do not reach most of the people of Pakistan. Partly because the training of doctors and nurses is lengthy and expensive, there is an acute shortage of health care providers, especially women. Although female health professionals are preferred for caring for women, cultural constraints inhibit women from seeking education. Such is the multifaceted dilemma in the provision of primary health care in Pakistan. PMID:9223980

  13. Bringing Person- and Family-Centred Care Alive in Home, Community and Long-Term Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Danielle; Holyoke, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It is now more important than ever for person- and family-centred care (PFCC) to be at the forefront of program and service design and delivery; yet, to date, very little guidance is available to assist home, community and long-term care (LTC) organizations to operationalize this concept and overcome inherent challenges. This article provides a list of practical strategies for healthcare leaders to promote and support a culture shift towards PFCC in their organizations and identifies and addresses five common concerns. The unique opportunities and challenges for practicing PFCC in home, community and LTC settings are also discussed. PMID:27133612

  14. Automated health alerts from Kinect-based in-home gait measurements.

    PubMed

    Stone, Erik E; Skubic, Marjorie; Back, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    A method for automatically generating alerts to clinicians in response to changes in in-home gait parameters is investigated. Kinect-based gait measurement systems were installed in apartments in a senior living facility. The systems continuously monitored the walking speed, stride time, and stride length of apartment residents. A framework for modeling uncertainty in the residents' gait parameter estimates, which is critical for robust change detection, is developed; along with an algorithm for detecting changes that may be clinically relevant. Three retrospective case studies, of individuals who had their gait monitored for periods ranging from 12 to 29 months, are presented to illustrate use of the alert method. Evidence suggests that clinicians could be alerted to health changes at an early stage, while they are still small and interventions may be most successful. Additional potential uses are also discussed. PMID:25570612

  15. [Challenges Associated with Involvement of Small-Scale Pharmacies in Home Health Care].

    PubMed

    Oka, Toyoka; Takeda, Namihiro; Hamana, Tomoko; Hirohara, Masayoshi; Kushida, Kazuki

    2015-12-01

    As our society is progressing towards a composition wherein a significant portion is constituted by the elderly, a comprehensive home health care system is warranted. The provision of pharmacy services is a key factor in ensuring comprehensive home health care. Our pharmacy has been involved in home health care since its inception. This report is an attempt at evaluation of future prospects through identification and analysis of current operational issues. Our pharmacy is adequately equipped to accommodate home cared patients with significant medical dependency. However, being a small-scale business with few employees, coordinating shifts to ensure 24 hours operation in addition to providing home visits when required has been challenging. These place a substantial burden on the staff pharmacists. It is highly challenging for a single small-scale pharmacy to operate as a"self-contained pharmacy"that remains independent and still adequately serves their clients. Creating a collaborative pharmaceutical service team, consisting of several complementary small-scale pharmacies, provisionally called a "regional cooperative pharmacy,"could prove to be a more realistic alternative. In the coming decade, improving the implementation of home health care through regional level cooperation is necessary. This would require the collaboration various professionals, and the involvement of municipalities and professional organizations to ensure adequate regional support services. PMID:26809404

  16. Guidelines for Dietitians and Public Health Nutritionists in Home Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Prepared by the Public Health Service to clarify the role of health professionals and subprofessionals in the home care field, this guide is directed to dietitians and public health nutritionists who are involved in planning, directing, carrying out, and evaluating the nutrition aspects of medical care programs for patients at home. Program…

  17. Promoting health, building community.

    PubMed

    Artis, Bobby

    2005-01-01

    As part of its mission to honor human dignity and to care for the poor and vulnerable, Catholic Healthcare Partners (CHP), Cincinnati, has made a systemwide commitment to address housing needs in the communities it serves. A priority for the system is providing safe, affordable housing options for the low-income elderly. CHP's approach goes beyond "bricks and mortar," however. The system aims not only to provide a home for senior adults but also to enrich their lives. Through various activities and support services, CHP's senior living complexes in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee offer residents an opportunity to live in a vibrant community. CHP facilities have developed a variety of initiatives to enhance residents' lives. Among these are: spiritual care services, nurses who serve as a resource to low-income elders, a short-stay shelter for seniors in transition, a service referral program, and therapy to help elders remain independent. In order to offer these comprehensive services to senior adults, CHP relies on partnerships with a variety of organizations and on funding from both the federal government and private investors. Especially as the nation's population ages, CHP continues to make its housing ministry a strategic priority. PMID:15807065

  18. 66 FR 46273 - Community Based In-Home Asthma Environmental Education and Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2001-09-04

    ... Radiation and Indoor Air. Section 103(a)(1) of the Clean Air Act authorizes the Administrator to conduct and...: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures'' ( http://books.nap.edu/catalog/9610.html ). (1-5 points) (7) Applicant... and adults with asthma), results of existing in-home education efforts and/or existing indoor...

  19. Adult Learning, Community Education, and Public Health: Making the Connection through Community Health Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Community health education does more than educate communities about health. In the most basic form, community health education seeks to enable citizens to assume responsibility for their own and their community's health through an understanding of their community's health problems and the societal influences that act upon them. Many community…

  20. Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

  1. Partnership for community health development.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, G

    1993-01-01

    A programme of community health development is reported from two villages in Haiti. It involves close cooperation between a district hospital, a local dispensary, and, most importantly, the inhabitants themselves. The programme is simple, financially realistic, adapted to local conditions, and linked to activities designed to meet basic requirements, such as those of food production and water supply. PMID:8185759

  2. Community financing of health care.

    PubMed

    Carrin, G

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses ways to lesson the restrictions on health development in sub-Saharan Africa caused by limited public health budgets. Health improvements can be funded by the implementation of health insurance, the use of foreign aid, the raising of taxes, the reallocation of public money, and direct contributions by users or households either in the form of charges for services received or prepayments for future services. Community financing, i.e. the direct financing of health care by households in villages or distinct urban communities, is seen as preferable to a national or regional plan. When community financing is chosen, a choice must then be made between direct payment, fee-for-service, and prepayment (insurance) systems. The 3 systems, using the example of an essential drugs program, are described. Theoretically, with direct payment the government receives full cost recovery, and the patients receive the drugs they need, thereby improving their health. Of course the poor may not be able to purchase the drugs, therefore a subsidy system must be worked out at the community level. Fee-for-service means charging for a consultation or course of treatment, including drugs. A sliding scale of fees or discounts for certain types of consultations (e.g. pre-and post natal) can be used. In fee-for-service the risk is shared; because the cost of drugs is financed by the fees, those who receive costly treatments are subsidized by those whose treatments are relatively inexpensive. With prepayment or health insurance the risk of illness is shifted from the patient to the insurance firm or state. 2 issues make insurance plans hard to implement. When patients are covered by insurance, they may demand "too much" medical care (moral hazard) and thus premiums may be too small to cover treatment costs. On the other hand, people in low-risk groups may be unwilling to pay a higher premium, thus leading to adverse selection. Eventually, premiums may rise to the point where

  3. Keys to Successful Community Health Worker Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duthie, Patricia; Hahn, Janet S.; Philippi, Evelyn; Sanchez, Celeste

    2012-01-01

    For many years community health workers (CHW) have been important to the implementation of many of our health system's community health interventions. Through this experience, we have recognized some unique challenges in community health worker supervision and have highlighted what we have learned in order to help other organizations effectively…

  4. Investment in home-based maternal, newborn and child health records improves immunization coverage in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Osaki, K; Hattori, T; Kosen, Soewarta; Singgih, Budihardja

    2009-08-01

    Indonesia Demographic and Health Surveys show that the ownership of home-based immunization records among children aged 12-23 months increased from 30.8% in 1997 and 30.7% in 2002-3 to 37% in 2007. In 2002-3, 70.9% of children who owned records had received all vaccines by the time of the survey, whereas 42.9% of children who did not own records had been fully immunized. An Indonesian ministerial decree of 2004 stated that the Maternal and Child Health Handbook (MCH handbook) was to be the only home-based record of maternal, newborn and child health. The increased immunization coverage seen would be a reflection of MCH handbook implementation, through raising awareness of immunization among community and health personnel and children's parents or guardians and allowing more accurate measurement of immunization coverage. PMID:19375141

  5. Patient Moderator Interaction in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W.; Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to share experiences and seek health information. Although studies have enumerated reasons for patients’ visits to online communities for health information from peers, we know little about how patients gain health information from the moderators in these communities. We qualitatively analyze 480 patient and moderator posts from six communities to understand how moderators fulfill patients’ information needs. Our findings show that patients use the community as an integral part of their health management practices. Based on our results, we suggest enhancements to moderated online health communities for their unique role to support patient care. PMID:24551364

  6. Expertise in community health nursing.

    PubMed

    McMurray, A

    1992-01-01

    This article reports on a study of expertise in community health nursing. The objective of the study was to develop a model of expertise derived from identification of the characteristics and factors influencing clinical expertise in community health nurses (CHNs) practicing in district nursing, school health, and child health. Participant observations, individual interviews, and written retrospective accounts of clinical episodes were analyzed from 37 nurses (10 novices within the first year of community practice and 27 experts identified by peers and colleagues). The data identified the expert as someone in whom the following characteristics operate synchronously: knowledge; empathy; appropriate communication; holistic understanding; an ability to get right to the problem at hand; and self-confidence in her or his perceptions, judgments, and intervention strategies. The findings suggest that there is a combination of factors which influences the development of expertise. These include educational factors, personal factors, and experience. These factors are incorporated into the model of expertise. The data also suggest that, in order to educate for expert levels of practice, the educational process must be designed to stimulate the learner's perceptual as well as analytic abilities. This can best be achieved through clinical practice opportunities and through demonstrations and case studies which stimulate inferential and intuitive thinking in students. PMID:1624980

  7. Infection in home health care: Results from national Outcome and Assessment Information Set data

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Larson, Elaine; Liu, Jianfang; Stone, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients in home health care (HHC), the fastest growing health care sector, are at risk for infection. The existing research on infection in HHC is often limited by small sample sizes, local scope of inquiry, and a lack of current data. There is no national study examining agency-level infection rates. Methods This secondary data analysis used a 20% random sample of the 2010 national Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) data. An infection case was identified when the HHC patient was hospitalized or received emergency care for respiratory infection, urinary tract infection, intravenous catheter-related infection, wound infection, or deterioration. Proportions of infection cases out of the total number of patients were calculated for the whole sample and for each HHC agency. Results The final analysis included 199,462 patients from 8,255 HHC agencies. Approximately 3.5% of patients developed infections during their HHC stay, leading to emergency care treatment or hospitalization. Seventeen percent of unplanned hospitalizations among HHC patients were caused by infections. The agency-level infection rate ranged from 0%–34%, with an average of 3.5%. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the proportion of hospitalizations or emergency care treatment caused by infection in HHC and the agency-level infection rate at a national level by using OASIS data. These data demonstrate that infection is a serious problem in HHC, and infection rates varied between agencies. The variance in agency level rates may be caused by differences in infection control policies and practices. Better infection surveillance system in HHC is needed to benchmark quality of care. PMID:25681302

  8. Association of Maternal and Community Factors With Enrollment in Home Visiting Among At-Risk, First-Time Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Eric S.; Jones, David E.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen K.; Short, Jodie A.; Ammerman, Robert T.; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We identified individual and contextual factors associated with referral and enrollment in home visiting among at-risk, first-time mothers. Methods. We retrospectively studied referral and enrollment in a regional home visiting program from 2007 to 2009 in Hamilton County, Ohio. Using linked vital statistics and census tract data, we obtained individual and community measures on first-time mothers meeting eligibility criteria for home visiting (low income, unmarried, or age < 18 years). Generalized linear modeling was performed to determine factors associated with relative risk (RR) of (1) referral to home visiting among eligible mothers and (2) enrollment after referral. Results. Of 8187 first-time mothers eligible for home visiting, 2775 were referred and 1543 were enrolled. Among referred women, high school completion (RR = 1.10) and any college (RR = 1.17) compared with no high school completion were associated with increased enrollment, and enrollment was less likely for those living in communities with higher socioeconomic deprivation (RR = 0.71; P < .05). Conclusions. Barriers to enrollment in home visiting persisted at multiple ecological levels. Ongoing evaluation of enrollment in at-risk populations is critical as home visiting programs are implemented and expanded. PMID:24354835

  9. Health Care Marketing: Role Evolution of the Community Health Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syre, Thomas R.; Wilson, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses role delineation in the health education profession, defines and presents principles of health care marketing, describes marketing plan development, and examines major ethical issues associated with health care marketing when utilized by community health educators. A marketing plan format for community health education is…

  10. Meeting the "Now" Need: PMH-APRN-- Interpreter Teams Provide In-Home Mental Health Intervention for Depressed Latina Mothers With Limited English Proficiency.

    PubMed

    Beeber, Linda S; Lewis, Virginia S; Cooper, Carolyn; Maxwell, Lauren; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2009-08-01

    Latina mothers of infants and toddlers are at high risk for developing serious depressive symptoms if they are newly immigrated and have limited English proficiency (LEP). Depressive symptoms compromise these mothers and result in severe consequences for their U.S.-born children. A randomized clinical trial of a short-term, in-home psychotherapy intervention for symptomatic mothers in an area of the United States where bilingual mental health providers were scarce used teams of English-speaking advanced practice psychiatric mental health nurses and bilingual community interpreters who were trained in a conduit, consecutive model of interpretation. The article describes the development of a theoretically congruent interpreter model, the training program that supported it, the challenges that surfaced and lessons learned during successful implementation in the field. Future refinements in progress and uses of the model are discussed. PMID:21665811

  11. Collaborative Community: Health Education Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Setta

    2004-01-01

    Four community colleges in Western Massachusetts--Berkshire Community College (BCC), Greenfield Community College (GCC), Holyoke Community College (HCC), and Springfield Technical Community College (STCC)--have created a collaborative Web site, at www.healthprograms.org, to present information on allied health associate degrees or certificate…

  12. A Marine's journey from battle injury to employment in home community.

    PubMed

    Linstad, Casey; Schafer, David J

    2015-01-01

    After surviving a severe brain injury from a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) blast and working daily to reclaim his life, one of the military's finest was ready to pursue community employment. At 27-years-old, he completed an 8-year-long, comprehensive traumatic brain injury rehabilitation program by making an autobiographical documentary. The documentary served as a stepping stone for his community employment as well as a means to encourage others to keep working toward their goals. He is now successfully employed, on a part-time basis, with a local retailer, in his home community. This paper outlines the progression from initial concept to a completed documentary. It tracks his experiences and accomplishments through years of rehabilitation therapy, through making an autobiographical documentary, to bridging a transition from his identity as a rehabilitation patient to a working member of his home community. PMID:25167906

  13. Lessons in Community Health Activism

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study employed historical methodologies to explore the means through which the Maternity Care Coalition used grassroots activism to dismantle the power structures and other obstacles that contributed to high infant mortality rates in Philadelphia’s health districts 5 and 6 during the 1980s. Infant mortality within the black community has been a persistent phenomenon in the United States. Refusing to accept poverty as a major determinant of infant mortality within marginalized populations of women, activists during the 1980s harnessed momentum from a postcivil rights context and sought alternative methods toward change and improvement of infant mortality rates. PMID:24892861

  14. Bridging the Gap Between Community Health and School Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The responsibility for community health should be shared and coordinated among schools, parents, and health agencies. Children's knowledge and skills should be developed so that they too can promote personal good health. Issues and strategies are discussed. (BJV)

  15. Preserving community in health care.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, E J; Emanuel, L L

    1997-02-01

    There are two prominent trends in health care today: first, increasing demands for accountabilty, and second, increasing provision of care through managed care organizations. These trends promote the question: What form of account-ability is appropriate to managed care plans? Accountability is the process by which a party justifies its actions and policies. Components of accountability include parties that can be held or hold others accountable, domains and content areas being assessed, and procedures of assessment. Traditionally, the professional model of accountability has operated in medical care. In this model, physicians establish the standards of accountability and hold each other accountable through professional organizations. This form of accountability seems outdated and inapplicable to managed care plans. The alternatives are the economic and the political models of accountability. In the economic model, medicine becomes more like a commodity, and "exit" (consumers changing providers for reasons of cost and quality) is the dominant procedure of accountability. In the political model, medicine becomes more like a community good, and "voice" (citizens communicating their views in public forums or on policy committees, or in elections for representatives) is the dominant procedure of accountability. The economic model's advantages affirm American individualism, make minimal demands on consumers, and use a powerful incentive, money. Its disadvantages undermine health care as a nonmarket good, undermine individual autonomy, undermine good medical practice, impose significant demands on consumers to be informed, sustain differentials of power, and use indirect procedures of accountability. The political model's advantages affirm health care as a matter of justice, permit selecting domains other than price and quality for accountability, reinforce good medical practice, and equalize power between patients and physicians. Its disadvantages include inefficiency in

  16. eHealth Technology Competencies for Health Professionals Working in Home Care to Support Older Adults to Age in Place: Outcomes of a Two-Day Collaborative Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ansam; Woolrych, Ryan D; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kearns, William D

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for care is increasing, whereas in the near future the number of people working in professional care will not match with the demand for care. eHealth technology can help to meet the growing demand for care. Despite the apparent positive effects of eHealth technology, there are still barriers to technology adoption related to the absence of a composite set of knowledge and skills among health care professionals regarding the use of eHealth technology. Objective The objective of this paper is to discuss the competencies required by health care professionals working in home care, with eHealth technologies such as remote telecare and ambient assisted living (AAL), mobile health, and fall detection systems. Methods A two-day collaborative workshop was undertaken with academics across multiple disciplines with experience in working on funded research regarding the application and development of technologies to support older people. Results The findings revealed that health care professionals working in home care require a subset of composite skills as well as technology-specific competencies to develop the necessary aptitude in eHealth care. This paper argues that eHealth care technology skills must be instilled in health care professionals to ensure that technologies become integral components of future care delivery, especially to support older adults to age in place. Educating health care professionals with the necessary skill training in eHealth care will improve service delivery and optimise the eHealth care potential to reduce costs by improving efficiency. Moreover, embedding eHealth care competencies within training and education for health care professionals ensures that the benefits of new technologies are realized by casting them in the context of the larger system of care. These care improvements will potentially support the independent living of older persons at home. Conclusions This paper describes the health care professionals

  17. The reliability of in-home measures of height and weight in large cohort studies: Evidence from Add Health

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Jon M.; Nguyen, Quynh C.; Whitsel, Eric A.; Richardson, Liana J.; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Tabor, Joyce W.; Entzel, Pamela P.; Harris, Kathleen Mullan

    2015-01-01

    Background With the emergence of obesity as a global health issue an increasing number of major demographic surveys are collecting measured anthropometric data. Yet little is known about the characteristics and reliability of these data. Objectives We evaluate the accuracy and reliability of anthropometric data collected in the home during Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), compare our estimates to national standard, clinic-based estimates from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and, using both sources, provide a detailed anthropometric description of young adults in the United States. Methods The reliability of Add Health in-home anthropometric measures was estimated from repeat examinations of a random subsample of study participants. A digit preference analysis evaluated the quality of anthropometric data recorded by field interviewers. The adjusted odds of obesity and central obesity in Add Health vs. NHANES were estimated with logistic regression. Results Short-term reliabilities of in-home measures of height, weight, waist and arm circumference—as well as derived body mass index (BMI, kg/m2)—were excellent. Prevalence of obesity (37% vs. 29%) and central obesity (47% vs. 38%) was higher in Add Health than in NHANES while socio-demographic patterns of obesity and central obesity were comparable in the two studies. Conclusions Properly trained non-medical field interviewers can collect reliable anthropometric data in a nationwide, home visit study. This national cohort of young adults in the United States faces a high risk of early-onset chronic disease and premature mortality. PMID:26146486

  18. Promoting Community Health Resources: Preferred Communication Strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Community health promotion efforts involve communicating resource information to priority populations. Which communication strategies are most effective is largely unknown for specific populations. Objective: A random-dialed telephone survey was conducted to assess health resource comm...

  19. Lessons on sustainability for community health projects.

    PubMed

    Aubel, J; Samba-Ndure, K

    1996-01-01

    In the Gambia a community-based strategy was tested, in which a traditional snack food was promoted as a dietary supplement to improve women's nutrition during pregnancy. The results suggest how community nutrition programmes can be designed so as to favour sustainability. By and large, the lessons learned are also applicable to other types of community health programme. PMID:8820144

  20. Building Community for Effective Health Promotion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.; Engstrom, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Health promotion on campuses has two audiences or targets: individuals and the community. Through strategies of leadership, consensus development, and community service, college and university communities cannot only change social norms, but more critically, found and nurture a flexible, gentle network of caring and connectedness that pulls people…

  1. Ohio Valley Community Health Information Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guard, Roger; And Others

    The Ohio Valley Community Health Information Network (OVCHIN) works to determine the efficacy of delivering health information to residents of rural southern Ohio and the urban and suburban Cincinnati area. OVCHIN is a community-based, consumer-defined demonstration grant program funded by the National Telecommunications and Information…

  2. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  3. The Yaffo Community Mental Health Center.

    PubMed

    Kleinhauz, M; Beran, B

    1978-01-01

    The Yaffo Mental Health Center was intended as a model for the implementation of the Israel national program for community psychiatry. The principles governing the function of the community mental health center are set out and the various component (if integrated) service structures are described. PMID:555502

  4. Marketing and Community Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferniany, Isaac W.; Garove, William E.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that a marketing approach can be applied to community mental health centers. Marketing is a management orientation of providing services for, not to, patients in a systematic manner, which can help mental health centers improve services, strengthen community image, achieve financial independence and aid in staff recruitment. (Author)

  5. Endotoxin levels in homes and classrooms of Dutch school children and respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, José H; Krop, Esmeralda J M; de Wind, Siegfried; Spithoven, Jack; Heederik, Dick J J

    2013-08-01

    Several studies describe indoor pollutant exposure in homes and to a lesser extent in schools. Population studies that include both environments are sparse. This study aims to assess endotoxin levels in primary schools and homes of children. Endotoxin was also studied in relation to asthma and sensitisation. 10 schools with (index) and without (reference) dampness were selected, based on reports and inspections. Cases and controls were selected from 169 homes based on the presence or absence of asthma-like symptoms of children. Classroom and bedroom airborne settled dust was sampled using electrostatic dust fall collectors. Average endotoxin levels in schools ranged from 2178 to 6914 endotoxin units (EU)·m(-2) per week compared with 462-1285 EU·m(-2) per week in homes. After mutual adjustment for home and school endotoxin, school endotoxin was positively associated with nonatopic asthma (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.97-1.27), while no associations with endotoxin were found at home. The high endotoxin levels in schools compared with homes indicate that exposure at school can contribute considerably to environmental endotoxin exposure of children and teachers. Our results also suggest that endotoxin in schools may be associated with nonatopic asthmatic symptoms in pupils, although the results require reproduction because of the modest sample size. PMID:23100494

  6. Health Knowledge Effects: An Integrated Community Health Promotion Platform.

    PubMed

    Chang, I-Chiu; Lin, Chih-Yu; Tseng, Hsiao-Ting; Ho, Wen-Yu

    2016-03-01

    The Taiwanese government subsidizes healthcare providers offering preventive medicine to patients to help reduce the threats of chronic sickness and halt skyrocketing medical expenditures. Usually, nurses are the primary workers who perform community health promotion; however, because of the chronic shortage of working nurses, many Taiwan hospitals have closed wards and deferred the responsibility of promoting primary prevention. With a community health promotion platform integrating interactive response features and Web sites for community patients and hospital staff, a case hospital efficiently sustained the community health services. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the integrated community health promotion platform for conducting education. Fifty-four patients/residents were invited to join a quasi-experiment of health education, and a follow-up survey was conducted to assess the acceptance of the community health promotion platform from both the experimental group of learners/users and the hospital staff. The results showed that the community health promotion platform was effective in improving participant health awareness. The experimental group outperformed the control group, with higher posttest scores and longer knowledge retention. Furthermore, users indicated a high acceptance of the community health promotion platform. PMID:26657621

  7. Examining Therapist Comfort in Delivering Family Therapy in Home and Community Settings: Development and Evaluation of the Therapist Comfort Scale

    PubMed Central

    Glebova, Tatiana; Foster, Sharon L.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Brennan, Patricia A.; Whitmore, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the development and psychometric properties of a new measure assessing therapist comfort in the home treatment context, and the relationship between therapist comfort, related process variables, and therapist characteristics. Data were drawn from a longitudinal evaluation of 185 families treated by 51 therapists using Multisystemic Therapy (MST). Therapist comfort was measured at four time points. Psychometric evaluation indicated that the measure was internally and temporally consistent. Examination of the measure’s validity indicated that therapists’ feelings of safety and comfort during the provision of home-based treatment were associated with family neighborhood characteristics and family socioeconomic factors. Furthermore, the therapist’s reported level of alliance (as measured by the Emotional Bonding subscale of the Working Alliance Inventory) was related to her/his feeling of comfort. Analyses also indicated that therapists with greater belief in the clinical utility of the MST model felt more comfortable when delivering MST. Together the results suggest that economically disadvantaged families treated in home and community settings may be most at risk for erosions in the therapeutic relationship over time as a function of lower therapist comfort. Because therapist comfort was associated with therapeutic alliance - a factor found to be associated with clinical outcomes across studies and treatment models - findings imply that psychotherapists should regularly examine their own level of comfort, especially when providing services in non-traditional settings, and that therapist comfort should be routinely assessed as part of clinical supervision and training. PMID:22181024

  8. Weaving Clinical Expertise in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; Pratt, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Many patients visit online health communities to receive support. In face-to-face support groups, health professionals facilitate peer-patients exchanging experience while adding their clinical expertise when necessary. However, the large scale of online health communities makes it challenging for such health professional moderators’ involvement to happen. To address this challenge of delivering clinical expertise to where patients need them, we explore the idea of semi-automatically providing clinical expertise in online health communities. We interviewed 14 clinicians showing them example peer-patient conversation threads. From the interviews, we examined the ideal practice of clinicians providing expertise to patients. The clinicians continuously assessed when peer-patients were providing appropriate support, what kinds of clinical help they could give online, and when to defer to patients’ healthcare providers. The findings inform requirements for building a semi-automated system delivering clinical expertise in online health communities. PMID:26413582

  9. Environmental and Community Health. Health Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantzler, Nora J.; Miner, Kathleen R.

    The 10-volume "Health Facts" series is intended to supplement health education curricula and provide a handy reference for individuals who would like additional background information on particular health topics. The emphasis is placed on topics and examples relevant to youth of middle and high school age. This book is divided into two parts: Part…

  10. Afghan Health Education Project: a community survey.

    PubMed

    Lipson, J G; Omidian, P A; Paul, S M

    1995-06-01

    This study assessed the health concerns and needs for health education in the Afghan refugee and immigrant community of the San Francisco Bay Area. The study used a telephone survey, seven community meetings and a survey administered to 196 Afghan families through face-to-face interviews. Data were analyzed qualitatively and statistically. Health problems of most concern are mental health problems and stress related to past refugee trauma and loss, current occupational and economic problems, and culture conflict. Physical health problems include heart disease, diabetes and dental problems. Needed health education topics include dealing with stress, heart health, nutrition, raising children in the United States (particularly adolescents), aging in the United States, and diabetes. Using coalition building and involving Afghans in their community assessment, we found that the Afghan community is eager for culture- and language-appropriate health education programs through videos, television, lectures, and written materials. Brief health education talks in community meetings and a health fair revealed enthusiasm and willingness to consider health promotion and disease-prevention practices. PMID:7596962

  11. Ethiopia's health extension program: improving health through community involvement.

    PubMed

    Banteyerga, Hailom

    2011-07-01

    The Health Extension Program is one of the most innovative community-based health programs in Ethiopia. It is based on the assumption that access to and quality of primary health care in rural communities can be improved through transfer of health knowledge and skills to households. Since it became operational in 2004-2005, the Program has had a tangible effect on the thinking and practices of rural people regarding disease prevention, family health, hygiene and environmental sanitation. It has enabled Ethiopia to increase primary health care coverage from 76.9% in 2005 to 90% in 2010. PMID:21778960

  12. [Health promotion in the Pankararu indigenous community].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jonas Welton Barros; Aquino, Jael Maria; Monteiro, Estela Maria Leite Meirelles

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to know how the Pankararu indigenous perceive their health situation and identify actions they prioritize as necessary to promote health in their community. Qualitative research, in which the declarations collected were subjected to the technique of analyzing the Collective Subject Discourse. It was identified that in the indigenous perception, as the health status of their community, there is a lack of general assistance, and a lack of professionals to assist them meeting their needs. In relation to actions that the Indigenous prioritize as necessary to promote the health of their community, it was highlighted provision of health unit with trained professionals and access to health education actions. It was, thus, proposed an overhaul of the organizations and establishments of the subsystems in promoting indigenous health. PMID:23032334

  13. Developing Responsive Indicators of Indigenous Community Health.

    PubMed

    Donatuto, Jamie; Campbell, Larry; Gregory, Robin

    2016-01-01

    How health is defined and assessed is a priority concern for Indigenous peoples due to considerable health risks faced from environmental impacts to homelands, and because what is "at risk" is often determined without their input or approval. Many health assessments by government agencies, industry, and researchers from outside the communities fail to include Indigenous definitions of health and omit basic methodological guidance on how to evaluate Indigenous health, thus compromising the quality and consistency of results. Native Coast Salish communities (Washington State, USA) developed and pilot-tested a set of Indigenous Health Indicators (IHI) that reflect non-physiological aspects of health (community connection, natural resources security, cultural use, education, self-determination, resilience) on a community scale, using constructed measures that allow for concerns and priorities to be clearly articulated without releasing proprietary knowledge. Based on initial results from pilot-tests of the IHI with the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community (Washington State, USA), we argue that incorporation of IHIs into health assessments will provide a more comprehensive understanding of Indigenous health concerns, and assist Indigenous peoples to control their own health evaluations. PMID:27618086

  14. Linking community health improvement with clinical strategies.

    PubMed

    Hattis, P; Matheny, P

    2001-01-01

    In most health care organizations, there is a separation between community health improvement (CHI) efforts and other strategic goals--in particular, clinical care strategies. By carefully managing their approach to CHI, health care organizations can successfully link these areas and reap significant tangible and intangible rewards, including cost savings and better outcomes of care. PMID:11372277

  15. Health and Taxes: Hospitals, Community Health and the IRS.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act created new conditions of federal tax exemption for nonprofit hospitals, including a requirement that hospitals conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every three years to identify significant health needs in their communities and then develop and implement a strategy responding to those needs. As a result, hospitals must now do more than provide charity care to their patients in exchange for the benefits of tax exemption. The CHNA requirement has the potential both to prompt a radical change in hospitals' relationship to their communities and to enlist hospitals as meaningful contributors to community health improvement initiatives. Final regulations issued in December 2014 clarify hospitals' obligations under the CHNA requirement, but could do more to facilitate hospitals' engagement in collaborative community health projects. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has a rich opportunity, while hospitals are still learning to conduct CHNAs, to develop guidance establishing clear but flexible expectations for how providers should assess and address community needs. This Article urges the IRS to seize that opportunity by refining its regulatory framework for the CHNA requirement. Specifically, the IRS should more robustly promote transparency, accountability, community engagement, and collaboration while simultaneously leaving hospitals a good degree of flexibility. By promoting alignment between hospitals' regulatory compliance activities and broader community health improvement initiatives, the IRS could play a meaningful role in efforts to reorient our system towards promoting health and not simply treating illness. PMID:27363258

  16. Aneroid Blood Pressure Manometer Calibration Rates of Devices Used in Home Health.

    PubMed

    Arena, Sara K; Bacyinski, Andrew; Simon, Lee; Peterson, Edward L

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with cardiovascular disease, stroke, and a range of other medical sequelae. Accurate blood pressure (BP) readings, which depend on the integrity and calibration of the measuring device, are essential to identifying suboptimal BP. This study describes calibration rates of aneroid BP devices (a) utilized in home healthcare (HHC) and (b) having the needle resting within the zero accuracy indicator. BP devices from one branch of a home care agency were inspected and checked for calibration according to the protocol set forth by the European Society of Hypertension. Of the 125 devices measured, 78.4% were in calibration. Of the 94 devices with the gauge needle resting in the zero accuracy indicator, 11.7% were not in calibration; whereas, 51.6% of the 31 devices with the gauge needle resting outside the zero accuracy indicator were found not in calibration. Twenty-one devices were not checked for calibration due to inflation bulb malfunction, tubing tears, or excessive wear. Furthermore, visual inspection of the needle placement did not confirm a device as being in or out of calibration. Proper maintenance and routine calibration of BP equipment is foundational to assuring accuracy of BP readings obtained by HHC providers. PMID:26645840

  17. Listening to Community Health Workers: How Ethnographic Research Can Inform Positive Relationships Among Community Health Workers, Health Institutions, and Communities

    PubMed Central

    Closser, Svea; Kalofonos, Ippolytos

    2014-01-01

    Many actors in global health are concerned with improving community health worker (CHW) policy and practice to achieve universal health care. Ethnographic research can play an important role in providing information critical to the formation of effective CHW programs, by elucidating the life histories that shape CHWs’ desires for alleviation of their own and others’ economic and health challenges, and by addressing the working relationships that exist among CHWs, intended beneficiaries, and health officials. We briefly discuss ethnographic research with 3 groups of CHWs: volunteers involved in HIV/AIDS care and treatment support in Ethiopia and Mozambique and Lady Health Workers in Pakistan. We call for a broader application of ethnographic research to inform working relationships among CHWs, communities, and health institutions. PMID:24625167

  18. Oral Health in Rural Communities

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of dental care access? The Rural Health Information Hub provides two useful tools that may be useful when looking for additional strategies to address dental care access. RHIhub’s Rural Health ...

  19. Health care philanthropies: how communities can participate.

    PubMed

    1996-09-01

    When a nonprofit hospital or health plan converts to for-profit status, the value of its assets endows a charitable foundation. As a result, billions of health care dollars are being shifted into new philanthropic institutions with an explicit mission to "improve the health of the community." But this issue of States of Health argues that mission can only be accomplished if consumers are involved significantly in the conversion process. PMID:11503873

  20. Quality Assurance in Community Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racusin, Robert; Krell, Helen

    1980-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages to various methods of assuring quality and accountability in community mental health centers are discussed. Examples are external structure review, peer monitoring, and site visitation. (LAB)

  1. Assessing Financial Health in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy H.; Head, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    In this age of educational accountability, there is an increasing emphasis on assessment and institutional effectiveness, not only in the academic arena but also in other aspects of community college operation, such as fiscal health and stability, revenue generation, resource allocation, facilities, workforce development, and community enrichment…

  2. Sexual health needs and the LGBT community.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sue

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) individuals have particular vulnerabilities to sexually transmitted infections and HIV infection. Globally, reasons for this include physiological factors, discrimination and poor understanding of their sexual health needs. In many countries LGBT individuals are not able to exercise fully their rights to health care. This raises public health concerns for the LGBT community and the wider population. This article explores these issues, and makes recommendations for the healthcare profession to address health inequalities and promote improved health outcomes for LGBT populations. This article aims to promote an evidence-based approach that focuses on rights and public health issues. PMID:23641652

  3. A community-based participatory research study of multifaceted in-home environmental interventions for pediatric asthmatics in public housing.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jonathan I; Brugge, Doug; Peters, Junenette L; Clougherty, Jane E; Saddler, Shawnette S

    2006-10-01

    Pest infestation is a major problem in urban, low-income housing and may contribute to elevated asthma prevalence and exacerbation rates in such communities. However, there is poor understanding of the effectiveness of integrated pest management (IPM) efforts in controlling pediatric asthma, or of the interactions among various interventions and risk factors in these settings. As part of the Boston-based Healthy Public Housing Initiative, we conducted a longitudinal, single-cohort community-based participatory research intervention study. Fifty asthmatic children aged 4-17 from three public housing developments in Boston, Massachusetts, USA successfully completed interventions and detailed environmental, medical, social, and health outcome data collection. Interventions primarily consisted of IPM and related cleaning and educational efforts, but also included limited case management and support from trained community health advocates. In pre-post analyses, we found significant reductions in a 2-week recall respiratory symptom score (from 2.6 to 1.5 on an 8-point scale, p = 0.0002) and in the frequency of wheeze/cough, slowing down or stopping play, and waking at night. Longitudinal analyses of asthma-related quality of life similarly document significant improvements, with a suggestion of some improvements prior to environmental interventions with an increased rate of improvement subsequent to pest management activities. Analyses of potential explanatory factors demonstrated significant between-development differences in symptom improvements and suggested some potential contributions of allergen reductions, increased peak flow meter usage, and improved social support, but not medication changes. In spite of limitations with pre-post comparisons, our results are consistent with aggressive pest management and other allergen reduction efforts having a positive impact on clinical health outcomes associated with asthma. Our findings reinforce the multifactorial nature

  4. Community Health Needs Assessment: Potential for Population Health Improvement.

    PubMed

    Pennel, Cara L; McLeroy, Kenneth R; Burdine, James N; Matarrita-Cascante, David; Wang, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Derived from various health care policies and initiatives, the concept of population health has been newly adopted by health care and medicine. In particular, it has been suggested that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provision that requires nonprofit hospitals to conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) and implement strategies to address health priorities has the potential to improve population health. A mixed methods study design was used to examine the potential for population health improvements to occur through the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)-mandated nonprofit hospital CHNA and planning processes. Methods involved a 2-phased approach composed of (1) content analysis of 95 CHNA/implementation strategies reports and (2) interviews with key informants, consultants, and community stakeholders involved in CHNA and planning processes. Although this is a great opportunity for the nonprofit hospital assessment and planning processes to influence population health outcomes, the findings from the first 3-year assessment and planning cycle (2011-2013) suggest this is unlikely. As nonprofit hospitals begin the second 3-year assessment and planning cycle, this article offers recommendations to increase the potential for nonprofit hospitals to improve population health. These recommendations include clarifying the purpose of IRS CHNA regulations, engaging community stakeholders in collaborative assessment and planning, understanding disease etiology and identifying and addressing broader determinants of health, adopting a public health assessment and planning model, and emphasizing population health improvement. (Population Health Management 2016;19:178-186). PMID:26440370

  5. Measuring Contextual Characteristics for Community Health

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, Marianne M; Lynch, John; Harper, Sam; Casper, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Objective To conceptualize and measure community contextual influences on population health and health disparities. Data Sources We use traditional and nontraditional secondary sources of data comprising a comprehensive array of community characteristics. Study Design Using a consultative process, we identify 12 overarching dimensions of contextual characteristics that may affect community health, as well as specific subcomponents relating to each dimension. Data Collection An extensive geocoded library of data indicators relating to each dimension and subcomponent for metropolitan areas in the United States is assembled. Principal Findings We describe the development of community contextual health profiles, present the rationale supporting each of the profile dimensions, and provide examples of relevant data sources. Conclusions Our conceptual framework for community contextual characteristics, including a specified set of dimensions and components, can provide practical ways to monitor health-related aspects of the economic, social, and physical environments in which people live. We suggest several guiding principles useful for understanding how aspects of contextual characteristics can affect health and health disparities. PMID:14727793

  6. Running as fast as they can: organizational changes in home health care.

    PubMed

    Estes, C L; Swan, J H; Bergthold, L A; Spohn, P H

    1992-01-01

    During the 1980s, as the health care industry experienced what observers have dubbed a revolution, the home health industry also experienced its own transformation. Utilizing three organizational theories (neoinstitutional, resource dependency and population ecology), the authors report on a study of a probability sample of 163 home health agencies (HHAs) that were interviewed in 1986 and again in 1987 on the effects of Medicare policy changes including prospective payment (DRGs). This study tests hypotheses concerning the influence of environmental factors (e.g., state policy and characteristics of the local market) and organizational characteristics of the HHA (e.g., tax status and Medicare reliance) in explaining the propensity of HHAs to be (or become) parts of chains and/or multi-facility systems; and to develop particular types of interorganizational relations. The paper discusses the results in the context of public policy changes and the implications for future research and practice. PMID:10126432

  7. Community health workers can improve male involvement in maternal health: evidence from rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    August, Furaha; Pembe, Andrea B.; Mpembeni, Rose; Axemo, Pia; Darj, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background Male involvement in maternal health is recommended as one of the interventions to improve maternal and newborn health. There have been challenges in realising this action, partly due to the position of men in society and partly due to health system challenges in accommodating men. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of Home Based Life Saving Skills training by community health workers on improving male involvement in maternal health in terms of knowledge of danger signs, joint decision-making, birth preparedness, and escorting wives to antenatal and delivery care in a rural community in Tanzania. Design A community-based intervention consisting of educating the community in Home Based Life Saving Skills by community health workers was implemented using one district as the intervention district and another as comparison district. A pre-/post-intervention using quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the effect of Home Based Life Saving Skills training on male involvement and place of delivery for their partners. The effect of the intervention was determined using difference in differences analysis between the intervention and comparison data at baseline and end line. Results The results show there was improvement in male involvement (39.2% vs. 80.9%) with a net intervention effect of 41.1% (confidence interval [CI]: 28.5–53.8; p <0.0001). There was improvement in the knowledge of danger signs during pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum periods. The proportion of men accompanying their wives to antenatal and delivery also improved. Shared decision-making for place of delivery improved markedly (46.8% vs. 86.7%), showing a net effect of 38.5% (CI: 28.0–49.1; p <0.0001). Although facility delivery for spouses of the participants improved in the intervention district, this did not show statistical significance when compared to the comparison district with a net intervention effect of 12.2% (95% CI: −2.8–27.1: p=0

  8. An alternative strategy in community health care: community-oriented primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kark, S L; Kark, E

    1983-08-01

    The need for alternative strategies in providing personal health services in the community is discussed in relation to Israel, which has a widespread network of community-based curative clinics and preventive family health centers. Community-oriented primary health care (C-OPHC) is the major alternative strategy, which has been developed and evaluated by the Hadassah Teaching and Research Health Center in Kiryat Hayovel, a neighborhood of Jerusalem. The case for adapting this C-OPHC approach throughout the country is presented in a review of existing primary health care services. PMID:6885360

  9. State of evaluation: community health workers.

    PubMed

    Nemcek, Mary Ann; Sabatier, Rosemary

    2003-01-01

    Disparity groups, especially racial and ethnic minority groups, are at greater risk for poor health yet experience numerous obstacles in accessing health care. Community health workers (CHWs) are indigenous, trusted, and respected members of the underserved community. They can serve as a bridge between peers and health professionals. Use of CHWs has fluctuated since the federal government first endorsed their use for expanded health access to the underserved in the 1960s. National demands to eliminate health disparities and recent socioeconomic pressures have focused attention on use of CHWs to improve community health. Still, underutilization exists due to, in part, a lack of understanding of the CHW concept and a dearth of evaluation literature on CHWs. This article describes the CHW concept, provides a summary of CHW evaluation literature, and suggests quality care indicators to strengthen evaluation. The review of evaluation research relating to CHWs provides a preliminary state of the science for nurses to begin building an evidence-based practice. Quality of care indicators pertinent to CHW are summarized from the existing evaluation literature. The three best practice domains (therapeutic alliance, risk reduction and health care utilization) are proposed along with suggestions for using quality indicators to improve evaluation. A reduction in health disparities can occur with enhanced CHW utilization. PMID:12823786

  10. Korea Community Health Survey Data Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Wha; Ko, Yun Sil; Kim, Yoo Jin; Sung, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Hyo Jin; Choi, Hyung Yun; Sung, Changhyun; Jeong, Eunkyeong

    2015-06-01

    In 2008, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated the first nationwide survey, Korea Community Health Survey (KCHS), to provide data that could be used to plan, implement, monitor, and evaluate community health promotion and disease prevention programs. This community-based cross-sectional survey has been conducted by 253 community health centers, 35 community universities, and 1500 interviewers. The KCHS standardized questionnaire was developed jointly by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff, a working group of health indicators standardization subcommittee, and 16 metropolitan cities and provinces with 253 regional sites. The questionnaire covers a variety of topics related to health behaviors and prevention, which is used to assess the prevalence of personal health practices and behaviors related to the leading causes of disease, including smoking, alcohol use, drinking and driving, high blood pressure control, physical activity, weight control, quality of life (European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, European Quality of Life-Visual Analogue Scale, Korean Instrumental Activities of Daily Living ), medical service, accident, injury, etc. The KCHS was administered by trained interviewers, and the quality control of the KCHS was improved by the introduction of a computer-assisted personal interview in 2010. The KCHS data allow a direct comparison of the differences of health issues among provinces. Furthermore, the provinces can use these data for their own cost-effective health interventions to improve health promotion and disease prevention. For users and researchers throughout the world, microdata (in the form of SAS files) and analytic guidelines can be downloaded from the KCHS website (http://KCHS.cdc.go.kr/) in Korean. PMID:26430619

  11. A mobile-health application to detect wandering patterns of elderly people in home environment.

    PubMed

    Vuong, N K; Goh, S G A; Chan, S; Lau, C T

    2013-01-01

    Wandering is a common and risky behavior in people with dementia (PWD). In this paper, we present a mobile healthcare application to detect wandering patterns in indoor settings. The application harnesses consumer electronics devices including WiFi access points and mobile phones and has been tested successfully in a home environment. Experimental results show that the mobile-health application is able to detect wandering patterns including lapping, pacing and random in real-time. Once wandering is detected, an alert message is sent using SMS (Short Message Service) to attending caregivers or physicians for further examination and timely interventions. PMID:24111292

  12. Community unemployment and immigrants' health in Montreal.

    PubMed

    Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria; Forster, Mathieu; Gauvin, Lise; Raynault, Marie-France; Douglas Willms, J

    2006-07-01

    This research examines the relationship between community unemployment and the physical and mental health of immigrants in comparison to non-immigrants in Montreal under the hypothesis that high unemployment in the community may generate more negative effects on the health of immigrants than on non-immigrants. Possible gender differences in these associations are also examined. Montreal residents were studied via multilevel analysis, using both individual survey data and neighbourhood data from 49 police districts. Individual-level data were excerpted from a 1998 health survey of Montreal residents, while neighbourhood data originated from survey data collected in the 49 Montreal police districts and the 1996 Canadian Census. The associations between community unemployment and self-rated health, psychological distress and obesity are examined, and hypotheses regarding the modifying mechanisms via which male and female immigrants may run a greater risk of poor health than non-immigrants when living in areas of high unemployment were tested. Between neighbourhoods, variations in the three health outcomes were slight, and differences in health were not associated with differences in community unemployment. The associations between community unemployment and health varied according to immigration status. At the individual level, immigrants do not differ from non-immigrants with respect to the three health indicators, except that second-generation males are slightly heavier. However, when living in areas of high unemployment, immigrants tend to report poor physical and mental health in comparison to non-immigrants. Among first-generation immigrants, community unemployment was associated with psychological distress. Among second-generation immigrants, the probability of obesity and poor self-rated health increased significantly for those living in areas with high unemployment, but these associations reached statistical significance only for men. Findings among first

  13. Volunteers in Community Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet gives detailed accounts of mental health programs in operation around the nation. A total of nine different types of activities is included. "Helping Children" describes a program whereby students from nearby colleges give troubled children, at home, an experience in friendship by serving as big brothers or sisters. "Helping the…

  14. Design of a terminal solution for integration of in-home health care devices and services towards the Internet-of-Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zhibo; Zheng, Lirong; Tian, Junzhe; Kao-Walter, Sharon; Dubrova, Elena; Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    In-home health care services based on the Internet-of-Things are promising to resolve the challenges caused by the ageing of population. But the existing research is rather scattered and shows lack of interoperability. In this article, a business-technology co-design methodology is proposed for cross-boundary integration of in-home health care devices and services. In this framework, three key elements of a solution (business model, device and service integration architecture and information system integration architecture) are organically integrated and aligned. In particular, a cooperative Health-IoT ecosystem is formulated, and information systems of all stakeholders are integrated in a cooperative health cloud as well as extended to patients' home through the in-home health care station (IHHS). Design principles of the IHHS includes the reuse of 3C platform, certification of the Health Extension, interoperability and extendibility, convenient and trusted software distribution, standardised and secured electrical health care record handling, effective service composition and efficient data fusion. These principles are applied to the design of an IHHS solution called iMedBox. Detailed device and service integration architecture and hardware and software architecture are presented and verified by an implemented prototype. The quantitative performance analysis and field trials have confirmed the feasibility of the proposed design methodology and solution.

  15. [Community education in perinatal health].

    PubMed

    Ortigosa-corona, E; Martinez-sanchez, C

    1990-01-01

    The National Institute of Perinatology develops educational programs for the population using its services in order to promote positive behavior related to reproduction. One of the most frequently observed problems during prenatal control is patient abandonment of the services offered by health institutions. We present an investigation of the relationship between the educational program for pregnant women offered by the Institute and compliance with prenatal care. A group of 215 patients elected to participate in the educational program. The program consisted of themes on the evolution and culmination of the pregnancy, preparation for nursing, nutrition, developmental milestones, and dental health. Another group was selected at the same time, equal in size to the first but without participation in the course, as a control group. Both groups contained patients categorized in the 3 perinatal risk groups accepted by the Institute. PMID:12283076

  16. New directions for community mental health centers.

    PubMed

    Kipp, M F

    1987-01-01

    Community Mental Health Centers and other quasi-public authorities are operating within a larger health market characterized by the rapid unfolding of a number of key trends in consumer behavior, provider supply, and financing. Each of these trends, though not readily apparent, is strongly reflected in the specialty mental health sector. Mental health managers are faced with fundamental choices about the direction of their respective organizations and the adequacy of their resources to proceed. Mr. Kipp outlines the market dynamics at issue, describes three basic alternatives, and offers some guidelines for management in charting a course. PMID:10287206

  17. Ethical considerations in community oral health.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Sudeshni

    2015-05-01

    As the public's oral health care needs increase in complexity, there is renewed attention to the ethical dimensions of community oral health decision making and the development of public health ethics in teaching and research in dentistry. Despite their reduction globally, oral diseases persist with a particular distribution pattern that is a reflection of the increasingly widespread inequality in access to community oral health preventive and dental care. This is due to differences in the appropriateness, availability, accessibility, and acceptability of oral health education and the care provided. This article provides an overview of community oral health from an ethical perspective, including the importance of equity, human rights, and social justice in providing oral health care to the underserved. The need for a paradigm shift from highly technical and individualistic dental training curricula is discussed, together with the need to instill a holistic approach to ethical and social responsibility in new dental graduates. It concludes with some possible strategies, using the overarching principles of ethics and bioethics that are applicable to practice among vulnerable populations. PMID:25941240

  18. [Turkish emigrants in Germany. Deficits in home care knowledge and health services - a review].

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, N; Grässel, E

    2010-10-01

    Family members caring for relatives at home are often under great stress. Numerous studies have shown that taking care of a chronically ill family member may have negative effects on physical and emotional health. Frequent symptoms observed in family caregivers are insomnia, joint pain, physical exhaustion, and depression. There are, as yet, no definitive empirical studies in Germany on the subjective burden of family caregivers in Turkish families and on their specific needs for help, although their numbers are increasing exponentially. The statement based on the low rate of use of professional care by Turkish families in Germany that there is great willingness among Turkish families to take care of family members at home - a self-evident part of the concept of family - should not lead to the assumption that care causes less stress in this population. There is a great need for research into the way in which the care situation and the changes attendant thereon are experienced by Turkish family caregivers. Recording of subjective burden and individual needs is important to develop accepted strategies to relief Turkish family caregivers. PMID:20379726

  19. Catholic health care's community-benefit role.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Carol

    2005-06-16

    "While contemporary Catholic health care and other not-for-profit health care institutions excel in quality, innovation and technology, they remain community-benefit organizations, founded and sustained because of community need," Sister Carol Keehan, a Daughter of Charity who chairs the board of trustees of the Catholic Health Association of the United States, said in May 26 testimony in Washington before the House Ways and Means Committee, which conducted a hearing on the tax-exempt hospital sector. Keehan chairs the board of Sacred Heart Health System in Pensacola, Fla. She spoke the day after Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, announced that the Senate Finance Committee, which he chairs, had asked 10 nonprofit hospitals or health systems to account for their charitable activities in light of their tax-exempt status. Rep. Bill Thomas, R-Calif., chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, said at the House hearing that "the standards for tax exemption are not just an academic debate." In reviewing the broad ways Catholic hospitals benefit local communities, Keehan stressed that the services of Catholic hospitals are not provided "to justify continued tax exemption" but because serving communities in this way is integral to their identity and mission. Keehan's text follows. PMID:16178107

  20. Women's health is a community issue.

    PubMed

    Irvin, A

    1997-01-01

    When a member of the Community Life Project in Nigeria led a group of women in a discussion about HIV/AIDS, the women reported that they understood that condom use is the best means of protection but that they were unable to negotiate condom use with their husbands. Even if the women were economically independent, they would rather face the risk of HIV/AIDS than divorce. Thus, efforts to improve women's health have not generated much change on the local level. This can also be seen by the facts that current programs have failed to reduce the numbers of women dying from pregnancy-related causes each year, nearly 3000 women die from tuberculosis each day, women suffer occupational health risks, and domestic violence is an important determinant of health problems for women. Because women lack power in many societies, efforts to effect individual change may be blocked by a woman's particular circumstances. Thus, the involvement of entire communities is necessary to improve the conditions affecting women's health. Community-level discussions may open the door for couples to discuss sexuality and gender-based issues as well as safer sex behavior. Despite the important role they can play, women's community health groups face stiff challenges because of a lack of knowledge or training and because of the difficulty in overcoming gender-based discrimination. The Hesperian Foundation's publication, "Where Women Have No Doctor," is an excellent resource for understanding how poverty and gender issues affect women's health. The book contains practical information, promotes a model of community-based responses to problems with social origins, and shares experiences of grassroots groups world-wide. PMID:12292725

  1. Developing a Student Community Health Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Gary D.

    1976-01-01

    An interdisciplinary, team-approach program has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, in which students (1) apply principles of community research, (2) join a multidisciplinary team, (3) identify components of a service agency, (4) become involved in its working, and (5) demonstrate the incorporation of health education…

  2. Promoting Community Health and Eliminating Health Disparities Through Community-Based Participatory Research.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ruiping; Stone, John R; Hoffman, Julie E; Klappa, Susan G

    2016-03-01

    In physical therapy, there is increasing focus on the need at the community level to promote health, eliminate disparities in health status, and ameliorate risk factors among underserved minorities. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is the most promising paradigm for pursuing these goals. Community-based participatory research stresses equitable partnering of the community and investigators in light of local social, structural, and cultural elements. Throughout the research process, the CBPR model emphasizes coalition and team building that joins partners with diverse skills/expertise, knowledge, and sensitivities. This article presents core concepts and principles of CBPR and the rationale for its application in the management of health issues at the community level. Community-based participatory research is now commonly used to address public health issues. A literature review identified limited reports of its use in physical therapy research and services. A published study is used to illustrate features of CBPR for physical therapy. The purpose of this article is to promote an understanding of how physical therapists could use CBPR as a promising way to advance the profession's goals of community health and elimination of health care disparities, and social responsibility. Funding opportunities for the support of CBPR are noted. PMID:26251479

  3. Community health nursing vision for 2020: shaping the future.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Ruth; Ganann, Rebecca; Brooks, Sandy; McGugan, Jennifer; Dalla Bona, Kim; Betker, Claire; Dilworth, Katie; Parton, Laurie; Reid-Haughian, Cheryl; Slepkov, Marlene; Watson, Cori

    2011-12-01

    As health care is shifting from hospital to community, community health nurses (CHNs) are directly affected. This descriptive qualitative study sought to understand priority issues currently facing CHNs, explore development of a national vision for community health nursing, and develop recommendations to shape the future of the profession moving toward the year 2020. Focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted across Canada. Five key themes were identified: community health nursing in crisis now, a flawed health care system, responding to the public, vision for the future, and CHNs as solution makers. Key recommendations include developing a common definition and vision of community health nursing, collaborating on an aggressive plan to shift to a primary health care system, developing a comprehensive social marketing strategy, refocusing basic baccalaureate education, enhancing the capacity of community health researchers and knowledge in community health nursing, and establishing a community health nursing center of excellence. PMID:20660926

  4. How community mental health centers are coping.

    PubMed

    Okin, R L

    1984-11-01

    Many community mental health centers have had to operate with less funding in the past several years, especially since the advent of block grant funding. Evidence is now accumulating that some centers have had to decrease their overall level of services and staffing. Others have attempted to adjust by increasing their clinician caseloads, closing their satellite facilities, and de-emphasizing services that fail to generate adequate fees and third-party reimbursements, such as consultation and education, partial hospitalization, and programs for children and the elderly. In contrast, and partly as a result of the increased authority of the states over the community mental health centers program, services for the severely and chronically mentally ill appear to be receiving higher priority. This development will require that centers improve their access to the general health care sector, maintain and improve their relationships with academic institutions, and increase the number, responsibilities, and rewards of the psychiatrists they employ. PMID:6500524

  5. Institutionalization of Community Partnerships: The Challenge for Academic Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Magwood, Gayenell S.; Andrews, Jeannette O.; Zapka, Jane; Cox, Melissa J.; Newman, Susan; Stuart, Gail W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current public health priorities emphasize the elimination of health disparities, translational research, and transdisciplinary and community alliances. The Center for Community Health Partnerships is a proactive initiative to address new paradigms and priorities in health care through institutionalization of community-university partnerships. This report highlights innovative strategies and lessons learned. PMID:23698666

  6. Multiculturalism, Medicine and Health Part V: Community Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Masi, R.

    1989-01-01

    In this article the author examines multicultural health issues from a community perspective, dealing with relationships between cultural communities and health-care systems in terms of: hospitals and health-care institutions, family and social supports, social norms, and community-health programs. PMID:21248882

  7. [Community health worker: a core element of health actions].

    PubMed

    Costa, Simone de Melo; Araújo, Flávia Ferreira; Martins, Laiara Versiani; Nobre, Lívia Lícia Rafael; Araújo, Fabrícia Magalhães; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto Quintão

    2013-07-01

    This research sought to identify the actions developed by the Community Health Worker (CHW) in the context of family health in Montes Claros, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The research was conducted under the Program of Education through Work for Health-PET-SAÚDE, and is a quantitative study and census together with 241 CHWs. Most of them make family registrations and home visits, identify families with health risks and inform the health team. They also instruct families about available health services, arrange referrals and schedule consultations/exams, perform health education and teamwork reflections. Some also assist in the clinical environment. The majority who provide health education and those who are responsible for the referrals feel that they are professionally qualified for such tasks. CHWs are a core element of health actions, but the scope of performance requires investment in professional training to maintain the quality of the work executed by them in surveillance activities and teamwork reflection. In this way, the CHW can be jointly responsible for primary care and integrate the system of health care administration. PMID:23827919

  8. [Community nutrition strategy project: an innovation in community health].

    PubMed

    Diallo, I; Ndiaye, B; Pouye, A; Gaye, I A; Sy, A; Sarr, R; Tall-Dia, A

    1998-01-01

    The strategy of the community nutrition project is based on the utilization of the community development structures to deliver the nutrition services. These structures, represented in Senegal by youth associations, women groups, GIEs and NGOs, are part of the decentralization process, and as such play an important role in health and health development activities in poor urban districts. The Community Nutrition Project (CNP), funded for five years by the World Bank, German Cooperation (KFW), World Food Program (WFP) and the Senegalese government aims to halt further deterioration in the nutrition status of the most vulnerable groups in the poorest urban districts of Senegal. All nutrition services and particularly the IEC services have been entirely contracted out the first year to 76 GIEs involving 323 unemployed persons, operating as micro-enterprises "MIC" and 17 "GIEs" of unemployed physicians, pharmacists, and social workers for a total of 34 persons, organized as "maître d'Oeuvre communautaires "MOC", in charge of the supervision tasks. Each community nutrition center recruits and monitors every six months 460 to 600 beneficiaries composed of women at six months of pregnancy, lactating mother of children under 6 months, and a group of children aged from 6 to 35 months old. An average of 87% of registered children in the nutrition centers are weekly or monthly weighted. Thus the proportion of malnourished children in cohort of children followed from January to July 1996 has decreased from 70% to 25% within six months. The malnutrition rate has been reduced up to 65% after six months. PMID:10797950

  9. Community Health Nursing through a Global Lens.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Norma; Dallwig, Amber; Abbott, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Community Health Nursing (N456) is a required senior clinical course in the undergraduate nursing curriculum at the University of Michigan in which students learn to assess and address the health of populations and communities. In 2012, we began our efforts to internationalize the curriculum using a globally engaged nursing education framework. Our goal is for all students to have an intercultural learning experience understanding that all students are unable to travel internationally. Therefore, this intercultural learning was implemented through a range of experiences including actual immersion, virtual activities (videoconferencing) and interventions with local vulnerable populations. Grants were obtained to provide immersion experiences in Quito, Ecuador and New Delhi, India. Several technologies were initiated with partner nursing schools in Leogane, Haiti and New Delhi, India. Weekly videoconferencing utilizing BlueJeans software and exchange of knowledge through the Knowledge Gateway facilitated intercultural exchange of knowledge and culture. Local clinical groups work with a variety of vulnerable populations. A private blog was developed for all sections to share community assessment data from local and international communities. Qualitative evaluation data was collected for local and international students to begin to assess cultural competence and student learning. Analysis of data documented increased awareness of culture and identified the many positive benefits of interaction with a global partner. PMID:25980716

  10. Building Research Infrastructure in Community Health Centers: A Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN) Report

    PubMed Central

    Likumahuwa, Sonja; Song, Hui; Singal, Robbie; Weir, Rosy Chang; Crane, Heidi; Muench, John; Sim, Shao-Chee; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN), a practice-based research network of community health centers (CHCs). Established by the Health Resources and Services Administration in 2010, CHARN is a network of 4 community research nodes, each with multiple affiliated CHCs and an academic center. The four nodes (18 individual CHCs and 4 academic partners in 9 states) are supported by a data coordinating center. Here we provide case studies detailing how CHARN is building research infrastructure and capacity in CHCs, with a particular focus on how community practice-academic partnerships were facilitated by the CHARN structure. The examples provided by the CHARN nodes include many of the building blocks of research capacity: communication capacity and “matchmaking” between providers and researchers; technology transfer; research methods tailored to community practice settings; and community institutional review board infrastructure to enable community oversight. We draw lessons learned from these case studies that we hope will serve as examples for other networks, with special relevance for community-based networks seeking to build research infrastructure in primary care settings. PMID:24004710

  11. Financing geriatric programs in community health centers.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, D E; Ray, S; List, N; Duggar, B

    1991-01-01

    There are approximately 600 Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs) providing preventive and primary health care services principally to medically underserved rural and urban areas across the United States. The need to develop geriatric programs within C/MHCs is clear. Less clear is how and under what circumstances a comprehensive geriatric program can be adequately financed. The Health Resources and Services Administration of the Public Health Service contracted with La Jolla Management Corporation and Duke University Center on Aging to identify successful techniques for obtaining funding by examining 10 "good practice" C/MHC geriatric programs. The results from this study indicated that effective techniques included using a variety of funding sources, maintaining accurate cost-per-user information, developing a marketing strategy and user incentives, collaborating with the area agency on aging and other community organizations, and developing special services for the elderly. Developing cost-per-user information allowed for identifying appropriate "drawing card" services, negotiating sound reimbursement rates and contracts with other providers, and assessing the financial impact of changing service mixes. A marketing strategy was used to enhance the ability of the centers to provide a comprehensive package of services. Collaboration with the area agency on aging and other community organizations and volunteers in the aging network was found to help establish referral networks and subsequently increase the number of elderly patients served. Finally, development of special services for the elderly, such as adult day care, case management, and health education, was found to increase program visibility, opportunities to work with the network of services for the aging, and clinical utilization. PMID:1908588

  12. The Health of the School Nurse Community: A Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christeson, Elisabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    School nursing is based on a conceptual foundation of community health nursing. Using community health nursing as a reference point, this article describes a viewpoint of school nurses as the population of care. With this perspective, school nurses will better understand how to foster the health of their community. Developed on the basis of…

  13. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Daniel Seth; Davison, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study explores community college student mental health by comparing the responses of California community college and traditional university students on the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II). Using MANOVA, we compared community college and traditional university students, examining…

  14. Integrating the environment, the economy, and community health: a Community Health Center's initiative to link health benefits to smart growth.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, Peter V; Driscoll, Mary Beth; Gramling, Benjamin J

    2004-04-01

    The Sixteenth Street Community Health Center (SSCHC) in Milwaukee, Wis, is making a difference in the livability of surrounding neighborhoods and the overall health of the families it serves. SSCHC is going beyond traditional health care provider models and working to link the environment, the economy, and community health through urban brownfield redevelopment and sustainable land-use planning. In 1997, SSCHC recognized that restoration of local air and water quality and other environmental conditions, coupled with restoring family-supporting jobs in the neighborhood, could have a substantial impact on the overall health of families. Recent events indicate that SSCHC's pursuit of smart growth strategies has begun to pay off. PMID:15053995

  15. Role Development of Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Squires, Allison P.; Bixby, Rebecca A.; Larson, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Research evaluating community health worker (CHW) programs inherently involves these natural community leaders in the research process, and often represents community-based participatory research (CBPR). Interpreting the results of CHW intervention studies and replicating their findings requires knowledge of how CHWs are selected and trained. Methods A summative content analysis was performed to evaluate the description of CHW selection and training in the existing literature. First-level coding focused on contextual information about CHW programs. Second-level coding identified themes related to the selection and training of CHWs. Results There was inconsistent reporting of selection and training processes for CHWs in the existing literature. Common selection criteria included personal qualities desired of CHWs. Training processes for CHWs were more frequently reported. Wide variation in the length and content of CHW training exists in the reviewed studies. A conceptual model is presented for the role development of CHWs based on the results of this review, which is intended to guide future reporting of CHW programs in the intervention literature. Conclusions Consistent reporting of CHW selection and training will allow consumers of intervention research to better interpret study findings. A standard approach to reporting selection and training processes will also more effectively guide the design and implementation of future CHW programs. All community-based researchers must find a balance between describing the research process and reporting more traditional scientific content. The current conceptual model provides a guide for standard reporting in the CHW literature. PMID:19896028

  16. Community Health Workers as Agents of Health Promotion: Analyzing Thailand's Village Health Volunteer Program.

    PubMed

    Kowitt, S D; Emmerling, D; Fisher, E B; Tanasugarn, C

    2015-08-01

    The village health volunteers (VHVs) have been a regular part of Thailand's health system since the 1960s. Despite widespread recognition, little research has been conducted to describe VHV activities, the settings in which VHVs provide help, how the program is administered, and how changing politics and health problems in Thailand have influenced the program. In order to understand the roles and practices of the VHVs, we conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and focus groups with VHVs, community leaders and members, and public health officials in three semi-urban communities in central Thailand. Using the Social Ecological Framework, we mapped factors that influenced how the VHVs provided support, including governmental oversight, collaboration with public health officials, and community trust. These influences are discussed as "points of consideration," which help to identify the strengths and tensions within the VHV program and best practices in supporting and assessing community health worker efforts. PMID:25744815

  17. Community matters - why outbreak responses need to integrate health promotion.

    PubMed

    Kickbusch, Ilona; Reddy, K Srikanth

    2016-03-01

    Communities are characterized by common interests, common ecology, and common social system or structure. These characteristics, qualities, and processes involved in the community affect both health behaviors and health outcomes during disease outbreaks. Hence, health promotion theorists and practitioners emphasize working 'with' rather than 'on' communities. They believe health promotion, with all its experiences in community mobilization, empowerment, and health literacy programs, should be part of disease prevention and control efforts from the very beginning. Health promotion knowledge needs to be fully integrated into infectious disease control, especially in the context of outbreaks. PMID:26518038

  18. Function Model for Community Health Service Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Pan, Feng; Liu, Danhong; Xu, Yongyong

    In order to construct a function model of community health service (CHS) information for development of CHS information management system, Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF0), an IEEE standard which is extended from Structured Analysis and Design(SADT) and now is a widely used function modeling method, was used to classifying its information from top to bottom. The contents of every level of the model were described and coded. Then function model for CHS information, which includes 4 super-classes, 15 classes and 28 sub-classed of business function, 43 business processes and 168 business activities, was established. This model can facilitate information management system development and workflow refinement.

  19. Writing to learn in community health nursing: the aggregate.

    PubMed

    Baumann, L C; Schmelzer, M O

    1994-08-01

    Writing to learn is a strategy that can be used to develop competencies of undergraduate students for the practice of community health nursing. It provides an opportunity for students to apply community health theory in a paper that integrates health status indicators, primary prevention, and aggregate-focused nursing interventions. It also develops students' writings abilities and creative approaches to community health nursing practice in a clinically applicable manner, thereby facilitating synthesis of professional principles and practices. PMID:7937498

  20. Outcome prediction in home- and community-based brain injury rehabilitation using the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory.

    PubMed

    Malec, James F; Parrot, Devan; Altman, Irwin M; Swick, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop statistical formulas to predict levels of community participation on discharge from post-hospital brain injury rehabilitation using retrospective data analysis. Data were collected from seven geographically distinct programmes in a home- and community-based brain injury rehabilitation provider network. Participants were 642 individuals with post-traumatic brain injury. Interventions consisted of home- and community-based brain injury rehabilitation. The main outcome measure was the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) Participation Index. Linear discriminant models using admission MPAI-4 Participation Index score and log chronicity correctly predicted excellent (no to minimal participation limitations), very good (very mild participation limitations), good (mild participation limitations), and limited (significant participation limitations) outcome levels at discharge. Predicting broad outcome categories for post-hospital rehabilitation programmes based on admission assessment data appears feasible and valid. Equations to provide patients and families with probability statements on admission about expected levels of outcome are provided. It is unknown to what degree these prediction equations can be reliably applied and valid in other settings. PMID:25708369

  1. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery. PMID:24720659

  2. Community Health Workers as Support for Sickle Cell Care.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lewis L; Green, Nancy S; Donnell Ivy, E; Neunert, Cindy E; Smaldone, Arlene; Johnson, Shirley; Castillo, Sheila; Castillo, Amparo; Thompson, Trevor; Hampton, Kisha; Strouse, John J; Stewart, Rosalyn; Hughes, TaLana; Banks, Sonja; Smith-Whitley, Kim; King, Allison; Brown, Mary; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Smith, Wally R; Martin, Molly

    2016-07-01

    Community health workers are increasingly recognized as useful for improving health care and health outcomes for a variety of chronic conditions. Community health workers can provide social support, navigation of health systems and resources, and lay counseling. Social and cultural alignment of community health workers with the population they serve is an important aspect of community health worker intervention. Although community health worker interventions have been shown to improve patient-centered outcomes in underserved communities, these interventions have not been evaluated with sickle cell disease. Evidence from other disease areas suggests that community health worker intervention also would be effective for these patients. Sickle cell disease is complex, with a range of barriers to multifaceted care needs at the individual, family/friend, clinical organization, and community levels. Care delivery is complicated by disparities in health care: access, delivery, services, and cultural mismatches between providers and families. Current practices inadequately address or provide incomplete control of symptoms, especially pain, resulting in decreased quality of life and high medical expense. The authors propose that care and care outcomes for people with sickle cell disease could be improved through community health worker case management, social support, and health system navigation. This paper outlines implementation strategies in current use to test community health workers for sickle cell disease management in a variety of settings. National medical and advocacy efforts to develop the community health workforce for sickle cell disease management may enhance the progress and development of "best practices" for this area of community-based care. PMID:27320471

  3. National Study on Community College Health. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottenritter, Nan

    This is a report on a national survey of community colleges conducted by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) in 2000. The survey was designed to identify various community health programs, centers, classes, and services related to HIV/AIDS that community colleges administered, partnered, or sponsored. The study surveyed 1,100…

  4. "Race" and Community Care. "Race," Health and Social Care Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Waqar I. U., Ed.; Atkin, Karl, Ed.

    This collection offers a wide-ranging introduction to contemporary issues surrounding the health care needs of members of minority ethnic communities within the framework of community care in Britain. The following chapters consider state welfare, minority communities, family structures, and social change: (1) "'Race' and Community Care: An…

  5. Attitudes toward community mental health care: the contact paradox revisited.

    PubMed

    Pattyn, E; Verhaeghe, M; Bracke, P

    2013-06-01

    Contact with people with mental illness is considered to be a promising strategy to change stigmatizing attitudes. This study examines the underlying mechanisms of the association between contact and attitudes toward community mental health care. Data are derived from the 2009 survey "Stigma in a Global Context-Belgian Mental Health Study", using the Community Mental Health Ideology-scale. Results show that people who received mental health treatment themselves or have a family member who has been treated for mental health problems report more tolerant attitudes toward community mental health care than people with public contact with people with mental illness. Besides, the perception of the effectiveness of the treatment seems to matter too. Furthermore, emotions arising from public contact are associated with attitudes toward community mental health care. The degree of intimacy and the characteristics of the contact relationship clarify the association between contact and attitudes toward community mental health care. PMID:23179045

  6. Identifying Value Indicators and Social Capital in Community Health Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausman, Alice J.; Becker, Julie; Brawer, Rickie

    2005-01-01

    Increasingly, public health practice is turning to the application of community collaborative models to improve population health status. Despite the growth of these activities, however, evaluations of the national demonstrations have indicated that community health partnerships fail to achieve measurable results and struggle to maintain integrity…

  7. Appalachian Women's Perceptions of Their Community's Health Threats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Hatcher, Jennifer; Dignan, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Decades of behavioral research suggest that awareness of health threats is a necessary precursor to engage in health promotion and disease prevention, findings that can be extended to the community level. Purpose: We sought to better understand local perspectives on the main health concerns of rural Appalachian communities in order to…

  8. Using Community Health Assessment to Teach and Explore Health Status Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Marianne; Levine, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Community health assessment (CHA) is a useful tool for identifying health status disparities at the community level. Developing the skills of master's level public health students to conduct CHA addresses a number of the Association of Schools of Public Health Core competencies for graduate public health education. Teaching…

  9. The Shifting Sands of Health Care Delivery: Curriculum Revision and Integration of Community Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conger, Cynthia O'Neill; Baldwin, Joan H.; Abegglen, JoAnn; Callister, Lynn C.

    1999-01-01

    Brigham Young University's nursing curriculum was revised to reflect the community-driven nature of primary health care. Curricular threads of inquiry, practice, stewardship, spirituality, and service are the framework for integrating community health nursing practice. (SK)

  10. Facilitating communities in designing and using their own community health impact assessment tool

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Colleen; Ghosh, Sebanti; Eaton, Susan L.

    2011-07-15

    Reducing health inequities and improving the health of communities require an informed public that is aware of the social determinants of health and how policies and programs have an impact on the health of their communities. People Assessing Their Health (PATH) is a process that uses community-driven health impact assessment to build the capacity of people to become active participants in the decisions that affect the well-being of their community. The PATH process is both a health promotion and a community development approach that builds people's ability to bring critical analysis to a situation and to engage in effective social action to bring about desired change. Because it increases analytical skills and provides communities with their own unique tool to assess the potential impact of projects, programs or policies on the health and well-being of their community it is an empowering process. PATH was originally used in three communities in northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada in 1996 when the Canadian health care system was being restructured to a more decentralized system. Since then it has been used in other communities in Nova Scotia and India. This paper will describe the PATH process and the use of the community health impact assessment as well as the methodology used in the PATH process. The lessons learned from PATH's experiences of building capacity among the community in Canada and India will be presented.

  11. Evaluating Community-Based Participatory Research to Improve Community-Partnered Science and Community Health

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Sarah; Duran, Bonnie; Wallerstein, Nina; Avila, Magdalena; Belone, Lorenda; Lucero, Julie; Magarati, Maya; Mainer, Elana; Martin, Diane; Muhammad, Michael; Oetzel, John; Pearson, Cynthia; Sahota, Puneet; Simonds, Vanessa; Sussman, Andrew; Tafoya, Greg; Hat, Emily White

    2013-01-01

    Background Since 2007, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Policy Research Center (PRC) has partnered with the Universities of New Mexico and Washington to study the science of community-based participatory research (CBPR). Our goal is to identify facilitators and barriers to effective community–academic partnerships in American Indian and other communities, which face health disparities. Objectives We have described herein the scientific design of our National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study (2009–2013) and lessons learned by having a strong community partner leading the research efforts. Methods The research team is implementing a mixed-methods study involving a survey of principal investigators (PIs) and partners across the nation and in-depth case studies of CBPR projects. Results We present preliminary findings on methods and measures for community-engaged research and eight lessons learned thus far regarding partnership evaluation, advisory councils, historical trust, research capacity development of community partner, advocacy, honoring each other, messaging, and funding. Conclusions Study methodologies and lessons learned can help community–academic research partnerships translate research in communities. PMID:22982842

  12. Electronic networks, community intermediaries, and the public's health.

    PubMed

    Milio, N

    1996-04-01

    Information technology (IT) has the potential to assist disadvantaged communities in gaining access to mainstream resources, and to a new kind of community health-supporting infrastructure. Federal and state information technology policy will affect how and how well community institutions can reach their goals, collaborate with service agencies, and effectively advocate investing essential, health-supporting resources in their communities. The current information technology focus of the health professions is institution and provider-oriented. It should have a wider scope to include community-based organizations. Laborious efforts undertaken by community-based organizations (CBOs) with only a patchwork of resources and without policy support suggest their value to the public's health. Increasingly burdened public health organizations should examine the public health interest in closing the gap between IT-poor and IT-rich organizations and develop a strategy for building inclusive electronic webs with CBOs. PMID:8826628

  13. Electronic networks, community intermediaries, and the public's health.

    PubMed Central

    Milio, N

    1996-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has the potential to assist disadvantaged communities in gaining access to mainstream resources, and to a new kind of community health-supporting infrastructure. Federal and state information technology policy will affect how and how well community institutions can reach their goals, collaborate with service agencies, and effectively advocate investing essential, health-supporting resources in their communities. The current information technology focus of the health professions is institution and provider-oriented. It should have a wider scope to include community-based organizations. Laborious efforts undertaken by community-based organizations (CBOs) with only a patchwork of resources and without policy support suggest their value to the public's health. Increasingly burdened public health organizations should examine the public health interest in closing the gap between IT-poor and IT-rich organizations and develop a strategy for building inclusive electronic webs with CBOs. PMID:8826628

  14. A Student-Led Health Education Initiative Addressing Health Disparities in a Chinatown Community

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benjamin J.; So, Chunkit; Chiu, Brandon G.; Polisetty, Radhika; Quiñones-Boex, Ana; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Together with community advocates, professional student organizations can help improve access to health care and sustain services to address the health disparities of a community in need. This paper examines the health concerns of an underserved Chinese community and introduces a student-led health education initiative that fosters service learning and student leadership. The initiative was recognized by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) and received the 2012-2013 Student Community Engaged Service Award. PMID:26839422

  15. A Student-Led Health Education Initiative Addressing Health Disparities in a Chinatown Community.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin J; Wang, Sheila K; So, Chunkit; Chiu, Brandon G; Wang, Wesley Y; Polisetty, Radhika; Quiñones-Boex, Ana; Liu, Hong

    2015-11-25

    Together with community advocates, professional student organizations can help improve access to health care and sustain services to address the health disparities of a community in need. This paper examines the health concerns of an underserved Chinese community and introduces a student-led health education initiative that fosters service learning and student leadership. The initiative was recognized by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) and received the 2012-2013 Student Community Engaged Service Award. PMID:26839422

  16. From theory to practice: community health nursing in a public health neighborhood team.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, L O; Schultz, P R

    2000-12-01

    An interdisciplinary team in a local public health district tested its ability to implement the core public health functions of assessment, policy development, and assurance by changing its practice to a community-driven model of building partnerships for health with groups and communities in a designated locale. Evaluation of this innovation revealed that the public health nurse members of the team enacted their community health nursing knowledge to strengthen agency to cocreate health. Interdisciplinary collaboration was essential to the team's community mobilization efforts. Additional findings suggested that this organizational innovation was associated with developing a more participatory organizational climate, increasing system effectiveness, and building community capacity. PMID:11104324

  17. A Community Health Education System to meet the health needs of Indo-Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Ratnaike, R N; Chinner, T L

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents a Community Health Education System which is cost-effective, sustainable, strongly community-based, and directed at improving the health status of rural women in Indo-china (Kampuchea, Laos and Vietnam). The system is developed through a series of steps which are concerned with the education of Community Health Education Units (in national ministries of health) and, at the village level, among community health workers, women's groups, and other women. The ultimate aim is the establishment of a community health education program in Indochinese villages. PMID:1602046

  18. Community Health Workers as a Component of the Health Care Team.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sheri L; Gunn, Veronica L

    2015-10-01

    In restructuring the delivery of primary care to improve the wellness of a community, every community must review its own circumstances for factors such as resources and capacities, health concerns, social and political perspectives, and competing priorities. Strengthening the health care team with community health workers to create a patient-centered medical home can enhance health care access and outcomes. Community health workers can serve as critical connectors between health systems and communities; they facilitate access to and improve quality and culturally sensitive medical care, emphasizing preventive and primary care. PMID:26318954

  19. Growing urban health: community gardening in South-East Toronto.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Sarah; Yeudall, Fiona; Taron, Carolin; Reynolds, Jennifer; Skinner, Ana

    2007-06-01

    This article describes results from an investigation of the health impacts of community gardening, using Toronto, Ontario as a case study. According to community members and local service organizations, these gardens have a number of positive health benefits. However, few studies have explicitly focused on the health impacts of community gardens, and many of those did not ask community gardeners directly about their experiences in community gardening. This article sets out to fill this gap by describing the results of a community-based research project that collected data on the perceived health impacts of community gardening through participant observation, focus groups and in-depth interviews. Results suggest that community gardens were perceived by gardeners to provide numerous health benefits, including improved access to food, improved nutrition, increased physical activity and improved mental health. Community gardens were also seen to promote social health and community cohesion. These benefits were set against a backdrop of insecure land tenure and access, bureaucratic resistance, concerns about soil contamination and a lack of awareness and understanding by community members and decision-makers. Results also highlight the need for ongoing resources to support gardens in these many roles. PMID:17324956

  20. The future of community health trusts.

    PubMed

    Browning, R

    1996-02-01

    In summary therefore, I believe Community/Mental Health Trusts must: Work closely with purchasers/contracts in context. Focus local services in GP surgeries or own homes. Dispose of unnecessary estate. Concentrate on what they do best. Meet customer needs, improve customers' perceptions and market and publicise services. Cut out restrictive professional practices and increase staff flexibility, information systems etc. Develop customer relations, contracting, business planning. Identify ¿niche' (minority/specialist) markets (including social care). Develop active Quality Assurance, Clinical Audit, outcomes, research programmes. Create effective organisation and management style (Empowerment, delivery). Minimise costs (Value For Money, minimise internal expenditure, rationalise estate, streamline management). Maximise income. Build alliances. Develop user empowerment, advocacy etc. Finally, whatever the future holds we must keep our eye on the ball - the patient - and ensure their needs are paramount over professions and organisations. PMID:8683541

  1. Identity Theft in Community Mental Health Patients

    PubMed Central

    Klopp, Jonathon; Konrad, Shane; Yanofski, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Identity theft is a serious problem in the United States, and persons with enduring mental illnesses may be particularly vulnerable to becoming victims of this crime. Victims of identity theft experience a variety of consequences that include financial loss and serious emotional distress. Little is known about the impact of identity theft on individuals with mental illnesses. The two cases from a community mental health center presented in this article demonstrate many of the facets that may be associated with an increased risk for becoming the victim of identity theft. A summary of preventive steps as well as steps involved in resolving the crime once one has become a victim are presented. PMID:20806029

  2. Diabetes Training for Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background A 2.5-month diabetes education training for community health workers (CHWs) was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Methods Training methods used included case studies, role-playing, and lectures. Exams were used throughout the training for its evaluation. Teaching was delivered by different ways: a one day American Diabetes Association (ADA) course; a five day Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP); Conversation Maps; and a series of seven National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) diabetes education booklets. Results Qualitative and quantitative evaluative methods were used during and after the training. The CHWs’ diabetes knowledge was evaluated by a pre- and post-test Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ). The post-test was conducted one week after completing the training. The findings showed that the diabetes knowledge of the CHWs increased. Conclusions Diabetes competencies and evaluative tools need to be developed specific for CHWs as a way to standardize all CHW diabetes trainings. PMID:27110434

  3. Building trusting relationships in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Ha, Sejin; Widdows, Richard

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates consumers' use of online health communities (OHCs) for healthcare from a relationship building perspective based on the commitment-trust theory of relationships. The study proposes that perspective taking, empathic concern, self-efficacy, and network density affect the development of both cognitive and affective trust, which together determine OHC members' membership continuance intention (MCI) and knowledge contribution. Data collected from eight existing OHCs (N=255) were utilized to test the hypothesized model. Results show that perspective taking and self-efficacy can increase cognitive trust and affective trust, respectively. Network density contributes to cognitive and affective trust. Both cognitive trust and affective trust influence MCI, while only affective trust impacts members' knowledge contribution behaviors. PMID:23786170

  4. Boston's Codman Square Community Partnership for Health Promotion.

    PubMed Central

    Schlaff, A L

    1991-01-01

    The Codman Square Community Partnership for Health Promotion is a program designed to promote changes in individual behavior and community relationships to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with the many problems affecting poor, minority communities in the United States. Problems of particular concern to be addressed by the program include violence, injuries, substance abuse, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), infant mortality, child abuse and neglect, and cardiovascular disease. The failure of traditional health promotion approaches to poor communities has created a literature supporting community-based action directed at broad social forces. The Codman Square Community Partnership for Health Promotion uses a variety of models--community participation, community organization, empowerment education, and community-oriented primary care--to encourage new coalitions that can ameliorate the social isolation and health-averse social norms linked to poverty and poor health. The program uses local residents trained as lay health workers to deliver home-based health services and to help create the necessary partnerships, linkages, and communication networks to foster the reorganization of the community to better address its health problems. PMID:1902312

  5. A model for community health care in rural Java.

    PubMed

    Hendrate, L

    1981-01-01

    This article describes a method of conveying health care to poor villages by training residents for part-time voluntary service, combined with localized health insurance covering both local medicines and the fees for a nearby health center. The project began under the auspices of the Foundation for Christian Hospitals in Hurakarta, in Central Java. The village of Klampok has a population of 5,614, mostly farm workers. Health services are supplied by the Emmanuel Health Center. Although the program was granted funds for jeeps, buildings, instruments, and personnel, the center lacked community participation. Health workers developed a strategy of communication and understanding of the village to encourage participation. Implementation of the strategy included 2 elements: the village health cadre, voluntary workers from the community selected by the community; and the village health insurance scheme, in which each household partially pays for the overall health service, and credit is extended. Rather than being distributors of health care, the project staff sees itself as a stimulant and enabler of the community being able to accept the responsibility of handling its own health problems. This Indonesian experience has proven itself replicable in that health cadre systems have spread to several surrounding villages. To make community health care participation a viable plan both the health personnel and community leaders need to be oriented and motivated to the idea. PMID:12278505

  6. The community health worker cultural mentoring project: preparing professional students for team work with health workers from urban communities.

    PubMed

    Sherwen, Laurie N; Schwolsky-Fitch, Elena; Rodriquez, Romelia; Horta, Greg; Lopez, Ivanna

    2007-01-01

    Community Health Workers or CHWs (also known by a variety of alternative titles) are health workers drawn from communities to provide access to care for members of their communities. CHWs have been documented as effective in delivering a variety of services in a culturally-sensitive manner, and in providing a bridge between health professionals and underserved or minority communities. Yet, CHWs have not been well incorporated into interdisciplinary health care teams. The majority of health professionals are not even aware of the possible role and skills of CHWs. Believing that the best time to educate professionals about this valuable health worker and ensure that CHWs become part of interdisciplinary health care teams is during the student years, the Hunter College Schools of the Health Professions, and the Community Health Worker Network of New York City developed a pilot project, the Community Health Worker Cultural Mentoring Project. Community Health Workers, who were members of the Network, served as "community mentors" for health professions students drawn from the programs of community health education, nursing, and nutrition. CHWs worked with faculty of selected courses in each of the professional programs, and served as panelists in these courses, presenting information about health beliefs and alternative health practices of diverse cultural groups in communities of New York City. Class sessions were first held in the fall of 2004; subsequent sessions were held in following semesters. Approximately 40 students participated in 7 classes, with 6 CHWs serving as mentors - two per class. At the end of the classroom presentations, students wrote reflections relating to their understanding of the CHW role and relevance for their future interdisciplinary practice. The majority of reflections met the goal of increasing professional students' understanding of the CHW role and skills. At this point, quantitative and qualitative data will need to be collected to

  7. The changing scene in community health nursing.

    PubMed

    Harris, M D

    1988-09-01

    The DRGs and their aftermath have had an effect on all who are involved with home health care services, including the patient and provider. The staff of home health agencies must be competent, caring professionals who must also be able to cope with the regulatory issues that affect patient care. The effects on patients and families have also increased. Today's health care environment is requiring that they be responsible for self-care programs for many hi-tech procedures as well as care for those who are terminally ill. They are discovering that reimbursement is not available for the many services that they consider necessary, but that third-party payers consider these services to be of a custodial nature and, therefore, nonreimbursable. The effect on physicians is an increased amount of paperwork for home care services, as a result of frequent admissions to and discharges from service and changes in the frequency of visits or treatment plans. There is also the need for the timely signing of the required forms for agencies to meet the requirements of the Medicare program. The effects on the agencies include attempting to maintain financial solvency while providing quality health care services; maintaining staff morale and productivity; making hi-tech services available at an increased cost on a 24-hour basis by qualified staff to remain competitive; and guaranteeing safe, sound policies and procedures for patients and staff. Certainly the advent of DRGs has also had an impact on the nursing profession as it relates to home health care. The benefits of community health nursing identified in the past are no longer applicable in 1988. The job characteristics have changed and are no longer as attractive as they once were to nurses. In a recent publication I said there are times when I feel that I know what a swimmer experiences when being pounded by unrelenting waves in a rough surf. There is hardly time to catch your breath before the next wave hits. The DRG aftermath

  8. Community-oriented integrated mental health services

    PubMed Central

    Morris, David

    2014-01-01

    Unprecedented levels of cost containment in NHS and social care organisations – together with integration as a policy priority – make this a key moment for fresh ways of thinking about how to commission and provide community-based integrated services that meet the challenge of local accountability and citizen participation. This is nowhere more important than in mental health. Primary care with its local orientation is properly at the heart of this agenda, but there is a need for new forms of leadership for collaboration in the sector. In this context, the contribution of general practitioner (GP) networks is likely to be fundamental. This paper is a brief discussion of some of the issues associated with GP networks and mental health, set in the context of a round table discussion with three sets of participants at a 2014 London Journal of Primary Care/Royal College of General Practitioners conference. The conference provided a forum for capturing a diversity of experience and knowledge and for turning this into a force for critical transformation. This paper describes a contribution to the day. PMID:25949738

  9. Evaluating an in-home multicomponent cognitive behavioural programme to manage concerns about falls and associated activity avoidance in frail community-dwelling older people: Design of a randomised control trial [NCT01358032

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Concerns about falls are frequently reported by older people. These concerns can have serious consequences such as an increased risk of falls and the subsequent avoidance of activities. Previous studies have shown the effectiveness of a multicomponent group programme to reduce concerns about falls. However, owing to health problems older people may not be able to attend a group programme. Therefore, we adapted the group approach to an individual in-home programme. Methods/Design A two-group randomised controlled trial has been developed to evaluate the in-home multicomponent cognitive behavioural programme to manage concerns about falls and associated activity avoidance in frail older people living in the community. Persons were eligible for study if they were 70 years of age or over, perceived their general health as fair or poor, had at least some concerns about falls and associated avoidance of activity. After screening for eligibility in a random sample of older people, eligible persons received a baseline assessment and were subsequently allocated to the intervention or control group. Persons assigned to the intervention group were invited to participate in the programme, while those assigned to the control group received care as usual. The programme consists of seven sessions, comprising three home visits and four telephone contacts. The sessions are aimed at instilling adaptive and realistic views about falls, as well as increasing activity and safe behaviour. An effect evaluation, a process evaluation and an economic evaluation are conducted. Follow-up measurements for the effect evaluation are carried out 5 and 12 months after the baseline measurement. The primary outcomes of the effect evaluation are concerns about falls and avoidance of activity as a result of these concerns. Other outcomes are disability and falls. The process evaluation measures: the population characteristics reached; protocol adherence by facilitators; protocol adherence

  10. Health promotion community development and the tyranny of individualism.

    PubMed

    Shiell, A; Hawe, P

    1996-01-01

    Economic evaluation of health promotion poses few major difficulties when the theoretical approach of the programme and the evaluation of cost and benefits are confined within the context of the individual. Methodological individualism has a long history in economics and the techniques of microeconomics are well suited to the examination of individually focused behaviour change programmes. However, new developments in community health promotion pose special challenges. These programmes have the community, not the individual, as the focus of programme theory and "community' means something completely different from the sum of individuals. Community empowerment and promotion of the community's capacity to deal with health issues are the goals of such programmes. To reflect these notions, sense of community and community competence should be considered as "functionings', an extra-welfarist constituent of well-being. Their inclusion as outcomes of community health promotion requires a shift from individualist utilitarian economics into a communitarian framework which respects the programme's notion of community. If health economics fails to develop new constructs to deal with these new approaches in health promotion, the application of existing techniques to community programmes will mislead health decision makers about their value and potential. PMID:8817298

  11. Accountable Communities for Health: Moving From Providing Accountable Care to Creating Health.

    PubMed

    Tipirneni, Renuka; Vickery, Katherine Diaz; Ehlinger, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Lessons from community-oriented primary care in the United States can offer insights into how we could improve population health by integrating the public health, social service, and health care sectors to form accountable communities for health (ACHs). Unlike traditional accountable care organizations (ACOs) that address population health from a health care perspective, ACHs address health from a community perspective and consider the total investment in health across all sectors. The approach embeds the ACO in a community context where multiple stakeholders come together to share responsibility for tackling multiple determinants of health. ACOs using the ACH model provide a roadmap for embedding health care in communities in a way that uniquely addresses local social determinants of health. PMID:26195684

  12. Functional health pattern assessment: a seasonal migrant farmworker community.

    PubMed

    Decker, S D; Knight, L

    1990-01-01

    A broad-based needs assessment of a migrant farmworker community was conducted using the community functional health pattern tool (Gikow & Kucharski, 1987) and Porter's (1987) factor-isolating theory of population group diagnosis. Data analysis revealed numerous health needs in all 10 functional health patterns and an urgent need for accessible primary prevention programs. A mobile outreach program to the migrant camps was seen as the most effective way to provide education, screening, and health care. PMID:2401903

  13. The Impact of Integrating Community Advocacy Into Community Health Worker Roles on Health-Focused Organizations and Community Health Workers in Southern Arizona.

    PubMed

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Ingram, Maia; Schachter, Kenneth; Sabo, Samantha; Verdugo, Lorena; Carvajal, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Organizational environments may encourage community health workers (CHWs) to engage community members in improving their communities. We conducted open-ended interviews and focus groups to explore how participation in the Acción intervention, which trained CHWs in community advocacy, affected organizational capacity to support their CHWs. Supervisors described improved organizational recognition and trust of CHWs. Organizational leaders reported organizational benefits and increased appreciation of CHW leadership. Both expressed increased interest in future advocacy trainings. Limiting factors included organizational mission, CHW position descriptions, and funding. Findings indicate that, with training and funding, CHW community advocacy can be integrated into organizations with congruent missions. PMID:26049654

  14. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN CHILDREN’S ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Barbara L.; Manice, Melissa P.

    2010-01-01

    Community engagement strategies and skills can build trust and reduce historical mistrust between researchers, communities and populations being studied, as well as contribute to the quality of study designs, methods and dissemination of findings. This review paper discusses why community engagement is of increasing importance in children’s environmental health research, describes models and the continuum of methods that are used and discusses their challenges and benefits. Two case studies, representing different study designs and using different community engagement models and methods, and lessons learned from these cases are described. Community engagement methods are best understood on a continuum based on the degree to which community members or representatives of community populations are involved in research planning, decision making and dissemination. Methods along this continuum include community consultation, community based participatory research(CBPR) and community consent to research. Community engagement knowledge and skills are especially important in the conduct of children’s environmental health research with its emphasis on reducing environmental risks at the community level; the increasing focus on genetics and gene-environment interactions; and the importance placed on translation of scientific results into behaviors and policies that protect the community. Across study designs, whether qualitative survey research, an observational epidemiology study, or a randomized intervention trial, understanding community interests, norms and values is necessary to describe attitudes and behaviors of specific population groups, build evidence of cause and effect between environmental exposures and health and/or that demonstrate the effectiveness of interventions to reduce risks. PMID:21259265

  15. Improving Child Health Services: Lessons Learned from Nine Community Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, William D.

    One of the major reasons many children do not receive efficient, effective health care is that much of public spending for child health services has been funneled through categorical funding programs. The Child Health Initiative provided an opportunity to learn how different communities would approach improving child health services through…

  16. Community Management That Works: How to Build and Sustain a Thriving Online Health Community

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals, patients, caregivers, family, friends, and other supporters are increasingly joining online health communities to share information and find support. But social Web (Web 2.0) technology alone does not create a successful online community. Building and sustaining a successful community requires an enabler and strategic community management. Community management is more than moderation. The developmental life cycle of a community has four stages: inception, establishment, maturity, and mitosis. Each stage presents distinct characteristics and management needs. This paper describes the community management strategies, resources, and expertise needed to build and maintain a thriving online health community; introduces some of the challenges; and provides a guide for health organizations considering this undertaking. The paper draws on insights from an ongoing study and observation of online communities as well as experience managing and consulting a variety of online health communities. Discussion includes effective community building practices relevant to each stage, such as outreach and relationship building, data collection, content creation, and other proven techniques that ensure the survival and steady growth of an online health community. PMID:23759312

  17. Community health program evaluation using accreditation as a framework.

    PubMed

    Severance, Janet Hahn

    2009-03-01

    Increasingly, health system leaders seek to determine whether community health interventions make a difference to individuals in the community. However, community health improvement is difficult to measure, and health system staff may not be familiar with evaluation research methods. Health care organizations can improve their evaluation efforts relatively easily by building on what they already know: the Joint Commission accreditation process. By using accreditation as a framework, community health evaluation may be seen as more approachable when viewed through that lens. This article provides a framework for practical approaches to program planning, evaluation, and sustainability. Joint Commission accreditation functions (chapters) are similar to health program goals. Standards are similar to program objectives. Elements of performance are similar to activities or methods. Scoring comparisons are similar to measures. PMID:19116229

  18. Development of the Community Health Improvement Navigator Database of Interventions.

    PubMed

    Roy, Brita; Stanojevich, Joel; Stange, Paul; Jiwani, Nafisa; King, Raymond; Koo, Denise

    2016-02-26

    With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the requirements for hospitals to achieve tax-exempt status include performing a triennial community health needs assessment and developing a plan to address identified needs. To address community health needs, multisector collaborative efforts to improve both health care and non-health care determinants of health outcomes have been the most effective and sustainable. In 2015, CDC released the Community Health Improvement Navigator to facilitate the development of these efforts. This report describes the development of the database of interventions included in the Community Health Improvement Navigator. The database of interventions allows the user to easily search for multisector, collaborative, evidence-based interventions to address the underlying causes of the greatest morbidity and mortality in the United States: tobacco use and exposure, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. PMID:26917110

  19. Developing Learning Communities in Health and Human Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Karen L.; Dawkins, Phyllis W.

    2007-01-01

    Learning communities in health and human performance are creative approaches to traditional academic outcomes. Learning communities are becoming increasingly widespread in a variety of contexts, and there is extensive evidence suggesting that effective learning communities have important benefits for students as well as faculty. In this article,…

  20. A Community Mental Health Approach to Drug Addiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotman, Richard; Freedman, Alfred

    The nature of the historical changes in the presumed stereo-types of drug users in the United States, and the associated policy changes, are described in this report which takes a community health viewpoint of drug use while concurrently dealing with the individual. Eight case histories illustrate the community mental health approach in action.…

  1. A Community Health Approach to Asthma in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss-Randall, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a leading cause of school absenteeism in the United States, especially in poor and minority communities, where prevalence and hospitalization rates are significantly higher than average. A community health approach can help poorer school districts hire full-time nurses and access other health resources.

  2. Community Mental Health Ideology, Dogmatism, and Political-Economic Conservatism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Frank; Schulberg, Herbert C.

    1969-01-01

    Indications are that degree of adherence to philosophy of community mental health among area board members, as measured by the Community Mental Health Ideology Scale and the five-term form of the Political-Economic-Conservatism Scale, is significantly negatively correlated with dogmatism and conservatism. (Author/CJ)

  3. Community Mental Health: Issues for Social Work Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Arthur J., Ed.

    Articles by social work educators on some of the critical issues in community mental health are presented. Examined are some conceptual and program developments related to coordination, continuity of care, and the use of teams in planning and service delivery for community mental health (Lawrence K. Berg). The issue of civil commitment to and…

  4. Identifying Rural Health Care Needs Using Community Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Patricia L.; Miller, Marlene E.; Offutt, Sue M.; Gibbens, Brad P.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Community input can lead to better-defined goals in an organization. With this in mind, the Center for Rural Health at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences embarked on a series of 13 meetings with representatives of organizations serving rural communities, including 5 Native American reservations. Purpose:…

  5. Service Learning and Community Health Nursing: A Natural Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marilyn P.; Swanson, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Community health nursing students performed community assessments and proposed and implemented service learning projects that addressed adolescent smoking in middle schools, home safety for elderly persons, industrial worker health, and sexual abuse of teenaged girls. Students learned to apply epidemiological research methods, mobilize resources,…

  6. The community leaders institute: an innovative program to train community leaders in health research.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Lori E; Parr, William; Smith, Teresa; Mitchell, Monica J

    2013-03-01

    An emerging best practice of addressing health and improving health disparities in communities is ensuring that academic health centers (AHCs) are engaged with area schools, primary care practices, and community advocates as equal partners in research, services, and programs. The literature documents the importance of ensuring that academic-community collaboration is based on equity, trust, and respect and that there is capacity (time and resources) and a shared culture (language, skills, and applied knowledge) for accomplishing mutual goals in academic-community research partnerships. It is also essential that an academic-community collaboration result in tangible and measurable goals and outcomes for both the target community and the AHC. Currently, the models for implementing best practices in community health partnerships, especially training programs, are limited.This article summarizes the goals and outcomes for the Community Leaders Institute (CLI), a six-week innovative leadership development training program designed to enhance academic-community research, integrate the interests of community leaders and AHC researchers, and build research capacity and competencies within the community. On the basis of two years of outcome data, the CLI is achieving its intended goals of engaging faculty as trainer-scholars while promoting academic-community partnerships that align with community and AHC priorities. The training and collaborative research paradigm used by the CLI has served to accelerate AHC-community engagement and integration efforts, as CLI graduates are now serving on AHC steering, bioethics, and other committees. PMID:23348087

  7. Community Health Risk Assessment of Primary Aluminum Smelter Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Larivière, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Primary aluminum production is an industrial process with high potential health risk for workers. We consider in this article how to assess community health risks associated with primary aluminum smelter emissions. Methods: We reviewed the literature on health effects, community exposure data, and dose–response relationships of the principal hazardous agents emitted. Results: On the basis of representative measured community exposure levels, we were able to make rough estimates on health risks associated with specific agents and categorize these as none, low, medium, or high. Conclusions: It is possible to undertake a rough-estimate community Health Risk Assessment for individual smelters on the basis of information available in the epidemiological literature and local community exposure data. PMID:24806724

  8. [Community health agent program: perception by patients and health service workers].

    PubMed

    Levy, Flávia Mauad; Matos, Patrícia Elizabeth de Souza; Tomita, Nilce Emy

    2004-01-01

    Two basic premises of Brazil's Community Health Agents Program (PACS) are to value the family and community to which the program belongs and to encourage their participation in health promotion and disease prevention. This study focused on the work developed by PACS in Bauru, São Paulo State, as perceived by the community health agents and the families served by them. As the study's point of departure, 22 community health agents and 22 representatives of families were interviewed, randomly selected according to residential micro-areas. Two focus groups were formed according to the PACS to which the community agents and families belonged. Qualitative analysis of the answers demonstrated agreement between the perceptions by community health agents and the community in the two focus groups. However, the two focus groups differed from each other. Distinct realities were observed in the two communities, thereby orienting new program actions and handling of local difficulties. PMID:15029321

  9. Developing a health promotion program for faith-based communities.

    PubMed

    Kotecki, Catherine Nuss

    2002-04-01

    The article describes the partnership formed between community outreach programs, a school of nursing, and hospitals to implement Healthy People 2010 goals in urban, faith-based communities. To date this program has provided health promotion programs to 125 people from more than 18 congregations in the context of their faith setting. The program has allowed congregants to develop ministry strategies to meet health care needs within the congregation and community. The article provides overall program goals, specific lesson plans, and evaluation strategies. Outcome measures include an increase in health promotion knowledge, participant satisfaction, and improved health in congregations. PMID:11913228

  10. Knowledge and Behavioral Effects in Cardiovascular Health: Community Health Worker Health Disparities Initiative, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Margarita; Yang, Manshu; Evensen, Christian; Windham, Amy; Ortiz, Gloria; Tracy, Rachel; Ivy, Edward Donnell

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and disparities in cardiovascular health exist among African Americans, American Indians, Hispanics, and Filipinos. The Community Health Worker Health Disparities Initiative of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) includes culturally tailored curricula taught by community health workers (CHWs) to improve knowledge and heart-healthy behaviors in these racial/ethnic groups. Methods We used data from 1,004 community participants in a 10-session curriculum taught by CHWs at 15 sites to evaluate the NHLBI’s health disparities initiative by using a 1-group pretest–posttest design. The curriculum addressed identification and management of cardiovascular disease risk factors. We used linear mixed effects and generalized linear mixed effects models to examine results. Results Average participant age was 48; 75% were female, 50% were Hispanic, 35% were African American, 8% were Filipino, and 7% were American Indian. Twenty-three percent reported a history of diabetes, and 37% reported a family history of heart disease. Correct pretest to posttest knowledge scores increased from 48% to 74% for heart healthy knowledge. The percentage of participants at the action or maintenance stage of behavior change increased from 41% to 85%. Conclusion Using the CHW model to implement community education with culturally tailored curricula may improve heart health knowledge and behaviors among minorities. Further studies should examine the influence of such programs on clinical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24524426

  11. Creating Meaningful Partnerships Between Communities and Environmental Health Researchers

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Rachael; Aguilar, Genevieve C.; de Castro, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Community engagement is a necessary, although challenging, element of environmental health research in communities. To facilitate the engagement process, direct action community organizing agencies can be useful in bringing together communities and researchers. This article describes the preliminary activities that one direct action community organizing agency used in partnership with researchers to improve community engagement in the first 6 months of an environmental health study conducted in a major U.S. city. Activities included developing communication strategies, creating opportunities for researcher–community interaction, and sustaining project momentum. To conduct environmental research that is both scientifically rigorous and relevant to communities, collaborating partners had to develop professional skills and strategies outside of their areas of expertise. PMID:23875568

  12. Selecting alternative strategies for community health education in guineaworm control.

    PubMed

    Brieger, W R; Ramakrishna, J; Akpovi, S U; Adeniyi, J D

    1984-01-01

    Community health education strategies in guineaworm control can be applied at several intervention levels. Community development mobilizes local resources to provide safe water supplies such as wells. Mass education in schools and communities can teach personal protection measures such as filtering water. Training of volunteer community health workers produces front line staff, who by being culturally in tune with the community can demonstrate and promote the use of appropriate prevention and treatment measures. Advocacy assists community members to express their needs to government and ministry decision makers. All of these strategies have been applied in a community health education/primary health care program in Idere, Ibarapa District, Oyo State. Community development for well construction was found to be a long-term strategy that first must overcome problems of village organization and resource location. Mass education, to be effective, must have a simple and acceptable technology to promote. Trained village health workers must overcome traditional beliefs that inhibit use of preventive and treatment measures. Advocacy requires basic political education of community leaders. A variety of health education strategies is needed to address short- and long-term priorities as well as to overcome the different barriers to guineaworm control. PMID:20841266

  13. The reach and rationale for community health fairs

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kate; Liang, Annie; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica; Navarro, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Latinos living in the United States account for one-third of the uninsured population and face numerous cultural, linguistic, and financial barriers to accessing health care services. Community health fairs have developed to address the unmet need for no- and low-cost services that target prevention and education among underserved communities. The current research describes an ongoing effort in a community in southern California and examines the barriers to health care among participants registering to receive free breast health screenings, one of the major services offered at a 2010 health fair. A total of 186 adult Latina women completed a brief questionnaire assessing their health care utilization and self-reported barriers to engaging in preventive and screening services. Approximately two-thirds of participants reported never receiving or having more than 2 years passing since receiving a preventive health check-up. Participants identified cost (64.5%) and knowledge of locations for services (52.3%) as the primary barriers to engaging in routine health care services. Engaging with health professionals represents a leading way in which adults obtain health information and health fairs offering cancer health screenings represent a culturally appropriate venue for increased cancer health equity. Implications of the current research for future health fairs and their role in community cancer education are discussed. PMID:23907787

  14. A Door-to-Door Needs Assessment to Guide a Community-Campus Health Partnership and Contribute to Community Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jerrold

    2006-01-01

    A community-campus health partnership was formed in 1999. To determine health partnership priorities, it was collaboratively decided that an assessment of the community's health needs and interests was necessary. This article describes a community-based participatory research project: namely, a door-to-door survey to assess community health needs…

  15. Constructing a Health and Social Indicator Framework for Indigenous Community Health Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Elisabeth; Cargo, Margaret D.; Daniel, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Health and social indicators that capture the distinct historical, social, and cultural contexts of Indigenous communities can play an important role in informing the planning and delivery of community interventions. There is currently considerable interest in cataloguing and vetting meaningful community-level health and social indicators that…

  16. Our Environment, Our Health: A Community-Based Participatory Environmental Health Survey in Richmond, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alison; Lopez, Andrea; Malloy, Nile; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a health survey conducted by a community-based participatory research partnership between academic researchers and community organizers to consider environmental health and environmental justice issues in four neighborhoods of Richmond, California, a low-income community of color living along the fence line of a major oil…

  17. An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sherry L. Fowler, Cecile; Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally; Martinez, Yolanda; Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice; Jacobs, David E.

    2009-01-15

    We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

  18. Faith Community Nursing: Supporting Mental Health during Life Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Anaebere, Ann Kiki; DeLilly, Carol Rose

    2013-01-01

    Faith Community Nurses consider community cultural practices an essential component in understanding how to effectively support an individual’s mental health during important life transitions. Additionally, as part of their practice, Faith Community Nurses seek to understand how religious beliefs and life transitions such as marriage, divorce, birth, death, and illness impact on spiritual and mental health care. The emotional tolls of family separations due to wars, unexpected life events, or planned transitions are pivotal time-points for the implementation of Faith Community Nursing interventions to support mental health. As we witness a worldwide declining economy, nationally high unemployment rates, a decline in health care resources, and reduced access to treatment, medication, and nutritious foods, Faith Community Nursing care will be a valuable asset to various religious communities. It is our intent to examine briefly the historical and cultural uses of Faith Community Nurses, as well as examine the concept of transitions to better understand how Faith Community Nurses can be utilized as agents to support mental health for diverse faith communities during key life events. PMID:22545641

  19. Anishinabe youth perceptions about community health: toward environmental repossession.

    PubMed

    Big-Canoe, Katie; Richmond, Chantelle A M

    2014-03-01

    This community-based research applied environmental dispossession as a theoretical framework for understanding Anishinabe youth perceptions about health, social relationships and contemporary Anishinabe way of life in Northern Ontario, Canada. Qualitative interviews with 19 youth reveal considerable worry about their community's health. Youth perceive changes in the Anishinabe way of life, including decreased access to their traditional lands, to be central to poor health at the community level. Youth emphasized the importance of social relationships for fostering healthy behaviours and developing community wide initiatives that will provide opportunities for reconnecting to land, and for learning and practicing Indigenous Knowledge. This study builds on the growing body of decolonizing research with Indigenous communities, and it concludes by offering the concept of environmental repossession as a way forward for studies on the Indigenous environment-health interface. PMID:24440804

  20. [Community participation in health: the challenge in Chile].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Claudio A; López, Jairo J Vanegas

    2010-02-01

    Health care reforms implemented in Latin America and the Caribbean over the last 20 years have viewed community participation as a system-wide component. Nonetheless, these reform efforts have yet to break through the conceptual and operational barriers holding back the development and expansion of community participation. In Chile, changes introduced to the health care system are far from achieving any real participation from the community. Therefore, the consumer's role needs to be redefined from merely controlling the parts, to reaching across the whole system in a way that consumer input might identify and quickly correct any possible shortcomings in the health system's design, as well as its operations. With this in mind, the main challenges are to strengthen coordination among the various promotion and participation commitments, as well as community control, and to generate data and other evidence to assess the impact of community participation in health strategies. PMID:20339619

  1. Using Community Health Workers in Community-Based Growth Promotion: What Stakeholders Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afulani, Patience A.; Awoonor-Williams, John K.; Opoku, Ernest C.; Asunka, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The Nutrition and Malaria Control for Child Survival Project is a community-based growth promotion project that utilizes Community Health Workers (CHWs), referred to as Community Child Growth Promoters (CCGPs), as the principal change agents. The purpose of this study was to identify perceptions of key stakeholders about the project and the role…

  2. Community as Teacher Model: Health Profession Students Learn Cultural Safety from an Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Cathy C.; Godolphin, William J.; Chhina, Gagun S.; Towle, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Communication between health care professionals and Aboriginal patients is complicated by cultural differences and the enduring effects of colonization. Health care providers need better training to meet the needs of Aboriginal patients and communities. We describe the development and outcomes of a community-driven service-learning program in…

  3. Capacity building for health through community-based participatory nutrition intervention Research in rural communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Building community capacity for health promotion in small rural communities is essential if health promotion research is to yield sustainable outcomes. Since its inception, capacity-building has been a stated goal of the Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative, a tri-state collaboration in ...

  4. Capacity building for health through community based participatory nutrition intervention research in rural communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Building community capacity for health promotion in small rural communities is essential if health promotion research is to yield sustainable outcomes. Since its inception, capacity-building has been a stated goal of the Delta Nutrition Intervention Research initiative, a tri-state collaboration in ...

  5. Community Colleges, Health-Related Social Problems, and the Community Services Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Donald Dean

    The major objective of the persent research was to determine the degree of commitment to community service in the area of health related social problems on the part of public community colleges. Specifically, the study sought to determine if these institutions have a responsibility for assisting in the amelioration of health-related problems. The…

  6. Cooperative Health Occupation Education (Course Outline), The Life Span and Community Health: 3099.10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grade twlve. SUBJECT MATTER: The physical development and needs, as well as the psychological development and needs of the individual from infancy to old age. The health of the community is studied in terms of communicable diseases, immunology, resources available for the optimal health of any community (including health services…

  7. Community-based prevention marketing: organizing a community for health behavior intervention.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Carol A; Brown, Kelli R McCormack; McDermott, Robert J; Forthofer, Melinda S; Bumpus, Elizabeth C; Calkins, Susan A; Zapata, Lauren B

    2007-04-01

    This article describes the application and refinement of community-based prevention marketing (CBPM), an example of community-based participatory research that blends social marketing theories and techniques and community organization principles to guide voluntary health behavior change. The Florida Prevention Research Center has worked with a community coalition in Sarasota County, Florida to define locally important health problems and issues and to develop responsive health-promotion interventions. The CBPM framework has evolved as academic and community-based researchers have gained experience applying it. Community boards can use marketing principles to design evidence-based strategies for addressing local public health concerns. Based on 6 years of experience with the "Believe in All Your Possibilities" program, lessons learned that have led to revision and improvement of the CBPM framework are described. PMID:16923844

  8. Neighborhood adversity, child health, and the role for community development.

    PubMed

    Jutte, Douglas P; Miller, Jennifer L; Erickson, David J

    2015-03-01

    Despite medical advances, childhood health and well-being have not been broadly achieved due to rising chronic diseases and conditions related to child poverty. Family and neighborhood living conditions can have lasting consequences for health, with community adversity affecting health outcomes in significant part through stress response and increased allostatic load. Exposure to this "toxic stress" influences gene expression and brain development with direct and indirect negative consequences for health. Ensuring healthy child development requires improving conditions in distressed, high-poverty neighborhoods by reducing children's exposure to neighborhood stressors and supporting good family and caregiver functioning. The community development industry invests more than $200 billion annually in low-income neighborhoods, with the goal of improving living conditions for residents. The most impactful investments have transformed neighborhoods by integrating across sectors to address both the built environment and the social and service environment. By addressing many facets of the social determinants of health at once, these efforts suggest substantial results for children, but health outcomes generally have not been considered or evaluated. Increased partnership between the health sector and community development can bring health outcomes explicitly into focus for community development investments, help optimize intervention strategies for health, and provide natural experiments to build the evidence base for holistic interventions for disadvantaged children. The problems and potential solutions are beyond the scope of practicing pediatricians, but the community development sector stands ready to engage in shared efforts to improve the health and development of our most at-risk children. PMID:25733725

  9. Community Oriented Videotapes-Action Tools for Health Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazes, Peter M.; Snyder, David

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the four-year-old Health Education Project (HEP) established at the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Newark. Notes the use of bilingual, community-oriented videotapes as teaching tools to inform consumers about critical health care information and explores the use of these tapes with health education discussion groups.…

  10. Community Health Workers and Their Value to Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Michael S.; Gunter, Kathryn E.; Palmisano, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) play a vital and unique role in linking diverse and underserved populations to health and social service systems. Despite their effectiveness, as documented by empirical studies across various disciplines including public health, nursing, and biomedicine, the value and potential role of CHWs in the social work…

  11. Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors of California Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trieu, Sang Leng; Bratton, Sally; Marshak, Helen Hopp

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the sexual and reproductive health behaviors of students from 13 community college campuses in California. Participants: Heterosexual college students, ages 18 to 24, who have had sexual intercourse (N = 4,487). Methods: The American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) survey was…

  12. Policing, Community Fragmentation, and Public Health: Observations from Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Marisela B

    2016-04-01

    Studies show that policing, when violent, and community fragmentation have a negative impact on health outcomes. This current study investigates the connection of policing and community fragmentation and public health. Using an embedded case study analysis, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 African-American female and male residents, ages 21-64 years of various neighborhoods of high arrest rates and health and socioeconomic depravation in Baltimore City, MD. Baltimore residents' perceptions of policing, stress, community fragmentation, and solutions are presented. Analysis of the perceptions of these factors suggests that violent policing increases community fragmentation and is a public health threat. Approaches to address this public health threat are discussed. PMID:26753881

  13. Strand IV Environmental and Community Health, World Health, Grades 7, 8, and 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The interweaving of personal and community health with world health are referred to in this prototype curriculum, to show students in grades 7-9 that health problems of individual nations are health problems of the world. Specific curriculum content studies: (1) factors influencing world health (population, culture, family structure, economic…

  14. A community health worker intervention to address the social determinants of health through policy change.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Maia; Schachter, Ken A; Sabo, Samantha J; Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Gomez, Sofia; De Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Carvajal, Scott C

    2014-04-01

    Public policy that seeks to achieve sustainable improvements in the social determinants of health, such as income, education, housing, food security and neighborhood conditions, can create positive and sustainable health effects. This paper describes preliminary results of Acción para la Salud, a public health intervention in which Community health workers (CHWs) from five health agencies engaged their community in the process of making positive systems and environmental changes. Academic-community partners trained Acción CHWs in community advocacy and provided ongoing technical assistance in developing strategic advocacy plans. The CHWs documented community advocacy activities through encounter forms in which they identified problems, formulated solutions, and described systems and policy change efforts. Strategy maps described the steps of the advocacy plans. Findings demonstrate that CHWs worked to initiate discussions about underlying social determinants and environment-related factors that impact health, and identified solutions to improve neighborhood conditions, create community opportunities, and increase access to services. PMID:24363179

  15. The need of community health centers for international medical graduates.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, L D; Konrad, T R; Miller, J S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine whether community health centers need international medical graduates to fill staff positions. METHODS: The authors surveyed 100 community health center administrators to learn about their perceptions of international medical graduates. RESULTS: Nationally, about one quarter of community health centers depend on international medical graduates to fill physician vacancies; most of these centers foresee unfilled positions in the event of a cutback. CONCLUSIONS: Policies calling for a national reduction in the supply of international medical graduates need to be balanced by an understanding of these individuals' role in reducing local physician shortages. PMID:10511843

  16. The Willow Hill Community Health Assessment: Assessing the Needs of Children in a Former Slave Community.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Moya L; Jackson, Gayle; Jackson, Alvin; Hardy, DeShannon; Gupta, Akrati

    2015-10-01

    The overall purpose of this community needs assessment was to explore the perceptions of health and educational needs among youth residing in a rural Georgia community, document existing assets that could be utilized to meet those needs, and to identify socioeconomic barriers and facilitators in health education. A sequential mixed method design was used. Intercept surveys were conducted followed by individual, key informant interviews and a focus group. Survey data was entered into an Excel spreadsheet and SPSS for analysis and descriptive statistics including means and frequencies were calculated. For qualitative interviews, full transcripts were created from audio-recordings and uploaded into NVivo for content analysis. Several health issues were highlighted by the Willow Hill/Portal Georgia community members, including teachers, parents, youth and Willow Hill Heritage and Renaissance Center board members. Some of the health issues identified by youth in the community were low levels of physical activity, obesity, diabetes, lack of healthy food choices, and access to health care services. Including the issues identified by youth, the parents, teachers and board members identified additional health issues in the community such as asthma, hygiene and lack of dental and eye care facilities. Overall, there is a need for better infrastructure and awareness among community members. Utilizing identified assets, including active community leaders, involved faith-based organizations, commitment of community members, presence of land resources, and commitment to physical activity and sports, could modify the current community landscape. PMID:26264907

  17. Community participation in health activities in an Amazon community of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tauil, M C; de Azevedo, A C

    1978-01-01

    This article describes community participation in a comprehensive eight-year health program at Porto Nacional, a town in Brazils Amazon region. The authors discuss various techniques employed to encourage community participation, indicate methods used to resolve low-key conflicts in a positive manner, describe the major contributions made by community participation in this program, and present a number of conclusions considered applicable to other communities in this part of Brazil. PMID:698459

  18. Health politics meets post-modernism: its meaning and implications for community health organizing.

    PubMed

    Rosenau, P V

    1994-01-01

    In this article, post-modern theory is described and applied to health politics with examples from community health organizing, social movements, and health promotion. Post-modernism questions conventional assumptions about concepts such as representation, participation, empowerment, community, identity, causality, accountability, responsibility, authority, and roles in community health promotion (those of expert, leader, and organizer). I compare post-modern social movements with their modern counterparts: the organizational forms, leadership styles, and substantive intellectual orientations of the two differ. I explain the social planning, community development, and social action models of community health organizing, comparing them with the priorities of post-modern social movements, and show the similarities and differences between them as to structural preferences, process, and strategies. Finally, and most importantly, I present the implicit lessons that post-modernism offers to health politics and outline the strengths and weaknesses of this approach to health politics. PMID:8077633

  19. In health care reform, who cares for the community?

    PubMed

    Sigmond, R; Seay, J D

    1994-01-01

    Health care reform has again focused the issues of ownership and mission of organizations in the health care field. Some believe that universal entitlement will eventually make both charitable patient care and the nonprofit form of organization obsolete. Others believe that special treatment of nonprofit organizations does not depend on charity at all; rather that the nonprofit form has social value in and of itself. The authors reflect a different point of view. They suggest that with reform, community benefit as the modern expression of a charitable mission will become ever more important in achieving the nation's health care goals. They believe that nonprofit organizations will continue to be entitled to special treatment only if their missions and programs extend beyond care of patients and entitled populations to focus also on care of communities. Any health organization's investment in disciplined community initiatives encompasses all the people in targeted communities, including those served by competing organizations. Without tax exemption, an organization committed to community care initiatives will be at a competitive disadvantage under the proposed community rated capitation payment system. Rather than abandoning the community benefit standard for tax exemption, health care reform calls for more systematic management of community care initiatives by nonprofit organizations and also of tax-exemption eligibility by the IRS. PMID:10135183

  20. The reach and rationale for community health fairs.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kate; Liang, Annie; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica; Navarro, Ana M

    2014-03-01

    Latinos living in the USA account for one third of the uninsured population and face numerous cultural, linguistic, and financial barriers to accessing healthcare services. Community health fairs have developed to address the unmet need for no- and low-cost services that target prevention and education among underserved communities. The current research describes an ongoing effort in a community in Southern California and examines the barriers to health care among participants registering to receive free breast health screenings, one of the major services offered at a 2010 health fair. A total of 186 adult Latina women completed a brief questionnaire assessing their healthcare utilization and self-reported barriers to engaging in preventive and screening services. Approximately two thirds of the participants reported never receiving or having more than 2 years passing since receiving a preventive health check-up. Participants identified cost (64.5%) and knowledge of locations for services (52.3%) as the primary barriers to engaging in routine healthcare services. Engaging with health professionals represents a leading way in which adults obtain health information; health fairs offering cancer health screenings represent a culturally appropriate venue for increased cancer health equity. Implications of the current research for future health fairs and their role in community cancer education are discussed. PMID:23907787

  1. Three evaluation methods of a community health advocate program.

    PubMed

    Rodney, M; Clasen, C; Goldman, G; Markert, R; Deane, D

    1998-10-01

    The title Community Health Advocate (CHA) is one of thirty or more titles used throughout the world for an indigenous outreach worker who is trusted and respected in his or her community and who serves as a bridge between peers and health professionals. In 1992, the Center for Healthy Communities in Dayton, Ohio developed a program to train as Advocates people indigenous to the communities in which they would be working. Since the first CHAs began work in January 1993, the effectiveness of the program has been evaluated from three perspectives: the Community Health Advocates, the managers/directors of the community sites at which the CHAs work, and the clients with whom the CHAs work. Advocates indicated that the training program adequately prepared them for their roles and functions. They also identified systematic frustrations and barriers that made it more difficult for them to perform their job. Community site directors and community leaders indicated that the CHAs were considered a positive force in meeting client needs and facilitating independence, and were very effective in outreach and coordination of resources. A survey of CHA clients revealed an overwhelmingly positive response to the Advocate's work, validating the belief that CHAs can fill an important niche in the health care community. The three evaluation processes described in this paper helped to document the need for and the effectiveness of this program and can serve as a model for similar programs. PMID:9793834

  2. Website Sharing in Online Health Communities: A Descriptive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Chinmoy; Huh, Jina; Adupa, Abhishek Kalyan

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of people visit online health communities to seek health information. In these communities, people share experiences and information with others, often complemented with links to different websites. Understanding how people share websites can help us understand patients’ needs in online health communities and improve how peer patients share health information online. Objective Our goal was to understand (1) what kinds of websites are shared, (2) information quality of the shared websites, (3) who shares websites, (4) community differences in website-sharing behavior, and (5) the contexts in which patients share websites. We aimed to find practical applications and implications of website-sharing practices in online health communities. Methods We used regular expressions to extract URLs from 10 WebMD online health communities. We then categorized the URLs based on their top-level domains. We counted the number of trust codes (eg, accredited agencies’ formal evaluation and PubMed authors’ institutions) for each website to assess information quality. We used descriptive statistics to determine website-sharing activities. To understand the context of the URL being discussed, we conducted a simple random selection of 5 threads that contained at least one post with URLs from each community. Gathering all other posts in these threads resulted in 387 posts for open coding analysis with the goal of understanding motivations and situations in which website sharing occurred. Results We extracted a total of 25,448 websites. The majority of the shared websites were .com (59.16%, 15,056/25,448) and WebMD internal (23.2%, 5905/25,448) websites; the least shared websites were social media websites (0.15%, 39/25,448). High-posting community members and moderators posted more websites with trust codes than low-posting community members did. The heart disease community had the highest percentage of websites containing trust codes compared to

  3. Predictors for Assessing Electronic Messaging Between Nurses and General Practitioners as a Useful Tool for Communication in Home Health Care Services: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofoss, Dag; Grimsmo, Anders; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    (ease of use and system functionality), organizational (training), and individual (full-time equivalent percentage) elements had an impact on home health care nurses’ assessments of using e-messaging to communicate with GPs. By identifying these elements, it is easier to determine which interventions are the most important for the development and implementation of ICT systems in home health care services. PMID:25691234

  4. The academic health center and the healthy community.

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, J; Vana, J E

    1994-01-01

    US medical care reflects the priorities and influence of academic health centers. This paper describes the leadership role assumed by one academic health center, the State University at Buffalo's School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and its eight affiliated hospitals, to serve its region by promoting shared governance in educating graduate physicians and in influencing the cost and quality of patient care. Cooperation among hospitals, health insurance payers, the business community, state government, and physicians helped establish priorities to meet community needs and reduce duplication of resources and services; to train more primary care physicians; to introduce shared governance into rural health care delivery; to develop a regional management information system; and to implement health policy. This approach, spearheaded by an academic health center without walls, may serve as a model for other academic health centers as they adapt to health care reform. PMID:8017527

  5. Quality and Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and use of health information technology, the electronic health record (EHR) in particular, has the potential to help improve the quality of care, increase patient safety, and reduce health care costs. Unfortunately, adoption and use of health information technology has been slow, especially when compared to the adoption and use of…

  6. Health Literacy Innovations in California Community College Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenia, Joanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Limited health literacy is a national public health problem contributing to adverse health outcomes and increasing healthcare costs. Both health and educational systems are intervention points for improvement; however, there is paucity in empirical research regarding the role of educational systems. This needs assessment study explored health…

  7. Connecting Allied Health Students to Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guion, W. Kent; Mishoe, Shelley C.; Taft, Arthur A.; Campbell, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Statewide studies indicate a continuing shortfall of personnel in several allied health disciplines in rural Georgia. National trends indicate lagging enrollment in allied health education programs, suggesting that the workforce shortages will worsen. Purpose: This article describes the efforts of the School of Allied Health Sciences at…

  8. Health Issues in the Latino Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre-Molina, Marilyn, Ed.; Molina, Carlos W., Ed.; Zambrana, Ruth Enid, Ed.

    This collection of papers includes 6 parts. Part 1, "Latino Populations in the United States," includes: (1) "Latino Health Policy: Beyond Demographic Determinism" (Angelo Falcon, Marilyn Aguirre-Molina, and Carlos W. Molina); (2) "Latino Health Status" (Olivia Carter-Pokras and Ruth Enid Zambrana); and (3) "Latino Access To Health Care: The Role…

  9. Functionalism and holism: community nurses' perceptions of health.

    PubMed

    Long, A; Baxter, R

    2001-05-01

    This paper reports the results of a study that was designed to explore and examine the perceptions of two groups of newly qualified community nurses about the factors they considered to be embedded within the concepts of health, health-enhancing behaviours at individual, family and community levels and their 'innermost self'. The research was exploratory in nature, and included two sample groups: group 1 comprised 16 newly qualified health visitors; group 2 comprised 16 newly qualified community mental health nurses. Purposive sampling was used and data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The group of health visitors perceived health in terms of physical fitness and functional states. At a global level they perceived the need to provide education on health matters. They gave generously to 'charities' and perceived the 'inner self' as 'that part that matters'. The group of community mental health nurses perceived health in terms of holism and being states. Their concept of health was related to listening to each individual's perception of what is 'right' and 'health-enhancing' for them. At a global level they considered the protection of the ozone layer and the promotion of a just and equitable society which focused on the reduction of poverty, to be key health-enhancing activities. They perceived their 'innermost self' to be 'that part of me that makes life worth living', and the soul. The findings have implications for developing new and creative approaches for teaching the holistic concept of health and healing. Educational activities could be designed which strive to ensure that nurses themselves have safe and health embracing opportunities for exploring all the elements that are embedded within the topic of health. Their role in facilitating holistic health promoting activities for all clients also needs to be addressed. PMID:11820541

  10. Does sustained participation in an online health community affect sentiment?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaodian; Bantum, Erin; Owen, Jason; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    A large number of patients rely on online health communities to exchange information and psychosocial support with their peers. Examining participation in a community and its impact on members' behaviors and attitudes is one of the key open research questions in the field of study of online health communities. In this paper, we focus on a large public breast cancer community and conduct sentiment analysis on all its posts. We investigate the impact of different factors on post sentiment, such as time since joining the community, posting activity, age of members, and cancer stage of members. We find that there is a significant increase in sentiment of posts through time, with different patterns of sentiment trends for initial posts in threads and reply posts. Factors each play a role; for instance stage-IV members form a particular sub-community with patterns of sentiment and usage distinct from others members. PMID:25954470

  11. Community-wide Implementation of Health Information Technology: The Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative Experience

    PubMed Central

    Goroll, Allan H.; Simon, Steven R.; Tripathi, Micky; Ascenzo, Carl; Bates, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative (MAeHC) was formed to improve patient safety and quality of care by promoting the use of health information technology through community-based implementation of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information exchange. The Collaborative has recently implemented EHRs in a diverse set of competitively selected communities, encompassing nearly 500 physicians serving over 500,000 patients. Targeting both EHR implementation and health information exchange at the community level has identified numerous challenges and strategies for overcoming them. This article describes the formation and implementation phases of the Collaborative, focusing on barriers identified, lessons learned, and policy issues. PMID:18952937

  12. Upgrading Health Technology Curriculum: A Community Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramson, Sharon; Merlino, Ann

    1976-01-01

    Describes the phased development of a program in Blood Transfusion Technology at Staten Island Community College of the City University of New York. Presents a detailed outline of the instructional content of the course. (SL)

  13. Primary health care in support of community development.

    PubMed

    Ferrinho, P; Robb, D; Cornielje, H; Rex, G

    1993-01-01

    A community development approach has been adopted in the outreach component of the work of the Alexandra Health Centre in South Africa. The importance of local township organizations has been recognized and the Centre is seen not only as providing technical solutions but also as helping people to achieve improved living conditions. This requires clear motivation, rigorous management, purposeful action by teams of health staff, and planning in conjunction with the community. PMID:8185757

  14. Community Size as a Factor in Health Partnerships in Community Parks and Recreation, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Jo An M.; Mowen, Andrew J.; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although partnerships between park and recreation agencies and health agencies are prevalent, little research has examined partnership characteristics and effectiveness among communities of different sizes. The objective of this study was to determine whether park and recreation leaders’ perceptions of partnership characteristics, effectiveness, and outcomes vary by community size. Methods A web-based survey was completed in 2007 by 1,217 National Recreation and Park Association members. Community size was divided into 4 categories: very small, small, medium, and large. Questions measured agencies’ recognition of the need for partnerships, their level of experience, and the effectiveness and outcomes of partnerships. Results Larger communities were significantly more likely to recognize the need for and have more experience with partnerships than smaller communities. Very small and large communities partnered significantly more often with senior services, nonprofit health promotion agencies, and public health agencies than did small and medium ones. Large and small communities were significantly more likely than very small and medium communities to agree that their decision making in partnerships is inclusive and that they have clearly defined goals and objectives. Large communities were significantly more likely than very small communities to report that their partnership helped leverage resources, make policy changes, meet their mission statement, and link to funding opportunities. Conclusion Community size shapes partnership practices, effectiveness, and outcomes. Very small communities are disadvantaged in developing and managing health partnerships. Increasing education, training, and funding opportunities for small and rural park and recreation agencies may enable them to more effectively partner with organizations to address community health concerns. PMID:23886043

  15. The Wellness Mobile: Bringing Preventative Health Services to Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilson, Ralph; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Wellness Mobile transports medical supplies, equipment, informational materials, and staff to rural Saskatchewan communities to assist them in developing wellness programs that stress disease prevention. Staff from the Wellness Mobile offer health-risk screening and appraisal to community members and work with local practitioners and schools…

  16. COMMUNITY PLANNING FOR HEALTH EDUCATION AND WELFARE, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TAYLOR, KANARDY L.

    THE ANNOATATED BIBLIOGRAPHY IS PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR STATE AND LOCAL PUBLIC WELFARE AGENCIES RESPONSIBLE FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING. IT MAY ALSO BE OF ASSISTANCE TO OTHERS INTERESTED IN HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE. THE SELECTED REFERENCES ON BASIC CONCEPTS AND APPROACHES IN COMMUNITY PLANNING AND RELATED SUBJECTS ARE GENERALLY AVAILABLE IN PUBLIC…

  17. Community ownership and program continuation following a health demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Bracht, N; Finnegan, J R; Rissel, C; Weisbrod, R; Gleason, J; Corbett, J; Veblen-Mortenson, S

    1994-06-01

    Community ownership and maintenance of heart health programs was a major study goal of the Minnesota Heart Health Program (MHHP), a community-based National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (NIH)-funded demonstration project. A partnership between the University of Minnesota and three Upper Midwest intervention communities was initiated in 1981. Local citizen boards were instrumental in planning, implementing and incorporating programs. Through an 8 year process of community organization, training and volunteer involvement, MHHP educational program responsibility was transferred to existing community-based groups and organizations. In 1989, when federal funding was withdrawn, 70% of all heart health intervention programs initiated by MHHP were being continued by local sponsors and supported by local funds. By 1992, maintenance of programs had decreased to an average 60%. Differential results of program incorporation among the three intervention communities are presented including findings on community sectors that most frequently sponsored programs. Factors that facilitate or impede local ownership are discussed. Research on longer-term maintenance of heart health programs in the three communities continues. PMID:10150448

  18. Community Organization and Mental Health; The Woodlawn Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael D.; Lewis, Judith A.

    A paraprofessional training program designed to provide community controlled mental health services to the Woodlawn community of Chicago, Illinois, is described in this monograph. The neighborhood and The Woodlawn Organization (T.W.O.A), a self help project formed in early 1960, are described from an historical perspective. Some of the areas…

  19. Mental Health Training and the Hospice Community: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Charles A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summarizes a national survey of the hospice community. Results indicated that the hospice community is attempting to meet the mental health training needs of its paid staff members and volunteers. However, more than half expressed a need for further training and a more systematic and comprehensive curriculum. (Author)

  20. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Though there are at least 12.4 million community college students, accounting for 44% of all undergraduates within the United States (Cohen & Brawer, 2008), little academic research has explored the mental health needs of community college students as a distinct population ( Floyd, 2003; Townsend & LaPaglia, 2000; Townsend, Donaldson,…

  1. The Southern Community Cohort Study: Investigating Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Signorello, Lisa B.; Hargreaves, Margaret K.; Blot, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Over 73,700 adults age 40–79, nearly 70% African American, were recruited at community health centers across 12 southeastern states; individual characteristics were recorded and biologic specimens collected at baseline for later follow-up. The Southern Community Cohort Study is a unique national resource for assessing determinants of racial/ethnic differentials in diseases. PMID:20173283

  2. Global Health Watch Canada? Mobilizing the Canadian public health community around a global health advocacy agenda.

    PubMed

    McCoy, David; Labonte, Ronald; Orbinski, James

    2006-01-01

    Growing poverty, collapsing health care systems, the AIDS pandemic and the widening of health and health care inequities within and between countries all point to the limited success of global public health interventions over the past few decades. Notwithstanding the efforts of multilateral agencies such as the World Health Organization and the many existing contributions from the Canadian community of health professionals, this commentary argues and appeals for further action particularly in relation to the social and political impediments to better health and justice. Specifically, it calls for the development of a robust instrument to assess the impact of Canada as a whole on the state of global health, and to monitor the performance of key Canadian institutions. It is suggested that such an instrument would result in a process that enhances global citizenship and public accountability, and buttresses the efforts of civil society to forge trans-national links in pursuit of a fairer and healthier world. Public health professionals, by virtue of their social standing as well as the nature and tools of their discipline, should be at the forefront of such civic efforts. PMID:16620004

  3. Development of critically reflective dialogues in communities of health professionals.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Esther; Endedijk, Maaike; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2013-10-01

    Critically reflective dialogues (CRD) are important for knowledge sharing and creating meaning in communities. CRD includes different aspects: being open about mistakes, critical opinion sharing, asking for and giving feedback, experimentation, challenging groupthink and research utilisation. In this article we explore whether CRD aspects change over time, through a study of two dialogues each from six different communities of veterinary health professionals. Change was studied from the perspective of observations, through analysing transcripts of dialogues, and from the perspective of community members' perceptions, through an evaluative discussion with members. The results showed that some communities became more open about mistakes, a finding that is related to an increase in trust. Other observed aspects of CRD seemed to be fairly stable over time. Community members perceived research utilisation and asking for and giving feedback to have been increased. From an analysis of perceptions of the community members it emerged that limited interaction could be associated with the epistemological conceptions of community members. PMID:22976456

  4. Urban community health workers: selection, training, practice and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ramontja, R M; Wagstaff, L A; Khomo, N E

    1998-09-01

    The role, desirability and success of community health workers is debated. Conflicting reports have highlighted important concerns and provided guidelines. Particular issues identified are the necessity for both community and health professional input to determine needs and to ensure an acceptable selection process, training, support and accountability. Such steps were followed in the Greater Soweto Maternal Child Project. These are described together with the results achieved. Eight trained Soweto community health workers centered at Chiawelo Clinic and providing home based and neighbourhood health care undertake supervised Tuberculosis treatment, tracing of immunisation defaulters, and health education based on GOBI FFF (Grant JP, UNICEF:1985;94) and "Facts for Life" (UNICEF 1989-1993). They form a link between the community and government health care services and also other available resources. Over a period of 26 months, working from their own homes, they provided 14,254 health related services and in addition undertook 14,501 neighbourhood home visits. They were responsible for 8,710 referrals to the clinic or other relevant agencies for assistance. Incremental training has included HIV/AIDS counselling, advice on family planning with regular report back sessions and discussions. Participatory management involves all major role players. The community health workers have the approval and support of the Local Soweto Health Authority, the Civic Association and the communities they serve. On completion of the project, all were redeployed into local health service posts where it is intended that they form the nucleus of an expanding service. Delegation of selected tasks allows for cost effective functioning of more highly trained staff, an improved service and better use of available resources. PMID:11040587

  5. Health Education Community Health Teaching Supports. Grade 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This handbook contains suggested teaching activities, student worksheets, background information, and a list of basic resources for teachers of health education. Topics covered are mortality rate, health promotion, sexually transmitted diseases, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and major dimensions of health. Included in the handbook is…

  6. A Community Health Record: Improving Health Through Multisector Collaboration, Information Sharing, and Technology.

    PubMed

    King, Raymond J; Garrett, Nedra; Kriseman, Jeffrey; Crum, Melvin; Rafalski, Edward M; Sweat, David; Frazier, Renee; Schearer, Sue; Cutts, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    We present a framework for developing a community health record to bring stakeholders, information, and technology together to collectively improve the health of a community. It is both social and technical in nature and presents an iterative and participatory process for achieving multisector collaboration and information sharing. It proposes a methodology and infrastructure for bringing multisector stakeholders and their information together to inform, target, monitor, and evaluate community health initiatives. The community health record is defined as both the proposed framework and a tool or system for integrating and transforming multisector data into actionable information. It is informed by the electronic health record, personal health record, and County Health Ranking systems but differs in its social complexity, communal ownership, and provision of information to multisector partners at scales ranging from address to zip code. PMID:27609300

  7. Climbing the walls: prison mental health and community engagement.

    PubMed

    Caie, Jude

    Until recently, treatment for mental health conditions has focused on medical and psychological therapy. The role and significance of social and community interventions and initiatives in fostering recovery, resilience and a sense of 'flourishing' is now being recognised. This paper seeks to explore how these principles, which are usually community-based, can be successfully applied within a prison setting, and how such interventions may have a positive effect on the mental health of prisoners through successfully engaging them with the communities they are set to return to after release while still in custody. PMID:22875351

  8. Community-Based Participatory Research for Improved Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Smikowski, Jane; Dewane, Sarah; Johnson, Mark E.; Brems, Christiane; Bruss, Catherine; Roberts, Laura W.

    2009-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) focuses on specific community needs, and produces results that directly address those needs. Although conducting ethical CBPR is critical to its success, few academic programs include this training in their curricula. This paper describes the development and evaluation of an online training course designed to increase the use of CBPR in mental health disciplines. Developed using a participatory approach involving a community of experts, this course challenges traditional research by introducing a collaborative process meant to encourage increased participation by special populations, and narrow the parity gap in effective mental health treatment and services delivery. PMID:20186257

  9. Building relationships and changing lives: a community health worker story.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Maria; Matos, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Maria Murphy is a community health worker in the south Bronx, an impoverished underprivileged neighborhood of largely Latino and African American communities along with smaller ethnic minority groups. Having come to New York at 13 years of age from her native Puerto Rico, Maria held numerous jobs while supporting her family and completing her education. Maria soon got a position as a community health worker and discovered purpose in her work. Her work with people she serves has been called a labor of love by her clients. Maria describes it as her passion. This is her story. PMID:21914995

  10. Considerations for Community-Based mHealth Initiatives: Insights From Three Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) is gaining widespread attention for its potential to engage patients in their health and health care in their daily lives. Emerging evidence suggests that mHealth interventions can be used effectively to support behavior change, but numerous challenges remain when implementing these programs at the community level. This paper provides an overview of considerations when implementing community-based mHealth initiatives, based on the experiences of three Beacon Communities across the United States that have launched text messaging (short message service, SMS) pilot programs aimed at diabetes risk reduction and disease management. The paper addresses lessons learned and suggests strategies to overcome challenges related to developing text message content, conducting marketing and outreach, enrolling participants, engaging providers, evaluating program effectiveness, and sustaining and scaling the programs. PMID:24128406

  11. Acceptability and Trust of Community Health Workers Offering Maternal and Newborn Health Education in Rural Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Debra; Cumming, Robert; Negin, Joel

    2015-01-01

    When trusted, Community Health Workers (CHWs) can contribute to improving maternal and newborn health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries through education. Issues of acceptability of CHWs by communities were explored through experiences gained in a qualitative study that is part of a cluster randomized trial in East Uganda. Initially,…

  12. Design of an online health-promoting community: negotiating user community needs with public health goals and service capabilities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An online health-promoting community (OHPC) has the potential to promote health and advance new means of dialogue between public health representatives and the general public. The aim of this study was to examine what aspects of an OHPC that are critical for satisfying the needs of the user community and public health goals and service capabilities. Methods Community-based participatory research methods were used for data collection and analysis, and participatory design principles to develop a case study OHPC for adolescents. Qualitative data from adolescents on health appraisals and perspectives on health information were collected in a Swedish health service region and classified into categories of user health information exchange needs. A composite design rationale for the OHPC was completed by linking the identified user needs, user-derived requirements, and technical and organizational systems solutions. Conflicts between end-user requirements and organizational goals and resources were identified. Results The most prominent health information needs were associated to food, exercise, and well-being. The assessment of the design rationale document and prototype in light of the regional public health goals and service capabilities showed that compromises were needed to resolve conflicts involving the management of organizational resources and responsibilities. The users wanted to discuss health issues with health experts having little time to set aside to the OHPC and it was unclear who should set the norms for the online discussions. Conclusions OHPCs can be designed to satisfy both the needs of user communities and public health goals and service capabilities. Compromises are needed to resolve conflicts between users’ needs to discuss health issues with domain experts and the management of resources and responsibilities in public health organizations. PMID:23826944

  13. [Community health as a determinant of the nursing curriculum].

    PubMed

    Espino de Alayo, S

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experience acquired under the first university-level program for the basic training of nurses in Peru. It describes the gradual refining of the academic curriculum, which was designed not only to train people as competent professionals, but also to acquaint them with the country's basic social problems. Four levels of teaching-learning were defined in wide-ranging discussions in which various academic and professional sectors connected with the health field participated. Establishing a process of steps of increasing complexity has considerably facilitated the integration of community health, the scientific method, and mental health into the structure of the curriculum. The practice of community nursing was heavily emphasized, and it was endeavored to strike a balance between hospital experience and work in communities themselves. The program includes specific studies community groups spanning such aspects as control of the more common disease, epidemiologic surveillance, and accident and disaster prevention. Practical work in community health care earns the same credit as hospital internship. The paper closes with a description of the experience of a specific program conducted in the self-managed city of Villa El Salvador under an agreement between the community and the university. The writer also notes that the intense campaign to publicize the program is having an effect because most nurse-training institutions in Peru are tending to add community nursing to their curricula. PMID:393491

  14. The Development of Educational Materials for Community College Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busky, Henry F.

    Guidelines are presented for the development of educational materials for the Health Services Program at Prince George's Community College. This program, as part of the Human Development Department, serves three kinds of functions: remediation--the correction of health problems after they have arisen; prevention--the prior identification and…

  15. Art in the Community for Potentially Vulnerable Mental Health Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyle, Elaine; Bolton, Gillie

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Drawing on literature and the evaluation of a UK community Arts in Health project, this article aims first to demonstrate that, in spite of the common association in mental health practice between art and the use of psychotherapeutic techniques, involvement in art creation can, in itself, have a sustained and positive impact on the mental…

  16. Health Literacy and Happiness: A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angner, Erik; Miller, Michael J.; Ray, Midge N.; Saag, Kenneth G.; Allison, Jeroan J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between health literacy and happiness was explored using a cross-sectional survey of community-dwelling older primary-care patients. Health literacy status was estimated with the following previously validated question: "How confident are you in filling out medical forms by yourself?" Happiness was measured using an adapted…

  17. An Informatics Approach to Establishing a Sustainable Public Health Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriseman, Jeffrey Michael

    2012-01-01

    This work involved the analysis of a public health system, and the design, development and deployment of enterprise informatics architecture, and sustainable community methods to address problems with the current public health system. Specifically, assessment of the Nationally Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS) was instrumental in…

  18. RACIAL AND ETHNIC APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY HEALTH (REACH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 is the cornerstone of CDC's efforts to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health. Launched in 1999, REACH 2010 is designed to eliminate disparities in the following six priority areas: cardiovascular disease, i...

  19. Exploring Community Health through the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnidge, Ellen K.; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Motton, Freda; Fitzgerald, Teresa; Rose, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Health disparities are a major concern in the United States. Research suggests that inequitable distribution of money, power, and resources shape the circumstances for daily life and create and exacerbate health disparities. In rural communities, inequitable distribution of these structural factors seems to limit employment opportunities. The…

  20. The Impact of Economic Stress on Community Mental Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Brian J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Warns that community mental health services are threatened by reductions in federal support and increased numbers of clients. Reviews literature on the effect of adverse economic events on mental health. Identifies issues and answers for managing this dilemma including planning, financial diversification, and inter-agency cooperation. (Author/JAC)

  1. Community Health Crisis: Solving the Nurse Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitiello, Erie

    2003-01-01

    Describes how Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD), California, the major provider of nursing graduates to the Sacramento area, addressed the issue of the nursing shortage crisis. LRCCD faced the dual issues of student/faculty ratio restrictions of 10/1 and funding that accommodated a 40/1 ratio. Describes LRCCD's new off-campus,…

  2. A survey of community gardens in upstate New York: implications for health promotion and community development.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D

    2000-12-01

    Twenty community garden programs in upstate New York (representing 63 gardens) were surveyed to identify characteristics that may be useful to facilitate neighborhood development and health promotion. The most commonly expressed reasons for participating in gardens were access to fresh foods, to enjoy nature, and health benefits. Gardens in low-income neighborhoods (46%) were four times as likely as non low-income gardens to lead to other issues in the neighborhood being addressed; reportedly due to organizing facilitated through the community gardens. Additional research on community gardening can improve our understanding of the interaction of social and physical environments and community health, and effective strategies for empowerment, development, and health promotion. PMID:11027957

  3. Benefits of community-based education to the community in South African health science facilities

    PubMed Central

    Flack, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Community-based education (CBE) is utilised by health science faculties worldwide to provide a relevant primary care experience for students and a service to underserved communities and, hopefully, to affect student career choices. The benefits to training institutions and students are well documented, but it may well be that communities, too, will be able to benefit from a more balanced partnership, where they are consulted in the planning of such training programmes. Method An exploratory qualitative study was undertaken by three South African universities in the provinces of Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal and the Western Cape. Focus group interviews were conducted in their local languages with groups of community leaders, patients and supervisors at community sites involved in CBE training. A thematic analysis of their views was undertaken with the aid of NVivo (version 9). Ethics approval was obtained from the respective universities and health care training sites. Results Benefits to the community could be categorised into short-term and long-term benefits. Short-term benefits included improved service delivery, reduction in hospital referrals, home visits and community orientated primary health care, improved communication with patients and enhanced professionalism of the health care practitioner. Long-term benefits included improved teaching through a relationship with an academic institution and student familiarity with the health care system. Students also became involved in community upliftment projects, thereby acting as agents of change in these communities. Conclusion Communities can certainly benefit from well-planned CBE programmes involving a training site - community site partnership.

  4. [Community financing for health care in Africa: mutual health insurance].

    PubMed

    Richard, V

    2005-01-01

    Health care in sub-Saharan Africa is increasingly financed by direct payments from the population. Mutual health insurance plans are developing to ensure better risk sharing. However mutual health insurance cannot fully resolve all equity issues. The low resources available for contribution and the limited availability of care services especially in the public sector cannot guarantee the quality of care necessary for the development of mutual health insurance. National governments must not forget their responsibility especially for defining and ensuring basic services that must be accessible to all. Will mutual health insurance plans be a stepping-stone to universal health care coverage and can these plans be successfully implemented in the context of an informal economy? PMID:15903084

  5. Community Engagement and Data Disclosure in Environmental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Erin N.; Elam, Sarah; Burns, Roxanne; Spencer, Alonzo; Yancey, Elissa; Kuhnell, Pierce; Alden, Jody; Walton, Mike; Reynolds, Virgil; Newman, Nicholas; Wright, Robert O.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Praamsma, Meredith L.; Palmer, Christopher D.; Dietrich, Kim N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Federal funding agencies increasingly support stakeholder participation in environmental health studies, and yet there is very little published research on engagement of community members in the development of data disclosure (DD) strategies. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency reported airborne manganese (Mn) concentrations in East Liverpool, Ohio, 30 times higher than the reference concentration, which led to an academic–community research partnership to address community concern about Mn exposure, particularly among children. Children and their families were recruited to participate in a pilot study. Samples of blood and hair were collected from the children and analyzed for metals. DD mechanisms were developed using an iterative approach between community and academic partners. Individual DD letters were mailed to each participating family, and a community meeting was held. A post-meeting survey was administered to gauge community perception of the DD strategies. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the effectiveness of engaging community partners in the conduct of environmental health research and in the development of DD strategies for individuals and the community at large. Scientists should include community partners in the development of DD strategies to enhance translation of the research findings and support the right of study participants to know their individual results. PMID:26829152

  6. Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - WSSU

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, L. and W. Templin-Branner

    2010-11-10

    Environmental health focus with training conducted as part of the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine HBCU ACCESS Project at Winston-Salem State University, NC on November 10, 2010.

  7. Research collaboration in health management research communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study uses scientometrics methodology to reveal the status quo and emerging issues of collaboration in health management. Methods We searched all the articles with the keyword “health management” in the period 1999–2011 in Web of Knowledge, then 3067 articles were found. Methods such as Social network analysis (SNA), co-authorship, co-word analysis were used in this study. Results Analysis of the past 13 years of research in the field of health management indicates that, whether the production of scientific research, or authors, institutions and scientific research collaboration at the national level, collaboration behavior has been growing steadily across all collaboration types. However, the international scientific research cooperation about health management study between countries needs to be further encouraged. 17 researchers can be seen as the academic leaders in this field. 37 research institutions play a vital role in the information dissemination and resources control in health management. The component analysis found that 22 research groups can be regarded as the backbone in this field. The 8 institution groups consisting of 33 institutions form the core of this field. USA, UK and Australia lie in the center by cohesive subgroup analysis; Based on keywords analysis, 44 keywords with high frequency such as care, disease, system and model were involved in the health management field. Conclusions This study demonstrates that although it is growing steadily, collaboration behavior about health management study needs to be enhanced, especially between different institutions or countries/regions, which would promote the progress and internationalization of health management. Besides, researchers should pay attention to the cooperation of representative scholars and institutions, as well as the hot areas of research, because their experience would help us promote the research development of our nation. PMID:23617236

  8. Ethical challenges in home mechanical ventilation: A secondary analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dybwik, Knut; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in home mechanical ventilation based on a secondary analysis of qualitative empirical data. The data included perceptions of healthcare professionals in hospitals and community health services and family members of children and adults using home mechanical ventilation. The findings show that a number of ethical challenges, or dilemmas, arise at all levels in the course of treatment: deciding who should be offered home mechanical ventilation, respect for patient and family wishes, quality of life, dignity and equal access to home mechanical ventilation. Other challenges were the impacts home mechanical ventilation had on the patient, the family, the healthcare services and the allocation of resources. A better and broader understanding of these issues is crucial in order to improve the quality of care for both patient and family and assist healthcare professionals involved in home mechanical ventilation to make decisions for the good of the patient and his or her family. PMID:22183963

  9. The Neighborhood Health Exchange: Developing a Community Partnership in Residency

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M.; Press, Valerie G.; Freed, Benjamin H.; Baker, Timothy; Tang, Joyce W.; Cohen, Julie C.; Laiteerapong, Neda; Alvarez, Kimberly; Schwartz, Mindy; Arora, Vineet M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The current system of residency training focuses on the hospital setting, and resident exposure to the surrounding community is often limited. However, community interaction can play an important role in ambulatory training and in learning systems-based practice, a residency core competency. The goal of the Neighborhood Health Exchange was to develop a community partnership to provide internal medicine residents with an opportunity to interface with community members through a mutually beneficial educational experience. Methods Internal medicine residents received training during their ambulatory block and participated in a voluntary field practicum designed to engage community members in discussions about their health. Community members participated in education sessions led by resident volunteers. Results Resident volunteers completed a survey on their experiences. All residents stated that the opportunity to lead an exchange was very useful to their overall residency training. Eight exchanges were held with a total of 61 community participants, who completed a 3-question survey following the session. This survey asked about the level of material, the helpfulness of the exchanges, and opportunities for improvement. We received 46 completed surveys from community members: 91% stated that the material was presented “at the right level” and 93% stated that the presentations were somewhat or very helpful. Eighty percent gave positive and encouraging comments about the exchange. Conclusion Effective community partnerships involve assessing needs of the stakeholders, anticipating leadership turnover, and adapting the Neighborhood Health Exchange model to different groups. Community outreach can also enhance internal medicine ambulatory training experience, provide residents with patient counseling opportunities, and offer a novel method to enhance resident understanding of systems-based practice, especially within the larger community in which their

  10. A Health Education Program for Underserved Community Youth Led by Health Professions Students

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Ann Ryan; Christensen, Carla; Lust, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To develop and implement a health fair and educational sessions for elementary school children led by health professions students. Design The structure and process were developed with elementary school administration to determine the health topics to be covered. Students and faculty members created a “hands-on,” youth-oriented health fair and interactive health educational sessions. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected on learning outcomes from the underserved child population and health professions students. Assessment The health fair and educational sessions increased awareness of underserved youth in the areas of critical health behaviors, purposeful education on health issues facing their community, and exposure to careers in various health professions. The activities provided meaningful learning experiences for the health professions students. Conclusion The health education program model is an excellent way to teach health education, communication and critical thinking skills, and service learning to health professions students. PMID:19885067