Science.gov

Sample records for in-situ cantilever beam

  1. SEM in situ MiniCantilever Beam Bending of U-10Mo/Zr/Al Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mook, William; Baldwin, Jon K.; Martinez, Ricardo M.; Mara, Nathan A.

    2014-06-16

    In this work, the fracture behavior of Al/Zr and Zr/dU-10Mo interfaces was measured via the minicantilever bend technique. The energy dissipation rates were found to be approximately 3.7-5 mj/mm2 and 5.9 mj/mm2 for each interface, respectively. It was found that in order to test the Zr/U-10Mo interface, location of the hinge of the cantilever was a key parameter. While this test could be adapted to hot cell use through careful alignment fixturing and measurement of crack lengths with an optical microscope (as opposed to SEM, which was used here out of convenience), machining of the cantilevers via MiniMill in such a way as to locate the interfaces at the cantilever hinge, as well as proper placement of a femtosecond laser notch will continue to be key challenges in a hot cell environment.

  2. Dual-Cantilever-Beam Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Emmitt A.; Speckhart, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Sensitivity to velocity changes along beam axis reduced. Weighted-end cantilever beams of accelerometer deflected equally by acceleration in y direction. When acceleration to right as well as up or down, right beam deflected more, while left beam deflected less. Bridge circuit averages outputs of strain gauges measuring deflections, so cross-axis sensitivity of accelerometer reduced. New device simple and inexpensive.

  3. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-21

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  4. In situ mass measurement of electron-beam-induced nanometer-sized W-related deposits using a carbon nanotube cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Sawaya, Shintaro; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-06

    Using a carbon nanotube oscillator, the authors performed in situ measurements of densities of electron-beam-induced tungsten compounds with size of less than 100 nm. Total mass of the deposit was proportional to the deposition time. A higher deposition rate was obtained at lower electron-beam acceleration voltage. Density of the deposit decreased from 2.7 to 1.4 g/cm{sup 3} with increasing acceleration voltage from 5 to 15 kV. These results indicate that the increased density with low-acceleration voltage produces effective decomposition of W(CO){sub 6}.

  5. Oscillations of end loaded cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho-Stadler, E.; Elejalde-García, M. J.; Llanos-Vázquez, R.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents several simple experiments based on changing transverse vibration frequencies in a cantilever beam, when acted on by an external attached mass load at the free end. By using a mechanical wave driver, available in introductory undergraduate laboratories, we provide various experimental results for end loaded cantilever beams that fit reasonably well into a linear equation. The behaviour of the cantilever beam’s weak-damping resonance response is studied for the case of metal resonance strips. As the mass load increases, a more pronounced decrease occurs in the fundamental frequency of beam vibration. It is important to note that cantilever construction is often used in architectural design and engineering construction projects but current analysis also predicts the influence of mass load on the sound generated by musical free reeds with boundary conditions similar to a cantilever beam.

  6. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  7. Deflection of a flexural cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherbourne, A. N.; Lu, F.

    The behavior of a flexural elastoplastic cantilever beam is investigated in which geometric nonlinearities are considered. The result of an elastica analysis by Frisch-Fay (1962) is extended to include postyield behavior. Although a closed-form solution is not possible, as in the elastic case, simple algebraic equations are derived involving only one unknown variable, which can also be expressed in the standard form of elliptic integrals if so desired. The results, in comparison with those of the small deflection analyses, indicate that large deflection analyses are necessary when the relative depth of the beam is very small over the length. The present exact solution can be used as a reference by those who resort to a finite element method for more complicated problems. It can also serve as a building block to other beam problems such as a simply supported beam or a beam with multiple loads.

  8. Piezoresistive cantilever working in a shear force mode for in situ characterization of exposed micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Kopiec, Daniel; Janus, Paweł; Ekwińska, Magdalena; Płuska, Mariusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method of characterization micro- and nanostructures defined in a photolithography process. To implement this method a measurement system composed of an atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a system for maskless lithography was developed. This integration enables exposed patterns to be examined in situ, without any necessity for a developing process. The microscope works in a shear force mode, uses a cantilever with a piezoresistive method of detecting deflection and can be used for measuring surfaces with high aspect ratio by applying an appropriate technology of sharpening in a focused ion beam process. The cantilever fabrication process, its calibration and examination procedures are presented. Finally, the AFM images of structures scanned directly after exposure are shown.

  9. Microfabricated cantilever-based detector for molecular beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachels, T.; Schäfer, R.

    1998-11-01

    A low cost detector for particles in molecular beam experiments is presented which can easily be mounted in a molecular beam apparatus. The detector is based on microfabricated cantilevers, which can be employed either as single sensors or as sensor arrays. The single cantilever technique has been used to measure the absolute number of atoms coming out of a pulsed laser vaporization cluster source. The particles are detected by the shift of the thermally excited resonance frequency of the cantilever due to the cluster deposition. We have determined with the single cantilever the ratio of neutral to ionized clusters and we have investigated the cluster generation at different source conditions. In addition to this, a microfabricated cantilever array has been used to measure molecular beam profiles, which opens new possibilities for molecular beam deflection experiments.

  10. Mass sensor for in situ monitoring of focused ion and electron beam induced processes

    SciTech Connect

    Friedli, Vinzenz; Santschi, Christian; Michler, Johann; Hoffmann, Patrik; Utke, Ivo

    2007-01-29

    A cantilever-based mass sensor for in situ monitoring of deposition and milling using focused ion and electron beams is presented. Carefully designed experiments allowed for mass measurements with a noise level of {+-}10 fg by tracking the resonance frequency of a temperature stabilized piezoresistive cantilever using phase locking. The authors report on measurements of precursor surface coverage, residence time, mass deposition rates, yields, and deposit density using the (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}PtCpCH{sub 3} precursor.

  11. UNDERSIDE. NOTE DOUBLE BEAMS CANTILEVERED FOR PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY. DATE ADDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UNDERSIDE. NOTE DOUBLE BEAMS CANTILEVERED FOR PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY. DATE ADDED TO BRIDGE UNKNOWN, BUT PROBABLY 1921-22 OR AFTER 1927. - Bath-Haverhill Bridge, Spanning Ammonoosuc River, bypassed section of Ammanoosuc Street (SR 135), Woodsville, Grafton County, NH

  12. 14. UNDERSIDE, SHOWING PIERS, CROSS BEAMS, AND CANTILEVERED EXTENSION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. UNDERSIDE, SHOWING PIERS, CROSS BEAMS, AND CANTILEVERED EXTENSION OF BRIDGE FOR ACCESS TO WAREHOUSE, LOOKING NORTH - Appomattox Bridge, U.S. Route 1 over Appomattox River, Petersburg, Petersburg, VA

  13. Active control of cantilever-beam vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbyn, M. Roman

    2002-11-01

    A bang-bang control system previously developed for the stabilization of a rigid platform [ISA Trans. 21, 55-59 (1982)] has been adapted to the problem of reducing flexural vibrations of a beam. The electromechanical system develops an appropriate control signal for the actuator from samples of the disturbance by analog and digital signal processing using integrated circuits. The effectiveness of this approach is predicated upon the sampling rate being much higher than the maximum vibration frequency to be silenced. It is also robust with respect to the waveform of the disturbance. Noise reductions of 10-20 dB have been achieved, depending on the bandwidth of the noise. The cantilever, chosen because of its mechanical and theoretical simplicity, provides a good foundation for the study of more complex structures, like airfoils and nonrigid platforms. In both experimental and analytical investigations the emphasis has been on the optimization of control parameters, particularly with regard to the application of the cancellation signal. Reduction in size and cost of the control unit is possible by incorporating the latest technological advances in electronic and electromechanical devices, such as FPGA boards and MEMS components.

  14. Experimental investigation of fatigue in a cantilever energy harvesting beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avvari, Panduranga Vittal; Yang, Yaowen; Liu, Peiwen; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, cantilever energy harvesters gained immense popularity owing to the simplicity of the design and piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) using the cantilever design has undergone considerable evolution. The major drawback of a vibrating cantilever beam is its vulnerability to fatigue over a period of time. This article brings forth an experimental investigation into the phenomenon of fatigue of a PEH cantilever beam. As there has been very little literature reported in this area, an effort has been made to scrutinize the damage due to fatigue in a linear vibrating cantilever PEH beam consisting of an aluminum substrate with a piezoelectric macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch attached near the root of the beam and a tip mass attached to the beam. The beam was subjected to transverse vibrations and the behavior of the open circuit voltage was recorded with passing time. Moreover, electro-mechanical admittance readings were obtained periodically using the same MFC patch as a Structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor to assess the health of the PEH beam. The results show that with passing time the PEH beam underwent fatigue in both the substrate and MFC, which is observed in a complimentary trend in the voltage and admittance readings. The claim is further supported using the variation of root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the real part of admittance (conductance) readings. Thus, this study concludes that the fatigue issue should be addressed in the design of PEH for long term vibration energy harvesting.

  15. Energy harvesting of two cantilever beams structure: interfacing circuit discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Yin; Vasic, Dejan

    2015-03-01

    Today research on supplying of low power consumption device is highly focused on piezoelectric energy harvesting from ambient vibration. The most popular structure is a cantilever beam with piezoelectric patch to convert mechanical energy into electric energy. In the past researches, the theoretical analysis and interfacing circuit design of single cantilever beam structure is highly developed. In this study, the electrical interfacing circuit of two (or more) piezoelectric generators connected to only one load is proposed and discussed. The nonlinear synchronized switching technique SSHI (Synchronized Switching Harvesting in Inductor) is examined to increase the power efficiency effectively of each piezoelectric generator. In the multiple cantilever beam or flag structure application, the structure may be composed of many piezoelectric patches and the interfacing circuit becomes more complicated and important. From the theoretical analysis and the governing equation, the equivalent circuit of two cantilever beam will be proposed and simulated with the optimized synchronous electric charge extraction (OSECE) nonlinear technique to optimize the interfacing circuit and increase the power efficiency by using the Matlab and PSIM software. The experiments will also show the good agreement with the theoretical analysis. The interfacing circuit design concept in the two cantilever beams structure can be further used in the multi-piezoelectric patches energy harvesting system such as piezoelectric flag to optimize the circuit and increase the power efficiency.

  16. 41. Fixed Span, Floor Beam 1, showing the cantilever; looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Fixed Span, Floor Beam 1, showing the cantilever; looking N. (The splice between the original beam and the 1960 extension (widening) is between the two stringers to the left of the bottom chord tension members). - Pacific Shortline Bridge, U.S. Route 20,spanning Missouri River, Sioux City, Woodbury County, IA

  17. Investigation of fiber bridging in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Managalgiri, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility to eliminate fiber bridging or at least to reduce it, and to evaluate an alternative approach for determination of in situ mode 7 fracture toughness values of composite matrix materials were investigated. Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were made using unidirectional lay-ups of T6C/Hx205 composite material in which the delaminating halves were placed at angles of 0, 1.5, and 3 degrees to each other. The small angles between the delaminating plies were used to avoid fiber nesting without significantly affecting mode I teflon insert. The DCB specimens were fabricated and it was found that: (1) the extent which fiber bridging and interlaminar toughness increase with crack length can be reduced by slight cross ply at the delamination plane to reduce fiber nesting; (2) some fiber bridging may occur even in the absence of fiber nesting; (3) the first values of toughness measured ahead of the thin teflon insert are very close to the toughness of the matrix material with no fiber bridging; (4) thin adhesive bondline of matrix material appears to give toughness values equal to the interlaminar toughness of the composite matrix without fiber bridging.

  18. Accurate method for determining adhesion of cantilever beams

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, M.P.; Michalske, T.A.

    1999-07-01

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  20. Large and small deflections of a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beléndez, Tarsicio; Neipp, Cristian; Beléndez, Augusto

    2002-05-01

    The classical problem of the deflection of a cantilever beam of linear elastic material, under the action of an external vertical concentrated load at the free end, is analysed. We present the differential equation governing the behaviour of this physical system and show that this equation, although straightforward in appearance, is in fact rather difficult to solve due to the presence of a non-linear term. In this sense, this system is similar to another well known physical system: the simple pendulum. An approximation of the behaviour of a cantilever beam for small deflections was obtained from the equation for large deflections, and we present various numerical results for both cases. Finally, we compare the theoretical results with the experimental results obtained in the laboratory.

  1. Vibration Characteristics of Partially Covered Double-Sandwich Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Qinghua; Levy, Cesar

    1996-01-01

    The differential equations of motion together with the boundary conditions for a partially covered, double-sandwich cantilever beam are derived. Bending and extension, rotational and longitudinal inertia of damping layers, and shear deformation and rotational and longitudinal inertia of the constraining layers and the primary beam are included in the equations. The theory is applicable for long as well as short, soft, or stiff damping layer, double-sandwich beams. Also, the effects of different parameters on the system loss factor and resonance frequency are discussed. Differences are found to exist with the previous beam model (called the Euler beam model) when the damping layers are stiff, when the thickness of the damping layer is large compared to the primary-beam thickness, and in the case of higher modes of vibration.

  2. Systematic design of cantilever beams for muscle research.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, R J

    1977-05-01

    Experimental studies of muscle contraction often involve difficult problems in the design of cantilever beams for movable levers, transducers, or mechanical supports. Equations are presented for the calculation of mass, inertia, stress distribution, strain, deflection curve, compliance, and resonant frequency of uniform or nonuniform cantilever beams made of structural materials of different density or elastic modulus. Formulas are listed for solid, thick-wall, and thin-wall uniform beams of rectangular and circular cross section. Physical properties including density, elastic and torsional moduli, stress and strain limits, thermal expansion coefficients, Poisson's ratio, and certain elastic-modulus-to-density ratios are tabulated for structural materials including common metals, glass, plastic, and wood. A graphical design procedure is presented based on a chart containing loci of constant beam parameter values as a function of beam length and height or diameter, for the simple geometries. The choice of structural material is discussed for design problems with typical constraints, and examples are given of the design of beams of nonuniform cross section. Methods for extending the design chart to other geometries and materials are included. PMID:863848

  3. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of cantilever beam with clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Jin, W.; Han, L.; He, Z.

    2012-05-01

    Clearances occur in almost all mechanical systems, typically such as the clearance between slide plate of gun barrel and guide. Therefore, to study the clearances of mechanisms can be very important to increase the working performance and lifetime of mechanisms. In this paper, rigid dynamic modelling of cantilever with clearance was done according to the subject investigated. In the rigid dynamic modelling, clearance is equivalent to the spring-dashpot model, the impact of beam and boundary face was also taken into consideration. In ADAMS software, the dynamic simulation was carried out according to the model above. The software simulated the movement of cantilever with clearance under external excitation. Research found: When the clearance is larger, the force of impact will become larger. In order to study how the stiffness of the cantilever's supporting part influences natural frequency of the system, A Euler beam which is restricted by a draught spring and a torsion spring at its end was raised. Through numerical calculation, the relationship between natural frequency and stiffness was found. When the value of the stiffness is close to the limit value, the corresponding boundary condition is illustrated. An ADAMS experiment was carried out to check the theory and the simulation.

  4. Magnetostrictive bending of cantilever beams and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Victor H.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    2003-11-01

    The models currently used to determine strains, stresses, and deflections in beams and plates made of magnetostrictive films deposited on nonmagnetic substrates are based on the assumption that the film is relatively thin compared to the substrate. Despite the lack of self-consistency and the limitations of these models, they can be used to calculate approximate strains and deflections when the ratio of the thickness of the film to the thickness of the substrate is smaller than about 0.001; even then they do not consistently predict stresses or energies. Unfortunately, the large deflections required in modern applications are only achievable with films that do not satisfy this assumption of relative film thinness, and the results obtained with the traditional models show large errors. In these circumstances it is necessary to introduce robust methods that can be applied regardless of the relative magnitude of the thickness of the film. In this article, one such method is presented. The method represents a self-consistent approach based on the minimization of the total internal energy of a film-substrate system, performed based on the assumption that the magnetostrictive strains can be modeled as anisotropic expansional strains. The expressions obtained using this approach can be used to calculate strains, stresses, deflections, and energies in an accurate way. The method is suitable for generalization to the cases in which the deformation of beams and plates is produced not only due to magnetostriction in the films, but may also include thermal, piezoelectric, or hygroscopic strains.

  5. The frequencies of cantilever wings in beam and torsional vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, C P

    1940-01-01

    Methods are described for calculating the period and frequency of vibration of cantilever wings and similar structures in which the weight and moment of inertia vary along the span. Both the beam and torsional frequencies may be calculated by these methods. The procedure is illustrated by examples. It is shown that a surprisingly close approximation to the beam frequency may be obtained by a very brief calculation in which the curvature of the wing in vibration is assumed to be constant. A somewhat longer computation permits taking account of the true curvature of the beam by a series of successive approximations which are shown to be strongly convergent. Analogous methods are applied to calculations of the torsional frequency. For the first approximation it is assumed that the angle of twist varies linearly alone the semispan. True variation of the twist is computed by successive approximations which are strongly convergent, as in the case of beam vibrations.

  6. Calibrating laser beam deflection systems for use in atomic force microscopes and cantilever sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, L.Y.; Godin, Michel; Laroche, Olivier; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Gruetter, Peter

    2006-02-20

    Most atomic force microscopes and cantilever-based sensors use an optical laser beam detection system to monitor cantilever deflections. We have developed a working model that accurately describes the way in which a position sensitive photodetector interprets the deflection of a cantilever in these instruments. This model exactly predicts the numerical relationship between the measured photodetector signal and the actual cantilever deflection. In addition, the model is used to optimize the geometry of such laser deflection systems, which greatly simplifies the use of any cantilever-based instrument that uses a laser beam detection system.

  7. Effective AFM cantilever tip size: methods for in-situ determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragliano, Carlo; Glia, Ayoub; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations, knowledge of the cantilever tip radius R is essential for the quantitative interpretation of experimental observables. Here we propose two techniques to rapidly quantify in-situ the effective tip radius of AFM probes. The first method is based on the strong dependency of the minimum value of the free amplitude required to observe a sharp transition from attractive to repulsive force regimes on the AFM probe radius. Specifically, the sharper the tip, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe such a transition. The key trait of the second method is to treat the tip-sample system as a capacitor. Provided with an analytical model that takes into account the geometry of the tip-sample’s capacitance, one can quantify the effective size of the tip apex fitting the experimental capacitance versus distance curve. Flowchart-like algorithms, easily implementable on any hardware, are provided for both methods, giving a guideline to AFM practitioners. The methods’ robustness is assessed over a wide range of probes of different tip radii R (i.e. 4 < R < 50 nm) and geometries. Results obtained from both methods are compared with the nominal values given by manufacturers and verified by acquiring scanning electron microscopy images. Our observations show that while both methods are reliable and robust over the range of tip sizes tested, the critical amplitude method is more accurate for relatively sharp tips (4 nm < R < 10 nm).

  8. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  9. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  10. The stress intensity factor for the double cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Fourier transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique are used in conjunction with plane elastostatics to examine the singular crack tip stress field in the double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. In place of the Dirac delta function, a family of functions which duplicates the important features of the concentrated forces without introducing unmanageable mathematical complexities is used as a loading function. With terms of order h-squared/a-squared retained in the series expansion, the dimensionless stress intensity factor is found to be K (h to the 1/2)/P = 12 to the 1/2 (a/h + 0.6728 + 0.0377 h-squared/a-squared), in which P is the magnitude of the concentrated forces per unit thickness, a is the distance from the crack tip to the points of load application, and h is the height of each cantilever beam. The result is similar to that obtained by Gross and Srawley by fitting a line to discrete results from their boundary collocation analysis.

  11. Bending stresses due to torsion in cantilever box beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1935-01-01

    The paper beings with a brief discussion on the origin of the bending stresses in cantilever box beams under torsion. A critical survey of existing theory is followed by a summary of design formulas; this summary is based on the most complete solution published but omits all refinements considered unnecessary at the present state of development. Strain-gage tests made by NACA to obtained some experimental verification of the formulas are described next. Finally, the formulas are applied to a series of box beams previously static-tested by the U.S. Army Air Corps; the results show that the bending stresses due to torsion are responsible to a large extent for the free-edge type of failure frequently experienced in these tests.

  12. Ultra large deflection of thin PZT/aluminium cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seveno, Raynald; Guiffard, Benoit; Regoin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Flexible piezoelectric cantilever beam has been realized by depositing lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film (4.5 μm) by chemical solution deposition (CSD) onto very thin aluminium foil (16 μm). The tip deflection of the beam has been measured as a function of the frequency of the applied sinusoidal voltage to the PZT film for different amplitudes. Resonance curves have been compared to a classical model of an oscillating system under sinusoidal stress with a very good agreement. Despite of weak ferroelectric properties (remnant polarization: 13 μC/cm2), ultra-large deflection amplitudes have been measured under very moderate applied voltage values: 750 μm@10 V for quasi-static mode and 5 mm@10 V at the resonance frequency ( 12 Hz), which makes this PZT/aluminium composite film very promising for highly flexible actuation applications where large displacements are wanted.

  13. Micromachined silicon cantilever beam accelerometer incorporating an integrated optical waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Kevin E.; De Brabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1993-01-01

    A micromachined cantilever beam accelerometer is described in which beam deflection is determined optically. A diving board structure is anisotropically etched into a silicon wafer. This diving board structure is patterned from the wafer backside so as to leave a small gap between the tip of the diving board and the opposite fixed edge on the front side of the wafer. In order to sense a realistic range of accelerations, a foot mass incorporated onto the end of the beam is found to provide design flexibility. A silicon nitride optical waveguide is then deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) onto the sample. Beam deflection is measured by the decrease of light coupled across the gap between the waveguide sections. In order to investigate sensor response and simulate deflection of the beam, we utilized a separate beam and waveguide section which could be displaced from one another in a precisely controlled manner. Measurements were performed on samples with gaps of 4.0, 6.0, and 8.0 micron and the variation of the fraction of light coupled across the gap as a function of displacement and gap spacing was found to agree with overlap integral calculations.

  14. Four-beam model for vibration analysis of a cantilever beam with an embedded horizontal crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Weidong; Charalambides, Panos G.; Shao, Yimin; Xu, Yongfeng; Wu, Kai; Xiao, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    As one of the main failure modes, embedded cracks occur in beam structures due to periodic loads. Hence it is useful to investigate the dynamic characteristics of a beam structure with an embedded crack for early crack detection and diagnosis. A new four-beam model with local flexibilities at crack tips is developed to investigate the transverse vibration of a cantilever beam with an embedded horizontal crack; two separate beam segments are used to model the crack region to allow opening of crack surfaces. Each beam segment is considered as an Euler-Bernoulli beam. The governing equations and the matching and boundary conditions of the four-beam model are derived using Hamilton's principle. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of the four-beam model are calculated using the transfer matrix method. The effects of the crack length, depth, and location on the first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam are investigated. A continuous wavelet transform method is used to analyze the mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam. It is shown that sudden changes in spatial variations of the wavelet coefficients of the mode shapes can be used to identify the length and location of an embedded horizontal crack. The first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cantilever beam with an embedded crack from the finite element method and an experimental investigation are used to validate the proposed model. Local deformations in the vicinity of the crack tips can be described by the proposed four-beam model, which cannot be captured by previous methods.

  15. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  16. Strain energy release rate distributions for double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A 24-ply composite double cantilever-beam specimen under mode I (opening) loading has been analyzed by a 3D FEM code that calculated along a straight delamination starter for several different specimen materials. An isotropic specimen was found to have a strain-energy release rate distribution which varied along its delamination front due to the boundary-layer effect and another effect associated with the anticlastic curvature of the bent specimen arms. A 0-deg graphite-reinforced epoxy specimen had a nearly-uniform strain-energy release rate distribution which dropped only near the edge, due to the boundary-layer effect, and a +/- 45-deg graphite/epoxy specimen exhibited a pronounced strain-energy release rate variation across the specimen width.

  17. A Compact 2 Degree-of-Freedom Energy Harvester with Cut-Out Cantilever Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Tang, Lihua; Yang, Yaowen; Kiong Soh, Chee

    2012-04-01

    In this work, a novel 2 degree-of-freedom (DOF) vibration energy harvester is proposed. The harvester comprises one main cantilever beam and one secondary cantilever beam cut out within the main beam. By varying the proof masses, the first two resonances can be tuned close to each other, while maintaining significant magnitudes, thus providing a useful wide bandwidth for energy harvesting. Unlike previous 2-DOF harvesters, the proposed harvester is compact and utilizes the beam more efficiently by generating energy from both the main and secondary cantilevers. Therefore, the proposed harvester is more adaptive and functional in practical random or frequency-variant vibrational circumstances.

  18. In situ cell detection using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate-stainless steel cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jeong W.; Shih, Wan Y.; Mutharasan, R.; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-stainless steel cantilevers as real-time in-water cell detectors using yeast cells as a model system. Earlier studies have shown that mass changes of a cantilever can be detected by monitoring the resonance frequency shift. In this study, two PZT-stainless steel cantilevers with different sensitivities were used to detect the presence of yeast cells in a suspension. The stainless steel cantilever tip was coated with poly-L-lysine that attracted yeast cells from the suspension, and immobilized them on the cantilever surface. After immersing the poly-L-lysine coated tip in a yeast suspension, the flexural resonance frequency of the cantilever was monitored with time. The flexural resonance frequency decreased with time in agreement with the optical micrographs that showed increasing amount of adsorbed yeast cells with time. The resonance frequency shifts are further shown to be consistent with both the mass of immobilized cells on the poly-L-lysine coated stainless steel surface and that deduced from the optical micrographs. Furthermore, under the present experimental conditions where the cell diffusion distance is smaller than the linear dimension of the adsorption area, it is shown that the rate of resonance frequency shift is linear with the cell concentration and the rate of resonance frequency shift can be used to quantify the cell concentration.

  19. Mechanical behavior simulation of MEMS-based cantilever beam using COMSOL multiphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Acheli, A. Serhane, R.

    2015-03-30

    This paper presents the studies of mechanical behavior of MEMS cantilever beam made of poly-silicon material, using the coupling of three application modes (plane strain, electrostatics and the moving mesh) of COMSOL Multi-physics software. The cantilevers playing a key role in Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices (switches, resonators, etc) working under potential shock. This is why they require actuation under predetermined conditions, such as electrostatic force or inertial force. In this paper, we present mechanical behavior of a cantilever actuated by an electrostatic force. In addition to the simplification of calculations, the weight of the cantilever was not taken into account. Different parameters like beam displacement, electrostatics force and stress over the beam have been calculated by finite element method after having defining the geometry, the material of the cantilever model (fixed at one of ends but is free to move otherwise) and his operational space.

  20. A Novel Approach to the Sensing of Liquid Density Using a Plastic Optical Fibre Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is…

  1. Evaluation of bimaterial cantilever beam for heat sensing at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito; Liu, Fei; Voiculescu, Ioana

    2010-05-01

    The bimaterial cantilever beam is an important basic structure of microelectromechanical system thermal devices. The research described in this paper is a study of the deflection of the bimaterial cantilever beam operated in the air and irradiated with a laser beam at the free end. The bimaterial cantilever beam is a composite structure formed by layers of silicon nitride and gold. The temperature variations produce the deflection of the cantilever beam end due to different values of the thermal expansion coefficients of silicon nitride and gold. The deflection was experimentally measured in vacuum and atmospheric pressure when a laser beam was irradiated at the free end. A formula for the calculation of the deflection as a function of incident power applied at the free end of the cantilever beam operated in air was also demonstrated. The predicted values of the deflection calculated using this formula and the experimental values of the deflection were compared, and the results were in good agreement. A systematic investigation of the cantilever beam deflection in vacuum and atmospheric pressure as a function of the heat applied at the free end is important for chemical and biological applications. PMID:20515169

  2. Factors influencing elastic stresses in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    An elastic stress analysis was conducted for a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen using finite-element methods. The purpose of this study was to identify the important parameters that influence stresses ahead of the delamination front. The study focused on an aluminum DCB specimen, typical of adhesively-bonded joints, and on a graphite/epoxy specimen representing a cocured composite. Opening mode sigma sub y stresses ahead of the crack tip were calculated and compared with those for a monolithic reference specimen. Beyond the singularity-dominated region very near the crack tip, the sigma sub y distribution was elevated compared to the monolithic case. Both the adhesive thickness and the adherend transverse (thickness-direction) stiffness were found to influence the elevation of sigma sub y. In contrast, adherend thickness and longitudinal stiffness has very little effect on this stress distribution. Estimates for adhesive yielding beyond the aluminum DCB crack tip showed that both the area and height of the plastic zone increased to a peak value for increasing adhesive thicknesses. Results from this study would provide insight for comparing data from different DCB specimens and for designing new DCB specimens.

  3. Factors influencing elastic stresses in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1988-01-01

    An elastic stress analysis was conducted for a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen using finite-element methods. The purpose of this study was to identify the important parameters that influence stresses ahead of the delamination front. The study focused on an aluminum DCB specimen, typical of adhesively-bonded joints, and on a graphite/epoxy specimen representing a cocured composite. Opening mode sigma sub y stresses ahead of the crack tip were calculated and compared with those for a monolithic reference specimen. Beyond the singularity-dominated region very near the crack tip, the sigma sub y distribution was elevated compared to the monolithic case. Both the adhesive thickness and the adherend transverse (thickness-direction) stiffness were found to influence the elevation of sigma sub y. In contrast, adherend thickness and longitudinal stiffness has very little effect on this stress distribution. Estimates for adhesive yielding beyond the aluminum DCB crack tip showed that both the area and height of the plastic zone increased to a peak value for increasing adhesive thicknesses. Results from this study would provide insight for comparing data from different DCB specimens and for designing new DCB specimens.

  4. Forced response of a cantilever beam with a dry friction damper attached. I - Theory. II - Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Schwartz, H. B.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the forced vibration response of a cantilevered beam with Coulomb damping nonlinearity is described. Viscous damping in the beam is neglected. Beam and dry friction damper configurations of interest for applications to turbine blade vibrations are considered. It is shown that the basic phenomena found by Dowell (1983) for a simply supported beam with an attached dry friction damper of specific geometry also apply to a cantilevered beam and a more general representation of the dry friction damper and its associated mass and stiffness.

  5. Integrated motion measurement illustrated by a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örtel, T.; Wagner, J. F.; Saupe, F.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of inertial sensors and satellite navigation receivers like those of GPS (Global Positioning System) represents a very typical integrated navigation system. Integrated navigation is the most common example of integrated motion measurement determining the translational and angular position, velocity, and acceleration of a vehicle. Traditionally, this object is assumed to be a rigid body and the signals of its closely spaced sensors are referenced to a single point of the structure. During periods of low vehicle dynamics such common navigation systems typically show stability problems due to a loss of observability of some of the motion variables. The range of applications for integrated navigation systems can be expanded due to the continuously increasing performance of data processing and cheap sensors. Further, it can be shown that the stability of such a navigation system (i. e. of the motion observer employed for the system, typically a Kalman filter) can be sustained by distributing appropriately additional sensors over the vehicle structures at distinct locations. This comprises the compensation of drift effects of the system by adding sensors that are drift-free and the guarantee of the observability of all estimated motion components. Large structures like airplanes, space stations, skyscrapers, and tower cranes with distributed sensors, however, have to take the flexibility of the structure into account. This includes an appropriate kinematical model of the structure. In this case, the theory of integrated systems has to be expanded to flexible structures. On the other hand, the additional system information obtained can be used not only for vehicle guidance but also for structural control. Within this work individual kinematical models especially of a cantilever beam, idealizing e.g. the wing of an airplane, are developed and investigated with regard to the observability of the motion variables to guarantee a stable integrated system

  6. A complete analysis of the laser beam deflection systems used in cantilever-based systems.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, L Y; Godin, Michel; Laroche, Olivier; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Grütter, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A working model has been developed which can be used to significantly increase the accuracy of cantilever deflection measurements using optical beam techniques (used in cantilever-based sensors and atomic force microscopes), while simultaneously simplifying their use. By using elementary geometric optics and standard vector analysis it is possible, without any fitted or adjustable parameters, to completely and accurately describe the relationship between the cantilever deflection and the signal measured by a position sensitive photo-detector. By arranging the geometry of the cantilever/optical beam, it is possible to tailor the detection system to make it more sensitive at different stages of the cantilever deflection or to simply linearize the relationship between the cantilever deflection and the measured detector signal. Supporting material and software has been made available for download at http://www.physics.mun.ca/beauliu_lab/papers/cantilever_analysis.htm so that the reader may take full advantage of the model presented herein with minimal effort. PMID:17174033

  7. Effect of Centrifugal Force on the Elastic Curve of a Vibrating Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkinson, Scott H; Eatherton, Laurel J; Millenson, Morton B

    1948-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effect of rotation on the dynamic-stress distribution in vibrating cantilever beams. The results of a mathematical analysis are presented together with experimental results obtained by means of stroboscopic photographs and strain gages. The theoretical analysis was confined to uniform cantilever beams; the experimental work was extended to include a tapered cantilever beam to simulate an aircraft propeller blade. Calculations were made on nondimensional basis for second and third mode vibration; the experiments were conducted on beams of various lengths, materials, and cross sections for second-mode vibration. From this investigation it was concluded that high vibratory-stress positions are unaffected by the addition of centrifugal force. Nonrotating vibration surveys of blades therefore are valuable in predicting high vibratory-stress locations under operating conditions.

  8. Finite-element method for a uniformly loaded cantilever beam with general cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Michell (1901) theory for the analysis of beam-type structures is combined with that of Friedrich and Lin (1984) to obtain a finite element solution for a uniformly loaded cantilever beam with general cross section. A plane-strain problem established with internal body and boundary forces that were computed from the warping displacement is solved by means of the regular two-dimensional finite element program, on the same model used for warping displacement calculation. Numerical examples are given for cantilever beams with circular and thin-rectangular cross section. 6 references.

  9. Damping analysis of a flexible cantilever beam containing an internal fluid channel: Experiment, modeling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Masoumi, Masoud; Gaucher-Petitdemange, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Passive structural damping treatments have been applied with the use of high-viscosity fillings (in practice) and have been the focus of numerous research studies and papers. However, internal viscoelastic fluid leading to passive damping of flexible cantilever beams, has not yet been investigated in the literature. Although structures containing internal fluid channels provide multifunctional solutions to many engineering issues, they also raise damping control requests caused by unacceptable vibrations due to ambient environmental changes. In this paper, we examine ambient effects on damping properties of flexible cantilever beams, each conveying an internal high-viscosity fluid channel. Experiments are conducted to investigate how the internal fluids provide damping to the system under varied temperatures, frequencies and base-acceleration levels. While the vibration analysis of pipes conveying internal flow has been extensively studied, internal high-viscosity fluids in relation to passive damping of flexible cantilever beams and their ambient, environment-dependent behaviors have not been well-investigated. Originally motivated by research, which uses internal fluid channels to provide the cooling of multifunctional composite structures, we aim to research the damping behaviors of cantilever beams. We will conduct an experimental study and modeling analysis, examining the vibrations and frequency responses of the cantilever beams when filled with three types of internal fluids.

  10. Modal flexibility-based damage detection of cantilever beam-type structures using baseline modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, S. H.; Koo, K. Y.; Jung, H. J.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new damage detection approach for cantilever beam-type structures using the damage-induced inter-storey deflection (DIID) estimated by modal flexibility matrix. This approach can be utilized for damage detection of cantilever beam-type structures such as super high-rise buildings, high-rise apartment buildings, etc. Analytical studies on the DIID of cantilever beam-type structures have shown that the DIID abruptly occurs from damage location. Baseline modification concept was newly introduced to detect multiple damages in cantilever beam-type structures by changing the baseline to the prior damage location. This approach has a clear theoretical base and directly identifies damage location(s) without the use of a finite element (FE) model. For validating the applicability of the proposed approach to cantilever beam-type structures, a series of numerical and experimental studies on a 10-storey building model were carried out. From the tests, it was found that the damage locations can be successfully identified by the proposed approach for multiple damages as well as a single damage. In order to confirm the superiority of the proposed approach, a comparative study was carried out on two well-known damage metrics such as modal strain-based damage index approach and uniform load surface curvature approach.

  11. Design Optimization of PZT-Based Piezoelectric Cantilever Beam by Using Computational Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Park, Sanghyun; Lim, Woochul; Jang, Junyong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Seong Kwang; Song, Yewon; Sung, Tae Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting is gaining huge research interest since it provides high power density and has real-life applicability. However, investigative research for the mechanical-electrical coupling phenomenon remains challenging. Many researchers depend on physical experiments to choose devices with the best performance which meet design objectives through case analysis; this involves high design costs. This study aims to develop a practical model using computer simulations and to propose an optimized design for a lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based piezoelectric cantilever beam which is widely used in energy harvesting. In this study, the commercial finite element (FE) software is used to predict the voltage generated from vibrations of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam. Because the initial FE model differs from physical experiments, the model is calibrated by multi-objective optimization to increase the accuracy of the predictions. We collect data from physical experiments using the cantilever beam and use these experimental results in the calibration process. Since dynamic analysis in the FE analysis of the piezoelectric cantilever beam with a dense step size is considerably time-consuming, a surrogate model is employed for efficient optimization. Through the design optimization of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam, a high-performance piezoelectric device was developed. The sensitivity of the variables at the optimum design is analyzed to suggest a further improved device.

  12. Design Optimization of PZT-Based Piezoelectric Cantilever Beam by Using Computational Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Park, Sanghyun; Lim, Woochul; Jang, Junyong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Seong Kwang; Song, Yewon; Sung, Tae Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting is gaining huge research interest since it provides high power density and has real-life applicability. However, investigative research for the mechanical-electrical coupling phenomenon remains challenging. Many researchers depend on physical experiments to choose devices with the best performance which meet design objectives through case analysis; this involves high design costs. This study aims to develop a practical model using computer simulations and to propose an optimized design for a lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based piezoelectric cantilever beam which is widely used in energy harvesting. In this study, the commercial finite element (FE) software is used to predict the voltage generated from vibrations of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam. Because the initial FE model differs from physical experiments, the model is calibrated by multi-objective optimization to increase the accuracy of the predictions. We collect data from physical experiments using the cantilever beam and use these experimental results in the calibration process. Since dynamic analysis in the FE analysis of the piezoelectric cantilever beam with a dense step size is considerably time-consuming, a surrogate model is employed for efficient optimization. Through the design optimization of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam, a high-performance piezoelectric device was developed. The sensitivity of the variables at the optimum design is analyzed to suggest a further improved device.

  13. Comparison of Theory with Experimental Data For a Partially Covered Double-Sandwich Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Qinghua; Levy, Cesar

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, vibration characteristics of a partially covered, double-sandwich cantilever beam are evaluated experimentally and compared to the theoretical results of Levy and Chen for partially covered beams with and without end mass. The results obtained indicate that the theoretical models serve very well in providing the frequency factors and loss factors for the system being investigated.

  14. Investigation of fiber bridging in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mangalgiri, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility to eliminate fiber bridging or at least to reduce it, and to evaluate an alternative approach for determination of in situ mode 7 fracture toughness values of composite matrix materials were investigated. Double cantilver beam (DCB) specimens were made using unidirectional lay-ups of T6C/Hx205 composite material in which the delaminating halves were placed at angles of 0, 1.5, and 3 degrees to each other. The small angles between the delaminating plies were used to avoid fiber nesting without significantly affecting mode I teflon insert. The DCB specimens were fabricated and it was found that: (1) the extent which fiber bridging and interlaminar toughness increase with crack length can be reduced by slight cross ply at the delamination plane to reduce fiber nesting; (2) some fiber bridging may occur even in the absence of fiber nesting; (3) the first values of toughness measured ahead of the thin teflon insert are very close to the toughness of the matrix material with no fiber bridging; (4) thin adhesive bondline of matrix material appears to give toughness values equal to the interlaminar toughness of the composite matrix without fiber bridging.

  15. In situ studies of interfacial contact evolution via a two-axis deflecting cantilever microinstrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Laboriante, Ian; Bush, Brian; Roper, Christopher S.; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2009-09-01

    The time-dependent assessment of two contacting polycrystalline silicon surfaces is realized using a microinstrument that allows for in situ surface analysis. The evolution in contact resistance, morphology, and chemistry is probed as a function of contact cycle. Initially, the contact resistance is found to decrease and then increase with impact cycle. Upon prolonged cycling, the fracture of Si grains is observed which grow to form a wear crater. The electrical, morphological, and chemical analyses suggest that the wear of rough polysilicon surfaces due to impact proceeds through three distinct phases, namely plastic deformation of asperities, adhesive wear, and grain fracture.

  16. Response of long, flexible cantilever beams applied root motions. [spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralich, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an analysis of the response of long, flexible cantilever beams to applied root rotational accelerations. Maximum values of deformation, slope, bending moment, and shear are found as a function of magnitude and duration of acceleration input. Effects of tip mass and its eccentricity and rotatory inertia on the response are also investigated. It is shown that flexible beams can withstand large root accelerations provided the period of applied acceleration can be kept small relative to the beam fundamental period.

  17. Sensing cantilever beam bending by the optical lever technique and its application to surface stress.

    PubMed

    Evans, Drew R; Craig, Vincent S J

    2006-03-23

    Cantilever beams, both microscopic and macroscopic, are used as sensors in a great variety of applications. An optical lever system is commonly employed to determine the deflection and thereby the profile of the cantilever under load. The sensitivity of the optical lever must be calibrated, and this is usually achieved by application of a known load or deflection to the free end of the cantilever. When the sensing operation involves a different type of load or a combination of types of loadings, the calibration and the deflection values derived from it become invalid. Here we develop a master equation that permits the true deflection of the cantilever to be obtained simply from the measurement of the apparent deflection for uniformly distributed loadings and end-moment loadings. These loadings are relevant to the uniform adsorption or application of material to the cantilever or the application of a surface stress to the cantilever and should assist experimentalists using the optical lever, such as in the atomic force microscope, to measure cantilever deflections in a great variety of sensing applications. We then apply this treatment to the experimental evaluation of surface stress. Three forms of Stoney's equation that relate the apparent deflection to the surface stress, which is valid for both macroscopic and microscopic experiments, are derived. Analysis of the errors arising from incorrect modeling of the loading conditions of the cantilever currently applied in experiments is also presented. It is shown that the reported literature values for surface stress in microscopic experiments are typically 9% smaller than their true value. For macroscopic experiments, we demonstrate that the added mass of the film or coating generally dominates the measured deflection and must be accounted for accurately if surface stress measurements are to be made. Further, the reported measurements generally use a form of Stoney's equation that is in error, resulting in an

  18. Active vibration control of a flexible cantilever beam using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kagawa, Y.

    2010-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as actuators to control the vibration of a flexible cantilever beam. In a tendon mechanism, SMAs are controlled in a push-pull fashion based on H-infinity theory and taking into account the uncertainty in the actuator performance. Using this mechanism, the four vibrational modes (three bending and one torsional) of the cantilever beam can be simultaneously damped. To control bending and torsional vibrational modes of a flexible beam, we install SMAs obliquely in a beam-SMA structure, then measure and theoretically model the properties of an actuator consisting of an SMA and a spring. Using the properties of the actuator, we introduce the state equations based on the dynamic model of the proposed beam-SMA structure and design the active control system according to H-infinity theory. Finally, we experimentally verify the functioning of the system.

  19. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  20. A case study of analysis methods for large deflections of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, L. D.

    1994-01-01

    A load case study of geometric nonlinear large deflections of a cantilever beam is presented. The bending strain must remain elastic. Closed form solution and finite element methods of analysis are illustrated and compared for three common load cases. A nondimensional nomogram for each case is presented in the summary.

  1. A case study of analysis methods for large deflections of a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, L. D.

    1994-05-01

    A load case study of geometric nonlinear large deflections of a cantilever beam is presented. The bending strain must remain elastic. Closed form solution and finite element methods of analysis are illustrated and compared for three common load cases. A nondimensional nomogram for each case is presented in the summary.

  2. Simulation of large motions of nonuniform beams in orbit. I - The cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, D. A.; Kane, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for producing numerical simulations of large motions of a nonuniform cantilever beam in orbit. Special emphasis is given to the effective formulation of equations of motion and to the use of the finite element method to construct modal functions. Finite element methods are used to generate modal functions in such a way as to permit a particularly harmonious relationship to be established between the disciplines of rigid body dynamics and structural analysis. Sufficient information is provided to enable a reader to create, with relatively little effort, his own simulation program; simulation results are reported, both to provide check cases for other investigators and to illustrate certain important facets of the behavior of flexible spacecraft.

  3. Large Deflection of Ideal Pseudo-Elastic Shape Memory Alloy Cantilever Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shitang; Hu, Liming; Yan, Jun

    This paper deals with the large deflections of pseudo-elastic shape memory alloy cantilever beams subjected to a concentrated load at the free end. Because of the large deflections, geometry nonlinearity arises and this analysis employs the nonlinear bending theory. The exact expression of curvature is used in the moment-curvature relationship. As a vertical force at the tip of cantilever, curvature and bending moment distribution expressions are deduced. The curvature changed distinctly when the surface material undergoes phase transformation. The length of phase transformation region was affected greatly with the force at the free end.

  4. An approximate solution for the free vibrations of rotating uniform cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Approximate solutions are obtained for the uncoupled frequencies and modes of rotating uniform cantilever beams. The frequency approximations for flab bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion are simple expressions having errors of less than a few percent over the entire frequency range. These expressions provide a simple way of determining the relations between mass and stiffness parameters and the resultant frequencies and mode shapes of rotating uniform beams.

  5. Enhanced DySEM imaging of cantilever motion using artificial structures patterned by focused ion beam techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, M.-A.; Ritter, M.; Holschneider, M.; Sturm, H.

    2016-03-01

    We use a dynamic scanning electron microscope (DySEM) to map the spatial distribution of the vibration of a cantilever beam. The DySEM measurements are based on variations of the local secondary electron signal within the imaging electron beam diameter during an oscillation period of the cantilever. For this reason, the surface of a cantilever without topography or material variation does not allow any conclusions about the spatial distribution of vibration due to a lack of dynamic contrast. In order to overcome this limitation, artificial structures were added at defined positions on the cantilever surface using focused ion beam lithography patterning. The DySEM signal of such high-contrast structures is strongly improved, hence information about the surface vibration becomes accessible. Simulations of images of the vibrating cantilever have also been performed. The results of the simulation are in good agreement with the experimental images.

  6. Influence of axial loads on the nonplanar vibrations of cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Eulher C.; Gonçalves, Paulo B.; Del Prado, Zenón; Rega, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    The three-dimensional motions of cantilever beams have been extensively studied in the past. This structural element can be found in several applications, including MEMS and NEMS. In many applications the beam is subjected to axial loads which can play an important role in the dynamics of very slender beams. In this paper a cantilever inextensible beam subject to a concentrated axial load and a lateral harmonic excitation is investigated. Special attention is given to the effect of axial load on the frequency-amplitude relation, bifurcations and instabilities of the beam, a problem not tackled in the previous literature on this subject. To this aim, the nonlinear integro-differential equations describing the flexural-flexural-torsional couplings of the beam are used, together with the Galerkin method, to obtain a set of discretized equations of motion, which are in turn solved by numerical integration using the Runge-Kutta method. Both inertial and geometric nonlinearities are considered in the present analysis. Due to symmetries of the beam cross section, the beam exhibits a 1:1 internal resonance which has an important role on the nonlinear oscillations and bifurcation scenario. The results show that the axial load influences the stiffness of the beam changing its nonlinear behavior from hardening to softening. A detailed parametric analysis using several tools of nonlinear dynamics, unveils the complex dynamics of the beam in the parametric or external resonance regions. Bifurcations leading to multiple coexisting solutions are observed.

  7. Large deflections of a cantilever beam subjected to a follower force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsman, B. S.

    2007-07-01

    The large-deflection problem of a non-uniform spring-hinged cantilever beam under a tip-concentrated follower force is considered. The angle of inclination of the force with respect to the deformed axis of the beam remains unchanged during deformation. The mathematical formulation of this problem yields a nonlinear two-point boundary-value problem which is reduced to an initial-value problem by change of variables. The resulting problem can be solved without iterations. It is shown that there exist no critical loads in the Euler sense (divergence) for any flexural-stiffness distribution and angle of inclination of the follower force. The load-displacement characteristics of a uniform cantilever under a follower force normal to the deformed beam axis are presented.

  8. Application of a passive/active autoparametric cantilever beam absorber with PZT actuator for Duffing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, B.

    2013-04-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a cantilever-type passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber, with a PZT patch actuator, to be used in a primary damped Duffing system. The primary system consists of a mass, viscous damping and a cubic stiffness provided by a soft helical spring, over which is mounted a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled to attenuate harmonic and resonant excitation forces. With the PZT actuator on the cantilever beam absorber, cemented to the base of the beam, the auto-parametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness and damping associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies and parametric uncertainty. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from a high resolution optical encoder on the primary Duffing system and an accelerometer on the tip beam absorber, a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus modifying the closed-loop dynamic stiffness and providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary Duffing system. Experimental results are included to describe the dynamic and robust performance of the overall closed-loop system.

  9. Neutral beam species measurements using in situ Rutherford backscatter spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.; Gammel, G.; Williams, M.D.

    1984-12-01

    This work describes a new in situ method for measuring the neutral particle fractions in high power deuterium neutral beams, used to heat magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Deuterium beams, of variable energies, pulse lengths, and powers up to 47 keV, 100 msec, 1.6 MW, were Rutherford backscattered at 135/sup 0/ from TiC inner neutral beam armor of the PDX, and detected using an electrostatic analyzer with microchannel plates. Complete energy scans were made every 20 msec and data were obtained simultaneously from five different positions across the beam profile. The neutral particle fractions were measured to be D/sup 0/(E):D/sup 0/(E/2):D/sup 0/(E/3)=53:32:15. The corresponding neutral power fractions were P/sup 0/(E):P/sup 0/(E/2):P/sup 0/(E/3)=72:21:7, and the associated ionic fractions at the output of the ion source were D/sub 1//sup +/(E):D/sub 2//sup +/(E):D/sub 3//sup +/(E)=74:20:6. The measured neutral particle fractions were relatively constant over more than 70% of the beam power distribution. A decrease in the yield of the full energy component in the outer regions of the beam was observed. Other possible experimental configurations and geometries are discussed.

  10. Research on vibration measurement of a cantilever beam by twin-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Tao; Liu, Tao; Peng, Feng; Dai, Qiang; Yang, Yuan

    2009-05-01

    A novel interference transducer based on the measurement principle of multicore fiber interference for vibration measurement of a cantilever beam is designed in the paper. Twin-core fiber is special designed fiber, which contains a pair of parallel fiber core. Two paths integrated in one fiber not only greatly decreases sensor's volume, but also makes environment temperature effect approximately equal to each. A twin-core fiber which is pasted on the cantilever beam with epoxy resin is used as the sensing element. The twin-core fiber act as a two-beam in-fiber integrated interferometer that has a far-field interferometric fringe pattern which shift thereupon with the cantilever beam oscillates. CCD was used to measure the displacement of interferometer fringes instead of the traditional photodetector. The continuous capture of interference fringes was realized. The design of low pass filter and image smoothing were finished according to the characteristics of interference fringes. Orientation error of interference fringe center was removed. Displacement of fringe center was calculated and the spectrum of the displacement was analyzed with Fourier Transform. The system uses high-speed CCD camera as the photoelectric transformer. By using the high sensitivity twin-core fiber, the system realizes high precision measurement of vibration frequency, and ensures real-time performance. The experiment results show that the vibration measurement method is feasible and possesses potential application prospect in tiny vibration measure.

  11. Surface acoustic wave acceleration sensor with high sensitivity incorporating ST-X quartz cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Huang, Yangqing; Liu, Xinlu; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The implementation and performance of a surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based acceleration sensor is described. The sensor was composed of a flexible ST-X quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass at the undamped end, a pattern of a two-port SAW resonator deposited directly on the surface of the beam adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity and a SAW resonator affixed on the metal package base for temperature compensation. The acceleration was directed to the proof mass flex of the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW traveling along the beams. The frequency signal from the differential oscillation structure utilizing the SAW resonators as the feedback element varies as a function of acceleration. The sensor response mechanism was analyzed theoretically, with the aim of determining the optimized dimension of the cantilever beam. The coupling of modes (COM) model was used to simulate the synchronous SAW resonator prior to fabrication. The oscillator frequency stability was improved using the phase modulation approach; the obtained typical short-term frequency stability ranged up to 1 Hz s-1. The performance of the developed acceleration sensor was evaluated using the precise vibration table and was also evaluated in comparison to the theoretical calculation. A high frequency sensitivity of 29.7 kHz g-1, good linearity and a lower detection limit (˜1 × 10-4 g) were achieved in the measured results.

  12. Analytical determination of coupled bending-torsion vibrations of cantilever beams by means of station functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, Alexander; Gendler, Selwyn

    1951-01-01

    A method based on the concept of station functions is presented for calculating the modes and the frequencies of nonuniform cantilever beams vibrating in torsion, bending, and coupled bending-torsion motion. The method combines some of the advantages of the Rayleigh-Ritz and Stodola methods, in that a continuous loading function for the beam is used, with the advantages of the influence-coefficient method, in that the continuous loading function is obtained in terms of the displacements of a finite number of stations along the beam.

  13. An analytical investigation of delamination front curvature in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical investigation is conducted to determine the shape of a growing delamination and the distribution of the energy release rate along the delamination front in a laminated composite double cantilever beam specimen. Distributions of the energy release rate for specimens with straight delamination fronts and delamination front contours for delaminations whose growth is governed by the fracture criterion that G = Gc at all points are predicted as a function of material properties and delamination length. The predicted delamination front contours are utilized to ascertain the effect of the changing shape of the delamination front on the value of the critical strain energy release rate as computed from double cantilever beam fracture toughness test data.

  14. Nonlinear analysis of cantilever shape memory alloy beams of variable cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashiqur Rahman, Muhammad; Arefin Kowser, Muhammad

    2007-04-01

    Cantilever beams, made of shape memory alloy (SMA), undergo much larger deflection in comparison to those made of other materials. Again, cantilever beams with reducing cross section along the span show much larger deflections compared to those of constant cross section beams. Analysis was conducted for such a cantilever beam with reducing cross-sectional area made of SMA, taking into account its highly nonlinear stress-strain curves. A computer code in C has been developed using the Runge-Kutta technique for the purpose of simulation. For rigorous analysis, the true stress-strain curves in tension as well as in compression have been used for the study. Moment-curvature and reduced modulus-curvature relations are obtained from the nonlinear stress-strain relations for different sections of the beam and used in the simulation. It is seen that load-deflection curves are initially linear but nonlinear and convex upward at a high load. Furthermore, the compressive stress in the beam is significantly higher than the tensile stress because of asymmetry. Interestingly, for the different cases considered, it is found that part of the SMA beam material may remain in the parent austenite phase, mixed phase or in the stress-induced martensitic phase. Importantly, it is found that more material can be removed from an SMA beam of uniform strength, originally designed without considering geometric nonlinearity and the effect of end-shortening. Comparison of the numerical results with the available theory shows very good agreement, verifying the soundness of the entire numerical simulation scheme.

  15. Large deflections of a cantilever beam under arbitrarily directed tip load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, H. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear beam equation was integrated numerically in a direct fashion to obtain results for large deflections of cantilevers under tip loads of arbitrary direction. A short BASIC computer program for performing this integration is presented. Results for selected load cases are presented. The numerical process is performed rapidly on a modern microcomputer, and comparisons with results from closed form solutions show that the process is accurate.

  16. Mechanics of cantilever beam: Implementation and comparison of FEM and MLPG approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trobec, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Two weak form solution approaches for partial differential equations, the well known meshbased finite element method and the newer meshless local Petrov Galerkin method are described and compared on a standard test case - mechanics of cantilever beam. The implementation, solution accuracy and calculation complexity are addressed for both approaches. We found out that FEM is superior in most standard criteria, but MLPG has some advantages because of its flexibility that results from its general formulation.

  17. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging.

    PubMed

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D; Fantner, Georg E

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  18. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  19. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-11-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  20. Thermal stress analyses of multilayered films on substrates and cantilever beams for micro sensors and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Luttrell, Claire Roberta; Cui, Tianhong

    2006-01-01

    Thermal stress-induced damage in multilayered films formed on substrates and cantilever beams is a major reliability issue for the fabrication and applications of micro sensors and actuators. Using closed-form predictive solutions for thermal stresses in multilayered systems, specific results are calculated for the thermal stresses in PZT/Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 film layers on Si substrates and PZT/Pt/Ti/SiO2 film layers on Si3N4 cantilever beams. When the thickness of the film layer is negligible compared to the substrate, thermal stresses in each film layer are controlled by the thermomechanical mismatch between the individual film layer and the substrate, and the modification of thermal stresses in each film layer by the presence of other film layers is insignificant. On the other hand, when the thickness of the film layer is not negligible compared to the cantilever beam, thermal stresses in each film layer can be controlled by adjusting the properties and thickness of each layer. The closed-form solutions provide guidelines for designing multilayered systems with improved reliability.

  1. Measurement and Evaluation of the Gas Density and Viscosity of Pure Gases and Mixtures Using a Micro-Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Badarlis, Anastasios; Pfau, Axel; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of gas density and viscosity was conducted using a micro-cantilever beam. In parallel, the validity of the proposed modeling approach was evaluated. This study also aimed to widen the database of the gases on which the model development of the micro-cantilever beams is based. The density and viscosity of gases are orders of magnitude lower than liquids. For this reason, the use of a very sensitive sensor is essential. In this study, a micro-cantilever beam from the field of atomic force microscopy was used. Although the current cantilever was designed to work with thermal activation, in the current investigation, it was activated with an electromagnetic force. The deflection of the cantilever beam was detected by an integrated piezo-resistive sensor. Six pure gases and sixteen mixtures of them in ambient conditions were investigated. The outcome of the investigation showed that the current cantilever beam had a sensitivity of 240 Hz/(kg/m³), while the accuracy of the determined gas density and viscosity in ambient conditions reached ±1.5% and ±2.0%, respectively. PMID:26402682

  2. Measurement and Evaluation of the Gas Density and Viscosity of Pure Gases and Mixtures Using a Micro-Cantilever Beam

    PubMed Central

    Badarlis, Anastasios; Pfau, Axel; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of gas density and viscosity was conducted using a micro-cantilever beam. In parallel, the validity of the proposed modeling approach was evaluated. This study also aimed to widen the database of the gases on which the model development of the micro-cantilever beams is based. The density and viscosity of gases are orders of magnitude lower than liquids. For this reason, the use of a very sensitive sensor is essential. In this study, a micro-cantilever beam from the field of atomic force microscopy was used. Although the current cantilever was designed to work with thermal activation, in the current investigation, it was activated with an electromagnetic force. The deflection of the cantilever beam was detected by an integrated piezo-resistive sensor. Six pure gases and sixteen mixtures of them in ambient conditions were investigated. The outcome of the investigation showed that the current cantilever beam had a sensitivity of 240 Hz/(kg/m3), while the accuracy of the determined gas density and viscosity in ambient conditions reached ±1.5% and ±2.0%, respectively. PMID:26402682

  3. Application of GRASP to nonlinear analysis of a cantilever beam. [General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1987-01-01

    The General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) was developed to analyze the steady-state and linearized dynamic behavior of rotorcraft in hovering and axial flight conditions. Because of the nature of problems GRASP was created to solve, the geometrically nonlinear behavior of beams is one area in which the program must perform well in order to be of any value. Numerical results obtained from GRASP are compared to both static and dynamic experimental data obtained for a cantilever beam undergoing large displacements and rotations caused by deformation. The correlation is excellent in all cases.

  4. Application of GRASP (General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program) to nonlinear analysis of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1987-01-01

    The General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) was developed to analyse the steady-state and linearized dynamic behavior of rotorcraft in hovering and axial flight conditions. Because of the nature of problems GRASP was created to solve, the geometrically nonlinear behavior of beams is one area in which the program must perform well in order to be of any value. Numerical results obtained from GRASP are compared to both static and dynamic experimental data obtained for a cantilever beam undergoing large displacements and rotations caused by deformations. The correlation is excellent in all cases.

  5. Finite Element Analysis of Micro-cantilever Beam Experiments in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Bowen

    Uranium Dioxide (UO2) is a significant nuclear fission fuel, which is widely used in nuclear reactors. Understanding the influence of microstructure on thermo-mechanical behavior of UO2 is extremely important to predict its performance. In particular, evaluating mechanical properties, such as elasticity, plasticity and creep at sub-grain length scales is key to developing this understanding as well as building multi-scale models of fuel behavior with predicting capabilities. In this work, modeling techniques were developed to study effects of microstructure on Young's modulus, which was selected as a key representative property that affects overall mechanical behavior, using experimental data obtained from micro-cantilever bending testing as benchmarks. Beam theory was firstly introduced to calculate Young's modulus of UO2 from the experimental data and then three-dimensional finite element models of the micro-cantilever beams were constructed to simulate bending tests in UO2 at room temperature. The influence of the pore distribution was studied to explain the discrepancy between predicted values and experimental results. Results indicate that results of tests are significantly affected by porosity given that both pore size and spacing in the samples are of the order of the micro-beam dimensions. Microstructure reconstruction was conducted with images collected from three-dimensional serial sectioning using focused ion beam (FIB) and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) and pore clusters were placed at different locations along the length of the beam. Results indicate that the presence of pore clusters close to the substrate, i.e., the clamp of the micro-cantilever beam, has the strongest effect on load-deflection behavior, leading to a reduction of stiffness that is the largest for any location of the pore cluster. Furthermore, it was also found from both numerical and i analytical models that pore clusters located towards the middle of the span and close

  6. Flow structure interaction between a flexible cantilever beam and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Andrew; Morvan, Thomas; Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Elvin, Niell

    2015-11-01

    In the present experimental work we consider the degree of distortion of isotropy and homogeneity of grid turbulence caused by the presence of a thin flexible cantilever beam immersed in the flow aligned in the longitudinal direction. Beams of various rigidities and lengths were used in the experiments. Piezoelectric patches were attached to the beams which provided an output voltage proportional to the strain and therefore proportional to the beam's deflection. The experiments were carried out in a large scale wind tunnel and hot-wires were used to measure turbulence intensity in the vicinity of the beams for various values of the ratio of aerodynamic loading to beam's rigidity. It was found that the flow field distortion depends on the rigidity of the beam. For very rigid beams this distortion is of the order of the boundary layer thickness developing over the beam while for very flexible beams the distorted region is of the order of the beam's tip deflection. Analysis of the time-dependent signals indicated some correlation between the frequency of beam's vibration and flow structures detected. Supported by NSF Grant: CBET #1033117.

  7. An energy harvester using piezoelectric cantilever beams undergoing coupled bending-torsion vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkefi, A.; Najar, F.; Nayfeh, A. H.; Ben Ayed, S.

    2011-11-01

    Recently, piezoelectric cantilevered beams have received considerable attention for vibration-to-electric energy conversion. Generally, researchers have investigated a classical piezoelectric cantilever beam with or without a tip mass. In this paper, we propose the use of a unimorph cantilever beam undergoing bending-torsion vibrations as a new piezoelectric energy harvester. The proposed design consists of a single piezoelectric layer and a couple of asymmetric tip masses; the latter convert part of the base excitation force into a torsion moment. This structure can be tuned to be a broader band energy harvester by adjusting the first two global natural frequencies to be relatively close to each other. We develop a distributed-parameter model of the harvester by using the Euler-beam theory and Hamilton's principle, thereby obtaining the governing equations of motion and associated boundary conditions. Then, we calculate the exact eigenvalues and associated mode shapes and validate them with a finite element (FE) model. We use these mode shapes in a Galerkin procedure to develop a reduced-order model of the harvester, which we use in turn to obtain closed-form expressions for the displacement, twisting angle, voltage output, and harvested electrical power. These expressions are used to conduct a parametric study for the dynamics of the system to determine the appropriate set of geometric properties that maximizes the harvested electrical power. The results show that, as the asymmetry is increased, the harvester's performance improves. We found a 30% increase in the harvested power with this design compared to the case of beams undergoing bending only. We also show that the locations of the two masses can be chosen to bring the lowest two global natural frequencies closer to each other, thereby allowing the harvesting of electrical power from multi-frequency excitations.

  8. Evaluation of the split cantilever beam for Mode 3 delamination testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1989-01-01

    A test rig for testing a thick split cantilever beam for scissoring delamination (mode 3) fracture toughness was developed. A 3-D finite element analysis was conducted on the test specimen to determine the strain energy release rate, G, distribution along the delamination front. The virtual crack closure technique was used to calculate the G components resulting from interlaminar tension, GI, interlaminar sliding shear, GII, and interlaminar tearing shear, GIII. The finite element analysis showed that at the delamination front no GI component existed, but a GII component was present in addition to a GIII component. Furthermore, near the free edges, the GII component was significantly higher than the GIII component. The GII/GIII ratio was found to increase with delamination length but was insensitive to the beam depth. The presence of GII at the delamination front was verified experimentally by examination of the failure surfaces. At the center of the beam, where the failure was in mode 3, there was significant fiber bridging. However, at the edges of the beam where the failure was in mode 3, there was no fiber bridging and mode 2 shear hackles were observed. Therefore, it was concluded that the split cantilever beam configuration does not represent a pure mode 3 test. The experimental work showed that the mode 2 fracture toughness, GIIc, must be less than the mode 3 fracture toughness, GIIIc. Therefore, a conservative approach to characterizing mode 3 delamination is to equate GIIIc to GIIc.

  9. Evaluation of the split cantilever beam for mode III delamination testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick, H.

    1991-01-01

    A test rig for testing a thick split cantilever beam for scissoring delamination (mode 3) fracture toughness was developed. A 3-D finite element analysis was conducted on the test specimen to determine the strain energy release rate, G, distribution along the delamination front. The virtual crack closure technique was used to calculate the G components resulting from interlaminar tension, GI, interlaminar sliding shear, GII, and interlaminar tearing shear, GIII. The finite element analysis showed that at the delamination front no GI component existed, but a GII component was present in addition to a GIII component. Furthermore, near the free edges, the GII component was significantly higher than the GIII component. The GII/GIII ratio was found to increase with delamination length but was insensitive to the beam depth. The presence of GII at the delamination front was verified experimentally by examination of the failure surfaces. At the center of the beam, where the failure was in mode 3, there was significant fiber bridging. However, at the edges of the beam where the failure was in mode 3, there was no fiber bridging and mode 2 shear hackles were observed. Therefore, it was concluded that the split cantilever beam configuration does not represent a pure mode 3 test. The experimental work showed that the mode 2 fracture toughness, GIIc, must be less than the mode 3 fracture toughness, GIIIc. Therefore, a conservative approach to characterizing mode 3 delamination is to equate GIIIc to GIIc.

  10. Measurements of the solidification process of resins from cantilever beams resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Gustavo F.; Duchowicz, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a technique to infer elastic and mechanical properties of light-curing resins by using cantilever beams. The methodology includes vibration resonance measurements performed with a fiber optic Fizeau interferometer. As is known, the natural resonance frequency of cantilever beams depends strongly on any variation in its physical properties and geometry. Following this idea, square shaped solid aluminum beams with a short transverse deep crack drilled near its fixed end were studied. The slot was filled with photo-curing resins and resonance frequency was monitored as polymerization proceeded. In order to track resonance peaks, we adopted a simple electromagnetic actuator to force the beam into oscillations of variable frequencies. Beams were scanned periodically around its natural resonance as photo-curing was carried out. Due to the small vibrations amplitude present at the free end of beams (tens of microns typically), we used a Fizeau interferometric fiber optic sensor placed near the free end. Its extremely high sensitivity and resolution are its outstanding features, yielding a non-invasive sensor that ensures natural evolution and distortionless amplitude and frequency measurements. Results show that liquid resin in the slot did not produce changes on beam resonance prior to curing. On the other hand, photo-polymerization partially recovered original properties of the beam in a few tens of seconds, suggesting that vitrification of resins is completely achieved while photoreaction is still occurring. Moreover, additional information of volumetric shrinkage of polymers can be extracted from these measurements. In summary, this powerful and simple technique enables to evaluate the static resonance of beams as well as polymer shrinkage and solidification time evolution in one single measurement.

  11. Sensitivity of inelastic response to numerical integration of strain energy. [for cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    The exact solution to the quasi-static, inelastic response of a cantilever beam of rectangular cross section subjected to a bending moment at the tip is obtained. The material of the beam is assumed to be linearly elastic-linearly strain-hardening. This solution is then compared with three different numerical solutions of the same problem obtained by minimizing the total potential energy using Gaussian quadratures of two different orders and a Newton-Cotes scheme for integrating the strain energy of deformation. Significant differences between the exact dissipative strain energy and its numerical counterpart are emphasized. The consequence of this on the nonlinear transient responses of a beam with solid cross section and that of a thin-walled beam on elastic supports under impulsive loads are examined.

  12. Nonlinear Elastic J-Integral Measurements in Mode I Using a Tapered Double Cantilever Beam Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macon, David J.

    2006-01-01

    An expression for the J-integral of a nonlinear elastic material is derived for an advancing crack in a tapered double cantilever beam fracture specimen. The elastic and plastic fracture energies related to the test geometry and how these energies correlates to the crack position are discussed. The dimensionless shape factors eta(sub el and eta(sub p) are shown to be equivalent and the deformation J-integral is analyzed in terms of the eta(sub el) function. The fracture results from a structural epoxy are interpreted using the discussed approach. The magnitude of the plastic dissipation is found to strongly depend upon the initial crack shape.

  13. Three-dimensional elastic analysis of a composite double cantilever beam specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Attention is given to the stresses and the strain energy release rate along the delamination front in the present three-dimensional elastic analysis of a 24-ply, cocured double-cantilever beam specimen by means of 20-noded parabolic-isoparametric finite elements. At the free surface, the strain energy release rate was found to be substantially smaller than the plane strain value; this is suggested to be due to the free-surface effect that exists where the delamination meets the surface edge.

  14. Characterization of Interlaminar Crack Growth in Composites with the Double Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    A project to examine the double cantilever beam specimen as a quantitative test method to assess the resistance of various composite materials to interlaminar crack growth is discussed. A second objective is to investigate the micromechanics of failure for composites with tough matrix resins from certain generic types of polymeric systems: brittle thermosets, toughened thermosets, and thermoplastics. Emphasis is given to a discussion of preliminary results in two areas: the effects of temperature and loading rate for woven composites, and the effects of matrix toughening in woven and unidirectional composites.

  15. Dynamic crack propagation and arrest in orthotropic DCB fiber composite specimens. [Double Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Kousiounelos, P. N.

    1981-01-01

    An orthotropic double cantilever beam (DCB) model is used to study dynamic crack propagation and arrest in 90 deg unidirectional Hercules AS/3501-6 graphite fiber epoxy composites. The dynamic fracture toughness of the composite is determined from tests performed on the long-strip specimen and DCB crack arrest experiments are conducted. By using the dynamic fracture toughness in a finite-difference solution of the DCB governing partial differential equations, a numerical solution of the crack propagation and arrest events is computed. Excellent agreement between the experimental and numerical crack arrest results are obtained.

  16. Thermoelastic Analysis of a Vibrating TiB/Ti Cantilever Beam Using Differential Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, Larry; Wyen, Travis; Byrd, Alex

    2008-02-15

    Differential thermography has been used to detect the fluctuating temperatures due the thermoelastic effect for a number of years. This paper examines functionally graded TiB/Ti cantilever beams excited on an electromechanical shaker in fully reversed bending. Finite difference analysis of specimens was used to look at the effect of heat conduction, convection and the fundamental frequency on the surface temperature distribution and compared to experimental data. The thermoelastic effect was also used to detect cracking and the stress field at the tip of the fixture during fatigue.

  17. Assessing the severity of fatigue crack using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Lin, Yin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates fatigue crack severity assessment using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam. In this study, a nonlinear oscillator system is constructed to induce the hysteretic frequency response of the cantilever beam in dynamics, and the hysteretic vibration is then used to modulate the acoustic waves to generate the vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect. Through modulation of hysteretic vibration, the hysteretic response of the VAM can be achieved. The experimental results further validated that the VAM hysteresis phenomenon can be enhanced with the increase of crack severity owing to the change of beam's effective stiffness. Simulations in the proposed physical model explained the reason of enhancement of hysteresis phenomenon. Combined with nonlinear bistable structural model, a fatigue crack severity assessment approach was proposed by evaluating the hysteretic region (e.g., bandwidth or jumping frequency) in the vibration frequency response of the VAM effect. The reported study is valuable in building a monotonic relationship to assess the severity of fatigue crack by a nonlinear acoustics approach.

  18. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-15

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170–206 Hz has 28–188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137–1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035–0.36 μW cm{sup −3} volume power density at 170–206 Hz.

  19. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm(-3) volume power density at 170-206 Hz. PMID:24985867

  20. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm-3 volume power density at 170-206 Hz.

  1. Bidirectional frequency tuning of a piezoelectric energy converter based on a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, C.; Goldschmidtboeing, F.; Woias, P.

    2009-09-01

    A piezoelectric energy converter is presented, whose resonance frequency can be tuned by applying mechanical stress to its structure. The converter consists of a piezo-polymer cantilever beam with two additional thin arms, which are used to apply an axial preload to the tip of the beam. The compressive or tensile prestress applied through the arms leads to a shift of the beam's resonance frequency. Experiments with this structure indicate a high potential: the resonance frequency of a harvester to which a compressive preload was applied could be altered from 380 Hz to 292 Hz. In another experiment, a harvester with stiffened arms was tuned from 440 Hz to 460 Hz by applying a tensile preload. In combination with automatic control of the applied force, this type of structure could be used to enhance the performance of energy harvesters in vibrating environments with occasional shifts of the vibrational frequency.

  2. An active reference spring array for in-situ calibration of the normal spring constant of AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Brand, U.; Hahn, S.; Hiller, K.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper the concept of an "active reference spring array (ARSA)" for the AFM cantilever normal spring constant calibration is proposed. The ARSA with nominal stiffness varying from 0.4 N/m to 150 N/m will be available on these arrays with the aim to calibrate the normal stiffness of cantilevers ranging from 0.04 N/m to 1500 N/m. The fabrication process of the MEMS ARSA on basis of the Bonding Deep RIE technology developed at Chemnitz University of Technology is reported. A first characterization of the MEMS and the traceable determination of the stiffness of the MEMS suspending system have been realized. First experimental results compare very well with the Finite Element (FE) simulation of the numerical design, and prove the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  3. Stiffening and damping capacity of an electrostatically tuneable functional composite cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginés, R.; Bergamini, A.; Motavalli, M.; Ermanni, P.

    2015-09-01

    The damping capacity of a novel composite film, designed to exhibit high dielectric strength and a high friction coefficient for an electrostatic tuneable friction damper, is tested on a cantilever beam. Such a system consists of a carbon fibre reinforced polymer stiffening element which is reversibly laminated onto a host structure with a dielectric material by means of electrostatic fields. Damping is achieved when the maximum shear at the interface between the stiffening element and structure exceeds the shear strength of the electrostatically laminated interface. The thin films tested consist of barium titanate particles and alumina platelets in an epoxy matrix. Their high dielectric constant and high coefficient of friction compared to a commercial available polymer film, polyvinylidene fluoride, lead to a reduction of the required electric field to stiffen and damp the cantilever beam. Reducing the operating voltage affects different aspects of the studied damper. The cost of possible applications of the frictional damper can be reduced, as the special components necessary at high voltages become redundant. Furthermore, the enhanced security positively affects the damping system’s appeal as an alternative damping method.

  4. Out-of-resonance vibration modulation of ultrasound with a nonlinear oscillator for microcrack detection in a cantilever beam

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qingbo Xu, Yanyan; Lu, Siliang; Dai, Daoyi

    2014-04-28

    This Letter reports an out-of-resonance vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect in nonlinear ultrasonic evaluation of a microcracked cantilever beam. We design a model to involve the microcracked cantilever beam in a nonlinear oscillator system whose dynamics is introduced to extend the operating vibration excitation band of the VAM out of resonance. The prototype model exhibits an effective bandwidth four times that of the traditional linear model. The reported VAM effect allows efficiently enhancing the detection, localization, and imaging of various types of microcracks in solid materials at out-of-resonance vibration excitation frequencies.

  5. Height-tapered double cantilever beam specimen for study of rate effects on fracture toughness of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaniv, Gershon; Daniel, Isaac M.

    1988-01-01

    Loading rate effects on the mode I delamination fracture toughness of AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy are presently studied by means of a height-tapered double-cantilever beam specimen whose height contour is designed to furnish a slightly decreasing compliance with increasing crack length, in order to yield a stable and smooth crack propagation at high loading rates. This specimen geometry also allows much higher crack propagation velocities to be obtained with either uniform or width-tapered double cantilever beam specimens.

  6. An explicit solution of the large deformation of a cantilever beam under point load at the free tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Chen, Jian-Kang; Liao, Shijun

    2008-03-01

    The large deformation of a cantilever beam under point load at the free tip is investigated by an analytic method, namely the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The explicit analytic formulas for the rotation angle at the free tip are given, which provide a convenient and straightforward approach to calculate the vertical and horizontal displacements of a cantilever beam with large deformation. These explicit formulas are valid for most practical problems, thus providing a useful reference for engineering applications. The corresponding Mathematica code is given in the Appendix.

  7. Mimicking the cochlear amplifier in a cantilever beam using nonlinear velocity feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian cochlea exhibits a nonlinear amplification which allows mammals to detect a large range of sound pressure levels while maintaining high frequency sensitivity. This work seeks to mimic the cochlea’s nonlinear amplification in a mechanical system. A nonlinear, velocity-based feedback control law is applied to a cantilever beam with piezoelectric actuators. The control law reduces the linear viscous damping of the system while introducing a cubic damping term. The result is a system which is positioned close to a Hopf bifurcation. Modelling and experimental results show that the beam with this control law undergoes a one-third amplitude scaling near the resonance frequency and an amplitude-dependent bandwidth. Both behaviors are characteristic of data obtained from the mammalian cochlea. This work could provide insight on the biological cochlea while producing bio-inspired sensors with a large dynamic range and sharp frequency sensitivity.

  8. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission.

    PubMed

    Chrystal, C; Burrell, K H; Grierson, B A; Pace, D C

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access. PMID:26520957

  9. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  10. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, B. A.; Pace, D. C.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  11. Transverse vibration and buckling of a cantilevered beam with tip body under constant axial base acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storch, J.; Gates, S.

    1983-01-01

    The planar transverse bending behavior of a uniform cantilevered beam with rigid tip body subject to constant axial base acceleration was analyzed. The beam is inextensible and capable of small elastic transverse bending deformations only. Two classes of tip bodies are recognized: (1) mass centers located along the beam tip tangent line; and (2) mass centers with arbitrary offset towards the beam attachment point. The steady state response is studied for the beam end condition cases: free, tip mass, tip body with restricted mass center offset, and tip body with arbitrary mass center offset. The first three cases constitute classical Euler buckling problems, and the characteristic equation for the critical loads/accelerations are determined. For the last case a unique steady state solution exists. The free vibration response is examined for the two classes of tip body. The characteristic equation, eigenfunctions and their orthogonality properties are obtained for the case of restricted mass center offset. The vibration problem is nonhomogeneous for the case of arbitrary mass center offset. The exact solution is obtained as a sum of the steady state solution and a superposition of simple harmonic motions.

  12. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Kaita, Robert

    1987-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

  13. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Kaita, Robert

    1987-03-03

    An arrangement is provided for the in-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams. The beam is directed onto a target surface of known composition, such that Rutherford backscattering of the beam occurs. The yield-energy characteristic response of the beam to backscattering from the target is analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques to determine the yields of energy species components of the beam.

  14. Damage detection in a cantilever beam under dynamic conditions using a distributed, fast, and high spatial resolution Brillouin interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motil, A.; Davidi, R.; Bergman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Hahami, M.; Tur, M.

    2016-05-01

    The ability of Brillouin-based fiber-optic sensing to detect damage in a moving cantilever beam is demonstrated. A fully computerized, distributed and high spatial resolution (10cm) Fast-BOTDA interrogator (50 full-beam Brillouin-gain-spectra per second) successfully directly detected an abnormally stiffened (i.e., `damaged') 20cm long segment in a 6m Aluminum beam, while the beam was in motion. Damage detection was based on monitoring deviations of the measured strain distribution along the beam from that expected in the undamaged case.

  15. Finite difference analysis of torsional vibrations of pretwisted, rotating, cantilever beams with effects of warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical natural frequencies of the first three modes of torsional vibration of pretwisted, rotating cantilever beams are determined for various thickness and aspect ratios. Conclusions concerning individual and collective effects of warping, pretwist, tension-torsion coupling and tennis racket effect (twist-rotational coupling) terms on the natural frequencies are drawn from numerical results obtained by using a finite difference procedure with first order central differences. The relative importance of structural warping, inertial warping, pretwist, tension-torsion and twist-rotational coupling terms is discussed for various rotational speeds. The accuracy of results obtained by using the finite difference approach is verified by a comparison with the exact solution for specialized simple cases of the equation of motion used in this paper.

  16. Sizing Single Cantilever Beam Specimens for Characterizing Facesheet/Core Peel Debonding in Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper details part of an effort focused on the development of a standardized facesheet/core peel debonding test procedure. The purpose of the test is to characterize facesheet/core peel in sandwich structure, accomplished through the measurement of the critical strain energy release rate associated with the debonding process. The specific test method selected for the standardized test procedure utilizes a single cantilever beam (SCB) specimen configuration. The objective of the current work is to develop a method for establishing SCB specimen dimensions. This is achieved by imposing specific limitations on specimen dimensions, with the objectives of promoting a linear elastic specimen response, and simplifying the data reduction method required for computing the critical strain energy release rate associated with debonding. The sizing method is also designed to be suitable for incorporation into a standardized test protocol. Preliminary application of the resulting sizing method yields practical specimen dimensions.

  17. The width-tapered double cantilever beam for interlaminar fracture testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Jensen, R. M.; Bullman, G. W.; Hunston, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The width-tapered double-cantilever-beam (WTDCB) specimen configuration used to determine the Mode-I interlaminar fracture energy (IFE) of composites has special advantages for routine development work and for quality-assurance purposes. These advantages come primarily from the simplicity of testing and the fact that the specimen is designed for constant change in compliance with crack length, so that the computation of Mode-I IFE is independent of crack length. In this paper, a simplified technique for fabrication and testing WTDCB specimens is described. Also presented are the effects of fiber orientation and specimen dimensions, a comparison of data obtained using the WTDCB specimens and other specimen geometries, and comparison of data obtained at different laboratories. It is concluded that the WTDCB gives interlaminar Mode-I IFE essentially equal to other type specimens, and that it can be used for rapid screening in resin-development work and for quality assurance of composite materials.

  18. An improved finite-difference analysis of uncoupled vibrations of tapered cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure for determining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of tapered cantilever beams undergoing uncoupled vibrations is presented. Boundary conditions are derived in the form of simple recursive relations involving the second order central differences. Results obtained by using the conventional first order central differences and the present second order central differences are compared, and it is observed that the present second order scheme is more efficient than the conventional approach. An important advantage offered by the present approach is that the results converge to exact values rapidly, and thus the extrapolation of the results is not necessary. Consequently, the basic handicap with the classical finite difference method of solution that requires the Richardson's extrapolation procedure is eliminated. Furthermore, for the cases considered herein, the present approach produces consistent lower bound solutions.

  19. Double Cantilever Beam and End Notched Flexure Fracture Toughness Testing of Two Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Two different unidirectional composite materials were provided by NASA Langley Research Center and tested by the Composite Materials Research Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed to measure the mode I (crack opening) and mode II (sliding or shear) interlaminar fracture toughness of the two materials. The two composites consisted of IM7 carbon fiber combined with either RP46 resin toughened with special formulation of LaRC IA resin, known as JJS1356; or PES chain extended thermoplastic resin known as JJS1361. Double Cantilever Beam Specimen Configuration and Test Methods As received from NASA, the test specimens were nominally 0.5 inch wide, 6 inches long, and 0.2 inch thick. A 1 inch long Kapton insert at the midplane of one end of the specimen (placed during laminate fabrication) facilitated crack initiation and extension. It was noted that the specimens provided were smaller than the nominal 1.5 inch wide, 9.0 inch long configuration specified. Similarly, the Kapton inserts were of greater length than those in the present specimens. Hence, the data below should not be compared directly to those generated with the referenced methods. No preconditioning was performed on the specimens prior to testing. In general, the methodology was used for the present work. Crack opening loads were introduced to the specimens via piano hinges attached to the main specimen faces at a single end of each specimen. Hinges were bolted to the specimens using the technique presented. The cracks were extended a small distance from the end of the Kapton insert prior to testing. Just before precracking, the sides of the specimens were coated with water-soluble typewriter correction fluid to aid in crack visualization. Scribe marks were then made in the coating at half-inch intervals.

  20. Symmetry limit theory for cantilever beam-columns subjected to cyclic reversed bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetani, K.; Nakamura, Tsuneyoshi

    THE BEHAVIOR of a linear strain-hardening cantilever beam-column subjected to completely reversed plastic bending of a new idealized program under constant axial compression consists of three stages: a sequence of symmetric steady states, a subsequent sequence of asymmetric steady states and a divergent behavior involving unbounded growth of an anti-symmetric deflection mode. A new concept "symmetry limit" is introduced here as the smallest critical value of the tip-deflection amplitude at which transition from a symmetric steady state to an asymmetric steady state can occur in the response of a beam-column. A new theory is presented for predicting the symmetry limits. Although this transition phenomenon is phenomenologically and conceptually different from the branching phenomenon on an equilibrium path, it is shown that a symmetry limit may theoretically be regarded as a branching point on a "steady-state path" defined anew. The symmetry limit theory and the fundamental hypotheses are verified through numerical analysis of hysteretic responses of discretized beam-column models.

  1. Investigation of the Transient Behavior of a Cantilever Beam Using PVDF Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chien-Ching; Huang, Yu-Hsi; Pan, Shan-Ying

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a PVDF film sensor was used to measure the transient responses of a cantilever beam subjected to an impact loading. The measurement capability of a PVDF sensor is affected by the area of the PVDF film sensor and the signal conditioner (charge amplifier). The influences of these effects on the experimental measurements were investigated. The transient responses for the dynamic strain of the beam were measured simultaneously by the PVDF sensor and a conventional strain gauge. The resonant frequencies of the beam were determined by applying the Fast Fourier Transform on transient results in the time domain of the PVDF sensor and the strain gauge. The experimentally measured resonant frequencies from the PVDF sensor and the strain gauge were compared with those predicted from theoretical and FEM numerical calculations. Based on the comparison of the results measured for these two sensors, the PVDF film sensor proved capable of measuring transient responses for dynamic strain, and its sensitivity is better than that of the strain gauge. Furthermore, almost all the resonant frequencies can be obtained from the results of transient responses for PVDF film. PMID:22438754

  2. Fault Diagnosis of Cantilever Beam Using Finite Element Analysis: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, B. S. N.; Ratnam, C.; Kumar, K. A.

    2013-10-01

    Damage prediction in mechanical and structural systems is establishing a prominent role in modern engineering. Vibration based damage methods give ample flexibility to understand the extent of expected damages in the system. Measurement of vibration characteristics like natural frequencies and mode shapes, Fourier responses and transient responses can help in comprehending the present status of a system either by comparing with their baseline equivalents or by formulating residual functions and minimizing them. The minimization of residues is carried out using non-conventional optimization techniques like genetic algorithms. Genetic algorithms being a meta-heuristic method obtain global minimum values with implicitly defined constraints and objective. In all the residual functions considered in this paper, it is assumed that only the stiffness parameters are reduced individually in each element due to the damage. The amount of reduction in each element is an unknown parameter. The approach is attempted with a structural member like beam. Experimental analysis is carried out to test the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the damaged beams from finite element model considered. A cantilever beam with central slot of desired depth is selected and impact hammer analysis is performed to know the variation in modes when compared to undamaged counter part. Results are presented in the form of table and graphs.

  3. Improved Beam Diagnostic Spatial Calibration Using In-Situ Measurements of Beam Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.; Pablant, N. A.

    2014-10-01

    A new technique has been developed for determining the measurement geometry of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic (CER) on DIII-D. This technique removes uncertainty in the measurement geometry related to the position of the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This has been accomplished by combining standard measurements that use in-vessel calibration targets with spectroscopic measurements of Doppler shifted and Stark split beam emission to fully describe the neutral beam positions and CER views. A least squares fitting routine determines the measurement geometry consistent with all the calibration data. The use of beam emission measurements allows the position of the neutral beams to be determined in-situ by the same views that makeup the CER diagnostic. Results indicate that changes in the measurement geometry are required to create a consistent set of calibration measurements. However, changes in quantities derived from the geometry, e.g. ion temperature gradient and poloidal rotation, are small. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-09H11466.

  4. An experimental-theoretical correlation study of non-linear bending and torsion deformations of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.; Traybar, J.; Hodges, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study of the large deformation of a cantilevered beam under a gravity tip load has been made. The beam root is rotated so that the tip load is oriented at various angles with respect to the beam principal axes. Static twist and bending deflections of the tip and bending natural frequencies have been measured as a function of tip load magnitude and orientation. The experimental data are compared with the results of a recently developed non-linear structural theory. Agreement is reasonably good when bending deflections are small compared to the beam span, but systematic differences occur for larger deflections.

  5. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  6. Bending and Shear Stresses Developed by the Instantaneous Arrest of the Root of a Moving Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge, Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has been made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in transverse motion when its root is suddenly brought to rest. Equations are given for determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that arise in the beam as a result of the impact. The theoretical equations, which have been confirmed experimentally, reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam, whereas the shear stresses vary inversely with the length.

  7. Large deflections of non-prismatic nonlinearly elastic cantilever beams subjected to non-uniform continuous load and a concentrated load at the free end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brojan, Miha; Cebron, Matjaz; Kosel, Franc

    2012-06-01

    This work studies large deflections of slender, non-prismatic cantilever beams subjected to a combined loading which consists of a non-uniformly distributed continuous load and a concentrated load at the free end of the beam. The material of the cantilever is assumed to be nonlinearly elastic. Different nonlinear relations between stress and strain in tensile and compressive domain are considered. The accuracy of numerical solutions is evaluated by comparing them with results from previous studies and with a laboratory experiment.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Output Response of PVDF Sensor Attached on a Cantilever Beam Subjected to Impact Loading.

    PubMed

    Dung, Cao Vu; Sasaki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Polyvinylidene Flouride (PVDF) is a film-type polymer that has been used as sensors and actuators in various applications due to its mechanical toughness, flexibility, and low density. A PVDF sensor typically covers an area of the host structure over which mechanical stress/strain is averaged and converted to electrical energy. This study investigates the fundamental "stress-averaging" mechanism for dynamic strain sensing in the in-plane mode. A numerical simulation was conducted to simulate the "stress-averaging" mechanism of a PVDF sensor attached on a cantilever beam subjected to an impact loading, taking into account the contribution of piezoelectricity, the cantilever beam's modal properties, and electronic signal conditioning. Impact tests and FEM analysis were also carried out to verify the numerical simulation results. The results of impact tests indicate the excellent capability of the attached PVDF sensor in capturing the fundamental natural frequencies of the cantilever beam. There is a good agreement between the PVDF sensor's output voltage predicted by the numerical simulation and that obtained in the impact tests. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sensor size and sensor position and it is shown that a larger sensor tends to generate higher output voltage than a smaller one at the same location. However, the effect of sensor location seems to be more significant for larger sensors due to the cancelling problem. Overall, PVDF sensors exhibit excellent sensing capability for in-plane dynamic strain induced by impact loading. PMID:27128919

  9. Effects of T-tabs and large deflections in double cantilever beam specimen tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.; Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    1991-01-01

    A simple strength of materials analysis was developed for a double-cantilever beam (DCB) specimen to account for geometric nonlinearity effects due to large deflections and T-tabs. A new DCB data analysis procedure was developed to include the effects of these nonlinearities. The results of the analysis were evaluated by DCB tests performed for materials having a wide range of toughnesses. The materials used in the present study were T300/5208, IM7/8551-7, and AS4/PEEK. Based on the present analysis, for a typical deflection/crack length ratio of 0.3 (for AS4/PEEK), T-tabs and large deflections cause a 15 and 3 percent error, respectively, in the computer Mode I strain energy release rate. Design guidelines for DCB specimen thickness and T-tab height were also developed in order to keep errors due to these nonlinearities within 2 percent. Based on the test results, for both hinged and tabbed specimens, the effects of large deflection on the Mode I fracture toughness (G sub Ic) were almost negligible (less than 1 percent) in the case of T300/5208 and IM7/8551-7; however, AS4/PEEK showed a 2 to 3 percent effect. The effects of T-tabs G sub Ic were more significant for all the materials with T300/5208 showing a 5 percent error, IM7/8551-7 a 15 percent error, and, AS4/PEEK a 20 percent error.

  10. Sizing Single Cantilever Beam Specimens for Characterizing Facesheet/Core Peel Debonding in Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    This technical publication details part of an effort focused on the development of a standardized facesheet/core peel debonding test procedure. The purpose of the test is to characterize facesheet/core peel in sandwich structure, accomplished through the measurement of the critical strain energy release rate associated with the debonding process. Following an examination of previously developed tests and a recent evaluation of a selection of these methods, a single cantilever beam (SCB) specimen was identified as being a promising candidate for establishing such a standardized test procedure. The objective of the work described here was to begin development of a protocol for conducting a SCB test that will render the procedure suitable for standardization. To this end, a sizing methodology was developed to ensure appropriate SCB specimen dimensions are selected for a given sandwich system. Application of this method to actual sandwich systems yielded SCB specimen dimensions that would be practical for use. This study resulted in the development of a practical SCB specimen sizing method, which should be well-suited for incorporation into a standardized testing protocol.

  11. A Mode-Shape-Based Fault Detection Methodology for Cantilever Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejada, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    An important goal of NASA's Internal Vehicle Health Management program (IVHM) is to develop and verify methods and technologies for fault detection in critical airframe structures. A particularly promising new technology under development at NASA Langley Research Center is distributed Bragg fiber optic strain sensors. These sensors can be embedded in, for instance, aircraft wings to continuously monitor surface strain during flight. Strain information can then be used in conjunction with well-known vibrational techniques to detect faults due to changes in the wing's physical parameters or to the presence of incipient cracks. To verify the benefits of this technology, the Formal Methods Group at NASA LaRC has proposed the use of formal verification tools such as PVS. The verification process, however, requires knowledge of the physics and mathematics of the vibrational techniques and a clear understanding of the particular fault detection methodology. This report presents a succinct review of the physical principles behind the modeling of vibrating structures such as cantilever beams (the natural model of a wing). It also reviews two different classes of fault detection techniques and proposes a particular detection method for cracks in wings, which is amenable to formal verification. A prototype implementation of these methods using Matlab scripts is also described and is related to the fundamental theoretical concepts.

  12. Analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Zeng, Jin; Lang, Ziqiang; Zhang, Long; Guo, Yuzhu; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam are studied based on a new finite element (FE) model where both plane and beam elements are used to reduce the computational costs. Simulation studies show that the proposed model has the same system natural frequencies and vibration responses as those in the pure plane element model but is computationally more efficient. Based on the new model, the effects of loads such as gravity Fg, excitation force amplitude F0 and direction angles of excitation force φ, and crack parameters including slant crack angle θ, dimensionless crack depth s and dimensionless crack location p, on system dynamics have been analyzed. The results indicate that (1) the gravity has a more significant effect on the sub-harmonic resonance responses than on the super-harmonic resonance and resonance responses; (2) The amplitudes of the system responses at both excitation force frequencies fe and its harmonics such as 2fe and 3fe increase almost linearly with the increase of the excitation force amplitude F0; (3) Under the constant excitation force in the flexural direction, the tensile and compressive forces along the longitudinal direction can lead to opposite breathing behaviors of the crack within the super-harmonic and sub-harmonic resonance frequency regions; (4) Vibration is most severe under the straight crack angle (θ=90°) and near the straight crack angle such as θ=100° and 110°, and the vibration responses under smaller or larger crack angles such as θ=30° and θ=150° become weaker; (5) The resonance at 2fe is sensitive to the faint crack signals when s is small and p is large. In addition, the significant vibration responses at the multiple frequency of 3fe and the fractional frequency of 0.5fe can be regarded as a distinguishable feature of the serious crack with large s and small p.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Output Response of PVDF Sensor Attached on a Cantilever Beam Subjected to Impact Loading

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Cao Vu; Sasaki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Polyvinylidene Flouride (PVDF) is a film-type polymer that has been used as sensors and actuators in various applications due to its mechanical toughness, flexibility, and low density. A PVDF sensor typically covers an area of the host structure over which mechanical stress/strain is averaged and converted to electrical energy. This study investigates the fundamental “stress-averaging” mechanism for dynamic strain sensing in the in-plane mode. A numerical simulation was conducted to simulate the “stress-averaging” mechanism of a PVDF sensor attached on a cantilever beam subjected to an impact loading, taking into account the contribution of piezoelectricity, the cantilever beam’s modal properties, and electronic signal conditioning. Impact tests and FEM analysis were also carried out to verify the numerical simulation results. The results of impact tests indicate the excellent capability of the attached PVDF sensor in capturing the fundamental natural frequencies of the cantilever beam. There is a good agreement between the PVDF sensor’s output voltage predicted by the numerical simulation and that obtained in the impact tests. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sensor size and sensor position and it is shown that a larger sensor tends to generate higher output voltage than a smaller one at the same location. However, the effect of sensor location seems to be more significant for larger sensors due to the cancelling problem. Overall, PVDF sensors exhibit excellent sensing capability for in-plane dynamic strain induced by impact loading. PMID:27128919

  14. The TriBeam system: Femtosecond laser ablation in situ SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Echlin, McLean P.; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Filevich, Jorge; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation offers the unique ability to remove material at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than existing ion beam technologies with little or no associated damage. By combining ultrafast lasers with state-of-the-art electron microscopy equipment, we have developed a TriBeam system capable of targeted, in-situ tomography providing chemical, structural, and topographical information in three dimensions of near mm{sup 3} sized volumes. The origins, development, physics, current uses, and future potential for the TriBeam system are described in this tutorial review. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • An emerging tool, the TriBeam, for in situ femtosecond (fs) laser ablation is presented. • Fs laser ablation aided tomography at the mm{sup 3}-scale is demonstrated. • Fs laser induced deposition of Pt is demonstrated at sub-diffraction limit resolution. • Fs laser surface structuring is reviewed as well as micromachining applications.

  15. Residual stress in sputtered gold films on quartz measured by the cantilever beam deflection technique.

    PubMed

    Thornell, G; Ericson, F; Hedlund, C; Ohrmaim, J; Schweitz, J A; Portnoff, G

    1999-01-01

    With resonator applications in mind, the residual stress in sputtered gold electrodes on quartz has been investigated with respect to various deposition rates (2, 10, and 50 A/s), pressures (1.0 and 3.0 10(-3) mbar), deposition temperatures (80 degrees C and room temperature (RT)), film thicknesses (approx. 400 to 800 A), and substrate smoothnesses (lapped and polished), using the cantilever beam deflection method. Samples were monitored for 4 weeks at room temperature followed by 13 weeks of annealing at 85 degrees C. The initial stress (ranging from -180 to -60 MPa) was compressive for all samples but turned tensile (a few megaPascals) in some of the samples after annealing. A significant decrease in initial compressive stress appeared with samples coated at an elevated temperature. From samples prepared at lower pressure and differing only in film thickness and substrate roughness, an increased compressive stress was found in thicker films and on rougher surfaces. The stress relaxation has been fitted to an exponential expression, and an attempt to relate the stress to a frequency shift (typically a few parts per million for ordinary, 100-mum thick AT blanks) has been made. With the help of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the film morphology was investigated and related to the deposition parameters and aging. Judging from the increase in compressive stress and grain refinement with increased deposition rate and decreased pressure, the atomic peening mechanism is the most likely reason for the induced stress. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was employed to rule out the inclusion of argon (below or around 0.5%) as an explanation. From the vague, but clearly discernible, trend toward faster RT stress relaxation with higher initial stress, together with the finer film morphology, the relief mechanism is believed to be stress-promoted grain boundary diffusion. PMID:18238503

  16. A Novel Method for Calculation of Strain Energy Release Rate of Asymmetric Double Cantilever Laminated Composite Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrieh, M. M.; Zeinedini, A.

    2014-06-01

    In this research, a novel data reduction method for calculation of the strain energy release rate ( SERR) of asymmetric double cantilever beams ( ADCB) is presented. For this purpose the elastic beam theory ( EBT) is modified and the new method is called as the modified elastic beam theory ( MEBT). Also, the ADCB specimens are modeled using ABAQUS/Standard software. Then, the initiation of delamination of ADCB specimens is modeled using the virtual crack closure technique ( VCCT). Furthermore, magnitudes of the SERR for different samples are also calculated by an available data reduction method, called modified beam theory ( MBT). Using the hand lay-up method, different laminated composite samples are manufactured by E-glass/epoxy unidirectional plies. In order to measure the SERR, all samples are tested using an experimental setup. The results determined by the new data reduction method ( MEBT) show good agreements with the results of the VCCT and the MBT.

  17. Beam-assisted large elongation of in situ formed Li₂O nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X; Wang, Jianbo; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-01-01

    As an important component of the solid electrolyte interface in lithium ion batteries and an effective blanket breeding material in fusion reactor, the mechanical property of Li(2)O is of great interest but is not well understood. Here we show that the polycrystalline Li(2)O nanowires were formed in situ by touching and pulling lithium hydroxide under electron beam (e-beam) illumination. The Li(2)O nanowires sustained an enhanced elongation (from 80% to 176%) under low dose e-beam irradiation near room temperature as compared with that (from 51% to 57%) without e-beam irradiation. The extremely high deformability could be understood by the fast Li(2)O diffusion under e-beam irradiation and tensile stress condition. The large elongation without e-beam irradiation implies that nano-structured Li(2)O is ductile near room temperature. PMID:22848788

  18. Beam-assisted large elongation of in situ formed Li2O nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Jianbo; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-01-01

    As an important component of the solid electrolyte interface in lithium ion batteries and an effective blanket breeding material in fusion reactor, the mechanical property of Li2O is of great interest but is not well understood. Here we show that the polycrystalline Li2O nanowires were formed in situ by touching and pulling lithium hydroxide under electron beam (e-beam) illumination. The Li2O nanowires sustained an enhanced elongation (from 80% to 176%) under low dose e-beam irradiation near room temperature as compared with that (from 51% to 57%) without e-beam irradiation. The extremely high deformability could be understood by the fast Li2O diffusion under e-beam irradiation and tensile stress condition. The large elongation without e-beam irradiation implies that nano-structured Li2O is ductile near room temperature. PMID:22848788

  19. In situ growth of superconducting YBaCuO using reactive electron-beam coevaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Missert, N.; Hammond, R.; Mooij, J.E.; Matijasevic, V.; Rosenthal, P.; Geballe, T.H.; Laderman, S.S.; Lu, C.; Garwin; Barton, R.

    1989-03-01

    Conditions required for in situ growth of YBaCuO thin films by reactive electron-beam evaporation have been explored. Three sources of activated oxygen (atomic oxygen from microwave discharge, a plasma generated by electron beams and an ion beam) were compared. The best results so far were obtained with atomic oxygen. Epitaxial films with high critical currents were grown on SrTiO/sub 3/ <100> and <110>, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ <1102> and MgO <100> at 600/sup 0/C. Evaporation rates were controlled with a rate monitor using atomic absorption.

  20. In situ growth of superconducting YBaCuO using reactive electron-beam coevaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Missert, N.; Hammond, R.; Mooij, J.E.; Matijasevic, V.; Rosenthal, P.; Geballe, T.H.; Kapitulnik, A.; Beasley, M.R.; Laderman, S.S.; Lu, C.

    1988-09-01

    Conditions required for in situ growth of YBaCuO thin films by reactive electron-beam evaporation have been explored. Three sources of activated oxygen (atomic oxygen from microwave discharge, a plasma generated by electron beams, and an ion beam) were compared. The best results so far were obtained with atomic oxygen. Epitaxial films with high critical currents were grown on SrTiO/sub 3/ <100> and <110>, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ <1/bar 1/02> and MgO <100> at 600/degree/C. Evaporation rates were controlled with a rate monitor using atomic absorption. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A Homotopy Perturbation-Based Method for Large Deflection of a Cantilever Beam Under a Terminal Follower Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Lin, Wen-Hui; Liu, Ning

    2012-05-01

    The large deflection problem of a uniform cantilever beam subjected to a terminal concentrated follower force is investigated. The governing equations, which characterize a two-point boundary value problem, are transformed into an initial-value problem. A new algorithm based on the homotopy perturbation method is proposed and applied to the resulting problem and the characteristics of load versus displacement are obtained analytically. The convergence of this method is discussed and the details of load-deflection curves are present. Compared with other existing methods, the present scheme is shown to be highly accurate, while only lower order perturbation is required.

  2. Measuring the cantilever-position-sensitive detector distance and cantilever curvature for cantilever sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Tian, Ye; Coates, M L; Beaulieu, L Y

    2009-09-01

    Measuring cantilever sensor deflections using an optical beam deflection system is more complicated than often assumed. The direction of the reflected beam is dependent on the surface normal of the cantilever, which in turn is dependent on the state of the cantilever. It is often assumed that the cantilever is both straight and perfectly level before the onset of sensing experiments although this assumption, especially the former, is rarely true. Failure to characterize the initial state of the cantilever can lead to irreproducibility in cantilever sensor measurements. We have developed three new methods for characterizing the initial state of the cantilever. In the first case we show how to define the initial angle of inclination beta of the chip on which the cantilever is attached. This method was tested using an aluminum block with a known angle of inclination. A new method for determining the initial distance L(o) between the cantilever and the position-sensitive detector (PSD) is also presented. This parameter which behaves as an amplification factor of the PSD signal is critical for obtaining precise cantilever sensor data. Lastly, we present a method for determining the initial curvature of the cantilever which often results from depositing the sensing platform on the lever. Experiments conducted using deflected cantilevers showed the model to be accurate. The characterization methods presented in this work are simple to use, easy to implement, and can be incorporated into most cantilever sensor setups. PMID:19791971

  3. Study of dislocations in copper by weak beam, stereo, and in situ straining TEM

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, R. J.; Misra, A.; Mitchell, T. E.

    2002-01-01

    Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been an invaluable tool for verifjhg and developing dislocation theories since the first direct observations of dislocations were made using a TEM in the 1950s. Several useful techniques and technological advancements have been made since, helping fbrther the advancement of dislocation knowledge. The present paper concerns two studies of dislocations in copper made by coupling several of these techniques, specifically weak beam, in situ straining, and stereo TEM. Stereo-TEM coupled with in situ straining TEM was used for tracking 3D dislocation motion and interactions in low dislocation density copper foils. A mechanism by which dislocations in a pileup bypass a dislocation node is observed and discussed. Weak beam TEM is used in conjunction with stereo-TEM to analyze the dislocation content of a dense dislocation wall (DDW).

  4. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  5. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A; Groen, Wilhelm A; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 micros have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 microm nozzle releases about 10(16) particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10(22) particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10(-6) Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Delta v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the

  6. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  7. Decreasing Beam Auto Tuning Interruption Events with In-Situ Chemical Cleaning on Axcelis GSD

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Dieter; Spreitzer, Stefan; Vogl, Josef; Bishop, Steve; Eldridge, David; Kaim, Robert

    2008-11-03

    Ion beam auto tuning time and success rate are often major factors in the utilization and productivity of ion implanters. Tuning software frequently fails to meet specified setup times or recipe parameters, causing production stoppages and requiring manual intervention. Build-up of conductive deposits in the arc chamber and extraction gap can be one of the main causes of auto tuning problems. The deposits cause glitching and ion beam instabilities, which lead to errors in the software optimization routines. Infineon Regensburg has been testing use of XeF{sub 2}, an in-situ chemical cleaning reagent, with positive results in reducing auto tuning interruption events.

  8. A family of carbon-based nanocomposite tubular structures created by in situ electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Jie; Ni, Yong; Fan, Feng-Jia; Zhang, Chuan-Ling; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-05-22

    We report a unique approach for the fabrication of a family of curling tubular nanostructures rapidly created by a rolling up of carbon membranes under in situ TEM electron beam irradiation. Multiwall tubes can also be created if irradiation by electron beam is performed long enough. This general approach can be extended to curve the conductive carbon film loaded with various functional nanomaterials, such as nanocrystals, nanorods, nanowires, and nanosheets, providing a unique strategy to make composite tubular structures and composite materials by a combination of desired optical, electronic, and magnetic properties, which could find potential applications, including fluid transportation, encapsulation, and capillarity on the nanometer scale. PMID:22530775

  9. In situ nanomechanical testing in focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gianola, D. S.; Sedlmayr, A.; Moenig, R.; Kraft, O.; Volkert, C. A.; Major, R. C.; Cyrankowski, E.; Asif, S. A. S.; Warren, O. L.

    2011-06-15

    The recent interest in size-dependent deformation of micro- and nanoscale materials has paralleled both technological miniaturization and advancements in imaging and small-scale mechanical testing methods. Here we describe a quantitative in situ nanomechanical testing approach adapted to a dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope. A transducer based on a three-plate capacitor system is used for high-fidelity force and displacement measurements. Specimen manipulation, transfer, and alignment are performed using a manipulator, independently controlled positioners, and the focused ion beam. Gripping of specimens is achieved using electron-beam assisted Pt-organic deposition. Local strain measurements are obtained using digital image correlation of electron images taken during testing. Examples showing results for tensile testing of single-crystalline metallic nanowires and compression of nanoporous Au pillars will be presented in the context of size effects on mechanical behavior and highlight some of the challenges of conducting nanomechanical testing in vacuum environments.

  10. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  11. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80–400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50–220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  12. In situ tomography of femtosecond optical beams with a holographic knife-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohaber, J.; Kaya, G.; Kaya, N.; Hart, N.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Paulus, G. G.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2011-07-01

    We present an in situ beam characterization technique to analyze femtosecond optical beams in a folded version of a 2f-2f setup. This technique makes use of a two-dimensional spatial light modulator (SLM) to holographically redirect radiation between different diffraction orders. This manipulation of light between diffraction orders is carried out locally within the beam. Because SLMs can withstand intensities of up to I˜1011 W/cm2, this makes them suitable for amplified femtosecond radiation. The flexibility of the SLM was demonstrated by producing a diverse assortment of ``soft apertures'' that are mechanically difficult or impossible to reproduce. We test our method by holographically knife-edging and tomographically reconstructing both continuous wave and broadband radiation in transverse optical modes.

  13. "Metallic burn paper" used for in situ characterization of laser beam properties.

    PubMed

    Bass, Isaac L; Negres, Raluca A; Stanion, Ken; Guss, Gabe; Bude, Jeff

    2016-04-20

    In situ ablation of thin metal films on fused silica substrates by picosecond class lasers was investigated as a method of characterizing the beam at the sample plane. The technique involved plotting the areas enclosed by constant fluence contours identified in optical microscope images of the ablation sites versus the logs of the pulse energies. Inconel films on commercially available neutral density filters as well as magnetron sputtered gold films were used. It was also shown that this technique could be used to calibrate real-time beam profile diagnostics against the beam at the sample plane. The contours were shown to correspond to the boundary where part or all of the film was ablated. PMID:27140078

  14. IN SITU PRECISE ANGLE MONITORING ON SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MONOCHROMATOR BY USE OF PENCIL BEAM INTERFEROMETER.

    SciTech Connect

    QIAN,S.TAKACS,P.DONG,Q.HULBERT,S.

    2003-08-25

    Monochromator is a very important and precise instrument used in beam lines at synchrotron radiation facilities. We need to know if there is actual thermal distortion on gratings resulting in the degradation of the monochromator resolution. We need to know the characteristics of the grating rotation. It is possible to make a simple but precise in-situ distortion monitoring and rotation angle test of the grating by use of a precise pencil beam angle monitor. We have made preliminary measurements on a monochrometer grating of an undulator beam line X1B at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We monitored a small amount of angle variation on the grating. We detected 1.7 {micro}rad backlash (P-V) of the grating controlling system.

  15. In Situ Mitigation of Subsurface and Peripheral Focused Ion Beam Damage via Simultaneous Pulsed Laser Heating.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Iberi, Vighter; Fowlkes, Jason D; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D

    2016-04-01

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+)) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+)/Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposure process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. These results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams. PMID:26864147

  16. In situ mitigation of subsurface and peripheral focused ion beam damage via simultaneous pulsed laser heating

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Iberi, Vighter O.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-02-16

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+) ) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+) /Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposuremore » process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. In conclusion, these results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.« less

  17. In situ mitigation of subsurface and peripheral focused ion beam damage via simultaneous pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Iberi, Vighter O.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+) ) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+) /Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposure process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. In conclusion, these results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.

  18. Effects of initial delamination on CIc and GIth values from glass/epoxy double cantilever beam tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of insert thickness and method of precracking on mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, GIc, and delamination fatigue threshold, GIth, values were determined for a glass/epoxy double cantilever beam specimen. The results of the static tests showed that precracking in tension would cause fiber bridging and thus may yield unconservative values of GIc and GIth. Precracking in shear yields suitable values of GIc but overly conservative values of GIth. For the glass/epoxy composite used, an insert thickness of 0.5 mil was most suitable for determining GIc and GIth values, although an insert thickness up to 3 mil was acceptable. Inserts thicker than 3 mil were not acceptable for determining GIc and GIth values.

  19. Diversity between shell-like and beam-like regions for a cantilever cylindrical shell under follower forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki, Mohammad Ebrahim; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Mahmoudkhani, Saied

    2012-12-01

    The effect of length and thickness on dynamic stability analysis of cantilever cylindrical shells under follower forces is addressed. Beck's, Leipholz's, and Hauger's problems were solved for cylindrical shells with different length-to-radius and thicknesses-to-radius ratios using the Galerkin method. First-order shear theory was used, and rotary inertias were considered in deriving the differential equations. Critical circumferential and longitudinal mode numbers and loads were evaluated for each case. Diagrams containing nondimensional load parameters vs. length and thickness parameters were plotted for each problem. For some shells with small length-to-radius ratios, flutter occurred in high longitudinal mode numbers where the first-order shear theory may not suffice to accurately evaluate the deformations. However, for long and moderately thick shells, there are ranges in which the shell can be analyzed using the simplified equivalent beam model.

  20. Mechanical properties of compositionally-modulated Au--Ni thin films: nanoindentation and micro-cantilever beam deflection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.P.; Nix, W.D. )

    1994-12-01

    The mechanical properties of compositionally-modulated Au--Ni films were investigated by sub-micrometer depth-sensing indentation and by deflection of micrometer-scale cantilever beams. Films prepared by sputter deposition with composition wavelengths between 0.9 and 4.0 nm were investigated. Strength was found to be high and invariant with composition wavelength. Experimental and data analysis methods were developed to provide more accurate and precise measurements of elastic stiffness. Large enhancements in stiffness (the supermodulus effect'') were [ital not] observed. Rather, relatively small but significant minima were observed at a composition wavelength of about 1.6 nm by both techniques. These variations were found to be strongly correlated with variations in the average lattice parameter normal to the plane of the film. Both structural and mechanical property variations are consistent with a simple model in which the film consists of bulk-like Au and Ni layers with interfaces of constant thickness.

  1. Robust energy harvesting from walking vibrations by means of nonlinear cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluger, Jocelyn M.; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work we examine how mechanical nonlinearity can be appropriately utilized to achieve strong robustness of performance in an energy harvesting setting. More specifically, for energy harvesting applications, a great challenge is the uncertain character of the excitation. The combination of this uncertainty with the narrow range of good performance for linear oscillators creates the need for more robust designs that adapt to a wider range of excitation signals. A typical application of this kind is energy harvesting from walking vibrations. Depending on the particular characteristics of the person that walks as well as on the pace of walking, the excitation signal obtains completely different forms. In the present work we study a nonlinear spring mechanism that is composed of a cantilever wrapping around a curved surface as it deflects. While for the free cantilever, the force acting on the free tip depends linearly on the tip displacement, the utilization of a contact surface with the appropriate distribution of curvature leads to essentially nonlinear dependence between the tip displacement and the acting force. The studied nonlinear mechanism has favorable mechanical properties such as low frictional losses, minimal moving parts, and a rugged design that can withstand excessive loads. Through numerical simulations we illustrate that by utilizing this essentially nonlinear element in a 2 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) system, we obtain strongly nonlinear energy transfers between the modes of the system. We illustrate that this nonlinear behavior is associated with strong robustness over three radically different excitation signals that correspond to different walking paces. To validate the strong robustness properties of the 2DOF nonlinear system, we perform a direct parameter optimization for 1DOF and 2DOF linear systems as well as for a class of 1DOF and 2DOF systems with nonlinear springs similar to that of the cubic spring that are physically realized

  2. Fluid-structure interaction of quasi-one-dimensional potential flow along channel bounded by symmetric cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Gang-Won; Chang, Se-Myong; Gim, Gyun-Ho

    2013-07-01

    An analysis of fluid-structure interaction is presented for incompressible and inviscid flow in a channel bounded by symmetric cantilever beams. Small deflections of the beams and no flows normal to the beams are assumed, thus allowing the governing equations to be defined using quasi-one-dimensional pressure and flow velocity distribution; pressure and velocity are assumed to be uniform across the cross section of the channel. The steady-state solution of the present problem is analytically derived by the linearization of the governing equations. The solution is shown to consist of infinite modes, which is verified by comparing with numerical solutions obtained by the finite element method. The nonlinear effect in the steady-state solution is modeled by numerical method to estimate the error due to linearization. However, only a few leading modes are physically significant owing to the effects of flow compressibility and viscosity. The analytic solutions of the fluid-structure interaction are also presented for dynamic problems assuming harmonic vibration. The steady-state and stationary initial conditions are used, and the equilibrium frequency is determined to minimize the residual error of Euler equation. The fluid-structure interaction is characterized by a phase difference and distortion of waveform shape in the time history of the boundary velocity.

  3. Structural analysis of tree trunks and branches: tapered cantilever beams subject to large deflections under complex loading.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J; Cannell, M G

    1987-12-01

    The dimensions, deflections and support costs of tree trunks and branches can be deduced using the structural theory for cantilever beams. However, elementary theory applies only as long as deflections are small, and complex analytical solutions are required to account for complex taper and patterns of loading. This paper describes a method that copes with large deflections, any patterns of taper, and any patterns of distributed loading, point loading or externally applied bending moments. A beam is considered to be composed of a series of short segments, such that each has only a small deflection, and each can have specified dimensions, Young's modulus and loading. The transport matrix method of structural analysis is used to determine the end conditions of each segment and of the whole beam. The method is verified by comparing predicted deflections with deflections (a) calculated using an analytical solution by Bisshopp and Drucker (1945), (b) calculated and measured for sapling tree trunks by Leiser and Kemper (1968), and (c) measured on tapered and untapered plastic rods. PMID:14975920

  4. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Tung, I C; Chang, S-H; Bhattacharya, A; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques. PMID:26827327

  5. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S. -H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  6. Mechanical test in-situ fracture device for Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    An in-situ fracture device for Auger spectroscopy was described. The device is designed to handle small tensile specimens or small double cantilever beam specimens and is fully instrumented with load and displacement transducers so that quantitative stress-strain measurements can be made directly. Some initial test results for specimens made from 4130 and 1020 steel were presented.

  7. In-situ spectral reflectance for improving molecular beam epitaxy device growth

    SciTech Connect

    Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Killeen, K.P.; Klem, J.F.; Reno, J.L.; Sherwin, M.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the development of in situ spectral reflectance as a tool for improving the quality, reproducibility, and yield of device structures grown from compound semiconductors. Although initially targeted at MBE (Molecular Beam Epitaxy) machines, equipment difficulties forced the authors to test most of their ideas on a MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) reactor. A pre-growth control strategy using in situ reflectance has led to an unprecedented demonstration of process control on one of the most difficult device structures that can be grown with compound semiconductor materials. Hundreds of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL`s) were grown with only {+-} 0.3% deviations in the Fabry-Perot cavity wavelength--a nearly ten-fold improvement over current calibration methods. The success of the ADVISOR (Analysis of Deposition using Virtual Interfaces and Spectroscopic Optical Reflectance) method has led to a great deal of interest from the commercial sector, including use by Hewlett Packard and Honeywell. The algorithms, software and reflectance design are being evaluated for patents and/or license agreements. A small company, Filmetrics, Inc., is incorporating the ADVISOR analysis method in its reflectometer product.

  8. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lloyd, Peter D; Lowe, Larry E; Ulrich, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  9. In-situ Study of Nanostructure and Electrical Resistance of Nanocluster Films Irradiated with Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Qiang, You; McCloy, John S.; Henager, Charles H.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2014-08-11

    An in-situ study is reported on the structural evolution in nanocluster films under He+ ion irradiation using an advanced helium ion microscope. The films consist of loosely interconnected nanoclusters of magnetite or iron-magnetite (Fe-Fe3O4) core-shells. The nanostructure is observed to undergo dramatic changes under ion-beam irradiation, featuring grain growth, phase transition, particle aggregation, and formation of nanowire-like network and nano-pores. Studies based on ion irradiation, thermal annealing and election irradiation have indicated that the major structural evolution is activated by elastic nuclear collisions, while both electronic and thermal processes can play a significant role once the evolution starts. The electrical resistance of the Fe-Fe3O4 films measured in situ exhibits a super-exponential decay with dose. The behavior suggests that the nanocluster films possess an intrinsic merit for development of an advanced online monitor for neutron radiation with both high detection sensitivity and long-term applicability, which can enhance safety measures in many nuclear operations.

  10. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-30

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights ({approx}280 nm) on Si <111> substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) and medium doped (3x10{sup 16} and 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (10{sup 18} and 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  11. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-01

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  12. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-15

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  13. Optimum structural sizing of conventional cantilever and joined wing configurations using equivalent beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.; Chen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper describes an approach for the optimum sizing of single and joined wing structures that is based on representing the built-up finite element model of the structure by an equivalent beam model. The low order beam model is computationally more efficient in an environment that requires repetitive analysis of several trial designs. The design procedure is implemented in a computer program that requires geometry and loading data typically available from an aerodynamic synthesis program, to create the finite element model of the lifting surface and an equivalent beam model. A fully stressed design procedure is used to obtain rapid estimates of the optimum structural weight for the beam model for a given geometry, and a qualitative description of the material distribution over the wing structure. The synthesis procedure is demonstrated for representative single wing and joined wing structures.

  14. Nonlinear targeted energy transfer of two coupled cantilever beams coupled to a bistable light attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, P.-O.; Ponçot, R.; Pachebat, M.; Côte, R.

    2016-07-01

    In order to control the sound radiation by a structure, one aims to control vibration of radiating modes of vibration using "Energy Pumping" also named "Targeted Energy Transfer". This principle is here applied to a simplified model of a double leaf panel. This model is made of two beams coupled by a spring. One of the beams is connected to a nonlinear absorber. This nonlinear absorber is made of a 3D-printed support on which is clamped a buckled thin small beam with a small mass fixed at its centre having two equilibrium positions. The experiments showed that, once attached onto a vibrating system to be controlled, under forced excitation of the primary system, the light bistable oscillator allows a reduction of structural vibration up to 10 dB for significant amplitude and frequency range around the first two vibration modes of the system.

  15. Influence of gallium ion beam acceleration voltage on the bend angle of amorphous silicon cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeki, Takahiro; Phan, Hoang-Phuong; Viet Dao, Dzung; Inoue, Shozo; Namazu, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a plastic reshaping technique for Si thin membranes by using focused ion beam (FIB) processing. FIB is used to locally pattern and implant Ga ions into the membranes. The combination of Ga ion doping and alkali wet etching enables us to fabricate nanometer-thick Ga-ion-doped amorphous Si membranes, which can be bent upward at arbitrary angle by controlling the FIB beam irradiation condition. The bending mechanism is discussed in the light of Ga ions implanted depth from the membrane surface. By using this technique, a micrometer-sized chute structure with several different angles is produced.

  16. A Novel Method for Characterizing Fatigue Delamination Growth Under Mode I Using the Double Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carvalho, Nelson; Murri, G.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to obtain Mode I delamination growth rate from a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen. In the proposed method, Unidirectional (UD) DCB specimens are tested in fatigue at different initial maximum energy release rates levels. The growth rate data obtained in the first increments of crack growth at each maximum energy release rate level are used to generate a Paris Law equation, which characterizes delamination growth rate without fiber-bridging, and can also be used to determine a delamination onset curve. The remaining delamination growth rate data from each test are used to determine a modified Paris law, which characterizes the delamination growth rate in a DCB specimen, explicitly accounting for fiber-bridging. The proposed expression captures well the scatter in experimental data obtained using the DCB specimens, suggesting its adequacy. The Paris Law characterizing delamination growth rate without fiber-bridging predicts higher delamination growth rates for the same maximum energy release rate applied, leading to a conservative estimate for delamination growth. This is particularly relevant, since in generic ply interfaces, fiber-bridging is less predominant than in UD DCB specimens. Failing to account for fiber-bridging in UD DCB specimens may underestimate the delamination growth rate, yielding non-conservative predictions.

  17. Modeling energy transport in a cantilevered Euler-Bernoulli beam actively vibrating in Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, Cassio T.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2014-04-01

    When a mechanical and/or structural component is immersed in a fluid and it vibrates, the reasonable assumption is that part of the energy is transmitted to the adjacent media. For some engineering applications the energy transport between these two domains, i.e., structure and fluid, plays a central role. The work presented in this paper is focused on discussing the energy transport in beam-like structures as they can be used to represent flexible swimmers (fish-like pulsating mechanisms) in their simplest form. In order to expose the role of each of the fluid and beam properties effecting the energy transfer process, a simplified analytical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is derived. After analysis of the resulting coupled-systems' damping coefficient, a new energy transport component is added to the initial Euler-Bernoulli beam equation; a term associated with diffusion (fluid viscosity). In addition our modeling results in an added mass term, a characteristic consistent with previous literature. While deriving the model, an important assumption is made: beam mode shapes are not significantly affected by the domains' interaction. This hypothesis is experimentally tested in two different fluid media and confirmed to be reasonable for the first three vibration mode shapes.

  18. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    Metal photocathodes are commonly used in high-field RF guns because they are robust, straightforward to implement and tolerate relatively poor vacuum compared to semi-conductor cathodes. However these cathodes have low quantum efficiency (QE) even at UV wavelengths, and still require some form of cleaning after installation in the gun. A commonly used process for improving the QE is laser cleaning. In this technique the UV drive laser is focused to a small diameter close to the metal's damage threshold and then moved across the surface to remove contaminants. This method does improve the QE, but can produce non-uniform emission and potentially damage the cathode. Ideally an alternative process which produces an atomically clean, but unaltered surface is needed. In this paper we explore using a hydrogen ion (H-ion) beam to clean a copper cathode. We describe QE measurements over the wavelength range of interest as a function of integrated exposure to an H-ion beam. We also describe the data analysis to obtain the work function and derive a formula of the QE for metal cathodes. Our measured work function for the cleaned sample is in good agreement with published values, and the theoretical QE as a function of photon wavelength is in excellent agreement with the cleaned copper experimental results. Finally, we propose an in-situ installation of an H-ion gun compatible with existing s-band RF guns.

  19. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing.

    PubMed

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices. PMID:26233395

  20. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  1. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  2. Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating

    SciTech Connect

    Herschcovitch,A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Poole, H. J.

    2009-05-04

    Electron clouds have been observed in many accelerators, including the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). They can limit the machine performance through pressure degradation, beam instabilities or incoherent emittance growth. The formation of electron clouds can be suppressed with beam pipe surfaces that have low secondary electron yield. At the same time, high wall resistivity in accelerators can result in levels of ohmic heating unacceptably high for superconducting magnets. This is a concern for the RHIC machine, as its vacuum chamber in the superconducting dipoles is made from relatively high resistivity 316LN stainless steel. The high resistivity can be addressed with a copper (Cu) coating; a reduction in the secondary electron yield can be achieved with a titanium nitride (TiN) or amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. Applying such coatings in an already constructed machine is rather challenging. We started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for in-situ coating of long, small diameter tubes. The technique entails fabricating a device comprised of staged magnetrons and/or cathodic arcs mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of about 5 {micro}m (a few skin depths) of Cu followed by about 0.1 {micro}m of TiN (or a-C).

  3. Focused beam reflectance measurement as a tool for in situ monitoring of the lactose crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Pandalaneni, K; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-07-01

    Lactose accounts for about 75 and 85% of the solids in whey and deproteinized whey, respectively. Production of lactose is usually carried out by a process called crystallization. Several factors including rate of cooling, presence of impurities, and mixing speed influence the crystal size characteristics. To optimize the lactose crystallization process parameters to maximize the lactose yield, it is important to monitor the crystallization process. However, efficient in situ tools to implement at concentrations relevant to the dairy industry are lacking. The objective of the present work was to use a focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) system for in situ monitoring of lactose crystallization at supersaturated concentrations (wt/wt) 50, 55, and 60% at 20 and 30°C. The FBRM data were compared with Brix readings collected using a refractometer during isothermal crystallization. Chord length distributions obtained from FBRM in the ranges of <50 µm (fine crystals) and 50 to 300 µm (coarse crystals) were recorded and evaluated in relation to the extent of crystallization and rate constants deduced from the refractometer measurements. Extent of crystallization and rate constants increased with increasing supersaturation concentration and temperature. The measured fine crystal counts from FBRM increased at higher supersaturated concentration and temperature during isothermal crystallization. On the other hand, coarse counts were observed to increase with decreasing supersaturated concentration and temperature. Square weighted chord length distribution obtained from FBRM showed that as concentration increased, a decrease in chord lengths occurred at 20°C and similar observations were made from microscopic images. The robustness of FBRM in understanding isothermal lactose crystallization at various concentrations and temperatures was successfully assessed in the study. PMID:27132102

  4. Vibration of cantilever piezolaminated beam with extension and shear mode piezo actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Wankhade, Rajan L.

    2015-04-01

    Vibration of piezolaminated beams with extension and shear mode piezo actuators subjected to electromechanical loading is studied. A finite element eight node isoparametric element is adopted in the formulation with higher order shear deformation theory. Constitutive law for piezoelectric is considered. In case of the extension actuation mechanism, top and bottom layers of beam are of PZT-5A piezoelectric material and the central core is of Aluminum. Whereas, in case of shear actuation mechanism, top and bottom layers are of Aluminum and the central core is provided with a small patch of PZT-5A piezoelectric material and the rest of the core is a rigid foam material. Frequencies obtained by using present methodology are presented for both extension as well as shear actuation mechanism of piezoelectric material

  5. Uncertain boundary condition Bayesian identification from experimental data: A case study on a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritto, T. G.; Sampaio, R.; Aguiar, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    In many mechanical applications (wind turbine tower, substructure joints, etc.), the stiffness of the boundary conditions is uncertain and might decrease with time, due to wear and/or looseness. In this paper, a torsional stiffness parameter is used to model the clamped side of a Timoshenko beam. The goal is to perform the identification with experimental data. To represent the decreasing stiffness of the clamped side, an experimental test rig is constructed, where several rubber layers are added to the clamped side, making it softer. Increasing the number of layers decreases the stiffness, thus representing a loss in the stiffness. The Bayesian approach is applied to update the probabilistic model related to the boundary condition (torsional stiffness parameter). The proposed Bayesian strategy worked well for the problem analyzed, where the experimental natural frequencies were within the 95% confidence limits of the computed natural frequencies probability density functions.

  6. Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a cantilever beam rotating with constant angular velocity about a transverse axis through the root

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in rotational motion about a transverse axis through the root determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that occur in the beam as a result of the arrest of motion. The equations for bending and shear stress reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip and at a given trip velocity, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam and the shear stresses vary inversely with the length. When examined with respect to a given angular velocity instead of a given tip velocity, the equations reveal that the bending stress is proportional to the length of the beam whereas the shear stress is independent of the length. Sufficient experimental verification of the theory has previously been given in connection with another problem of the same type.

  7. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  8. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, F.-A.; Nicolas, C.; Sirven, J.-B.; Ouf, F.-X.; Lacour, J.-L.; Robert, E.; Benkoula, S.; Yon, J.; Miron, C.; Sublemontier, O.

    2015-01-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed. PMID:26498694

  9. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreda, F.-A.; Nicolas, C.; Sirven, J.-B.; Ouf, F.-X.; Lacour, J.-L.; Robert, E.; Benkoula, S.; Yon, J.; Miron, C.; Sublemontier, O.

    2015-10-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed.

  10. Note: An advanced in situ diagnostic system for characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources.

    PubMed

    Bundesmann, C; Tartz, M; Scholze, F; Leiter, H J; Scortecci, F; Gnizdor, R Y; Neumann, H

    2010-04-01

    We present an advanced diagnostic system for in situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources. The system uses a high-precision five-axis positioning system with a modular setup and the following diagnostic tools: a telemicroscopy head for optical imaging, a triangular laser head for surface profile scanning, a pyrometer for temperature scanning, a Faraday probe for current density mapping, and an energy-selective mass spectrometer for beam characterization (energy and mass distribution, composition). The capabilities of our diagnostic system are demonstrated with a Hall effect thruster SPT-100D EM1. PMID:20441379

  11. Compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo Martin; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry Joseph

    2006-08-15

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  12. Modeling and control of piezoelectric cantilever beam micro-mirror and micro-laser arrays to reduce image banding in electrophotographic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hung-Ming; Ewe, Michael T. S.; T-C Chiu, George; Bashir, Rashid

    2001-09-01

    This paper present a theoretical evaluation of the application of microelectromechanical technology to reduce banding artifacts in electrophotographic printing systems. The proposed system would consist of arrays of micro-mirrors and micro-lasers replacing conventional laser printing mechanisms. Several advantages of the new system include faster printing speeds, elimination of synchronization problems, improved image quality and lower production costs. Each micro-mirror can be a surface micro-machined piezoelectric cantilever beam with a reflective surface. An analytical model for the cantilever beam describing the dynamic relationship between scan line deflection and the applied voltage is derived. Using a closed-loop feedback control strategy, the effectiveness of the micro-mirror arrays in reducing banding was theoretically evaluated. Calculations show that each micro-mirror should be capable of deflecting the scan line a distance of 50 µm or approximately one 600 dots per inch (dpi) pixel by only using a 2 V voltage potential. Using an actual measured line spacing sequence, the operation of the system was simulated. The results demonstrated good tracking and significant reduction of the low-frequency banding components. Emulated images showed significant reduction in banding for a typical 600 dpi print resolution.

  13. In situ patterning of organic molecules in aqueous solutions using an inverted electron-beam lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazako, Hiroki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    A method for in situ controlling the detachment and deposition of organic molecules such as sugars and biocompatible polymers in aqueous solutions by electron-beam (EB) scan is proposed and evaluated. It was demonstrated that EB irradiation could detach 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymers from a silicon nitride membrane. Moreover, organic molecules such as cationic polymers and sugars could be deposited on the membrane by EB irradiation. Spatial distributions of scattered electrons were numerically simulated, and acceleration voltage dependences of the detachment and deposition phenomena were experimentally measured. The simulations and experimental results suggest that the detachment of MPC polymers is mainly due to electrical effects of primary electrons, and that the deposition of organic molecules is mainly due to chemical reactions induced by primary electrons. In view of these findings, the proposed method can be applied to in situ and nanoscale patterning such as the fabrication of cell scaffolds.

  14. Ion Beams: In Situ Mitigation of Subsurface and Peripheral Focused Ion Beam Damage via Simultaneous Pulsed Laser Heating (Small 13/2016).

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Iberi, Vighter; Fowlkes, Jason D; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D

    2016-04-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) processing is an important direct-write nanoscale synthesis technique; however it generates subsurface defects that can preclude its use for many applications. On page 1779 P.D. Rack and co-workers demonstrate an in situ laser assisted focused ion beam synthesis approach, which photothermally mitigates the defects generated in silicon during focused He(+) and Ne(+) exposures. Finally, the group shows that laser assisted FIB reduces the damage generated in graphene nanochannels fabricated via the He(+) FIB. PMID:27038178

  15. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  16. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Van der Waals materials have received a great deal of attention for their exceptional layered structures and exotic properties, which can open up various device applications in nanoelectronics. However, in situ epitaxial growth of dissimilar van der Waals materials remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures were synthesized on cobalt substrates by using molecular beam epitaxy. Various characterizations were carried out to evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°. PMID:26442629

  17. Beam-folding ultraviolet-visible Fourier transform spectrometry and underwater cytometry for in situ measurement of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuzhu

    itself insensitive to these fluctuations. In addition, an attempt on fast-scanning visible IFTS based on the improved beam-folding technique was done. Preliminary experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the fast-scanning visible IFTS based on the improved beam-folding technique. In part two, an underwater cytometer for in situ measurement of marine phytoplankton using a combining technique of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and laser differential Doppler velocimetry (LDDV) was developed. The advancement compared to the previous work done in the laboratory is to realize an in situ underwater measurement system by means of improving the optical design. The experimental results in June and August 2004 in the coastal area of Hong Kong demonstrated that the new cytometer can be used for in situ measurement of marine phytoplankton. The mean concentration detected by this instrument agreed closely with the experimental data measured by the traditional cell counting under a microscope. With an underwater optical sensing unit that does not rely on an electrical power source, the sensing unit can stay submerged underwater for long periods, making a long-term real-time monitoring system possible.

  18. In situ study of e-beam Al and Hf metal deposition on native oxide InP (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H.; KC, Santosh; Azcatl, A.; Cabrera, W.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M.; Zhernokletov, D.

    2013-11-28

    The interfacial chemistry of thin Al (∼3 nm) and Hf (∼2 nm) metal films deposited by electron beam (e-beam) evaporation on native oxide InP (100) samples at room temperature and after annealing has been studied by in situ angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The In-oxides are completely scavenged forming In-In/In-(Al/Hf) bonding after Al and Hf metal deposition. The P-oxide concentration is significantly decreased, and the P-oxide chemical states have been changed to more P-rich oxides upon metal deposition. Indium diffusion through these metals before and after annealing at 250 °C has also been characterized. First principles calculation shows that In has lower surface formation energy compared with Al and Hf metals, which is consistent with the observed indium diffusion behavior.

  19. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  20. In situ study of erosion and deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films by exposure to a hydrogen atom beam

    SciTech Connect

    Markelj, Sabina; Pelicon, Primoz; Cadez, Iztok; Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Jacob, Wolfgang

    2012-07-15

    This paper reports on the first dual-beam experiment employing a hydrogen atom beam for sample exposure and an ion beam for analysis, enabling in situ and real-time studies of hydrogen atom interaction with materials. The erosion of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) layer by deuterium atoms at 580 K sample temperature was studied and the uptake of deuterium during the erosion process was measured in real time. The deuterium areal density increased at the beginning to 7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} D cm{sup -2}, but then stabilized at a constant value of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} D cm{sup -2}. Formation of a polymer-like deposit on an a-C:H layer held at room temperature and subjected to the deuterium atom beam was observed and also studied in situ. For both erosion and deposition studies an a-{sup 13}C:H layer on top of an Si substrate was used as a sample, making the experiments isotopically fully specified and thereby differentiating the deposited from the original layer and the interacting D atoms from H atoms present in the layer and in the residual vacuum. From the deposition study it was shown that carbon in the deposited layer originates from carbon-carrying species in the background vacuum that interact with hydrogen atoms. The areal density of the carbon at the surface was determined from the energy shift of the Si edge in the Rutherford backscattering spectrum. The cross section for {sup 7}Li on D at 4.3 MeV Li ion energy and at a recoil angle of 30 Degree-Sign was also determined to be (236 {+-} 16) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -27} cm{sup 2}/sr. This is a factor of 3 {+-} 0.2 times higher than the Rutherford elastic cross section.

  1. Modeling effects of gas bubbles on the mechanical behaviors of Ag/Bi-2212 round wires using a double cantilever beam bridge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yurong; Wang, Zhongtong; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-07-01

    Due to the larger current-carrying property, Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) superconductors have a great potential application in high field magnet. Bi2212 superconducting material can be fabricated as an isotropic round wire. However, there is 30% void space in the wire, such as gas bubbles. The void space has a larger influence on the property of the wire. In this paper, we will study the effect of gas bubble on the fracture behavior. Based on the double cantilever beam model and critical state theory, the mechanical behavior of Bi2212 wire is studied for decreasing field. Two different damage mechanisms are discussed using the strain energy release rate and strain of bridge. The results show that the large gas bubble can increase the strain of bridge. The central filaments with gas bubble are easier to be damaged than the edge filaments with gas bubble.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Effects of Random Loading on the Fatigue Life of Notched Cantilever-Beam Specimens of 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralich, Robert W.

    1959-01-01

    Results of random-loading fatigue tests on 125 notched cantilever-beam specimens and constant-amplitude fatigue tests on 46 similar specimens are presented in terms of the root-mean-square value of peak stresses. The results from the two sets of tests are compared on the basis of time to failure, where the results from the constant-amplitude tests are expressed in terms of an equivalent time to failure based on the natural period of vibration. Compared on this basis, failure at the lower stress levels occurred in a shorter time for the random loading than for the constant-amplitude loading, whereas at the higher stress levels failure occurred in the reverse order. A theoretical result for random loading is also presented and compared with the experimental results. The theoretical result shows good agreement with experiment for low values of stress but underestimates the time to failure at the higher stresses.

  3. A comparison of constant-load and constant-deflection stress-corrosion tests on precracked DCB specimens. [Double Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison is made between measurements of stress-corrosion crack propagation made by a constant-load procedure and by a constant-deflection procedure. Precracked double cantilever beam specimens from 7075 aluminum alloy plate were used. The specimens were oriented in such a way that cracking would begin in the short-transverse plane and would propagate in the rolling direction. The specimens were subjected to a buffered salt-chromate solution and a 3.6% synthetic sea salt solution. The measurements were made optically with a binocular microscope. Stress intensities and crack lengths were calculated and crack velocities were obtained. Velocity was plotted against the average calculated stress intensity. Good agreement between the two methods was found for the salt-chromate solution, although some descrepancies were noted for the artificial sea salt solution.

  4. Passive vibration control in a building-like structure using a tuned-mass-damper and an autoparametric cantilever beam absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enriquez-Zarate, J.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2015-04-01

    This article considers a theoretical and experimental comparative analysis in the responses of a three-story building-like structure using two different schemes of passive vibration control. These control schemes are designed to reduce the effects of resonant vibrations generated by an electromechanical shaker located in the base of the building-like structure. The first control scheme consists on the design of a Tuned-Mass-Damper located over the third floor of the structure, and the second control scheme considers the implementation of an autoparametric cantilever beam absorber. The mathematical model of the overall system is obtained using Euler-Lagrange method. In order to validate the frequency response of the main system a finite element model is completed. Some numerical and experimental results are included to show the dynamic behavior and stability performance of the overall mechanical system.

  5. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-05-01

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.

  6. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-01

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field. PMID:27172892

  7. Toward Higher-Order Mass Detection: Influence of an Adsorbate's Rotational Inertia and Eccentricity on the Resonant Response of a Bernoulli-Euler Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Stephen M; Dufour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new theoretical model is derived, the results of which permit a detailed examination of how the resonant characteristics of a cantilever are influenced by a particle (adsorbate) attached at an arbitrary position along the beam's length. Unlike most previous work, the particle need not be small in mass or dimension relative to the beam, and the adsorbate's geometric characteristics are incorporated into the model via its rotational inertia and eccentricity relative to the beam axis. For the special case in which the adsorbate's (translational) mass is indeed small, an analytical solution is obtained for the particle-induced resonant frequency shift of an arbitrary flexural mode, including the effects of rotational inertia and eccentricity. This solution is shown to possess the exact first-order behavior in the normalized particle mass and represents a generalization of analytical solutions derived by others in earlier studies. The results suggest the potential for "higher-order" nanobeam-based mass detection methods by which the multi-mode frequency response reflects not only the adsorbate's mass but also important geometric data related to its size, shape, or orientation (i.e., the mass distribution), thus resulting in more highly discriminatory techniques for discrete-mass sensing. PMID:26610493

  8. In-situ aberration correction of Bessel beams using spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jákl, Petr; Arzola, Alejandro V.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) is a versatile device capable of real-time generation of diffractive phase gratings. Employing the SLM in an optical setup opens the possibility of dynamic modification of properties of the incident laser beam, such as its splitting into an arbitrary number of diffracted beams, changing its convergence or its modification into non-traditional laser beam profiles. Advanced feedback procedures enable resolving complex phase masks correcting aberrations inherent to the whole optical system, such as imprecisions of manufacturing process, inhomogeneity of refractive index of materials used or misalignment of optical elements. In this work, generation of Bessel beams (BB) using the SLM is presented. The BB quality is very sensitive to the optical aberrations of the system, especially when higher topological charge is applied to create so-called optical vortices. Therefore, the method compensating those aberrations is applied and the corrected beam is inspected by a CCD camera and optical micro-manipulations of micro-particles. Our experimental results demonstrate successful trapping, rotation and translation of micrometer-sized particles purely by optical forces.

  9. In situ electrochemical STM study of platinum nanodot arrays on highly oriented pyrolythic graphite prepared by electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foelske-Schmitz, A.; Peitz, A.; Guzenko, V. A.; Weingarth, D.; Scherer, G. G.; Wokaun, A.; Kötz, R.

    2012-12-01

    Model electrodes consisting of platinum dots with a mean diameter of (30 ± 5) nm and heights of 3-5 nm upon highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were prepared by electron beam lithography and subsequent sputtering. The Pt nanodot arrays were stable during scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) measurements in air and in sulphuric acid electrolyte, indicating the presence of "anchors", immobilising the dots on the HOPG surface. Electrochemical STM was used to visualise potential induced Pt, carbon and Pt-influenced carbon corrosion in situ in 0.5 M sulphuric acid under ambient conditions. Potentiostatic hold experiments show that the Pt dots start to disappear at electrode potentials of E > 1.4 V vs. SHE. With increasing time and potential a hole pattern congruent to the original dot pattern appears on the HOPG basal planes. Corrosion and peeling of the HOPG substrate could also be followed in situ. Dissolution of Pt dots appears to be accelerated for potential cycling experiments compared to the potential hold statistics.

  10. Thermographic in-situ process monitoring of the electron-beam melting technology used in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Lowe, Larry E.; Ulrich, Joe B.

    2013-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  11. Molecular-beam epitaxy growth and in situ arsenic doping of p-on-n HgCdTe heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Jose; Zandian, M.; Pasko, J. G.; Shin, S. H.; Bubulac, L. O.; DeWames, R. E.; Tennant, W. E.

    1991-02-01

    In this paper we present, results on the growth of in situ doped p-on-n heterojunctions on HgCdTe epilayers grown on (211)B GaAs substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). Long wavelength infrared (LWIR) photodiodes made with these grown junctions are of high performance. The n-type MBE HgCdTe/GaAs alloy epilayer in these structures was grown at Ts=185 °C and it was doped with indium (high 1014 cm-3 range) atoms. This epilayer was directly followed by the growth, at Ts=165 °C, of an arsenic-doped (1017-1018 cm-3 ) HgTe/CdTe superlattice structure which was necessary to incorporate the arsenic atoms as acceptors. After the structure was grown, a Hg annealing step was needed to interdiffuse the superlattice and obtain the arsenic-doped p-type HgCdTe layer above the indium-doped layer. LWIR mesa diodes made with this material have 77 K R0A values of 5×103, 81, 8.5, and 1.1 Ω cm2 for cutoff wavelengths of 8.0, 10.2, 10.8, and 13.5 μm, respectively; the 77 K quantum efficiency values for these diodes were greater than 55%. These recent results represent a significant step toward the demonstration of MBE as a viable growth technique for the in situ fabrication of large area LWIR focal plane arrays.

  12. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

    1983-09-26

    Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

  13. Identification of biological molecules in situ at high resolution via the fluorescence excited by a scanning electron beam.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, P V; McKinney, W R; Ledbeter, M C; Pollack, R E; Moos, H W

    1976-01-01

    Proteins, nucleic acids, and fluorescein-conjugated antibody are shown to be identifidable in situ via the fluorescence excited by the focused electron beam of a canning electron microscope. A molecular species is identified by its characteristic fluorescence spectrum and by a characteristic alteration of the spectrum with time under the electron beam. Primary protein fluorescence is relatively rapidly destroyed by the beam, but protein photoproduct fluorescence is more rugged and will in some cases permit detection of small numbers of protein molecules. Nucleic acid fluorescence is extremely long-lived and will permit detection of small numbers of nucleic acid residues. The theoretical resolution limit for localization of a particular molecular species -- about 20 A--is determined by the known maximum distance for molecular excitation by fast electrons. Drect extapolation from an observed resolution of 900 A in the localization of nucleic acid using a low-efficiency detector leads to an experimental resolution limit of less than 60 A. Fluorescence is strongly quenched by residual water in the specimen. Similar quenching is produced by some macromolecular associations and so may serve to localize such associations. Images PMID:768980

  14. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  15. Turning electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate) nanofibers into graphitic nanostructures by in situ electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, H. G.; Xie, E. Q.; Han, L.

    2008-02-15

    Using ultrathin electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanofibers as precursor, graphitic nanofibers, nanobridges, nanocones, and fullerenelike onions could be prepared by electron beam irradiation in a controlled manner. With the help of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy, the real time processing of the carbonization and graphitization of the PMMA nanofibers could be investigated. This way to obtain graphitic nanostructures has promising applications in graphitic carbon nanostructure electronics and devices. Because PMMA is a widely used standard high resolution electron resist, this graphitization could be combined with electron beam lithography to obtain high resolution patterned graphitic circuits.

  16. Direct growth of graphene on in situ epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride flakes by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zuo, Zheng; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-11-23

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) single-crystal domains were grown on cobalt (Co) substrates at a substrate temperature of 850–900 °C using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Three-point star shape h-BN domains were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and confirmed by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The h-BN on Co template was used for in situ growth of multilayer graphene, leading to an h-BN/graphene heterostructure. Carbon atoms preferentially nucleate on Co substrate and edges of h-BN and then grow laterally to form continuous graphene. Further introduction of carbon atoms results in layer-by-layer growth of graphene on graphene and lateral growth of graphene on h-BN until it may cover entire h-BN flakes.

  17. In-situ white beam microdiffraction study of the deformation behavior in polycrystalline magnesium alloy during uniaxial loading

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Tamura, Nobumichi; Lynch, P.A.; Stevenson, A.W.; Liang, D.; Parry, D.; Wilkins, S.; Madsen, I.C.; Bettles, C.; Tamura, N.; Geandier, G.

    2007-01-19

    Scanning white beam X-ray microdiffraction has been used to study the heterogeneous grain deformation in a polycrystalline Mg alloy (MgAZ31). The high spatial resolution achieved on beamline 7.3.3 at the Advanced Light Source provides a unique method to measure the elastic strain and orientation of single grains as a function of applied load. To carry out in-situmeasurements a light weight (~;;0.5kg) tensile stage, capable of providing uniaxial loads of up to 600kg, was designed to collect diffraction data on the loading and unloading cycle. In-situ observation of the deformation process provides insight about the crystallographic deformation mode via twinning and dislocation slip.

  18. Highly indistinguishable photons from deterministic quantum-dot microlenses utilizing three-dimensional in situ electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschrey, M.; Thoma, A.; Schnauber, P.; Seifried, M.; Schmidt, R.; Wohlfeil, B.; Krüger, L.; Schulze, J.-H.; Heindel, T.; Burger, S.; Schmidt, F.; Strittmatter, A.; Rodt, S.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-07-01

    The success of advanced quantum communication relies crucially on non-classical light sources emitting single indistinguishable photons at high flux rates and purity. We report on deterministically fabricated microlenses with single quantum dots inside which fulfil these requirements in a flexible and robust quantum device approach. In our concept we combine cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with advanced in situ three-dimensional electron-beam lithography at cryogenic temperatures to pattern monolithic microlenses precisely aligned to pre-selected single quantum dots above a distributed Bragg reflector. We demonstrate that the resulting deterministic quantum-dot microlenses enhance the photon-extraction efficiency to (23+/-3)%. Furthermore we prove that such microlenses assure close to pure emission of triggered single photons with a high degree of photon indistinguishability up to (80+/-7)% at saturation. As a unique feature, both single-photon purity and photon indistinguishability are preserved at high excitation power and pulsed excitation, even above saturation of the quantum emitter.

  19. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes Using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2005-09-01

    Improving and maintaining the quantum efficiency (QE) of a metal photocathode in an s-band RF gun requires a process for cleaning the surface. In this type of gun, the cathode is typically installed and the system is vacuum baked to {approx}200 degrees C. If the QE is too low, the cathode is usually cleaned with the UV-drive laser. While laser cleaning does increase the cathode QE, it requires fluences close to the damage threshold and rastering the small diameter beam, both of which can produce nonuniform electron emission and potentially damage the cathode. This paper investigates the efficacy of a low energy hydrogen ion beam to produce high-QE metal cathodes. Measurements of the QE vs. wavelength, surface contaminants using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface roughness were performed on a copper sample, and the results showed a significant increase in QE after cleaning with a 1keV hydrogen ion beam. The H-ion beam cleaned an area approximately 1cm in diameter and had no effect on the surface roughness while significantly increasing the QE. These results and a comparison with theory as well as a scheme for installing an H-ion cleaner on an s-band gun are presented.

  20. Toward Higher-Order Mass Detection: Influence of an Adsorbate’s Rotational Inertia and Eccentricity on the Resonant Response of a Bernoulli-Euler Cantilever Beam

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Stephen M.; Dufour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new theoretical model is derived, the results of which permit a detailed examination of how the resonant characteristics of a cantilever are influenced by a particle (adsorbate) attached at an arbitrary position along the beam’s length. Unlike most previous work, the particle need not be small in mass or dimension relative to the beam, and the adsorbate’s geometric characteristics are incorporated into the model via its rotational inertia and eccentricity relative to the beam axis. For the special case in which the adsorbate’s (translational) mass is indeed small, an analytical solution is obtained for the particle-induced resonant frequency shift of an arbitrary flexural mode, including the effects of rotational inertia and eccentricity. This solution is shown to possess the exact first-order behavior in the normalized particle mass and represents a generalization of analytical solutions derived by others in earlier studies. The results suggest the potential for “higher-order” nanobeam-based mass detection methods by which the multi-mode frequency response reflects not only the adsorbate’s mass but also important geometric data related to its size, shape, or orientation (i.e., the mass distribution), thus resulting in more highly discriminatory techniques for discrete-mass sensing. PMID:26610493

  1. A cantilever array-based artificial nose

    PubMed

    Baller; Lang; Fritz; Gerber; Gimzewsk; Drechsler; Rothuizen; Despont; Vettiger; Battiston; Ramseyer; Fornaro; Meyer; Guntherodt

    2000-02-01

    We present quantitative and qualitative detection of analyte vapors using a microfabricated silicon cantilever array. To observe transduction of physical and chemical processes into nanomechanical motion of the cantilever, swelling of a polymer layer on the cantilever is monitored during exposure to the analyte. This motion is tracked by a beam-deflection technique using a time multiplexing scheme. The response pattern of eight cantilevers is analyzed via principal component analysis (PCA) and artificial neural network (ANN) techniques, which facilitates the application of the device as an artificial chemical nose. Analytes tested comprise chemical solvents, a homologous series of primary alcohols, and natural flavors. First differential measurements of surface stress change due to protein adsorption on a cantilever array are shown using a liquid cell. PMID:10741645

  2. In-situ Quasi-Instantaneous e-beam Driven Catalyst-Free Formation Of Crystalline Aluminum Borate Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Ignacio G.; Gemming, Thomas; Mendes, Rafael; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Bezugly, Viktor; Kunstmann, Jens; Eckert, Jürgen; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    The catalyst-assisted nucleation and growth mechanisms for many kinds of nanowires and nanotubes are pretty well understood. At times, though, 1D nanostructures form without a catalyst and the argued growth modes have inconsistencies. One such example is the catalyst-free growth of aluminium borate nanowires. Here we develop an in-situ catalyst-free room temperature growth route for aluminium nanowires using the electron beam in a transmission electron microscope. We provide strong experimental evidence that supports a formation process that can be viewed as a phase transition in which the generation of free-volume induced by the electron beam irradiation enhances the atomic mobility within the precursor material. The enhanced atomic mobility and specific features of the crystal structure of Al5BO9 drive the atomic rearrangement that results in the large scale formation of highly crystalline aluminium borate nanowires. The whole formation process can be completed within fractions of a second. Our developed growth mechanism might also be extended to describe the catalyst-free formation of other nanowires. PMID:26934833

  3. In-situ Quasi-Instantaneous e-beam Driven Catalyst-Free Formation Of Crystalline Aluminum Borate Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Ignacio G.; Gemming, Thomas; Mendes, Rafael; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Bezugly, Viktor; Kunstmann, Jens; Eckert, Jürgen; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2016-03-01

    The catalyst-assisted nucleation and growth mechanisms for many kinds of nanowires and nanotubes are pretty well understood. At times, though, 1D nanostructures form without a catalyst and the argued growth modes have inconsistencies. One such example is the catalyst-free growth of aluminium borate nanowires. Here we develop an in-situ catalyst-free room temperature growth route for aluminium nanowires using the electron beam in a transmission electron microscope. We provide strong experimental evidence that supports a formation process that can be viewed as a phase transition in which the generation of free-volume induced by the electron beam irradiation enhances the atomic mobility within the precursor material. The enhanced atomic mobility and specific features of the crystal structure of Al5BO9 drive the atomic rearrangement that results in the large scale formation of highly crystalline aluminium borate nanowires. The whole formation process can be completed within fractions of a second. Our developed growth mechanism might also be extended to describe the catalyst-free formation of other nanowires.

  4. High sensitivity resonance frequency measurements of individualmicro-cantilevers using fiber optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2009-03-04

    We describe a setup for the resonance frequency measurement of individual microcantilevers. The setup displays both high spatial selectivity and sensitivity to specimen vibrations by utilizing a tapered uncoated fiber tip. The high sensitivity to specimen vibrations is achieved by the combination of optical Fabry-Perot interferometry and narrow band RF detection. Wave fronts reflected on the specimen and on the fiber tip end face interfere, thus no reference plane on the specimen is needed, as demonstrated with the example of freestanding silicon nitride micro-cantilevers. The resulting system is integrated in a DB-235 dual beam FIB system, thereby allowing the measurement of micro-cantilever responses during observation in SEM mode. The FIB was used to modify the optical fiber tip. At this point of our RF system development, the microcantilevers used to characterize the detector were not modified in situ.

  5. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  6. Mode 1 and Mode 2 Analysis of Graphite/Epoxy Composites Using Double Cantilever Beam and End-Notched Flexure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hufnagel, Kathleen P.

    1995-01-01

    The critical strain energy release rates associated with debonding of the adhesive bondlines in graphite/epoxy IM6/3501-6 interlaminar fracture specimens were investigated. Two panels were manufactured for this investigation; however, panel two was layed-up incorrectly. As a result, data collected from Panel Two serves no real purpose in this investigation. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens were used to determine the opening Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, G1(sub c), of uni-directional fiber re-inforced composites. The five specimens tested from Panel One had an average value of 946.42J/sq m for G1(sub c) with an acceptable coefficient of variation. The critical strain energy release rate, G2(sub c), for initiation of delamination under inplane shear loading was investigated using the End-Notched Flexure (ENF) Test. Four specimens were tested from Panel One and an average value of 584.98J/sq m for G2(sub c) was calculated. Calculations from the DCB and ENF test results for Panel One represent typical values of G1(sub c) and G2(sub c) for the adhesive debonding in the material studied in this investigation.

  7. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  8. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  9. Piezoelectric cantilever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Wan Y. (Inventor); Shih, Wei-Heng (Inventor); Shen, Zuyan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A piezoelectric cantilever with a non-piezoelectric, or piezoelectric tip useful as mass and viscosity sensors. The change in the cantilever mass can be accurately quantified by monitoring a resonance frequency shift of the cantilever. For bio-detection, antibodies or other specific receptors of target antigens may be immobilized on the cantilever surface, preferably on the non-piezoelectric tip. For chemical detection, high surface-area selective absorbent materials are coated on the cantilever tip. Binding of the target antigens or analytes to the cantilever surface increases the cantilever mass. Detection of target antigens or analytes is achieved by monitoring the cantilever's resonance frequency and determining the resonance frequency shift that is due to the mass of the adsorbed target antigens on the cantilever surface. The use of a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever allows both electrical actuation and electrical sensing. Incorporating a non-piezoelectric tip (14) enhances the sensitivity of the sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric cantilever can withstand damping in highly viscous liquids and can be used as a viscosity sensor in wide viscosity range.

  10. In-situ weak-beam and polarization control of multidimensional laser sidebands for ultrafast optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weimin; Wang, Liang; Fang, Chong

    2014-03-01

    All-optical switching has myriad applications in optoelectronics, optical communications, and quantum information technology. To achieve ultrafast optical switching in a compact yet versatile setup, we demonstrate distinct sets of two-dimensional (2D) broadband up-converted multicolor arrays (BUMAs) in a thin type-I β-barium-borate crystal with two noncollinear near-IR femtosecond pulses at various phase-matching conditions. The unique interaction mechanism is revealed as quadratic spatial solitons (QSSs)-coupled cascaded four-wave mixing (CFWM), corroborated by numerical calculations of the governing phase-matching conditions. Broad and continuous spectral-spatial tunability of the 2D BUMAs are achieved by varying the time delay between the two incident pulses that undergo CFWM interaction, rooted in the chirped nature of the weak white light and the QSSs generation of the intense fundamental beam. The control of 2D BUMAs is accomplished via seeding a weak second-harmonic pulse in situ to suppress the 2D arrays with polarization dependence on the femtosecond timescale that matches the control pulse duration of ˜35 fs. A potential application is proposed on femtosecond all-optical switching in an integrated wavelength-time division multiplexing device.

  11. In-situ superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 thin films grown by ion beam co-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. H.; Kellett, B. J.; Gauzzi, A.; Dwir, B.; Pavuna, D.

    1989-12-01

    We present superconducting YBa2C3O7 (YBCO) thin films grown in-situ by three-ion-beam sputtering. Y, Y2O3, Cu, Cu2O, BaF2 and BaCO3 sputter targets have been investigated. The highest quality films were prepared using a BaCO3 target. Auger analysis of films grown using a BaCO3 target show no carbon content. Y2O3 and Cu2O are more suitable than the native metals as sputter targets for YBCO growth as they are much less prone to sputter rate variations with oxygen partial pressure. They also supply oxygen to the growing film. As-deposited YBCO films are metallic (resistivity 240 μΩ cm at 100 K), reflective, and of highly homogeneous composition with TCO transition temperatures of 73 K and transition widths of 15 K. Post-annealing in flowing oxygen improves TCO's to 82 K. Critical currents are in excess of 105 A cm-2 at 77 K. Films are textured with c-axis orientation perpendicular to the (100) SrTiO3 substrate surface. As-deposited superconducting YBCO films have also been prepared on SiO2 and Y2O3 buffer layers on Si wafers.

  12. In-situ weak-beam and polarization control of multidimensional laser sidebands for ultrafast optical switching

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weimin; Wang, Liang; Fang, Chong

    2014-03-17

    All-optical switching has myriad applications in optoelectronics, optical communications, and quantum information technology. To achieve ultrafast optical switching in a compact yet versatile setup, we demonstrate distinct sets of two-dimensional (2D) broadband up-converted multicolor arrays (BUMAs) in a thin type-I β-barium-borate crystal with two noncollinear near-IR femtosecond pulses at various phase-matching conditions. The unique interaction mechanism is revealed as quadratic spatial solitons (QSSs)-coupled cascaded four-wave mixing (CFWM), corroborated by numerical calculations of the governing phase-matching conditions. Broad and continuous spectral-spatial tunability of the 2D BUMAs are achieved by varying the time delay between the two incident pulses that undergo CFWM interaction, rooted in the chirped nature of the weak white light and the QSSs generation of the intense fundamental beam. The control of 2D BUMAs is accomplished via seeding a weak second-harmonic pulse in situ to suppress the 2D arrays with polarization dependence on the femtosecond timescale that matches the control pulse duration of ∼35 fs. A potential application is proposed on femtosecond all-optical switching in an integrated wavelength-time division multiplexing device.

  13. Highly indistinguishable photons from deterministic quantum-dot microlenses utilizing three-dimensional in situ electron-beam lithography

    PubMed Central

    Gschrey, M.; Thoma, A.; Schnauber, P.; Seifried, M.; Schmidt, R.; Wohlfeil, B.; Krüger, L.; Schulze, J. -H.; Heindel, T.; Burger, S.; Schmidt, F.; Strittmatter, A.; Rodt, S.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-01

    The success of advanced quantum communication relies crucially on non-classical light sources emitting single indistinguishable photons at high flux rates and purity. We report on deterministically fabricated microlenses with single quantum dots inside which fulfil these requirements in a flexible and robust quantum device approach. In our concept we combine cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with advanced in situ three-dimensional electron-beam lithography at cryogenic temperatures to pattern monolithic microlenses precisely aligned to pre-selected single quantum dots above a distributed Bragg reflector. We demonstrate that the resulting deterministic quantum-dot microlenses enhance the photon-extraction efficiency to (23±3)%. Furthermore we prove that such microlenses assure close to pure emission of triggered single photons with a high degree of photon indistinguishability up to (80±7)% at saturation. As a unique feature, both single-photon purity and photon indistinguishability are preserved at high excitation power and pulsed excitation, even above saturation of the quantum emitter. PMID:26179766

  14. Highly indistinguishable photons from deterministic quantum-dot microlenses utilizing three-dimensional in situ electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Gschrey, M; Thoma, A; Schnauber, P; Seifried, M; Schmidt, R; Wohlfeil, B; Krüger, L; Schulze, J-H; Heindel, T; Burger, S; Schmidt, F; Strittmatter, A; Rodt, S; Reitzenstein, S

    2015-01-01

    The success of advanced quantum communication relies crucially on non-classical light sources emitting single indistinguishable photons at high flux rates and purity. We report on deterministically fabricated microlenses with single quantum dots inside which fulfil these requirements in a flexible and robust quantum device approach. In our concept we combine cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with advanced in situ three-dimensional electron-beam lithography at cryogenic temperatures to pattern monolithic microlenses precisely aligned to pre-selected single quantum dots above a distributed Bragg reflector. We demonstrate that the resulting deterministic quantum-dot microlenses enhance the photon-extraction efficiency to (23±3)%. Furthermore we prove that such microlenses assure close to pure emission of triggered single photons with a high degree of photon indistinguishability up to (80±7)% at saturation. As a unique feature, both single-photon purity and photon indistinguishability are preserved at high excitation power and pulsed excitation, even above saturation of the quantum emitter. PMID:26179766

  15. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  16. Optical actuation of silicon cantilevers: modelling and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Keating, Adrian; Martyuink, Mariusz; Silva, Dilusha; Faraone, Lorenzo; Dell, John M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports on the modeling and experimental investigation of optical excitation of silicon cantilevers. In this work, the silicon cantilevers fabricated have dimensions with width of 15 μm, thickness of 0.26 μm, and variable length from 50 to 120 μm. In order to investigate the effect of the laser modulation frequency and position on the temperature at the anchor edge and displacements at the tip of cantilevers, a transient thermal ANSYS simulation and a steady-state static thermal mechanical ANSYS simulation were undertaken using a structure consisting of silicon device layer, SiO2 sacrificial layer and silicon substrate. The dynamic properties of silicon cantilevers were undertaken by a series of experiments. The period optical driving signal with controlled modulation amplitude was provided by a 405 nm diode laser with a 2.9 μW/μm2 laser power and variable frequencies. The laser spot was located through the longitude direction of silicon cantilevers. In factor, simulation results well matched with experimental observation, including: 1) for untreated silicon cantilevers, the maximum of displacement is observed when the laser beam was located half a diameter way from the anchor on the silicon suspended cantilever side; 2) for the both cantilevers, maximum displacement occurs when the optical actuation frequency is equal to the resonant frequency of cantilevers. Understanding the optical excitation on silicon cantilevers, as waveguides, can potentially increase sensing detection sensitivity (ratio of transmission to cantilever deflection).

  17. Electron beam collimation with a 40 000 tip metallic double-gate field emitter array and in-situ control of nanotip sharpness distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Guzenko, V. A.; Fink, H.-W.; Tsujino, S.

    2013-01-01

    The generation of highly collimated electron beams from a double-gate field emitter array with 40000 metallic tips and large collimation gate apertures is reported. Field emission beam measurements demonstrated the reduction of the beam envelope down to the array size by applying a negative potential to the on-chip gate electrode for the collimation of individual field emission beamlets. Owing to the optimized gate structure, the concomitant decrease of the emission current was minimal, leading to a net enhancement of the current density. Furthermore, a noble gas conditioning process was successfully applied to the double-gate device to improve the beam uniformity in-situ with orders of magnitude increase of the active emission area. The results show that the proposed double-gate field emission cathodes are promising for high current and high brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers and THz power devices.

  18. Demonstration of an electrostatic-shielded cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Pingue, P.; Piazza, V.; Baschieri, P.; Ascoli, C.; Menozzi, C.; Alessandrini, A.; Facci, P.

    2006-01-23

    The fabrication and performances of cantilevered probes with reduced parasitic capacitance starting from a commercial Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cantilever chip is presented. Nanomachining and metal deposition induced by focused ion beam techniques were employed in order to modify the original insulating pyramidal tip and insert a conducting metallic tip. Two parallel metallic electrodes deposited on the original cantilever arms are employed for tip biasing and as ground plane in order to minimize the electrostatic force due to the capacitive interaction between cantilever and sample surface. Excitation spectra and force-to-distance characterization are shown with different electrode configurations. Applications of this scheme in electrostatic force microscopy, Kelvin probe microscopy and local anodic oxidation is discussed.

  19. Cantilevered carbon nanotube hygrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroyanagi, Toshinori; Terada, Yuki; Takei, Kuniharu; Akita, Seiji; Arie, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the effects of humidity on the vibrations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using two types of CNT cantilevers: open-ended and close-ended CNT cantilevers. As the humidity increases, the resonant frequency of the open-ended CNT cantilever decreases due to the adsorption of water molecules onto the CNT tip, whereas that of the close-ended CNT cantilever increases probably due to the change in the viscosity of the air surrounding the CNT cantilever, which is negatively correlated with the humidity of air. Our findings suggest that a close-ended CNT cantilever is more suitable for a quick-response and ultrasensitive hygrometer because it continuously reads the viscosity change of moist air in the vicinity of the CNT.

  20. Coupling scanning tunneling microscope and supersonic molecular beams: A unique tool for in situ investigation of the morphology of activated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerieri, M.; Reichelt, R.; Savio, L.; Vattuone, L.; Rocca, M.

    2012-09-01

    We report here on a new experimental apparatus combining a commercial low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with a supersonic molecular beam. This setup provides a unique tool for the in situ investigation of the topography of activated adsorption systems and opens thus new interesting perspectives. It has been tested towards the formation of the O/Ag(110) added rows reconstruction and of their hydroxylation, comparing data recorded upon O2 exposure at thermal and hyperthermal energies.

  1. Development of double-cantilever infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shusen

    Detection and imaging of infrared (IR) radiation are of great importance to a variety of military and civilian applications. Recent advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of uncooled cantilever IR focal plane arrays (FPAs), which function based on the bending of bimaterial cantilevers upon the absorption of IR energy. In this dissertation, capacitive-based double-cantilever IR FPAs, which have a potential of reaching a noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) approaching the theoretical limit, i.e., <10 mK, are developed. Each pixel in the proposed double-cantilever IR FPAs consists of two facing bimaterial cantilevers: one bends upward and the other downward upon IR radiation, resulting in an extremely high sensitivity of the device. It is predicted that the NETD of the double-cantilever IR FPAs is about 60% of the current single-cantilever IR FPAs, which is a significant improvement of device performance. A surface micromachining module with polyimide as a sacrificial material is developed for the fabrication of both simplified single- and double-cantilever FPAs. It is found the as-fabricated FPAs are curved because of the imbalanced residual stresses (strains) in thin films developed in the fabrication processes. In this dissertation, therefore, the general relationship between the residual strain and the resultant elastic bending deformation is modeled. A thorough investigation of residual stresses in cantilever IR materials and structures is then conducted using the theory developed in this dissertation. Furthermore, thermal-cycling experiments reveal that the residual stresses in IR materials, i.e., plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) SiNx and electron beam (Ebeam) AI, can be significantly modified by thermal annealing. Therefore, an engineering approach to flattening IR FPAs is developed by using rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Finally, this dissertation demonstrates the thermal detection of cantilever

  2. Cantilever arrays for multiplexed mechanical analysis of biomolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Majumdar, Arunava

    2004-09-01

    Microchips containing arrays of cantilever beams have been used to mechanically detect and quantitatively analyze multiple reactions of DNA hybridization and antigen-antibody binding simultaneously. The reaction-induced deflection of a cantilever beam reflects the interplay between strain energy increase of the beam and the free energy reduction of a reaction, providing an ideal tool for investigating the connection between mechanics and chemistry of biomolecular reactions. Since free energy reduction is common for all reactions, the cantilever array forms a universal platform for label-free detection of various specific biomolecular reactions. A few such reactions and their implications in biology and biotechnology are discussed. PMID:16783934

  3. Exploiting cantilever curvature for noise reduction in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Grütter, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Optical beam deflection is a widely used method for detecting the deflection of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. This paper presents a first order derivation for the angular detection noise density which determines the lower limit for deflection sensing. Surprisingly, the cantilever radius of curvature, commonly not considered, plays a crucial role and can be exploited to decrease angular detection noise. We demonstrate a reduction in angular detection shot noise of more than an order of magnitude on a home-built AFM with a commercial 450 μm long cantilever by exploiting the optical properties of the cantilever curvature caused by the reflective gold coating. Lastly, we demonstrate how cantilever curvature can be responsible for up to 45% of the variability in the measured sensitivity of cantilevers on commercially available AFMs. PMID:21280834

  4. A Weed Cantilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Elhannan L.; Padalino, John

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Environmental Action Task activity, which may be used as a recreational game or an environmental perception experience, may be conducted indoors or out-of-doors, using weed stems (or spaghetti) and masking tape to construct a cantilever. Small groups of children work together to make the cantilever with the longest arm. Further…

  5. In situ doping control for growth of n p n Si/SiGe/Si heterojunction bipolar transistor by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Huang, D. D.; Li, J. P.; Liu, C.

    2005-01-01

    N-p-n Si/SiGe/Si heterostructures have been grown by a disilane (Si 2H 6) gas and Ge solid sources molecular beam epitaxy system using phosphine (PH 3) and diborane (B 2H 6) as n- and p-type in situ doping sources, respectively. Adopting an in situ doping control technology, the influence of background B dopant on the growth of n-Si emitter layer was reduced, and an abrupt B dopant distribution from SiGe base to Si emitter layer was obtained. Besides, higher n-type doping in the surface region of emitter to reduce the emitter resist can be realized, and it did not result in the drop of growth rate of Si emitter layer in this technology.

  6. Focused ion beam-based in situ patterning of gallium arsenide(001) and optical investigations of indium arsenide/gallium arsenide(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalburge, Amol Madhusudan

    This dissertation contributes to the two generic areas of current research focusing on epitaxical semiconductor nanostructures: (i) all in-situ nanostructure synthesis via epitaxical growth on non-planar patterned substrates (NPPS), and via highly strained epitaxical growth on planar substrates, and (ii) optical behaviour of such nanostructures. Towards in-situ nanostructure synthesis via epitaxical growth on NPPS, two Ga+ focused ion beam (FIB) based approaches are explored to create NPPS in-situ. The first approach is a direct-write (i.e. resist-less) approach and uses FIB assisted chlorine etching (FIBCE) to directly create mesas into the GaAs (001) substrate. Systematic investigations of the FIBCE process are carried out to develop a basic understanding necessary for its effective use as a direct-write patterning tool. The second approach is a lithographic approach and uses plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride (SiNx) as an in-situ resist and Ga+ implantation as a resist exposure method. For the in-situ nanostructure synthesis via highly strained epitaxical growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands on planar substrates, systematic optical investigations of the InAs/GaAs (001) system are carried out to both, reveal the potential of the islands as quantum boxes [dubbed quantum dots (QDs)] and optimize their synthesis. Through low temperature photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation studies we identify the optimum GaAs cap layer growth conditions and demonstrate the QD-like nature of 3D islands. Optical investigations of multiply stacked islands suggest that the size and shape uniformity of islands in the upper stacks improves during the vertical stacking process. Lasing is observed from the laser structures having single and multiple stacks of 2.00ML InAs islands, albeit at wavelengths shorter than the PL maximum. Through systematic optical studies of incremental InAs depositions ranging from 1.00ML to 2.00ML, and with

  7. 4. SIDE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ARCHES, CANTILEVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SIDE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ARCHES, CANTILEVERED WALKWAY, DECK BEAMS AND STREAMBED - Benson Street Concrete Bowstring Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek at Benson Street, Lockland, Hamilton County, OH

  8. The study of in situ scanning tunnelling microscope characterization on GaN thin film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.; Krzyzewski, T.; Jones, T.

    2013-03-18

    The epitaxial growth of GaN by Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy was investigated by Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). The GaN film was grown on initial GaN (0001) and monitored by in situ Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction and STM during the growth. The STM characterization was carried out on different sub-films with increased thickness. The growth of GaN was achieved in 3D mode, and the hexagonal edge of GaN layers and growth gradient were observed. The final GaN was of Ga polarity and kept as (0001) orientation, without excess Ga adlayers or droplets formed on the surface.

  9. Cantilever and capacitor technique for measuring dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.; Monahan, E.

    1983-05-01

    The relationship of EerNisse's technique for measuring small dilatations caused by irradiation with short-range particles, which utilizes a metallized thin plate mounted as a cantilever below whose free end an electrode is placed (forming a capacitor), to a photoelastic technique and to an interferometric technique are derived. The effects of stray capacitance, the fringing field of the capacitor, the clamping stress on the cantilever plate, the electrical resistance of the metallic coating, the charging of the tank circuit of which the capacitor is an element, the flange bolting stress, and the beam heating are assessed, and examples of the manner in which they contaminate the data are given.

  10. Calibrating IR Cameras for In-Situ Temperature Measurement During the Electron Beam Melting Process using Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Lloyd, Peter D; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides world-leading capabilities in advanced manufacturing (AM) facilities which leverage previous, on-going government investments in materials science research and characterization. MDF contains systems for fabricating components with complex geometries using AM techniques (i.e. 3D-Printing). Various metal alloy printers, for example, use electron beam melting (EBM) systems for creating these components which are otherwise extremely difficult- if not impossible- to machine. ORNL has partnered with manufacturers on improving the final part quality of components and developing new materials for further advancing these devices. One method being used to study (AM) processes in more depth relies on the advanced imaging capabilities at ORNL. High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ process monitoring and temperature measurements. However, standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption. Two techniques for temperature calibrations will be presented and compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ample information can be learned from in-situ IR process monitoring of the EBM process. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.