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Sample records for in-medium gauge boson

  1. Gauge invariants and bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijowski, J.; Rudolph, G.; Rudolph, M.

    1998-12-01

    We present some results, which are part of our program of analyzing gauge theories with fermions in terms of local gauge invariant fields. In a first part the classical Dirac-Maxwell system is discussed. Next we develop a procedure which leads to a reduction of the functional integral to an integral over (bosonic) gauge invariant fields. We apply this procedure to the case of QED and the Schwinger model. In a third part we go some steps towards an analysis of the considered models. We construct effective (quantum) field theories which can be used to calculate vacuum expectation values of physical quantities.

  2. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U. |

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is {approximately} 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than {Omicron}(10{sup {minus}2}). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed.

  3. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  4. Quartic gauge boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian

    1998-08-01

    We review the recent progress in studying the anomalous electroweak quartic gauge boson couplings (QGBCs) at the LHC and the next generation high energy e±e- linear colliders (LCs). The main focus is put onto the strong electroweak symmetry breaking scenario in which the non-decoupling guarantees sizable new physics effects for the QGBCs. After commenting upon the current low energy indirect bounds and summarizing the theoretical patterns of QGBCs predicted by the typical resonance/non-resonance models, we review our systematic model-independent analysis on bounding them via WW-fusion and WWZ/ZZZ-production. The interplay of the two production mechanisms and the important role of the beam-polarization at the LCs are emphasized. The same physics may be similarly and better studied at a multi-TeV muon collider with high luminosity.

  5. Probing anomalous gauge boson couplings at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.; Valencia, G.

    1994-12-31

    We bound anomalous gauge boson couplings using LEP data for the Z {yields} {bar {integral}}{integral} partial widths. We use an effective field theory formalism to compute the one-loop corrections resulting from non-standard model three and four gauge boson vertices. We find that measurements at LEP constrain the three gauge boson couplings at a level comparable to that obtainable at LEPII.

  6. Exotic Gauge Bosons in the 331 Model

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.; Ravinez, O.; Diaz, H.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    We analize the bosonic sector of the 331 model which contains exotic leptons, quarks and bosons (E,J,U,V) in order to satisfy the weak gauge SU(3){sub L} invariance. We develop the Feynman rules of the entire kinetic bosonic sector which will let us to compute some of the Z(0)' decays modes.

  7. Gauge Bosons--The Ties That Bind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Christopher T.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses four basic forces/interactions in nature (strong force, weak force, electromagnetic force and gravity), associated with elementary particles. Focuses on "gauge bosons" (for example, photons), thought to account for strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces. (Author/JN)

  8. Gauge bosons at zero and finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Axel

    2013-03-01

    Gauge theories of the Yang-Mills type are the single most important building block of the standard model of particle physics and beyond. They are an integral part of the strong and weak interactions, and in their Abelian version of electromagnetism. Since Yang-Mills theories are gauge theories their elementary particles, the gauge bosons, cannot be described without fixing a gauge. Therefore, to obtain their properties a quantized and gauge-fixed setting is necessary. Beyond perturbation theory, gauge-fixing in non-Abelian gauge theories is obstructed by the Gribov-Singer ambiguity, which requires the introduction of non-local constraints. The construction and implementation of a method-independent gauge-fixing prescription to resolve this ambiguity is the single most important first step to describe gauge bosons beyond perturbation theory. Proposals for such a procedure, generalizing the perturbative Landau gauge, are described here. Their implementation are discussed for two example methods, lattice gauge theory and the quantum equations of motion. After gauge-fixing, it is possible to study gauge bosons in detail. The most direct access is provided by their correlation functions. The corresponding two- and three-point correlation functions are presented at all energy scales. These give access to the properties of the gauge bosons, like their absence from the asymptotic physical state space, particle-like properties at high energies, and the running coupling. Furthermore, auxiliary degrees of freedom are introduced during gauge-fixing, and their properties are discussed as well. These results are presented for two, three, and four dimensions, and for various gauge algebras. Finally, the modifications of the properties of gauge bosons at finite temperature are presented. Evidence is provided that these reflect the phase structure of Yang-Mills theory. However, it is found that the phase transition is not deconfining the gauge bosons, although the bulk

  9. Search for new heavy charged gauge bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Magass, Carsten Martin

    2007-11-02

    Additional gauge bosons are introduced in many theoretical extensions to the Standard Model. A search for a new heavy charged gauge boson W' decaying into an electron and a neutrino is presented. The data used in this analysis was taken with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb-1. Since no significant excess is observed in the data, an upper limit is set on the production cross section times branching fraction σW'xBr (W' → ev). Using this limit, a W' boson with mass below ~1 TeV can be excluded at the 95% confidence level assuming that the new boson has the same couplings to fermions as the Standard Model W boson.

  10. Measurements of trilinear gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.

    1997-10-01

    Direct measurements of the trilinear gauge boson couplings by the D0 collaboration at Fermilab are reported. Limits on the anomalous couplings were obtained at a 95% CL from four diboson production processes: W{gamma} production with the W boson decaying to e{nu} or {mu}{nu}, WW production with both of the W bosons decaying to e{nu} or {mu}{nu}, WW/WZ production with one W boson decaying to e{nu} and the other W or Z boson decaying to two jets, and Z{gamma} production with the Z boson decaying to ee, {mu}{mu}, or {nu}{nu}. Limits were also obtained from a combined fit to W{gamma}, WW {yields} dileptons and WW/WZ {yields} e{nu}jj data samples.

  11. Approximate gauge symmetry of composite vector bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-08-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector bosons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in a more intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  12. Probing trilinear gauge boson interactions via single electroweak gauge boson production at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.

    2004-10-01

    We analyze the potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to study anomalous trilinear vector-boson interactions W{sup +}W{sup -}{gamma} and W{sup +}W{sup -}Z through the single production of electroweak gauge bosons via the weak boson fusion processes qq{yields}qqW({yields}l{sup {+-}}{nu}) and qq{yields}qqZ({yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}) with l=e or {mu}. After a careful study of the standard model backgrounds, we show that the single production of electroweak bosons at the LHC can provide stringent tests on deviations of these vertices from the standard model prediction. In particular, we show that single gauge-boson production exhibits a sensitivity to the couplings {delta}{kappa}{sub Z,{gamma}} similar to that attainable from the analysis of electroweak boson pair production.

  13. Composite gauge-bosons made of fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2016-07-01

    We construct a class of Abelian and non-Abelian local gauge theories that consist only of matter fields of fermions. The Lagrangian is local and does not contain an auxiliary vector field nor a subsidiary condition on the matter fields. It does not involve an extra dimension nor supersymmetry. This Lagrangian can be extended to non-Abelian gauge symmetry only in the case of SU(2) doublet matter fields. We carry out an explicit diagrammatic computation in the leading 1 /N order to show that massless spin-one bound states appear with the correct gauge coupling. Our diagram calculation exposes the dynamical features that cannot be seen in the formal auxiliary vector-field method. For instance, it shows that the s -wave fermion-antifermion interaction in the 3S1 channel (ψ ¯ γμψ ) alone cannot form the bound gauge bosons; the fermion-antifermion pairs must couple to the d -wave state too. One feature common to our class of Lagrangian is that the Noether current does not exist. Therefore it evades possible conflict with the no-go theorem of Weinberg and Witten on the formation of the non-Abelian gauge bosons.

  14. Massless gauge bosons other than the photon

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Gauge bosons associated with unbroken gauge symmetries, under which all standard model fields are singlets, may interact with ordinary matter via higher-dimensional operators. A complete set of dimension-six operators involving a massless U(1) field, {gamma}', and standard model fields is presented. The {mu} {yields} e{gamma}' decay, primordial nucleosynthesis, star cooling and other phenomena set lower limits on the scale of chirality-flip operators in the 1-15 TeV range, if the operators have coefficients given by the corresponding Yukawa couplings. Simple renormalizable models induce {gamma}' interactions with leptons or quarks at two loops, and may provide a cold dark matter candidate.

  15. Approximate gauge symemtry of composite vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-06-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector mesons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in more an intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  16. Implications of a heavy gauge boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junhai

    We study the implications of neutral heavy gauge bosons to electroweak (EW) baryogenesis, neutrino physics and the discovery limits at the Tevatron and LHC. For baryogenesis, we construct two anomaly free supersymmetric U(1)' models with secluded U(1) '-breaking sectors. In the framework of the one with E6 embedding, we study the one-loop effective potential at finite temperature, and show that there exist strong enough first order EW phase transition (EWPT) because of the large trilinear terms in the tree-level Higgs potentials. Unlike the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the stop masses can be very heavy. We discuss possible large tree-level CP violation associated with the Higgs sector. Numerical calculations show that the contribution purely from the thin wall regime is big enough to explain the observed baryon number asymmetry for some of the parameter space. Our model is free of domain wall problems and does not introduce new contributions to electric dipole moments (EDM). Secondly, we consider various possibilities for generating neutrino masses in supersymmetric models with an additional U(1)' gauge symmetry. One class of models involves two extra U (1)' x U(1)″ gauge symmetries, with U(1)″ breaking at an intermediate scale and yielding small Dirac masses through higher-dimensional operators. The right-handed neutrinos Nci can naturally decouple from the low energy U(1) ', avoiding cosmological constraints. We secondly consider models with a pair of heavy triplets which couple to left-handed neutrinos. After integrating out the heavy triplets, a small neutrino Majorana mass matrix can be generated by the induced non-renormalizable terms. We also study models involving the double-see-saw mechanism, in which heavy Majorana masses are associated with the TeV-scale of U(1)' breaking. We finally study how the exotic particles and supersymmetric partners would affect the discovery limit at the Tevatron and LHC for neutral gauge bosons in generic

  17. Trilinear gauge boson couplings in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyres, E. N.; Lahanas, A. B.; Papadopoulos, C. G.; Spanos, V. C.

    1996-02-01

    We study the C and P even WWγ and WWZ trilinear gauge boson vertices (TGV's), in the context of the MSSM assuming that the external W's are on their mass shell. We find that for energies s  q 2 ⩽ 200 GeV squark and slepton contributions to the aforementioned couplings are two orders of magnitude smaller than those of the Standard Model (SM). In the same energy range the bulk of the supersymmetric Higgs corrections to the TGV's is due to the lightest neutral Higgs, h0, whose contribution is like that of a Standard Model Higgs of the same mass. The contributions of the neutralinos and charginos are sensitive to the input value for the soft gaugino mass M {1}/{2}, being more pronounced for values M {1}/{2} < 100 GeV. In this case and in the unphysical region, 0 < s < 2M W, their contributions are substantially enhanced resulting in large corrections to the static quantities of the W boson. However, such an enhancement is not observed in the physical region. In general for 2M W < s < 200 GeV the MSSM predictions differ from those of the SM but they are of the same order of magnitude. To be detectable deviations from the SM require sensitivities reaching the per mille level and hence unlikely to be observed at LEP200. For higher energies SM and MSSM predictions exhibit a fast fall-off behaviour, in accord with unitarity requirements, getting smaller, in most cases, by almost an order of magnitude already at energies s ≈ 0.5 TeV.

  18. Searches for new gauge bosons at future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    The search reaches for new gauge bosons at future hadron and lepton colliders are summarized for a variety of extended gauge models. Experiments at these energies will vastly improve over present limits and will easily discover a Z` and/or W` in the multi-TeV range.

  19. Trilinear gauge boson couplings in the gauge—Higgs unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yuki; Maru, Nobuhito

    2016-07-01

    We examine trilinear gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the context of the SU(3)_W⊗ U(1)' gauge-Higgs unification scenario. The TGCs play important roles in probes of the physics beyond the standard model, since they are highly restricted by the experiments. We discuss the mass spectrum of the neutral gauge boson with brane-localized mass terms carefully and find that the TGCs and ρ parameter may deviate from standard model predictions. Finally, we put a constraint on these observables and discuss the possible parameter space.

  20. Polarisation of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, James; Vryonidou, Eleni

    2013-05-01

    We present results for the polarisation of gauge bosons produced at the LHC. Polarisation effects for W bosons manifest themselves in the angular distributions of the lepton and in the distributions of lepton transverse momentum and missing transverse energy. The polarisation is discussed for a range of different processes producing W bosons such as W+jets and W from top production. The relative contributions of the different polarisation states vary from process to process, reflecting the dynamics of the underlying hardscattering process. We also calculate the polarisation of the Z boson produced in association with QCD jets at the LHC.

  1. Heavy fermion nondecoupling effects in triple gauge boson vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedes, Athanasios; Suxho, Kristaq

    2012-05-01

    Within a spontaneously broken gauge group we carefully analyze and calculate triple gauge boson vertices dominated by triangle one-loop Feynman diagrams involving heavy fermions compared to external momenta and gauge boson masses. We perform our calculation strictly in four dimensions and derive a general formula for the off-shell, one-particle irreducible (1PI) effective vertex which satisfies the relevant Ward Identities and the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem. Our goal is to search for nondecoupling heavy fermion effects highlighting their synergy with gauge chiral anomalies. Particularly in the standard model, we find that when the arbitrary anomaly parameters are fixed by gauge invariance and/or Bose symmetry, the heavy fermion contribution cancels its anomaly contribution leaving behind anomaly and mass independent contributions from the light fermions. We apply these results in calculating the corresponding CP-invariant one-loop induced corrections to triple gauge boson vertices in the SM, minimal Z' models as well as their extensions with a fourth fermion generation, and compare with experimental data.

  2. Two gauge boson physics at future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, R.N.

    1988-05-13

    Electroweak unification suggests that there should be WW and ZZ physics analogous to {gamma}{gamma} physics. Indeed, WW and ZZ collisions will provide an opportunity to search for the Higgs boson at future high energy colliders. Cross sections in the picobarn range are predicted for Higgs boson production at the proposed 40-TeV SSC. While other states may be produced by WW and ZZ collisions, it is the Higgs boson that looms as the most attractive objective. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Determining triple gauge boson couplings from Higgs data.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Tyler; Éboli, O J P; Gonzalez-Fraile, J; Gonzalez-Garcia, M C

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of effective Lagrangians with the SU(2)(L)×U(1)(Y) symmetry linearly realized, modifications of the couplings of the Higgs field to the electroweak gauge bosons are related to anomalous triple gauge couplings (TGCs). Here, we show that the analysis of the latest Higgs boson production data at the LHC and Tevatron give rise to strong bounds on TGCs that are complementary to those from direct TGC analysis. We present the constraints on TGCs obtained by combining all available data on direct TGC studies and on Higgs production analysis. PMID:23862992

  4. LHC signals for warped electroweak charged gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Han, Tao; Huang, Gui-Yu; Soni, Amarjit

    2009-10-01

    We study signals at the LHC for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of electroweak charged gauge bosons in the framework of the standard model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk of a warped extra dimension. Such a scenario can solve both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchy problems of the SM. There are two such charged states in this scenario with couplings to light quarks and leptons being suppressed relative to those in the SM, whereas the couplings to top/bottom quarks are enhanced, similar to the case of electroweak neutral gauge bosons previously studied. However, unlike the case of electroweak neutral gauge bosons, there is no irreducible QCD background (including pollution from possibly degenerate KK gluons) for decays to top+bottom final states so that this channel is useful for the discovery of the charged states. Moreover, decays of electroweak charged gauge bosons to longitudinal W, Z and Higgs are enhanced just as for the neutral bosons. However, unlike for the neutral gauge bosons, the purely leptonic (and hence clean) decay mode of the WZ is fully reconstructible so that the ratio of the signal to the SM (electroweak) background can potentially be enhanced by restricting to the resonance region more efficiently. We show that such final states can give sensitivity to 2(3) TeV masses with an integrated luminosity of 100(300)fb-1. We emphasize that improvements in discriminating a QCD jet from a highly boosted hadronically decaying W, and a highly boosted top jet from a bottom jet will enhance the reach for these KK particles, and that the signals we study for the warped extra dimensional model might actually be applicable also to a wider class of nonsupersymmetric models of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  5. Charged current unitarity and extra neutral gauge bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.; Sirling, A.

    1987-03-01

    The experimental status of the Kobayashi-Maskawa-Cabibbo (KMC) matrix is surveyed and shown to provide a precision test of the standard model at the level of its O(..cap alpha..) radiative corrections. Implications for new physics and constraints of extra neutral gauge bosons are described. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Topological phases of lattice bosons with a dynamical gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raventós, David; Graß, Tobias; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Santos, Luis; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Optical lattices with a complex-valued tunneling term have become a standard way of studying gauge-field physics with cold atoms. If the complex phase of the tunneling is made density dependent, such a system features even a self-interacting or dynamical magnetic field. In this paper we study the scenario of a few bosons in either a static or a dynamical gauge field by means of exact diagonalization. The topological structures are identified computing their Chern number. Upon decreasing the atom-atom contact interaction, the effect of the dynamical gauge field is enhanced, giving rise to a phase transition between two topologically nontrivial phases.

  7. Production of Gauge Bosons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, C.E.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1997-06-01

    The CDF and D0 collaborations have used recent data taken at the Tevatron to perform QCD tests with W and Z bosons decaying leptonically. D0 measures the production cross section times branching ratio for W and Z bosons and determines the branching ratio B(W {yields} l{nu}) = (10.43 {+-} 0.44)% (l = e, {mu}). This also gives an indirect measurement of the total width of the W boson: {Gamma}{sub W} = 2.16 {+-} 0.09 GeV. The W cross section times branching ratio into tau leptons is measured to be {sigma}({anti p}p {yields} W + X)B(W {yields} {tau}{nu}) = 2.38{+-}0.13 nb, from which the ratio of the coupling constants is determined: g{sub {tau}}{sup W}/g{sub e}{sup W} = 1.004 {+-} 0.019 {+-} 0.026. D0`s measurement of the differential d{sigma}/dP{sub T} distribution for the Z boson decaying to electrons, discriminates between different phenomenologic vector boson production models. CDF measures the cross section for the Drell-Yan continuum, and extracts improved limits on compositeness scales for quarks and leptons of {Lambda}{sub ql} {approximately} 3 - 6 TeV, depending on the model. Studies of W + Jet production at CDF and D0 find that the QCD prediction underestimates the production rate of W + 1 Jet events by about a factor of 2 as measured by both collaborations.

  8. Trilinear neutral gauge boson couplings in effective theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios, F.; Pérez, M. A.; Tavares-Velasco, G.; Toscano, J. J.

    2001-06-01

    We list all the lowest dimension effective operators inducing off-shell trilinear neutral gauge boson couplings ZZγ, Zγγ, and ZZZ within the effective Lagrangian approach, both in the linear and nonlinear realizations of SU(2)L × U(1)Y gauge symmetry. In the linear scenario we find that these couplings can be generated only by dimension-8 operators necessarily including the Higgs boson field, whereas in the nonlinear case they are induced by dimension-6 operators. We consider the impact of these couplings on some precision measurements such as the magnetic and electric dipole moments of fermions, as well as the Z boson rare decay Z-->νν¯γ. If the underlying new physics is of a decoupling nature, it is not expected that trilinear neutral gauge boson couplings may affect considerably any of these observables. On the contrary, it is just in the nonlinear scenario where these couplings have the more promising prospects of being perceptible through high precision experiments.

  9. PDF uncertainties at large x and gauge boson production

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. In particular, I will argue that large rapidity gauge boson production at the Tevatron and the LHC has the highest short-term potential to constrain the theoretical nuclear corrections to DIS data on deuteron targets necessary for up/down flavor separation. This in turn can considerably reduce the PDF uncertainty on cross section calculations of heavy mass particles such as W' and Z' bosons.

  10. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hye-Sung

    2014-11-01

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  11. Constraints on the U(1)L gauge boson in a wide mass range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yu Seon; Kim, C. S.; Lee, Hye-Sung

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing interest for the search of new light gauge bosons. The small mass of a new boson can turn various kinds of low-energy experiments to a new discovery machine, depending on their couplings to the Standard Model particles. It is important to understand the properties of each type of gauge boson and their current constraints for a given mass. While the dark photon (which couples to the electric charges) and the U(1)B‑L gauge boson have been well studied in an extensive mass range, the U(1)L gauge boson has not been fully investigated yet. We consider the gauge boson of the U(1)L in a wide mass range mZ‧≈ 0-1012eV and investigate the constraints on its coupling from various experiments, discussing the similarities and differences from the dark photon and the U(1)B‑L gauge boson.

  12. CERN LHC signals for warped electroweak neutral gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Han, Tao; Huang, Gui-Yu; Perez, Gilad; Si, Zong-Guo; Soni, Amarjit

    2007-12-01

    We study signals at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of the electroweak gauge bosons in the framework with the standard model (SM) gauge and fermion fields propagating in a warped extra dimension. Such a framework addresses both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchy problems of the SM. Unlike the often studied Z' cases, in this framework, there are three neutral gauge bosons due to the underlying SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)X gauge group in the bulk. Furthermore, couplings of these KK states to light quarks and leptons are suppressed, whereas those to top and bottom quarks are enhanced compared to the SM gauge couplings. Therefore, the production of light quark and lepton states is suppressed relative to other beyond the SM constructions, and the fermionic decays of these states are dominated by the top and bottom quarks, which are, though, overwhelmed by KK gluons dominantly decaying into them. However, as we emphasize in this paper, decays of these states to longitudinal W, Z and Higgs are also enhanced similarly to the case of top and bottom quarks. We show that the W, Z and Higgs final states can give significant sensitivity at the LHC to ˜2(3)TeV KK scale with an integrated luminosity of ˜100fb-1 (˜1ab-1). Since current theoretical framework(s) favor KK masses ≳3TeV, a luminosity upgrade of LHC is likely to be crucial in observing these states.

  13. LHC signals for coset electroweak gauge bosons in warped/composite pseudo-Goldstone boson Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Azatov, Aleksandr; Han, Tao; Li, Yingchuan; Si, Zong-Guo; Zhu, Lijun

    2010-05-01

    The framework of a warped extra dimension with the standard model (SM) fields propagating in it is a very well-motivated extension of the SM since it can address both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchy problems of the SM. Within this framework, solution to the little hierarchy problem motivates extending the SM electroweak (EW) 5D gauge symmetry in such a way that its breakdown to the SM delivers the SM Higgs boson. We study signals at the large hadron collider (LHC) for the extra EW (called coset) gauge bosons, a fundamental ingredient of this framework. The coset gauge bosons, due to their unique EW gauge quantum numbers [doublets of SU(2)L], do not couple at leading order to two SM particles. We find that, using the associated production of the charged coset gauge bosons via their coupling to bottom quark and a (light) Kaluza-Klein excitation of the top quark, the LHC can have a 3σ reach of ˜2(2.6)TeV for the coset gauge boson masses with ˜100(1000)fb-1 luminosity. Since current theoretical framework(s) suggest an indirect lower limit on coset gauge boson masses of ≳3TeV, luminosity or energy upgrade of LHC is likely to be crucial in observing these states.

  14. A search for a new gauge boson A'

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Eric L.

    2013-08-01

    In the Standard Model, gauge bosons mediate the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces. New forces could have escaped detection only if their mediators are either heavier than order(TeV) or weakly coupled to charged matter. New vector bosons with small coupling {alpha}' arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing with the photon and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. Such particles can be produced in electron-nucleus fixed-target scattering and then decay to e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs. New light vector bosons and their associated forces are a common feature of Standard Model extensions, but existing constraints are remarkably sparse. The APEX experiment will search for a new vector boson A' with coupling {alpha}'/{alpha}{sub fs} > 6 × 10{sup -8} to electrons in the mass range 65MeV < mass A' < 550MeV. The experiment will study e{sup +}e{sup -} production off an electron beam incident on a high-Z target in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The e{sup -} and e{sup +} will be detected in the High Resolution Spectrometers (HRSs). The invariant mass spectrum of the e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs will be scanned for a narrow resonance corresponding to the mass of the A'. A test run for the APEX experiment was held in the summer of 2010. Using the test run data, an A' search was performed in the mass range 175-250 MeV. The search found no evidence for an A' --> e{sup +}e{sup -} reaction, and set an upper limit of {alpha}'/{alpha}{sub fs} ~ 10{sup -6}.

  15. Identification of Family Non-universal Gauge Bosons in High-energy Electron-positron Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bagneid, Ali A.; Althubiti, Numa A.

    2011-10-27

    We examine effects on measurable observables in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions resulting from the existence of additional neutral gauge bosons originating in extensions of the standard model. In particular, we consider family non-universal neutral gauge bosons occurring in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and in the Sp(6){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} model, as well as other theoretically motivated popular neutral gauge bosons. We show how the proper employment of the generation-dependent couplings of the extra gauge boson, and the appropriate adjustment of the beam polarization, not only improved the identification of the models but also enhanced the discovery potential of the family non-universal extra gauge bosons.

  16. Identification of Family Non-universal Gauge Bosons in High-energy Electron-positron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagneid, Ali A.; Althubiti, Numa A.

    2011-10-01

    We examine effects on measurable observables in e+e- collisions resulting from the existence of additional neutral gauge bosons originating in extensions of the standard model. In particular, we consider family non-universal neutral gauge bosons occurring in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and in the Sp(6)L ⊗ U(1)Y model, as well as other theoretically motivated popular neutral gauge bosons. We show how the proper employment of the generation-dependent couplings of the extra gauge boson, and the appropriate adjustment of the beam polarization, not only improved the identification of the models but also enhanced the discovery potential of the family non-universal extra gauge bosons.

  17. Triple neutral gauge boson couplings in noncommutative Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang

    2002-05-01

    It has been shown recently that the triple neutral gauge boson couplings are not uniquely determined in noncommutative extension of the Standard Model (NCSM). Depending on specific schemes used, the couplings are different and may even be zero. To distinguish different realizations of the NCSM, additional information either from theoretical or experimental considerations is needed. In this Letter we show that these couplings can be uniquely determined from considerations of unification of electroweak and strong interactions. Using SU(5) as the underlying theory and integrating out the heavy degrees of freedom, we obtain unique non-zero new triple γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, ZZZ, γGG, ZGG and GGG couplings at the leading order in the NCSM. We also briefly discuss experimental implications.

  18. Searching for Lee-Wick Gauge Bosons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2007-04-30

    In an extension of the Standard Model(SM) based on the ideas of Lee and Wick, Grinstein, O'Connell and Wise have found an interesting way to remove the usual quadratically divergent contributions to the Higgs mass induced by radiative corrections. Phenomenologically, the model predicts the existence of Terascale, negative-norm copies of the usual SM fields with rather unique properties: ghost-like propagators and negative decay widths, but with otherwise SM-like couplings. The model is both unitary and causal on macroscopic scales. In this paper we examine whether or not such states with these unusual properties can be uniquely identified as such at the LHC. We find that in the extended strong and electroweak gauge boson sector of the model, which is the simplest one to analyze, such an identification can be rather difficult. Observation of heavy gluon-like resonances in the dijet channel offers the best hope for this identification.

  19. Higgs-gauge boson interactions in the economical 3-3-1 model

    SciTech Connect

    Phung Van Dong; Hoang Ngoc Long; Dang Van Soa

    2006-04-01

    Interactions among the standard model gauge bosons and scalar fields in the framework of the SU(3){sub C}xSU(3){sub L}xU(1){sub X} gauge model with minimal (economical) Higgs content are presented. From these couplings, all scalar fields including the neutral scalar h and the Goldstone bosons can be identified and their couplings with the usual gauge bosons such as the photon, the charged W{sup {+-}}, and the neutral Z, without any additional conditions, are recovered. In the effective approximation, the full content of the scalar sector can be recognized. The CP-odd part of the Goldstone associated with the neutral non-Hermitian bilepton gauge boson G{sub X{sup 0}} is decoupled, while its CP-even counterpart has the mixing in the same way in the gauge boson sector. Masses of the new neutral Higgs boson H{sub 1}{sup 0} and the neutral non-Hermitian bilepton X{sup 0} are dependent on a coefficient of Higgs self-coupling ({lambda}{sub 1}). Similarly, masses of the singly charged Higgs boson H{sub 2}{sup {+-}} and of the charged bilepton Y{sup {+-}} are proportional through a coefficient of Higgs self-interaction ({lambda}{sub 4}). The hadronic cross section for production of this Higgs boson at the CERN LHC in the effective vector boson approximation is calculated. Numerical evaluation shows that the cross section can exceed 260 fb.

  20. Effect of Gauge Boson Mass on the Phase Structure of QED3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Feng, Hong-Tao; Sun, Wei-Min; Zong, Hong-Shi

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) in QED3 with finite gauge boson mass is studied in the framework of the rainbow approximation of Dyson-Schwinger equations. By adopting a simple gauge boson propagator ansatz at finite temperature, we first numerically solve the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the fermion self-energy to determine the chiral phase diagram of QED3 with finite gauge boson mass at finite chemical potential and finite temperature, then we study the effect of the finite gauge mass on the phase diagram of QED3. It is found that the gauge boson mass ma suppresses the occurrence of DCSB. The area of the region in the chiral phase diagram corresponding to DCSB phase decreases as the gauge boson mass ma increases. In particular, chiral symmetry gets restored when ma is above a certain critical value. In this paper, we use DCSB to describe the antiferromagnetic order and use the gauge boson mass to describe the superconducting order. Our results give qualitatively a physical picture on the competition and coexistence between antiferromagnetic order and superconducting orders in high temperature cuprate superconductors.

  1. Why Extra Gauge Bosons Should Exist and How to Hunt Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leike, Arnd

    2003-09-01

    Werner Heisenberg's work is the foundation for many topics of present research. This is also true for the search for extra gauge bosons. The prospects of future colliders in this search are shortly mentioned.

  2. Measurement of triple gauge-boson couplings at 172 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Ward, J. J.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M. M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Coles, J.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-03-01

    The triple gauge-boson couplings, αWΦ, αW and αBΦ, have been measured using 34 semileptonically and 54 hadronically decaying W+W- candidate events. The events were selected in the data recorded during 1996 with the ALEPH detector at 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10.65 pb-1. The triple gauge-boson couplings have been measured using optimal observables constructed from kinematic information of W+W- events. The results are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  3. The hunt for new gauge bosons: Present status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1991-09-01

    We survey the present limits on and future searches for new gauge bosons via direct production at colliders as well as by indirect methods such as radiative corrections analyses and cosmological constraints on the number of neutrinos. 29 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Fermions and gauge bosons in SU(4){sub L}xU(1){sub X} models with little Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Soo-hyeon

    2008-11-23

    We discuss the aspects of the little Higgs model with the SU(4){sub L}xU(1){sub X} electroweak gauge group as an alternative solution to the naturalness and fine-tuning issues. We introduce anomaly-free fermion spectra, and present their interactions with the physical gauge bosons. We also discuss some phenomenological implications of these fermions and the extra gauge bosons based on recent experimental results.

  5. Higher order QCD predictions for associated Higgs production with anomalous couplings to gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimasu, Ken; Sanz, Verónica; Williams, Ciaran

    2016-08-01

    We present predictions for the associated production of a Higgs boson at NLO+PS accuracy, including the effect of anomalous interactions between the Higgs and gauge bosons. We present our results in different frameworks, one in which the interaction vertex between the Higgs boson and Standard Model W and Z bosons is parameterized in terms of general Lorentz structures, and one in which Electroweak symmetry breaking is manifestly linear and the resulting operators arise through a six-dimensional effective field theory framework. We present analytic calculations of the Standard Model and Beyond the Standard Model contributions, and discuss the phenomenological impact of the higher order pieces. Our results are implemented in the NLO Monte Carlo program MCFM, and interfaced to shower Monte Carlos through the Powheg box framework.

  6. Topological phases of two-component bosons in species-dependent artificial gauge potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying-Hai; Shi, Tao

    2016-08-01

    We study bosonic atoms with two internal states in artificial gauge potentials whose strengths are different for the two components. A series of topological phases for such systems is proposed using the composite fermion theory and the parton construction. It is found in exact diagonalization that some of the proposed states may be realized for simple contact interaction between bosons. The ground states and low-energy excitations of these states are modeled using trial wave functions. The effective field theories for these states are also constructed and reveal some interesting properties.

  7. Signal of right-handed charged gauge bosons at the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Gonzalo, Tomas E.; Patra, Sudhanwa; Sahu, Narendra; Sarkar, Utpal

    2014-09-01

    We point out that the recent excess observed in searches for a right-handed gauge boson WR at CMS can be explained in a left-right symmetric model with D-parity violation. In a class of SO(10) models, in which D parity is broken at a high scale, the left-right gauge symmetry breaking scale is naturally small, and at a few TeV the gauge coupling constants satisfy gR≈0.6gL. Such models therefore predict a right-handed charged gauge boson WR in the TeV range with a suppressed gauge coupling as compared to the usually assumed manifest left-right symmetry case gR=gL. The recent CMS data show excess events which are consistent with the cross section predicted in the D-parity breaking model for 1.9 TeV

  8. Discriminating between Z'-boson effects and effects of anomalous gauge couplings in the double production of W ± bosons at a linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vasili V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The potential of the International Linear electron-positron Collider (ILC) for seeking, in the annihilation production of W ±-boson pairs, signals induced by new neutral gauge bosons predicted by models belonging to various classes and featuring an extended gauge sector is studied. Limits that will be obtained at ILC for the parameters and masses of Z' bosons are compared with present-day and future data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The possibility of discriminating between the effects of Z-Z' mixing and signals induced by anomalous gauge couplings (AGC) is demonstrated within theoretically motivated trilinear gauge models involving several free anomalous parameters. It is found that the sensitivity of ILC to the effects of Z-Z' mixing in the process e + e - → W + W - and its ability to discriminate between these two new-physics scenarios, Z' and AGC, become substantially higher upon employing polarized initial ( e + e -) and final ( W ±) states.

  9. Quartic gauge boson couplings at linear colliders. Interplay of WWZ/ZZZ production and WW-fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; He, Hong-Jian; Yuan, C.-P.

    1998-03-01

    We study new physics effects to the quartic gauge boson couplings formulated by the electroweak chiral Lagrangian. Five next-to-leading order operators characterize the anomalous quartic gauge interactions which involve pure Goldstone boson dynamics for the electroweak symmetry breaking. We estimate the typical size of these couplings in different strongly-interacting models and examine the sensitivity to directly probing them via the WWZ/ZZZ triple gauge boson production at the high energy linear colliders. The important roles of polarized e- and e+ beams are stressed. We then compare the results with those from the W-pair production of the WW-fusion processes, and analyze the interplay of these two production mechanisms for an improved probe of the quartic gauge boson interactions.

  10. Neutral triple gauge boson production in the large extra dimensions model at linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Sun; Ya-Jin, Zhou

    2012-10-01

    We consider the neutral triple-gauge boson production process in the context of large extra dimensions (LED) models including the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excited gravitons at future linear colliders, say ILC(CLIC). We consider γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, and ZZZ production processes, and analyze their impacts on both the total cross section and some key distributions. These processes are important for new physics searches at linear colliders. Our results show that KK graviton exchange has the most significant effect on e-e+→γZZ among the four processes with relatively small MS, while it has the largest effect on e-e+→γγγ with larger MS. By using the neutral triple-gauge boson production we could set the discovery limit on the fundamental Plank scale MS up to around 6-9 TeV for δ=4 at the 3 TeV CLIC.

  11. The measurement of tri-linear gauge boson couplings at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, Gilles; Gintner, Mikuláš; Godfrey, Stephen

    1995-11-01

    We describe a detailed study of the process e+e-→lvlqq¯ and the measurement of tri-linear gauge boson couplings (TGV's) at LEP200 and at a 500 GeV and 1 TeV NLC. We included all tree level Feynman diagrams contributing to the four-fermion final states including gauge boson widths and non-resonance contributions. We employed a maximum likelihood analysis of a five dimensional differential cross section of angular distributions. This approach appears to offer an optimal strategy for measurement of TGV's. LEP200 will improve existing measurements of TGV's but not enough to see loop contributions of new physics. Measurements at the NLC will be roughly 2 orders of magnitude more precise which would probe the effects of new physics at the loop level.

  12. Search for light gauge bosons of the dark sector at the Mainz Microtron.

    PubMed

    Merkel, H; Achenbach, P; Ayerbe Gayoso, C; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Debenjak, L; Denig, A; Distler, M O; Esser, A; Fonvieille, H; Friščić, I; Middleton, D G; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Rohrbeck, M; Sánchez Majos, S; Schlimme, B S; Schoth, M; Sirca, S; Weinriefer, M

    2011-06-24

    A new exclusion limit for the electromagnetic production of a light U(1) gauge boson γ' decaying to e + e- was determined by the A1 Collaboration at the Mainz Microtron. Such light gauge bosons appear in several extensions of the standard model and are also discussed as candidates for the interaction of dark matter with standard model matter. In electron scattering from a heavy nucleus, the existing limits for a narrow state coupling to e + e- were reduced by nearly an order of magnitude in the range of the lepton pair mass of 210 MeV/c2}

  13. Neutral triple electroweak gauge boson production in the large extra-dimension model at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Seth, Satyajit

    2012-05-01

    We study the prospects of probing large extra-dimension models at the LHC through neutral triple gauge boson production processes. In theories with extra dimensions these processes result from the exchange of a tower of massive graviton modes between the SM particles. We consider γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, and ZZZ production processes, and present our results for various kinematic distributions at the LHC for S=14TeV.

  14. Yang-Mills Gauge Theory and the Higgs Boson Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ngee-Pong

    The gauge symmetry principles of the Yang-Mills field of 1954 provide the solid rock foundation for the Standard Model of particle physics. To give masses to the quarks and leptons, however, SM calls on the solitary Higgs field using a set of mysterious complex Yukawa coupling matrices. We enrich the SM by reducing the Yukawa coupling matrices to a single Yukawa coupling constant, and endowing it with a family of Higgs fields that are degenerate in mass. The recent experimental discovery of the Higgs resonance at 125.09±0.21 GeV does not preclude this possibility. Instead, it presents an opportunity to explore the interference effects in background events at the LHC. We present a study based on the maximally symmetric Higgs potential in a leading hierarchy scenario.

  15. Yang-Mills gauge theory and the Higgs boson family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ngee-Pong

    2016-01-01

    The gauge symmetry principles of the Yang-Mills field of 1954 provide the solid rock foundation for the Standard Model of particle physics. To give masses to the quarks and leptons, however, SM calls on the solitary Higgs field using a set of mysterious complex Yukawa coupling matrices. We enrich the SM by reducing the Yukawa coupling matrices to a single Yukawa coupling constant, and endowing it with a family of Higgs fields that are degenerate in mass. The recent experimental discovery of the Higgs resonance at 125.09 ± 0.21 GeV does not preclude this possibility. Instead, it presents an opportunity to explore the interference effects in background events at the LHC. We present a study based on the maximally symmetric Higgs potential in a leading hierarchy scenario.

  16. Fundamental fermion interactions via vector bosons of unified SU(2) x SU(4) gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsch, Eckart; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-02-01

    Employing the fermion unification model based on the intrinsic SU(8) symmetry of a generalized Dirac equation, we discuss the fundamental interactions under the SU(8)=SU(2)⊗SU(4) symmetry group. The physics involved can describe all fermions, the leptons (electron and neutrino), and the coloured up and down quarks of the first generation in the standard model (SM) by a complex SU(8) octet of Dirac spinor fields. The fermion interactions are found to be mediated by the unified SU(4) and SU(2) vector gauge boson fields, which include the photon, the gluons, and the bosons Z and W as well known from the SM, but also comprise new ones, namely three coloured X bosons carrying a fractional hypercharge of ±4/3 and transmuting leptons into quarks and vice versa. The full covariant derivative of the model is derived and discussed. The Higgs mechanism gives mass to the Z and W bosons, but also permits one to derive the mass of the coloured X boson, for which depending on the choice of the values of the coupling constant, the estimates are 35~GeV or 156~GeV, values that are well within reach of the LHC. The scalar Higgs field can also lend masses to the fermions and fix their physical values for given appropriate coupling constants to that field.

  17. Electroweak gauge-boson production in association with b jets at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febres Cordero, F.; Reina, L.

    2015-06-01

    The production of both charged and neutral electroweak gauge bosons in association with b jets has attracted a lot of experimental and theoretical attention in recent years because of its central role in the physics programs of both the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The improved level of accuracy achieved both in the theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of these processes can promote crucial developments in modeling b-quark jets and b-quark parton distribution functions, and can provide a more accurate description of some of the most important backgrounds to the measurement of Higgs-boson couplings and several new physics searches. In this paper, we review the status of theoretical predictions for cross sections and kinematic distributions of processes in which an electroweak gauge boson is produced in association with up to two b jets in hadronic collisions, namely p\\bar {p}, pp → V + 1b jet and p\\bar {p}, pp → V + 2b jets with V = W±, Z/γ*, γ. Available experimental measurements at both the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider are also reviewed and their comparison with theoretical predictions is discussed.

  18. Conditions for the emergence of gauge bosons from spontaneous Lorentz symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, C. A.; Urrutia, L. F.

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of gauge particles (e.g., photons and gravitons) as Goldstone bosons arising from spontaneous symmetry breaking is an interesting hypothesis which would provide a dynamical setting for the gauge principle. We investigate this proposal in the framework of a general SO (N ) non-Abelian Nambu model (NANM), effectively providing spontaneous Lorentz symmetry breaking in terms of the corresponding Goldstone bosons. Using a nonperturbative Hamiltonian analysis, we prove that the SO (N ) Yang-Mills (YM) theory is equivalent to the corresponding NANM, after both current conservation and the Gauss laws are imposed as initial conditions for the latter. This equivalence is independent of any gauge fixing in the YM theory. A substantial conceptual and practical improvement in the analysis arises by choosing a particular parametrization that solves the nonlinear constraint defining the NANM. This choice allows us to show that the relation between the NANM canonical variables and the corresponding ones of the YM theory, Aia and Eb j , is given by a canonical transformation. In terms of the latter variables, the NANM Hamiltonian has the same form as the YM Hamiltonian, except that the Gauss laws do not arise as first-class constraints. The dynamics of the NANM further guarantees that it is sufficient to impose them only as initial conditions, in order to recover the full equivalence. It is interesting to observe that this particular parametrization exhibits the NANM as a regular theory, thus providing a substantial simplification in the calculations.

  19. Gamma-ray constraints on dark-matter annihilation to electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Fedderke, Michael A.; Kolb, Edward W.; Lin, Tongyan; Wang, Lian-Tao E-mail: Rocky.Kolb@uchicago.edu E-mail: liantaow@uchicago.edu

    2014-01-01

    Dark-matter annihilation into electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons results in γ-ray emission. We use observational upper limits on the fluxes of both line and continuum γ-rays from the Milky Way Galactic Center and from Milky Way dwarf companion galaxies to set exclusion limits on allowed dark-matter masses. (Generally, Galactic Center γ-ray line search limits from the Fermi-LAT and the H.E.S.S. experiments are most restrictive.) Our limits apply under the following assumptions: a) the dark matter species is a cold thermal relic with present mass density equal to the measured dark-matter density of the universe; b) dark-matter annihilation to standard-model particles is described in the non-relativistic limit by a single effective operator O∝J{sub DM}⋅J{sub SM}, where J{sub DM} is a standard-model singlet current consisting of dark-matter fields (Dirac fermions or complex scalars), and J{sub SM} is a standard-model singlet current consisting of electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons; and c) the dark-matter mass is in the range 5 GeV to 20 TeV. We consider, in turn, the 34 possible operators with mass dimension 8 or lower with non-zero s-wave annihilation channels satisfying the above assumptions. Our limits are presented in a large number of figures, one for each of the 34 possible operators; these limits can be grouped into 13 classes determined by the field content and structure of the operators. We also identify three classes of operators (coupling to the Higgs and SU(2){sub L} gauge bosons) that can supply a 130 GeV line with the desired strength to fit the putative line signal in the Fermi-LAT data, while saturating the relic density and satisfying all other indirect constraints we consider.

  20. Probing gauge-phobic heavy Higgs bosons at high energy hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yu-Ping; Xia, Ling-Hao

    2015-07-01

    We study the probe of the gauge-phobic (or nearly gauge-phobic) heavy Higgs bosons (GPHB) at high energy hadron colliders including the 14 TeV LHC and the 50 TeV Super Proton-Proton Collider (SppC). We take the process pp → t t bar t t bar , and study it at the hadron level including simulating the jet formation and top quark tagging (with jet substructure). We show that, for a GPHB with MH < 800 GeV, MH can be determined by adjusting the value of MH in the theoretical pT (b1) distribution to fit the observed pT (b1) distribution, and the resonance peak can be seen at the SppC for MH = 800 GeV and 1 TeV.

  1. Search at the Mainz Microtron for light massive gauge bosons relevant for the muon g-2 anomaly.

    PubMed

    Merkel, H; Achenbach, P; Ayerbe Gayoso, C; Beranek, T; Beričič, J; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Correa, L; Debenjak, L; Denig, A; Distler, M O; Esser, A; Fonvieille, H; Friščić, I; Gómez Rodríguez de la Paz, M; Hoek, M; Kegel, S; Kohl, Y; Middleton, D G; Mihovilovič, M; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Rohrbeck, M; Ron, G; Sánchez Majos, S; Schlimme, B S; Schoth, M; Schulz, F; Sfienti, C; Sirca, S; Thiel, M; Tyukin, A; Weber, A; Weinriefer, M

    2014-06-01

    A massive, but light, Abelian U(1) gauge boson is a well-motivated possible signature of physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. In this Letter, the search for the signal of such a U(1) gauge boson in electron-positron pair production at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration at the Mainz Microtron is described. Exclusion limits in the mass range of 40  MeV/c^{2} to 300  MeV/c^{2}, with a sensitivity in the squared mixing parameter of as little as ε^{2}=8×10^{-7} are presented. A large fraction of the parameter space has been excluded where the discrepancy of the measured anomalous magnetic moment of the muon with theory might be explained by an additional U(1) gauge boson. PMID:24949757

  2. Quantum phase transition of ultracold bosons in the presence of a non-Abelian synthetic gauge field

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, T.; Saha, K.; Sengupta, K.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-11-15

    We study the Mott phases and the superfluid-insulator transition of two-component ultracold bosons on a square optical lattice in the presence of a non-Abelian synthetic gauge field, which renders a SU(2)-hopping matrix for the bosons. Using a resummed hopping expansion, we calculate the excitation spectra in the Mott insulating phases and demonstrate that the superfluid-insulator phase boundary displays a nonmonotonic dependence on the gauge-field strength. We also compute the momentum distribution of the bosons in the presence of the non-Abelian field and show that they develop peaks at nonzero momenta as the superfluid-insulator transition point is approached from the Mott side. Finally, we study the superfluid phases near the transition and discuss the induced spatial pattern of the superfluid density due to the presence of the non-Abelian gauge potential.

  3. Dark matter annihilations into two light fermions and one gauge boson: general analysis and antiproton constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Vogl, Stefan E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de

    2012-04-01

    We study in this paper the scenario where the dark matter is constituted by Majorana particles which couple to a light Standard Model fermion and an extra scalar via a Yukawa coupling. In this scenario, the annihilation rate into the light fermions with the mediation of the scalar particle is strongly suppressed by the mass of the fermion. Nevertheless, the helicity suppression is lifted by the associated emission of a gauge boson, yielding annihilation rates which could be large enough to allow the indirect detection of the dark matter particles. We perform a general analysis of this scenario, calculating the annihilation cross section of the processes χχ→f f-bar V when the dark matter particle is a SU(2){sub L} singlet or doublet, f is a lepton or a quark, and V is a photon, a weak gauge boson or a gluon. We point out that the annihilation rate is particularly enhanced when the dark matter particle is degenerate in mass to the intermediate scalar particle, which is a scenario barely constrained by collider searches of exotic charged or colored particles. Lastly, we derive upper limits on the relevant cross sections from the non-observation of an excess in the cosmic antiproton-to-proton ratio measured by PAMELA.

  4. LFV couplings of the extra gauge boson Z‧ and leptonic decay and production of pseudoscalar mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Chong-Xing; Cui, Man-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Considering the constraints of the lepton flavor violating (LFV) processes μ→3e and τ→3μ on the LFV couplings Z‧ℓiℓj, in the contexts of the E6 models, the left-right (LR) models, the “alternative” left-right (ALR) models and the 331 models, we investigate the contributions of the extra gauge boson Z‧ to the decay rates of the processes ℓi→ℓjνℓνℓ, τ→μP and P→μe with P=π0, η and η‧. Our numerical results show that the maximal values of the branching ratios for these processes are not dependent on the Z‧ mass MZ‧ at leader order. The extra gauge boson ZX‧ predicted by the E6 models can make the maximum value of the branching ratio Br(τ→μνℓνℓ) reach 1.1×10-7. All Z‧ models considered in this paper can produce significant contributions to the process τ→μP. However, the value of Br(P→μe) is far below its corresponding experimental upper bound.

  5. Probing quartic couplings through three gauge boson production at an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.; Likhoded, A.; Valencia, G.; Yushchenko, O.

    1996-11-22

    We explore the capability of a 500 or 1000 GeV e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} linear collider to measure anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings. In the framework of a non-linear effective Lagrangian with a custodial SU(2) symmetry, there are only two next-to-leading order operators which contribute to quartic, but not to two- and three-gauge boson interactions. The limits on the coefficients of these operators from present and future e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} colliders are compared with those available from other sources.

  6. Discriminating between Z Prime -boson effects and effects of anomalous gauge couplings in the double production of W{sup {+-}} bosons at a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Vasili V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2013-06-15

    The potential of the International Linear electron-positron Collider (ILC) for seeking, in the annihilation production of W{sup {+-}}-boson pairs, signals induced by new neutral gauge bosons predicted by models belonging to various classes and featuring an extended gauge sector is studied. Limits that will be obtained at ILC for the parameters and masses of Z Prime bosons are compared with present-day and future data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The possibility of discriminating between the effects of Z-Z Prime mixing and signals induced by anomalous gauge couplings (AGC) is demonstrated within theoretically motivated trilinear gauge models involving several free anomalous parameters. It is found that the sensitivity of ILC to the effects of Z-Z Prime mixing in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and its ability to discriminate between these two new-physics scenarios, Z Prime and AGC, become substantially higher upon employing polarized initial (e{sup +}e{sup -}) and final (W{sup {+-}}) states.

  7. Directly Measuring the Tensor Structure of the Scalar Coupling to Gauge Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, Daniel; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Kinematic distributions in the decays of the newly discovered resonance to four leptons can provide a direct measurement of the tensor structure of the particle's couplings to gauge bosons. Even if the particle is shown to be a parity even scalar, measuring this tensor structure is a necessary step in determining if this particle is responsible for giving mass to the Z. We consider a Standard Model like coupling as well as coupling via a dimension five operator to either ZZ or Z\\gamma. We show that using full kinematic information from each event allows discrimination between renormalizable and higher dimensional coupling to ZZ at the 95% confidence level with O(50) signal events, and coupling to Z\\gamma can be distinguished with as few as 20 signal events. This shows that these measurements can be useful even with this year's LHC data.

  8. Third generation sfermion decays into Z and W gauge bosons: Full one-loop analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid

    2005-05-01

    The complete one-loop radiative corrections to third-generation scalar fermions into gauge bosons Z and W{sup {+-}} is considered. We focus on f-tilde{sub 2}{yields}Zf-tilde{sub 1} and f-tilde{sub i}{yields}W{sup {+-}}f-tilde{sub j}{sup '}, f,f{sup '}=t,b. We include SUSY-QCD, QED, and full electroweak corrections. It is found that the electroweak corrections can be of the same order as the SUSY-QCD corrections. The two sets of corrections interfere destructively in some region of parameter space. The full one-loop correction can reach 10% in some supergravity scenario, while in model independent analysis like general the minimal supersymmetric standard model, the one-loop correction can reach 20% for large tan{beta} and large trilinear soft breaking terms A{sub b}.

  9. CP Violation in Trilinear Neutral Gauge Boson Couplings Via the Anomalous tcZ Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyotl, A.; Tavares-Velasco, G.

    2008-07-01

    Trilinear Neutral Gauge Boson Couplings (TNGBCs), namely ZZZ, ZZγ, and Zγγ may be highly sensitive to any new physics effects as their amplitude is extremely suppressed in any renormalizable theory such as the standard model (SM), where these class of couplings arise up to the one-loop level. Even more, in the SM, CP-odd TNGBCs are more suppressed than CP-even ones as the former are absent at the one loop level. This opens up the window to examine CP-violating effects on TNGBCs induced by new sources of CP-violation. Along these lines, we analyze the possible CP-violation on TNGBCS induced by the most general renormalizable tcZ coupling.

  10. Search for new particles or gauge bosons decaying into dileptons/dijets at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    M. P. Giordani

    2003-10-31

    The existence of new particles decaying in a jet or lepton pair is probed with the Run II data collected by the Tevatron p{bar p} collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Searches performed on both jet and lepton data collected by the CDF and D0 detectors do not show signs of any new resonance within the considered mass range. The sensitivity achieved by these searches leads to 95% C.L. limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio for axigluons, flavour universal colorons, excited quarks, colour octet techni-{rho}, E{sub 6} diquarks, new gauge bosons and Randall-Sundrum gravitons. Excluded mass regions for these models are also computed.

  11. Effective gauge-Higgs operators analysis of new physics associated with the Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, We-Fu; Pan, Wei-Ping; Xu, Fanrong

    2013-08-01

    We study the new physics related to the recently discovered 125 GeV Higgs by employing an important subset of the standard model (SM) gauge-invariant dimension-6 operators constructed by the SM Higgs and gauge fields. Explicitly, we perform a model-independent study on the production and decays of the Higgs, the electric dipole moments (EDMs) of the neutron and the electron, and we take into account the anomalous magnetic dipole moments of the muon and electron as well. We find that, even if all Higgs decay channels agree with the SM predictions, the SM theoretical uncertainties provide a lot of room to host new phyiscs associated with the 125 GeV boson. A linear relation is revealed in our numerical study that μZZ≃μWW and 0.6≲μZZ,WW≲1.4 at 95% C.L. with or without the EDM constraints. The neutron and electron EDMs severely constrain the relevant Wilson coefficients. Therefore the CP-violating components in the h→WW, ZZ channels are too small, ˜O(10-5), to be detected at the LHC. However, we point out that, even though the parity of the 125 GeV boson has been largely determined to be even in the h→ZZ channel, one should pay special attention to the potentially large CP violation in the h→γγ and h→γZ channels. This should be seriously checked in the future spin correlation experiments.

  12. Implications of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with vector-like quarks and a ~125 GeV Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.; Wells, James D.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the implications of models that achieve a Standard Model-like Higgs boson of mass near 125 GeV by introducing additional TeV-scale supermultiplets in the vector-like 10+\\bar{10} representation of SU(5), within the context of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. We study the resulting mass spectrum of superpartners, comparing and contrasting to the usual gauge-mediated and CMSSM scenarios, and discuss implications for LHC supersymmetry searches. This approach implies that exotic vector-like fermions t'_{1,2}, b',and \\tau' should be within the reach of the LHC. We discuss the masses, the couplings to electroweak bosons, and the decay branching ratios of the exotic fermions, with and without various unification assumptions for the mass and mixing parameters. We comment on LHC prospects for discovery of the exotic fermion states, both for decays that are prompt and non-prompt on detector-crossing time scales.

  13. Charged Higgs and neutral Higgs pair production of the weak gauge boson fusion process in electron-positron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozumi, Takuya; Tamai, Kotaro

    2013-09-01

    Pair production of the neutral and charged Higgs bosons is a unique process that is a signature of the two-Higgs-doublet model. In this paper, we study the pair production and decays of the Higgses in the neutrinophilic two-Higgs-doublet model. The pair production occurs through the W and Z gauge boson fusion process. In the neutrinophilic model, the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the second Higgs doublet is small and is proportional to the neutrino mass. The smallness of VEV is associated with the approximate global U(1) symmetry, which is slightly broken. Therefore, there is a suppression factor for the U(1) charge breaking process. The second Higgs doublet has U(1) charge; its single production from gauge boson fusion violates the U(1) charge conservation and is strongly suppressed. In contrast to the single production, the pair production of the Higgses conserves U(1) charge and the approximate symmetry does not forbid it. To search for the pair productions in a collider experiment, we study the production cross section of a pair of charged Higgs and neutral Higgs bosons in e^+ e^- collisions with a center of energy from 600 GeV to 2000 GeV. The total cross section varies from 10^{-4} fb to 10^{-3} fb for the degenerate (200 GeV) charged and neutral Higgs mass case. The background process to the signal is the gauge boson pair W^+ + Z production and their decays. We show that the signal over background ratio is about 2-3% by combining the cross section ratio with ratios of branching fractions.

  14. Searching for MeV-scale gauge bosons with IceCube

    DOE PAGESBeta

    DiFranzo, Anthony; Hooper, Dan

    2015-11-05

    Light gauge bosons can lead to resonant interactions between high-energy astrophysical neutrinos and the cosmic neutrino background. We study this possibility in detail, considering the ability of IceCube to probe such scenarios. We also find the most dramatic effects in models with a very light Z' (mZ'≲10 MeV), which can induce a significant absorption feature at Eν~5–10 TeV×(mZ'/MeV)2. In the case of the inverted hierarchy and a small sum of neutrino masses, such a light Z' can result in a broad and deep spectral feature at ~0.1–10 PeV×(mZ'/MeV)2. Current IceCube data already excludes this case for a Z' lighter thanmore » a few MeV and couplings greater than g~10-4. Furthermore, we emphasize that the ratio of neutrino flavors observed by IceCube can be used to further increase their sensitivity to Z' models and to other exotic physics scenarios.« less

  15. Searching for MeV-scale gauge bosons with IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    DiFranzo, Anthony; Hooper, Dan

    2015-11-05

    Light gauge bosons can lead to resonant interactions between high-energy astrophysical neutrinos and the cosmic neutrino background. We study this possibility in detail, considering the ability of IceCube to probe such scenarios. We also find the most dramatic effects in models with a very light Z' (mZ'≲10 MeV), which can induce a significant absorption feature at Eν~5–10 TeV×(mZ'/MeV)2. In the case of the inverted hierarchy and a small sum of neutrino masses, such a light Z' can result in a broad and deep spectral feature at ~0.1–10 PeV×(mZ'/MeV)2. Current IceCube data already excludes this case for a Z' lighter than a few MeV and couplings greater than g~10-4. Furthermore, we emphasize that the ratio of neutrino flavors observed by IceCube can be used to further increase their sensitivity to Z' models and to other exotic physics scenarios.

  16. Dark matter coupling to electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons: An effective field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yuan; Kolb, Edward W.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    If dark matter is a new species of particle produced in the early universe as a cold thermal relic (a weakly-interacting massive particle-WIMP), its present abundance, its scattering with matter in direct-detection experiments, its present-day annihilation signature in indirect-detection experiments, and its production and detection at colliders, depend crucially on the WIMP coupling to standard-model (SM) particles. It is usually assumed that the WIMP couples to the SM sector through its interactions with quarks and leptons. In this paper we explore the possibility that the WIMP coupling to the SM sector is via electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons. In the absence of an ultraviolet-complete particle-physics model, we employ effective field theory to describe the WIMP-SM coupling. We consider both scalars and Dirac fermions as possible dark-matter candidates. Starting with an exhaustive list of operators up to dimension 8, we present detailed calculation of dark-matter annihilations to all possible final states, including γγ, γZ, γh, ZZ, Zh, W+W-, hh, and ffbar, and demonstrate the correlations among them. We compute the mass scale of the effective field theory necessary to obtain the correct dark-matter mass density, and well as the resulting photon line signals.

  17. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  18. Study of triple-gauge-boson couplings ZZZ, ZZγ and Zγγ at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2007-08-01

    Neutral triple-gauge-boson couplings ZZZ, ZZγ and Zγγ have been studied with the DELPHI detector using data at energies between 183 and 208 GeV. Limits are derived on these couplings from an analysis of the reactions e+e-→Zγ, using data from the final states γff¯, with f=q or ν, from e+e-→ZZ, using data from the four-fermion final states qq¯qq¯, qq¯μ+μ-, qq¯e+e-, qq¯νν¯, μ+μ-νν¯ and e+e-νν¯, and from e+e-→Zγ*, in which the final state γ is off mass-shell, using data from the four-fermion final states qq¯e+e- and qq¯μ+μ-. No evidence for the presence of such couplings is observed, in agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  19. Heavy gauge boson and {Lambda}{sub b} baryon searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maeshima, K.; The CDF Collaboration

    1992-06-01

    We have searched for new gauge bosons (W{prime}{yields} lv, Z{prime} {yields} ll) and b baryons ({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {psi}{Lambda}{sup 0}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV from the 1988--1989 run of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We present 95% confidence level (C.L.) limits on the W{prime} and Z{prime} production cross section in leptonic decay modes. The nonobservation of these processes leads to limits of M{sub w{prime}} > 520 GeV/c{sub 2} and M{sub z{prime}} > 412 GeV/c{sub 2} (95% C.L.), assuming Standard Model coupling strengths. We see no evidence for the signal ({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {psi}{Lambda}{sup 0}) in our {psi} sample ({psi} {yields} {mu}{mu}) around the {Lambda}{sub b} mass region of 5600 MeV. We set an upper limit on F({Lambda}{sub b})Br({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {psi}{Lambda}{sup 0}) of 0.55 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} (90% C.L.), assuming that b baryons and mesons are produced in the fragmentation process in similar ways. The CDF Ai, search is also reported in the QCD session of this conference. This paper summarizes our result briefly; the details can be found in the other talk.

  20. Anomalous photon-gauge boson coupling contribution to the exclusive vector boson pair production from two photon exchange in pp collisions at 13 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, D. E.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Sá Borges, J.; Rebello Teles, P.

    2015-04-10

    We study the W and Z pair production from two-photon exchange in proton-proton collisions at the LHC in order to evaluate the contributions of anomalous photon-gauge boson couplings, that simulates new particles and couplings predicted in many Standard Model (SM) extensions. The experimental results of W{sup +} W{sup −} exclusive production (pp → pW{sup +}W{sup −} p) at 7 TeV from the CMS collaboration [1] updates the experimental limits on anomalous couplings obtained at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). This motivates our present analysis hopefully anticipating the expected results using the Precision Proton Spectrometer (PPS) to be installed as part of CMS. In this work, we consider the W{sup +}W{sup −} exclusive production to present the p{sub T} distribution of the lepton pair corresponding to the SM signal with p{sub T} (e, μ) > 10 GeV. Next, we consider the photon-gauge boson anomalous couplings by calculating, from the FPMC and MadGraph event generators, the process γγ → W{sup +}W{sup −} from a model with gauge boson quartic couplings, by considering a 1 TeV scale for new physical effects. We present our results for an integrated luminosity of 5 fb{sup −1} at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and for an integrated luminosity of 100 fb{sup −1} at 13 TeV. We present our preliminary results for Z pair exclusive production from two-photon exchange with anomalous couplings, where the ZZγγ quartic coupling is absent in the SM. We calculate the total cross section for the exclusive process and present the four lepton invariant mass distribution. Finally we present an outlook for the present analysis.

  1. Bosons with Artificial Gauge Fields and Mott Physics on the Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidanovic, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2014-03-01

    We study bosons in the tight-binding model on the honeycomb lattice introduced by Haldane. We analyze the ground state topology and quasiparticle properties in the Mott phase by applying bosonic dynamical mean field theory, strong-coupling perturbation theory, exact diagonalization and numerical evaluations of sample Hall conductivity. The phase diagram also contains two different superfluid phases. The quasiparticle dynamics, number fluctuations, and local currents are measurable in cold atom experiments.

  2. QCD and electroweak interference in Higgs production by gauge boson fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jeppe R.; Smillie, Jennifer M.

    2007-02-01

    We explicitly calculate the contribution to Higgs production at the LHC from the interference between gluon fusion and weak vector boson fusion, and compare it to the pure QCD and pure electroweak result. While the effect is small at tree level, we speculate it will be significantly enhanced by loop effects.

  3. Reconciling the muon g -2 , a 125 GeV Higgs boson, and dark matter in gauge mediation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Ün, Cem Salih

    2015-12-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the standard model is supplemented by additional U (1 ) symmetry which acts only on the third generation fermions. The messenger fields carry a nontrivial U (1 ) charge and are vectorlike particles under this symmetry. This leads to additional contributions to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms for the third-generation squarks and sleptons. In this framework we show that the muon g -2 anomaly, the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass and the detected relic dark matter abundance (gravitino in our case) can be simultaneously accommodated. The resolution of the muon g -2 anomaly, in particular, yields the result that masses of squarks in the first two families, as well the gluino mass, should be ≲2.5 TeV , which will be tested at LHC14.

  4. Indications for an extra neutral gauge boson in electroweak precision data

    PubMed

    Erler; Langacker

    2000-01-10

    A new analysis of the hadronic peak cross section at LEP 1 implies a small amount of missing invisible width in Z decays, while the effective weak charge in atomic parity violation has been determined recently to 0.6% accuracy, indicating a significantly negative S parameter. As a consequence, the data are described well if the presence of an extra Z' boson, such as predicted in grand unified theories, is assumed. Moreover, the data are now rich enough to study an arbitrary extra Z' boson and to determine its couplings in a model independent way. An excellent fit to the data is obtained in this case, suggestive of a family nonuniversal Z' similar to those predicted in a class of superstring theories. PMID:11015875

  5. Hall response of interacting bosonic atoms in strong gauge fields: From condensed to fractional-quantum-Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, H.; Alba, E.; Taron, J.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Barberán, N.

    2013-05-01

    Interacting bosonic atoms under strong gauge fields undergo a series of phase transitions that take the cloud from a simple Bose-Einstein condensate all the way to a family of fractional-quantum-Hall-type states [M. Popp, B. Paredes, and J. I. Cirac, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.70.053612 70, 053612 (2004)]. In this work we demonstrate that the Hall response of the atoms can be used to locate the phase transitions and characterize the ground state of the many-body state. Moreover, the same response function reveals within some regions of the parameter space, the structure of the spectrum and the allowed transitions to excited states. We verify numerically these ideas using exact diagonalization for a small number of atoms, and provide an experimental protocol to implement the gauge fields and probe the linear response using a periodically driven optical lattice. Finally, we discuss our theoretical results in relation to recent experiments with condensates in artificial magnetic fields [L. J. LeBlanc, K. Jimenez-Garcia, R. A. Williams, M. C. Beeler, A. R. Perry, W. D. Phillips, and I. B. Spielman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAPNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1202579109 109, 10811 (2012)] and we analyze the role played by vortex states in the Hall response.

  6. Searches for new neutral gauge Z' bosons at the e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider and their identification

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, A. A. Pankov, A. A. Tsytrinov, A. V. Karpenko, N. V.

    2010-05-15

    The potential of the electron-positron International Linear Collider for searches for and the separation of signals induced by new neutral gauge bosons predicted by various classes of models featuring an extended gauge sector is investigated. The analysis presented in this article was performed for processes of annihilation fermion-pair production and was based on the use of differential polarization observables, which ensure a higher sensitivity (in relation to integrated observables) of the processes being considered to Z'-boson parameters. Thresholds for discovering and identifying new neutral gauge bosons associated with models belonging to the E{sub 6} and LR, as well as the ALR and SSM, classes are determined. In particular, it is shown that polarization experiments at a 0.5-TeV electron-positron collider of integrated luminosity 100 fb{sup -1} would make it possible to identify unambiguously the entire set of Z'-boson models (Z'{sub SSM}, Z'{sub {phi}}, Z'{sub {eta}}, Z'{sub {chi}}, Z'{sub LRS}, and Z'{sub ALR}) for M{sub Z'} < 6{radical}s and to improve considerably the respective estimates expected from experiments with unpolarized particles.

  7. Gauge-boson self-interactions and t (bar)t production as probes of new physics at high energy e(+)e(-) colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gintner, Mikulas

    1997-11-01

    We address two phenomenological problems, both related to the search for new physics beyond the SM with potential sensitivity to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking (ESB). In the first problem, we analyze the sensitivity of the process e+e/sp-/to/ell/nu/sb/ell q/bar q/prime to anomalous triple gauge boson couplings at energies appropriate to LEP2 and the NLC, considering all tree level diagrams and finite widths of the gauge bosons. While it is unlikely that LEP2 measurements would reveal anomalous couplings, the 500 GeV NLC measurements should be sensitive to loop contributions to the triple gauge boson vertices (TGV) while the 1 TeV NLC will be able to measure such effects. The different polarizations of initial states give different correlations between bounds on anomalous couplings. Thus the use of polarized beams at the NLC energies can help disentangle the nature of anomalous TGV's. We also examine the sensitivity of the off W-resonance production to the anomalous couplings and find that useful information could be extracted from this region of phase space. In the second problem, we investigate t/bar t production via vector boson fusion at e+e/sp- colliders as a means to study the mechanism of ESB. We calculate the cross sections for four different channels of the reaction e+e/sp- /to/ell/bar/ell V1V2/to/ell/bar/ell t/bar t using the effective vector boson approximation (EVA). We find that the WW mode is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish different Higgs boson masses. We examine the error introduced to the σ(e+e/sp-/to t/bar t) calculation by using high-energy approximations of the V1V2/to t/bar t cross sections rather than the full expressions and find it comparable to the error expected from the use of the EVA.

  8. Probing neutral gauge boson self-interactions in ZZ production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, U.; Rainwater, D.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed analysis of ZZ production at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider is presented for general ZZZ and ZZγ couplings. Deviations from the standard model gauge theory structure for each of these can be parametrized in terms of two form factors which are severely restricted by unitarity at high energy. Achievable limits on these couplings are shown to be a dramatic improvement over the limits currently obtained by e+e- experiments.

  9. Search for a new gauge boson in the $A'$ Experiment (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamyan, S; Allada, K; Anez, D; Averett, T; Barbieri, A; Bartlett, K; Beacham, J; Bono, J; Boyce, J R; Brindza, P; Camsonne, A; Cranmer, K; Dalton, M M; de Jager, C W; Donaghy, J; Essig, R; Field, C; Folts, E; Gasparian, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Gomez, J; Graham, M; Hansen, J -O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Iqbal, S; Jaros, J; Jensen, E; Kelleher, A; Khandaker, M; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Mammei, J; Markowitz, P; Maruyama, T; Maxwell, V; Mayilyan, S; McDonald, J; Michaels, R; Moffeit, K; Nelyubin, V; Odian, A; Oriunno, M; Partridge, R; Paolone, M; Piasetzky, E; Pomerantz, I; Qiang, Y; Riordan, S; Roblin, Y; Sawatzky, B; Schuster, P; Segal, J; Selvy, L; Shahinyan, A; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Stepanyan, S; Toro, N; Walz, D; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zhang, J

    2011-11-01

    We present a search at Jefferson Laboratory for new forces mediated by sub-GeV vector bosons with weak coupling {alpha}' to electrons. Such a particle A' can be produced in electron-nucleus fixed-target scattering and then decay to an e{sup +}e{sup -} pair, producing a narrow resonance in the QED trident spectrum. Using APEX test run data, we searched in the mass range 175-250 MeV, found no evidence for an A' {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} reaction, and set an upper limit of {alpha}'/{alpha} {approx} 10{sup -6}. Our findings demonstrate that fixed-target searches can explore a new, wide, and important range of masses and couplings for sub-GeV forces.

  10. Order-by-disorder of interacting bosons on the dice lattice under a synthetic gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payrits, Matjaz; Barnett, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    We consider a gas of interacting bosons in the two-dimensional dice lattice in the presence of a half-elementary magnetic flux threading each plaquette. The single particle spectrum of the system consists of three doubly-degenerate completely flat bands, which indicates a large ground state degeneracy. It is shown how this degeneracy is partially lifted in the superfluid regime at the mean-field level. Furthermore, it is shown how quantum and thermal fluctuations conclusively remove the remaining accidental degeneracy between the mean field states, thus selecting a unique state up to overall symmetries. This can be elegantly described by means of the distribution of condensate vortices in the Kagomé vortex lattice, which is dual to the dice lattice. We gratefully acknowledge support from the EPSRC and Imperial College London.

  11. Vortex lattice phases in bosonic ladders in the presence of gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraud, Marie; Greschner, Sebastian; Kolley, Fabian; McCulloch, Ian P.; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian; Vekua, Temo

    2016-05-01

    We study vortex lattices in the interacting Bose-Hubbard model defined on two- and three-leg ladder geometries in the presence of a homogeneous flux. Our work is motivated by recent experiments using laser assisted-tunneling in optical lattices and lattices in synthetic dimensions, which studied the regime of weak interactions. We focus on the effects arising from stronger interactions, in both the real space optical lattice and the synthetic dimension schemes. Based on extensive density matrix renormalization group simulations and a bosonization analysis, we show that vortex lattices form at certain commensurate vortex densities. We identify the parameter space in which they emerge, and study their properties. Very interestingly, an enlarged unit cell forms in the vortex lattice phases, which can lead to the reversal of the current circulation-direction in both geometries. We demonstrate this effect in weak coupling and at sufficiently low temperature, and show that it is significant for intermediate interactions.

  12. Signals for new spin-1 resonances in electroweak gauge boson pair production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, A.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Netto, D. Goncalves; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Mizukoshi, J. K.

    2009-10-01

    The mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) will be directly scrutinized soon at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We analyze the LHC potential to look for new vector bosons associated with the EWSB sector, presenting a possible model independent approach to search for these new spin-1 resonances. We show that the analyses of the processes pp{yields}l{sup +}l{sup '-}Ee{sub T}, l{sup {+-}}jjEe{sub T}, l{sup '{+-}}l{sup +}l{sup -}Ee{sub T}, l{sup {+-}}jjEe{sub T}, and l{sup +}l{sup -}jj (with l, l{sup '}=e or {mu} and j=jet) have a large reach at the LHC and can lead to the discovery or exclusion of many EWSB scenarios such as Higgsless models.

  13. Search for new light gauge bosons in Higgs boson decays to four-lepton final states in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; &Aaring; Kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. 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A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a search for Higgs bosons decaying to four leptons, either electrons or muons, via one or two light exotic gauge bosons Zd, H →Z Zd→4 ℓ or H →ZdZd →4 ℓ . The search was performed using p p collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb-1 at the center-of-mass energy of √{s }=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The observed data are well described by the Standard Model prediction. Upper bounds on the branching ratio of H →Z Zd→4 ℓ and on the kinetic mixing parameter between the Zd and the Standard Model hypercharge gauge boson are set in the range (1 - 9 )×1 0-5 and (4 - 17 )×1 0-2 respectively, at 95% confidence level assuming the Standard Model branching ratio of H →Z Z*→4 ℓ, for Zd masses between 15 and 55 GeV. Upper bounds on the effective mass mixing parameter between the Z and the Zd are also set using the branching ratio limits in the H →Z Zd→4 ℓ search, and are in the range (1.5 - 8.7 )×1 0-4 for 15 boson to dark vector bosons are set in the range (2 - 3 )×1 0-5 and (1 - 10 )×1 0-4 respectively, at 95% confidence level assuming the Standard Model Higgs boson production cross sections, for Zd masses between 15 and 60 GeV.

  14. A framework to analyze searches for gauge bosons of the hidden light sector in electron scattering fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Beranek, T.

    2013-11-07

    Electron scattering fixed target experiments are a versatile tool to probe various kinds of physics phenomena. Recently fixed target experiments in which an electron beam is scattered off a heavy nucleus and a lepton-antilepton pair is created, i.e. e(A,Z) →e(A,Z)l{sup +}l{sup −}, were utilized to search for physics beyond the standard model at modest energies. In these experiments one searches for a small, narrow resonance in the invariant mass spectrum of the lepton-antilepton pair, arising from the exchange of a new light gauge boson γ′ coupling to the dark sector as well as very weakly to standard model particles. Such a signal would appear as an enhancement over a smooth QED background. Hence a precise understanding of the background is crucial. We present a theoretical analysis of the process e(A,Z) →e(A,Z)l{sup +}l{sup −}. Therefore we have performed an analysis of the cross section, which is then used to extract exclusion limits on the parameter space of the γ′, describing the existing experimental data taken at MAMI.

  15. Electroweak corrections and anomalous triple gauge-boson couplings in W{sup +}W{sup -} and W{sup {+-}}Z production at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Accomando, E.; Kaiser, A.

    2006-05-01

    We have analyzed the production of WZ and WW vector-boson pairs at the LHC. These processes give rise to four-fermion final states, and are particularly sensitive to possible nonstandard trilinear gauge-boson couplings. We have studied the interplay between the influence of these anomalous couplings and the effect of the complete logarithmic electroweak O({alpha}) corrections. Radiative corrections to the standard model processes in double-pole approximation and nonstandard terms due to trilinear couplings are implemented into a Monte Carlo program for pp{yields}4f(+{gamma}) with final states involving four or two charged leptons. We numerically investigate purely leptonic final states and find that electroweak corrections can fake new-physics signals, modifying the observables by the same amount and shape, in kinematical regions of statistical significance.

  16. ATLAS search for a heavy gauge boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-08

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W'), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1. No excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. A W' with Sequential Standard Model couplings is excluded at the 95% credibility level for masses up to 2.55 TeV. Excited chiral bosons (W*) with equivalent coupling strength are excluded for masses up to 2.42 TeV.

  17. Pair Production of the Doubly Charged Leptons Associated with a Gauge Boson γ or Z in e+e- and γγ Collisions at Future Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qing-Guo; Ji, Li; Yang, Shuo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the production of a pair of doubly charged leptons associated with a gauge boson V(γ or Z) at future linear colliders via e+e- and γγ collisions. The numerical results show that the possible signals of the doubly charged leptons may be detected via the processes e+e- → VX++X-- and γγ → VX++X-- at future ILC or CLIC experiments. Supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grants Nos. 11275088, 11205023, 11375248 and the Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University under Grant No. LJQ2014135

  18. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.

  19. Measurement of the Z γ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. 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B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Ventura, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. 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F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Topaksu, A. Kayis; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-04-01

    The cross section for the production of Z γ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ γ and Z γγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Variable flavor number parton distributions and weak gauge and Higgs boson production at hadron colliders at next-to-next-to-leading order of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Reya, E.

    2009-12-01

    Based on our recent next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) dynamical parton distributions as obtained in the 'fixed flavor number scheme', we generate radiatively parton distributions in the 'variable flavor number scheme' where the heavy-quark flavors (c,b,t) also become massless partons within the nucleon. Only within this latter factorization scheme are NNLO calculations feasible at present, since the required partonic subprocesses are only available in the approximation of massless initial-state partons. The NNLO predictions for gauge boson production are typically larger (by more than 1{sigma}) than the next-to-leading order (NLO) ones, and rates at LHC energies can be predicted with an accuracy of about 5%, whereas at Tevatron they are more than 2{sigma} above the NLO ones. The NNLO predictions for standard model Higgs-boson production via the dominant gluon fusion process have a total (parton distribution function and scale) uncertainty of about 10% at LHC which almost doubles at the lower Tevatron energies; they are typically about 20% larger than the ones at NLO but the total uncertainty bands overlap.

  1. Measurements of W±Z production cross sections in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous gauge boson self-couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. 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E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents measurements of W±Z production in p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The gauge bosons are reconstructed using their leptonic decay modes into electrons and muons. The data were collected in 2012 by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 . The measured inclusive cross section in the detector fiducial region is σW±Z →ℓ'ν ℓℓ=35.1 ±0.9 (stat )±0.8 (sys )±0.8 (lumi ) fb , for one leptonic decay channel. In comparison, the next-to-leading-order Standard Model expectation is 30.0 ±2.1 fb . Cross sections for W+Z and W-Z production and their ratio are presented as well as differential cross sections for several kinematic observables. Limits on anomalous triple gauge boson couplings are derived from the transverse mass spectrum of the W±Z system. From the analysis of events with a W and a Z boson associated with two or more forward jets an upper limit at 95% confidence level on the W±Z scattering cross section of 0.63 fb, for each leptonic decay channel, is established, while the Standard Model prediction at next-to-leading order is 0.13 ±0.01 fb . Limits on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings are also extracted.

  2. Measurement of W+W- production in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV and probing anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Haolu

    This thesis presents the measurement of the vector boson pair W+W- production cross section in proton-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The leptonic decay channels of the W+W- →ℓ +nuℓℓ-nu ℓor ℓ=(e,mu) are analyzed using data corresponding to 20.3 fb -1 of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (in Geneva, Switzerland). The experimental signature of this measurement is two energetic isolated leptons ( e+e-, mu+mu-, e+mu-, e+/-mu∓) and associated large missing transverse energy (due to neutrinos in final states). A total of 6636 WW+ℓℓ candidate events is selected in ATLAS data with an estimation of 1547+/-28 background events from non-W+W- production processes. The measured total production cross section is 71+1.1 -1.1(stat)+5.7-5.0(syst)+2.1 -2.0)(lumi) pb, which is comparable with the theoretical prediction of 63.2+2.0-1.8 pb calculated with NNLO QCD and NLO EW corrections. The anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings (WWZ and WWgamma) could signal new physics beyond the Standard Model at much higher energy scales compared to the directly detectable mass scale at the LHC. An effective Lagrangian is used to generalize the anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings to describe the W ++W- productions at the LHC. These anomalous couplings can be experimentally probed by comparing the leading lepton transverse momentum spectrum with the theoretical predictions in different triple-gauge-boson coupling space. No observation of deviations from the Standard Model predicted couplings is found by a maximum likelihood fitting of the leading lepton transverse momentum. Therefore, the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings are set from this analysis.

  3. Search for a heavy gauge boson $W$ ' in the final state with an electron and large missing transverse energy in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A search for a heavy gauge boson W' has been conducted by the CMS experiment at the LHC in the decay channel with an electron and large transverse energy imbalance, using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. No excess above standard model expectations is seen in the transverse mass distribution of the electron-(missing E_T) system. Assuming standard-model-like couplings and decay branching fractions, a W' boson with a mass less than 1.36 TeV/c^2 is excluded at 95% confidence level.

  4. Search for a New Gauge Boson in Electron-Nucleus Fixed-Target Scattering by the APEX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamyan, S.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Anez, D.; Averett, T.; Barbieri, A.; Bartlett, K.; Beacham, J.; Bono, J.; Boyce, J. R.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Cranmer, K.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Donaghy, J.; Essig, R.; Field, C.; Folts, E.; Gasparian, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Gomez, J.; Graham, M.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Iqbal, S.; Jaros, J.; Jensen, E.; Kelleher, A.; Khandaker, M.; Lerose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Mammei, J.; Markowitz, P.; Maruyama, T.; Maxwell, V.; Mayilyan, S.; McDonald, J.; Michaels, R.; Moffeit, K.; Nelyubin, V.; Odian, A.; Oriunno, M.; Partridge, R.; Paolone, M.; Piasetzky, E.; Pomerantz, I.; Qiang, Y.; Riordan, S.; Roblin, Y.; Sawatzky, B.; Schuster, P.; Segal, J.; Selvy, L.; Shahinyan, A.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Stepanyan, S.; Toro, N.; Walz, D.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zhang, J.

    2011-11-01

    We present a search at the Jefferson Laboratory for new forces mediated by sub-GeV vector bosons with weak coupling α' to electrons. Such a particle A' can be produced in electron-nucleus fixed-target scattering and then decay to an e+e- pair, producing a narrow resonance in the QED trident spectrum. Using APEX test run data, we searched in the mass range 175-250 MeV, found no evidence for an A'→e+e- reaction, and set an upper limit of α'/α≃10-6. Our findings demonstrate that fixed-target searches can explore a new, wide, and important range of masses and couplings for sub-GeV forces.

  5. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Pangilinan, Monica

    2010-05-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the Vtb element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W'. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb-1 of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30-1.20+0.98 pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9σ Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 ± 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0σ, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |Vtb| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |Vtb| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W' using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W' with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W' → t$\\bar{p}$, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W'L with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W'R) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is

  6. ATLAS search for a heavy gauge boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-08

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W'), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1. No excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. A W' with Sequential Standard Model couplings is excluded at the 95% credibility level for masses up to 2.55 TeV. Excited chiral bosons (W*) with equivalent coupling strength are excluded for masses up to 2.42 TeV.

  7. Search for a heavy neutral gauge boson in the dielectron channel with 5.4~fb$^{-1}$ of $\\mathbf{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s} = 1.96}$~TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abazov, V.; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We report the results of a search for a heavy neutral gauge boson Z' decaying into the dielectron final state using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model prediction is observed in the dielectron invariant-mass spectrum. We set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} Z') x BR(Z' {yields} ee) depending on the dielectron invariant mass. These cross section limits are used to determine lower mass limits for Z' bosons in a variety of models with standard model couplings and variable strength.

  8. Search for a heavy gauge boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino in 1 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s=7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Siegrist, James L.

    2011-11-01

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W'), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb⁻¹. No excess above Standard Model expectations is observed. A W' with Sequential Standard Model couplings is excluded at the 95% confidence level for masses up to 2.15 TeV.

  9. Measurement of the Zγ → ν ν ‾ γ production cross section in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV and limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ trilinear gauge boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Neveu, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Gecit, F. H.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozcan, M.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Kumar, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-01

    An inclusive measurement of the Zγ → ν ν ‾ γ production cross section in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8TeV is presented, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. This measurement is based on the observation of events with large missing energy and with a single photon with transverse momentum above 145GeV and absolute pseudorapidity in the range | η | < 1.44. The measured Zγ → ν ν ‾ γ production cross section, 52.7 ± 2.1 (stat) ± 6.4 (syst) ± 1.4 (lumi) fb, agrees well with the standard model prediction of 50.0-2.2+2.4 fb. A study of the photon transverse momentum spectrum yields the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ trilinear gauge boson couplings.

  10. Extended gauge sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1995-02-01

    Present and future prospects for the discovery of new gauge bosons, Z{prime} and W{prime}, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider searches for the W{prime} of the Left-Right Symmetric Model.

  11. Standard Model Gauge Couplings from Gauge-Dilatation Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagiri, Kosuke

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that the self-energy of the gauge bosons is quadratically divergent in the Standard Model when a simple cutoff is imposed. We demonstrate phenomenologically that the quadratic divergences in fact unify. The unification occurs at a surprisingly low scale, GeV. Suppose now that there is a spontaneously broken rotational symmetry between the space-time coordinates and gauge theoretical phases. The symmetry-breaking pattern is such that the gauge bosons arise as the massless Goldstone bosons, whereas the dilatonic mode acts as the massive (Higgs) boson, whose vacuum expectation value determines the gauge couplings. In this case, the quadratic divergences or the tadpoles of the gauge boson self-energy should indeed unify because these divergences need to be cancelled by a universal dilatonic contribution, assuming dynamical symmetry breaking. If there is dynamical symmetry breaking, we are in principle able to calculate the value of the gauge couplings as well as the scale hierarchy . We perform this calculation by adopting a naive quartic symmetry-breaking potential which unfortunately violates local gauge invariance. Using tadpole-cancellation and dilatonic self-energy conditions, the value of is then found to be approximately GeV in the Feynman gauge and GeV in the Landau gauge. The cancellation of an anomaly in the dilaton self-energy requires that the number of fermionic generations equals three. The symmetry-breaking needs to be driven by some other mass-generating mechanism such as electroweak symmetry breaking. Our estimation for is of the correct order if GeV.

  12. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gaugemore » couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  13. R-parity violating supersymmetric Barr-Zee type contributions to the fermion electric dipole moment with weak gauge boson exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2013-06-01

    The contribution of the R-parity violating trilinear couplings in the supersymmetric model to the fermion electric dipole moment is analyzed at the two-loop level. We show that in general, the Barr-Zee type contribution to the fermion electric dipole moment with the exchange of W and Z bosons is not small compared to the currently known photon exchange one with R-parity violating interactions. We will then give new upper bounds on the imaginary parts of R-parity violating couplings from the experimental data of the electric dipole moments of the electron and of the neutron. The effect due to bilinear R-parity violating couplings, which needs to be investigated separately, is not included in our analyses.

  14. Bosonization of Weyl Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Eduardo

    The electron, discovered by Thomson by the end of the nineteenth century, was the first experimentally observed particle. The Weyl fermion, though theoretically predicted since a long time, was observed in a condensed matter environment in an experiment reported only a few weeks ago. Is there any linking thread connecting the first and the last observed fermion (quasi)particles? The answer is positive. By generalizing the method known as bosonization, the first time in its full complete form, for a spacetime with 3+1 dimensions, we are able to show that both electrons and Weyl fermions can be expressed in terms of the same boson field, namely the Kalb-Ramond anti-symmetric tensor gauge field. The bosonized form of the Weyl chiral currents lead to the angle-dependent magneto-conductance behavior observed in these systems.

  15. A Gauge Theory of Massive Spin One Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Vivek M.; Srinivasan, V.

    2016-05-01

    An Abelian gauge theory describing dynamics of massive spin one bosons is constructed. This is achieved by appending to the Maxwell action, a gauge invariant mass term. The theory is quantised in temporal as well as Lorentz gauge, and the corresponding Hilbert spaces are constructed. In both the gauges, it is found that, the theory respects Lorentz invariance, locality, causality and unitarity.

  16. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  17. A Search for Dark Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-06-08

    Recent astrophysical and terrestrial experiments have motivated the proposal of a dark sector with GeV-scale gauge boson force carriers and new Higgs bosons. We present a search for a dark Higgs boson using 516 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector. We do not observe a significant signal and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the Standard Model-dark sector mixing angle and the dark sector coupling constant.

  18. Multilocal bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguelova, Iana I.

    2015-12-01

    We present a bilocal isomorphism between the algebra generated by a single real twisted boson field and the algebra of the boson βγ ghost system. As a consequence of this twisted vertex algebra isomorphism, we show that each of these two algebras possesses both untwisted and twisted Heisenberg bosonic currents, as well as three separate families of Virasoro fields. We show that this bilocal isomorphism generalizes to an isomorphism between the algebra generated by the twisted boson field with 2n points of localization and the algebra of the 2n symplectic bosons.

  19. Slave boson theories of correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woelfle, P.

    1995-05-01

    Slave boson theories of various models of correlated fermions are critically reviewed and several new results are presented. In the example of the Anderson impurity model the limitations of slave boson mean field theory are discussed. Self-consistent conserving approximations are compared with results obtained from the numerical renormalization group. The gauge field theory of the t-J-model is considered in the quasistatic approximation. It is shown that weak localization effects can give valuable information on the existence of gauge fields. Applications of the slave-boson approach due to Kotliar and Ruckenstein to the Hubbard model are also discussed.

  20. Supersymmetric composite gauge fields with compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Hitoshi; Rajpoot, Subhash

    2016-06-01

    We study supersymmetric composite gauge theory, supplemented with compensator mechanism. As our first example, we give the formulation of N = 1 supersymmetric non-Abelian composite gauge theory without the kinetic term of a non-Abelian gauge field. The important ingredient is the Proca-Stueckelberg-type compensator scalar field that makes the gauge-boson field equation non-singular, i.e., the field equation can be solved for the gauge field algebraically as a perturbative expansion. As our second example, we perform the gauging of chiral-symmetry for N = 1 supersymmetry in four dimensions by a composite gauge field. These results provide supporting evidence for the consistency of the mechanism that combines the composite gauge field formulations and compensator formulations, all unified under supersymmetry.

  1. Heavy Higgs bosons and the 2 TeV $W'$ boson

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-10-19

    The hints from the LHC for the existence of a W' boson of mass around 1.9 TeV point towards a certain SU(2) L × SU(2) R × U(1) B-L gauge theory with an extended Higgs sector. We show that the decays of the W' boson into heavy Higgs bosons have sizable branching fractions. Interpreting the ATLAS excess events in the search for same-sign lepton pairs plus b jets as arising from W' cascade decays, we then estimate that the masses of the heavy Higgs bosons are in the 400-700 GeV range.

  2. Heavy Higgs bosons and the 2 TeV $W'$ boson

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-10-19

    The hints from the LHC for the existence of a W' boson of mass around 1.9 TeV point towards a certain SU(2) L × SU(2) R × U(1) B-L gauge theory with an extended Higgs sector. We show that the decays of the W' boson into heavy Higgs bosons have sizable branching fractions. Interpreting the ATLAS excess events in the search for same-sign lepton pairs plus b jets as arising from W' cascade decays, we then estimate that the masses of the heavy Higgs bosons are in the 400-700 GeV range.

  3. Heavy Higgs bosons and the 2 TeV W ' boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-10-01

    The hints from the LHC for the existence of a W ' boson of mass around 1.9 TeV point towards a certain SU(2) L × SU(2) R × U(1) B- L gauge theory with an extended Higgs sector. We show that the decays of the W ' boson into heavy Higgs bosons have sizable branching fractions. Interpreting the ATLAS excess events in the search for same-sign lepton pairs plus b jets as arising from W ' cascade decays, we estimate that the masses of the heavy Higgs bosons are in the 400-700 GeV range.

  4. Improved effective vector boson approximation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernreuther, Werner; Chen, Long

    2016-03-01

    We reexamine the improved effective vector boson approximation which is based on two-vector-boson luminosities Lpol for the computation of weak gauge-boson hard scattering subprocesses V1V2→W in high-energy hadron-hadron or e-e+ collisions. We calculate these luminosities for the nine combinations of the transverse and longitudinal polarizations of V1 and V2 in the unitary and axial gauge. For these two gauge choices the quality of this approach is investigated for the reactions e-e+→W-W+νeν¯ e and e-e+→t t ¯ νeν¯ e using appropriate phase-space cuts.

  5. Nonquadratic gauge fixing and ghosts for gauge theories on the hypersphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, F. T.; McKeon, D. G. C.

    2011-10-01

    It has been suggested that using a gauge fixing Lagrangian that is not quadratic in a gauge fixing condition is most appropriate for gauge theories formulated on a hypersphere. We reexamine the appropriate ghost action that is to be associated with gauge fixing, applying a technique that has been used for ensuring that the propagator for a massless spin-two field is transverse and traceless. It is shown that this nonquadratic gauge fixing Lagrangian leads to two pair of complex Fermionic ghosts and two Bosonic real ghosts.

  6. Nonquadratic gauge fixing and ghosts for gauge theories on the hypersphere

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, F. T.; McKeon, D. G. C.

    2011-10-15

    It has been suggested that using a gauge fixing Lagrangian that is not quadratic in a gauge fixing condition is most appropriate for gauge theories formulated on a hypersphere. We reexamine the appropriate ghost action that is to be associated with gauge fixing, applying a technique that has been used for ensuring that the propagator for a massless spin-two field is transverse and traceless. It is shown that this nonquadratic gauge fixing Lagrangian leads to two pair of complex Fermionic ghosts and two Bosonic real ghosts.

  7. Di-boson production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    De Lentdecker, Gilles; /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present some precision measurements on electroweak physics performed at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Namely they report on the boson-pair production cross sections and on triple gauge boson couplings using proton anti-proton collisions collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 324 pb{sup -1}.

  8. Bosonic (meta)stabilization of cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. R.

    2013-02-01

    We consider the possibility of a bosonic (meta)stabilization of a cosmic gauge string loop due to the presence of a gas of low-mass bosonic particles which become trapped within the string core. This boson gas exerts a pressure which tends to counteract the string tension, allowing a circular string loop to find a finite equilibrium radius, provided that gas particles do not escape the string core. However, high-energy bosons do escape, and, consequently, the loop shrinks, and the temperature rises. Estimates indicate that the bosonic stabilization mechanism is ineffective, and the loop is unstable against decay.

  9. Stable Higgs Bosons - new candidate for cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hosotani, Yutaka

    2010-08-12

    The Higgs boson is in the backbone of the standard model of electroweak interactions. It must exist in some form for achieving unification of interactions. In the gauge-Higgs unification scenario the Higgs boson becomes a part of the extra-dimensional component of gauge fields. The Higgs boson becomes absolutely stable in a class of the gauge-Higgs unification models, serving as a promising candidate for cold dark matter in the universe. The observed relic abundance of cold dark matter is obtained with the Higgs mass around 70 GeV. The Higgs-nucleon scattering cross section is found to be close to the recent CDMS II XENON10 bounds in the direct detection of dark matter. In collider experiments stable Higgs bosons are produced in a pair, appearing as missing energies momenta so that the way of detecting Higgs bosons must be altered.

  10. Search for the Higgs Boson and for Anomalous Quartic Gauge Boson Couplings in the WW Channel with Dielectron Events with the D0 Experiment at the Tevatron; Recherche du boson de Higgs et de couplages de jauge quartiques anormaux dans le canal WW en électrons dans l'expérience D0 au Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Chapon, Emilien

    2013-01-01

    Le paysage de la physique des particules a subi des changements majeurs entre le début de cette thèse, en septembre 2010, et sa n en juin 2013. On peut notamment qualier l'année 2012 de date-clé dans l'histoire de la physique des particules. En 2012, une nouvelle particule a été découverte au LHC [1, 2], dont la majeure partie de la communauté s'accorde aujourd'hui à dire qu'il s'agit très probablement du boson de Higgs. Cet événement est intervenu peu après une sorte de passage de relais entre le Tevatron, arrêté le 30 septembre 2011, et le LHC, dont les toutes premières collisions sont intervenues le 23 novembre 2009.

  11. pp{yields}jje{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{nu} and jje{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{nu} at O({alpha}{sub em}{sup 6}) and O({alpha}{sub em}{sup 4}{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) for the study of the quartic electroweak gauge boson vertex at CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Eboli, O. J. P.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Mizukoshi, J. K.

    2006-10-01

    We analyze the potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to study the structure of quartic vector-boson interactions through the pair production of electroweak gauge bosons via weak boson fusion qq{yields}qqWW. In order to study these couplings we have performed a partonic level calculation of all processes pp{yields}jje{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{nu} and pp{yields}jje{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{nu} at the LHC using the exact matrix elements at O({alpha}{sub em}{sup 6}) and O({alpha}{sub em}{sup 4}{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) as well as a full simulation of the tt plus 0 to 2 jets backgrounds. A complete calculation of the scattering amplitudes is necessary not only for a correct description of the process but also to preserve all correlations between the final-state particles which can be used to enhance the signal. Our analyses indicate that the LHC can improve by more than 1 order of magnitude the bounds arising at the present from indirect measurements.

  12. Exotic Quantum States of Rashba Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakyan, Tigran; Kamenev, Alex; Glazman, Leonid

    2013-03-01

    The recently discovered spin-orbit coupled boson systems are remarkable for their capacity to explore physics that may not be revealed in any other way. The spin-orbit couplings, which can be artificially engineered in cold-atom experiments, in many instances lead to single-particle dispersion relations exhibiting multiple minima or even degenerate manifold of minimal energy states. It is entirely the effect of collisions (i.e. boson-boson interactions) which lifts this degeneracy and leads to an amazing variety of completely new quantum many-body states. This talk describes a theoretical discovery of a novel phase of matter that realizes for Rashba spin-orbit coupled bosons, where, at low densities, bosons essentially redress themselves and behave as fermions. This state is a composite fermion state with a Chern-Simons gauge field and filling factor one.

  13. Two guage-boson physics at very high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1992-05-01

    Use of rapidity-gap signature can lead to observation of interesting processes involving collisions of gauge-bosons at the SSC. This includes production of the heavy Higgs boson (500 GeV-1 TeV), which appears straightforward.

  14. Search for low-mass dark-sector Higgs bosons.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Benitez, J F; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-05-25

    Recent astrophysical and terrestrial experiments have motivated the proposal of a dark sector with GeV-scale gauge boson force carriers and new Higgs bosons. We present a search for a dark Higgs boson using 516 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector. We do not observe a significant signal and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the standard model-dark-sector mixing angle and the dark-sector coupling constant. PMID:23003239

  15. Triple and quartic gauge couplings at LEP 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunelière, R.

    We review the status of published and preliminary measurements of triple and quartic gauge boson couplings from the four LEP experiments. Charged current triple gauge boson couplings (WWZ and WWγ) are measured using W-pair, single-W and single-γ productions with the data collected between 1997 and 2000 (700\\ pb-1 per experiment). Neutral current triple gauge boson couplings are studied with Zγ (Zγγ* and ZγZ* vertices) and ZZ (ZZγ* and ZZZ* vertices) events. Limits on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings with at least one photon (WWγγ, WWZγ and ZZγγ) are set from WWγ, q¯ {q}γ γ and ν ¯ {ν }γ γ events. No strong deviations from the Standard Model expectations are found.

  16. Interferometry with synthetic gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Taylor, Jacob M.; Galitski, Victor M.

    2011-03-15

    We propose a compact atom interferometry scheme for measuring weak, time-dependent accelerations. Our proposal uses an ensemble of dilute trapped bosons with two internal states that couple to a synthetic gauge field with opposite charges. The trapped gauge field couples spin to momentum to allow time-dependent accelerations to be continuously imparted on the internal states. We generalize this system to reduce noise and estimate the sensitivity of such a system to be S{approx}10{sup -7}(m/s{sup 2}/{radical}(Hz)).

  17. On the trail of the Higgs boson

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peskin, Michael E.

    2015-09-11

    I review theoretical issues associated with the Higgs boson and the mystery of spontaneous breaking of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In addition, this essay is intended as an introduction to the special issue of Annalen der Physik, “Particle Physics after the Higgs”.

  18. Mini force: The (B -L )+x Y gauge interaction with a light mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Sung; Yun, Seokhoon

    2016-06-01

    The relevant phenomenology and the best search schemes of a subelectroweak-scale gauge boson can be vastly different depending on its coupling. For instance, the rare decay into a light gauge boson and the high precision parity test can be sensitive if it has an axial coupling. The minimal gauge extension of the standard model with the U (1 )B-L +x Y requires only three right-handed neutrinos, well suited to the current neutrino mass and mixing data, and no additional exotic matter fields. We study the light gauge boson of this symmetry in detail, including its axial coupling property from the hypercharge shift.

  19. Gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, R.

    1989-06-01

    This article is a survey of the history and ideas of gauge theory. Described here are the gradual emergence of symmetry as a driving force in the shaping of physical theory; the elevation of Noether's theorem, relating symmetries to conservation laws, to a fundamental principle of nature; and the force of the idea (''the gauge principle'') that the symmetries of nature, like the interactions themselves, should be local in character. The fundamental role of gauge fields in mediating the interactions of physics springs from Noether's theorem and the gauge principle in a remarkably clean and elegant way, leaving, however, some tantalizing loose ends that might prove to be the clue to a future deeper level of understanding. The example of the electromagnetic field as the prototype gauge theory is discussed in some detail and serves as the basis for examining the similarities and differences that emerge in generalizing to non-Abelian gauge theories. The article concludes with a brief examination of the dream of total unification: all the forces of nature in a single unified gauge theory, with the differences among the forces due to the specific way in which the fundamental symmetries are broken in the local environment.

  20. Complementarity between nonstandard Higgs boson searches and precision Higgs boson measurements in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Haber, Howard E.; Low, Ian; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2015-02-03

    Precision measurements of the Higgs boson properties at the LHC provide relevant constraints on possible weak-scale extensions of the Standard Model (SM). In the context of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) these constraints seem to suggest that all the additional, non-SM-like Higgs bosons should be heavy, with masses larger than about 400 GeV. This article shows that such results do not hold when the theory approaches the conditions for “alignment independent of decoupling,” where the lightest CP-even Higgs boson has SM-like tree-level couplings to fermions and gauge bosons, independently of the nonstandard Higgs boson masses. In addition, the combination of current bounds from direct Higgs boson searches at the LHC, along with the alignment conditions, have a significant impact on the allowed MSSM parameter space yielding light additional Higgs bosons. In particular, after ensuring the correct mass for the lightest CP-even Higgs boson, we find that precision measurements and direct searches are complementary and may soon be able to probe the region of non-SM-like Higgs boson with masses below the top quark pair mass threshold of 350 GeV and low to moderate values of tanβ.

  1. Complementarity between nonstandard Higgs boson searches and precision Higgs boson measurements in the MSSM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carena, Marcela; Haber, Howard E.; Low, Ian; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2015-02-03

    Precision measurements of the Higgs boson properties at the LHC provide relevant constraints on possible weak-scale extensions of the Standard Model (SM). In the context of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) these constraints seem to suggest that all the additional, non-SM-like Higgs bosons should be heavy, with masses larger than about 400 GeV. This article shows that such results do not hold when the theory approaches the conditions for “alignment independent of decoupling,” where the lightest CP-even Higgs boson has SM-like tree-level couplings to fermions and gauge bosons, independently of the nonstandard Higgs boson masses. In addition, the combinationmore » of current bounds from direct Higgs boson searches at the LHC, along with the alignment conditions, have a significant impact on the allowed MSSM parameter space yielding light additional Higgs bosons. In particular, after ensuring the correct mass for the lightest CP-even Higgs boson, we find that precision measurements and direct searches are complementary and may soon be able to probe the region of non-SM-like Higgs boson with masses below the top quark pair mass threshold of 350 GeV and low to moderate values of tanβ.« less

  2. Leptophobic Boson Signals with Leptons, Jets and Missing Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.

    2015-06-14

    Color-singlet gauge bosons with renormalizable couplings to quarks but not to leptons must interact with additional fermions (''anomalons'') required to cancel the gauge anomalies. Analyzing the decays of such leptophobic bosons into anomalons, I show that they produce final states involving leptons at the LHC. Resonant production of a flavor-universal leptophobic Z' boson leads to cascade decays via anomalons, whose signatures include a leptonically decaying Z, missing energy and several jets. A Z' boson that couples to the right-handed quarks of the first and second generations undergoes cascade decays that violate lepton universality and include signals with two leptons and jets, or with a Higgs boson, a lepton, a W and missing energy.

  3. A supersymmetric extension of quantum gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.; Scharf, G.

    2003-01-01

    We consider a supersymmetric extension of quantum gauge theory based on a vector multiplet containing supersymmetric partners of spin 3/2 for the vector fields. The constructions of the model follows closely the usual construction of gauge models in the Epstein-Glaser framework for perturbative field theory. Accordingly, all the arguments are completely of quantum nature without reference to a classical supersymmetric theory. As an application we consider the supersymmetric electroweak theory. The resulting self-couplings of the gauge bosons agree with the standard model up to a divergence.

  4. Origin of gauge invariance in string theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, G. T.; Strominger, A.

    1986-01-01

    A first quantization of the space-time embedding Chi exp mu and the world-sheet metric rho of the open bosonic string. The world-sheet metric rho decouples from S-matrix elements in 26 dimensions. This formulation of the theory naturally includes 26-dimensional gauge transformations. The gauge invariance of S-matrix elements is a direct consequence of the decoupling of rho. Second quantization leads to a string field Phi(Chi exp mu, rho) with a gauge-covariant equation of motion.

  5. Building projected entangled pair states with a local gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Burrello, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Tensor network states, and in particular projected entangled pair states (PEPS), suggest an innovative approach for the study of lattice gauge theories, both from a pure theoretic point of view, and as a tool for the analysis of the recent proposals for quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories. In this paper we present a framework for describing locally gauge invariant states on lattices using PEPS. The PEPS constructed hereby shall include both bosonic and fermionic states, suitable for all combinations of matter and gauge fields in lattice gauge theories defined by either finite or compact Lie groups.

  6. The gauge-Higgs legacy of the LHC Run I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butter, Anja; Éboli, Oscar J. P.; Gonzalez-Fraile, J.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Plehn, Tilman; Rauch, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The effective Lagrangian expansion provides a framework to study effects of new physics at the electroweak scale. To make full use of LHC data in constraining higher-dimensional operators we need to include both the Higgs and the electroweak gauge sector in our study. We first present an analysis of the relevant di-boson production LHC results to update constraints on triple gauge boson couplings. Our bounds are several times stronger than those obtained from LEP data. Next, we show how in combination with Higgs measurements the triple gauge vertices lead to a significant improvement in the entire set of operators, including operators describing Higgs couplings.

  7. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain 1/2-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  8. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-28

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain (1/2)-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  9. Nonquadratic gauge fixing and global gauge invariance in the effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, F. T.; McKeon, D. G. C.

    2009-04-15

    The possibility of having a gauge fixing term in the effective Lagrangian that is not a quadratic expression has been explored in spin-two theories so as to have a propagator that is both traceless and transverse. We first show how this same approach can be used in spontaneously broken gauge theories as an alternate to the 't Hooft gauge fixing which avoids terms quadratic in the scalar fields. This 'nonquadratic' gauge fixing in the effective action results in two complex fermionic and one real bosonic ghost field. A global gauge invariance involving a fermionic gauge parameter, analogous to the usual Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin invariance, is present in this effective action.

  10. Chern Simons bosonization along RG flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minwalla, Shiraz; Yokoyama, Shuichi

    2016-02-01

    It has previously been conjectured that the theory of free fundamental scalars minimally coupled to a Chern Simons gauge field is dual to the theory of critical fundamental fermions minimally coupled to a level rank dual Chern Simons gauge field. In this paper we study RG flows away from these two fixed points by turning on relevant operators. In the 't Hooft large N limit we compute the thermal partition along each of these flows and find a map of parameters under which the two partition functions agree exactly with each other all the way from the UV to the IR. We conjecture that the bosonic and fermionic RG flows are dual to each other under this map of parameters. Our flows can be tuned to end at the gauged critical scalar theory and gauged free fermionic theories respectively. Assuming the validity of our conjecture, this tuned trajectory may be viewed as RG flow from the gauged theory of free bosons to the gauged theory of free fermions.

  11. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  12. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  13. Hidden sector dark matters and elusive Higgs boson(s) at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.

    2012-07-27

    We consider two types of hidden sector dark matters (DM's), with and without QCD-like new strong interaction with confinement properties, and their interplays with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. Assuming the hidden sector has only fermions (and gauge bosons in case of strongly interacting hidden sector), we have to introduce a real singlet scalar boson S as a messenger between the SM and the hidden sector dark matters. This singlet scalar will mix with the SM Higgs boson h, and we expect there are two Higgs-like scalar bosons H{sub 1} and H{sub 2}. Imposing all the relevant constraints from collider search bounds on Higgs boson, DM scattering cross section on proton and thermal relic density, we find that one of the two Higgs-like scalar bosons can easily escape the detections at the LHC. Recent results on the Higgs-like new boson with mass around with 125 GeV from the LHC will constrain this class of models, which is left for future study.

  14. Comparison of associated Higgs boson-radion and Higgs boson pair production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, E.; Keizerov, S.; Rakhmetov, E.; Svirina, K.

    2016-07-01

    Many models—in particular, the brane-world models with two branes—predict the existence of the scalar radion, whose mass can be somewhat smaller than those of all the Kaluza-Klein modes of the graviton and Standard Model (SM) particles. Due to its origin the radion interacts with the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of the SM. The fermion part of the radion interaction Lagrangian is different from that for the SM Higgs boson due to the presence of additional terms playing a role for off-shell fermions. It was shown previously [Phys. Rev. D 90, 095026 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.095026] that for the case of the single radion and single Higgs boson production processes in association with an arbitrary number of SM gauge bosons all the contributions to the perturbative amplitudes appearing due to these additional terms were canceled out, making the processes similar up to a replacement of masses and overall coupling constants. For the case of the associated Higgs boson-radion and the Higgs boson pair-production processes involving the SM gauge bosons, the similarity property also appears. However, a detailed consideration shows that in this case it is not enough to simply replace the masses and the constants (mh→mr and v →Λr). One should also rescale the triple Higgs coupling by the factor ξ ≡1 +m/r2-mh2 3 mh2 .

  15. LHC Higgs signatures from extended electroweak gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Chen, Ning; He, Hong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    We study LHC Higgs signatures from the extended electroweak gauge symmetry SU(2) ⊗ SU(2) ⊗ U(1). Under this gauge structure, we present an effective UV completion of the 3-site moose model with ideal fermion delocalization, which contains two neutral Higgs states ( h, H) plus three new gauge bosons ( W ' , Z '). We study the unitarity, and reveal that the exact E 2 cancellation in the longitudinal V L V L scattering amplitudes is achieved by the joint role of exchanging both spin-1 new gauge bosons W ' /Z ' and spin-0 Higgs bosons h/H. We identify the lighter Higgs state h with mass 125 GeV, and derive the unitarity bound on the mass of heavier Higgs boson H. The parameter space of this model is highly predictive. We study the production and decay signals of this 125 GeV Higgs boson h at the LHC. We demonstrate that the h Higgs boson can naturally have enhanced signals in the diphoton channel gg → h → γγ, while the event rates in the reactions gg → h → W W ∗ and gg → h → ZZ ∗ are generally suppressed relative to the SM expectation. Searching the h Higgs boson via the associated production and the vector boson fusions are also discussed for our model. We further analyze the LHC signals of the heavier Higgs boson H as a new physics discriminator from the SM. For wide mass-ranges of H, we derive constraints from the existing LHC searches, and study the discovery potential of H at the LHC (8 TeV) and LHC (14 TeV).

  16. Topological Physics of Little Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.; Hill, Richard J.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Topological interactions will generally occur in composite Higgs or Little Higgs theories, extra-dimensional gauge theories in which A5 plays the role of a Higgs boson, and among the pNGB's of technicolor. This phenomena arises from the chiral and anomaly structure of the underlying UV completion theory, and/or through chiral delocalization in higher dimensions. These effects are described by a full Wess-Zumino-Witten term involving gauge fields and pNGB's. We give a general discussion of these interactions, some of which may have novel signatures at future colliders, such as the LHC and ILC.

  17. Gauge mediated mini-split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Knapen, Simon

    2016-03-01

    We propose a simple model of split supersymmetry from gauge mediation. This model features gauginos that are parametrically a loop factor lighter than scalars, accommodates a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, and incorporates a simple solution to the μ- b μ problem. The gaugino mass suppression can be understood as resulting from collective symmetry breaking. Imposing collider bounds on μ and requiring viable electroweak symmetry breaking implies small a-terms and small tan β — the stop mass ranges from 105 to 108 GeV. In contrast with models with anomaly + gravity mediation (which also predict a one-loop loop suppression for gaugino masses), our gauge mediated scenario predicts aligned squark masses and a gravitino LSP. Gluinos, electroweakinos and Higgsinos can be accessible at the LHC and/or future colliders for a wide region of the allowed parameter space.

  18. Gauge-Higgs EW and grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosotani, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Four-dimensional Higgs field is identified with the extra-dimensional component of gauge potentials in the gauge-Higgs unification scenario. SO(5) × U(1) gauge-Higgs EW unification in the Randall-Sundrum warped space is successful at low energies. The Higgs field appears as an Aharonov-Bohm phase 𝜃H in the fifth dimension. Its mass is generated at the quantum level and is finite. The model yields almost the same phenomenology as the standard model for 𝜃H < 0.1, and predicts Z‧ bosons around 6-10 TeV with very broad widths. The scenario is generalized to SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unification. Fermions are introduced in the spinor and vector representations of SO(11). Proton decay is naturally forbidden.

  19. Standard model with partial gauge invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkareuli, J. L.; Kepuladze, Z.

    2012-03-01

    We argue that an exact gauge invariance may disable some generic features of the Standard Model which could otherwise manifest themselves at high energies. One of them might be related to the spontaneous Lorentz invariance violation (SLIV), which could provide an alternative dynamical approach to QED and Yang-Mills theories with photon and non-Abelian gauge fields appearing as massless Nambu-Goldstone bosons. To see some key features of the new physics expected we propose partial rather than exact gauge invariance in an extended SM framework. This principle applied, in some minimal form, to the weak hypercharge gauge field B μ and its interactions, leads to SLIV with B field components appearing as the massless Nambu-Goldstone modes, and provides a number of distinctive Lorentz breaking effects. Being naturally suppressed at low energies they may become detectable in high energy physics and astrophysics. Some of the most interesting SLIV processes are considered in significant detail.

  20. Di-boson physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Goshaw, A.T.; /Duke U.

    2005-07-01

    A summary is presented of recent measurements of di-boson production at the Tevatron. The results from the CDF and D0 experiments are based upon 130-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, WW, and WZ production properties are compared to Standard Model predictions, and limits extracted for anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  1. Spectra, triple, and quartic gauge couplings in a Higgsless model

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Wu Xiaohong; Yan Qishu

    2007-12-01

    Spectra, triple, and quartic gauge couplings of the Higgsless model with gauge group SU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sub B-L} defined in warped space are explored with a numerical method. We extend the equation of motions, boundary conditions, and formalism of multi-gauge-boson vertices to the Hirn-Sanz scenario. By assuming the ideally delocalized fermion profile, we study the spectra of vector bosons as well as the triple and quartic gauge couplings among vector bosons. It is found that mass spectra can be greatly modified by the parameters of QCD power corrections. Meanwhile, the triple and quartic gauge couplings can deviate from the values of the standard model to at least {+-}10% and can saturate the LEP2 bounds. We find the triple gauge couplings of ZWW can be 50% smaller than the unitarity bounds. The triple gauge couplings of ZWW is 20% smaller than the unitarity bounds, which might challenge the detection of Z via s channel at LHC if m{sub Z}>500 GeV.

  2. Gauge invariant actions for string models

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, T.

    1986-06-01

    String models of unified interactions are elegant sets of Feynman rules for the scattering of gravitons, gauge bosons, and a host of massive excitations. The purpose of these lectures is to describe the progress towards a nonperturbative formulation of the theory. Such a formulation should make the geometrical meaning of string theory manifest and explain the many ''miracles'' exhibited by the string Feynman rules. There are some new results on gauge invariant observables, on the cosmological constant, and on the symmetries of interacting string field theory. 49 refs.

  3. The Higgs Boson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltman, Martinus J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports recent findings related to the particle Higgs boson and examines its possible contribution to the standard mode of elementary processes. Critically explores the strengths and uncertainties of the Higgs boson and proposed Higgs field. (ML)

  4. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Goldman, N; Juzeliūnas, G; Öhberg, P; Spielman, I B

    2014-12-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle-the graviton-that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms 'feeling' laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials-both Abelian and non-Abelian-in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms. PMID:25422950

  5. Minimal Basis for Gauge Theory Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2009-10-16

    Identities based on monodromy for integrations in string theory are used to derive relations between different color-ordered tree-level amplitudes in both bosonic and supersymmetric string theory. These relations imply that the color-ordered tree-level n-point gauge theory amplitudes can be expanded in a minimal basis of (n-3)exclamation amplitudes. This result holds for any choice of polarizations of the external states and in any number of dimensions.

  6. Neutral triple and quartic gauge couplings at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofierzynski, R.

    2002-06-01

    The possible existence of neutral triple ZZZ, ZZγ and Zγγ and quartic ZZγγ gauge boson couplings is investigated. Based on data collected at LEP2 at centre-of-mass energies up to 208 GeV no evidence has been found for such couplings. Preliminary limits for neutral triple gauge couplings as obtained from the combination of the LEP experiments are presented.

  7. Generalizing twisted gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Duenas-Vidal, Alvaro; Vazquez-Mozo, Miguel A.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the twisting of gauge symmetry in noncommutative gauge theories and show how this can be generalized to a whole continuous family of twisted gauge invariances. The physical relevance of these twisted invariances is discussed.

  8. Gauge covariant fermion propagator in quenched, chirally symmetric quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Dong, Z.; Munczek, H.J.

    1995-08-01

    The chirally symmetric solution of the massless, quenched, Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) for the fermion propagator in three- and four-dimensional quantum electrodynamics was obtained. The DSEs are a valuable nonperturbative tool for studying field theories. In recent years a good deal of progress was made in addressing the limitations of the DSE approach in the study of Abelian gauge theories. Key to this progress is an understanding of the role of the dressed fermion/gauge-boson vertex in ensuring gauge covariance and multiplicative renormalizability of the solution of the fermion DSE. The solutions we obtain are manifestly gauge covariant and a general gauge covariance constraint on the fermion/gauge-boson vertex is presented, which motivates a vertex Ansatz that, for the first time, both satisfies the Ward identity when the fermion self-mass is zero and ensures gauge covariance of the fermion propagator. This research facilitates gauge-invariant, nonperturbative studies of continuum quantum electrodynamics and has already been used by others in studies of the chiral phase transition.

  9. Electroweak theory based on S U (4 )L⊗U (1 )X gauge group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, H. N.; Hue, L. T.; Loi, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    This paper includes two main parts. In the first part, we present generalized gauge models based on the S U (3 )C⊗S U (4 )L⊗U (1 )X (3-4-1) gauge group with arbitrary electric charges of exotic leptons. The mixing matrix of neutral gauge bosons is analyzed, and the eigenmasses and eigenstates are obtained. The anomaly-free as well as matching conditions are discussed precisely. In the second part, we present a new development of the original 3-4-1 model [R. Foot, H. N. Long, and T. A. Tran, Phys. Rev. D 50, R34 (1994), F. Pisano and V. Pleitez, Phys. Rev. D 51, 3865 (1995).]. Different from previous works, in this paper the neutrinos, with the help of the scalar decuplet H , get the Dirac masses at the tree level. The vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the Higgs boson field in the decuplet H acquiring the VEV responsible for neutrino Dirac mass leads to mixing in separated pairs of singly charged gauge bosons, namely the Standard Model (SM) W boson and K , the new gauge boson acting in the right-handed lepton sector, as well as the singly charged bileptons X and Y . Due to the mixing, there occurs a right-handed current carried by the W boson. From the expression of the electromagnetic coupling constant, ones get the limit of the sine-squared of the Weinberg angle, sin2θW<0.25 , and a constraint on electric charges of extra leptons. In the limit of lepton number conservation, the Higgs sector contains all massless Goldstone bosons for massive gauge bosons and the SM-like Higgs boson. Some phenomenology is discussed.

  10. On Gauge Independent Dynamical Chiral Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Raya, A.

    2006-09-25

    Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDEs) are an ideal framework to study nonperturbative phenomena such as dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB). Loss of gauge invariance is an obstacle to achieve fully reliable predictions from these equations. In addition to Ward-Green-Takahashi identity (WGTI), Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformations (LKFT) also play an important role in restoring the said invariance at the level of physical observables. On one hand, they impose useful constraints on the transverse part of the fermion-boson vertex and on the other, they govern the change in dynamically generated fermion propagator with a variation of gauge. We consider the latter in this article and study the gauge (in)dependence of chiral condensate in quantum electrodynamics in (2+1) space-time dimensions (QED3)

  11. Light Z' bosons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Matthew R.; Hooper, Dan; Kopp, Joachim; Neil, Ethan T.

    2011-06-10

    New gauge bosons with standard model-like couplings to leptons are constrained by collider searches to be heavier than approximately ~1 TeV. A Z' boson with suppressed couplings to leptons, however, could be much lighter and possess substantial couplings to standard model quarks. In this article, we consider a new leptophobic Z' gauge boson as a simple and well-motivated extension of the standard model, and discuss several of its possible signatures at the Tevatron. We find that three of the recent anomalies reported from the Tevatron—in particular, the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry and excesses in the 3b and W+2 jets final states—could be explained by a new Z' with a mass of approximately 150 GeV, relatively large couplings to quarks, and suppressed couplings to electrons and muons. Moreover, we find that such a particle could also mediate the interactions of dark matter, leading to potentially interesting implications for direct detection experiments.

  12. Light Z' bosons at the Tevatron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buckley, Matthew R.; Hooper, Dan; Kopp, Joachim; Neil, Ethan T.

    2011-06-10

    New gauge bosons with standard model-like couplings to leptons are constrained by collider searches to be heavier than approximately ~1 TeV. A Z' boson with suppressed couplings to leptons, however, could be much lighter and possess substantial couplings to standard model quarks. In this article, we consider a new leptophobic Z' gauge boson as a simple and well-motivated extension of the standard model, and discuss several of its possible signatures at the Tevatron. We find that three of the recent anomalies reported from the Tevatron—in particular, the top-quark forward-backward asymmetry and excesses in the 3b and W+2 jets final states—couldmore » be explained by a new Z' with a mass of approximately 150 GeV, relatively large couplings to quarks, and suppressed couplings to electrons and muons. Moreover, we find that such a particle could also mediate the interactions of dark matter, leading to potentially interesting implications for direct detection experiments.« less

  13. U(1) gauge symmetry breaking in a charged closed universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.E. ); Lee, T. )

    1990-10-30

    In this paper, the authors obtain the consistency condition on a U(1) gauge boson mass in a charged closed universe, m{sup 2} = 8{pi}GJ{sup 0}J{sub 0}/(R {minus} 2{Lambda}), where J{sup 0} is the charge density.

  14. Invisible Higgs boson decays in spontaneously broken R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, M.; Valle, J.W.F.; Villanova del Moral, A.

    2004-10-01

    The Higgs boson may decay mainly to an invisible mode characterized by missing energy, instead of the standard model channels. This is a generic feature of many models where neutrino masses arise from the spontaneous breaking of ungauged lepton number at relatively low scales, such as spontaneously broken R-parity models. Taking these models as framework, we reanalyze this striking suggestion in view of the recent data on neutrino oscillations that indicate nonzero neutrino masses. We show that, despite the smallness of neutrino masses, the Higgs boson can decay mainly to the invisible Goldstone boson associated to the spontaneous breaking of lepton number. This requires a gauge singlet superfield coupling to the electroweak doublet Higgses, as in the next to minimal supersymmetric standard model scenario for solving the {mu} problem. The search for invisibly decaying Higgs bosons should be taken into account in the planning of future accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider and the Next Linear Collider.

  15. New Fixed-Target Experiments to Search for Dark Gauge Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, James D.; Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP

    2010-06-11

    Fixed-target experiments are ideally suited for discovering new MeV-GeV mass U(1) gauge bosons through their kinetic mixing with the photon. In this paper, we identify the production and decay properties of new light gauge bosons that dictate fixed-target search strategies. We summarize existing limits and suggest five new experimental approaches that we anticipate can cover most of the natural parameter space, using currently operating GeV-energy beams and well-established detection methods. Such experiments are particularly timely in light of recent terrestrial and astrophysical anomalies (PAMELA, FERMI, DAMA/LIBRA, etc.) consistent with dark matter charged under a new gauge force.

  16. Elementary Goldstone Higgs boson and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanne, Tommi; Gertov, Helene; Sannino, Francesco; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a perturbative extension of the Standard Model featuring elementary pseudo-Goldstone Higgs and dark matter particles. These are two of the five Goldstone bosons parametrizing the SU(4)/Sp(4) coset space. They acquire masses, and therefore become pseudo-Goldstone bosons, due to the embedding of the Yukawa and the electroweak gauge interactions that do not preserve the full SU(4) symmetry. At the one-loop order, the top corrections dominate and align the vacuum in the direction where the Higgs is mostly a pseudo-Goldstone boson. Because of the perturbative and elementary nature of the theory, the quantum corrections are precisely calculable. The remaining pseudo-Goldstone boson is identified with the dark matter candidate because it is neutral with respect to the Standard Model and stable. By a direct comparison with the Large Hadron Collider experiments, the model is found to be phenomenologically viable. Furthermore the dark matter particle leads to the observed thermal relic density while respecting the most stringent current experimental constraints.

  17. D0 results on W boson properties

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, K.

    1997-06-01

    The D0 experiment collected {approx} 15 pb{sup -1} in run 1A (1992- 1993) and {approx}89 pb{sup -1} in run 1B (1994-1995) of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. Results from analyses of events with W and Z bosons are presented for the run 1B data samples. From W {yields} e{nu}, {mu}{nu} and Z {yields} ee, {mu}{mu} decays, the W and Z production cross sections and the W width are determined. Events with W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays are used to determine the ratio of the electroweak gauge coupling constants as a measure of lepton universality. Using W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee decays, the W boson mass is measured.

  18. Precision Probes of a Leptophobic Z' Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Matthew R.; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2012-03-01

    Extensions of the Standard Model that contain leptophobic Z' gauge bosons are theoretically interesting but difficult to probe directly in high-energy hadron colliders. However, precision measurements of Standard Model neutral current processes can provide powerful indirect tests. We demonstrate that parity-violating deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons off of deuterium offer a unique probe leptophobic Z' bosons with axial quark couplings and masses above 100 GeV. In addition to covering a wide range of previously uncharted parameter space, planned measurements of the deep inelastic parity-violating eD asymmetry would be capable of testing leptophobic Z' scenarios proposed to explain the CDF W plus dijet anomaly.

  19. Towards the natural gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ran; Li, Tianjun; Wang, Liucheng; Zhu, Bin

    2015-10-01

    The sweet spot supersymmetry (SUSY) solves the μ/ B μ problem in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with gauge mediated SUSY breaking (GMSB) via the generalized Giudice-Masiero (GM) mechanism where only the μ-term and soft Higgs masses are generated at the unification scale of the Grand Unified Theory (GUT) due to the approximate PQ symmetry. Because all the other SUSY breaking soft terms are generated via the GMSB below the GUT scale, there exists SUSY electroweak (EW) fine-tuning problem to explain the 125 GeV Higgs boson mass due to small trilinear soft term. Thus, to explain the Higgs boson mass, we propose the GMSB with both the generalized GM mechanism and Higgs-messenger interactions. The renormalization group equations are runnings from the GUT scale down to EW scale. So the EW symmetry breaking can be realized easier. We can keep the gauge coupling unification and solution to the flavor problem in the GMSB, as well as solve the μ/ B μ -problem. Moreover, there are only five free parameters in our model. So we can determine the characteristic low energy spectra and explore its distinct phenomenology. The fine-tuning measure can be as low as 100. For some benchmark points, the stop mass can be as low as 1.7 TeV while the glunio mass is around 2.5 TeV. The gravitino dark matter can come from a thermal production with the correct relic density and be consistent with the thermal leptogenesis. Because gluino and stop can be relatively light in our model, how to search for such GMSB at the upcoming run II of the LHC experiment could be very interesting.

  20. Light Higgs bosons in NMSSM at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchait, Monoranjan; Kumar, Jacky

    2016-04-01

    The next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) with an extended Higgs sector offers at least one Higgs boson as the Standard Model (SM)-like Higgs with a mass around 125 GeV. In this work, we revisit the mass spectrum and couplings of non-SM-like Higgs bosons taking into consideration most relevant constraints and identify the relevant parameter space. The discovery potential of these non-SM-like Higgs bosons, apart from their masses, is guided by their couplings with gauge bosons and fermions which are very much parameter space sensitive. We evaluate the rates of productions of these non-SM-like Higgs bosons at the LHC for a variety of decay channels in the allowed region of the parameter space. Although bb¯, ττ modes appear to be the most promising decay channels, but for a substantial region of parameter space the two-photon decay mode has a remarkably large rate. In this study we emphasize that this diphoton mode can be exploited to find the non-SM-like Higgs bosons of the NMSSM and can also be a potential avenue to distinguish the NMSSM from the MSSM. In addition, we discuss briefly the various detectable signals of these non-SM Higgs bosons at the LHC.

  1. A composite model of quarks and bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    A composite model of quarks and bosons is proposed in which a spin 1/2 isospin doublet ψ is the basic building block of quarks and bosons in the standard model. The ψ has two components v and w with charges Q = (1)/(3)e and Q = 0, respectively, that combine to form the three generations of colored quark flavors. A strong force described by a triplet of massless gluons binds the constituents called geminis. The confining constituent non-Abelian SU(2)C field theory is called constituent dynamics with a confining energy scale ΛCD. The constituent dynamics condensate <\\bar {v}v+\\bar {w}w>!=q 0 spontaneously breaks the electroweak symmetry SU(2)L×U(1)Y→U(1)EM and a triplet of Nambu-Goldstone bosons make the gauge bosons W± and Z0 massive, while retaining a massless photon. A global custodial SU(2)L×SU(2)R symmetry guarantees that the symmetry breaking in the weak interaction sector agrees with electroweak data. The non-Abelian SU(2)C color dynamics satisfies asymptotic freedom, which resolves the gauge and Higgs mass hierarchy problems and makes the model ultraviolet complete. The composite constituent dynamics model can realize a SU(3)C×SU(2)L×U(1)Y electroweak and strong interaction model that satisfies the naturalness principle. The three generations of colorless quarks α and β with charges Q = +1e and Q = 0, respectively, which are predicted to exist in the composite model can form bound states which can be identified with the spectrum of exotic mesons.

  2. Scattering of stringy states in compactified closed bosonic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharana, Jnanadeva

    2015-07-01

    We present scattering of stringy states of closed bosonic string compactified on torus Td. We focus our attention on scattering of moduli and gauge bosons. These states appear when massless excitations such as graviton and antisymmetric tensor field of the uncompactified theory are dimensionally reduced to lower dimension. The toroidally compactified theory is endowed with the T-duality symmetry, O (d, d). Therefore, it is expected that the amplitude for scattering of such states will be T-duality invariant. The formalism of Kawai-Lewellen-Tye is adopted and appropriately tailored to construct the vertex operators of moduli and gauge bosons. It is shown, in our approach, that N-point amplitude is T-duality invariant. We present illustrative examples for the four point amplitude to explicitly demonstrate the economy of our formalism when three spatial dimensions are compactified on T3. It is also shown that if we construct an amplitude with a set of 'initial' backgrounds, the T-duality operation transforms it to an amplitude associated with another set backgrounds. We propose a modified version of KLT approach to construct vertex operators for nonabelian massless gauge bosons which appear in certain compactification schemes.

  3. Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in Weak Boson Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollik, Wolfgang; Plehn, Tilman; Rauch, Michael; Rzehak, Heidi

    2009-03-06

    We compute the complete supersymmetric next-to-leading-order corrections to the production of a light Higgs boson in weak-boson fusion. The size of the electroweak corrections is of similar order as the next-to-leading-order corrections in the standard model. The supersymmetric QCD corrections turn out to be significantly smaller than expected and than their electroweak counterparts. These corrections are an important ingredient to a precision analysis of the (supersymmetric) Higgs sector at the LHC, either as a known correction factor or as a contribution to the theory error.

  4. Flavour dependent gauged radiative neutrino mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwon; Okada, Hiroshi; Yagyu, Kei

    2015-04-01

    We propose a one-loop induced radiative neutrino mass model with anomaly free flavour dependent gauge symmetry: μ minus τ symmetry U(1) μ- τ . A neutrino mass matrix satisfying current experimental data can be obtained by introducing a weak isospin singlet scalar boson that breaks U(1) μ- τ symmetry, an inert doublet scalar field, and three right-handed neutrinos in addition to the fields in the standard model. We find that a characteristic structure appears in the neutrino mass matrix: two-zero texture form which predicts three non-zero neutrino masses and three non-zero CP-phases from five well measured experimental inputs of two squared mass differences and three mixing angles. Furthermore, it is clarified that only the inverted mass hierarchy is allowed in our model. In a favored parameter set from the neutrino sector, the discrepancy in the muon anomalous magnetic moment between the experimental data and the the standard model prediction can be explained by the additional neutral gauge boson loop contribution with mass of order 100 MeV and new gauge coupling of order 10-3.

  5. Strain gauge installation tool

    DOEpatents

    Conard, Lisa Marie

    1998-01-01

    A tool and a method for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool.

  6. Strain gauge installation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Conard, Lisa Marie

    1997-12-01

    A tool and a method for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maintaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool.

  7. Gauge theory of glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasin, Mikhail

    2011-05-01

    A new analytical approach for the description of the glass transition in a frustrated system is suggested. The theory is based on the non-equilibrium dynamics technique, and takes into account the interaction of the local order field with the massive gauge field, which describes frustration-induced plastic deformation. The glass transition is regarded as a phase transition interrupted because of the premature critical slowing-down of one of the degrees of freedom caused by the frustrations. It is shown that freezing of the system appears when the correlation length and relaxation time of the gauge field diverge. The Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation for the transition kinetics and the critical exponent for the nonlinear susceptibility, 2.5\\lesssim \\gamma \\leq 3 , are derived in the framework of the suggested approach. An expression for the temperature dependence of the heat capacity near to the glass transition is derived. This dependence is qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. The presented theory reproduces the characteristic form of the langphiphirangt correlation function dependence on time, and explains the boson peak appearance on this curve. In addition, the function of the glass transition temperature value with cooling rate is derived; this dependence fully conforms with known experimental data.

  8. Jets and Vector Bosons in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Begoña

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews experimental results on jets and electroweak boson (photon,Wand Z) production in heavy-ion collisions, from the CMS and ATLAS detectors, using data collected during 2011 PbPb run and pp data collected at an equivalent energy. By comparing the two collision systems, the energy loss of the partons propagating through the medium produced in PbPb collisions can be studied. Its characterization is done using dijet events and isolated photon-jet pairs. Since the electroweak gauge bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and are thus unmodified by the nuclear medium, they serve as clean probes of the initial state in the collision.

  9. Effective Yukawa couplings and flavor-changing Higgs boson decays at linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielli, E.; Mele, B.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the advantages of a linear-collider program for testing a recent theoretical proposal where the Higgs boson Yukawa couplings are radiatively generated, keeping unchanged the standard-model mechanism for electroweak-gauge-symmetry breaking. Fermion masses arise at a large energy scale through an unknown mechanism, and the standard model at the electroweak scale is regarded as an effective field theory. In this scenario, Higgs boson decays into photons and electroweak gauge-boson pairs are considerably enhanced for a light Higgs boson, which makes a signal observation at the LHC straightforward. On the other hand, the clean environment of a linear collider is required to directly probe the radiative fermionic sector of the Higgs boson couplings. Also, we show that the flavor-changing Higgs boson decays are dramatically enhanced with respect to the standard model. In particular, we find a measurable branching ratio in the range (10{sup -4}-10{sup -3}) for the decay H{yields}bs for a Higgs boson lighter than 140 GeV, depending on the high-energy scale where Yukawa couplings vanish. We present a detailed analysis of the Higgs boson production cross sections at linear colliders for interesting decay signatures, as well as branching-ratio correlations for different flavor-conserving/nonconserving fermionic decays.

  10. Boson core compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorramzadeh, Y.; Lin, Fei; Scarola, V. W.

    2012-04-01

    Strongly interacting atoms trapped in optical lattices can be used to explore phase diagrams of Hubbard models. Spatial inhomogeneity due to trapping typically obscures distinguishing observables. We propose that measures using boson double occupancy avoid trapping effects to reveal two key correlation functions. We define a boson core compressibility and core superfluid stiffness in terms of double occupancy. We use quantum Monte Carlo on the Bose-Hubbard model to empirically show that these quantities intrinsically eliminate edge effects to reveal correlations near the trap center. The boson core compressibility offers a generally applicable tool that can be used to experimentally map out phase transitions between compressible and incompressible states.

  11. Linear moose model with pairs of degenerate gauge boson triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Coradeschi, Francesco; De Curtis, Stefania; Dominici, Daniele

    2008-05-01

    The possibility of a strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sector, as opposed to the weakly interacting light Higgs of the standard model, is not yet ruled out by experiments. In this paper we make an extensive study of a deconstructed model (or ''moose'' model) providing an effective description of such a strong symmetry breaking sector, and show its compatibility with experimental data for a wide portion of the model parameter space. The model is a direct generalization of the previously proposed D-BESS model.

  12. Linear moose model with pairs of degenerate gauge boson triplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Coradeschi, Francesco; de Curtis, Stefania; Dominici, Daniele

    2008-05-01

    The possibility of a strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sector, as opposed to the weakly interacting light Higgs of the standard model, is not yet ruled out by experiments. In this paper we make an extensive study of a deconstructed model (or “moose” model) providing an effective description of such a strong symmetry breaking sector, and show its compatibility with experimental data for a wide portion of the model parameter space. The model is a direct generalization of the previously proposed D-BESS model.

  13. Boson mapping techniques applied to constant gauge fields in QCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Peter Otto; Lopez, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Pairs of coordinates and derivatives of the constant gluon modes are mapped to new gluon-pair fields and their derivatives. Applying this mapping to the Hamiltonian of constant gluon fields results for large coupling constants into an effective Hamiltonian which separates into one describing a scalar field and another one for a field with spin two. The ground state is dominated by pairs of gluons coupled to color and spin zero with slight admixtures of color zero and spin two pairs. As color group we used SU(2).

  14. Experimental scattershot boson sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy. PMID:26601164

  15. Dark matter and gauged flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bishara, Fady; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Stamou, Emmanuel; Zupan, Jure

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the phenomenology of flavored dark matter (DM). DM stability is guaranteed by an accidental Z3 symmetry, a subgroup of the standard model (SM) flavor group that is not broken by the SM Yukawa interactions. We consider an explicit realization where the quark part of the SM flavor group is fully gauged. If the dominant interactions between DM and visible sector are through flavor gauge bosons, as we show for Dirac fermion flavored DM, then the DM mass is bounded between roughly 0.5 TeV and 5 TeV if the DM multiplet mass is split only radiatively. In general, however, no such relation exists. We demonstrate this using scalar flavored DM where the main interaction with the SM is through the Higgs portal. For both cases we derive constraints from flavor, cosmology, direct and indirect DM detection, and collider searches.

  16. Dark matter and gauged flavor symmetries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bishara, Fady; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Stamou, Emmanuel; Zupan, Jure

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the phenomenology of flavored dark matter (DM). DM stability is guaranteed by an accidental Z3 symmetry, a subgroup of the standard model (SM) flavor group that is not broken by the SM Yukawa interactions. We consider an explicit realization where the quark part of the SM flavor group is fully gauged. If the dominant interactions between DM and visible sector are through flavor gauge bosons, as we show for Dirac fermion flavored DM, then the DM mass is bounded between roughly 0.5 TeV and 5 TeV if the DM multiplet mass is split only radiatively. In general, however,more » no such relation exists. We demonstrate this using scalar flavored DM where the main interaction with the SM is through the Higgs portal. For both cases we derive constraints from flavor, cosmology, direct and indirect DM detection, and collider searches.« less

  17. Matrix product states for gauge field theories.

    PubMed

    Buyens, Boye; Haegeman, Jutho; Van Acoleyen, Karel; Verschelde, Henri; Verstraete, Frank

    2014-08-29

    The matrix product state formalism is used to simulate Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories. To this end, we define matrix product state manifolds which are manifestly gauge invariant. As an application, we study (1+1)-dimensional one flavor quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model, and are able to determine very accurately the ground-state properties and elementary one-particle excitations in the continuum limit. In particular, a novel particle excitation in the form of a heavy vector boson is uncovered, compatible with the strong coupling expansion in the continuum. We also study full quantum nonequilibrium dynamics by simulating the real-time evolution of the system induced by a quench in the form of a uniform background electric field. PMID:25215973

  18. Dark Matter and gauged flavor symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishara, Fady; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Stamou, Emmanuel; Zupan, Jure

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of flavored dark matter (DM). DM stability is guaranteed by an accidental {Z}_3 symmetry, a subgroup of the standard model (SM) flavor group that is not broken by the SM Yukawa interactions. We consider an explicit realization where the quark part of the SM flavor group is fully gauged. If the dominant interactions between DM and visible sector are through flavor gauge bosons, as we show for Dirac fermion flavored DM, then the DM mass is bounded between roughly 0.5 TeV and 5 TeV if the DM multiplet mass is split only radiatively. In general, however, no such relation exists. We demonstrate this using scalar flavored DM where the main interaction with the SM is through the Higgs portal. For both cases we derive constraints from flavor, cosmology, direct and indirect DM detection, and collider searches.

  19. PVLAS experiment, star cooling and big bang nucleosynthesis constraints: Possible interpretation with temperature dependent gauge symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihn E.

    2007-09-01

    It is known that the kinetic mixing of a photon and another U(1){sub ex} gauge boson can introduce millicharged particles. Millicharged particles f of mass 0.1 eV can explain the PVLAS experiment. I suggest a temperature dependent gauge symmetry breaking of U(1){sub ex} for this idea to be consistent with astrophysical and cosmological constraints.

  20. Higgs bosons from top quark decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Ruiz, Richard

    2014-04-01

    In light of the discovery of a standard model (SM)-like Higgs boson (h) at the LHC, we investigate the top quark to Higgs boson transition t→W*bh, which is the leading t→h decay mode in the SM. We find the decay branching fraction to be 1.80×10-9. In comparison, the two-body, loop-induced t→ch transition occurs at ˜10-14 in the SM. We consider the consequences of gauge-invariant dimension-six operators affecting the tt ¯h interaction and find that the decay branching fraction may be increased by a factor of 2 within current constraints on the coupling parameters from collider experiments. We also extend the calculation to the CP-conserving Type I and Type II two-Higgs-doublet models, including both CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons. For neutral scalar masses at about 100 GeV, the decay rates can be several times larger than the SM result in the allowed range of model parameters. Observation prospects at present and future colliders are briefly addressed.

  1. Two-color gauge theory with novel infrared behavior.

    PubMed

    Appelquist, T; Brower, R C; Buchoff, M I; Cheng, M; Fleming, G T; Kiskis, J; Lin, M F; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Schaich, D; Schroeder, C; Syritsyn, S; Voronov, G; Vranas, P; Witzel, O

    2014-03-21

    Using lattice simulations, we study the infrared behavior of a particularly interesting SU(2) gauge theory, with six massless Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation. We compute the running gauge coupling derived nonperturbatively from the Schrödinger functional of the theory, finding no evidence for an infrared fixed point up through gauge couplings g(2) of order 20. This implies that the theory either is governed in the infrared by a fixed point of considerable strength, unseen so far in nonsupersymmetric gauge theories, or breaks its global chiral symmetries producing a large number of composite Nambu-Goldstone bosons relative to the number of underlying degrees of freedom. Thus either of these phases exhibits novel behavior. PMID:24702347

  2. Chiral bosonic phases on the Haldane honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasić, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Le Hur, Karyn; Hofstetter, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments in ultracold atoms and photonic analogs have reported the implementation of artificial gauge fields in lattice systems, facilitating the realization of topological phases. Motivated by such advances, we investigate the Haldane honeycomb lattice tight-binding model, for bosons with local interactions at the average filling of one boson per site. We analyze the ground-state phase diagram and uncover three distinct phases: a uniform superfluid (SF), a chiral superfluid (CSF), and a plaquette Mott insulator with local current loops (PMI). Nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor currents distinguish CSF from SF, and the phase transition between them is first order. We apply bosonic dynamical mean-field theory and exact diagonalization to obtain the phase diagram, complementing numerics with calculations of excitation spectra in strong and weak coupling perturbation theory. The characteristic density fluctuations, current correlation functions, and excitation spectra are measurable in ultracold atom experiments.

  3. Natural inflation with pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freese, Katherine; Frieman, Joshua A.; Olinto, Angela V.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of given potential can naturally give rise to an epoch of inflation in the early universe. Mass scales which arise in particle physics models with a gauge group that becomes strongly interacting at a certain scales are shown to be conditions for successful inflation. The density fluctuation spectrum is nonscale-invariant, with extra power on large length scales.

  4. bosons production in the quantum statistical parton distributions approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrely, Claude; Buccella, Franco; Soffer, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    We consider W± gauge bosons production in connection with recent results from BNL-RHIC and FNAL-Tevatron and interesting predictions from the statistical parton distributions. They concern relevant aspects of the structure of the nucleon sea and the high-x region of the valence quark distributions. We also give predictions in view of future proton-neutron collisions experiments at BNL-RHIC.

  5. Bosonic and Baryonic String Theory in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuti, Julius

    2007-02-27

    Bosonic string formation in gauge theories is reviewed with particular attention to the confining flux in lattice QCD and its effective string theory description. Recent results on the Casimir energy of the ground state and the string excitation spectrum are analyzed in the Dirichlet string limit of large separation between static sources. The closed string-soliton (torelon) with electric flux winding around a compact dimension is discussed and a new bound state tower spectrum at baryon string junctions is presented.

  6. Non-Abelian gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbier, Fabrice; Goldman, Nathan; Lewenstein, Maciej; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    interesting and related effect, which arises from the interplay between strong magnetic field and lattice potentials, is the famous Hofstadter butterfly: the energy spectrum of a single particle moving on a lattice and subjected to a strong magnetic field displays a beautiful fractal structure as a function of the magnetic flux penetrating each elementary plaquette of the lattice. When the effects of interparticle interactions become dominant, two-dimensional gases of electrons exhibit even more exotic behaviour leading to the fractional quantum Hall effect. In certain conditions such a strongly interacting electron gas may form a highly correlated state of matter, the prototypical example being the celebrated Laughlin quantum liquid. Even more fascinating is the behaviour of bulk excitations (quasi-hole and quasi-particles): they are neither fermionic nor bosonic, but rather behave as anyons with fractional statistics intermediate between the two. Moreover, for some specific filling factors (ratio between the electronic density and the flux density), these anyons are proven to have an internal structure (several components) and non-Abelian braiding properties. Many of the above statements concern theoretical predictions—they have never been observed in condensed matter systems. For instance, the fractional values of the Hall conductance is seen as a direct consequence of the fractional statistics, but to date direct observation of anyons has not been possible in two-dimensional semiconductors. Realizing these predictions in experiments with atoms, ions, photons etc, which potentially allow the experimentalist to perform measurements complementary to those made in condensed matter systems, is thus highly desirable! Non-Abelian gauge fields couple the motional states of the particles to their internal degrees of freedom (such as hyperfine states for atoms or ions, electronic spins for electrons, etc). In this sense external non-Abelian fields extend the concept of spin

  7. Triple vector boson production through Higgs-Strahlung with NLO multijet merging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeche, Stefan; Kraus, Frank; Pozzorini, Stephano; Schoenherr, Marek; Thompson, Jennifer M.; Zapp, Korinna C.

    2014-07-25

    Triple gauge boson hadroproduction, in particular the production of three W-bosons at the LHC, is considered at next-to leading order accuracy in QCD. The NLO matrix elements are combined with parton showers. Multijet merging is invoked such that NLO matrix elements with one additional jet are also included. The studies here incorporate both the signal and all relevant backgrounds for V H production with the subsequent decay of the Higgs boson into W– or τ–- pairs. They have been performed using SHERPA+OPENLOOPS in combination with COLLIER.

  8. Gauge-independent chiral symmetry breaking in quenched QED

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Pennington, M.R. )

    1994-12-15

    In quenched QCD we construct a nonperturbative fermion-boson vertex that ensures the fermion propagator satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity, is multiplicatively renormalizable, agrees with perturbation theory for weak couplings, and has a critical coupling for dynamical mass generation that is strictly gauge independent. This is in marked contrast to the [ital rainbow] approximation in which the critical coupling changes by 50% just between the Landau and Feynman gauges. The use of such a vertex should lead to a more believable study of mass generation.

  9. A little more gauge mediation and the light Higgs mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana Mummidi, V.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2014-04-01

    We consider minimal models of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking with an extra U(1) factor in addition to the Standard Model gauge group. A U(1) charged, Standard Model singlet is assumed to be present which allows for an additional NMSSM like coupling, λHuHdS. The U(1) is assumed to be flavour universal. Anomaly cancellation in the MSSM sector requires additional coloured degrees of freedom. The S field can get a large vacuum expectation value along with consistent electroweak symmetry breaking. It is shown that the lightest CP even Higgs boson can attain mass of the order of 125 GeV.

  10. Decay t→cγ in models with SUL(3)×UX(1) gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Maldonado, I.; Hernández-Tomé, G.; Tavares-Velasco, G.

    2013-07-01

    The one-loop level mediated t→cγ decay is analyzed in the framework of 331 models, which are based on the SUL(3)×UX(1) gauge symmetry and require that the quark families transform differently in order to cancel anomalies, thereby inducing three-level flavor-changing neutral currents mediated by an extra neutral gauge boson Z' and a neutral scalar boson ϕ. These models also predict new charged gauge and scalar bosons, together with three new quarks, which can be exotic (with electric charges of -4/3e and 5/3e) or standard-model-like. Apart from the contribution of the W boson, the t→cγ decay receives contributions induced by the extra gauge boson and the neutral scalar boson, which are generic for 331 models. In the so-called minimal 331 model, there are additional contributions from the new charged gauge and scalar bosons accompanied by the exotic quarks. We present analytical results for the most general t→cγ amplitude in terms of transcendental functions. For the numerical analysis we focus on the minimal 331 model: the current bounds on the model parameters are examined and a particular scenario is discussed in which the corresponding branching ratio could be of the order of 10-6, with the dominant contributions arising from the charged gauge bosons and a relatively light neutral scalar boson with flavor-changing couplings, whereas the Z' contribution would be of the order of 10-9 for mZ'>2TeV. However, a further suppression could be expected due to a potential suppression of the values of the flavor-changing coupling constants. Under the same assumptions, in 331 models without exotic quarks, the t→cγ branching ratio would receive the dominant contribution from the neutral scalar boson, which could be of the order of 10-7 for a Higgs mass of a few hundreds of GeVs.

  11. Z{sub L} associated pair production of charged Higgs bosons in the littlest Higgs model at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Cagil, A.; Zeyrek, M. T.

    2009-09-01

    The production of single and doubly charged Higgs bosons associated with standard model gauge boson Z{sub L} in e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders is examined. The sensitivity of these processes on the littlest Higgs model parameters in the range of compatibility with electroweak precision observables is analyzed. The possibility of detecting lepton flavor violation processes is also discussed.

  12. Generalized higher gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Patricia; Sämann, Christian; Schmidt, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    We study a generalization of higher gauge theory which makes use of generalized geometry and seems to be closely related to double field theory. The local kinematical data of this theory is captured by morphisms of graded manifolds between the canonical exact Courant Lie 2-algebroid T M ⊕ T ∗ M over some manifold M and a semistrict gauge Lie 2-algebra. We discuss generalized curvatures and infinitesimal gauge transformations. Finite gauge transformation as well as global kinematical data are then obtained from principal 2-bundles over 2-spaces. As dynamical principle, we consider first the canonical Chern-Simons action for such a gauge theory. We then show that a previously proposed 3-Lie algebra model for the six-dimensional (2,0) theory is very naturally interpreted as a generalized higher gauge theory.

  13. Gauge fields in spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Jalil, M. B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Murakami, S.

    2011-12-01

    We present an overview of gauge fields in spintronics, focusing on their origin and physical consequences. Important topics, such as the Berry gauge field associated with adiabatic quantum evolution as well as gauge fields arising from other non-adiabatic considerations, are discussed. We examine the appearance and effects of gauge fields across three spaces, namely real-space, momentum-space, and time, taking on a largely semiclassical approach. We seize the opportunity to study other "spin-like" systems, including graphene, topological insulators, magnonics, and photonics, which emphasize the ubiquity and importance of gauge fields. We aim to provide an intuitive and pedagogical insight into the role played by gauge fields in spin transport.

  14. Strain gauge installation tool

    DOEpatents

    Conard, L.M.

    1998-06-16

    A tool and a method are disclosed for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maintaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool. 6 figs.

  15. Simple U (1 ) gauge theory explanation of the diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Spencer

    2016-03-01

    The recent ATLAS and CMS diphoton resonance excesses are explored in a simple U (1 ) gauge theory extension of the Standard Model where the resonance is the Higgs boson of the U (1 ) symmetry breaking, ϕ . This particle couples to exotic quarks which, through loops, can produce a large enough rate to explain the excess. Due to the choice of U (1 ) charges, flavor constraints are naturally suppressed, allowing arbitrary flavor violation in the decays of the new quarks to up-type quarks, modifying their signal topologies. An additional heavy quark in the model decays to the lighter exotic quark by emitting either ϕ or the U (1 ) gauge boson Ax, giving extra signals containing diphoton and digluon resonances. Finally, the new Higgs can decay into γ Ax and Z Ax, followed by Ax decaying into Standard Model fermions through kinetic mixing. Thus, this model gives interesting modified signals to the general class of exotic quark models explaining the diphoton resonance.

  16. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  17. Study of Neutral Triple Gauge Couplings in DELPHI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, Lidia

    2002-04-01

    Neutral Triple Gauge boson Couplings ZZZ, ZZ γ and Z γ γ are studied using data collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP at energies between 189 and 208 GeV. The reactions e^+ e^- arrow Z γ, e^+ e^- arrow Z Z and e^+ e^- arrow Z γ^* are used. A summary of the main theoretical aspects of NTGC is given. A summary of the reactions used for deriving limits on these couplings is reported. Current limits are shown.

  18. Coulomb problem for vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchiev, M.Yu.; Flambaum, V.V.

    2006-05-01

    The Coulomb problem for vector bosons W{sup {+-}} incorporates a well-known difficulty; the charge of the boson localized in a close vicinity of the attractive Coulomb center proves to be infinite. The paradox is shown to be resolved by the QED vacuum polarization, which brings in a strong effective repulsion that eradicates the infinite charge of the boson on the Coulomb center. This property allows one to define the Coulomb problem for vector bosons properly.

  19. Dynamical breakdown of Abelian gauge chiral symmetry by strong Yukawa interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, Petr; Brauner, Tomas; Hosek, Jiri

    2007-03-01

    We consider a model with anomaly-free Abelian gauge axial-vector symmetry, which is intended to mimic the standard electroweak gauge chiral SU(2){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} theory. Within this model we demonstrate: (1) Strong Yukawa interactions between massless fermion fields and a massive scalar field carrying the axial charge generate dynamically the fermion and boson proper self-energies, which are ultraviolet-finite and chirally noninvariant. (2) Solutions of the underlying Schwinger-Dyson equations found numerically exhibit a huge amplification of the fermion mass ratios as a response to mild changes of the ratios of the Yukawa couplings. (3) The 'would-be' Nambu-Goldstone boson is a composite of both the fermion and scalar fields, and it gives rise to the mass of the axial-vector gauge boson. (4) Spontaneous breakdown of the gauge symmetry further manifests by mass splitting of the complex scalar and by new symmetry-breaking vertices, generated at one loop. In particular, we work out in detail the cubic vertex of the Abelian gauge boson.

  20. General covariant gauge fixing for massless spin-two fields

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, F. T.; Frenkel, J.; McKeon, D. G. C.

    2007-11-15

    The most general covariant gauge fixing Lagrangian is considered for a spin-two gauge theory in the context of the Faddeev-Popov procedure. In general, five parameters characterize this gauge fixing. Certain limiting values for these parameters give rise to a spin-two propagator that is either traceless or transverse, but for no values of these parameters is this propagator simultaneously traceless and transverse. Having a traceless-transverse propagator ensures that only the physical degrees of freedom associated with the tensor field propagate, and hence it is analogous to the Landau gauge in electrodynamics. To obtain such a traceless-transverse propagator, a gauge fixing Lagrangian which is not quadratic must be employed; this sort of gauge fixing Lagrangian is not encountered in the usual Faddeev-Popov procedure. It is shown that when this nonquadratic gauge fixing Lagrangian is used, two fermionic and one bosonic ghosts arise. As a simple application we discuss the energy-momentum tensor of the gravitational field at finite temperature.

  1. A relation between gauge-invariant formulation of QCD and string theory in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Akihiro; Odaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-08-01

    We have studied the explicit relation between the gauge-invariant path-ordered operator (POO) and a string field in two dimensions. For this purpose, we use the hamiltonian of two-dimensional quantum chromodynamics reformulated in terms of POO. POO is expanded in a power series of a non-local bosonic operator. We show that such a bosonic operator describes Bars and Hanson's free string field in the second quantization. Interactions among bosonic operators are treated in perturbation theory. The coupling constant is proportional to 1/√ Nc.

  2. Higgs boson hunting

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.; Haber, H.E.; Rindani, S.D.

    1989-05-01

    This is the summary report of the Higgs Boson Working Group. We discuss a variety of search techniques for a Higgs boson which is lighter than the Z. The processes K /yields/ /pi/H, /eta//prime/ /yields/ /eta/H,/Upsilon/ /yields/ H/gamma/ and e/sup +/e/sup /minus// /yields/ ZH are examined with particular attention paid to theoretical uncertainties in the calculations. We also briefly examine new features of Higgs phenomenology in a model which contains Higgs triplets as well as the usual doublet of scalar fields. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Local existence of N=1 supersymmetric gauge theory in four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, Fiki T.; Gunara, Bobby E.; Zen, Freddy P.; Triyanta

    2015-04-16

    In this paper, we shall prove the local existence of N=1 supersymmetry gauge theory in 4 dimension. We start from the Lagrangian for coupling chiral and vector multiplets with constant gauge kinetic function and only considering a bosonic part by setting all fermionic field to be zero at level equation of motion. We consider a U(n) model as isometry for scalar field internal geometry. And we use a nonlinear semigroup method to prove the local existence.

  4. Rain Gauges Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology instrument suite (i.e., MET data stream).

  5. Quaternion gauge fields. Pseudocolor

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkov, A.B.

    1987-03-01

    A simplified Guenaydin-Guersey model, in which a Majorana field constructed using quaternions combines a lepton and a color quark, is considered. Formulation of the gauge principle directly in the quaternions leads to the appearance of two vector quaternion gauge fields, these corresponding to the decomposition SO(4) approx. SO(3) x SO(3) of the invariance group. The diagonal subgroup SO(3) of automorphisms of the quarternions appears as a pseudocolor symmetry of the quarks, and the gauge field corresponding to it as the field of three color gluons. The other gauge field corresponds to lepton-quark transitions and in the presence of spontaneous breaking of the SO(4) gauge symmetry by the scalar quaternion field acquires a (large) finite mass.

  6. Toward electroweak scale cold dark matter with local dark gauge symmetry and beyond the DM EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Pyungwon

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, I describe a class of electroweak (EW) scale dark matter (DM) models where its stability or longevity are the results of underlying dark gauge symmetries: stable due to unbroken local dark gauge symmetry or topology, or long-lived due to the accidental global symmetry of dark gauge theories. Compared with the usual phenomenological dark matter models (including DM EFT or simplified DM models), DM models with local dark gauge symmetries include dark gauge bosons, dark Higgs bosons and sometimes excited dark matter. And dynamics among these fields are completely fixed by local gauge principle. The idea of singlet portals including the Higgs portal can thermalize these hidden sector dark matter very efficiently, so that these DM could be easily thermal DM. I also discuss the limitation of the usual DM effective field theory or simplified DM models without the full SM gauge symmetry, and emphasize the importance of the full SM gauge symmetry and renormalizability especially for collider searches for DM.

  7. Light-Front Quantization of Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Brodskey, Stanley

    2002-12-01

    Light-front wavefunctions provide a frame-independent representation of hadrons in terms of their physical quark and gluon degrees of freedom. The light-front Hamiltonian formalism provides new nonperturbative methods for obtaining the QCD spectrum and eigensolutions, including resolvant methods, variational techniques, and discretized light-front quantization. A new method for quantizing gauge theories in light-cone gauge using Dirac brackets to implement constraints is presented. In the case of the electroweak theory, this method of light-front quantization leads to a unitary and renormalizable theory of massive gauge particles, automatically incorporating the Lorentz and 't Hooft conditions as well as the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem. Spontaneous symmetry breaking is represented by the appearance of zero modes of the Higgs field leaving the light-front vacuum equal to the perturbative vacuum. I also discuss an ''event amplitude generator'' for automatically computing renormalized amplitudes in perturbation theory. The importance of final-state interactions for the interpretation of diffraction, shadowing, and single-spin asymmetries in inclusive reactions such as deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering is emphasized.

  8. Higgs boson mass in the Standard Model at two-loop order and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.; Robertson, David G.

    2014-10-23

    We calculate the mass of the Higgs boson in the standard model in terms of the underlying Lagrangian parameters at complete 2-loop order with leading 3-loop corrections. A computer program implementing the results is provided. The program also computes and minimizes the standard model effective potential in Landau gauge at 2-loop order with leading 3-loop corrections.

  9. Gauge Coupling Unification and Nonequilibrium Thermal Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Olive, Keith A.; Quevillon, Jérémie; Zaldívar, Bryan

    2013-06-01

    We study a new mechanism for the production of dark matter in the Universe which does not rely on thermal equilibrium. Dark matter is populated from the thermal bath subsequent to inflationary reheating via a massive mediator whose mass is above the reheating scale TRH. To this end, we consider models with an extra U(1) gauge symmetry broken at some intermediate scale (Mint≃1010-1012GeV). We show that not only does the model allow for gauge coupling unification (at a higher scale associated with grand unification) but it can provide a dark matter candidate which is a standard model singlet but charged under the extra U(1). The intermediate scale gauge boson(s) which are predicted in several E6/SO(10) constructions can be a natural mediator between dark matter and the thermal bath. We show that the dark matter abundance, while never having achieved thermal equilibrium, is fixed shortly after the reheating epoch by the relation TRH3/Mint4. As a consequence, we show that the unification of gauge couplings which determines Mint also fixes the reheating temperature, which can be as high as TRH≃1011GeV.

  10. New results on charged compact boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kulshreshtha, Usha; Kulshreshtha, Daya Shankar

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present some new results that we have obtained in a study of the phase diagram of charged compact boson stars in the theory involving massive complex scalar fields coupled to the U(1) gauge field and gravity in a conical potential in the presence of a cosmological constant Λ , which we treat as a free parameter taking positive and negative values and thereby allowing us to study the theory in de Sitter and anti de Sitter spaces, respectively. We obtain four bifurcation points (the possibility of more bifurcation points not being ruled out) in the de Sitter region. We present a detailed discussion of the various regions in our phase diagram with respect to four bifurcation points. Our theory is seen to have rich physics in a particular domain for positive values of Λ , which is consistent with the accelerated expansion of the Universe.

  11. Magnetoresistance of an Anderson insulator of bosons.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Anirban; Galitski, Victor; Müller, Markus

    2013-07-12

    We study the magnetoresistance of two-dimensional bosonic Anderson insulators. We describe the change in spatial decay of localized excitations in response to a magnetic field, which is given by an interference sum over alternative tunneling trajectories. The excitations become more localized with increasing field (in sharp contrast to generic fermionic excitations which get weakly delocalized): the localization length ξ(B) is found to change as ξ(-1)(B)-ξ(-1)(0)~B(4/5). The quantum interference problem maps onto the classical statistical mechanics of directed polymers in random media (DPRM). We explain the observed scaling using a simplified droplet model which incorporates the nontrivial DPRM exponents. Our results have implications for a variety of experiments on magnetic-field-tuned superconductor-to-insulator transitions observed in disordered films, granular superconductors, and Josephson junction arrays, as well as for cold atoms in artificial gauge fields. PMID:23889427

  12. Non-Abelian gauge field theory in scale relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottale, Laurent; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle; Lehner, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    Gauge field theory is developed in the framework of scale relativity. In this theory, space-time is described as a nondifferentiable continuum, which implies it is fractal, i.e., explicitly dependent on internal scale variables. Owing to the principle of relativity that has been extended to scales, these scale variables can themselves become functions of the space-time coordinates. Therefore, a coupling is expected between displacements in the fractal space-time and the transformations of these scale variables. In previous works, an Abelian gauge theory (electromagnetism) has been derived as a consequence of this coupling for global dilations and/or contractions. We consider here more general transformations of the scale variables by taking into account separate dilations for each of them, which yield non-Abelian gauge theories. We identify these transformations with the usual gauge transformations. The gauge fields naturally appear as a new geometric contribution to the total variation of the action involving these scale variables, while the gauge charges emerge as the generators of the scale transformation group. A generalized action is identified with the scale-relativistic invariant. The gauge charges are the conservative quantities, conjugates of the scale variables through the action, which find their origin in the symmetries of the "scale-space." We thus found in a geometric way and recover the expression for the covariant derivative of gauge theory. Adding the requirement that under the scale transformations the fermion multiplets and the boson fields transform such that the derived Lagrangian remains invariant, we obtain gauge theories as a consequence of scale symmetries issued from a geometric space-time description.

  13. New ways to leptogenesis with gauged B-L symmetry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Babu, K.S.; Meng, Yanzhi; Tavartkiladze, Zurab

    2009-10-01

    We show that in supersymmetric models with gauged B-L symmetry, there is a new source for cosmological lepton asymmetry. The Higgs bosons responsible for B-L gauge symmetry breaking decay dominantly into right-handed sneutrinos N~ and N~* producing an asymmetry in N~ over N~*. This can be fully converted into ordinary lepton asymmetry in the decays of N~. In simple models with gauged B-L symmetry we show that resonant/soft leptogenesis is naturally realized. Supersymmetry guarantees quasi-degenerate scalar states, while soft breaking of SUSY provides the needed CP violation. Acceptable values of baryon asymmetry are obtained without causing serious problems with gravitinomore » abundance.« less

  14. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  15. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  16. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  17. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  18. BCS-BEC crossover induced by a synthetic non-Abelian gauge field

    SciTech Connect

    Vyasanakere, Jayantha P.; Shenoy, Vijay B.; Zhang Shizhong

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the ground state of interacting spin-(1/2) fermions in three dimensions at a finite density ({rho}{approx}k{sub F}{sup 3}) in the presence of a uniform non-Abelian gauge field. The gauge-field configuration (GFC) described by a vector {lambda}{identical_to}({lambda}{sub x},{lambda}{sub y},{lambda}{sub z}), whose magnitude {lambda} determines the gauge coupling strength, generates a generalized Rashba spin-orbit interaction. For a weak attractive interaction in the singlet channel described by a small negative scattering length (k{sub F}|a{sub s}| < or approx. 1), the ground state in the absence of the gauge field ({lambda}=0) is a BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) superfluid with large overlapping pairs. With increasing gauge-coupling strength, a non-Abelian gauge field engenders a crossover of this BCS ground state to a BEC (Bose-Einstein condensate) of bosons even with a weak attractive interaction that fails to produce a two-body bound state in free vacuum ({lambda}=0). For large gauge couplings ({lambda}/k{sub F}>>1), the BEC attained is a condensate of bosons whose properties are solely determined by the Rashba gauge field (and not by the scattering length so long as it is nonzero)--we call these bosons ''rashbons.'' In the absence of interactions (a{sub s}=0{sup -}), the shape of the Fermi surface of the system undergoes a topological transition at a critical gauge coupling {lambda}{sub T}. For high-symmetry GFCs we show that the crossover from the BCS superfluid to the rashbon BEC occurs in the regime of {lambda} near {lambda}{sub T}. In the context of cold atomic systems, these results make an interesting suggestion of obtaining BCS-BEC crossover through a route other than tuning the interaction between the fermions.

  19. BCS-BEC crossover induced by a synthetic non-Abelian gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyasanakere, Jayantha P.; Zhang, Shizhong; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the ground state of interacting spin-(1)/(2) fermions in three dimensions at a finite density (ρ˜kF3) in the presence of a uniform non-Abelian gauge field. The gauge-field configuration (GFC) described by a vector λ≡(λx,λy,λz), whose magnitude λ determines the gauge coupling strength, generates a generalized Rashba spin-orbit interaction. For a weak attractive interaction in the singlet channel described by a small negative scattering length (kF|as|≲1), the ground state in the absence of the gauge field (λ=0) is a BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) superfluid with large overlapping pairs. With increasing gauge-coupling strength, a non-Abelian gauge field engenders a crossover of this BCS ground state to a BEC (Bose-Einstein condensate) of bosons even with a weak attractive interaction that fails to produce a two-body bound state in free vacuum (λ=0). For large gauge couplings (λ/kF≫1), the BEC attained is a condensate of bosons whose properties are solely determined by the Rashba gauge field (and not by the scattering length so long as it is nonzero)—we call these bosons “rashbons.” In the absence of interactions (as=0-), the shape of the Fermi surface of the system undergoes a topological transition at a critical gauge coupling λT. For high-symmetry GFCs we show that the crossover from the BCS superfluid to the rashbon BEC occurs in the regime of λ near λT. In the context of cold atomic systems, these results make an interesting suggestion of obtaining BCS-BEC crossover through a route other than tuning the interaction between the fermions.

  20. Have we observed the Higgs boson (imposter)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Ian; Lykken, Joseph; Shaughnessy, Gabe

    2012-11-01

    We interpret the new particle at the Large Hadron Collider as a CP-even scalar and investigate its electroweak quantum number. Assuming an unbroken custodial invariance as suggested by precision electroweak measurements, only four possibilities are allowed if the scalar decays to pairs of gauge bosons, as exemplified by a dilaton/radion, a nondilatonic electroweak singlet scalar, an electroweak doublet scalar, and electroweak triplet scalars. We show that current LHC data already strongly disfavor both the “plain-vanilla” dilatonic and nondilatonic singlet imposters. On the other hand, a generic Higgs doublet gives excellent fits to the measured event rates of the newly observed scalar resonance, while the Standard Model Higgs boson gives a slightly worse overall fit due to the lack of a signal in the ττ channel. The triplet imposter exhibits some tension with the data. The global fit indicates that the enhancement in the diphoton channel could be attributed to an enhanced partial decay width, while the production rates are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. We emphasize that more precise measurements of the ratio of event rates in the WW over ZZ channels, as well as the event rates in bb¯ and ττ channels, are needed to further distinguish the Higgs doublet from the triplet imposter.

  1. Goldstone bosons and fermions in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Zwanziger, Daniel

    2010-06-15

    We consider the version of QCD in Euclidean Landau gauge in which the restriction to the Gribov region is implemented by a local, renormalizable action. This action depends on the Gribov parameter {gamma}, with dimensions of (mass){sup 4}, whose value is fixed in terms of {Lambda}{sub QCD}, by the gap equation, known as the horizon condition, ({partial_derivative}{Gamma}/{partial_derivative}{gamma})=0, where {Gamma} is the quantum effective action. The restriction to the Gribov region suppresses gluons in the infrared, which nicely explains why gluons are not in the physical spectrum, but this only makes more mysterious the origin of the long-range force between quarks. In the present article we exhibit the symmetries of {Gamma}, and show that the solution to the gap equation, which defines the classical vacuum, spontaneously breaks some of the symmetries of {Gamma}. This implies the existence of massless Goldstone bosons and fermions that do not appear in the physical spectrum. Some of the Goldstone bosons may be exchanged between quarks, and are candidates for a long-range confining force. As an exact result we also find that in the infrared limit the gluon propagator vanishes like k{sup 2}.

  2. Gauge coupling unification in gauge-Higgs grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamatsu, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    We discuss renormalization group equations for gauge coupling constants in gauge-Higgs grand unification on five-dimensional Randall-Sundrum warped space. We show that all four-dimensional Standard Model gauge coupling constants are asymptotically free and are effectively unified in SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unified theories on 5D Randall-Sundrum warped space.

  3. Geometry defects in bosonic symmetry-protected topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; You, Yi-Zhuang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we focus on the interplay between geometry defects and topological properties in bosonic symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases. We start from eight copies of 3D time-reversal (T ) invariant topological superconductors (TSC) on a crystal lattice. We melt the lattice by condensation of disclinations and therefore restore the rotation symmetry. Such a disclination condensation procedure confines the fermion and afterwards turns the system into a 3D boson topological liquid crystal (TCL). The low energy effective theory of this crystalline-liquid transition contains a topological term inherited from the geometry axion response in TSC. In addition, we investigate the interplay between dislocation and superfluid vortex on the surface of TCL. We demonstrate that the T and translation invariant surface state is a double [e T m T ] state with intrinsic surface topological order. We also look into the exotic behavior of dislocation in the 2D boson SPT state described by an O (4 ) nonlinear σ model (NL σ M ) with topological Θ term. By dressing the O (4 ) vector with spiral order and gauging the symmetry, the dislocation has mutual semion statistics with the gauge flux. Further reducing the O (4 )NL σ M to the Ising limit, we arrive at the Levin-Gu model with stripy modulation whose dislocation has nontrivial braiding statistics.

  4. Determine the critical fermion flavor in three-dimensional QED using nonlocal gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Yong-Long; Lu, Wei-Tao; Wang, Chuan-Cong

    2014-10-01

    We determine the critical fermion flavor for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in three-dimensional quantum electrodynamics using nonlocal gauge (gauge parameter depends on the momentum or coordinate). The coupled Dyson-Schwinger equations of the fermion and gauge boson propagators are considered in the vicinity of the critical point. Illustrated by using the transverse vertex proposed by Bashir et al., we show that: for a variety of the transverse vertex, the critical flavor is still 128/3π2, the same as using the bare vertex.

  5. Generalization of trinification to theories with 3N SU(3) gauge groups

    SciTech Connect

    Carone, Christopher D.

    2005-04-01

    We consider a natural generalization of trinification to theories with 3N SU(3) gauge groups. These theories have a simple moose representation and a gauge boson spectrum that can be interpreted via the deconstruction of a 5D theory with unified symmetry broken on a boundary. Although the matter and Higgs sectors of the theory have no simple extra-dimensional analog, gauge unification retains features characteristic of the 5D theory. We determine possible assignments of the matter and Higgs fields to unified multiplets and present theories that are viable alternatives to minimal trinified GUTs.

  6. On Lagrangian approach to self-dual gauge fields in spacetime of nontrivial topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandos, Igor

    2014-08-01

    We study the Lagrangian description of chiral bosons, p-form gauge fields with (anti-)self-dual gauge field strengths, in D = 2 p + 2 dimensional spacetime of non-trivial topology. We show that the manifestly Lorentz and diffeomorphism invariant Pasti-Sorokin-Tonin (PST) approach is consistent and produces the (anti-)self-duality equation also in topologically nontrivial spacetime. We discuss in what circumstances the nontrivial topology makes difference between two disconnected, da-timelike and da-spacelike branches of the PST system, the gauge fixed version of which are described by not manifestly invariant Henneaux-Teitelboim (HT) and Perry-Schwarz (PS) actions, respectively.

  7. Program Calibrates Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okazaki, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    Program dramatically reduces personnel and time requirements for acceptance tests of hardware. Data-acquisition system reads output from Wheatstone full-bridge strain-gauge circuit and calculates strain by use of shunt calibration technique. Program nearly instantaneously tabulates and plots strain data against load-cell outputs. Modified to acquire strain data for other specimens wherever full-bridge strain-gauge circuits used. Written in HP BASIC.

  8. Gauging without initial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Alexei; Strobl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The gauge principle is at the heart of a good part of fundamental physics: Starting with a group G of so-called rigid symmetries of a functional defined over space-time Σ, the original functional is extended appropriately by additional Lie(G) -valued 1-form gauge fields so as to lift the symmetry to Maps(Σ , G) . Physically relevant quantities are then to be obtained as the quotient of the solutions to the Euler-Lagrange equations by these gauge symmetries. In this article we show that one can construct a gauge theory for a standard sigma model in arbitrary space-time dimensions where the target metric is not invariant with respect to any rigid symmetry group, but satisfies a much weaker condition: It is sufficient to find a collection of vector fields va on the target M satisfying the extended Killing equationv a(i ; j) = 0 for some connection acting on the index a. For regular foliations this is equivalent to requiring the conormal bundle to the leaves with its induced metric to be invariant under leaf-preserving diffeomorphisms of M, which in turn generalizes Riemannian submersions to which the notion reduces for smooth leaf spaces M / ∼. The resulting gauge theory has the usual quotient effect with respect to the original ungauged theory: in this way, much more general orbits can be factored out than usually considered. In some cases these are orbits that do not correspond to an initial symmetry, but still can be generated by a finite-dimensional Lie group G. Then the presented gauging procedure leads to an ordinary gauge theory with Lie algebra valued 1-form gauge fields, but showing an unconventional transformation law. In general, however, one finds that the notion of an ordinary structural Lie group is too restrictive and should be replaced by the much more general notion of a structural Lie groupoid.

  9. Natural Poincare gauge model

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrovandi, R.; Pereira, J.G.

    1986-05-15

    Because it acts on space-time and is not semisimple, the Poincare group cannot lead to a gauge theory of the usual kind. A candidate model is discussed which keeps itself as close as possible to the typical gauge scheme. Its field equations are the Yang-Mills equations for the Poincare group. It is shown that there exists no Lagrangian for these equations.

  10. Classifying gauge anomalies through symmetry-protected trivial orders and classifying gravitational anomalies through topological orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we systematically study gauge anomalies in bosonic and fermionic weak-coupling gauge theories with gauge group G (which can be continuous or discrete) in d space-time dimensions. We show a very close relation between gauge anomalies for gauge group G and symmetry-protected trivial (SPT) orders (also known as symmetry-protected topological (SPT) orders) with symmetry group G in one-higher dimension. The SPT phases are classified by group cohomology class Hd+1(G,R/Z). Through a more careful consideration, we argue that the gauge anomalies are described by the elements in Free[Hd+1(G,R/Z)]⊕Hπ˙d+1(BG,R/Z). The well known Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomalies are classified by the free part of Hd+1(G,R/Z) (denoted as Free[Hd+1(G,R/Z)]). We refer to other kinds of gauge anomalies beyond Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomalies as non-ABJ gauge anomalies, which include Witten SU(2) global gauge anomalies. We introduce a notion of π-cohomology group, Hπ˙d+1(BG,R/Z), for the classifying space BG, which is an Abelian group and include Tor[Hd+1(G,R/Z)] and topological cohomology group Hd+1(BG,R/Z) as subgroups. We argue that Hπ˙d+1(BG,R/Z) classifies the bosonic non-ABJ gauge anomalies and partially classifies fermionic non-ABJ anomalies. Using the same approach that shows gauge anomalies to be connected to SPT phases, we can also show that gravitational anomalies are connected to topological orders (i.e., patterns of long-range entanglement) in one-higher dimension.